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VOL. 13 NO. 7

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2008

50 cents

NEWS HEADLINES PRIMARY RESULTS - See page 3 for all the local results from Tuesday’s Republican and Democrat party primaries. HELPING OUT - A benefit on Sept. 28 will raise money for victim of a diving accident and his family. Page 4 LIVING THROUGH 1945 - Area soldier recalls the end of World War II and one of the coldest winters in the history of Europe. Page 8 BOOK CLUB IN THE WORKS - An area library wonders if there is support in the community for a book club. Two interest meetings are planned for this month. Page 14 RESTORATION BENEFIT - Sales of prints of a painting of World War II towers near Dewey Beach will help to pay for a restoration of the tower. And the artist got her start in western Sussex County. Page 19 A TASTE OF HOME - Area mud hopper plans to send movies of the action in ‘Dodge City’ to soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Page 30 ASSAULT - Area woman is attacked while out running. Page 41 KICKOFF TIME - The Laurel and Delmar varsity football teams kick off their seasons with one team winning and one team losing in a pair of non-conference road games. Coverage begins on page 43 FALL PREVIEWS - The Laurel Star continues its exclusive varsity fall sports preview stories this week with field hockey, soccer, cross country, and football previews starting on page 43. STARS OF THE WEEK - A Delmar varsity football player and a Laurel varsity football player are this week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 45

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21 26 32 16 30 59 51 18 10 54 15 57 47

MOVIES OBITUARIES OPINION PAT MURPHY POLICE JOURNAL PUZZLES SNAPSHOTS SOCIALS SPORTS TIDES TODD CROFFORD TONY WINDSOR VETERANS OF WWII

Half the man he used to be With surgery, exercise and a new way of eating, Mark Cooper, who 13 months ago weighed 489 pounds, is now down to 240

INSIDE THE STAR BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT FINAL WORD FRANK CALIO GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS LYNN PARKS MIKE BARTON MIKE MCCLURE

April and Mark Cooper hold up a pair of pants that Mark used to wear. After surgery to implant a band around his stomach, Mark has lost 245 pounds. April, who learned to buy food that is low in fat and sugar, has lost 40 pounds. Photo by Pat Murphy

7 28 58 25 41 24 56 57 43 7 55 51 8

By Lynn R. Parks When Mark Cooper graduated from Delmar High School in 1982, he was already overweight. When he met his wife, April, he weighed 270 pounds and when they were married in 1983, he weighed 310 pounds. Then, he got a job as an equipment operator “and he really piled it on,” said April. By last summer, Mark, then 44, weighed 489 pounds. Today, at the age of 45, Mark weighs just 240 pounds. Since July 10, 2007, when doctors implanted a belt around his stomach to discourage eating, he has lost 245 pounds, more than half of what he weighed at the time of his surgery. His pants size has shrunk 20 inches, from a 54-inch waistband to a 34-inch

waistband. “I have a whole new life,” said Cooper, who lives in Laurel and works at Vulcan Materials in Blades and for Art Collins Trucking, Laurel. “I am able to do things that I hadn’t been able to do for 10 or 20 years, and I feel great. And now, I’ll get to be here for my grandchildren.” Before his surgery, Cooper was taking five prescription medicines, including pills to treat high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes. He also suffered from sleep apnea, characterized by loud snoring and pauses in breathing during sleep. Today, his only prescription is for potassium, to help prevent cramps. And his sleep apnea is gone. “He had gotten so he couldn’t do Continued on page five

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 3

Markell, Lee will face off in race for governor By Bryant Richardson Having endorsements from the Delaware State Democratic Party, the New Castle County Democratic Committee and the Wilmington Democratic Committee was not enough for John Carney. Jack Markell collected 1,737 more votes than Carney to become the Democrat’s candidate for governor. William Swain Lee will represent the Republicans in the race for governor. He won by a 44-point margin over Michael Protack. In a very close local race, Samuel R. Wilson, Jr., won the Republican primary race for the Sussex County Council District 2 seat. He beat Robert William Ricker by just 16 votes. In the other two statewide races, the women on the ballot prevailed. Karen Hartley-Nagle will represent the Democrats in the race for U.S. Representative. She won 55.4 percent of the Primary Election votes in the three-way race. Karen Weldin Stewart won a close race over Gene Reed, collecting 2,100 more votes in the three-way race to represent the Democrats on the fall ballot for Insurance Commissioner. Even though there were some highly publicized races this year, the voter turnout was still light, which is typical of Primary Elections. Democratic voter turnout was

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28 percent of eligible voters and Republican turnout was just 16 percent. Markell made the following statement in the Star’s Primary Election Issues and Answers section last week: “The issue in this campaign is whether we are going to continue along the path set by the MinnerCarney administration, or whether we are going to take bold steps toward a stronger, healthier Delaware. As governor, I will take Delaware in a bold new direction toward a brighter future with world-class schools, a booming economy, universal health care and a cleaner environment.” Lee said, “It pains me to see Delawareans suffering because their government is broken and their leaders are out of touch. I believe I have the experience to solve many of the problems we face.” Hartley-Nagle issued the following statement: “I want to take real solutions and common sense ideas straight from the people of Delaware to the halls of Congress. My efforts have earned me the reputation of a strong vocal leader who puts the interests of children, families and community above that of special interests and partisan bickering.” Stewart commented: “The primary responsibility of the Insurance Commissioner is to make sure that the claims of policyholders are paid in full and on time. Therefore, I do not accept campaign contributions from executives of insurance

Machine

Absentee

Total Votes

Percent

34879 21913 6286

1115 480 323

35994 22393 6609

55.4 % 34.5 % 10.1 %

35165 36622

947 1227

36112 37849

48.8 % 51.2 %

813 250

20826 8146

71.9 % 28.1 %

25980 12002 28080

39.3 % 18.2 % 42.5 %

558 736 765

27.1 % 35.7 % 37.2 %

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE (DEMOCRAT) Karen Hartley-Nagle Micheal Miller Jerry Northington

GOVERNOR (DEMOCRAT) John Carney Jack Markell

GOVERNOR (REPUBLICAN) William Swain Lee Michael Protack

20013 7896

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER (DEMOCRAT) Gene Reed Tom Savage Karen Weldin Stewart

25247 11708 27165

733 294 915

SUSSEX COUNCIL DISTRICT 2 (REPUBLICAN) Robert L. Reed Robert William Ricker Samuel R. Wilson Jr.

534 708 724

companies, insurance company PACs and from companies that have contracts with the insurance department.” Wilson issued this statement: “I am a strong proponent of property rights... Being a self employed businessman, farmer, I

24 28 41

understand that government should be run like a business and the county government must operate within its means. I want to maintain the low county taxes for the residents and fight against any tax increases on their behalf.”

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Work on renovation of train station to get underway soon Request for bids to be posted this week By Tony E. Windsor

NEW DICTIONARIES - Members of the Benevolent and Protective Order of The Elks Club, Seaford Lodge #2458, were in Laurel Intermediate School on Thursday, Sept. 4, to present dictionaries to new fifth-grade students. The local lodge also presented dictionaries to students in Seaford and Woodbridge schools. Back, from left: teacher Erin Brennan, Evan Ahtis, Madison Whaley, lodge trustee Delsmore Frye, lodge exalted ruler Bill Butterill, principal Julie Bradley, Angel Jones and teacher Kaitlin Callaway. Front, Mekell Horsey, Melanie Clark, Cedric Ulysse and Michaela Brodie Willey. The Elks were founded in 1868 and are involved with various community projects. Photo by Pat Murphy.

Benefit at Chickberry Farms to raise money for accident victim By Pat Murphy John Benson, 21 of Laurel, suffered a spinal cord injury June 22. He damaged several vertebrae when he mistakenly dove into the shallow end of a friend’s swimming pool in Laurel. He is paralyzed from the chest down, with full use of his arms and limited use of his hands. Members of the Laurel community are coming together to raise money to help with the expenses his family has and will encounter over his recovery time. Lil’ John’s Hay Day will be held Sunday, Sept. 28, 1 to 5 p.m. at Chickberry Farms on Delaware 24, about 4 miles east of Laurel. Activities will include a pop concert as well as a bluegrass show. A live auction will feature many donated items from lo-

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

cal merchants and individuals. There will be rides, events for the kids, petting zoo and much more. Tickets for a buffet meal will cost $15 in advance or $20 at the farm. Kids’ meals will cost $6. All meals will include chicken, pulled pork and all the sides you can imagine. If this does not suit, there will also be hot dogs, hamburgers, cotton candy and Chickberry’s homemade ice cream. Tickets for the event can be purchased at A&K Tackle, Peninsula Poultry, Bank of Delmarva and the Bethel Store. For further information call Kim O’Neal at 875-2293, or Chickberry Farms at 875-7274. Members of the Lil’ John Hay Day committee are looking forward to seeing everyone that day.

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The Laurel Train Station is back on the front burner in terms of work being done to renovate the building’s interior. During the Tuesday, Sept. 2, meeting of the Laurel Town Council, town manager Bill Fasano announced that the Delaware Department of Transportation has finalized plans for the work and the town is close to soliciting bids for the renovation work. “We expect to post ads to solicit bids for the project beginning this week,” he said. “We will then hold a pre-bid meeting in the next two weeks and finalize the bidding by the end of September.” Fasano said work will begin immediately after the town meets with the selected contractor and holds a pre-construction meeting with the winning firm. He said once the work is underway the town will schedule an open house so the public can tour the facility to see the work that has been done.

Works Supervisor, Woody Vickers, said that residents who are concerned about who is responsible for failed water meters will not have to pay for the issues that arise should a battery fail in the transmitter. During the meeting, Councilman Chris Calio said that residents who are getting water meters have expressed questions about whether they are liable should a meter fail. Vickers said he has had to take care of some meters where the batteries have failed and the batteries were replaced by the company that makes the meters at no cost to the town or resident. “The first 10 years is covered under warranty, but we may need to look at what we will do after that,” he said. He said there is newer technology available in the transmitter, which is the mechanism used for doing the monthly meter readings. “There is a new warranty for the upgraded transmitter that will give us 20 years instead of 10 years. We will probably upgrade the reader system and get the 20-year warranties, but this is something the town needs to discuss."

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 5

‘I’m very proud of him, and I tell him that every day’ Continued from page one

anything,” April said. “And now, he feels so much better and his attitude is so much better. He just has a wonderful attitude toward life.” Mark gives much of the credit for his weight loss to his wife. “She has spent hours and hours and hours of time, reading [food] labels and learning how to buy the right food,” he said. “You’d be surprised what’s in some foods,” she added. “Everything you eat, you should check how much sugar and fat is in it.” Mark is not the only one to have benefited from her efforts. In the year that she has helped him revamp his eating habits, April has lost 40 pounds, she said.

They tried every diet there is Mark and April had tried to lose weight before. “We’d tried every diet that there is,” Mark said. “I’d lose a lot of weight, then after a while it would start to get hard. I’d get discouraged and think, ‘Oh well, I’ll go ahead and eat this and then I’ll do better tomorrow.’ But tomorrow never comes.”

They had also talked about surgery for Mark, to decrease the size of his stomach and therefore his appetite. But his health insurance company determined that his body mass index, or the comparison of his height to his weight, was too high. “They said that surgery would be too much of a risk,” he said. On a Saturday morning last summer, Mark got ready for what he thought was going to be breakfast out. Instead, April took him to a seminar at the Delmarva Bariatric Center, Salisbury, Md., where information was presented about its weight loss program. It turned out that April had already filled out all the necessary paperwork. And when Mark met with Dr. Michael Sofronski a few days later, Sofronski knew exactly what Mark had to do to satisfy the insurance company. “I had to lose nearly 90 pounds” — reducing his body mass index — “before I could have the surgery,” Mark said. He did that in 90 days, with the help of nutrition classes, an exercise program and a support group, all through Delmarva Bariatric. After Mark lost his first 90 pounds, Sofronski, using laparoscopic surgery, implanted an

adjustable band around the upper part of Mark’s stomach. The outpatient surgery was done at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. According to Delmarva Bariatric, the “lap band” encourages weight loss by reducing the capacity of the stomach, “thereby restricting the amount of food that can be consumed at one time.” The band is adjustable, Mark said. When he has reached his target weight of 235 pounds, something he intends to do by his next checkup Sept. 22, doctors can expand the band to allow him to eat larger portions, to help ensure that he is getting the nutrition that he needs. If he starts gaining weight again, doctors can pull the band back in.

Exercise part of program

Implantation of the lap band was not the only trick to Mark’s weight loss. “This can still not work if you choose not to eat the right foods,” he said. Mark praises the Delmarva Bariatric Center and its total weight loss program, in particular its exercise facility and the fitness manager, Jesseca Baughan. “She is extremely patient,” he said. “She can get you from

Mark and April Cooper. Photo by Pat Murphy

doing nothing but sitting in a recliner to running on a treadmill, all at your own pace.” And sitting in a recliner was exactly what Mark was doing. “Getting up out of the recliner, that was my only exercise before,” he said. “I would get up to get something to eat or to go to the bathroom, and then come back to sit.” Today, he exercises regularly at the bariatric center. He and April have bought exercise equipment for their home. And when it comes time to help out with April’s lawn care business,

ATC Lawn Care, Mark now chooses to walk around, cutting trim. “Before, all I wanted to do was sit on the lawn mower,” he said. “Now, I’d much rather walk.” Mark said that everything he has gone through to lose weight was worth it. “It saved my life,” he said. “Really, it gave me a life.” “He didn’t go on a diet. He changed his whole way of living,” April said. “I’m very proud of him. And I tell him that every day.”


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Business SBA urges businesses to be prepared for natural disasters

Floods in the Midwest and hurricanes and tropical storms in Texas and Florida have cost homeowners, renters and businesses millions of dollars in damages. These events serve as reminders to have a disaster preparedness plan in place. “There’s a tendency to think that a large-scale disaster is not going to happen where you live,” said SBA Acting Administrator Sandy K. Baruah. To prepare for disasters, the SBA offers the following tips: Develop a solid emergency response plan. Find evacuation routes from the home or business and establish meeting places. Make sure everyone understands the plan beforehand. Keep emergency phone numbers handy. Business owners should designate a contact person to communicate with other employees, customers and vendors. Individuals and business owners should ask an out-of-state friend, colleague or family member to be a “postdisaster” point of contact, supporting the flow of information about short-term relocations, recovery, additional sources of assistance, etc. Make sure you have adequate insurance coverage. Disaster preparedness begins with having adequate insurance coverage – at least enough to rebuild your home or business. Homeowners and business owners should review their policies to see what is or isn’t covered. Businesses should consider “business interruption insurance,” which helps cover operating costs during the post-disaster shutdown period. Copy important records. Back up vital records and information saved on computer hard drives, and store that information at a distant offsite location. Computer data should be backed up routinely. Copies of important documents and CDs should be stored in fire-proof safe deposit boxes. Create a “Disaster Survival Kit.” The kit should include a flashlight, a portable radio, extra batteries, a first-aid kit, nonperishable packaged and canned food, bottled water, a basic tool kit, plastic bags, cash, and a digital camera to take pictures of the property damage after the storm. The SBA makes low-interest loans to homeowners, renters and non-farm businesses of all sizes. Homeowners may borrow up to $200,000 to repair or replace damaged real estate. Individuals may bor-

row up to $40,000 to cover losses to personal property. Non-farm businesses and non-profit organizations of any size may apply for up to $2 million to repair or replace disaster damaged business assets and real property. Small businesses that suffered economic losses as a direct result of the declared disaster may apply for a working capital loan up to $2 million, even if the property was not physically damaged. To learn more visit www.sba.gov/services/disasterassistance/index.html.

Thawley joins Century 21

Gordon A. Ramey Jr., broker of record for Century 21 Tull Ramey Real Estate, announces that Kevin Thawley has joined the team of realtors at the North Seaford office. Thawley has experience in the automotive and Thawley trucking industries. He is licensed to sell real estate in both Delaware and Maryland, and has experience in commercial, residential and investment areas. He is a graduate of Mendenhall Auction School and has experience in all types of auctions.

Wallace joins Century 21 Gordon A. Ramey Jr, broker of record for Century 21 Tull Ramey, announces that Mike Wallace has joined the company. Wallace has been in real estate for many years and is working at the Pennsylvania Avenue office in Seaford.

Wallace

Home Team top producers

Frank Parks and Rob Harman, co-brokers and owners of Home Team Realty are proud to announce that The Dream Team (Keri Simpler, Dave Todd, Ryan Horne, Jenn Weir and Bryan White) were the top producers for the month of July with Rick Bennett being the top listing agent.

CFM increases use of technology

Karen Hamilton and Trina Ruark, realtors with Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc., are educating fellow CFM agents

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about the new wave of Internet marketing. In their most recent seminar, Hamilton and Ruark covered prospecting through Innovia (the Sussex County multiple listing service), as well as enhancing property listings on national websites such as REALTOR.com. CFM is also following the “going

green” concept and has initiated programs to help them become virtually paperless. The company also recently became a Broker Showcase member of REALTOR.com, which enables its listings to reach over 6 million people daily. For more information call 629-4514.


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

MO V I E S

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/12 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:45 Journey to the Center of the Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:45 CLOSED SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/12 THRU THURSDAY 9/18 The Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 6:10, 9:00 Mamma Mia! The Sing-Along Edition . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00 Features the lyrics to every musical number. Vicky Cristina Barcelona . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:10 Disaster Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 3:45, 6:45 Tyler Perry’s: The Family That Preys . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 4:05, 6:35, 9:05 Righteous Kill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40 Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:00, 7:10, 9:30 Death Race . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:50, 7:25, 9:45 The House Bunny . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 9:35 The Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:15, 6:50, 9:20 Traitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30 Pineapple Express . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9:40 Babylon AD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:20 Bangkok Dangerous . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:35, 7:00, 9:15 Art House Theater Burn After Reading . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:30, 6:40, 9:10 all shows subject to change and availability

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/12 THRU THURSDAY 9/18 - CLOSED MON. & TUES. The House Bunny . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nightly 7:30 Sunday 2:00 & 7:30

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/12 THRU THURSDAY, 9/18 Tyler Perry’s: The Family That Preys . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:45, 1:45, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10:15 Righteous Kill . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00) 6:45, 7:45, 9:45, 10:30 Burn After Reading . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:15, 4:15) 7:15, 10:00 The Women . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:30, 4:15) 7:00, 10:00 Vicky Cristina Barcelona . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:45, 4:30) 7:05, 9:30 Bangkok Dangerous . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:40, 3:00, 5:30) 8:00, 10:30 Disaster Movie . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(2:15) Babylon AD . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(4:45) 10:10 Traitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:00, 3:45) 6:45, 9:35 House Bunny . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . .Fri (2:50, 5:15) 8:00, 10:20 Sat (12:30, 2:50) 8:00, 10:20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sun (2:50, 5:15) 8:00 Mon (2:50, 5:15) 10:20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tue (12:30, 2:50) 8:00 Death Race . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(5:00) 7:30, 10:10 The Longshots . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:30, 4:00) 6:30, 9:15 Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(2:00) 7:20 Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:15, 4:20) 7:15, 9:45 The Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:30, 3:45) 7:00, 10:15 Advance Tickets on Sale : Fireproof* (PG) Lakeview Terrace* (PG13) Eagle Eye* (PG13) * Pass Restrictions Apply Discounted Show Times in Parenthesis ()

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Near end of war, soldier’s unit met up with Russian army By James Diehl Seaford resident Sam Harris survived the infamous Battle of the Bulge in 1945, as well as that year’s bitterly cold European winter. Even Adolph Hitler’s Nazi Army couldn’t stop the teenager from marching across Germany and eventually meeting up with the Russian army. But one very tasty looking rabbit nearly did him in. “The Germans kept rabbits because they were very susceptible to gas. They would die very quickly so, if somebody was using gas warfare, they would know it because the rabbits would die,” says Harris, a native of Wilmington but a resident of Seaford since the mid-1960s. “Well, I went behind this house one night to get a rabbit for stew when a bullet went whizzing right past my nose. “I never did get that rabbit.” A member of the 273rd infantry regiment of the 69th infantry division, Harris’ unit had the distinction of being the first American regiment to meet up with the advancing Russian army on German soil. That was near the German town of Torgau in late April 1945, just days after conquering the city of Leipzig — when East met West, it touched off several days of wild celebration. “We were the first to meet them and, when we did, we had a big celebration and everybody got drunk. Everybody except for me,” says Harris, who held to his Christian beliefs and never did touch a drop of alcohol during World War II. The meeting with the Russians along the Elbe River was the climax to two hard fought years for Harris, who received his draft notice in the mail one late spring day in 1943. “I had just gotten out of high school so I was waiting for it,” he says. “Everybody back then wanted to go and serve. And really, you went whether you wanted to or not.” A former employee of the Hercules Power Co. in Wilmington, Harris was chosen for chemical warfare service in Uncle Sam’s army and off he went for basic training in the Deep South. “It was hot as blazes down there in Alabama and those were the days when if you went back to your bunk and there was a steel helmet there, you were going overseas,” Harris remembers. Harris never did receive that steel hel-

met — instead, he was informed one day that he would be receiving specialized training at the nearby University of Alabama. He was there for nearly a year, 12 months of training that more than likely “saved his neck.” “The fighting was getting pretty rough about that time so that training probably kept me from getting killed,” he admits today. Then one day, the training abruptly ended — Harris says he’s still not sure exactly why, but he was told to report to the 69th infantry division at Camp Shelby, Miss. He was assigned to the Ammunition and Pioneer (A&P) Platoon and began learning the fine art of demolition. Booby traps, mines, blowing things up — he learned it all. Then, in November 1944, the call came in — the 69th infantry was heading to Europe aboard the SS Santa Maria, a passenger liner turned troop transport ship. “For a while, we didn’t think we’d get in the war because the Army went across Europe so fast. But that came to a stop,” Harris recollects. “The United States Army just was not prepared for winter fighting.” Earning $54 a month, Harris headed overseas and prepared to put his life on the line for his country. He left in a convoy of about 50 ships, constantly on the lookout for German submarines rumored to be patrolling the North Atlantic. Escorted by destroyers and Canadian corvettes — small, maneuverable, lightly armed warships — the SS Santa Maria made her way across the Atlantic without incident, landing at the English town of Southampton near the end of 1944. “We did have a sub scare heading over, but we just wore our lifejackets and prayed they wouldn’t sink our ship,” Harris recalls. “When we got to England, we got on a train and went to a British army post. There were no Brits there, but it was available so that’s where we went.” And that’s where he and the men stayed for a couple of months — during that time, he trained, he blew a few things up and he met a young British woman by the name of Pamela Jean Moore. “I’m a Christian and I met this young lady when I went to church over there,” he remembers. “I was invited to an English home and this woman had several Canadian soldiers there, and some girls from the

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Seaford resident Sam Harris served in the 69th infantry division of the First Army during World War II. His unit was the first to greet the advancing Russian Army in Germany in April 1945. Photo by James Diehl

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 church. We just had a time of fel- and company continued across Europe, spending several weeks lowship and I asked this young at the famed Siegfried Line, a delady out. We went out several fense system stretching nearly times.” 400 miles with more than 18,000 Pamela Jean had a younger bunkers, tunnels and tank traps. brother, a 12-year-old who had There, the men blew up German grown up surrounded by the hor“pill boxes.” rors of war in his homeland. Used as dug-in guard posts, What sticks in Harris’ mind about the boy is that he had never in his pill boxes dotted the landscape in and around Western Europe durlife seen a grapefruit — so the ing World War II. American soldier gave one to the young forces would go in with rifle and man. mortar fire, followed by a soldier Then the Battle of the Bulge broke out in December 1944, and who placed a “satchel charge,” basically a bag filled with C-2 it was off to France for the men explosives, of the next to it. 273rd. The obBecause That was in January 1945 and jective was the Army Western Europe was engulfed in to make the needed reone of the coldest winters in its pill boxes placements unusable due to casu- history — soldiers did whatever moving foralties sufthey could to stay warm. ward. fered at the “We did Bulge, about half of Harris’ unit immedi- that for several weeks going through the Siegfried Line, but ately went across the English we went through the line with no Channel into France. problems and got west of the Harris waited until fresh Rhine River,” Harris recalls. troops were brought in to replenAt the Rhine, the men of the ish his unit, then they also 273rd found themselves the closcrossed the channel and headed est infantry division when Amerifor the front lines. can armored forces captured the That was in January 1945 and Remagen Bridge, at that time the Western Europe was engulfed in only bridge across the Rhine that one of the coldest winters in its was still standing. history — soldiers did whatever “It was the only bridge still inthey could to stay warm. tact. The Germans tried to blow it “I remember there were four up, but they failed,” Harris says. of us who got together and drew “So, we had this bridge handed to straws to see who was going to us so we could go across the be the two inside guys and who Rhine River with dry feet. We was going to be the two outside thought we’d go across the guys” — the two inside guys bridge and establish a beach head could theoretically draw some of on the east bank of the Rhine. the body heat from the two men “I still have yet to see that laying on the outside, Harris reRemagen Bridge.” calls. “I got the outside — I didAfter cutting down hundreds n’t win.” of trees and setting up a road In reality, nobody won. The across the river for advancing men lay in about a foot of snow American forces, the men of the and mud and just sort of dug in 273rd headed south along the waiting for battle. In Harris’ east bank of the Rhine River. words, they were “cold, wet and Surviving a few skirmishes mad.” along the way, they eventually Moving in to replace the 99th infantry division, which had been turned north and advanced along the Lahn River, following that decimated by casualties during the fighting at the Bulge, the men into central Germany. Eventually, they arrived at the of the 69th took their positions. Elbe River, where they met up The very first day, they came with the Russian Army. under artillery fire from the GerDuring the several days of celmans, artillery fire that hit a building where an American anti- ebrating that ensued, many of the men — American and Russian tank platoon had set up their alike — went out hunting for guns. The explosion buried the guns deer. Harris went with them — in a mountain of rubble, so Harris and company were asked to inter- well, at least once he did. “I went out deer hunting but vene. then I said I wasn’t going to do “They came back to us and that anymore,” he remembers. “I said they needed somebody to lived through the war, I wasn’t blow the debris away,” Harris recalls. “I remember this guy Lloyd going to go out and get shot while I was hunting. These GIs Smith from Texas looking at me would go out every day and just and saying ‘Sam, let’s go up start shooting at everything.” there the first day and get killed. Contrary to the belief that Let’s not wait around until the Gen. George S. Patton’s Third last day.’ ” Army was the first to meet the But the job was a success and advancing Russian troops in Gerlife went on, such as it was in many, Harris maintains that the Western Europe in 1945. First Army — Gen. Courtney After his failed attempt at seHicks Hodges’ army — was the curing a rabbit for dinner, Harris

first to shake hands with their then-friends from the east. “We were definitely the first,” he says. When the Germans officially surrendered on May 7, 1945, many American soldiers began heading home, but not Harris — he remained on the European front until he was finally discharged about a year later. “They were breaking up the divisions and sending troops home, giving them 30 days and then sending them over to Japan,” Harris remembers. “The

PAGE 9

guys that got orders were fortunate because they got discharged sooner. I did not get orders, so when the war in Japan ended, they took us young guys and left us in Germany. We transferred out of the infantry and went into ordnance outfits.” After furloughs to Switzerland and Paris, and many more days of “blowing stuff up,” Harris finally headed home in 1946. He began working for the DuPont Co. in New Jersey, moving to Delaware in 1965 and continuing to work for the company

until retiring in 1985. He and his first wife, Ann, had a son and a daughter. Ann tragically passed away in 1980, and Harris married his current wife, Carol, in 1983. For his service during World War II, Harris was awarded the Bronze Star and the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. But, like most of his colleagues, he doesn’t feel he did anything special during his nearly two years of overseas service. “I just did what I was supposed to do,” he says simply.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Health Children inherit more than just looks from their parents By Anthony Policastro, M.D

People often try to decide whether a newborn baby looks like the mother or the father. They base this upon facial characteristics. What people do not often realize is that there are many other characteristics that are inherited. I frequently see these when I do a newborn exam. They are normal inherited findings. The best example of this is Morton’s foot. In those individuals, the large toe appears to be smaller than the second toe. It is actually bone in the foot that is shorter. It gives the large toe a short appearance. Most people with Morton’s foot have inherited it from their parents. Another common inherited toe finding is when two of the toes (usually the second and third toes) are fused together. Infants who get this will have one parent with the

same finding. This fusion is called syndactyly. Syndactyly can also affect the fingers. It does that rarely. However, when it does, it can be associated with the baby having a sixth small finger attached to the hand. Usually what we see is just the sixth small finger attached to the hand. This too is hereditary. A third toe finding is called clinodactyly. In this situation one of the toes is bent inward instead of being straight. I recently had two babies in the nursery in the same week. One of them had a third toe bent inward. The other had the 5th toe bent inward. In both cases, I went to the mother’s room and found that the mother had exactly the same finding. Clinodactyly can also affect the fingers. Sizes of the jaw are hereditary. A small jaw or a large jaw usually comes from one of the parents.

There are some individuals who have eyes that are farther apart than others. This too is a hereditary condition. Some babies have large heads. The head size is most often just the result of a parent with a large head. The parent often does not think of himself or herself as having a large head until you ask them what their hat size is. Then he/she will tell you that they wear a very large hat. Some babies will have a little opening in the front of their ear. It is called an ear pit. Those are also frequently hereditary in nature. There are many similar minor findings that babies have when they are born. Sometimes people do not notice them. However, there is a lot more to a baby taking after his/her parents than just facial characteristics.

Nanticoke Cancer Care Center providing prostate screenings

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Once again this year the Cancer Care Center staff at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will provide a valuable service to our community by providing prostate screenings on Friday, September 19 from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on the second floor of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital's Cancer Care Center (located next to the hospital). There is a $5 screening fee and pre-registration is not required. Melinda Huffman, MSN, RN, CGRN, Cancer Screening Nurse, wants to let community members know that, "A simple blood test is all it takes. It just might save your life." Nanticoke Memorial Hospital encourages men over the age of 50 to take advantage of this service. If you are 40 years old and at high risk of developing this cancer you are also encouraged to participate. African-American men are at high risk for developing prostate cancer, as are men who have a family history of the disease. For further information, call Nanticoke Cancer Care Center at 629-6611 ext 3765.

Cancer Support Group

The Wellness Community-Delaware is offering a support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The group meets at the Cancer Care Center on the second Monday of the month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. For more information call Kaye or Lori at 645-9150.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 11

Health Briefs Cohen joins Nanticoke Health

Nanticoke Health Services welcomes Warren Cohen, D.O., F.A.C.E.P., to the position of medical director of radiology. Dr. Cohen, who started his role on Aug. 11, brings over 30 years of experience in emergency servicCohen es, family practice and radiology. He is board certified by the American College of Osteopathic Family Practitioners, American Board of Emergency Medicine and the American Osteopathic Board of Radiology. He is a university trained diagnostic radiologist at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and fellowship university trained neuroradiologist at Hahnemann University/Drexel College of Medicine. He comes to Nanticoke from Hahnemann University/Drexel College of Medicine where he was assistant professor of medicine and emergency medicine and associate professor in the Department of Radiologic Sciences at Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel College of Medicine.

Depression support

The Mental Health Association in Delaware is sponsoring a Depression Support Group in Laurel on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month.

The meetings begin at 7 p.m. The MHA encourages anyone dealing with a depressive disorder to attend. Register in advance by calling 1-800-287-6423. Peer support groups sponsored by Mental Health Association of Delaware are not intended to replace professional mental health treatment. MHA does not publish support group locations. Locations are provided with registration.

“This is aimed at addressing what they call ‘rogue pharmacies.’ Young people have died from getting illegal drugs delivered to their homes without their parents knowing,” said Hall-Long. People who use illicit Internet pharmacies could face up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Stroke support group

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will offer free monthly Stroke Support Group meetings designed for individuals who have survived a stroke as well as their families and caregivers. Meetings are held the third Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Cancer Care Center from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. Sheila Brant and Joan Burditt, occupational therapists at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, will facilitate the support group meetings. Pre-registration not required. For details call 629-6611, ext. 5121.

Law targets online pharmacies

Officials hope a new law targeting online pharmacies where clients can get drugs without seeing a doctor will give them a tool to crack down on the growing practice. Bill Waggaman of the state’s office of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs said many of the Internet-based operations are overseas, however, he hopes the law will deter

Prostate Screening Friday, September 19th 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Screening to be held at the

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Call 629-6611, ext. 3765, 2588 or 2378 www.nanticoke.org

people who might be considering setting up shop in the First State. Rep. Bethany Hall-Long, D-Middletown, said the bill won’t affect people who have legitimate prescriptions from their doctor and use online or mail-order pharmacy services to save money on drug costs.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Virus found in white-tailed deer not a threat to humans

Mary Landon Green, LDAF program and event coordinator and Melissa Tice Martin, executive director, with a 2008 Camry.

Autism Foundation plans car raffle The Lower Delaware Autism Foundation is selling raffle tickets for a 2008 Toyota Camry LE. Tickets are $100 each and the chances of winning are 1 in 1,000. The drawing for the car will be held at the Blue Jean Ball and Fall Art Show on Oct. 24 (winner need not be present to win). The winner will pick up the car from Hertrich’s Toyota in Milford. The winner will be responsible for any/all taxes and tags required. The Camry has been donated to LDAF from the Central Atlantic Division of Toyota Dealerships. Tushar Patel, GM of Hertrich’s Toyota has a son with autism and wanted the funds to be earmarked for adult services as his son approaches high school. "LDAF is working to ensure a lifetime

of opportunities for individuals with autism," says LDAF Executive Director Melissa Tice Martin. "As an organization, we are currently assessing how to best assist individuals with autism as they transition from school life to adult life." Autism has no cure, but appropriate interventions and opportunities help individuals develop functional skills. The Lower Delaware Autism Foundation envisions that individuals with autism in Sussex County will have a lifetime of meaningful and enriching opportunities and provides a variety of programs and services to individuals and families. Tickets are available at Rehoboth Car Wash; by calling LDAF’s office at 302644-3410 or John Willey, Peninsula Oil & Propane of Seaford, at 302-745-9737; or online at www.ldaf.com.

The Division of Fish & Wildlife is reassuring Delaware residents and hunters that an insect-borne disease that has been killing white-tailed deer throughout North America does not affect humans and has little long-range ramifications for the health of the state’s deer herd. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD), also known as “blue tongue,” is the most significant disease afflicting white-tailed deer in North America but is also the best known and most widely studied, having first been identified in 1955 with regular, almost annual outbreaks since. By Delaware standards, last year was an uncommonly severe year, with 132 EHD-related deer fatalities. “We recently received the first report of a suspected EHD deer casualty this year, so we want to begin educating hunters and the public about the disease. While the virus is often fatal, it apparently did not have much of an impact on the Delaware deer population, as the overall harvest from the 2007-2008 season was the third all-time highest,” said Game Mammal Biologist Joe Rogerson. Humans cannot be infected by EHD, nor can the disease be transmitted by consuming venison from infected animals. However, hunters are advised to avoid eating visibly sick deer because they may be stricken by a secondary infection that could affect people, Rogerson noted. EHD is transmitted by small biting flies commonly called midges or “no-see-ums.” All known outbreaks of EHD in Delaware have occurred in late summer and early fall, and are abruptly curtailed with the onset of frost, which kills the midges and suspends the hatch of larvae. No pesticides can be sprayed to kill the insects that

cause EHD, nor can white-tailed deer be vaccinated against the disease. “We are in a position of allowing nature to run its course and waiting for a hard frost to kill the midges,” Rogerson said. Symptoms of the disease in deer resemble another sickness, chronic wasting disease, or CWD, which is not yet known to have occurred in Delaware. Afflicted animals exhibit pronounced swelling of, and bleeding from the head, neck, tongue and eyes. Deer can die from EHD as soon as one day after contracting it, but more commonly survive for three to five days. Carcasses are often recovered near water and the EHD outbreaks are most often associated with periods of drought. As with many viruses, not all deer will die once they are infected. Some will be able to enact an immune response and fight off the infection. These deer will then have the antibodies to ward off any potential future infections. The virus deteriorates less than 24 hours after a deer dies, and cannot be spread from carcasses. EHD does not generally have a significant impact on livestock. Hunters or members of the public who see a deer carcass with no readily apparent cause of death are asked to report it to Game Mammal Biologist Joe Rogerson, Division of Fish & Wildlife, at 302-7353600. “While nothing can be done to prevent the further spread of EHD until colder weather halts the midges from infecting deer, the Division would like to document deer mortality for research and to obtain data for future references to the disease,” Rogerson said.

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Newest home in Habitat village to be blessed Saturday On Oct. 13, 2007, a small group of members from several Sussex County churches and volunteers from Sussex County Habitat for Humanity gathered with Jacqueline Hall and her family on an empty lot in Seaford’s Concord Village. They were there to bless the ground on which the Halls’ new home would be built. This same group, and many others, will gather at noon on Saturday, Sept. 13, to celebrate the completion of this home. The Church Build Project Team, consisting of representatives from Seaford Presbyterian Church, Gethsemane United Methodist Church, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church and Harvest Christian Church, together with Sussex County Habitat representatives, has worked together to coordinate the building of the traditional three-bedroom Habitat home. Many other area churches contributed funds, construction volunteers and support to make this project possible. A vital element of the Habitat for Humanity program is “sweat

equity” — where the real ministry takes place. Sweat equity refers to the actual hands-on involvement of prospective homeowners in the work of building their homes and helping in the construction of other Habitat houses. Homeowner Jackie Hall touched the hearts of those present at the project blessing last fall by saying, “I’ve been waiting for my own home for so long and now it is coming true. I thank God. It is a blessing.” She and her son, Tyvone, have worked nearly every Saturday since construction began in January. Members of the community are invited to join with the Hall family and Church Build volunteers in the celebration at noon on Saturday, Sept. 13, at Concord Village, near Seaford. For more information about how to volunteer, how to become a homeowner, or how to donate monetarily, contact the Habitat office in Georgetown at 855-1153 or visit the Web site, www.sussexcountyhabitat.org.

Homeowner Jackie Hall, with her son, Tyvone, in front of their new home in Concord Village, Seaford.

Hunters can feed the hungry The Division of Fish and Wildlife will participate in the Sportsman Against Hunger Program during the 2008-2009 hunting season. All donated deer will be processed and distributed to participating charitable groups. The division maintains five walk-in coolers where hunters may drop off their deer. These coolers are checked periodically and all donated deer are taken to the Sussex County prison where they are processed. Hunters who donate a deer should call the phone number posted on the cooler so that state personnel know the deer is there. Any deer dropped off at a cooler must be field dressed and

registered, with the registration number written on the field tag attached to the animal. This will allow the division to verify that a deer has been registered. The coolers are located at Redden State Forest, Assawoman Wildlife Area and Trap Pond State Park in Sussex County. Hunters may also take their deer to these participating private butcher shops - Double “K” Deer Cutters, Georgetown, Johnson’s Custom Cutting, Milton, and Mark’s Deer Cutting, Millsboro. For more information on the Sportsmen Against Hunger Program, contact Joe Rogerson at 302-735-3600.

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PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Programs at Laurel library will include photography lessons, story telling, maybe even a book club

SCRAPBOOK AWARD - Ann Foskey, left, president of Laurel American Legion Auxiliary Unit #19, Department of Delaware, presents to Doris Kernaghan, education chairwoman, an award from Department of Delaware American Legion Auxiliary for her education scrapbook.

Historical society receives help from national institute The Laurel Historical Society has been selected to receive a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 122,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The institute is comparable to the National Endowment for the Arts in its efforts to improve the historical collections in libraries, museums and historical societies throughout the United States. Across the nation, 776 museums, libraries, and archives representing all 50 states were selected this year to receive a collection of print and non-print resources that offer the most current practices and

techniques in preservation and conservation for historical artifacts, documents and photographs. Of the five Delaware grant winners, the Laurel Historical Society and the Milford Historical Society were the only Sussex County organizations. The collection of books and materials are available for review at the Cook House, which is open to the public on Sunday afternoons through October at 504 E. Fourth St. For more information about the Laurel Historical Society call 875-2820 or email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com.

Senior center plans events for September The Laurel Senior Center has planned the following: Thursday, Sept. 11 – 9 a.m., exercise; 10 a.m., bingo, all day. Friday, Sept. 12 – 9:30 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., Innovative Hospice Care with Gregory Hartman. Monday, Sept. 15 – 9:30 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., Peninsula Home Care with a program on assessing the risk of falling. Tuesday, Sept. 16 – 9 a.m., exercise; 9 a.m., blood pressure checks; 10 a.m., shuffleboard; 12:30 p.m., Jingo. Wednesday, Sept. 17 – 9 a.m., Coverall; 10:30 a.m., hymn sing; 11 a.m., Bible study; 12:30 p.m., bingo; 5 p.m., covered dish dinner. Thursday, Sept. 18 – 9 a.m., exercise; 10 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., dart game. Friday, Sept. 19 – Beach Day.

Monday, Sept. 22 – 9:30 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., Bring in the Fall program. Tuesday, Sept. 23 – 9 a.m., exercise; 10 a.m., Hand & Foot Card Club. Members of the Harrington Senior Center will visit and singer Tony Windsor will entertain. Wednesday, Sept. 24 – 9:45 a.m., blood pressure checks; 10 a.m. a.m., Pennies from Heaven Card Club; 11 a.m., Bible study; 12:30 p.m., dart ball. Thursday, Sept. 25 – 9 a.m., exercise; 10 a.m., shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., bingo. Friday, Sept. 25 – 9:30 a.m., shopping at Big Lots in Salisbury with lunch out. Monday, Sept. 29 – 9:30 shopping at Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., a talk from Peninsula Home Care. Tuesday, Sept. 30 – 9 a.m., exercise; 9:45 a.m., members will visit the Bridgeville Senior Center.

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

The Laurel District Library is planning several programs throughout the fall, for adults and for children. Area photographer Lloydlee Heite will present a program on the how-tos of digital photography at the Laurel Public Library on Monday, Sept. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in the Carpenter Community Room. Topics will range from the basics of handling a new digital camera to more advance techniques now possible with this new form of picture taking. Participants are encouraged to bring their cameras and questions to the open forum session. The library will host two exploratory meetings on Sept. 17 and 18, to determine if there is community interest in forming a library book club for adult readers. The Sept. 17 meeting is at 10:30 in the morning and the meeting on the Sept.18 is scheduled for 7 p.m. These organizational meetings will determine future book club dates and times, and the nature of the books to be read and discussed. Library staff will be available to review trends in book clubs nationwide, and to offer other materials on forming discussion groups. For further information email normajean.fowler@lib.de.us or call 875-3184. September is National Library Card Sign-up Month. The library is joining libraries across the nation in encouraging everyone who does not have one to apply for a card. Throughout September, adults 18 and over who sign up for a first-time library card will have their names entered into a drawing for a $50 gift card from the Georgia House restaurant in Laurel. Participants must be first-time card applicants, and will need to present proof of Delaware residency.

The fee to replace lost cards will also be waived during September if all associated fees and fines have been paid. The library’s story time for preschoolers will begin Tuesday, Sept. 23. Sessions will be held every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Children ages 2 to 5 and their parents, family members and caregivers are invited to join library staff members for stories, songs, poetry, math, science and crafts. Pre-registration not required. The library also holds Schools Out, programs for children in kindergarten through the sixth grade when school is not in session. Preregistration is not required. On Monday, Sept. 29, from 2 to 4 p.m. children are invited in to make a pony bead pumpkin. On Friday, Oct. 10, from 2 to 4 p.m., children can drop by to make a Columbus Day craft. Once Upon a Play Time will be Saturday, Oct. 11, at 12:30 p.m. Children in kindergarten through the sixth grade are invited to this program sponsored by the Winterthur Museum that looks at a time when toys didn’t have batteries. Pre-registration is required. To register, call 8753184 or email to Becky Norton, youth services librarian, at rebecca.norton@lib.de.us. The library will hold an after-school special Thursday, Oct. 23, at 4:15 p.m. Children in kindergarten through the sixth grade can play old-fashioned games and make old-fashioned toys. Pre-registration is required. To register, call 875-3184 or email to Becky Norton, youth services librarian, at rebecca.norton@lib.de.us.

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PAGE 15

Those who can plan for the future bear responsibility to do so My flowers, the few that are left, anyway, at the end of this dry YNN ARKS summer, were astounded Saturday when water began falling from the People who deny that realsky. This was something they hadity are only standing in the n’t seen in months, and something way of those of us who are that the kale and swiss chard that I planted in our garden several working to change it. I recweeks ago had never seen. In their ommend that the obstrucexperience, life-giving water came tionists do some real readonly from a hose. ing on the subject. But here it was, dropping out of the clouds and soaking not only their little areas but all of the dicted effects of climate change. I’m not thirsty earth around them. It was a miracle. saying that our current dry conditions on From hurricane Hanna, only a little Delmarva are the result of climate change. more than an inch of rain fell on our yard. I am saying, however, that increasing I had hoped for more. But an inch is better drought in some areas around the globe, as than nothing, especially in a summer when well as increased rainfall in others, in we have already had to pull two dead combination indicate that human-caused trees, both young red maples, out of our climate change and its ramifications are yard. Other trees, an adolescent shad bush here. and a dogwood, are looking pretty sickly. People, and in particular politicians, And the leaves on our five pin oaks and on who deny that reality are only standing in our river birch, all of which were planted the way of those of us who are working to more than 20 years ago, are turning brown change it. I recommend that the obstrucand falling to the ground. tionists do some real reading on the subI can barely think about the loss of so ject. many beloved trees, much less write about it. Depressingly, the latest politician to Drought, of course, is one of the preemerge on the national stage has indicated

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State to hand out recycling grants The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) is accepting applications for Recycling Assistance Grants for the 2009 grant year. Applications must be submitted no later than Sept. 19 and grant awards will be announced in October. Projects must be completed by Dec. 31. DNREC developed the grant program in conjunction with the Recycling Public Advisory Council to enhance Delaware’s recycling efforts by empowering Delawareans to develop or expand innovative waste reduction, reuse and/or recycling projects tailored to community needs. A total of $50,000 in grant funding is available. This is a matching program, with grant recipients required to provide 25 percent of total project funding in either cash or in-kind services. Eligible applicants include Delaware schools, colleges, universities, municipalities and not-for-profit organizations, such as scout troops, churches and community organizations. Applicants are encouraged

to establish cooperative partnerships with other parties, including private industry. Eligible activities are those that will reduce the amount of municipal solid waste going to Delaware’s landfills. Examples are the design, implementation, or expansion of recycling and yard waste composting programs; curbside collection of recyclables; design or implementation of “PayAs-You-Throw” programs; and recycling outreach or educational initiatives. The average Delawarean generates an estimated 2,400 pounds of municipal solid waste annually. The Recycling Assistance Grant Program aims to reduce the amount of municipal solid waste generated and disposed of in Delaware and contribute toward achieving the state’s goal of recycling 51 percent of municipal solid waste. For more information, call Bill Miller at 302-739-9403 or send him an email at bill.miller@state.de.us. Applications can also be downloaded from DNREC’s Web site, www.awm.delaware.gov/Pages/Recycling.aspx.

Lil’ John’s Hay Day Date: Sunday, Sept. 28, ‘08 (Rain Date 10/5) Time: 1 - 5 p.m. Place: Chickberry Farms Cost: Adults $15 advance for buffet or $20 day of.

that she has doubts that climate change is caused by human activity. Sarah Palin, governor of Alaska and the vice presidential candidate on the Republican ticket, said in an August interview with Newsmax when asked about climate change, “A changing environment will affect Alaska more than any other state, because of our location. I’m not one, though, who would attribute it to being man-made.” I can’t tell you how sad that makes me. Finally, the Bush administration, which has acknowledged that potentially devastating climate change is caused by human activity but has refused to do much to reverse it, is coming to an end. But it is possible that the replacement administration, with Palin a major part of it, would be even worse. John McCain, who selected Palin for his running mate and whose campaign includes a plan to curb emissions of greenhouse gases, the cause of climate change, has talked about the “compelling evidence of global warming.” “Instead of idly debating the precise extent of global warming, or the precise timeline of global warming, we need to deal with the central facts of rising temperatures, rising waters, and all the endless

Hearing on transportation projects is set for tonight The Delaware Department of Transportation and the Council on Transportation will hold a hearing on its Capital Transportation Program today, Sept. 11, at the South District Administration Building, 23697 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, from 4 to 7 p.m. The hearing will provide an opportunity to review the current transportation plan and suggest transportation projects or services to be considered for 2010 to 2015. Public input during the September hearings is crucial to the development of this program. The hearing will be an open house setting and a court reporter will be available to record formal comments. People can also submit written comments. Comments can be mailed to DelDOT Public Relations, P.O. Box 778, Dover,

Benefit Lunch & Auction for John Benson

John Benson, 21, of Laurel, misjudged diving into an inground pool on Kids: $6 advance, or $10 day of. June 22, ‘08 causing Lunch at 1-3 p.m. - Live auction starts at 4 p.m. him to hit the Lunch will be buffet style including: Chicken, pulled pork, bottom of the pool macaroni & cheese, applesauce, coleslaw, roll & drink. and now is unable COME OUT FOR A FUN FILLED DAY WITH THE to feel anything FAMILY & SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR JOHN!! from his chest down. This benefit Ticketed rides/events for kids, Live band, Live Auction, will help to cover Clowns, Magicians, Pony Rides (3-5p.m.), Hay Rides, bills he and his Corn Maze, Petting Zoo, Ice Cream, much more! family will encounter Tickets can be purchased at: A&K Tackle, Peninsula Poultry, Bank of Delmarva, Bethel Store. Info call: 875-2293 or 875-7274 over John’s recovery time. Make checks payable to: John Benson Benefit

troubles that global warming will bring,” he said as part of a speech in May. “We stand warned by serious and credible scientists across the world that time is short and the dangers are great.” He should be ashamed of himself, for selecting as his running mate someone who, no matter how energetic or glitzy, apparently would add to that idle debate that he criticizes. The trees that are slowly turning brown in my yard have no concept of the future. They, like all plants and all creatures, other than humans, exist only in the present, taking sustenance when they can and quietly waiting for it when they can’t. But we do understand the future. We know that our actions today will affect reality tomorrow. For us not to do everything we can, including sacrifice when necessary, to ensure a safe, clean and healthy world for those who will follow is absolutely inexcusable. The time for the debate about whether climate change is happening and whether it is caused by the greenhouse gases that we are pouring into the atmosphere is over. Palin and others who still insist on having it should step aside, and let the real work of saving the Earth go on.

DE 19903. Various information will be displayed and there will be opportunities for discussion with Delaware Department of Transportation representatives and other personnel. The Council on Transportation is composed of citizen representatives from every county in the state. Members are appointed by the governor. This location is accessible to people with disabilities. Any person having special needs or requiring special aid, such as an interpreter for the hearing impaired, is requested to contact DelDOT by phone or mail one week in advance. For more information, call 800-6525600 or 302-760-2080.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Education Admission to Treasures of the Sea exhibit free on Sept. 27 Admission to view the Treasures of the Sea Exhibit at Delaware Technical & Community College on Saturday, Sept. 27, will be free with a special admission card as the college celebrates Museum Day, sponsored by Smithsonian magazine. Museum Day celebrates the country’s cultural offerings, encourages the dissemination of knowledge and promotes museums nationwide. The Treasures of the Sea Exhibit features artifacts including gold and silver coins, bronze canons, emeralds and jewelry that were lost at sea in 1622 when the

ill-fated Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha sunk off the coast of Florida. The exhibit will be open on Sept. 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. To obtain free admission, attendees must present the Smithsonian magazine’s Museum Day Admission Card. The card is available in the September issue of Smithsonian magazine and on the Museum Day Web site at www.smithsonianmag/museumday. The exhibit is located in the Stephen J. Betze Library at Delaware Tech on Seashore Highway in Georgetown. For more information, call 302-856-5700.

From left are Classic Upward Bound students Jessica Portillo of Millsboro, Amber Broughton of Milton, Rosalie Magathan of Frankford, and Nathan Rathbone of Bridgeville, who received awards for maintaining a GPA of 93 or higher during the past school year.

Area students graduate from Upward Bound, go on to college On July 31, 17 high school seniors graduated from the Classic Upward Bound Program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. These graduates, along with current program participants, were honored at an annual awards ceremony held at the end of the six-week Upward Bound Summer Academic Program. Graduates of the program are: Veronica Allen, Natalie Harmon and Nicole Harmon of Lewes; Rayona Benson and Amber Broughton of Milton; Breanna Cranmer of Harbeson; Ashley Cook, Eliezer Dorelus, Jeremi Jones and Midelin Jules of Seaford; Antonio Dixon of Rehoboth Beach; Keli-Lynn Jordan and Mayra Tor-

res of Georgetown; Kelly Korosko of Long Neck; Rosalie Magathan of Frankford; Nathan Rathbone of Bridgeville; and Nick Spalt of Millsboro. The graduating seniors received 41 acceptances to 14 different colleges and earned 44 scholarships totaling more than $138,300. The mission of the Upward Bound program is to encourage and assist high school students who are traditionally under-represented in post-secondary education due to income or family educational background in preparation for, entry to, and completion of a post-secondary education.

NEW TEACHERS - New teachers at Sussex Technical High School this year are, front, from left: Cara Robinson of Millsboro, Shared Approach; Blanche Nickel of Dagsboro, basic science; Cindi Saxton of Frankford, math; and Dawn Rehnstrom of Ellendale, English and creative writing. Back: Tom Pegelow of Seaford, driver's education; Jeremy Locklear of Georgetown, electrical; Jay Maull of Milton, ISS; and Matt Jones of Millsboro, Shared Approach.

Education Briefs Computer certificate programs Computer skills courses are being offered at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. Two courses will begin in October and another in January. These courses are designed for those entering the workforce as well as those looking to advance their careers. Classes are offered in the evenings, from 6 to 9 p.m. “Computer Skills for the Workplace” covers Windows XP and Microsoft Applications. This eight-session course will begin on Oct. 1. “Microsoft Office 2007 Applications Certificate – Level I” offers instruction in Windows XP and the Microsoft Office 2007 applications - Excel, PowerPoint, Word, Access and Outlook. The ten-session course will begin Oct. 9. “Microsoft Office 2007 Applications Certificate – Level II” provides additional training in Window XP, QuickBooks, and the Microsoft Office 2007 applications Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Word, Access, Publisher and MS Project. Classes will run

for seven weeks beginning on Jan. 8. For details, contact Corporate and Community Programs at 854-6966.

School teaching manners

Greenwood Mennonite School, Greenwood, has added Tanner’s Manners, a curriculum written by Barbara Gilmour, to its program. Students in second through fourth grades will learn about manners and social skills. The program incorporates music, drama, art and discussion to teach children how to be polite and kind to others. The songs that are used in the classrooms will also be integrated into the school's music classes. In pilot studies at schools that used this program there were significant reductions in disciplinary issues and an increase in positive interactions between the students. Celebrating 80 years of Christian education, Greenwood Mennonite School serves a multi-denominational student body in grades pre-kindergarten through grade 12. For details, visit www.gmsflames.org or call 349-4131.

STUDENT ORIENTATION - Approximately 450 students attended the new student orientation recently at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. This was the largest group to attend an orientation program and students were congratulated by Owens Campus Director Dr. Ileana Smith (at podium) for their decision to enroll at the college.

Constitution Day program is planned Constitution Day, an annual national celebration, will be recognized at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17, at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, in the theatre of the Arts & Science Center. Guest speaker will be Dr. Ellen Marshall. In her presentation entitled “Connections," Marshall will lead an expedition through time, exploring modern-day people’s connections to the people and events that led to the signing of the U.S. Constitution.

Marshall is a faculty member of the criminal justice technology program at Delaware Tech. Constitution Day was established by a bill signed into law by President George W. Bush on Dec. 8, 2004, designating Sept. 17 as the day of recognition. The Constitution was signed on Sept. 17, 1787. The public is invited to attend. Free booklets containing the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States will be given to attendees.


SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 17

Prime Hook holding nature photo contest The deadline is approaching for the submission of entries in the fall Nature Photography Contest sponsored by the Friends of Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge located in Milton. The last date that mailed or hand-delivered photographs will be accepted is Sunday, Oct. 12. A new category has been added to the contest — the Beauty of Prime Hook. Photographs in this category must have been taken within the confines of the refuge and should depict the flora and/or fauna of the refuge or scenery within its boundaries. This new category supplements the already existing categories: Native Wildlife, Native Flowers and Plants and Delmarva Scenery. No photograph in any category may contain persons or man-made structures. In addition, the student category has been split into junior student (up through age 12) and senior student (ages 13 to 17). Monetary awards will be awarded in each category. The most exciting aspect of this year’s contest is the grand prize — a photo shoot with famed National Geographic photographer, Kevin Fleming. This will include time in the field and the lab with Fleming. For a complete list of rules governing the contest, visit www.friendsofprimehook.org or call the refuge office at 302-684-8419. Entries will be judged by a panel of three professional photographers, including Fleming. Winners will be announced during a reception for the artists and the general public on Sunday, Oct. 19 at the Refuge. All entries will be exhibited in the refuge auditorium from Oct. 19 through Nov. 21.

Positive parental attitudes can encourage a student’s success Parents’ attitude toward school has a significant effect on student readiness to return to school after summer vacation, educators say. Attitude can be a predictor of aptitude, and a positive attitude is contagious. Becky Grinath, executive director of the Sylvan Learning Center, said parents’ first priority should be to create a home environment that supports learning. Preparation doesn’t begin and end with the obligatory back-to-school shopping for clothes and school supplies. Every conversation about the new school year should “focus on the excitement of beginning the next grade,” Grinath said. Easy conversation starters are questions about the new teacher and your student’s classmates. This can lead into more substantive discussions about learning. “Establish priorities,” she said. Grinath advises parents to demonstrate that school responsibilities come before other activities. One way to do that is to set up a study area for your student. Decide together on a place to study away from potential distractions. Stock it with pens and pencils (and a pencil sharpener) and paper, and include a dictionary and thesaurus. During the first weeks of school, parents and students can plan for success by setting reasonable, attainable goals together. Because many students lose command of skills they don’t use over the summer, a few review sessions may serve to refresh those skills and keep students from falling behind.

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PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Delicious, quick and reliable — good for those busy weeknights Right about now, second only to emails about kid-friendly meals, ORETTA NORR are those relating to how to prepare quick weeknight meals for busy families. Now that vacations are over and school’s in session, the tempo of the household symphony has quickened dramatically. The chef, as symphony conductor, has a tough task bringing everyone together and keeping them in tune. When things get hectic, most of us have a portfolio of reliable dish10 large garlic cloves, peeled es designed to get a meal from pantry to 1 tablespoon olive oil table as quickly as possible. These are the 1/2 cup canned low-salt chicken broth recipes that every member will eat (no 1/3 cup dry white wine small accomplishment) and that, once discovered, are hard to give up. The trick is to add to the repertoire of Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Run finthese comforting stand-bys to avoid that gers under skin of chicken breasts to weekday dinner boredom. loosen; rub 1/2 teaspoon rosemary under Here are three suggestions for 30skin of each. Sprinkle chicken with salt minute main courses that are sure to beand pepper; place in medium ovenproof come family favorites. You’ll want to have skillet. the necessary ingredients on hand at all Toss garlic, oil and remaining 1 teatimes. spoon rosemary in small bowl to coat. Preparation is a snap and the finales Arrange garlic around chicken. Drizzle will merit standing ovations. any remaining oil mixture over chicken. Roast chicken 15 minutes. Add broth to skillet. Continue to roast until chicken is Rosemary-Roasted Chicken and Garlic cooked through, about 5 minutes. (Makes 2 servings, can easily be doubled) Transfer chicken and garlic to plates. Add wine to skillet; boil 1 minute to re2 chicken breast halves with skin and duce pan juices slightly. Spoon pan juices bones over chicken and garlic. 2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary Note: Try adding chunks of red or

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sweet potatoes around chicken while roasting. Bon Appétit, October 1999

mer until slightly reduced about 3 minutes. Mix in cilantro. Divide chicken among 4 plates. Spoon sauce over chicken. Top with avocado slices and serve. Bon Appétit, November 2002

Crunchy Chicken in Green Sauce (Serves 4. A spicy southwestern version of fried chicken. Try serving it with purchased Mexican-style rice pilaf.) 1/2 cup buttermilk 2/3 cup yellow cornmeal 1 tablespoon ancho chili powder or regular chili powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 4 skinless boneless chicken breast halves, pounded to 1/2- to 1/3-inch thickness 2 tablespoons corn oil 2/3 cup low-salt chicken broth 1 cup bottled green salsa 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 1 large avocado, peeled, pitted, sliced

Curried Cider-Braised Pork Chops (Serves 2, can be easily doubled) 1 and 1/2 tablespoons butter 4 thin boneless pork chops or 2 thick bone-in pork chops 2 cups chopped onions 1 large celery stalk, chopped 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon curry powder 1 and 1/2 cups apple cider Melt butter in large skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper. Add pork to skillet and sauté until brown, about 3 minutes per side. Using tongs, transfer pork to plate. Add onions, celery and bay leaf to skillet. Sauté until onions are golden, about 6 minutes. Mix in curry powder. Add cider and boil until sauce is slightly reduced, about 6 minutes. Return pork and any accumulated juices to skillet. Simmer just until cooked through, about 3 minutes for boneless chops and 5 minutes for bone-in chops. Season with salt and pepper. Bon Appétit, October 1999

Pour buttermilk into shallow dish. Combine cornmeal, chili powder and salt in separate shallow dish. Place chicken in buttermilk and turn to coat. Place chicken in cornmeal mixture and turn to coat. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add 2 chicken breasts; sauté until cooked through, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer chicken to plate; tent with foil. Repeat with remaining oil and chicken. Add broth to drippings in skillet. Bring to simmer over medium heat, stirring to scrape up browned bits. Stir in salsa; sim-

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Looking for the perfect rental? Year round or summer get-away? Don’t delay, call today! We Have 3 Convenient Offices to Serve You. BETHANY BEACH GEORGETOWN LEWES 32904 S. Coastal Hwy. 210 West Market St. 1520 Savannah Rd. 302-539-7511 302-855-0500 302-645-9215 1-800-441-8118 1-888-421-6521 1-888-421-6521

• BBQ Chicken** **You can pre-order your BBQ chicken platters by • ScrappleS andwiches calling church office, 875-4646 • Mums & Pumpkins • Hand painted windows & yard signs • Delicious homemade baked goods • C hili • TJ’s Special IceT ea Andm uch, much more!


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 19

Local artist selling prints to benefit restoration Well-known Delmarva artist Ellen Rice, who started her professional art career in Seaford in the 1970s, is selling prints of her new historic painting, “Silent Sentinel,” at her gallery in Ocean View. Proceeds from the sales will benefit the restoration of Delaware’s World War II Watchtower 3 near Dewey Beach. The original painting and prints were created by Rice at the request of the Delaware Seashore Preservation Foundation, the same non-profit organization which restored the Indian River Life-Saving Station on Route 1 in the 1990s. An introductory price of $210, which is $50 below the regular price, will apply to all print sales through Oct. 1. Ten percent of all print sales of “Silent Sentinel,” including proofs, will go directly to the restoration project. A special canvas giclée edition of “Silent Sentinel,” created strictly for those who join the foundation at the $1,000 4Star General Level of membership, will also be available through the foundation and through Rice’s gallery. The gallery will serve as a center for information and membership applications for the Tower 3 project. In “Silent Sentinel,” Rice says she endeavored to paint the tower in a way that is not only beautiful, but different from everything else that has been painted of the towers — and with a significant historic twist.

Painted at the top of the tower are two people representing either World War II local volunteers who manned the towers during the 1930s and 1940s or visitors watching the sun rise when the tower is fully restored. “We discussed a lot of ideas,” said Rice. “DSPF’s board wanted an historic element in the painting to help tell the tower’s unique story." Rice is writing a short history of Delaware’s watchtowers which she hopes will include comments from women and men who volunteered there. The history will be given away with each print purchase. The original 36-inch by 24-inch oil on canvas of “Silent Sentinel” took Rice more than three months to complete. Rice is considered one of Delaware’s most collectible artists. A resident of Sussex County since 1962, she’s been painting the area’s places, people and natural beauty since she was a teen and has been a full-time professional artist for more than 30 years. Her works are wide ranging, reflecting many aspects of life, and can be found in more than 30,000 private, government and corporate collections worldwide. Other historic subjects that she has painted include the Gov. Ross Mansion in Seaford; Lawrence, which was in Seaford until its demolition; the Parson Thorne Mansion in Milford, the Woodland Ferry,

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the Fenwick Lighthouse, Bethel’s Schooner Ram Victory Chimes, several local train stations and her most famous, nationally best-selling work of history and art, Treasure Beaches of the Mid-Atlantic. The Ellen Rice Gallery, a 2006 national NICHE Top Retailer Finalist, is located at 103 Atlantic Ave. (Delaware 26), in the

west end of the Country Wicker Building, 2.2 miles west of the intersection of Route 1 and Bethany Beach. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. “Silent Sentinel “can be purchased in the gallery, by calling 302-539-3405, or online at the Web site www.ellenrice.com.

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Ellen Rice, who started her professional art career in Seaford in the 1970s, is selling prints of her new historic painting, Silent Sentinel (shown here), at her gallery in Ocean View to benefit the restoration of Delaware’s World War II Watchtower 3 near Dewey Beach.

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MORNING STAR

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 20


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 21

Community Bulletin Board AARP Membership meeting

AARP Seaford, Chapter 1084 of Western Sussex County will meet Thursday, Sept. 11, at Methodist Manor House Fellowship Hall, Seaford, at 1:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be Connie Matthews of First State Community Action Agency. Guests, 50 years or older, are welcome and invited to join in refreshments and conversation after the meeting. For information regarding membership to this state chapter, call Helen at 875-5086.

Senior Basket Bingo

The Nanticoke Senior Center will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, Sept. 25, starting at 7 p.m. at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club, 310 Virginia Avenue. Proceeds to benefit the new Nanticoke Senior Center. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Large Hamper and the American Celebrations Oval Market Basket or one of the several door prizes. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information call 629-4939 or 628-2828.

Read Aloud Delaware

Read Aloud Delaware volunteer training session will be held Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 1 p.m. in the Seaford Public Library, 402 North Porter Street. Call 856-2527 to sign up for training.

GOP Women’s Club luncheon

The Seaford Republican Women’s Club will host a luncheon on Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 11:30 a.m. at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. The cost is $13 per person. The public is invited. Special guest speakers will be candidate for governor Bill Lee and candidate for lieutenant governor Charlie Copeland. Reservations are required and may be made by calling Ann Nesbitt at 628-7788. The deadline for reservations is Thursday, Sept. 18.

Breakfast benefit

Mt. Olivet Church in downtown Seaford will be holding a breakfast on Saturday, Sept. 13, from 7 to 10 a.m. in Fellowship Hall. This will be a fundraiser to support the preschool program to help keep costs affordable for families. All are welcome to enjoy a breakfast of pancakes, eggs, scrapple, sausage, fruit and more. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for children under 10. There will be a Schwann’s truckload sale in the parking lot. Call 6294458 mornings for information.

Fitness Classes

Fitness Classes Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9 a.m., Tuesday and Thursda,y 5:30 p.m. The six-week session starts the week of September 15 and meets in St. John’s UMC Fellowship Hall in Seaford

(sponsored by St. John’s but open to the public). Beginners to intermediate participants welcome in this fun, faith-filled, coed, non-competitive muscle-toning, stretching, high/low aerobic class. Get a doctor’s OK and come try a free session. Only a 6-8 week commitment at a time required. For more information or to register call 24-year AFAA certified fitness professional Carol Lynch at 629-7539.

The Ark Yard Sale

Seaford Wesleyan Senior Group yard sale will be held Saturday, Sept. 13, beginning at 7 a.m. Five dollar donation for table space. Bring a table or one will be provided. Call Barb at 302-877-0815. In the gym or on the lot, rain or shine. Hot dogs, chips, and sodas for sale. Bake goods table. Southbound lane of US 13 (Sussex Highway) at the Ark, Seaford Wesleyan Church.

Yard sale

Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades will hold a yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 13, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tables are $10 each. Rain date is Sept. 20. Call 875-7143.

Class of ‘88 reunion

The Seaford High School class of ‘88 20-year reunion will be Saturday, Nov. 29, at the banquet center next to Jimmy’s Grill Restaurant in Bridgeville. The reunion will be from 6-10 p.m. with a cocktail hour from 6-7 p.m., and dinner at 7. The cost is $75 a couple and $37.50 for a single. This includes dinner and entertainment. Contact Cathy Hastings (Maas) at dcat5186@hotmail.-com, Lexie Ketterman (Kingree) at lexketterman@gmail.com or Angie Zebley (Mitchell) at angie@tullramey.com with contact information.

Craft vendors

Christ Lutheran Church, 315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, needs craft vendors for its Christmas bazaar to be held on Saturday, Sept. 27, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. $20 per space. Contact Joan at 628-3601.

Breakfast cafe

VFW 4961 breakfast cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

Library IHOP fundraiser

The Seaford District Library has joined with IHOP in an effort to raise money for the library. Enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations on any day with any meal and return the receipts along with a comment card to the Seaford District Library.

Annual house tour

The St. John’s United Methodist Women will sponsor its annual house tour on Thursday, Oct. 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Seven homes and the St. John’s United Methodist Church will be open for visitors. A chicken salad luncheon will be served that day from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. The cost of a ticket for

the house tour is $10. The luncheon cost is $6 per person. For ticket information call Teresa Wilson at 629-6417.

ments will be available. For ticket information contact 628-0503 or 629-4481.

TOPS looking for members

TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is a non-profit weight loss group whose mission is “To support their members as they take off pounds sensibly.” TOPS meetings feature fellowship, weight loss programs and healthy living for a fee of $24 per year. They are non-commercial and there is no food to buy and no sales. Call 6298216 for details.

Biff Lee Pig Pickin’

Chicken barbecue

The American Legion Auxiliary in Seaford is holding its last Chicken Barbecue of the summer on Saturday, Sept. 13, beginning at 11 a.m.

40th District Rep. Clifford “Biff” Lee will be holding his 21st annual “PigPickin” at the Laurel Fire Hall on Saturday, Sept. 13. The event is from 4 until 7 p.m. Plenty to eat and a good time for all with door prizes. Tickets are $15 in advance by calling 875-5448, or at Small Insurance, South Central Avenue. They are also available at the door.

Blades VFC Basket Bingo

Former grads dinner

Blades Volunteer Fire Company will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, Sept. 18, starting at 7 p.m. at the Blades Fire Company. The evening will consist of 20 games featuring Longaberger baskets as prizes. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Large Hamper and the American Celebrations Oval Market Basket or one of the several door prizes. Nearly 30 chances to win. Refresh-

The annual fall get-together of former athletes, band members and interested Laurel High School graduates is Friday, Sept. 12, at the Georgia House with a 4 p.m. social hour and dinner, followed by the Laurel football game. For tickets call Craig Littleton at 875-7445 or 462-7450

Whaley Family Reunion

The Whaley Family Reunion will be Sunday, Sept. 21, at 1:30 p.m., at the Rev.

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410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379


PAGE 22 Lee Elliott Memorial Hall, Trinity UMC, Laurel. Bring a covered dish and a beverage. An offering will be taken to offset expenses of chicken, hot dogs, and supplies. During the business meeting, games will be available for the children. For more information, contact one of the following officers: Christina Wilson, 410-251-0413; Edna Mae Marvil, 875-9427; Ruth Ann Savage, 410-546-5818; Phyllis Johnson, 875-0463. Bring a family recipe. Organizers hope to do a Whaley Family cookbook.

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Beach House & Tiki Bar at Bargain Bill’s in Laurel at 5 p.m. Featuring a DJ, tropical buffet and cash bar. Tickets are $36 in advance. Invitations and reply cards have been mailed. If you did not receive one or need more information, contact committee at 302-280-6655; or reunioninfo2008@yahoo.com.

AARP Driving Course

Laurel Senior Center will host an AARP Driving Course, Sept. 22-23, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $10. To register call 875-2536.

Pepper Reunion

The 73rd Annual Pepper Reunion will be held at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 21, at Trap Pond State Park, Laurel. A brief business meeting will follow the potluck lunch. Bring a main dish, drinks, & table settings, plus a dish to share. Please notify other Pepper family members. For details call 717-697-0851.

Networking Expo

The Laurel Chamber of Commerce will host a Business to Business Expo on Tuesday, Sept. 23, at the Laurel Fire Hall. Businesses will have an opportunity to introduce their business and services to one another from 5-5:45 p.m., and doors will be open to the public from 6-7:30 p.m. For more information call 875-9319.

Class of ‘63 reunion

Laurel High School’s Class of ‘63, 45th reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Lakeside Community Center in Long Neck. Organizers are in need of upto-date addresses. If you have not received your letter contact Janet Lynch LeCates, 875-3955, or Sandra Kellam Russell, 8755985, or e-mail russellsk@dmv.com.

Class of ‘78 reunion

LHS Class of ‘78, 30-year reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 27, at the Beach House “Tiki Bar” at Bargain Bill’s in Laurel. Light finger food will be served, cash bar $15 per person from 7 until 11 p.m. DJ will be provided. Dress is casual. For more information contact Jan Conaway Allen at 443-614-0338, Gale Hall Daugherty at 410-626-3214, Tammy Hastings Whaley at 228-7267, Tammy Myers Wharton at 258-7371 or Sue Pressley at 875-3968. Send checks to Jan Allen, 110 Tracey Circle, Laurel, DE 19956.

Free community luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (chicken & dumplings), on Saturday, Sept. 20, noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 BiState Boulevard, approximately two miles south of town. For details call Shirley at 875-2314.

Class of ‘98 reunion

Laurel High School class of ‘98 is planning a class reunion. Contact Megan Jones by email megj22@comcast.net or phone 841-5835 with contact information.

Class of ‘88 reunion

Laurel class of ‘88, 20-year reunion is

Town meeting

The Commissioners of Bridgeville will host a town meeting on Thursday, Sept. 11, 7 p.m. at the Bridgeville Fire Hall. The meeting will include a wide range of topics including the status of past annexations and an update of highway construction projects. Community organizations have been invited to share information with the residents on their upcoming fall/winter events and the Library Trustees have also been encouraged to share plans for the new library.

Apple Scrapple Pageants

The third annual Little Miss Apple Scrapple Pageant is now accepting entries. New this year will be the addition of the Miss Apple Scrapple Pageant. Both pageants are open to girls who reside in the Woodbridge School District. Little Miss contestants must be between 5-8 years-old while Miss contestants must be in grades 9-12. The Pageants will be held on Thursday, Oct. 9, beginning at 7 p.m. in the Woodbridge High School Auditorium. All proceeds benefit the Apple Scrapple Scholarship Fund. For more information visit the Festival website at www.applescrapple.com.

Searching for ancestors

Are you searching for your ancestors? Do you need guidance to begin your family tree? Are you stuck or do you need help organizing your research? The Bridgeville Public Library will provide genealogy consultations facilitated by Alice duBois Min on the last Saturday of each month, Sept. 27 and Oct. 25 - from 10 a.m. to noon. Sign-up is required. Call the library at 337-7401, or e-mail Alice at famgen88@comcast.net. For special needs contact Karen Johnson 302-337-740

Clean-Up Day

Bridgeville will hold a Neighborhood Clean-Up Day on Saturday, Sept. 27. All items must be curbside by 6 a.m., as M.T. Trash will only go down each street once. Allowable items for pick-up include: furniture, household trash, stoves, and limbs bundled in 4-ft. lengths. Items that will not be picked up include tires, batteries, oil, construction materials, dirt, rocks, bricks, etc. M-T Trash will have a truck available to pick-up refrigerators, freezers and air conditioners, as long as the Freon has been removed. M-T Trash will also have a truck to pick up paint, stain, etc. Note: These items must be kep in a separate area from the rest of the trash. Large tree limbs can be delivered to the town’s wastewater treatment plant. Resi-

dents will be directed to an area for placement of limbs. A scrap metal container will be placed at the Town Hall parking lot for the disposal of such items as aluminum siding, window frames, barbecue grills, tire rims, bicycles and stainless steel. Residents are asked not to place any other types of trash in this container. Questions may be directed to Town Manager Bonnie Walls at 337-7135.

Lunch will be served and prizes awarded at 12:30 p.m. The $100 entry fee per golfer includes the continental breakfast, golf, lunch and prizes. The non-refundable deadline for entries is September 12. For more information and to register for the tournament contact Dwayne Landis at 236-6822. Entries and payment can be mailed to: GMS Golf Tournament, Attn: Dwayne Landis, P.O. Box 309, Greenwood, DE 19950.

Community yard sale

Voter’s Registration Day

The Town of Bridgeville hosts a communitywide yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 20, beginning at 7 a.m. Find great bargains at many homes throughout the town.

Historical Society’s Museum

The Bridgeville Historical Society Museum is open to the public on the first Sunday of each month through October from 1 - 4 p.m. The museum is located at 102 William Street, Bridgeville.

Fall Festival

There will be a Fall Festival and Car, Truck and Motorcycle Show on Saturday, Sept. 20, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at Phillis Wheatley Middle School, Church Street, Bridgeville. Sponsored by the Trustees of Mt. Calvary United Methodist Church, Bridgeville. Dash plates given to the first 50 vehicles registered. Top 30 cars registered will receive trophies. Registration fee for vehicles and motorcycles is $10 per vehicle. Registration for vehicles will be from 9 a.m until 12 p.m. There will be plenty of food available for sale, choirs will be singing, there will be a health fair, voter registration, and many more activities for the children, youth and adults. There will also be a yard sale from 7 a.m. until 12 p.m. Tables for the yard sale are $10 per table. Choirs will be performing from noon until 2 p.m. Choirs or praise teams that would like to participate should contact Sis. Ginger Speight at 629-9799 or email mtcalvarybville@aol.com. For more information call Hollis Smack at 337-3430. Leroy Tingle at 349-4962 or Ginger Speight at 629-9799.

A Voter’s Registration Day will be held at Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 on Friday, Sept. 19, from 11 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. The Post is located on Governor’s Avenue in Greenwood and the event is sponsored by the Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 7478. Eligible voters may register to vote in the state and national elections by completing an application form at the Post. Bring a driver’s license and a birth certificate. Persons who wish to vote in the Greenwood municipal elections must register in person at the Town Hall on West Market Street. The Town Hall will be open all day on September 19 to accept new registrations. The Town Hall will remain open until 5:30 p.m. for this special Voter’s Registration Day. If anyone needs assistance in this registration, stop by VFW Post 7478. For more information contact President Michaele Russell at 349-4220.

Autumn Craft Night

On Thursday, Sept. 18, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., the Greenwood Public Library will be holding a family Autumn Craft Night. Participants will be decorating canvas tote bags with a variety of materials including ribbon, paints, iron-ons, and more. There is no cost and all materials will be provided. The activity is open to all, but children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration is required by September 12. Stop by the front desk or call 349-5309. The library is located at 100 Mill Street.

IHOP Family Night

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library announce a fundraiser. Enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Take and fill out the comment card; staple the receipt to the comment card and drop it off at the Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or the Providence Sales Cottage in Heritage Shores. For more information call Pat McDonald at 337-7192.

Golf Tournament

Greenwood Mennonite School announces its 6th annual benefit golf tournament to be held on Friday, Sept. 26, at the Heritage Shores Golf Course in Bridgeville. This is a scramble tournament open to groups and individuals. Registration is from 7-8 a.m. with a continental breakfast. A shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m.

Delmar Heritage Day

The town of Delmar will be holding its 2nd annual Heritage Day Festival in Downtown Delmar on Saturday, Sept. 27. The event starts at 10 a.m. and concludes with a concert that evening. There will be a 10 a.m. parade with many scheduled events throughout the day including a pie eating contest, “Carry The Yoke Relay,” and fire engine rides. There will be a Horseshoe Tournament at 4:30 p.m. with a $300 first prize. A special part of the day will be a “Farewell to the Lights Ceremony” as Delmar prepares for new streetscape work to be done. The Kiwanis will feature their famous oyster sandwiches and The Lions Club will have their food booth. Bring coolers, lawn chairs and spend a great day in Delmar. The event is sponsored by the Delmar


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 Revitalization Committee. For vendor space call 410-896-2777.

Chorus Fundraiser

The Chorus Boosters for the Delmar middle and senior high school chorus is sponsoring a fund raiser at Hardee’s Restaurant in Delmar on Wednesday, Sept. 17, from 5-8 p.m. The chorus will receive a portion of all receipts (dine-in, carryout or drive-thru) during the hours of the fund raiser. All proceeds will support the middle and senior high School chorus and their activities. Delmar Chorus Boosters is an all-volunteer organization whose purpose is to support the activities of the Delmar Middle and Senior High School Chorus.

Longaberger sale

The Delmar Lions Club is holding a Longaberger basket sale with all proceeds going to the community and the visually impaired. Baskets, with blue and orange trim and Wildcat paws, cost $49 each. The price of the lid, with a Delmar and Wildcat logo, is $30. Liners and dividers are available upon request. For more information or to order a basket contact King Lion Mildred Riley at 846-3846 or kragera@verizon.net

topics to be discussed are traffic, the Hearn’s Pond Dam, and annexation. As always, H.A.P.P.E.N. members welcome any group or individual who is interested in attending the meeting.

Acorn Club

The G.F.W.C.-Acorn Club of Seaford will have a business meeting on Thursday, Sept. 11, at the Seaford Library at 7:30 p.m. Hostesses will be Carolyn Griffith and Kay Johnson and their committee.

SCWDC

The Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. on September 18 at Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown. The guest speaker will be Richard S. Cordrey, Secretary of Finance. Dinner is $13 per person. For details and reservations call Catherine King 628-4812.

Equine Council

A meeting of the Delaware Equine Council will be held Monday, Sept 15, at 7 p.m. in the Exhibitors’ Hall Board Room. A short business meeting followed by 2008 Awarding of Scholarships (four) supporting Agriculture Education, Dr. David Marshall, DVM will be our guest speaker. For more info call Peggy, 6295233.

NARFE planning

Adult Plus+

Seniors can take advantage of a variety of activities offered by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, Georgetown. Anyone interested in playing bridge can attend open bridge sessions through January 20. Starting September 11, learn or improve your bridge skills with beginner and intermediate lessons. Challenge yourself by playing the Hand and Foot Card Game, beginning September 15. Socialize and make new friends by attending the Adult Plus+ Mixed Singles Club on September 17. Examine the Bible in “Surprises in the Old Testament.” Learn how “You can Design your own Web Page” on September 23. Learn to use a firearm properly and proficiently in “Firearms: Protection and Training” beginning September 18, with an FBI-certified instructor. For details call 856-5618.

The Georgetown Chapter of the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees will hold a planning meeting for 2008/2009 activities on Monday, Sept. 15, at noon, with lunch at the Pizza King Restaurant on Stein Highway in Seaford. For more information, or to become a member, contact Chapter president Charles Singman at 337-0337.

Marine Corps

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

Trap Pond Partners

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 for details.

H.A.P.P.E.N.

Spaghetti and meatballs

Trap Pond Partners (a volunteer nonprofit organization) meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bald Cypress Nature Center at Trap Pond State Park, Laurel. We are always looking for new members and ideas to improve our state park. To learn more, visit www.trappondpartners.com.

The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearn’s Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization will meet on Thursday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Museum. Among the

or carry out. Call 629-7117 or 337-8836 for tickets or information.

Millsboro Basket Bingo

The Kiwanis Club of Greater Millsboro will host a Basket Bingo on Saturday, Oct. 4, at the Millsboro Fire Hall on State Street in downtown Millsboro. Proceeds from the event will benefit local children and youth. Doors open at 6 p.m. and games start at 7 p.m. The Basket Bingo features a great selection of Longaberger products, including holiday items and retired items. A silent auction, 50/50 drawing, raffles, door prizes and refreshments will also be offered. Basket Bingo tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. For ticket reservations or information, call Millsboro Kiwanis at 934-8424 or e-mail gmillsborokiwanis@mchsi.com.

An “all-you-can-eat” spaghetti and meatball dinner with salad, beverage, bread and dessert will be held Saturday, Sept. 13, at Bethel Community House, Oak Grove, 4-6 p.m. Donation $8. Eat in

sion is taught by an experienced genealogist and should be of interest to anyone interested in beginning a family history. For more information on tuition and details or to get the Wilmington Collage Fall brochure call 227-6295.

Benefit nights

The Roadhouse Steak Joint is taking reservations for non-profit organizations benefit nights for the 2008-2009 season. Call 645-8273, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 18693 Coastal Highway, Rehoboth Beach, www.roadhousesteakjoint.com

Family reunion

Minos & Edith Littleton Family Reunion on Sunday, Sept. 21, 3-7 p.m., at the John West Park in Ocean View. Raindate September 28. Contact Tommy Wilson at 629-2153.

Wheatley Family Reunion

Beginners square dances

Geneology class

Embroiders’ Guild open house

The descendents of Ezekiel Henry Taylor and Annie Caroline Wheatley will hold a covered dish luncheon on Sunday, Sept. 21, at 1 p.m., at Cokesbury Community House in Cokesbury, Md. Contact Nancy Wheatley Adams at 629-6440 for further information.

The Sussex County Genealogical Society will be teaching a class of four sessions on beginning genealogy at Wilmington College, 41 Rehoboth Avenue, Rehoboth Beach. The sessions are on Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. beginning Sept. 27 and ending on Oct. 18. Each ses-

The Whirl-A-Ways square dance club is offering beginning level square dances at the Georgetown American Legion log cabin, Wednesday evenings, Sept. 17 and 24. Classes will be held starting Oct. 1, if there are enough people interested. For information call the Messicks at 629-5530.

The public is invited to attend an open house sponsored by the Embroiders’ Guild of America, Inc. The open house will be held on Monday, Oct. 13, from 12:30 p.m. at the CHEER Community Center at 20520 Sand Hill Road, Georgetown. For information call Carolyn, 947-1949.

2nd Annual

Heritage Day

Widowed Persons

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 16, at 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral. The planned guest speaker will be Rosalee Walls speaking about the Marvel Museum and Return Day. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

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Downtown Delmar

Saturday, September 27 10 am ‘til 9 pm FIRE ENGINE RIDES PIE-EATING CONTEST

PARADE 11 am “CARRY THE YOKE” RELAY 11 am BRICK UNVEILING 12 pm KIDS STREET ART CARRIAGE RIDES COMPETITION 12:30 pm MARTIAL ARTS/DANCE WORKSHOP DELMAR 1 pm to 3 pm HOMECOMING “CRUISING IN DELMAR” FOOTBALL GAME CAR SHOW Registration 10 am to 2 pm 1-4 $10 per vehicle, Awards at 2 pm Farewell to the Lights “MOTIVATE THE MELON” Free Concert featuring CONTEST 4 pm Randy Lee Ashcraft “OVER THE LINE” HORSESHOE & the Saltwater Cowboys TOURNAMENT 4:30 pm 5:30 - 9:30 pm Registration 2 to 4 pm, $15 per team, $300 first place prize Lions Club Hamburgers “EAT THE PIE” CONTEST 5 pm and French Fries VENDOR SET UPS All Day Kiwanis Club Oyster Call for Information 410-896-2777

Sandwiches

Sponsored by Delmar Revitalization Committee

GAMES • FOOD VENDORS • ENTERTAINMENT


PAGE 24

Senior Center

Nanticoke Senior Center’s Nashville and Memphis trip will take place on Sunday, Sept. 14, to Saturday, Sept. 20. Cost is $850 double occupancy. Some of the sights you will see are Graceland, Grand Olé Opry, and Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum. For information call 629-4939.

Radio City

Seaford Recreation’s 17th annual Radio City Christmas Spectacular is set for Sunday, Dec. 7, and is now taking registrations. The cost is $145 and the seats are in the orchestra section. The cost includes a charter bus and there will be a few hours after the show to shop and tour NYC. Call 629-6809 for more information or to sign up.

Nashville

Seaford will host a trip to Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 13-17. Cost of $799 per person/double occupancy includes lodging at the Opryland Hotel, performance of Radio City’s “Christmas Spectacular” featuring world-famous Rockettes, Fantasy in Ice, holiday dinner show featuring Louise Mandrell, most meals, motorcoach transportation and much more. For more information call Frances Horner at 629-4416.

New York City

Bus trip to N.Y. City, Saturday, Oct 25, to the American Museum of Natural History to visit “The Horse” exhibit. Fee is $65/person includes bus fare and admission to the Exhibit.

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 Bus will board approx 7 a.m. in the Sears parking lot at the Dover Mall. For information, call Mary Everhart 302-659-0460, or Paula Barto 629-5233, or visit website www.delawarequinecouncil.org

will also have time to Christmas shop at the Rockvale Outlets and have lunch on your own before going to the theater. Must sign up now. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180 for more information on these trips.

Delmar Alumni

Delaware Tech offerings

Delmar Alumni sponsors a trip to Rainbow Dinner Theatre, Lancaster, Pa. on Saturday, Nov. 1. Bus departs from Delmar High School at 2:30 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m., and show “Barefoot in the Park,” at 8 p.m. Cost is $80 per person. RSVP: Kay Carrier, 10843 Dorthy Road, Laurel, 8757877; or Dorothy Wolfgang, 36360 BiState Boulevard, Delmar, 846-2366.

Seaford AARP

Money has to be paid in time to make reservations for all trips. • Oct. 13-16 - New Hampshire White Mountains for 4 days. Stay in Laconia, N.H. at the Margate Resort Hotel with seven meals included. Cost is $650 per person, double occupancy. Visit Franconia Notch State Park, Chutter’s Store, Sugar Hill Sampler, Harman’s Cheese & Country Store, Hampton Pewter, and more. Have a five course dinner served aboard the Café Lafayette Dinner Train during your two hour ride! Then ride the Lake Winnipesaukee Scenic Railroad before taking a cruise on a 230’ ship across Lake Winnipesaukee. • Nov. 19 - Rainbow Dinner Theater in Pennsylvania to see the comedy: “Deck The Halls And Clean The Kitchen.” Cost: $65. Bus leaves Seaford Peebles parking lot at 7:30 a.m. • Dec. 5 - The American Music Theater to see “Christmas Show.” Cost is $65. Enjoy holiday songs and comedy sketches. Also an appearance of Santa. We

Embark on exciting trips with Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, Georgetown. On September 18, attend a one-night-only concert event with American folk singer Arlo Guthrie and the NSO Pops as part of the Kennedy Center’s “Arts Across America” celebration. Join Detective McDevitt and frantic witnesses on September 19 for “History on Foot,” a firsthand look at the investigation into Lincoln’s assassination in Washington, D.C. On September 20, listen to country music veterans Crystal Gayle, Ray Clark, and Ray Price at the American Music Theatre in Lancaster, Pa. View the natural scenic beauty of Pine Creek Gorge, also known as Pennsylvania’s Grand Canyon, from September 22 to 24. On September 25, enjoy Judy Garland’s captivating and timeless songs performed by Broadway veteran Linda Eder with the NSO Pops led by Principal Pops Conductor Marvin Hamlisch. Visit Occoquan, a historic riverfront mill town in Virginia, on Sept. 27 for their annual fall craft show. Tickets are now available for trips to two National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) Pops shows at the Kennedy Center in September, sponsored by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College. For more information about these or other trips, call 8565618.

Tickets available now for Possum Point Players ‘On Golden Pond’ Possum Point Players in Georgetown present the popular comedy “On Golden Pond” by Ernest Thompson. The theatre recommends advance ticket reservations as sales have already begun. Director Pat Erhardt of Seaford has included a variety of talent from the area in the cast. Possum regulars John Hulse and Bud Clark will be joined by Deana Duby, Zachary Hearn and Kathleen Richter. “On Golden Pond,” a classic tale of long-lasting love, is a touching and humorous story about Ethel and Norman Thayer, their daughter and her teenage son. Audiences can relate to family complications and the love between the retired Thayers is inspiring. There will be a reception on opening night for the audience to meet the cast after the show. All opening night ticket holders are invited to attend. Performances are Oct. 3, 4, 10 and 11 at 8 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Oct. 5 and 12. Tickets are available for $16 ($15 for seniors or students) by calling the Possum Ticketline at 302-856-4560. Directions to Possum Hall are also available at the Ticketline number.

Make reservations early for Christmas Concerts in Seaford and Lewes The Southern Delaware Choral Society Christmas concert, “A Newborn Child: Cantatas and Carols for Christmas,” will be presented Saturday, Dec. 13, at 7 p.m. at the Mt. Olivet United Methodist church in Seaford, and on Sunday, Dec. 14, at 3 p.m. at St. Edmund’s Roman Catholic Church, Rehoboth Beach. The Southern Delaware Choral Society is supported in part by grants from the Delaware Division of the Arts, the Sussex County Council, the Freeman Foundation and the City of Lewes. The cost for tickets will be $15 for adults and $10 for students. Tickets are available after October 15 by contacting SDCS at 226-5231 or online at www.brownpapertickets.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 47


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 25

DuPonters with 25 years at Seaford plant hold annual dinner The DuPont 25-Year Club held its annual dinner, Friday, Sept. 5. It AT URPHY was held at the Laurel Fire Hall with 300 of the 1,965 members atEvery single person there tending. All but a few of the 25-Year Club members are retirees now, at had some special memoleast from DuPont and the companies that followed. ries of their days at the Earl Radding, 96, would have to be the dean of the retirees. Earl retired on April 30, 1979, more Seaford ‘string factory.’ than 31 years ago. He was at the banquet, enjoying his many fellow goes, left both their safety glasses and employees from years ago. I remember shoes in the hallway for all to see. bowling in the DuPont League against I remember literally 100 or so funny Earl and he was an avid bowler. stories, and I would like to tell them all, Club membership reached its peak in but for sake of this already being too long, 1994 with Ray Whaley as president with I’ll just tell one. It’s about Joe Hall, a pan2,292 members. Since there will be no el-board operator on the fifth and sixth more 25-year members, membership has floors back in the 1950s and 1960s. Joe declined by about 50 or so members every could always make you laugh, but the year. This year’s president is Dwight Blak- family that got off the elevator on the fifth eney. Next year’s will be Dale Kenney, floor got the shock of their lives years ago. followed by new first vice president, Don- Joe often got wet doing his job and on this ald Tull. day, he had taken off his traditional blue Ray Whaley is the treasurer and Connie coveralls and they were hung over a pipe Keene is secretary. Both Connie and Ray to dry. To greet the visitors, there was Joe have had their positions for at least 12 in his safety shoes, safety glasses, shorts years. and nothing else, patrolling his panelAll these folks are to be congratulated board. That had to be a funny sight. on their efforts to keep the club going. Well, that’s enough. I can honestly say They receive no help from the long-gone that I still appreciate the DuPont Company DuPont Company. — through it I met a lot of nice people, Well, what’s the banquet about? Simply had a steady income and a world of memput, it’s renewing old friendships from the ories. How about yours? DuPont Company — people we do not get to see on a regular basis anymore. Every single person there had some special memories of their days at the Seaford “string factory.” Sitting at the end table with me, at the far end of the fire hall, were Barry Brumbley, David Smith, Bob Whaley, Virgil Allen, Randy Revel, Ed Evans, Jim Dunn, Roger Quillen and Carlton Tull. Our experiences in power house mainB ank-issued, FDIC- insured to $100,000 tenance were part of our stories but we went further back to the old shift picnics. *APY Do you DuPonters remember Cedar Grove, that popular swimming, boating and picnic area west of Secretary, about 5-year Minimum deposit $5,000 five miles from Cambridge? I am sure “A” shift had several picnics there and so did *Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 9/8 /08. CDs are some of the other shifts. federally insured up to $100,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per issuing institution. CDs are also federally Do you remember Santa Claus visiting insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) in qualified retirement accounts per issuing institution. our children at the Layton Theatre, a yearSubject to availability and price change. CD values may decline in ly event for many, many years? And if you a rising interest rate environment, and the market value may fluctuate if sold prior to maturity. The amount received from the sale worked Christmas Day, there was the traof a CD at current market value may be more than, less than or ditional free turkey dinner for everyone — equal to the amount initially invested, FDIC Insurance does not cover losses in market value in these instances. Early withdrawal not too bad either, but as I think about it., may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. You pay no additional commissions, annual fees or periodic being home with family would have been charges. The estate feature allows heirs to redeem the certificates better. of deposit upon the death of an owner at face value, interest earned, subject to limitations, CDs require the distribution of Hank Rowe, Al Simpson and others interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. were our safety supervisors. Follow the $5,000 minimum investment per issuing institution. All CDs sold by safety rules or get “written up.” All Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC) DuPonters knew what that meant. The best Call or visit your local thing was to just follow the rules and it’s funny, many of them we carry with us tofinancial advisor today. day. If we went 180 days without an inMelinda R. Tingle jury, or something like that, we all got a Financial Advisor safety award that we chose from a brochure. Several of those old awards had 204 Laureltowne been stored away and were auctioned off Front St & Delaware Ave. at the banquet. Laurel, DE 19956 No matter what shift you were on, 302-875--0355 many funny things happened, and a few not so funny. How about that new pair of www.edwardjones.com safety shoes we received every year? I imagine there are a few pairs left around. No thanks, I do not want them. A few emMAKING SENSE OF INVESTING ployees left unhappy and they, so the story

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It’s amazing how stories can take on a funny twist to them at a later date. A couple of weeks ago Eddie Downes called me and with great humbleness asked me to thank Rick and Dee Elliott for finding his wallet at Delmarva Motor Sports Track. Now, from an unnamed informer (Bobby Twilley), I hear more to this story. Eddie and Bobby were having a conversation recently when Eddie explained to him that the rubber band around his wallet was so that he would never lose it. He must have intended to keep the rubber band because he sure lost his wallet! People are funny, aren’t they? Messiah Vineyard Church will hold its fourth annual yard sale and barbecue on Saturday, Sept. 20. It’s one of the biggest

yard sales around and church members make it fun for everyone. I’m asking Joyce Vincent to save me a scrapple sandwich and a cup of TJ’s iced tea — it’s great. See you there. Oh yes, Joyce is a member of the Laurel High School class of 1963, which will hold its 45th year reunion that evening. A busy day, Joyce. Folks, my watermelon crop appears to be a complete failure as one of my two watermelons was pulled prematurely, or did not get enough irrigation and is no good. We farmers now understand each other a little better now. Have a sweet week, everyone.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Church Bulletins Multicultural services

Siempre Verde, a multicultural, bilingual service is being led by Pastor Luis Almandoz on Sundays at 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall at St. John’s United Methodist Church at Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford. Praise music, powerful preaching and a small meal unite this fellowship of persons of both Hispanic and Anglo origins. Alberto Mendez leads worship on the keyboard.

Ladies’ bible study

There is a ladies’ bible study, held every Tuesday starting at 10 a.m., at Laurel Baptist Church, Bi-State Boulevard. This is a non-denominational study. For details call Gertrude R. Smith at 875-5300.

The Lighthouse

Rebecca Jones presents “God’s Deliverance and Provision,” Wednesdays at 7 p.m., at The Lighthouse Church, 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel. Pastor Timothy Jones provides kid’s church for grades K-6, and a nursery is available. Call 875-7814.

Celebrate Recovery

Celebrate Recovery, a step program which claims Jesus Christ as its higher power, is meeting at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford, on Tuesdays from 7-9 p.m. For details call Rev. Constance Hastings, 6299466, or Robert Spadaccini, 841-1720.

Delaware Right to Life banquet

Delaware Right to Life’s annual banquet will be Thursday, Sept. 25, and will feature Operation Rescue founder Randall Terry.

Terry has devoted his life to the pro-life cause. He has been arrested more than 40 times for his peaceful, pro-life activities. In 2003 he founded the Society for Truth and Justice and he conducted a program called Operation Witness. Most recently Terry published the book, A Humble Plea, written primarily to Catholic bishops and clergy on how to end the abortion holocaust. The banquet will take place at the Christiana Hilton in Newark. Tickets are $50 per person. Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., dinner begins at 7 p.m., followed by the keynote speaker. Contact prolifedela-ware@juno.com or call 302-478-5469 for tickets.

United Faith Women’s Conference

United Faith Believers Ministries, 10771 N. Plaza Road, Laurel, with Pastor Esther M. Henry will host its 2008 Women’s Conference on Sept. 12-14. Guest speakers are: • Friday, Sept. 12, at 7:30 p.m. - Evangelist Ella Purnell of Victory Temple, Bridgeville. • Saturday, Sept. 13, at 6 p.m- Co-Pastor Lynn Mifflin of Power & Love Ministries, Dagsboro. • Sunday, Sept. 14, at 4 p.m.- Pastor Helena M. Bailey of Kingdom Life Family Ministries, Millsboro. For details contact the church office at 875-4285.

Mary and Martha Tea Room

The Mary and Martha Tea Room, a women’s ministry sponsored by Take My Hand Ministry, Inc., will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 17, from 2 - 4 p.m. at 102 Maryland Avenue in Greenwood. Featured is a time of worship, ministry, and a light

ANNUAL HOUSE TOUR - The St. John’s United Methodist Women will sponsor the annual house tour on Thursday, Oct. 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The home above is owned by Christopher and Suzanne Black, 3 Sandpebble Drive, Holly Shores, Seaford. The Blacks’ home was built in 2000. It has a Georgian style exterior and originated from a plan in a Southern Living house plan book. The entry foyer features a vaulted ceiling and oak hardwood floors and opens up to the dining room. The great room was designed for entertaining. It is open to the kitchen and breakfast room. The fireplace is a Count Rumford design. This fireplace is very efficient and was approved by the EPA in California as clean burning. Throughout the home are pictures showing Chris’s love of trains. In his son’s bedroom there hangs a handmade wooden Keystone train whistle. The window treatments were designed and made by Suzanne. A large basement is where Chris has built a scale model railroad that represents a majority of railroads on the Delmarva Peninsula. Seven homes and the St. John’s United Methodist Church will be open for visitors on the tour. A chicken salad luncheon will be served that day from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. The cost of a ticket for the house tour is $10. The luncheon cost is $6 per person. For ticket information call Teresa Wilson at 629-6417.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, D el. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church

Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary) Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S .C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker WorshipS ervices: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Pastor www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road6 8, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 lunch. A freewill offering will be taken for the speaker, First Lady Tyvonnia Bull, from the Seaford area. For details contact Dr. Michaele Russell at 349-4220.

New Zion UMC Homecoming

New Zion United Methodist Church in Laurel will celebrate its “Annual Homecoming” on Sunday, Sept. 14, at 10 a.m. morning worship with messenger the Rev. Timothy A. Duffield Sr.; 2 p.m. dinner; 3 p.m. memorial Service; 3:30 p.m. Guest Pastor, the Rev. Thomas Johnson of Rehoboth/Lewes circuit, along with choir and congregation. Host Pastor is Timothy A. Duffield Sr.

Second Sunday Prayer Service

Pray for our community, families, nation and world. Share what and who is on our hearts. Interdenominational. All are welcome Sunday, Sept 14, at 4 p.m. at the Seaford Presbyterian Church. The next service is October 13. Those who have prayer requests but cannot attend, may call 629-9077 with requests..

Life’s hard questions

Come and join us as we explore some of the difficult questions of life and death, and how we live to the best of who we are and how we are made! “Living Fully, Dying Well” is an eight-week course for anyone, of any faith, who wants to explore how we live the best life we can, even in the faith of mortality. This course will be offered on Thursday afternoons, 1-2 p.m., and on Sunday mornings, 8:45 a.m. If you are busy on Sunday mornings, sign up for the Thursday afternoon. Call Seaford Presbyterian Church 629-9077, to register before Sept 15. $10 for materials.

St. John’s UMC House Tour

The annual St. John’s house tour will be held on Thursday, Oct. 2, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. The cost for a ticket is $10. Seven homes and St. John’s Church will open their doors for the day. The ladies of the church will serve a chicken salad luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. for an additional fee. There will also be a boutique opened in Fellowship Hall with handmade items and goodies of all kinds.

Fall Mum Sale

St. Luke’ Episcopal Church is once again sponsoring a Fall Mum Sale. Plants are $4.50 each and are in your choice of pink, bronze, red, burgundy or white and yellow daisy mums. Mums are to be picked up Saturday, Sept. 20, between 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at Jackson-Hewitt Office at the Nylon Capital Shopping Center. Mums can be ordered by contacting any St. Luke’s member, the church office

New Gospel CD: ‘Beside the Still Waters’ Tony Windsor’s brand new Gospel CD compilation is on sale now. Tony sings songs of faith and inspiration including “The Angels Cried,” “Everlasting Arms,” “I Saw the Light” and much more. Get your copy at the Star office for only $6.00 [includes $1.00 donation to NIE (Newspapers in Education) program].

Call: 302-236-9886

PAGE 27

at 629-7979 between the hours of 9:30 a.m. to noon, Monday through Thursday, or by calling Nancy Harper at 629-7272

Wesley Fun-d Day

Fourth annual Wesley Fun-d Day, Saturday, Sept. 20, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wesley United Methodist Church, Atlanta Road, Seaford. Oyster fritter sandwiches, homemade ice cream, silent auction, dunking booth, pony rides, moon bounce, games and snow cones.

Woodland UMC dinner

The women of the Woodland United Methodist Church will serve a Chicken and Dumpling dinner on Saturday, Sept. 20, at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Cost is adults, $10; children 6-12 years old, $4; 5 years and under are free. Woodland Church is located 4.5 miles west of Seaford next to the Woodland Ferry house. No carry-outs. For additional information call 629-5404 or 629-4662.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Memorial services are planned for Dr. James Robert Carmean Dr. James Robert Carmean, “Doc” of Laurel, passed away on Friday Aug. 29, 2008 at his home. He was 71. Dr. Carmean was a retired Dentist serving the surrounding communities for over 43 years. Memorial contributions can be made to: Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963 or the American Cancer Society PO Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718. Memorial Service will be held Friday, September 26, at the Laurel Fire Hall, at 2 p.m. Friends may visit prior to that time.

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Church School -All Ages - 9:15 a.m. Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Rev. Rick Elzey Wings of Prayer - Tues. 7:00 p.m. Come Join Our Family

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward J. Laremore, Senior Pastor David A. Krilov, Associate Pastor

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755 Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:30 AM • Sunday School 9:30 AM • Traditional Worship 11 AM

ROCK CHURCH

Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids through Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12); DivorceCare; 7:00 Prayer Meeting Kidstuf 103 (K-6 and their parents, 1st & 3rd Wednesday)

30320 Seaford Road, Laurel, Del. Ph: 875-7275 • Pastor Bill Konkel Sunday School: 9a .m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. & 1st & 3rd Sunday Evening: 5 p.m. Thurs Evening Prayer: 7p .m.

COKESBURY CHURCH

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

T on y W in d sor

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Mount Olivet

Besid e the StillW aters

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302- 875-4646

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

Spirituality of Nanticoke Indians

The Nanticoke Indians have lived on Delmarva for more than 400 years, originally along the waterways of the peninsula. Today, the area in which they live has changed significantly, but they are still connected to the land and strive to preserve their native traditions. The Nanticoke Tribe remains a vital part of the region. Seekers, Spiritual Treasures at St. Peter’s Square, is pleased to present Odette Wright on Sept. 13, in St. Peter’s Parish Hall, 211 Mulberry St., Lewes, from 10 a.m. until noon. Wright will discuss the history and spirituality of the Nanticoke Tribe. For more information on this topic and others, visit www.seekerslewes.com, or call 645-9916.

Messiah’sV ineyard Church

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’sP astor:M arilyn Searcey

629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


PAGE 28

Obituaries Levin N. Dickerson, Sr., 92

Levin N. Dickerson, Sr., of Claymont, passed away peacefully on Saturday, Aug. 30, 2008, at home. Mr. Dickerson was born and raised in Laurel, a son of Herman and Ethel Dickerson and made Claymont his home for Levin Dickerson Sr. the past 60 years. He was a graduate of Laurel High School and Goldey Commercial College. He was a longtime and faithful member of Chester Bethel United Methodist Church, where he served in many capacities over the years. Mr. Dickerson served his country proudly as a member of the US Army Air Force during World War II, serving in Germany. He was an expediter for Phoenix Steel, Claymont, for 42 years, retiring in 1983. He enjoyed gardening, travel and fishing. He was a “fanatical” Phillies’ fan and he was an extraordinary shopper and coupon clipper. Levin will best be remembered for the family man he was. His heart belonged to his family as he loved and cared for them. Levin’s beloved wife of 49-1/2 years, Maxine S. Dickerson passed away in 1989. He was also predeceased by his sons, Levin N. Dickerson, Jr., and James E. Dickerson; grandson, Franklyn Boardman, III; brothers, James Dickerson and Everett Dickerson; and sisters, Pauline Ralph, Helen Elliott and Mae Oliphant. Mr. Dickerson will be dearly missed by his son, Jay A. Dickerson of Claymont; daughter, Iva J. Boardman of Wilmington; grandchildren, Klair Bendorf, Gale Ziegler, and Krystal Dickerson; and greatgrandchildren, Chelsea Bendorf, Whitney Bendorf, Chandler Bendorf and Noah Ziegler. Services were September 9 at Chester Bethel United Methodist Church with interment in Chester Bethel Cemetery. A donation is suggested to Chester Bethel United Methodist Church, 2619 Foulk Road, Wilmington, DE 19810.

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

Jeremy Harris and Wyatt Galloway; a brother, Fred Ross and his wife Lucy of Wilmington; and a sister-in-law, Mae Ross of Wilmington. Several nieces and nephews also survive him. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, Delmar, on September 5. Interment followed in St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar. The family suggests contributions be made to St. Francis de Sales Church, 514 Camden Ave., Salisbury, MD 21801. Arrangements were in the care of Short Funeral Home in Delmar.

Arthur Vincent Griffies, Sr., 68

Arthur Vincent Griffies, Sr., of Seaford died Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2008, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. Born in Birmingham, Ala., he was a son of Kathryn Rockhill and Clem Chester Griffies, who predeceased him. He was a representative for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, out of Washington, DC. He was a member of the Woodland United Methodist Church and past president of the Woodland Ferry Association. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn Bibb Griffies; two sons, Arthur V. Griffies, Jr, of Pasadena, Md. and Jeff A. Griffies, of Woodland; a daughter, Terri A. Schnetzler of Bowie, Md.; a brother, Carl Dean Griffies of Birmingham, Ala.; and a sister

Carol L. Gilligan, 54

Carol L. Gilligan passed away suddenly Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2008, at Christiana Hospital. “Christmas Carol” was born December 24, 1953 in Milford. She was raised in Bridgeville, and never forgot her Bridgeville “roots.” Mrs. Gilligan graduated in 1971 from Woodbridge High School, where she was elected the Homecoming Queen. She later received her degree in Criminal Justice from Delaware Tech College. Mrs. Gilligan worked for many years in the automobile business as an administrative assistant. She was personal assistant to Norman and Marcella Loebensberg, former owners of numerous auto dealerships in the New Castle area. She was also the vice president of Auto Wholesale Corporation. She was a volunteer with Meals on Wheels. She had many varying interests including golfing, knitting, gardening, and spending summers in Sea Isle City, N.J. She was the beloved daughter of William S. and Marie Waters Hastings. Mrs. Gilligan is survived by her husband and friend, Tom Gilligan; sister, Linda and her husband Dave Elliott, of Federalsburg, Md. She is the loving aunt of Lisa and her husband Tim Weigard, Bryan and Jody Elliott. Beloved niece of Margaret “Bootsy” and Ronald Sipple of Bridgeville. She is the daughter-in-law of Margaret Gilligan of Philadelphia, and sister-in-law of Bill and Julie Gilligan of Media, Grace Glennon, Marjorie McCann, and Paula Campbell and John Witmer, all of Philadelphia. Numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and her “Best Friend” Dyanne Gerhardt of Wilmington

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 HandicapF riendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

Dominick A. Ross, 82

Dominick A. Ross of Fairfax, Va., and formerly of Delmar, died Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2008, at The Virginian in Fairfax. He was born on May 11, 1926 in Delmar, a son of Tony Ross and Christina Thomas Ross, who predeceased him. Mr. Ross was a farmer for many years and a founding member of Holy Redeemer Catholic Church in Delmar. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a brother and sister-inlaw, Lewis and Clara Ross; a brother, Frank Ross; and a sister, Lydia DiRocco. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Margaret B. Ross; two sons, Stephen A. Ross of York, Pa., and Marty Ross and his wife Chris of Delmar; a daughter, Mary R. Hacker and her husband Dan of Fairfax, Va.; six grandchildren, Andy Ross, Katie Galloway and Tami Harris, Michael D. Ross, Ray Hacker and Kevin Hacker; four great-grandchildren, Alex Ross, J.D. Ross,

Mary Emma Yarbrough of Trussville, Ala.; seven grandchildren, Chris, Kaliegh, Doug, Thompson, Savannah, Wes and Annabelle. Services were September 6 in Woodland United Methodist Church. The Rev. Richard Bridge officiated. Burial followed in the church cemetery.

also survive her. Services were held on Saeptember 6 at McCreery Memorial Funeral Home, Wilmington. Memorial contributions may be sent to Delaware Foundation Reaching Citizens, 640 Plaza Drive, Newark, DE 19702.

Mary Burton Cooper, 79

Mary Burton Cooper of Seaford, formerly of Greenwood, died Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2008, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Born in Seaford, the daughter of Samantha Drumm and Verl Thomas Burton, she was bookkeeper for the former Baltimore Trust of Bridgeville. She was a lifelong member of Cannon United Methodist Church, Cannon, and a member of the Ladies of the Moose, Harrington Lodge. Beside her family, she was proud of being a retiree of Baltimore Trust Company. She also enjoyed serving her friends at Seaford Bowling Lanes and Dunkin’ Donuts. In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her husband Wesley O. Russom; her brothers, Paul, Charles F., Joseph E., Walter D., and George R. Burton; and an infant daughter, Nancy Fay. She is survived by a daughter, Jessie Lee Dodson and husband James of Northport, Fla.; a son, Thomas C. Lahman and wife Suzanne of Preston. Md.; nine grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren and seven great-great-grandchildren. Services were September 7 in WatsonYates Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford. The family requests contributions to Alzheimer’s Association, Delaware Valley Chapter, 399 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19186.

Edward J. Twilley, 90

Edward J. Twilley of Salisbury, died Thursday, Sept. 4, 2008, at Anchorage Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Salisbury. He was born Sept. 19, 1917, in Salis-

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… When words are not enough, choose from our elegant selection of floral arrangements.

John’s Four Season’s Flowers & Gifts

Stein Hwy. at Reliance, John Beauchamp 302

629-2644

410-754-5835

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701B ridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 bury, a son of Norman and Amy (Adkins) Twilley, who predeceased him. Mr. Twilley was a member of St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church in Delmar. He loved his life as a farmer and owned and operated a TV repair business for many years. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death Edward Twilley by his wife, Edna Mae Ellis Twilley, whom he married in 1945, and who passed in 2004. He is survived by a daughter, Joyce Twilley Hovatter and her husband, Elston “Jerry” Hovatter, Jr.; a grandson, Jason, and his wife, Arrowyn; a great-granddaughter, Manzanita; a sister, Rachel Adkins; and two nephews, Robert Adkins and Raymond Adkins. He is also survived by four very special Chihuahuas. A graveside service was held September 7 at Laurel Hill Cemetery in Laurel. The Rev. Marsha Carpenter officiated. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to: Humane Society of Wicomico County, 5130 Citation Drive, Salisbury, MD 21804.

David George Johnson, 57

David George Johnson of Seaford died Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2008, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Mr. Johnson was born on Feb. 7, 1951 in Milford, a son of the late George A. Johnson and Louise Petrovich Johnson of

Seaford. He was in the US Army from 1969-1971. Mr. Johnson worked as a electrician with the Mundy Company at Invista in Seaford. He loved deer and duck hunting, golfing and fishing. He was a member of the American Legion Post in Seaford. Besides his mother he is survived by his wife, Diana Lynn Johnson; one daughter, Bonnie Lynn Ketlz Johnson, and a grandson, Braydon Ketlz of Mechanicsburg, Pa; two brothers, Daryl Johnson of Indiana, Pa., and Duane Johnson of Lincoln; two sisters, Denise Thornsberry and Diane Johnson, both of Seaford; many nieces and nephews; two step-daughters, Jennifer Boland of Laurel and Melissa M. Moss of Lincoln; and two step-granddaughters, Naomi Bonneville and Skye Passwaters. Services were September 8. Arrangements were handled by Fleischauer Funeral Home, West Market Street, Greenwood.

Alice S. McCauley, 100

Alice S. McCauley of Seaford, died Thursday, Sept. 4, 2008, in the Methodist Manor House, two weeks after celebrating her 100th birthday. Born Aug. 21, 1908 in Preston, Md., Alice F. Schulke married Charles E. McAlice McCauley Cauley in 1934. After living in Milford for two years, they

moved to Newark, where they resided until 1951, relocating to Catonsville, Md. for three years. Returning to Delaware in 1954, the remainder of their lives was spent in Seaford. Alice devoted her life to being a mother and homemaker. She was a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church and enjoyed gardening, sewing and cooking. She and her husband enjoyed traveling, and took trips to Ireland, England, Germany, Canada and the western United States. She leaves her two sons, Charles E. Jr. of Indian Lake, Pa., and William L. of Ellicott City, Md.; four grandsons and nine great-grandchildren. Burial was private. Arrangements were handled by Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

Paul E. Hudson, 65

Paul E. Hudson of Mardela Springs died Sunday, Sept. 7, 2008 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. He was born on July 3, 1943 in Millsboro, a son of Calvin and Alice Phillips Hudson, who predeceased him. Paul Hudson Mr. Hudson retired from the DuPont Company in Seaford after 40 years of service. He was an avid outdoorsman and a bow hunter. He was a sports enthusiast and a dedicated follower of Mardela High School basketball teams and the Maryland Terrapins.

PAGE 29 He is survived by his wife, Claudia Hudson; a daughter, Tania Hudson-Reeder and her husband, G. David Reeder, and their daughter, Evelyn; a son, Bradley Paul Hudson and his wife Michelle Hudson, and their children, McKinley and Ava, all of Mardela Springs; a Godson, Stan Bradley and his wife, Jennifer, and their son, Carter, of Laurel; a brother, Charles Hudson and his wife, Nancy, of Millsboro; a sister, Phyllis Majors and her husband, George, of Delmar; a brother, Phil Hudson and his wife, Lois, of Millsboro; a brother, Jimmy Hudson and his wife, Ruthie, of Millsboro; a sister, Lois Ward and her husband, Norris, of Clinton, Md.; and a sister, Iris Furrow and her husband, Marty, of Bramwell, W.Va.; father-in-law, Joseph Layton Sr. of Mardela Springs; and sistersin-law and brothers-in-law, Sylvia Bradley of Laurel, Buddy and Laura Layton of Vienna, Md., Carol and Willis Robinson of Sharptown, Frannie and Ed Hearthway of Salisbury, and Jay Walker of Sharptown. He also has an extended loving family of nieces and nephews and is fondly remembered by many Mardela High School students. A visitation for family and friends was held Tuesday evening at the Short Funeral Home, Delmar. A funeral service was held on Wednesday, Sept. 10, in the Emmanuel Wesleyan Church, Salisbury, Md. The Rev. Marty Furrow officiated. The interment was private. A reception celebrating Paul’s life was held immediately following the service. Contributions may be sent to the Mardela High School Athletic Department, P.O. Box A, Mardela Springs, MD 21837, or to Coastal Hospice at the Lake, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, MD 21804.

Donald A. Baker, Sr. 7-29-59 to 9-16-01

“ExclusiveD ealer”

Family Owned & Operated Serving Delmarva since “1869”

On this day we’ll remember your great smile, the crazy ways of making us laugh, that gentle side that not many saw, your excitement on race day — things that we think of and miss the most. We miss you more than any words could ever say.

Diane, Donnie, Chas, Lil’ Eddie, Robbie, Robert, Rocky, “Destiny”, Lil’ Donnie, Lily, Bryan and Cam

Wm. V. Sipple & Son Main Office and Display 300S. Rehoboth Blvd., Milford,D E 302-422-4214 AreaR epresentative: Hannigan, Short & DisharoonF .H.

302-875-3637 1-800-673-9041


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Entertainment Local man plans to send some 'mud' over to troops By Tony E. Windsor Joe Hearn is over 50 years old, but still loves playing in the mud. For six years he has owned and operated “Dodge City, The Mud Hole,” just south of Seaford. Home to twice monthly “mud hops,” Dodge City has been designed to give four-wheel drive vehicles and their drivers a real run for the money. In what some business people would call unorthodox, Hearn holds his Dodge City Mud Hops and does not charge an admission or registration fee. The hand written sign that greets patrons as they enter the mud hop obstacle course states, “If you don’t sign in, you don’t get in.” “All I ask is that people sign in so I can keep track of who is on the property. I have done this for six years and only once have I ever had to put somebody out because they wanted to get a little rowdy,” Hearn said. “The people that come here are all ages and if they’re not driving the trucks, they love to just watch the mud fly.” The role of the spectators is what gave Hearn an idea for a special project he is now involved in to support the military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. While reading four-wheel drive industry magazines, Hearn saw photos of troops in Iraq driving their Army vehicles through the mud in a makeshift mud hop of their own. “These guys in the military love to play in the mud too,” he said laughing. “I thought it would be a great idea if I could send them a little taste of home, so I video taped our mud hops here at Dodge City.” Hearn is now taking the videos and transferring them to a DVD format and plans to mail 150 DVDs to troops in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He is also working with a local veterans group on a plan to also send the DVDs to veteran’s hospitals throughout the region. “We owe these men and women who have fought for our country,” he said. “If

it wasn’t for them, we couldn’t do the things we do. I decided I wanted to do something to say ‘thank you’ and this is what I want to do.” Throughout the main area of Dodge City’s “Mud Hole” track there are hand made signs which share some of Hearn’s philosophy. One sign reads, “You be you and let me be me.” Then there is the sign located directly facing patrons as they enter the complex, which sends a “thank you” message out to the troops serving overseas. Hearn, who worked for the DuPont Company for 13 years, has also worked extensively in construction. Today he enjoys wandering about his acres of woodlands and spending the lion’s share of his days preparing the “Mud Hole” for the twice a month events. Perhaps it is the “Dodge City Jail House” sign that hangs over one of the buildings on the mud hop grounds, but Hearn says trouble is not part of the sixyear tradition of the mud hop. “We have this place filled with trucks and people,” he said. “But, I never get any complaints about noise. The people that come here also respect Dodge City,” so there is nothing but a good time going on.” Hearn has three four-wheel drive trucks of his own, but a serious construction accident while he was working in Ocala, Fla., prevents him from running the trucks through the mud hop course.

Joe Hearn and The Dodge City Mud Hop crew is shown at "The Mud Hole". (Left to right): Joe Hearn, Dean Greener, Ruth Ann Wagner, Jimmy Justice, Paul Fleetwood, John Littleton and Matt Bowser. Photo by Tony Windsor

www.CountyBankDel.com

10 M on th C ertificate of D eposit

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Food drive at next mud hop

On Sunday, Sept. 14, Dodge City’s Mud Hole will be operating in support of a local church canned good drive. Everyone who comes to the complex must have a canned good to get in the gate. “I love this,” Hearn says with a big smile. “I love that I can have this much fun and help people at the same time.” The Dodge City Mud Hole is located on Dilliards Road, just west of Airport Road, between Seaford and Laurel.

A n n ual P ercen tage Y ield 18 M on th C ertificate of D eposit

4.04% * A n n ual P ercen tage Y ield

Community Concert drive The volunteer workers of the Seaford Community Concert Association are holding their 2008-09 membership drive. To celebrate 60 years of bringing top-notch professional concerts to the area, there will be six concerts. They are: • Pavlo, guitarist and singer on Oct. 14 • Tribute to Benny Goodman, Oct. 28 • Dale Gonyea, pianist and humorist, Jan. 17 • Bronn and Katherine Journey, Harpist and vocalist, March 12 • Side Street Strutters, a jazz ensemble, April 3 • Mantini Sisters, vocalists, April 20 All concerts are held at the Seaford High School. The membership campaign will end on September 27. For further information call Allan Kittila at 629-6184 or Mary Ann Torkelson at 228-6097.

B ank locally. B ring your m oney around full circle. Your hard-earned deposits at County Bank are invested locally to keep our region vibrant and our economy strong. When you bank with us, your investment comes around full circle. It not only earns you a great return, but also helps make southern Delaware an even better, stronger, and healthier place to live. Member FDIC

*Penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. *Rates effective as of date of publication and are subject to change without notice. *Minimum balance $500.

Rehoboth

Long Neck

Milford

Seaford

Millville

Georgetown

226-9800

947-7300

424-2500

628-4400

537-0900

855-2000

Laurel

Lewes

Milton

877-5000 645-8880 684-2300


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Exhibition ‘Between Fences’

The Seaford Historical Society in cooperation with the Delaware Humanities Forum will open the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition “Between Fences” on Friday, Sept. 19, at 11 a.m. on the steps of the Seaford Museum. This exhibit, a part of the Museum on Main Street project, explores the multiple meanings behind this everyday item. Whether made of split rails, decorative white pickets, chain links or concrete, a fence conveys information about the people who built it, how they view and use their property and the nature of their relations with their neighbors as at our country’s border’s with Canada and Mexico. Different exhibits pertaining to fences will be on display in the Seaford Museum each of the eight weeks the Smithsonian exhibit is in place. At the time of the opening, photographs of fences in Seaford and surrounding area will be shown. Local photographers whose work will be there are: Connie and Jerry Chapman, Karen Messick, Doug Miller, Neil Edgell, Jr. and Monica Nagy. Dignitaries from city, county and state will be taking part in the opening ceremony. The public is invited. There is no admission fee for this exhibit. Light refreshments will be served. The Museum is open Thursday through Sunday 1 to 4 p.m.

Victorian Tea at Ross Mansion

The Seaford Historical Society’s annual fall Victorian Tea will be held on Saturday, Oct. 18 , at 2 p.m., at the Ross Mansion on Ross Station Road (formerly North Pine Street Extended). This event is reminiscent of the preCivil War days when Governor Ross’s wife entertained her friends with a lavish display of “savories” and sweets. Jeanne Conner does extensive research on Victorian era recipes and plans a different menu for each tea. Volunteers cook the preparations as directed by Conner. Volunteers dressed in period gowns will serve tea. Guests may tour the 13-room mansion and the outbuildings, including the only original slave cabin in Delaware in its original location. Seating is arranged in tables of four people each. Reservations in multiples of two are required and may be made by calling Ruthe Wainwright at 6298765. Tickets are $10 per person. Seating is limited to 40 people.

Beach Day 2008

On Friday, Sept.19, thousands of senior citizens from all over Delmarva will converge on beautiful downtown Rehoboth

PAGE 31

Beach to take part in the 32nd Annual Beach Day Event. This special day will be filled with events and activities for Senior Citizens from all over the shore. Planned activities include continuous entertainment at the bandstand by performers Cathy Gorman and Sky Brady; a large Senior Healthy Living Expo with over 47 vendors with plenty of giveaways in the Rehoboth Convention Center; and the CHEER Power Walk to benefit CHEER’s Meals on Wheels program. The Power Walk begins at 10 a.m. Register today for the Power Walk (only cost $10) and get a commemorative Tshirt. For details call 856-5187 and ask for Joyce Westen or Ken Moore.

10th annual Nanticoke Bike Tour

The 10th annual Nanticoke Bike Tour, sponsored by Nemours Health and Prevention Services, will take place Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club, 310 Va. Ave., Seaford. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m. and the tour starts at 8:30 a.m. Pre-tour day registration, which includes a custom T-shirt and lunch, is $30; $35 on the day of the tour. Riders can choose from routes of 25 and 50 miles along the back roads of western Sussex County in Delaware and Dorchester and Wicomico counties in Maryland along the Nanticoke River. There will also be a family bicycle ride in the area around the Boys & Girls Club sponsored by the Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition. The cost is $5. For more information, go to www.nanticokebiketour.com or phone Karen Schreiber at 629-8740 or Ron MacArthur at 236-2041. Registration can be done online.

Rocktober Fishing cancelled

The Annual Rocktober Fishing Tournament and Festival has been suspended for the 2008 season. The Horsey Family Youth Foundation and Sussex County Land Trust have agreed that due to the high cost of fuel that it would be impossible to hold this event this year. The cost of fuel this year has put a strain on the economy to the point where organizers don’t feel confident that the fishermen will be able to participate. The Horsey Family Youth Foundation and Sussex County Land Trust would like to thank all of their loyal fishermen that have continually supported these two charities. Organizers hope to return in 2009. LAKESIDE MANOR - LAUREL: Wonderfully cozy 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA rancher in desirable neighborhood with plenty of privacy. Gather on the spacious front porch, or in the private rear porch overlooking the in-ground pool. Come inside to snuggle in front of the fireplace on the beautiful hardwood floors. Lovely updated kitchen with lots of cabinet space. Bonus / Family Room. Storage Shed. MOTIVATED SELLERS! MLS #562766. Only $189,000!! Call Tina Moore for a showing today.

22128 Sussex Highway Seaford, DE 19973 302-628-8500 500 W. Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973

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628-8500 office 536-6017 direct 536-6252 fax 302 381-9882 cell tina@cfmnet.com email 302 302

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PAGE 32

MORNING STAR

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com GIVE-AWAY FREE Grey & white male Bobtail Kitten to good home (half grown). 875-4604. 9/11

NOTICE FOOD & CRAFT VENDORS NEEDED For 1st annual Wings & Wheels Fall Festival in Georgetown, Oct. 25, 10 am - 8 pm. Craft spaces, $40-$50; Food spaces $10$115. 856-1544 or visit www.wings-wheels.com for more info. 9/4 CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that really works! 302-875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

YARD SALE ‘THE ARK’ YARD SALE, Seaford Wesleyan Ch., Sussex Hwy., Sat., 9/13, 7 am til ? $5 Donation for table space. Bring own or use ours. Rain or shine., Hot dogs, chips,, sodas & baked goods. 9/11 EX. LARGE YARD SALE! Sat., 9/13, 7-1. Appliances, furniture, HH,kids, toys, clothes, everything! All gotta go! 30439 Beaver Dam Branch Rd., Shiloh Farms, Laurel. 9/11

GOLF YARD SALE! on Sept. 13, 8 am - 4 pm. All golf stuff, used bags, irons, old woods, shoes, balls etc. 2209 Thomson Pkwy & Elks Rd., Seaford. 9/11 NANTICOKE YACHT CLUB Yard Sale, 9/13, 8 am-1 pm. Tables $10 ea. Call 8757143 or 629-0687 to reserve or for info. Rain date 9/20. 4th Annual X-Lg Yard Sale & BBQ, 9/20, 7 am, Messiah’s Vineyard Church, Rt. 13 & Discount Land Rd., Laurel. BBQ chicken, scrapple sandwiches, mums, pumpkins, crafts, & more. 9/4

WANTED GOOD USED KAYAK & paddle, reasonably priced. 398-0309. 9/4

AUTOMOTIVE ‘02 CHRYSLER SEBRING LXi, 87k mi., new tires & battery, loaded. Why pay more? $4700. 875-5792. 8’ LEER TRUCK CAP, fits Ford or Dodge, $475. 2586553. 9/11 ‘96 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO, great cond., new brakes & more, orig. owner, asking $2400. 875-1778. ‘96 EXPLORER, 4 DR., dark gr., 4 whl. dr., power door locks & windows, V6, 135k mi. Very nice SUV, $3000. 629-4348. 9/4

DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR – WESTERN SUSSEX BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB Qualified candidates sought to fill position which focuses on individual donors, corporations, government, civic groups and other potential sources within the Western Sussex Community. Individual will assist Executive Director with generation of income, marketing and public relations. Minimum requirements: bachelor’s degree, 2 years development experience, strong planning and organizational skills. To apply, email cover letter and resume to: hr@bgclubs.org

RIM & TIRE fr 2000 Saturn, P195/65R15, $35 OBO. 628-0871. 9/11

STATE QUARTERS, 25 rolls, misc. quarters, $275. 628-8761. 9/4

‘86 CHEV. 350 MOTOR, just rebuilt, 30 over w/new carburator. 875-7281. 8/14

AMERICAN GIRL Biddy Baby Doll, $50. 536-7287.

EAGLE TALON Tsiawd rear bumper & tail lights. Honda S 2000 short eng. block. 629-8022. 8/7

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES MINI RACING GO-CART, Quaker State, fiberglass body, 3.5 hp Briggs; 6’ long, $200. 628-0102. 8/28

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS ‘92 TERRY RESORT CAMPER, 25’ awning stabilizer hitch & new stabilizer jacks. Full bed & bunk sleeps 6, Del. tagged till 3/31/10. $3500. 846-0178. 23’ SHASTA TRAVEL TRAILER, sleeps 4, $1000. 875-4485. 8/21 ‘89 TRAVEL TRAILER, 26’, sleeps 6, awking, AC, rear bath, like new inside, $3450. 629-6448. 8/14

BOATS 18’ KAYAK ‘Perception Sea Lion’ has everything - for the quality-oriented person. A must see. $1600 OBO. 875-9775. 9/4 LIVE WELL PORTABLE, includes pump, $85. 3377359, 559-8061 cell. 7/24

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES ANT. OAK SEWING MACHINE Cabinet, $50. 6286953. 9/11

FOR SALE WASHER $120; DRYER $120. 628-1320. 11/29/tnc SCOOBYDOO BOWLING BALL, 8 lb. & bag, $15. 875-4700 after 5 pm. 9/11 RITEWAY WOODSTOVE, auto thermostat, $350, 8754700 after 5 pm. 9/11 DK. BLUE LEATHER COUCH & 2 leather chairs (1 dk. bl., 1 white), 1 end table, 2 coffee tables, 1 lamp & rug, perfect shape, limited use, $850. 8752460. 9/11 2 GOLF PULL CARTS, $50 ea. Nordic Track treadmill, self propelled, exc. cond., $100. 628-5388. 9/11 HEDGE TRIMMER, antique 2-handle manual type, $10. 628-5388. 9/11 GE ELEC. RANGE, freestanding, immac. & mint, self-cleaning, bisque color, $200. 875-1778. 9/11 ROOFING SHINGLES: 2 squares & 1 bundle,a 30 yr. warranty, asking $135. 8750766 after 6 p.m. 9/11 POOL TABLE, used, 3x6, $150. 258-6553. 9/11

TOOLS: Air compressor $125. Sears Best Router, $50. 12.5” surface plane $200. Table top drill press, $75. Dremmel moto shop, $45. Bench shaper, $25. 16 ga. finishing nail gun, $75. More small tools, call 8759089. 9/11 GRILL WITH HOOD, $75. 628-6953. 9/11 ELEC. GRILL, stainless steel, optional w/portable top, $75. 875-5889. 9/4 CRAFTS: Pieces of glass collected from beaches of N.C. to use in crafts. Lg. quantity, $5. 629-5238. 9/4 LEISURE FITNESS Incumbent exercise bike, computerized w/options. $1200 new, asking $400 neg. 6292135. 9/4 ‘70 BOLENS HUSKY 1476 Yard Tractor. Rebuilt motor runs great. 2 blades, belly mower, 3 pt. hitch & chains, $1100 OBO. 628-8761. 9/4 SLEEP SOFA, Hamilton Hill, floral patern, exc. cond., $75. 875-5667. 8/28 SOFA & LOVE SEAT, sage color, exc. cond., $250. Pine Bunk Beds, $50. Dishwasher, good cond., $50. 629-5465. 8/28 SPINDLE CRIB, white, w/ mattress & access., $50. 245-7999. 8/28

15 CRAB TRAPS, $4 ea. or $40 for all. 337-3370. 8/28 BIKE - NEXT ALUMINUM, Tiara DS24. 21 spd. Shimano, new cond., $85. 536-1884. 8/21 LADDER - 40’ ALUM. EXT. Werner, 1A - EX. HD industrial, new cond., $450. 5361884. 8/21 LEAD SAILORS, COWBOYS & AMISH Figurines. $35 for set. Asst. Del. advertisements. Craftsman miter saw. 398-0309. 8/21 GE Washer, good cond., $50. 877-0519. 8/21 TVs: 19” Mont. Ward set, $20. 27” RCA, good cond., $30. 877-0519. 8/21 COUCH & Oversized Recliner, camel color, microfiber, exc. cond., $500. 8753463. 8/21 BEDROOM SET: Full size headboard, dresser & mirror, $85. 2 maple end tables, $20 ea. TV tray set of 4, $15. Dbl bowl SS sink, $20 629-8745. 8/21 OIL DRUM, 250 gal., on legs, good cond., $50. Cast Iron Drag, good cond., $50. Storm Door w/glass & screen, $20. 875-4485. TREADMILL, like new, Cadance 70E. 875-3084. 8/21

$250 GIFT CERT., Nascar Racing Store. Will sell for $75. 629-7674. 9/11 PROPANE/LP GAS HEATER, Vanguard 1400-2800 BTUs, vent free, floor or wall mount, $125. 337-7494. SOFA, 3 cushions, beige, exc. cond., $100. 2 Matching wing-back chairs, plaid fabric, $200 for both. 6296337. 9/11

Help Wanted The Woodbridge School District is seeking a qualified person for the position of:

• Temporary Custodian Location: This is a temporary position with the Building Location and Shift yet to be determined Qualifications: Three (3) years of custodial/maintenance experience in schools or industry, High School Diploma. Salary: $24,946 to $33,555 per year. ClosingD ate: Monday, Sept. 15, 2008. ItemsN ecessary: Completed Application, Resume APPLY TO: Heath B. Chasanov, Assistant Superintendent, 16359 Sussex Highway, Bridgeville, DE 19933 orw ww.teachdelaware.com The Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all applicants, readvertise and/or withdraw the position. The Woodbridge School District does not discriminate in the employment or educational programs, services, or activities, based on race, sex, or handicap in accordance with the State and FederalL aws.

We are now hiring for the following positions for our soon to open club in Millsboro:

Customer Service Manager Receiving Inventory Control Manager Night Manager Bakery Manager Tire Manager Please mail all resumes to our temporary office at: BJ’s Wholesale Club Temporary Office 28632 Dupont Road, Unit 0, Millsboro, DE 19966 Attn: General Manager You may also fax resume to: 302-934-7869 or email to: jobs@bjs.com referencing Job Code BM/197/NA. At BJ’s, we value diversity in our organization, and we are an equal employment opportunity employer.

www.bjs.com/careers


MORNING STAR 2 WOOD SPLITTING MAULS, 16” 5 lb.; 32” 10 lb., rubberized handles, both for $10. 628-5388. 8/21

4-WHL. FUNNEL WAGON, exc., $750. Seed Rye, $13.50/bushel. 349-4874. 8/14

IONIC PRO Air Purifier, 28” high, woks perfectly, new was $100, asking $45. 6285388. 8/21

REFRIGERATOR: Amana, side-by-side, icemaker & water dispenser, cream w/blk. trim 25 cu. ft., $275. 875-2115. 8/14

EXPRESS-IT Beach Chair, Folding, fits carrying case 27” x 7” x 4”, $10. Hedge Trimmer, antique, 2 handle type, $10. 628-5388. 8/21

MATTHEWS LEGACY 28” BOW, 70 lb. pull, hard case, arrows, release, all equipped, ready to hunt, $500. 875-4009. 8/14

WOMEN’S 10 SPD. BIKE, Vintage Fuji, 20.5”, super conditon, updated parts, $60. 629-3628. 8/21

LITTLE TYKES KITCHEN SET with access., $60. 877-0644 Eves. after 7 pm. 8/14

CANON EOS CAMERA 35mm Model 3000 (body only, no lens) w/instructions, $50. Minalta 35mm camera, 3000 I w/35-70 AF lens, $75. Minalta 35mm camera 550 SI w/AF35-70 lens, $50. 875-1877. 8/14

TOOLS: Craftsman CompuCarve Computer-Controlled Compact Woodworking Machine, new in box, $1500 (pd. $1900). HomeLite Ranger Chain Saw in case 33cc $100. Craftsman router table mount, $130.

J AUCTION HOME

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Delta Shopmaster miter saw on 10" Black & Decker bench, $120. 2 Craftsman 11 1/2” w. roller support stands w/ edge guides, $40. Dremel 16" 2-spd scroll saw $165. RotoZip in case $100. Detail Biscuit Joiner 3.5 amp motor 19,000 BTM $65. 632-1980, lv. msg.

PR. OF BLUE INDIA PEAFOWL, plus white peahen, 1 yr. Also 3 4-mo.-old Silkie Polish Chicks. $12.50 for all 3 or $5 ea. 410-8733036. 8/14

BIKES – 2 Roadmaster 18 speed sport SX 26L brand new with tags $60 each. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14

BOAR/NUBIAN GOAT MIX, “Little Girl,” 4 mos. old, makes a wonderful pet. Very friendly & sm size. We raise meat goats & she’s too small for breeding. Great pet! 410-873-3036. 8/14

FREEZER, Welbuilt, $70. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14

HOME FOR SALE

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HOUSE FOR RENT

2 LEATHER SADDLES, brown, great shape, 15” & 16”, $150 ea. 875-8620. 4 BROWN EGG LAYERS, 4 mo. old hens, Austrolorps. Vaccinated & tested for pollurum, $10 ea. 875-8620.

In Seaford, 1 block from golf course. Large house, 3 BRs, 2 baths, lg. fam. rm., Fla. rm., lg. yard, detached garage & cottage on site. $1000/mo.+ u tilities.

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PAGE 33

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PAGE 34 Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-858-2121 or visit www.CenturaOnline.com Mountain Property MOUNTAIN LOG CABIN & 20+ ACRES- $149,900 Sale- Saturday 9/13 Beautifully wooded mountain setting with spectacular new 1800’ log cabin kit. Enjoy private access to Potomac River & C&O Canal. Close to town. Perfect for vacation/retirement. SAVE $10,000 Guaranteed! Ask how to pay NO closing costs. Low rate financing. Call now 1-800-888-1262

MORNING STAR

LEGALS NOTICE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that Heather Baer of Bridgeville, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 9/11/1tp

Real Estate Move or Retire to Delaware and discover the value of manufactured housing. Gated community w/ homes from low 100's Brochure Avail. Toll- Free 1-866-6290770 www.coolbranch.com Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108.

NOTICE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that LeRoy A. Messick Jr. of Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 9/11/1tp

Vacation Rentals OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com. After Labor Day Savings! Deep Creek Lake, MD Long & Foster Resort Rentals Rent three nights and get the fourth night free! Lakefront, lake access & mountaintop homes, condos & townhomes. Pet friendly. 800.336.7303 www.deepcreekresort.com Waterfront Properties FREE DVD & list of coastal NC land bargains. List updated weekly. Call now1800-732-6601, x 2241

NOTICE OF PETITION TO OBTAIN TITLE TO ABANDONED PROPERTY A petition has been filed to obtain title to the following abandoned property: JP19-08-001379, 2003 Mazda Protege Vin: JM1BJ 245X31187236. The petition was filed by: Frederick Ford Mercury, Inc. The following persons have been identified as owners or other persons with an interest in the property: Aaron Edward Piper, 381 Addison Rd., Smyrna, DE 19977; USAA Federal Savings Bank, PO Box 660986, Sacramento, CA 95866.

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

If judgement is entered for the Property Holder/ Petitioner, the Petitioner will be awarded complete and absolute title to the property pursuant to 25 Del. C. §4002 and any existing liens or other interests against it will be void. Anyone with a legal interest in this property may contest the petition by filing an Answer (J.P. Civ. Form No. 53) by 9/19/08 with Justice of the Peace Court No. 19, 408 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Date: 8/26/08. 9/11/2tc

LEGAL NOTICE Seaford Ventures, LLC has applied on September 4, 2008, with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission for a variance to its restaurant liquor license to include external speakers on their licensed patio on the premises located at 22920 Sussex Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Persons who are against this application should provide written notice of their objections to the Commissioner. For the Commissioner to be required to hold a hearing to consider additional input from persons against this application, the Commissioner must receive one or more documents containing a total of at least 10 signatures of residents or property owners located within one mile of the premises or in any incorporated areas located within one mile of where the licensee is to operate. The protest must be filed with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner at the 3rd Floor, Carvel State Office Building, 820 N. French Street, Wilmington, DE 19801. The protest must be received by the Commissioner’s office

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on or before October 4, 2008. Failure to file such a protest may result in the Commissioner considering the application without further notice, input or hearing. If you have questions regarding this matter, please contact the Commissioner’s Office. 9/11/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE You are hereby notified the below applications will be before: The City of Seaford Board of Adjustment and Appeals for their determination on Wednesday, October 1, 2008, at 12:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: V-17-08: DKR Investments, property owner of 800 Norman Eskridge Highway, Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.00 49 is seeking relief from the Municipal Code, Chapter 15 Sec. 1575 Off-street parking requirements. Rommel’s ACE Hardware proposes to build a fenced area for storage of materials which will incorporate six parking spaces. If any of these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 11th day of September 2008 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 9/11/1tc

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PUBLIC NOTICE You are hereby notified the below matters will be before: The City of Seaford Planning and Zoning Commission for their review and recommendation on Thursday, October 2, 2008 at 78:00 P.M., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware; and, The City of Seaford Mayor and Council for their determination on Tuesday, October 28, 2008, at 7:05 P.M., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: 1) Case No. R-16-08: Bradley McAninch, property owner of Tax Map and Parcel 531 10.00 217.02, located on Tull Drive, is seeking a rezoning of 2.38 acres from C-2 Highway Commercial to R-3 High Density Residential. 2) Keith Culver, 517 Bridgeville Highway, Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.19 110, is seeking a final plan approval for the conversion of an office building into a facility to be used for “Head Start” program. 3) Seaford District Library, property owner of Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.00 4.15, Market Street Ext., in Ross Business Park, is seeking a final site plan approval for the construction of a new one-story library, including site improvements. If these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 11th day of September 2008 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 9/11/1tc

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BROAD CREEK HUNDRED Subd. #2007-11 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, OCTOBER 9, 2008, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of DONALD K. MILLER to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 64.79 acres into 5 lots, located south of Road 480, 620 feet west of Road 489. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/11/1tc

NOTICE Estate of Janet C. Hastings, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Janet C. Hastings who departed this life on the 27th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Janet T. Pritchett on the 13th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 27th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Janet T. Pritchett 25418 Alexander Lane Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/28/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Lucile C. McCoy, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Lucile C. McCoy who departSee LEGALS—page 36


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PAGE 36

MORNING STAR

LEGALS - from Page 34 ed this life on the 22nd day of June, A.D. 2008 late of Bethel, DE were duly granted unto Thomas McCoy on the 13th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 22nd day of February, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Thomas McCoy 911 West Street Bethel, DE 19931 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/28/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Pauline V. Williams, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Pauline V. Williams who departed this life on the 26th day of May, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Diana E. Mims on the 8th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said

Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 26th day of January, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Diane E. Mims 2127 Harbour Dr. Palmyra, NJ 08065 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Co-Executors: Elizabeth Star Ayers 6263 Boyce Road Seaford, DE 19973 Mark G. Ayers 9844 Nanticoke Circle Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Stephen P. Ellis, Esq. Ellis & Szabo LLP P.O. Box 574 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE NOTICE Estate of S. Layton Ayers, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of S. Layton Ayers who departed this life on the 15th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Elizabeth Star Ayers, Mark G. Ayers on the 11th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 15th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf.

Estate of Pearl H. Reynolds, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Pearl H. Reynolds who departed this life on the 30th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Linford L. Reynolds on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 30th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Linford L. Reynolds 16790 Hardscrabble Rd.

PUBLIC AUCTION OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE WITH 3 BR/1 BA HOME IN LAUREL, DELAWARE From the Estate of Elizabeth “Helen” Owens

Location: 418 Willow Street, Laurel, Delaware 19956. From the intersection of U.S. Rt. 13 and Del. Rt. 24 in Laurel, travel west on Rt. 24 into Laurel for approx. 0.6 mile. Turn left onto Willow Street and home will be on right (Sign Posted).

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2008 10:00 A.M.

Preview: Tuesday, Sept. 16 from 4:00 to 5:30 P.M. Sunday, Sept. 21 from 2:00 to 3:30 P.M. Tuesday, Sept. 23 from 4:00 to 5:30 P.M. View our website at www.onealsauction.com for additional information and photos Spacious 3BR/1BA two-story estate home situated on a corner lot with frontage on Willow Street and Fifth Street in the town limits of Laurel. The first level of the home features a kitchen with appliances and washer & dryer, as well as a dining room, study, and living room, all generously sized with built-in cabinets. The second level of the home features three bedrooms and a full bathroom. The home also features window-unit A/C, oil heat, as well as an attic and basement with exterior entrance. The property is also improved with a two-car detached garage with a large carport. The property is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 3-32 on Map 1.07 as Parcel 35.00. Terms: $6,000.00 down payment in the form of Cash, Certified Check, or Cashier’s Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal, Inc. Balance to be paid within 45 days when a good and marketable deed will be given. The property is being sold in “AS IS” condition. A 3% Buyer’s Premium will be charged on the final selling price. Seller reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property. Broker Participation invited. Brokers must have clients registered 24 hours prior to auction. Contact our office for complete details. View complete terms at www.onealsauction.com.

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Laurel, DE 19956 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of George N. Walston, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of George N. Walston who departed this life on the 2nd day of August, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Dennis Walston on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the

said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 2nd day of April, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Dennis Walston 28825 Cannon Drive Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek See LEGALS—page 37

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE AUCTION Oct 3 at 5:37 P.M. On-Site

26841 Sussex Hwy (Rt. 13), Seaford Previews: 9/21 & 9/28 1-2 pm

1+/- Acre * Zoned C-1

1800 sq.ft. Home * Full Basement * 24x24 Garage w/ Deck In-ground Pool, Slide & Diving Board, Concrete Surround

Marshall Auction Marketing Co. 302.856.7333 For Pictures, Terms, Details for this & Other Upcoming Auction Events, including a 13-property builder Inventory Reduction Auction:

www.MarshallAuctions.com SECTION 00100 NOTICE TO BIDDERS SEALED BIDS WANTED

Sealed bids for the interior rehabilitation of the Laurel Railway Station will be received at the Town Hall in the Town of Laurel, DE. Bids must be received no later than 2:00 PM EDT on September 30, 2008 at Town Hall, in the Town of Laurel, DE. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud immediately following the 2:00 P.M. EDT the bid submission deadline on September 30, 2008 at the Town Hall, in the Town of Laurel, DE. Copies of the plans and specifications are on file and open to the public inspection and may be obtained at the Town Hall, located at 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, DE 19956 during normal business hours 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday. A non-refundable check for $70.00 made payable to Town of Laurel shall be submitted as payment for each set of bidding documents requested. A bid bond by acceptable surety or a certified check made payable to the Town of Laurel in the amount of five percent (5%) of the maximum bid must be deposited by each bidder with his bid. A pre-bid conference will be held at 2:00 P.M. EDT September 15, 2008 at the Town Hall in the Town of Laurel, located at 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, DE 19956. Attendance is mandatory. The Laurel Railway Station is located behind the Town Hall. Notice is hereby given to bidders that this project is subject to the provisions of the Delaware Prevailing Wage Act and the U.S. Dept. of Labor, Davis-Bacon Act and wage rates for both acts are included in the Contract Documents. Laurel, DE, in accordance with Title VI of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Parts 21 and 23 of 49 C.F.R., notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that DBE will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and that no person will be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, sex, or national origin in consideration for an award. There is no minimum DBE percentage target required for this project. A construction period of six months (183 days) from issuance of a Notice to Proceed (NTP) has been budgeted for this project. A proposed construction schedule shall be included with the Bid package submission. It is expected that responsible bidders shall have a minimum of five (5) years of previous contract experience similar to those that are to be faced on this project. Completion of the statement of qualifications must be included with the submission of the bid form. The contractor and subcontractor qualifications, the proposed construction schedule, and the bid price will be taken into consideration in determining the best value to the Town of Laurel. Low bid is not intended to be the sole determining criteria for selection: Experience of both the prime and sub contractors along with the proposed schedule will also be important criteria in the selection process. The Town of Laurel reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids. William Fasano, Town Manager The Town of Laurel, Delaware


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36 Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware beginning at a point on the northerly right of way of Delaware Route 24 (60 feet wide) said point being located westerly from the westerly right of way of County Route No. 497, a distance of 388 feet plus or minus; thence, continuing with the northerly right of way of Delaware Route 24, South 67 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds West 120.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence with lands now or formerly of James Hastings North 22 degrees 13 minutes 30 seconds West 199.85 feet to a concrete monument; thence continuing with lands of James Hastings North 01 degrees 29 minutes 32 seconds West, 717.93 feet to a concrete monument, the center of a 20 foot wide right of way dirt road; thence with the center of the 20 foot right of way South 69 degrees 43 minutes 00 seconds East, 155.20 feet to a pipe set; thence with lands now or formerly of Alton White South 01 degrees 27 minutes 30 seconds West 618.81 feet to a rebar rod set near broken monument; thence with lands now or formerly of Scott Wingate South 22 degrees 13 minutes 30 seconds East 199.85 feet to a concrete monument, the point and place of beginning, with improvements thereon, being more particularly described on a plant of survey prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Associates dated March 1986. AND BEING the same lands and premises which William Daniel Alvarez, Heir and Chad Michael Alvarez, Heir of the Estate of Belva C. Alvarez by deed dated August 23, 2003, recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Record 2885, Page 51 did grant and convey unto RYAN WALLS AND JESSICA L. WALLS all in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-32-11.0040.06 Property Address: 6859 Sharptown Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by

the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RYAN & JESSICA L. WALLS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: BEGINNING at a cement marker set on the southern edge of East Market Street, a fifty foot right of way, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Robert A. Reynolds; thence with said East Market Street South 73 degrees 30 minutes and 00 seconds East 62.00 feet to a point; thence South 25 degrees 28 minutes 24 seconds East 13.38 feet to a point on the Western Edge of the South line of U.S. Route 13; thence with the said south land of US Route 13 South 22 degrees 33 minutes 12 seconds West 150.00 feet to a nail, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly or Robert A. Reynolds; thence with lands now or formerly of Robert A. Reynolds North 15 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East 150.89 feet to the point and place of beginning. BEING the same lands and premises which Education Awareness Trust and David Chvata, Trustee did by deed dated December 12, 2005 and recorded in

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

the office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3253 Page55 did grant and convey unto Melinda Hughes and Brent Ricketts. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.1384.00 Property Address: 414 E. Market Street, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BRENT RICKETTS & MELINDA R. HUGHES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land being known and designated as Lot number 15 as shown on

the Plot entitled AUTUMN ACRES PHASE II which plot is filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds Sussex Delaware Plot Book 50 Page 54. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Michael Smith Spinella, by deed of RJJ. INC., dated December 6, 2005 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 3241, Page 001. Tax Parcel: 4-30-9.0040.11 Property Address: 13251 Hunters Cove Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL SMITH SPINELLA and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County

PAGE 37 Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, bounded and described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found, said concrete monument being located 250 feet, more or less, from the intersection of County Road #468 (50 feet ROW) and Delaware Route 13A (60 feet ROW); thence from the point and place of beginning and running along Delaware Route 13A North 15 degrees 28 minutes 05 seconds West, 124.64 feet to an iron pipe set; thence turning and running by and with the line of this lot and lands now or formerly of Hollis S. & Mary Marie Wright, North 74 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds East, 327.16 feet to a concrete monument found, said concrete monument being located on the Westerly side of County Road #468; thence turning and running by and with County Road #468, South 26 degrees 16 minutes 31 seconds West, 166.93 feet to an iron pipe set; thence turning and running by and with these lands and lands now or formerly of Daily Markets, Inc., South 74 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West, 216.02 feet back to the point and place of beginning, with improvements, as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, Inc., said survey dated January 6, 2004. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Phillip A. Dechene, Executor of the Estate of Elsie D. Truitt a/k/a Elsie E. Truitt and Phillip A. Dechene, Individually, by deed dated February 2, 2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Record 2947, Page 215 did grant and convey unto ERNEST W. SNYDER, in fee. Tax Parcel: 2-32-12.1433.00 Property Address: 30419 Seaford Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash,

Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ERNEST W. SNYDER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Seaford, County of Sussex and State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob at the intersection of Shipley Street and Juniper Street in said town; thence by and with Juniper Street, South 79 degrees 33 minutes West, 185 feet to an iron spike at the curb base on Juniper Street, a comer for this lot and lands of W.R. Breasure; thence by and with these lands and lands of said W.R. Breasure, South 12 degrees 00 minutes East, 95 feet to a pipe, a corner for this lot and lands of Albert E. Rosenbauer thence by and with these lands and lands of said Rosenbauer, North 79 degrees 30 minutes East See LEGALS—page 38


PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37 175 feet to an iron stob on the southwesterly side of Shipley Street; thence by and with the sidewalk of Shipley Street, North 12 degrees 00 minutes West, 49.80 feet to the iron spike, the place of beginning. Be the contents thereof what they may. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.1025.00 Property Address: 218 North Shipley Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOANNE WESCOTT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit:

MORNING STAR ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred. Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found on the West side of US. Road #13 (200' right of way) a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Sussex Trust Company, said beginning point being 110 feet more or less South of County Road #534; thence, by and with U.S. Road #13, South 12 degrees 42 minutes 25 seconds West 155.73 feet to an iron pipe found, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Star East, Inc.; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Star East, Inc. North 77 degrees 18 minutes 05 seconds West 192.00 feet to an iron rod found, a corner for this lot; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Seaford Properties, LLC, North 20 degrees 48 minutes 52 seconds East 157.19 feet to an iron rod found, a corner for this lot: thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Sussex Trust Company, South 77 degrees 20 minutes 20 seconds East 169.83 feet to the place of beginning. Containing therein 28,162 square feet of land, more or less as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, Inc. dated May 14, 1998. Tax Parcel: 3-31-5.0050.17 Property Address: Lot 3, Seaford Village Shopping Center, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ISLAND DEVELOPERS SEAFORD, LLC and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, being Lot No. 804 in "Northridge" (a subdivision of Woodside Manor") (Ref. PB 6-17) and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob (found) on the West right of way line of Lantana Drive at a corner for this Lot and Lot No. 806; thence with the West right of way line of Lantana Drive South 05 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East 088.00 feet to an iron spike (found) on the West right of way line of Lantana Drive at a comer for this Lot No. 302; thence with Lot No. 302, South 80 degrees 39 minutes 00 seconds West - 148.70 feet to a point at a corner for this Lot, Lot No. 4 and in line of Lot No. 3 02; thence with Lots No. 4 and 6 North 07 degrees 04 minutes 19 seconds West - for this Lot, Lot No. 806 and in line of Lot No. 6; thence with Lot No. 806 North 80 degrees 48 minutes 25 seconds East 151.10 feet to an iron stob (found) on the West right of Way line of Lantana Drive being located at the point and place of beginning, containing 13,192 square feet of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. Del. P.L.S. No 242, Dated June 23, 2003. BEING the same land and premises which Carole H. Tripple by deed dated June 26, 2003 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder

of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2857, Page 169, did grant and convey unto Janet S. Willey, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-31-10.1878.00 Property Address: 804 Lantana Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JANET S. WILLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain Lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, lying on the Southeastern right-ofway of County Road #516 (50 R/W), being more partic-

ularly described as follows, to-wit; Beginning at a point of beginning, said point of beginning being 229' t/- from the intersection of County Road #516 and County Road #525, and also being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Cherell S. Carter; thence from the said point of beginning by and along the common boundary line of these lands now or formerly of Cherell S. Carter South 58 deg. 27' 40" East 165.18 feet to an iron pipe found; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line of these lands and lands now or formerly of Ronald E. Hastings, North 70 deg. 49' 12" West 169.10 feet to an iron pipe found; thence turning and running by and along the Southeastern right-of-way of County Road #516 North 31 deg. 32' 20" East 150.00 feet, home to the place of Beginning, said to contain 0.5002 acres of land, be the same more or less, as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, Inc., Registered Surveyors, on 9/22/97. Being the same lands and premises which David B. Webb, Jr. did grant and convey unto Elva M Williams by deed dated 10/16/1997 and recorded 10/20/1997 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02239PG246. Tax Parcel: 2-31-12.00162.03 Property Address: 24433 Concord Pond Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a

proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ELVA M. WILLIAMS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, together with the improvements thereon, lying and being on the Easterly side of County Road #594, Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe set on the Easterly right of way line of County Road #594, said pipe being 630.00 feet, more or less, to the centerline of County Road #603; thence from said point and place of beginning, running in an Easterly direction, South 77 degrees 19 minutes 31 seconds East 657.00 feet to a point lying on the centerline of Gum Branch Ditch; thence turning and running along the center line of Gun Branch Ditch, South 42 degrees 56 minutes 50 seconds West 150.00 feet to a point lying on the aforesaid centerline; thence turning and running in a Westerly direction, North 78 degrees 51 minutes 15 seconds West 616.06 feet to an iron pipe set on the Easterly right of way line of the aforesaid County Road #594; thence turning and running along the aforesaid right of way line in a Northerly direction along a curve having a radius of 3,113.45 feet an arc distance of 150.00 feet to the point and place of beginning, said to contain 2.003 acres, more or less, said parcel is designated as Parcel "A" on a survey of "Newberg Lots" prepared by Coast Survey, Inc., dated August 6, 1992. The lands herein described are subject to an exSee LEGALS—page 39


LEGALS - from Page 38 isting 50' wide Ingress and Egress Easement per Plot Book 46, Page 204. Being the same lands and premises which Troy U. Hazzard did grant and convey unto Christopher McNeil by deed dated 11/20/2006 and recorded 2/6/2006 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record 03268PG151. Tax Parcel: 4-30-10.0022.00 Property Address: 14429 Oak Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHRISTOPHER McNEIL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hun-

dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with the improvements thereon erected, situated in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being all of lot #4, Phase II, of the Deer Trails Subdivision as shown on the plot of said subdivision recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 25, Page 148. Being the same lands and premises which Robert G. Nelson and Yvonne C. Nelson did grant and convey unto Dennis B. Buckley, Jr. and Lisa C. Buckley by deed dated 1/21/2005 and recorded 1/27/2005 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03094PG123. Tax Parcel: 5-30-13.0089.00 Property Address: 14010 Mile Stretch Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LISA C. & DENNIS B. BUCKLEY, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 West 130.00 feet to the chaser. Also subject to 1 SHERIFF SALE

PAGE 39 SHERIFF SALE

point and place of Beginning, containing 7,800 square feet of land, more or less, as will more fully and at large appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., dated June 30, 1984, and incorporated herein. Being the same lands and premises which Seaford Federal Credit Union, a credit union chartered by the United States Government, did grant and convey unto Robert M. Thomason deed dated 4/7/1988 and recorded 4/8/1988 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK1558PG166. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00100.00 Property Address: 229 Front Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ROBERT M. THOMASON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

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By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situated, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, on the northern side of Tenth Street, more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument located on the Northerly right of way line of Tenth Street, said monument being a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Tracy L. Kefauver; thence running along the right of way line of Tenth Street, North 81 degrees 21 minutes 44 seconds West 80.61 feet to a fence post; said post being a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Conrad Steven Boisvert; thence turning and running along the line of lands of Boisvert North 15 degrees 02 minutes 21 seconds East 49.19 feet to a pipe, said pipe being a point for this lot and lands now or formerly of Roland G. & Amanda K. Ruth; thence running North 11 degrees 14 minutes 39 seconds East 63.34 feet to a rebar found, said rebar being a point for this lot and a corner for lands now or formerly of Craig L. & Christina L. Smith; thence running North 09 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East 14.67 feet to a point in maple tree; said tree being a corner for this lot and lands of Smith; thence turning and running along the line of lands of Smith South 80 degrees 35 minutes 37 seconds East 29.60 feet to a concrete monument, said monument being a point for this lot and corner for lands now or formerly of JPJ Development, LLC; thence running North 80 degrees 46 minutes 23 seconds West 40.40 feet to a concrete monument, said monument being a corner for this lot and lands of Tracy L. Kefauver; thence turning and running along the lands of Kefauver, South 10 degrees 39 minutes 00 seconds West 124.95 feet to a concrete monument, said monument being a corner for this lot located along the right of way line of Tenth Street and being the point and place of

Call 629-9788

See LEGALS—page 40

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Beginning at a pipe found at the Northwesterly right of way County Road 62, the corner of this lot and lands now or formerly of Donald L. Marine, thence, by and with the said right of way, South 50 deg. 53' 03" West 170.00 feet to a point, the corner of this lot and land now or formerly of Eugene H. Moore, thence by and with the said Moore land, North 58 deg. 05' 00" West 957.81 feet to a point, a corner of this lot and lands now or formerly of Leon S. Johnson, thence, by and with the said Johnson land, North 50 deg. 45' 18" East 170.58 feet to a point, a corner of this lot and lands now or formerly of Donald L. Marine, thence, by and with the said Marine land, South 58 deg. 57' 56" East 258.30 feet to the point and place of Beginning, containing 1.009 acres, more or less, and the improvements thereon. Being the same lands and premises which Peter B. Weidlein and Virginia Glanville did grant and convey unto Raymond Charles Coppage by deed dated 3/19/2001 and recorded 3/20/2001 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02573PG203. Tax Parcel: 2-32-15.0024.00 Property Address: 30284 E. Trappe Pond Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Pur-

1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RAYMOND CHARLES COPPAGE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a pipe located on the easterly side of a 6 foot sidewalk on the easterly side of Front Street, 24.3 feet from the centerline thereof and 61.85 feet from the inside line of the sidewalk on Poplar Street, said pipe also being a corner for lands of William T. Marvel, III, etux,; thence with the easterly line of said sidewalk, North 01 degrees 45 minutes West 60.00 feet to a pipe located on the Easterly side of said sidewalk at a corner for lands of Albert Girardi, etux; thence with the line of lands of said Girardi, North 88 degrees 06 minutes East 130.00 feet to a pipe located in the line of lands of lands of Clarence I. Roberts, etux; thence with line of lands of the said Roberts and with the line of Frederica V. Roberts, South 01 degrees 45 minutes East 60.00 feet to a pipe in the line of lands of said Roberts at a corner for lands of said Marvel; thence with line of lands of said Marvel, South 86 degrees 06 minutes


PAGE 40 LEGALS - from Page 39 BEGINNING. Being the same lands and premises which Harry W. Seymore, Jr., did grant and convey unto Michael R. Chorman and Jenna O. Shaffer by deed dated 9/28/2005 and recorded 12/16/2005 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03246PG182. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.1067.00 Property Address: 235 West 10th Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL R. CHORMAN & JENNA O. SHAFFER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hun-

MORNING STAR dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and lot of land lying and being in the Town of Bridgeville, Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described in accordance with a plat prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc. dated June 1, 2007, and recorded in Plot Book 113, Page 271, as follows: BEGINNING at a iron pipe (found) on the northwesterly right-of-way of Cannon Street at 40 feet in width; thence with said Cannon Street South 47 degrees 19' 56" West 113.61 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with the right-of-way of First Street at 40 feet in width North 43 degrees 56' 03" West 56.63 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with lands now or formerly of Freddie E. and Gail L. Williams North 46 degrees 46' 04" East 115.30 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with other lands of Gerry D. Royal South 42 degrees 13' 46" East 57.75 feet to the point of beginning; containing 6,545 square feet of land, be the same more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Gerry D. Royal did grant and convey unto Andre Boggerty and Kimberly Boggerty by deed dated 8/31/2007 and recorded 9/27/2007 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03503P00200. Tax Parcel: 1-31-10.1285.00 Property Address: 219 First Street, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be re-

• SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

quired to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ANDRE & KIMBERLY BOGGERTY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known and designated as Lot No. Twenty-Four (24) on a Plat of Shiloh Woods II, prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., January 15, 2000, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 70, Page 153, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Blue Ribbon Properties, L.L.C., a Delaware Limited Liability Company did grant and convey unto Harold L. Wingate, Jr., by deed dated 4/28/2004 and recorded 5/14/2004 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02978PG279. Tax Parcel: 2-32-14.00166.00 Property Address: 14450 Megan Way, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The bal-

ance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of HAROLD L. WINGATE, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being designated and distinguished as Lot No. 35, Phase II as shown on the plat of Meadow Stream Farms, prepared by Lowenstein, Soule and Associates, Inc., and filed in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware in Plat Book No. 39, Page 335 and Plat Book No. 54 Page 204 as reference thereto being had will more fully and at large appear. It being the same land described in a Deed from James M. Taylor, Jr. to Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife, dated February 13, 1998 and recorded in Book 2266, page 193 of the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same land conveyed from Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife to M. Renee Jones,

sole owner, bearing even date and recorded simultaneously herewith. Being the same lands and premises which Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall did grant and convey unto M. Renee Jones deed dated 10/19/2000 and recorded 10/27/2000 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02533PG202. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0098.00 Property Address: 51235 Line Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MILLIE RENEE JONES, A/K/A M. RENEE JONES (07L-06-005) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hun-

dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being designated and distinguished as Lot No. 35, Phase II as shown on the plat of MEADOW STREAM FARMS, prepared by Loewenstein, Soule and Associates, Inc. and filed in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware in Plat Book No. 39, Page 335 and Plat Book 54, Page 204, as reference thereto being had will more fully and at large appear. It being the same land described in a Deed from James M. Taylor, Jr. to Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife, dated February 13, 1998 and recorded in Book 2266, page 183 of the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same lands and premises which Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. HalI did grant and convey unto M. Renee Jones by deed dated 10/19/2000 and recorded 10/27/2000 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02533PG202. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0098.00 Property Address: 51235 Line Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmaSee LEGALS—page 41


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

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Police Journal Woman attacked while jogging

A 27-year-old woman was attacked recently while jogging on the Woodbridge School District athletic fields near Bridgeville. Police are searching for a teenage boy in connection with the case. The assault occurred Sunday, Aug. 31, at approximately 11 a.m. Police said that the Police composite woman was jogging when the suspect, described as a black male, 15 to 18 years old and wearing a white T-shirt, confronted her. The suspect told the victim that he knew her. The victim replied that she did not know him and continued on her run. The suspect continued to follow her, police said, insisting that he knew her. When the victim tried to run away from the suspect, he tripped her to the ground, police said, and jumped on top of her, attempting to restrain her. He removed his Tshirt, wrapped it around his fist and struck the victim several times in the face, police said. He also reportedly took the victim's I-Pod earphones and wrapped them around her neck in an attempt to choke her. The victim told police that she was able to fight back enough to prevent the suspect from getting full control. She was also able to strike him in the groin area, after which he became dazed, got up and fled into a nearby wooded area. Troopers responded to the scene after a person who arrived to work on the fields LEGALS - from Page 40 tion. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MILLIE JONES (08L-03-037) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

TAX SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Delmar, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County,

found the victim lying there semi-conscious and called 911. Police located the victim and the concerned citizen behind metal bleachers near the softball field. The victim was taken by ambulance to Nanticoke Hospital, treated for injuries sustained in the assault and released. Police searched the area using a dog and a helicopter, but did not locate the suspect. Investigators have been able to create a composite sketch of the suspect and are asking for anyone with information on this crime to contact investigators at Troop 4 at 856-5850 ext 208 or Crime Stoppers at 1800-TIP-3333.

Man charged with attempted robbery Laurel police have arrested a teenager in connection with two robbery attempts. Jeffery Layton, 19, was arrested Sept. 5 around 1 a.m. on charges unrelated to the robbery. After police noticed that he matched the description of the man wanted in connection with the robbery attempts, they charged him with two counts of first degree attempted robbery, two counts of wearing a disguise during the commission Jeffery Layton of a felony and two counts of possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony. The first robbery attempt occurred at 5:45 p.m. on Aug. 31 at the Rite Aid on North Central Avenue in Laurel. Police

Delaware, lying on the north side of and binding on Jewell Street, adjoining lands now or formerly of Paul T. Kinikin and Anna L. Kinikin, his wife, on the east, lands now or formerly of Carl C. West on the north, being known as 103 Jewell Street, be the contents what they may. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING the same lands conveyed to Michael D. McCane and Kimberly McCane by deed from Donald T. Ellis and Bonnie L. Ellis, dated April 30, 2001, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 2587 page 70. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.14123.00 Property Address: 103 E. Jewell Street, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s li-

cense or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL D. & KIMBERLY McCANE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

said that Layton told the clerk to open the cash drawer. The clerk yelled to an employee who was in the store and Layton reportedly fled on foot. The second robbery attempt occurred on the same day at 10:20 p.m. at the Shore Stop in Laurel. Layton allegedly entered the store and demanded money from the register. When the clerk refused, Layton fled on foot. In both robberies Layton acted as if he had a gun, but it was never displayed, police said. Bond for Layton was set at $42,000.

Shots fired on Pine Street

On Sept. 1 at 12:22 a.m., Seaford Police received a report of shots being fired from inside a parked vehicle in the 300 block of Pine Street. Officers arrived at the scene and took James E. Cover, 49, of Seaford, into custody at his residence on Pine Street. Police said that a .40-caliber semi-automatic handgun was recovered from the defendant’s residence. Cover was processed at the Seaford Police Department and taken before the Justice of Peace Court #3 in Georgetown. He was committed to the custody of the Department of Corrections in lieu of $1,500 cash bond.

Woman stabbed man, police say

The Delaware State Police have charged a 45-year-old Laurel woman with second-degree assault and possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony after a stabbing that occurred in Bridgeville, Tuesday, Sept. 2. At approximately 8:20 p.m., troopers responded to a 911 call from the residence of a 49-year-old man, located in the 20000 block of Booker T. Washington Street in Bridgeville. When troopers arrived, police said that they recovered the victim's bloodstained T-shirt and shoes. The victim was transported to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, where he was admitted and treated for non-life threatening injuries resulting from stab wounds to the back and shoulder. Investigators said that the victim was involved in a verbal argument with his girlfriend, Joyce A. Lingham, 45, of Laurel. During the argument, Lingham allegedly stabbed the victim two times with a knife. Investigators located a witness who told police that Lingham admitted that she stabbed the victim during the argument. Lingham turned herself in on Wednesday, Sept. 3, at Troop 5. She was committed to the Sussex Correctional Institute in lieu of $7,000 secured bond.

Wanted man accused of rape

Delaware State Police are searching for a 25-year-old Seaford man who is wanted in connection with a rape that occurred Friday, Sept. 5, at a residence in the 10000 block of Sourwood Drive, Seaford. Saturday morning, a 20-year-old Seaford woman reported that she had been sexually assaulted by Carlton I. Hughes Jr., Seaford. Police said that the woman, Hughes and their 3-year-old child were at Hughes’ residence late Friday evening and became in-

volved in an argument. The two have been in a previous romantic relationship. The victim drove Hughes to his residence, police said, and when they got there he removed the child from the vehicle and took the car keys from the victim, preventing her from leaving. The victim refused to exit the vehicle, police said, and attempted to lock the vehicle doors. However, Hughes was able to unlock the vehicle door with the keys. He forced her from the vehicle and into the residence, police said, where she was physically assaulted in the presence of their son. Hughes then forced her into the bedroom, where he allegedly sexually assaulted her. During the sexual assault, he struck her head on a wall, police said. Following the assault, the victim was able to leave the residence with the child. She was later treated at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital for injuries sustained in the assault. Arrest warrants are on file for Hughes, charging him with second-degree rape, first-degree unlawful imprisonment, thirddegree assault and endangering the welfare of a child. Police are asking anyone with information on his whereabouts to contact investigators at Troop 4 at 856-5150. Tips may also be forwarded to law enforcement through tip lines maintained by Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or on line at www.tipsubmit.com.

Police searching for robbery suspect

The Delaware State Police Criminal Investigation Unit is investigating an armed robbery that occurred on Friday, Aug. 29, at the Shore Stop located on S. Main Street in Bridgeville. Police responded to the 911 call at 11:55 p.m. Investigators said that a male subject entered the store via the side door. The suspect, armed with a handgun, allegedly pointed it at the lone clerk, a 59-year-old Bridgeville woman, and demanded money. The clerk gave the robber an undisclosed amount of cash and cigarettes before he fled out the door. A store video camera was able to capture a photograph of the suspect. He is described as 5 feet 5 inches to 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighing between 120 and 140 pounds. He was wearing a dark colored skullcap and a bandanna over his face. Anyone with information pertaining to this crime is urged to call investigators at Troop 4 at 856-5850 ext. 255. Tips may also be forwarded to law enforcement through tip lines maintained by Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-333 3 or online at www.tipsubmit.com.

Over 900 charged with speeding

During the second month of a statewide enforcement initiative to get drivers to stop speeding, Delaware police issued 99 citations for speeding violations. In the first five weeks of the initiative, police issued 939 citations for speeding violations. In addition, officers made one aggressive driving arrest and issued 83 citations for other traffic violations including individual offenses such as running red lights and stop signs, which are identified aggressive driving behaviors.


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

SCEMS to participate in three day EMS competition in Israel Paramedics Holly Donovan, Stuart Hensley and Jill Wix along with Division Manager Robbie Murray are leaving for Israel to participate in an international EMS competition. The SCEMS Paramedic Competition Team, consisting of three paramedics and one manager has been invited by Magen David Adom Israel, the national EMS system to participate in the three-day competition and symposium. The competition will entail eleven scenarios using actors, simulated patients and mannequins. During the scenarios, SCEMS will be paired up in an ambulance with an Israeli EMT-paramedic and a youth volunteer. Teams will be dispatched to each scenario where they will simulate response, arrive on scene and render care. “This will provide an excellent oppor-

tunity for our paramedics to observe how other EMS systems around the world respond to a variety of patient care scenarios. The scenarios will range from everyday medical calls to seldom seen mass casualty incidents,” said Murray. According to Sussex County EMS Director Luedtke, “Our participation in this competition keeps our organization and community in the national and international spotlight as we move forward with our efforts to recruit and retain paramedics.” Other countries that are represented include the Czech Republic, Poland, Canada, Turkey, Ireland, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Norway, France, Germany and Israel. So far, Sussex County is the only team from the United States participating in the competition. All costs associated with the trip excluding airfare are being paid by the host organization.

Services Sunday for firefighter Alan Carey Capt. Alan B. Carey, 66, of Laurel, passed away at Cadbury in Lewes. Born on Feb. 6, 1942, he was a son of the late Reese and Ester Carey. Mr. Carey was a firefighter for Laurel Volunteer Fire Company Station 81. He was also an active member of the Delaware State Fire Police and Sussex County Fire Police where he served as a past president. He was a member of the Broad Creek Grange and Delaware StateGrange. A member of the Delaware Sheep and Wool Association Mr. Carey was an avid Dirt Track Race fan, operating a tow truck for the Delmar Speedway for more than 30 years. He also operated tow trucks for many NASCAR events, including Dover and Charlotte. Mr. Carey had once worked for his father at Reese Carey’s and Sons Farm Tractor in Laurel and later owned and operated an Allis Chambers Tractor Dealership in Laurel. He is also a member of the 1st State Tractor Club. He will be cherished by his community for his dedication to the local fire companies and as a community event organizer. He is proceded in death by his wife Connie Carey whom passed away in 2005. He is survived by his sons, Aaron

Carey and his wife, Dawn, of Laurel and Reese Carey and his wife, Wendy, of Gumboro; a brother Bobby Carey of Laurel; and a sister, Ann Iremer, of Egg Harbor, NJ; grandchildren, Zachary Carey, Dylan Carey, Amanda Carey, Kassie Carey, Hunter Bensel and Madison Carey, and an expected grandson, Reese Carey, Jr. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. A Funeral Service with full Fireman Honors will be held at the Laurel Volunteer Fire Company Station 81 on 10th Street on Sunday Sept. 14, at 2 p.m. where friends and family may call from noon to 2 p.m. A time of food and fellowship will follow the service. Internment will be in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Laurel. The Rev. Kevin English will officiate. Memorial Contributions may be made in his memory to the Laurel Fire Department 205 W. 10th Street Laurel DE, 19956, to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, P.O. Drawer 498, Emmitsburg, MD. 21727, or to the Sussex County Fire Police Association c/o Ray Collas, 28256 Cannon Drive, Millsboro, DE 19966. Arrangements are by the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, 700 West Street, Laurel.

Open House Sept. 21 st 2-4 pm

Patrolmen graduate from academy The Seaford Police Department announces the graduation of Patrolman James Bachman and Patrolman Toby Laurion from the Delaware State Police Academy’s 69th Municipal Class on Aug. 29. The graduation ceremony was held at Delaware State University in Dover. A total of 21 officers from police agencies

throughout the state completed the 21 weeks of training. Patrolman Bachman was awarded the Outstanding Proficiency in Firearms Award and both officers will begin an eight week field training program under the supervision of a field training officer.

VOTE FOR GREG FULLER

SUSSEX COUNTY CLERK OF THE PEACE

Strong Marriages make Strong Families. Strong Families make Strong Communities. And Those Strong Communities contribute to Strong County and State Government.

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SUSSEX TECH RATED SUPERIOR - Sussex Technical High School recently accepted another Superior School banner from the Delaware Department of Education. Sussex Tech received the accountability rating for maintaining a high level of performance over an extended period of time regarding the percentage of students who achieve proficiency in the English/language arts and math portions of the Delaware Student Testing Program. From left are Principal Curt Bunting, Senior Class President Rachel Southmayd of Ocean View, Junior Class President Kelsey Daisey of Millsboro and Sophomore Class President Brent Scott of Lincoln.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

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Young Delmar varsity field hockey squad looks to gain experience By Mike McClure The Delmar varsity field hockey team, which went 12-0-1 in the conference and 17-0-1 overall last season, has some new faces this year but the Wildcats are hoping for another Henlopen South title and a berth in the state tournament. Susan Elliott is in her first year as the team’s head coach but she has been with the program for the past 15-16 years. She takes over for her sister, Linda Budd, who stepped down to spend time with her family. “I have a good repoir with all the kids,” said Elliott. “They know my coaching style. My coaching style’s a lot like Linda’s. I’m not coming in to change things.” Key losses from last year’s team include graduates Alison Bloodsworth (Salisbury University), Katie McMahon, and Maribeth Beach. The team is also without the services of Mallory Elliott, who is out for the year with an ACL injury. The Wildcats have just three returning starters. “Inexperience will show the first couple games until they get in some playing experience,” said Coach Elliott. “I think

we’ll do OK. We have a lot of aggressive players that are picking the game up. I think we should be competitive in most games.” The team’s returning players are seniors Lindsay Lloyd (midfield) and Shan- Shannon Wilson non Wilson (GK); juniors Alyssa Martin (midfield) and Amanda Campbell (attack); and sophomore Lauren Massey (back). Elliott expects Wilson and Lloyd, who give the Wildcats some experience up the middle, to help the newer players adjust to the varsity level. Massey and Martin give the team added experience, but Elliott may start three freshman in the opener against Cape Henlopen. Delmar’s newcomers include junior Lauren Ruark (attack) and freshmen Carlee Budd (midfield) and Taylor Elliott (attack). “I’m excited for this team. They have big shoes to fill,” Elliott said. “I think Continued on page 46

Delmar varsity boys’ soccer team looks to stay healthy during season By Mike McClure The Delmar varsity boys’ soccer team has a number of key players back from last year’s team which went 8-4 in conference play and 11-5 overall and fell to Dover, 1-0, in the first round of the state tournament. Head coach Greg Cathell, in his third season as the team’s coach, says the health of his players will be a key to the team’s season. “I feel like we’ve got a really skilled team but we’re so incredibly thin that one injury could change the whole complexion of out season,” said Cathell, who is 20-11-1 in two seasons as the Wildcats’ coach. Delmar, which got a little beat up in the pre-season (injuries), has just 14 varsity players but does have a JV team this season. Gone from last year’s team is Jared Rittenhouse (GK/Sweeper). The team’s returning players are seniors Denny Murray (Striker), Cody Webster (Mid), Frank VanGessell (Mid), Tay Moore (Def.), Sean Wilkerson (Def.), Seth Benson (Def.), Mike Bireley (Def.), Seth Figgs (Def.), Adam Mariner (Def.) and Frank VanGessell juniors Casey Bellamy (Def./Mid) and Corey Phillips (Mid). Sean Scovell, who made some

starts in goal for the Wildcats last season, is also back. “We do have some good senior leadership,” Cathell said. “When you bring two all-state players (Murray and Webster) back it’s Denny Murray never a bad thing.” The team’s newcomers include sophomores Thomas Gray and Brady Scott and freshman Roel Dominguez. Also on the varsity team are Carl VanGessell, Levi Gilmore, and Dylan Koval. Delmar opens the season at home against Caesar Rodney. This year the Wildcats face CR, Indian River, Dover, and Sussex Tech at home. They had close losses to CR, IR, and Dover and beat Sussex Tech in road games last season. “When you make them travel here and play in front of your home crowd it just makes it a different game,” said Cathell. Cathell sees Indian River as the team to beat in the Henlopen South while Seaford will also be competitive. He expects Dover, Caesar Rodney, Sussex Central, and Sussex Tech to be tough in the North. But Cathell also believes his team can battle with the best in the conference if it can stay healthy. “We’ve got a nice group. I just really want to see them prove their worth,” Cathell said.

LAUREL POP WARNER- Laurel’s Austin Venables scampers for a touchdown during his team’s Mitey Mite game against the Cape Sharks on Sunday, Aug. 30. See page 45 for more Pop Warner photos and results. Photo by Doug Worster, Delmarva Sports Photography

Delmar football team opens with 35-12 win over St. Frances The Delmar varsity football team held a 21-6 lead at the half and didn’t look back in a 35-12 win over St. Frances last Friday night. Tevin Jackson scored a touchdown on a three-yard run and Casey Bellamy booted the extra point to give the Wildcats a 7-0 lead with 9:08 left in the opening quarter. In the second quarter, Jackson had a 44-yard touchdown run and Bellamy’s extra point made it 14-0 with 8:21 left in the half. Bernie Vaughn completed a 23-yard touchdown pass to Marcus Snipes to put the Panthers on the board with 2:17 left in the half. Delmar answered with a 15-yard touchdown run by B.J. Daniels. Bellamy’s third successful PAT gave the Wildcats a 21-6 advantage going into half-time. Jackson scored his third touchdown of the game on a 15-yard run with 5:18 to go in the third quarter. Bellamy’s kick made it 28-6 before Vaughn completed a five-yard touchdown pass to Snipes with 1:04 left in the quarter. Delmar’s Cameron Mattox capped the scoring with a five-yard run for a score and Bellamy’s PAT gave the Wildcats a 35-12 advantage with 8:39 remaining in the game. Jackson had 20 carries for 209 yards and three touchdowns and Durante DeShields added seven carries for 63 yards as the Wildcats ran for 348 yards and four touchdowns on 39 carries. Quarterback Kevin Forse completed one of two passes for five yards with Jackson making the five-yard reception. The Wildcats play their second of three straight road games this Friday night when they travel to Lewes to face the Cape Henlopen Vikings.

Laurel boys’ soccer team looks to play consistently, eliminate mistakes By Mike McClure Laurel varsity boys’ soccer coach Tony Matthews, in his second season as the team’s coach, is looking for his team to play consistently and eliminate mistakes. The Bulldogs have three returning seniors and a junior along with a large number of sophomores who are out for the team for the first time. Matthews has around 16 players on his team and is hoping a few more will come out prior to the start of the season. While the middle school team has a lot of players out for the team, Laurel doesn’t get many players who come out for the varsity squad as freshmen. “The thing that lets the varsity team down is not having a JV team,” Matthews said. “To get the experience we need a JV team.”

The varsity team is led by seniors Aaron Givens, Lineker Valladares, and Caleb Wilson and junior Marco Hernandez. Among the newcomers, which include a large number of sophomores who played soccer in middle school but did not go out as freshmen, is sophomore Roosevelt Joinville. According to Matthews, many of the young players are athletic but are in need of more experience. There is just one freshman on the varsity squad. “There must be other freshmen in the school that want to play,” Matthews said. One of the main concerns for Matthews is the lack of a returning goalkeeper. His goals for the team are to get a few wins and play consistently. Continued on page 45


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Sussex Tech field hockey team is looking to take one game at a time By Mike McClure

Shown (l to r) are the returning runners for the Sussex Tech girls’ cross country team: front- Brittany Chesser, Paige Collins, Danae Evans, Rachel Crum; backEmma Mancusso, Monica Patel, Dee Carrillo, and Emily Ritter. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech cross country teams look to improve during ‘08 season By Mike McClure Sussex Tech cross country coach David Demarest, in his first year as the Ravens’ head coach after a year as an assistant coach, is looking for improvement from his runners as the season goes along. Demarest, a secondary education and history major at Salisbury University, is pleased with the number of runners he has (18 girls and 16 boys). “Overall I’m really happy with the numbers,” said Demarest, a Sussex Tech graduate and former cross country runner. “It’s (coaching at Sussex Tech) a little different because some of these guys I used to run with.” Gone from last year’s boys’ team, which went 8-1 in the conference and 9-1 overall, are graduates David Ricksecker, Derek Kitchen, and Steve Spera. The girls’ team went 4-5 in the conference and 5-5 overall last season. Among the returning athletes on the boys’ team are: seniors Anil Chandaradat and Mike Metzler, junior Brian Singh, and sophomore Jamie Price. Singh is the Ravens’ top returning runner while Price was the team’s top Anil Chandaradat freshman runner last year. “They’ve got a lot of heart and good

attitudes,” Demarest said of his returning runners. The returning runner for the girls include seniors Emma Mancuso and Dee Carrillo; juniors Monica Patel and Liva Berg; and sophomores Paige Collins, Brittany Chesser, and Rachel Crum. “The girls look really good,” said Demarest. “The girls are in a nice, tight group and it looks like they’re going to be strong this year.” Among the Lady Ravens’ newcomers are seniors Tiffani Savage and Ashley Nicholson; juniors Daisy Wharton, Margo Carey, Danae Evans, and Heidi Perez; sophomore Emily Ritter; and freshmen Lexie Pusey, Rebekah Hufford, and Megan Thompson. For the boys, seniors Chad McMaster, Ryan Faucett, and Andrew Townsend; juniors Brian Donahue and Sam Crowther; sophomore Conor Small; and freshmen Peter Ottley, Nathan Showell, Zachary Veasey, and Ryan Fitzgerald are new to the team. Demarest is pleased with the large number of sophomores and juniors who came out for the team for the first time. “In this sport you don’t sit the bench, you come out and run and participate,” Demarest said. Demarest sees the team’s unity, heart, attitude and depth as its strengths while injuries are a concern entering the season. He’d like to see his runners improve throughout the season in preparation for the season ending state meet. “Ultimately it’s up to the kids whether they want it or not,” said Demarest.

Only the Star covers Sussex Tech sports every week.

The Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team is looking to build on last season’s success (13-2-1, 16-2-1). Guided by head coach Nancy Tribbitt, who is in her 17th year with Sussex Tech and 19th year overall, the Ravens are looking to come together as a team and progress one game at a time. Tribbitt said her young squad is getting better every day and is learning to communicate and play together a team. Gone from last year’s team, which advanced to the state tournament, are graduates Lindsay Danz, Ellen Rowe, and Jara Pugh. “They tasted it and they want to get back,” Tribbitt said of her team’s playoff run. The team’s returning players are: seniors Sara Adams (F), Lauren Joseph (M), Sara Adams Becca McMillan (M), Rachel Springer (B); juniors Abby Adkins (F), Courtenay Rickards (B), Caitlin Stone (G), Melissa Trout (B); and sophomores Maxine Fluharty (F), Logan Pavlik (B), and Abby Atkins (M),

Adams, Joseph, and McMillan are the team’s captains while Stone, Courtenay Rickards and Pavlik lead the defense. The team’s newcomers are senior Jenna Allen (B); juniors Amanda Ritter (F) and Tori Seuss (F); and sophomores Lauren Joseph Leanne Rowe (F), Lindsay Rickards (B), Taylor Kieffer (M), and Kelsey Doherty (F). A number of sophomores have moved into the spots vacated by the team’s graduates. “Everybody needs to take a step up,” said Tribbitt. “They’re positive and they’re looking forward to the season.” Tribbitt sees the Becca McMillan team’s speed as a strength while youth is a concern entering the season. Continued on page 48

Sussex Tech football falls to Milford, soccer game ends in tie The Sussex Tech varsity football team fell to Milford, 36-12, last Friday in Georgetown. Desmond Sivels had a six-yard touchdown run in the second quarter and a 10yard touchdown run in the fourth for the Ravens. Sussex Tech 1, Worcester Prep 1- The Sussex Tech varsity soccer team tied Worcester Prep in a non-conference contest last Friday. Worcester Prep scored on a penalty kick in the first half. Sussex Tech’s Aris Reynoso knotted the score with a second half goal. James Smith recorded seven saves for the Ravens.

ACE OF ACES TOURNEY- The Heritage Shores Ladies’ 18 Hole Golf Association played Ace of Aces on Wednesday, August 27. From left are Joanie Van Oostrom-Phipps (second place Low Net), Ursula Gardner (first place Low Net), and Kay Mooney (first place Low Gross).


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 45

Laurel Stars of the Week

Laurel Mitey Mite quarterback Mitchel Moyer runs for a touchdown on a quarterack keeper during the team’s opener against the Cape Sharks. Photo by Doug Worster, Delmarva Sports Photography

Male Co-Athlete of the WeekTevin Jackson- Delmar High

The Laurel Mite Mite cheerleaders cheer on their team during a game against the Cape Sharks. Photo by Doug Worster, Delmarva Sports Photography

Laurel Pee Wee team opens season with 31-6 win over Milford The Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee football team opened last Sunday’s season opener with 12 unanswered points and didn’t look back in a 31-6 win over Milford. Tarez White had a three-yard touchdown run and Elijah Snead scored from one yard out in the opening quarter. White scampered for a 26-yard touchdown and Snead had a 27-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Snead also caught a pass from Justin Revel for the extra point to make it 25-0. White added a 30-yard touchdown run and Milford scored on a 53-yard run. White carried the ball 11 times for 153 yards and three touchdowns, Snead had four carries for 38 yards and two touchdowns, and Trevon Milton added 31 yards rushing on eight carries. Cole Gullett caught a 20-yard pass from White. The Laurel defense allowed just 15 total yards. White, Ethan Cahall, and Johnny McGinnis each had four tackles; Gullett added two tackles and two sacks; and Christian Ellsworth made three tackles. Leon West recorded two tackles and an assist, Justin Taylor had a tackle and an assist, Ryan Koesters added a tackle and a sack, and Snead and Milton each made a tackle. Laurel visits Seaford on Saturday at 11 a.m.

Male Co-Athlete of the WeekBrandon Hearne- Laurel High

Laurel senior quarterback Brandon Delmar senior running back Tevin Hearne completed eight passes for 178 Jackson rumbled for 209 yards and yards and a touchdown in his team’s three touchdowns in his team’s win over loss to Hodgson on Monday night. St. Frances in the opening game last Laurel hosts DelCastle on Friday Friday. Jackson had 20 carries and a renight. ception to pace the Wildcats. Honorable mention- Desmond Sivels- Sussex Tech; Aris Reynoso- Sussex Tech; James Smith- Sussex Tech; Durante DeShields- Delmar; Casey Bellamy- Delmar; David Albert- Laurel; Tyler West- Laurel

CONGRATULATES

THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477 Laurel soccer continued “If they play consistently and don’t give up any early goals you always have a chance of winning,” said Matthews, who is looking for his team to eliminate mistakes and work together.

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

Matthews expects Dover, with nine seniors, and the other big schools in the Henlopen Conference to be dominate. Laurel was scheduled to open the season at home against Polytech on Tuesday before visiting Smyrna on Thursday.

Laurel Midget team wins 70th straight regular season game The Laurel Pop Warner Midget Bulldogs won their 70th straight Henlopen Conference regular season game with an impressive 39-6 victory over the Milford Lil Bucs. Laurel scored 16 points in each of the first two quarters and held a 7-6 advantage in the second half of last Sunday’s game. Leading the way for the Bulldogs was Tyler Robertson (four carries for 118 yds) with a TD run of 13 yards and a kickoff return of 85 yards. Joe McGinnis completed five of seven passes for 97 yards and two extra points, while rushing for a five-yard touchdown. Shawn Miller, Kegan Yossick and Brandon Scott all scored touchdowns on runs of 12, five and 55 yards respectively. The Bulldog defense held Milford to a total of 40 yards for the game. The Midget Bulldogs will play this week at Wicomico and then return home for a game with their upstate rival Dover on September 20 at 1pm.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Laurel’s Lineker Valladares, shown right (9) during a game last season, is one of theBulldogs’ key players back from last year’s team. Photo by Mike McClure

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

laurelstar.com


PAGE 46 Delmar field hockey continued with some games underneath their belt they’ll come around.” Elliott is pleased with her team’s unity, attitude, and speed on the line. Even though a large number of the Lindsay Lloyd Wildcats’ players lack experience on the varsity level, they have been playing in Delmar’s system since they were in

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 sixth grade. Elliott expects the Henlopen South to be very competitive although she says Milford looks like the strongest team on paper. “The South is pretty even this year,” said Elliott, who has no high Lauren Massey expectations for her team but would like to see them compete for the Henlopen South title and qualify for the state tournament.

Laurel grad Candace Gaull named Washington College captain Washington College head field hockey coach Rachel Boyle has named her captains for the 2008 season. They are seniors Candace Gaull (Laurel) Jaimie Barlow, and Amy Spadanuta. Gaull, an attacker, led the team with 11 goals and 29 points in 2007, adding seven assists, which was good for second on the squad. Entering the 2008 season, she had 12 goals and eight assists for 32 points in 49 career contests.

Keith Sexton and Ben Byrd win outlaw races at U.S. 13 By Charlie Brown, The Outlaw street cars were back in town at the U.S. 13 Dragway on Sunday, Aug. 31. Keith Sexton of Dayton, Md., piloted his ’69 Camaro to the win in the Outlaw 10.5 division and Ben Byrd out of Saxis, Va., in his ’85 Mazda took the Drag Radial final. Other winners on the day included: Ben Parks of Salisbury (Super Pro); Eddie Baker of Salisbury (Pro); James Farmer of Felton (Pro Bike); Doug Sylvester of Laurel (Street Eliminator); Brian Riebert, Jr. of Berlin, Md., (Import); James West of Laurel (Bike Trophy); Paul Riddle, Jr. of Millsboro (Jr. Dragster 1) and Beckie Bireley of Salisbury (Jr. Dragster 2). All Outlaw contests were run at the eighth mile. Keith Sexton faced Darrin Johnson of Salisbury’s ’91 Dodge in the Outlaw 10.5 final. Sexton took the win with a 5.067/138.34 over Johnson’s 5.514/131.57 in the head-up run. Ben Byrd took on Steve Drummond of Laurel in his ’67 Ford. Byrd’s Mazda was much quicker with a 5.272/144.16. Drummond had problems in the semi and could only manage an 8.924/79.90 to finish the runner-up. Ben Parks was matched against John Myers of Glen Burnie, Md., in the all-dragster Super Pro final. Myers had a red light foul and Parks was on his dial with a 7.831/170.77 on a 7.83 dial. Semi-finalists were Carlton Mason of Pocomoke and Mike Hooper of Hurlock. In Pro it was Eddie Baker up against Frank Parks of Denton. Parks had a .004 reaction but was off his dial and Baker took the win with an 11.010/118.29 on an 11.00 dial. Parks ran a 12.347/91.56 on a 12.24 dial. Semi-finalists were John Donovan of Federalsburg and Robin Lewers of Delmar, Md. It was an all-Felton rider final in Pro Bike with James Farmer riding up against Jay Windsor. Windsor had a red light foul and Farmer got the win with a 9.568/133.88 on a 9.56 dail. Semi-finalists were Eddie Savage, Jr. of Wallops Island, Va., and Sean Tilghman of Ridgely, Md. Street Eliminator paired Doug Sylvester against Jessica Haas of Millsboro in the final. Haas had red light foul and Sylvester took the win with a run of 12.190/111.91 on a 12.20 dial. In Import, it was Brian Riebert, Jr. going up against John Harshman of Parsonsburg. Harshman had a red light foul and Riebert, Jr. drove to the victory with a 16.188/87.16 on a 16.18 dial. The red light fouls kept coming in Bike Trophy with Irvin Bonneville of Salisbury leaving too early. James West got the win with a 15.225/74.57 on a 14.99 dial. The Jr. Dragster 1 was a close one with Paul Riddle, Jr. edging Cortney Cathell of Laurel. Riddle had the slight edge at the start and took the win with an 8.923/72.15 on an 8.90 dial. Cathell ran a solid 9.033/74.45 on a 9.02 dial. Beckie Bireley hit a .004 reaction in the Jr. Dragster 2 final and went on to defeat Ashley Parsons of Delmar. Bireley ran a 7.970/80.31 on a 7.95 dial for the win and Parsons ran a 7.977/81.45 on a 7.90 dial.

Laurel Star sports section has its own e-mail address Got sports? Send your sports scores, photos, and press releases to the Star’s sports e-mail address: sports@mspublications.com. You can also send info by fax to 302-6299243. Call sports editor Mike McClure at 302-629-9788 with any questions.

Hill loses power on final turn, Elliott gets third straight win By Charlie Brown David Hill appeared to be headed to his first win of the season in the 20-lap Super Late Model feature on Saturday, Aug. 30 but, as the old saying goes, “It’s not over until it’s over,” he found himself in second as Ricky Elliott recorded his third straight win. Hill started on the pole when Kevin Scott, Jr., who flipped in the heat, couldn’t make the call. Hill looked strong in the high groove with Rick Whaley running close behind in second. Jon Callaway was on the move taking third on lap three and Ricky Elliott, who started in 12th, entered the top five. The battle in the top five was an intense one with Ray Davis, Jr. grabbing third on lap six with Elliott taking fourth and Staci Warrington cracking the top five. At the crossed flags Hill was out front holding off Callaway as Elliott worked by Davis for third. Elliott made several challenges on Hill pulling even in the bottom groove but Hill was able to hold him off every time. The yellow was out for a final time with five to go when Dave Hertz came to a stop. Again Hill was able to stay on top and actually opened about a three car length advantage with two to go. Elliott once again closed going into the final turn. Just as it appeared that Hill would be able to hold off Elliott for the win his engine sputtered in the final turn. Elliott shot to the bottom and took the win by .11 seconds in his Charles Jarvis/Rocket. Hill carried enough momentum to barely hold off Davis for second with Callaway fourth and Warrington fifth. Heats were won by Whaley and Callaway. “Last week I was in the wrong place, this week I was in the right place,” said Elliott. “No, I hated that for David. David is a good customer of mine and his dad and mom are good friends of mine.” The 15-lap Crate Model feature was a caution filled affair with eight yellows. Mike Wharton led the first two laps before Barry Beauchamp moved on top. Tyler Reed climbed to third but then brought out the yellow on lap four. Joe Warren jumped into second on the restart. At the halfway sign the top five were Beauchamp, Warren, Wharton, Kelly Putz, and Mike Williams. Yellows would keep the field tightly bunched. Beauchamp slipped high on lap 11 and Warren moved by to take the lead. Warren survived two more yellows on laps 13 and 14 to take his fourth win of the year in the King’s Crop Insurance/Lazer. Beauchamp finished in the second spot with Putz third. Eric Vent made a late race charge to finish in fourth and Williams rounded out the top five. Fast time in qualifying was set by Beauchamp. Duke Walsen led the first three laps of the 10-lap Little Lincoln Vintage feature. Mel Joseph, Jr. held second until lap three when Jamie Wagner shot into the spot. Wagner took the lead on the next lap and would never look back. Walsen held second until the final lap when Bill Brittingham used the outside to take second. Wagner easily took the win in the ’53 Chevy with Brittingham second and Walsen third. Fourth went to Joseph and Mark Cashdan rounded out the top five. Dylan Betts led every laps to collect his third straight win in the Slide for 5. Matt Carmean avoided a traffic jam on the final lap to finish in second with Greg Nailor, Jr. third. Fourth went to Randy Gray and Shane Phillips rounded out the top five. RESULTS: 20-Lap Super Late Model Feature: 1. RICKY ELLIOTT; 2. David Hill; 3. Ray Davis Jr; 4. Jon Callaway; 5. Staci Warrington; 6. Rick Whaley; 7. Kerry King; 8. Hal Browning; 9. Dave Hertz; 10. Bryan Driver; 11. Derrik Hill; 12. Bob Geiger; DNS: Kevin Scott Jr; Ross Robinson. 15-Lap Crate Model Feature: 1. JOE WARREN; 2. Barry Beauchamp; 3. Kelly Putz; 4. Eric Vent; 5. Mike Williams; 6. Chris Hitchens; 7. Justin Breeding; 8. Jody Cahall; 9. Travis Justice; 10. Nick Davis; 11. Richie Hornsby; 12. Clint Chalabala; 13. Skip Syester; 14. Jeff Swartz; 15. Gus Economides; 16. Richard Harden; 17. Tyler Reed; 18. Michael Wilkins; 19. Josh Millman; 20. Mike Wharton; 21. Mike Wilson; 22. Herb Tunis; 23. Roger Moore; 24. Roy Hassler; 25. Bobby Bayly. 10-Lap Little Lincoln Vintage Feature: 1. JAMIE WAGNER; 2. Bill Brittingham; 3. Duke Walsen; 4. Mel Joseph Jr.; 5. Mark Cashdan; 6. Donald Robinson Jr.; 7. Matt Johnson; 8. John Stevenson; 9. Emory West; 10. Steve Baker; 11. Chris Loveland; 12. Albet Mitchell; 13. Tony Daisey; 14. Bryan Brasure; 15. Pat McNeal.

Seaford varsity football team looks to be competitive in ‘08 Head coach- Darnell Savage Years coaching- one Last season- 0-6, 1-9 Returning players- Seniors Robbie Payne (SE), Spencer Coulbourn (QB), Mykeal Purnell (TB), DeAndre Dickerson (T), Yvens St. Phard (NG), Ross Miller (LB), Marcus Wright (T); junior DeShawn McIvor (DT) Newcomers- Seniors Glenn Blake (FB), Jordan Maddox (LB), and Jamar Brittingham (D); sophomores Jason Owens (TE) and Myron Hayes (TB); and freshman Danny Rayne (TE) Team strengths- strong returning backfield Concerns- getting the younger players to step up Outlook for season- To be competitive in the Henlopen Conference


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

The Laurel varsity football team was unable to rally from an 18-6 first quarter deficit in Monday’s game at Hodgson. The defending state champs put 18 points on the board in the opening quarter with Laurel’s Tyler West scoring on a twoyard touchdown run. West added a three-yard run for a score in the second quarter, but the Silver Eagles added 20 points in the quarter and led, 38-12, at the half. Laurel quarterback Brandon Hearne completed a four-yard pass to David Albert for a touchdown and Kyle Brown booted the extra point for the only points of the third quarter. Hodgson added a touchdown in the fourth for the 44-19 win. West had 21 carries for 99 yards and two touchdowns and Chris Jones ran the ball 10 times for 31 yards. Albert hauled in David Albert seven receptions for 121 yards and a touchdown and Josh Kosiorowski had one reception for 61 yards. Hearne completed eight of 15 passes for 182 yards and a touchdown. Laurel’s Justin Rife recorded six tackles, Nick Munoz had five tackles and an assist, and West and Chris Cutsail each added four tackles and an assist. Kline Valentin chipped in with three tackles and Jordan Brown had two tackles and two assists.

Laurel Star Tuesday night high school scoreboard Field hockey- Polytech 3, Woodbridge 1- Woodbridge’s Kelsey Johnson netted the first goal of the game after a scoreless first half but Polytech answered with three second half goals. Kelli Warner recorded 11 saves for the Raiders. Cape Henlopen 2, Delmar 1- Delmar’s Carlee Budd netted the only goal of the first half. The Vikings came back with a pair of goals in the second half for the win. Shannon Wilson made 13 saves in goal for the Wildcats. Soccer- Delmarva Christian 6, Campus Community 3- Justin Hawkes had four goals and an assist, Tyler Troyer netted two goals to help lead the Royals to the win. Shane Ivory recorded 10 saves in goal for Delmarva Christian. Holly Grove 4, Greenwood Mennonite 0- Jason Swartzentruber had 17 saves in goal for the Flames. Caesar Rodney 3, Delmar 0- Sean Scovell made 17 saves in the Wildcats’ home loss.

Strong start for Seaford boys’ soccer in home opener By Lynn Schofer The Seaford boys’ soccer team faced Sussex Central Tuesday evening in its home opener. The Blue Jays came to play and they played hard winning 5-0. Seaford’s goals were scored by five different players. Obviously very proud of his team coach Tim Lee said, “The boys were strong in every position tonight. They passed the ball, spread the field, and really gelled out there.” Daniel DeMott scored first, followed by a goal each for Leonel Lopez, Abraham Cruz, Aaron Robinson, and Ethan Lee. Oscar Castrejon led the team with two assists followed by Aaron Robinson and Abraham Cruz with one assist each. The defensive wall, led by Joey Mitchell and Tyrek Camper, held Seaford’s Ethan Lee, right, attempts to take Sussex Central to three shots on the ball and prevent the pass by Sussex Cengoal all stopped by goalie Jose tral during Tuesday’s home win. Lee scored a Cortez. Seaford served up nine goal for Seaford in the 5-0 win. Photo by Lynn shots on goal and four corners. Schofer “They know they’re good and they played with confidence,” said Lee. Looking to the next game against Sussex Tech, Lee said they will have to be a little quicker and sharper. Lee wants his team to stay grounded and focused on their game and goals.

Laurel varsity football game ticket prices announced Laurel High School recently announced the ticket prices for its varsity football games. Tickets will cost $5 for adults and $4 for students. The Bulldogs’ home opener is this Friday night.

Laurel Middle School football ticket prices are announced Tickets for Laurel Middle School football home games will cost $2 for adults and $2 for students.

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor Mother nature- Mother nature was not kind to the local sports teams (or the local sports writers and photographers) in the opening week. Some games were played Friday night, despite heavy rains at times. (I’ve got the once soggy notes to prove it.) Most of the Saturday games were rescheduled for other days. Woodbridge had to play Sunday afternoon and Laurel played on Monday. Delmar’s game was even moved up from Saturday to Sunday. On Tuesday the rains came again. Some of the games were postponed while a few were played despite the soggy conditions. As a result of the rain and the fact that I was chained to my desk until 9 p.m. Tuesday night (no, not literally), I’m doing the newspaper equivalent of Rick Dempsey running around the bases with the tarp on the field during a rain delay. House cleaning- Rainy days do provide us with an opportunity to do some house cleaning and other things we don’t normally get a chance to do. I’ll get to the house and office cleaning later, but right now I can address a few things I’ve meaning to write about. First of all, I want to thank all of the Fall sports coaches for their cooperation. We received most of the preview forms and all of the coaches who sent back the forms were nice enough to allow me (or another staff member) to come out to their practices and interview them and take pictures of their players. This is the first year we have tried this and while it is a very cumbersome task, I think our local athletes will be pleased to see their photos in the papers.

I also need to thank all of the athletic directors for taking time out of their busy schedules to meet with me prior to the start of the season. Thank you in advance to all of the local coaches for sending their scores to the Star at sports@mspublications.com or 302-629-9243 (f). You can also leave a message on our machine (302-6299788) with scores, just leave a contact number. New staff members- We’ve been running preview stories for what seems like forever, but I need to introduce our own newcomers. Daniel Richardson is not new to the paper but he returns as a sports writer and prognosticator this Fall. Daniel will be back next week with his picks. I think he was just a little scared to pick his Eagles against my Cowboys this week. Lynn Schofer joined the sports staff in the summer and will continue to cover Seaford high school and youth sports. Unfortunately, she is also an Eagles’ fan. James Diehl has been writing news stories for us for a while, but he is also helping out with sports this Fall. James was my editor at another paper. We have already started reminiscing about the “good old days” at staff meetings. Alas, James is also a dreaded Eagles’ fan. Quick hits- Woodbridge grad Chelsea Collison was left off the list of local grads who are playing Fall sports in college. She joins Laurel grad Candace Gaull on the Washington College field hockey team. Claire Rekitzke, a Seaford grad, is playing field hockey at York College, not cross country.

Laurel Star varsity sports schedules for Sept. 11-17 Thursday, Sept. 11- Laurel soccer at Smyrna, 7 p.m.; Delmar field hockey home vs. Holly Grove, 4 p.m.; Delmar boys’ soccer at Cape Henlopen, 5:30 p.m.; Seaford at Sussex Tech boys’ soccer, 5:30 p.m.; Sussex Tech field hockey home vs. Cape Henlopen, 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12- Laurel football home vs. Delcastle, 7:30 p.m.; Delmar football at Cape Henlopen, 7:30 p.m.; Sussex Tech football home vs. A.I. duPont, 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13- Laurel at Delmar field hockey, 4 p.m.; Sussex Tech field hockey at Tower Hill, 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16- Laurel field hockey at Caesar Rodney, 4 p.m.; Laurel boys’ soccer home vs. Sussex Central, 4 p.m.; Delmar boys’ soccer home vs. Dover, 5:30 p.m.; Delmar volleyball at Polytech, 4 p.m.; Sussex Tech boys’ soccer at Milford, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17- Sussex Tech at Delmar field hockey, 4 p.m.; Sussex Tech cross country home vs. Milford, 4 p.m.

laurelstar.com SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Laurel football team falls to Hodgson, 44-19, in opener

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Sussex Tech football team looks for young starters to mature By Mike McClure The Sussex Tech varsity football team lost a number of key players from last year’s team due to graduation, including four running backs who combined to rush for over 3,000 yards last season. Head coach Bill Collick, in his eighth year at the helm of the Ravens, is looking for some of his younger players to step up as the season progresses. "It's been a good camp. I think we have a good group of kids,” said Collick. "We're looking for some kids to step up. It's part of football, to see where you can get with what you have. A lot of life's lessons can be learned in this wonderful game. It's a great opportunity for young people to grow up. You only play football for a short period of time and you have to go to work after that." Gone from last year’s 7-3 team are running backs Jamar Beckett, George Godwin, Tyrone Hickman, and Darius Sivels as well as lineman Corey Wyatt and linebacker Marcus Dukes who led the Ravens to five shutouts last season. Sophomore Desmond Sivels and senior Seth Hastings are back as the team’s running backs along with freshman wing back Shane Marvel. Quarterback Zach Adkins, who started in 2006, is back after missing last season with an injury. "We're very pleased to have him back,” Collick said of Adkins. The offensive line consists of junior Joe Casullo (T) and senior Tyler Justice (G), who switched positions this season. Senior Joe Cooper, a newcomer with the varsity team, will play center joining senior Jon Davis (T), junior Brad Ellingsworth (G), and junior Andrew Hitchens (TE) on the line. Junior Justin Allen and sophomore Jon Hitchens are expected to split time at wideout while senior David Bunch will also help out at running back. Hastings returns as the team’s kicker and punter with sophomore Jesse Swanson as the team’s short snapper and Marvel as the deep snapper. Collick said the team is trying out different combinations on defense, but Casullo and senior Jon Davis are expected to play on the interior line with sophomore Orlando Theiss and Justice on the ends. Ellsworth, Andrew Hitchens, Marvel, and Hastings will see time at linebacker along with Bunch while freshman Deshawn Sheppard and Sivels will play at cornerback. Sophomores Lavaar Showell and Jonathan Hitchens are expeceted to play at safety and junior Wendall Cannon (CB) and sophomore Jeff Shaeffer (DE) will also see time. Collick expects Sussex Central, Caesar Rodney, Dover, and Cape Henlopen to once again be tough in the Henlopen North. The success of the 2008 Sussex Tech team will depend on how quickly the young starters step up. Last year senior Josh Marshall stepped in for Adkins and came within one play of leading the Ravens into the playoffs despite having no varsity experience. "Hopefully we can get some people who will step up and grow again,” said Collick.

CHECK PRESENTATION- Shown (l to r) presenting a check to Mary Catherine Hopkins (second from left) are Louise Marine, Nancy DeFelice, and Valerie Jefferson. They collected $1,145 from the men and women golfers as they manned the refreshment cart during the Seaford Golf and Country Club championship. They money will go to the Western Sussex Relay for Life Cancer Society.

Delmarva Christian boys’ soccer 9/16 home vs. Gunston 4 p.m. 9/18 home vs. Salisbury School 4 p.m. 9/20 home vs. Archmere 1 p.m. 9/22 home vs. Salisbury Christian 4 p.m. 9/25 at Worcester Prep 3:45 p.m. 9/29 home vs. Wilmington Christian 4:00 p.m. 10/1 home vs. Delaware Military 4 p.m. 10/3 home vs. Worcester Prep 4 p.m. 10/6 at Campus Community 4 p.m 10/11 at Red Lion Christian 10:30 a.m. 10/14 at Gunston 4 p.m. 10/17 at Holly Grove 4 p.m. 10/20 ESIAC play in game 3:30 p.m. 10/22 ESIAC semifinals 3:30 p.m. 10/24 ESIAC finals 3:30 p.m. 10/28 at Polytech 4:00 p.m.

Delmarva Christian field hockey 9/12 9/16 9/19 9/23 9/25 9/29

Members of the Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team swarm to the ball during a play day game at Seaford. The Ravens look for another solid season in the competitive Henlopen Conference. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech hockey continued The Ravens will look to be competitive in the strong Henlopen Conference and will also play tough non-conference foes such as Tower Hill, St. Mark’s, and Padua.

“We have to take it one game at a time,” Tribbitt said. “We’re definitely going to be tested.” Sussex Tech opens the season against Seaford, Cape Henlopen, Tower Hill and Delmar.

10/3 10/6 10/10 10/14 10/16 10/20 10/22 10/24 10/24 10/28

home vs. Holly Grove 4:00 home vs. Gunston 4:00 at St. Peter & Paul 4:00 at Holly Grove 4:00 at Worcester Prep 3:45 home vs. Wilmington Christian 4:00 home vs. Worcester Prep 4:00 at Campus Comm. 4:00 at Red Lion Christian 4:00 at Gunston 4:00 home vs. Archmere 4:00 ESIAC play in game 3:30 ESIAC semifinals 3:30 ESIAC finals 3:30 at St. Thomas More 4:30 home vs. Campus 4:00

Covering all the local sports teams: the Seaford and Laurel Star.

Delmarva Christian volleyball 9/11 9/14 9/21 9/25 9/27 9/29 10/2 10/6 10/9 10/10 10/12 10/16 10/20 10/22 10/24 10/27

at Indian River 5:00 at Nandua 5:30 home vs. Aquinas Acad. 5:30 home vs. Archmere 5:30 at St. Andrews 4:00 home vs. Red Lion 1:00 at Salisbury Christian 5:30 at Wilmington Christian 12:00 at Campus Comm. 4:00 at Smyrna 5:00 at Sussex Central 5:00 home vs. Lake Forest 5:00 at St. Thomas More 12:00 home vs. Delaware Mil. 5:30 home vs. Sussex Central 5:00 home vs. Polytech 12:00

Delmarva Christian soccer Head Coach: Josh James, first year Last Season: 6-10 overall Returning players: Seniors Justin Hawkes, Center MF/Fwd, Luke Matthews,Def, Jeff Mohr, Sweeper, Cole Painter, Fwd; Adam Troyer, MF; junior Mark Engle, MF; sophomores Garrett Menoche, MF, Tyler Troyer, Fwd, Josh Willey, Def Newcomers- Sophomore Kory Joseph, Def/MF; freshmen Skyler Butler, Striker, Tommy Hudson, MF, Todd Hurley, Def, Shane Ivory, GK, James Mohr, GK/Def, Andrew Oechsler, MF, Joel Scott, Def, Geoffrey Shepard, Def, Cory Twisselmann, Def/MF, Casey Zitvogel, MF Team strengths: The Royals are led by a strong core of returning players, including five seniors. Jeff Mohr and Luke Matthews provide extensive experience and strong leadership capabilities to lead an aggressive defensive unit. Justin Hawkes, Mark Engle, and Tyler Troyer also return as pivotal offensive players to create a balanced attack. Concerns: While very deep, the bench is inexperienced at the high school level. Key Losses: Tom Deneau Outlook for season: Delmarva hopes to bounce back from a difficult season last year. The combination of experienced returning players along with an energetic incoming class should create a formula for a very successful season.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

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Seaford Bowling Lanes Nite Owl High games and series Michael Workman 278 Barry Whayland 686

Tuesday AM Mixed High games and series

Mike Baker 223, 614 Edna Turner 224 Carolyn Chandler 573

Mardel ABC High games and series Wayne Sammons 290 Tom Koonte 778

Wed. AM Mixed High games and series Jim Suda 251 Randy Heath 251 Mark Benson 657 Kim Marine 241 Judi Uccello 644

Club 50 High games and series Randy Heath 277, 757 Janet Lecates 277 Shirley Ellis 698

Eastern Shore Men High games and series Tom Wheatley 287 Joe Holloway 682

Young Adults High games and series Michael Cherrix 234, 593 Kristyn Parlier 212 Katie Hickey 586

Star High games and series Brad Morgan 233 Robert Bay 585 Morgan Slavin 227 Jenna Cottet 575

Baby Blue Jays High games and series Travis Collins 153, 283 Athena Sammons 155 Shelby Williams 289

Friday Trios High games and series Buzzy Watson 240, 668 Carol Stewart 233, 612

Super Pro championship ends in a three way tie at U.S. 13 Dragway STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK- -Shown is the Seaford Middle School girls’ soccer team which went 6-1 last spring in its first year.

Seaford Middle School girls’ soccer team completes first year The Seaford Middle School girls’ soccer program completed its first year last spring. Coaches Charles Michel, Lori Hoch and Frank Parks could not be more proud of the team’s accomplishments. The girls finished their season with a 6-1 record, outscoring their opponents 24-6 with two shutouts. All but two starters will be returning next year: co-captains Thania Sanchez and Uri Robelledo, who had a great deal of experience and helped lead the way on offense and defense. Seventh grade captains, Allysa “Bailey” Hoch and Tynetta Washington contributed in huge way as well. Hoch was the team’s leading goal scorer and Washington was the staple of the defense. Other multi-goal scorers were Alisza Phares (seventh grade) and Haley Cherrix (sixth grade). Nadine Trigo, Priscilla Vicery, and Catherine Mackler also scored this year. Defensive starters were Erin Quillen, Dianna Sarabia, Courtney Ruiz, Tykia Nichols and Sarah Bell. There was great support from Taylor Prance, Hailey Parks, Destiny and Ebony Miles, Norma Ortiz-Lyva, Megan Mahetta, Nancy Balderas, Cinthia Galaviz, Ana Rojas-Labra, Sinhai Garcia, Ketsia Avrele, Ashley Gray and Morgan Swain.

Send your team photo to the Seaford/Laurel Star at sports@mspublications.com to be a Star team of the week.

Make-A-Wish Triathlon to take place this month Registration is open for the 25th Anniversary Make-A-Wish Triathlon at Sea Colony in Bethany Beach. The event, featuring a 1.5K ocean swim, 40K bike and 10K run, will benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of the Mid-Atlantic and will take place Sept. 20. For additional information and to register, visit midatlantic.wish.org or call 301962-9474. The Make-A-Wish Foundation of the Mid-Atlantic, Inc. is a nonprofit organization that fulfills the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy. Founded in 1983, the Foundation has fulfilled the wishes of nearly 6,000 children in Maryland, the District of Columbia, Northern Virginia and Delaware.

Sussex County Sports Foundation looking for Fall ball players The Sussex County Sports Foundation is looking for players for its Fall ball baseball and softball leagues. The leagues will play from Sept. 21 through Oct. 26 at Clifford Lee Memorial Park in Laurel. For further information, visit the league’s website at www.sussexcountysportsfoundation.com.

SCSF benefit tourney to be held at Heritage Shores A four-man scramble will be held at Heritage Shores Golf Club on Saturday, Sept. 20 (rain date TBA). The cost is $500 per team (includes golf, cart, dinner, and gift). Registration for the tournament, which will benefit the Sussex County Sports Foundation, will take place at 12:30 p.m. with a shotgun start at 2 p.m. Contests include closest to the pin on all par threes and a hole in one car hole. There will also be a 50/50 drawing and free range balls. The following are the prizes (based on a full field): first- $500, second- $400; third- $300; fourth- $250; fifth- $225; sixth$200; seventh- $175; eighth- $150; ninth- $125; 10th- $100. Prizes to be awarded as pro shop merchandise. For more information, contact Mike Payne at 302-542-1373 or 302-542-7813.

If it’s not in the Star, it’s not in the local paper.

By Charlie Brown The 2008 Summit E.T. Point Series ended in spectacular fashion on Sunday at the U.S. 13 Dragway. When the final win light had flashed in Super Pro, a three way tie existed between Danny Bastianelli of Georgetown, Steve Drummond of Laurel, and David Tucker of Ellendale. While the trio will go into the record books as tri-champions, a runoff was held to determine who would race in the Race of Champions at the NHRA Bracket Finals and hold the Gold Card for 2009. The honor went to Tucker who defeated Bastianelli in the runoff final. The following champions were also crowned at the end of the day: Jim Williams in Pro; Jay Windsor in Pro Bike; Crystal Hudson in Street Eliminator (second consecutive); Shelby Bireley in Jr. Dragster 1 and Tyler Doak in Jr. Dragster 2. The Super Pro final round was a match up between Mike Hooper of Hurlock and Mary Passwaters of Bridgeville. Hooper had an outstanding .007 reaction and drove to the win with an 8.640/156.14 on an 8.63 dial. Passwaters had a .017 reaction and ran a 10.198/130.64 on a 10.17 dial. Semi-finalists were Jay Bradford of Newark, Md., and Eddie Savage of Wallops Island, Va. David Tucker’s quarter-final loss earned him enough point to tie him with Drummond and Bastianelli in the final standings. In the runoff, Tucker drew a bye and Bastianelli edged Drummond by a mere .002 seconds to advance against Tucker. Bastianelli was too quick in the final with a 7.513 E.T. on a 7.52 dial and Tucker took the win with a 7.854/165.13 on a 7.83 dial. Jim Williams of Seaford faced Jesse Truitt of Parsonsburg in the Pro final. It was a double break out run with Williams out by less to take the win with a 9.606/138.22 on a 9.61 dial. Truitt had a 9.557/137.67 on a 9.57 dial. Semi-finalists were Steven Truitt of Parsonsburg and Roger Ridgeway, Jr. of Dover. James Farmer of Felton was back in the Pro Bike final again this week this time against Charles Nock of Frankford. Nock had a red light foul and Farmer posted his second consecutive win with a

9.500/134.95 on a 9.48 dial. Semi-finalist was John Bartkovich of Salisbury. Billy McLamb of Pittsville, Md., was the spoiler for Crystal Passwaters of Millsboro in the Street Eliminator final. McLamb ran a 12.174/110.34 on an 11.97 dial for the win as Passwaters broke out with a 12.839/97.47 on a 12.85 dial. Brian Robert, Jr. of Berlin met Allison Trice of Fruitland in the Import final. Neither driver was on their dial as Robert took the win with a 16.541/79.14 on a 16.30 dial. Trice ran a 15.835/87.61 on a 15.74 dial. Irvin Bonneville of Laurel rode up against James West of Laurel in the Bike Trophy final. West broke out with a 14.791 on a 14.93 dial and Bonneville took the win with a 14.612/79.15 on a 14.60. The Jr. Dragster 1 final was a heads-up run between Katelyn Muir of Delmar and Kody Mariner of Salisbury. Both racers dialed an 8.90 with Muir having the better reaction and taking the win with an 8.933/72.55 to Mariner’s 8.920/74.04. In Jr. Dragster 2 it was Jordan Dill of Ellendale against Ashley Parsons of Delmar. Parsons left too early and fouled and Dill took the win with an excellent run of 8.028/80.67 on an 8.02 dial. The High School Eliminator final boiled down to a duel between James Farmer, Jr. of Felton and Holly Passwaters of Bridgeville. Passwaters had a slightly better start but Farmer was on his dial with a 13.858/89.57 on a 13.83 dialin for the win. This Sunday will feature the Bad 8 eliminations plus it will be Goodyear Bonus Days. Gates open at 10 a.m. with time runs at 11 a.m. and eliminations at approximately 2:30 p.m.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

The Heritage Shores Ladies’ 18 Hole Golf Association played the game of “If” on Wednesday, Sept. 3. Players disregarded their worst hole then deducted their handicap. Winners were: Cinda Allison, first place (center); Ursula Gardner, second place( left), and Barb Jarkovsky, third place.

Racing at Delaware International Speedway quieted by Hanna Tropical storm Hanna dumped several inches of rain on Delmarva Saturday washing out the R.C. Holloway Night featuring the URC Sprints. Action returns this Saturday with Hertrich Pontiac/Buick/GMC Night and will include the Little Lincoln cars and the Slide for 5 racers along with the five weekly divisions. It will be a “Bonus Night” with the weekly point racers competing for additional cash. General admission to the spectator side will be just $12 with pit admission $25. Due to the rainout, it will still be Queen Anne Fan Appreciation Night with anyone with a picture I.D. that includes a Queen Anne address admitted to the spectator side free of charge.

Maurice L. Fields Sr. Memorial Golf Tournament is Oct. 17 Golfers always worry about their handicap. Jeff Fields worries about high school seniors’ financial handicaps as they consider college. “That’s why we hold our tournament, to help fund college scholarships for local high school baseball players and golfers,” he explained. “That can help them better realize their dreams of furthering their education.” Fields is looking to field a full group of individuals and golf teams for the Sixth Annual Maurice L. Fields, Sr. Memorial Golf Tournament which is presented by the Eastern Shore Baseball Foundation. The shotgun start begins at noon on Friday, Oct. 17 at Quantico’s Green Hill Yacht and Country Club. Check in is at 11 a.m. and an awards banquet and auction follows at 4:30 p.m. A putting contest will be held between the ninth and tenth holes. The tournament will include a hole-in-one contest for a new car, a long drive and closest to the pin contest, a 50/50 raffle, putts for cash, door prizes, and goody bags. For more information or to register for the tournament, contact Fields at 443-7834920 or visit esbf@comcast.net.

Eastern Shore Baseball Foundation banquet set for Nov. 15 Baseball aficionados from across the Delmarva Peninsula will gather at the Delmar VFW on Nov. 15 to acknowledge the achievements of ballplayers past and present at the annual Eastern Shore Baseball foundation banquet. The doors open at 5 p.m. with the program getting underway one hour later. After a brief presentation and dinner, the new members of the ESBF Hall of Fame will be introduced and inducted. Some of the players are past Major League players. Tickets cost just $20 and are available from Kenny Green (410-430-5497), Jeff Fields (443-783-4920), or Wayne Mitchell (410-896-2807).

Fall 2008 varsity sports preview forms are still needed Fall ‘08 preview forms are needed for the following teams: Seaford cross country, Woodbridge soccer, Greenwood Mennonite sports, Seaford Christian sports.

BLUE JAY CAPTAINS- Seaford varsity football captains (l to r) Spencer Coulbourn, MyKeal Purnell, Yvens St. Phard (42), and Ross Miller (57) run off the field following the opening toss during last Friday’s season opener in Snow Hill. The Jays tied the score at 14-14 at the start of the second half but the Eagles scored 14 unanswered points for the 28-14 win. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel/Seaford Star sports predictions: week 2 High school football- Woodbridge home vs. Polytech- Woodbridge 21-10- Woodbridge will win using their offense. Woodbridge could be the surprise contender of the conference this year. Delmar at Cape Henlopen- Delmar 28-17 Sussex Tech home vs. A.I. duPont- Sussex Tech 14-7-Although Sussex had a bad outing last week, I will pick them to top AI. Laurel home vs. Delcastle- Laurel 17-14- Laurel to win, it will be close, but I must stick with the local team. Seaford home vs. Friends- Seaford- The Blue Jays must turn on the offense against this tough competitor. Lynn Schofer- 5-3 High school soccer-Seaford at Sussex Tech- Seaford 3-1- The last week, 5-3 overall defense will have to be strong and protect the goal. Seaford’s offense will set the tone. College football- West Chester at University of Delaware- UD 28-10 NFL- New Orleans at Washington- Washington 21-7 Baltimore at Houston- Baltimore 27-21 Philadelphia at Dallas- Philadelphia 28-24- The Eagles looked really good in week one. They will beat the Cowboys this week. High school football- Woodbridge home vs. Polytech- Woodbridge 21-20 Delmar at Cape Henlopen- Delmar 28-14- Cape is coming off a narrow defeat against Indian River. Despite being on the road for the second consecutive week, Delmar should also top their Henlopen North foes. Sussex Tech home vs. A.I. DuPont- Sussex Tech 21-20 Laurel home vs. Delcastle- Laurel 28-17 Seaford home vs. Friends- Friends 35-21 High school soccer- Seaford at Sussex Tech- Sussex Tech 3-2- Mike McClure- 5-3 last week, 5-3 This will be a close one. I’m going with the Ravens at home, but overall this game may need overtime to decide a winner. College football- West Chester at University of Delaware- Delaware 42-21 NFL- New Orleans at Washington- New Orleans 28-17 Baltimore at Houston- Houston 21-14- Joe Flacco will have his happy feet going in this one. Philadelphia at Dallas- Dallas 35-24- Both teams are coming off big wins in the season openers. Dallas, at home, had a tougher test in the first week and should prevail in this one.

FA LL S P O R TS P R ED IC TIO N S The Star’s “Experts” are making predictions again this year.

We invite you to send in your predictions as well.

Fill in this form, circling the teams you think will win & pick a score for the tie-breaker. Make sure you include your info so we can contact you if you win. WEEK 3 (Sept. 18): Turn in your predictions by Wed., Sept. 17, 5 p.m.

High School Football: Smyrna at Woodbridge Sussex Tech at Laurel Archmere at Seaford Delmar at St. Elizabeth High School Field Hockey: Woodbridge at Laurel CollegeF ootball: Widener at Wesley NFL: Arizona at Washington Pittsburgh at Philadelphia Tiebreaker: Cleveland at Baltimore ___________________ Name:___________________________________ Daytime Phone #_____________________ The Star is offering prizes such as Free Movie Tickets to the winner each week.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

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Ordinance does more than ban new wells in town If anyone who lives in the town limits of Laurel thinks the ordiRANK ALIO nance banning new wells for irrigation grandfathers in those who Before passage of the have existing wells, think again. Not only has the town slammed ordinance last month to the door on new wells, an ordiprohibit private wells I nance given its first reading Sephad obtained a permit tember 2, prohibits private wells operating within the boundaries of from the state to drill on the Town of Laurel and they shall my property in town... be disconnected, capped, and abandoned by the property owner withthe Georgia House are still under developin 30 days from the enactment of the ordiment and is the only residential communinance. ty using a private well. Which means if those who currently irBecause their well hit a pocket of rusty rigate from a private well want to continue water, the owners invested a large amount watering, they must pay the cost of purchasing a water meter, and pay to hook the of money to treat the rusty water. Now they will have to abandon the well under meter to the town's water system and pay for the privilege to irrigate their lawns and the new ordinance. I know of one other private well, a sinshrubs. gle residential well in the limits of the I don't think the few who have private town. wells in town are aware of the proposed So obsessed that private wells will polordinance as only the title has to be publute the town's water system the mayor, lished in a newspaper that serves the area. council, and town manager have lost sight The title printed for the public to read of the expense these people went through, says nothing about existing wells; it reads as though the new law refers to the recent- that they were approved for wells, but no ly passed chapter 170 of the code prohibit- matter to them, with the exception of one council person, it's damn the torpedoes, ing private agricultural wells. The largest user of a well are the Laurel full steam ahead. Before passage of the ordinance last schools: the high schools for their athletic fields and the middle school. Imagine their month to prohibit private wells I had obtained a permit from the state to drill on water bill! my property in town and almost did; the The Villas on Broadcreek across from

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town had no ordinance at that time to prohibit a well, but my attorney advised me if I put one in the town could make life miserable for me by putting on fees higher than having a meter or make me abandon mine. He was right. One councilman has the idea everyone in town who wants a private well has a garden, and would pile their fertilizer next to the well pipe and the crap will seep into the town's water system. I can count the number of gardens in the town on one hand and have some fingers left. Even though the town's water system in the Columbia aquifer is unprotected from chemicals, nitrates, petroleum, and other chemicals, they are more concerned about the contamination of everyone else in the town, but have done nothing to protect the drinking water for their citizens. The town thinks they own the water in the ground. I told my bride I was going to ask the town if I could put in a wind mill to generate electricity. She said the town would probably say no, saying they owned the wind. I understand the Town of Lewes is revisiting their ban on private wells because the cost of treating water for irrigation is getting too expensive, which was one of my arguments with the Laurel Council. Lewes may reconsider private wells for irrigation. The second and final reading is September 15.

Borrowing money The town wants to borrow $2.5 million, 25-year no interest loan to improve a much needed water distribution system on the west part of town. For the first five years of the loan the town pays nothing and in the sixth year they begin making payments of $100,000 per year Sounds good so far, but my question is: how are they coming up with $100,000 a year without raising water rates which climb year after year to offset not having to raise property taxes already among the highest in the state. Town manager Bill Fasano says, "Over the course of the 25-year life of the loan we will see a difference in the value of the dollar, so eventually this $100,000 payment will gradually become more affordable." Sorry to say, Bill, but the cost of operating the town with inflation will be a lot higher and that $100,000 will be just as difficult to fund as it is today. Maybe the town believes the developer who has presented plans to the town to build 3000 homes is really going to build them and every house will be sold; property taxes and impact fees will flow and everyone will put in an extra water meter and the towns money coffers will runneth over. Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus, and he lives in Laurel.

The big black communication device was the first reality show I have noticed that there are few people that I see during any given ONY INDSOR day who are not equipped with a cell phone. This attractive nuisance Everybody would be has become more predominant in our daily life than air. clustered around their At home I have cordless phones, telephones like hogs so it is possible for me to go through a work day without using a around a slop bucket, phone with cord. I was on the teletrying to find out all the phone the other day and it struck latest gossip. me just how much this communication system has changed since I else’s call. Many were the times you was a young boy. would go to pick up the phone just to hear I remember as a child the telephone the next-door neighbor in the middle of a was an ominous looking gadget, pitch conversation. black and weighing in excess of 25 The polite thing to do was immediately pounds. It was more like a boat anchor or hang up, not offer an apology but hang up a door stop than a communication device. loudly enough for the neighbor to be There was no rotary dial or push butaware you were no longer on their line. ton, only a round, white label situated at However, it was a tempting proposition the center of the base which displayed our to simply remain on the line and listen to phone number, 39-W. Interestingly enough, the phone lines in the details of what I assure you was titillating news. Crisfield, Md., in the early 1960s had not I recall listening in as Miss Addie gave progressed enough to allow us individual Miss Dot her recipe for applesauce cake lines. and Mr. Lane was talking to Forbush Our family shared our phone lines with Hardware store about paint for his garage. three other families on Richardson AveYou have to understand, I was very nue. It just so happened that two of these young and the biggest thrill for me and my families were comprised of the biggest comrades was picking the phone up and gossip mongers in the community. hearing the lady operator say, “Number Each family was assigned a special please.” number of rings to identify when the We would do this time after time and phone call was intended for them. For injust laugh and laugh as the operator said stance, I believe we had three rings which with a very commanding voice, “You kids indicated that the call was for us. get off this line and stop playing with the Each time the phone rang you had to wait a few seconds to count the number of phone.” She would even call back and tell my mother what we were doing. We were rings so as to not pick up on someone

T

W

simply uncivilized heathen younguns. My mother even today recalls the times she would be talking on the phone only to hear the familiar click of someone picking up another phone. She would then not hear what should have been the loud click of this person hanging up. Not wanting to appear paranoid she would continue her conversation, leaving out the good stuff that she knew fueled the ambitions of this unwanted third party. I can recall that on one occasion my mother learned she was pregnant with my younger brother and shared the information with her friend Pat during a phone conversation. This was the first person to have been told outside of my father. About 15 minutes after finishing her phone call, Mom walked down to Miss Ruby’s store and was greeted by Miss Ruby, sitting in her chair, saying, “So, I hear your going to have another baby.”

There is no doubt that the Crisfield Times newspaper had nothing on the Richardson Avenue party line crew. I tried to imagine what it would be like today if we still had party lines and shared the airwaves with our neighbors. You would suddenly see the ratings drop on shows like Dr. Phil and Oprah. Everybody would be clustered around their telephones like hogs around a slop bucket, trying to find out all the latest gossip. But, I guess that’s something that has never changed throughout the ages. The interest in knowing what we perceive as intimate details of other people’s lives. I guess the gossip tabloids and the shock gossip television talk shows actually got their start from the party lines of yesterday. To think, if we would have simply put a toll charge on our party line, we would be millionaires today.

Gas Lines

Price dips a penny at the pumps

The average price of regular unleaded gasoline this past week in Delaware was $3.45, down one penny from the previous week. The price of unleaded gasoline a year ago was $2.75 a gallon. The national average for regular unleaded gasoline was $3.67 last week. So, Delawareans are paying 70 cents a gallon or 25 percent more for gasoline this year over last year. On average regular unleaded gasoline is 22 cents a gallon less than the national average.


changei sgood. S t ar t i ngt hi sOct ober ,t heMor ni ngS t arBus i nes sRepor t wi l l beagl os s yf ul l col ormagaz i ne. Cont actyouradver t i s i ngr epr es ent at i vet odayf ormor ei nf or mat i on. 3026299788


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 53

Three arrests earn state trooper a national safety award Officials from the Delaware Division of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), along with the Eastern Service Center of FMCSA, recently presented the FMCSA's Partner's in Safety Award to a member of the Delaware State Police. Senior Corporal Keith Lamey, a 12year veteran, who is assigned to the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP), was nationally recognized for his efforts in commercial vehicle enforcement and inspections. Robert Miller of the FMCSA presented the award to Lamey at the Delaware State Police Museum in Dover. Lamey received the award because of his efforts during the following three incidents: • April 9 - Lamey stopped a motor coach on I-95 north, destined for New York City, for speeding. As part of the normal inspection routine, he asked the driver to show him the fire extinguisher. The driver opened a compartment that contained the fire extinguisher as well as a large number of cigarettes. Forty-two cartons of cigarettes were found, none having the required state or federal tax stamps. Because of the stop, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), the Delaware Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control and Tobacco Enforcement and the Delaware Department of Revenue were contacted and began a joint investigation. The investigation discovered that the

bus originated in Atlanta, Ga., and its destination was Manhattan. Several passengers were illegal aliens; the driver of the bus, also an illegal alien, had obtained an Oregon commercial driver’s license fraudulently and the driver previously had obtained fraudulent licenses in New York and Florida. The entire case was turned over to the ATF. • Jan. 17 - Lamey stopped a tractortrailer for speeding and improper lane change. While reviewing the CDL the driver presented to him, he felt the texture of the license and thought it did not feel right. In addition, the license had the word “motor” misspelled. When Lamey compared the license with the Florida DMV report, he discovered the driver’s name was spelled differently; the zip codes did not match; the license had endorsements for tank and tandem and the Driver Motor Vehicle (DMV) report did not; and the driver’s license picture and signature did not match Florida’s record. The investigation revealed that the driver bought the Florida license in Newark, N.J., and was running on this license for more than a year. Additionally, his real name was different from what was on the license and he was in this country illegally from Costa Rica. There were also warrants for immigration parole violations. The driver was detained and turned over to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency.

Police urge motorcyclists to slow down and to use caution Fifteen motorcyclists have been killed in Delaware traffic crashes since Jan. 1, with more than half of the deaths (eight) occurring in the last three and a half weeks. According to state police reports, speed and failing to negotiate curves were primary factors in these crashes. The Delaware Office of Highway Safety Office of Highway Safety (OHS) is urging motorcyclists to slow down and operate their bikes defensively. OHS urges drivers of passenger and commercial vehicles to be on the lookout for increased motorcycle traffic during Delmarva Bike Week. The week, which is held annually in Ocean City, Md., begins Thursday, Sept. 11, and ends Sunday, Sept. 14. Motorcyclists heading for this popular event will likely be seen on Routes 1 and 113. The number of registered motorcycles has increased nationwide. In Delaware, motorcycle deaths have been on the rise since 2001, and hit an all time high in 2005 when 21 motorcyclists died in crashes. Though that number dropped by almost half in 2006, it rose again in 2007, when 17 cyclists were killed. When the motorcyclist is at fault in a crash, it is often the result of speed, alcohol use, lack of training or inattentive driving. The average age of motorcyclists killed in crashes is 42. When the driver of a passenger vehicle is at fault it is often because of inattentive driving, following

too closely, or making a left turn into the path of the motorcyclist. Motorcyclists are much more vulnerable than passenger vehicle drivers in the event of a crash. Research shows that approximately 80 percent of motorcycle crashes injure or kill a motorcycle rider, while only 20 percent of passenger car crashes injure or kill a driver or passenger in their vehicle. OHS offers the following safety tips: Motorcyclists • Follow posted speed limits and keep all wheels on the ground at all times • Do not try to share a lane with a vehicle, stay in your own • Always signal your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic; • Never drink and ride, it is responsible for roughly 1/4th of Delaware’s motorcycle deaths • Watch out for loose sand, gravel, debris, and uneven and textured surfaces • Do not pass on the shoulder • Suit up for Safety – wear not only a helmet, but also appropriate eye gear, long sleeves, over the ankle boots and reflective material when riding at night • Keep your skills up to date by signing up for a DMV Motorcycle Training Course, either beginner or advanced For more information on motorcycle training courses, visit www.dmv.de.gov and click on Driver Services.

Senior Corporal Keith Lamey, a 12-year veteran who is assigned to the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program, was nationally recognized for his efforts in commercial vehicle enforcement and inspections. From left: state police Colonel Thomas F. Mac Leish, Lamey and Robert Miller with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

• May 22, 2007 - Lamey stopped a tractor-trailer for speeding, a routine traffic violation. While reviewing documents provided by the driver, he noticed that the driver’s Florida license was missing a hyphen in his name and the misspelling of a word on the license. Interrogation of the driver revealed the driver’s identity and that he

had recently paid for the fraudulent Florida CDL. The driver was arrested for identity theft and related offenses. “This award is well deserved and reflective of the type of work Keith does daily,” said Colonel Thomas F. Mac Leish.

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PAGE 54

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Letters to the Editor You do not dishonor them, they are beyond your reach. You dishonor yourself...

Mother of soldier responds to act that damaged banner The following letter was written in response to a criminal mischief incident that occurred Monday, Sept. 1, near the Rehoboth Bandstand. Mytia T. Dorman, 21, of the 18000 block of Chaplins Chapel Road, Bridgeville, was charged with criminal mischief after allegedly ripping one of the banners. I am writing in response to the attack on the Hometown Hero Banner in Rehoboth. I am the mother of Chad Clifton and it was his banner that was damaged. The woman that perpetrated it claimed that the date of death was inaccurate. It was not. These banners were created with the input and knowledge of the families and we checked Chad’s information prior to the banner being made. She also claimed to have served with Chad. As far as we have been able to ascertain, this is not true. As Chad was 19 at the time of his death, the woman would have been very young to be in a war zone and there were no women in his combat unit. As for the description of her as wearing "a red Obama t-shirt," I'm sure it was very helpful in police identification, but I caution against turning it into a political statement. Perhaps the most difficult part of this for the family has been the utterly ignorant and biased opinions posted online as comments to the news story. To use this incident as proof of one political stance over another is ludicrous and indicative of perhaps the most damaging and immediate problem facing our country today: the apathy of the American people. Instead of an educated and thoughtful consideration of the realities we are faced with and a concerted effort to strengthen ourselves as a society, I see an inability, or perhaps simply an unwillingness, to move beyond prejudices and ingrained personal issues. Chad was in Iraq for the voting in January of 2005. While turnout in the city of Ramadi was small, the overall turnout of the country’s citizens was not. More people, percentage wise, voted under threat of death than America manages to turn out on a sunny day. But even voter participation is not the entire answer. As long as people still go to the polls filled with hatred, ignorance and personal agendas we will never achieve the best results for our country. In the words of G. B. Shaw, "Democracy is a device that insures we will be governed no better that we deserve." The men and women featured on the Hometown Heroes Banners were individu-

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net als, with individual opinions and experiences. They stood up and served at various times in our history and the conflicts they fought in occurred for various reasons. It was act the of standing up, not the fighting they faced, that was the protection of your freedom. You have the freedom to serve your country well by applying your mind to understanding such issues as foreign policy and economics. Or you can serve it poorly by slinging mud and calling names and never moving beyond your own ignorance. To anyone who would use our Fallen to political advantage, I say this: You do not dishonor them, they are beyond your reach. You dishonor yourself and prove yourself unworthy of such a sacrifice. You may be a Republican or a Democrat, but you are a sorry excuse for an American. Terri Clifton

Milford

US Coast Guard helps educate boaters to be more responsible

After reading Margie Wilson’s article about “Irresponsible boaters,” we hope Margie continues to recover from her horrible injuries. As she stated in the article, we the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Seaford Flotilla provide boat safety courses and a whole lot more. The Seaford Flotilla consists of 16 men and women aged 40 to 83 who are bound together by their spirit of volunteerism, love of our Country and desire to help people. Our “home” is the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Young and old new members are always welcome. In addition to public service the Seaford Flotilla continually engages in important useful training to increase the skills of its members. Routine training includes Boat Crew & Coxswain, Communications, Emergency

Response Drills, Advanced Navigation and Instructor Training. Boat Safety classes are not only offered to adults, the Auxiliary teaches several courses just for kids. Girl Scouts and Boy Scout are also encouraged to take our courses. As much as training and volunteerism is a part of the Auxiliary and Seaford Flotilla, so is fellowship one of the foundations of the Auxiliary itself. Throughout the year the Seaford Flotilla has numerous activities, including picnics, restaurant gatherings, and Change of Watch (COW) dinners where elected officers are sworn in and awards are given out. We also participate in local parades. If any of the above sounds good to you, I encourage you to stop in at one of our meetings. We meet the second Thursday of the month at 1900 (7 p.m.) at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Please feel free to donate as much or as little time as you like. In any event, if you join the Auxiliary you’ll be a part of an extraordinary organization and recognize what it means to be “ America’s Volunteer Lifesaver.” Cindi Chaimowitz FSO-PA USCGA

Seaford Flotilla

Same-sex ‘Marriage’ may harm

Rebuttal of J. Reid Williamson’s letter of August 28, 2008, in the Star and further facts and opinion in favor of saving traditional marriage and the family. I stand by my statement that we need a Constitutional Amendment to the United States Constitution defining marriage as between a man and a woman. Men and women are different and without these differences procreation of the species and the continuation of a society would be impossible. Without these differences having a family would be impossible. The intention of rewriting the definition of marriage to include two and possibly more persons of the same sex and the rewriting of the definition of a family to include two “mothers” or two “fathers” weakens the institution of marriage and family and will prove unhealthy for society (a review of history and scientific studies shows this). If two persons want to live together they now have that choice. There is no scientific evidence that homosexuality is inherent or included in DNA or the gene pool. Homosexual behavior is learned and there is considerable scientific evidence to support this. So, by virtue of definition and evidence, if two persons of the same sex wish to marry, they should thoroughly examine themselves, make a choice to live together or choose to opt out of the deception and propaganda that the homosexual community has used to convince them that they cannot be married to anyone other than someone of the same sex. The Declaration of Independence before the Constitution postulated that people should have certain unalienable rights such as life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. How does one have liberty if the homosexual community would take the religious freedom of those who believe the Bible and prosecute them for hate speech

and throw them in jail for preaching that the Bible says homosexuality is wrong? Those in favor of traditional marriage and family do not take homosexuals to court because of their belief in homosexuality or seek to alter their definition of homosexual relationship. The Constitution and the Declaration needed no reference to homosexual behavior or traditional marriage because traditional marriage and family was and is the norm. Mr. Williamson states that, “the Constitution shows clearly that American society was created for a number of reasons not one of which is marriage or family,” but forgets that without family there can be no society and also that the society of that era had no need to make reference to things that were so clear to them. (Further reading of the Federalist papers and correspondence of the founders may prove enlightening about their beliefs). Discrimination against those who speak out in favor of traditional marriage and family by the homosexual community is very evident. The arguments and tactics they use show that they are trying to destroy “straight” marriage. They want to change society and indoctrinate children by making it mandatory that they hear about homosexual behavior and non-traditional families as young as age 6. What 6-year-old should be forced to hear these things and what 6-year-old can make this distinction? Parents who believe in traditional values have no choice in the sensitive area of sex, family or values education. The state and those who protest with emotional arguments of discrimination, unfairness, and threatened lawsuits are pushing and forcing the same-sex “marriage” social experiment on society. Mr. Williamson mentions that discrimination does not exist in the Constitution and at the same time references that no one can vote unless they are 18. Why is this an acceptable definition of the right to vote and not discrimination against 17 yr.olds? Everything in life is not fair and some things should be accepted and not challenged because one can. Mr. Williamson goes on to mention the 50% divorce rate and battered women as a defense to allow same-sex “marriage.” The high divorce rate is partially due to the change in laws and society that allows for so-called no-fault divorce. Before this social experiment (as a result of a change in the laws and a liberal judiciary) the divorce rate was lower and society more “healthy.” Battered women and children partially are a product of a permissive society that has lowered its standards and beliefs. If these costs are high, as he claims, they are not related to the marriage issue. Scientific studies have shown that violence against children increases in a “family” that does not consist of the biological mother and father of a child. These health care costs could certainly go up if the social experiment of redefining marriage and family continues. The sociological, economic and other documented evidence is clear and shows that there are many danger signals to changing the definition of marriage and


PAGE 54

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Letters to the Editor You do not dishonor them, they are beyond your reach. You dishonor yourself...

Mother of soldier responds to act that damaged banner The following letter was written in response to a criminal mischief incident that occurred Monday, Sept. 1, near the Rehoboth Bandstand. Mytia T. Dorman, 21, of the 18000 block of Chaplins Chapel Road, Bridgeville, was charged with criminal mischief after allegedly ripping one of the banners. I am writing in response to the attack on the Hometown Hero Banner in Rehoboth. I am the mother of Chad Clifton and it was his banner that was damaged. The woman that perpetrated it claimed that the date of death was inaccurate. It was not. These banners were created with the input and knowledge of the families and we checked Chad’s information prior to the banner being made. She also claimed to have served with Chad. As far as we have been able to ascertain, this is not true. As Chad was 19 at the time of his death, the woman would have been very young to be in a war zone and there were no women in his combat unit. As for the description of her as wearing "a red Obama t-shirt," I'm sure it was very helpful in police identification, but I caution against turning it into a political statement. Perhaps the most difficult part of this for the family has been the utterly ignorant and biased opinions posted online as comments to the news story. To use this incident as proof of one political stance over another is ludicrous and indicative of perhaps the most damaging and immediate problem facing our country today: the apathy of the American people. Instead of an educated and thoughtful consideration of the realities we are faced with and a concerted effort to strengthen ourselves as a society, I see an inability, or perhaps simply an unwillingness, to move beyond prejudices and ingrained personal issues. Chad was in Iraq for the voting in January of 2005. While turnout in the city of Ramadi was small, the overall turnout of the country’s citizens was not. More people, percentage wise, voted under threat of death than America manages to turn out on a sunny day. But even voter participation is not the entire answer. As long as people still go to the polls filled with hatred, ignorance and personal agendas we will never achieve the best results for our country. In the words of G. B. Shaw, "Democracy is a device that insures we will be governed no better that we deserve." The men and women featured on the Hometown Heroes Banners were individu-

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net als, with individual opinions and experiences. They stood up and served at various times in our history and the conflicts they fought in occurred for various reasons. It was the act of standing up, not the fighting they faced, that was the protection of your freedom. You have the freedom to serve your country well by applying your mind to understanding such issues as foreign policy and economics. Or you can serve it poorly by slinging mud and calling names and never moving beyond your own ignorance. To anyone who would use our Fallen to political advantage, I say this: You do not dishonor them, they are beyond your reach. You dishonor yourself and prove yourself unworthy of such a sacrifice. You may be a Republican or a Democrat, but you are a sorry excuse for an American. Terri Clifton

Milford

US Coast Guard helps educate boaters to be more responsible

After reading Margie Wilson’s article about “Irresponsible boaters,” we hope Margie continues to recover from her horrible injuries. As she stated in the article, we the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Seaford Flotilla provide boat safety courses and a whole lot more. The Seaford Flotilla consists of 16 men and women aged 40 to 83 who are bound together by their spirit of volunteerism, love of our Country and desire to help people. Our “home” is the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Young and old new members are always welcome. In addition to public service the Seaford Flotilla continually engages in important useful training to increase the skills of its members. Routine training includes Boat Crew & Coxswain, Communications, Emergency

Response Drills, Advanced Navigation and Instructor Training. Boat Safety classes are not only offered to adults, the Auxiliary teaches several courses just for kids. Girl Scouts and Boy Scout are also encouraged to take our courses. As much as training and volunteerism is a part of the Auxiliary and Seaford Flotilla, so is fellowship one of the foundations of the Auxiliary itself. Throughout the year the Seaford Flotilla has numerous activities, including picnics, restaurant gatherings, and Change of Watch (COW) dinners where elected officers are sworn in and awards are given out. We also participate in local parades. If any of the above sounds good to you, I encourage you to stop in at one of our meetings. We meet the second Thursday of the month at 1900 (7 p.m.) at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Please feel free to donate as much or as little time as you like. In any event, if you join the Auxiliary you’ll be a part of an extraordinary organization and recognize what it means to be “ America’s Volunteer Lifesaver.” Cindi Chaimowitz FSO-PA USCGA

Seaford Flotilla

Same-sex ‘Marriage’ may harm

Rebuttal of J. Reid Williamson’s letter of August 28, 2008, in the Star and further facts and opinion in favor of saving traditional marriage and the family. I stand by my statement that we need a Constitutional Amendment to the United States Constitution defining marriage as between a man and a woman. Men and women are different and without these differences procreation of the species and the continuation of a society would be impossible. Without these differences having a family would be impossible. The intention of rewriting the definition of marriage to include two and possibly more persons of the same sex and the rewriting of the definition of a family to include two “mothers” or two “fathers” weakens the institution of marriage and family and will prove unhealthy for society (a review of history and scientific studies shows this). If two persons want to live together they now have that choice. There is no scientific evidence that homosexuality is inherent or included in DNA or the gene pool. Homosexual behavior is learned and there is considerable scientific evidence to support this. So, by virtue of definition and evidence, if two persons of the same sex wish to marry, they should thoroughly examine themselves, make a choice to live together or choose to opt out of the deception and propaganda that the homosexual community has used to convince them that they cannot be married to anyone other than someone of the same sex. The Declaration of Independence before the Constitution postulated that people should have certain unalienable rights such as life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. How does one have liberty if the homosexual community would take the religious freedom of those who believe the Bible and prosecute them for hate speech

and throw them in jail for preaching that the Bible says homosexuality is wrong? Those in favor of traditional marriage and family do not take homosexuals to court because of their belief in homosexuality or seek to alter their definition of homosexual relationship. The Constitution and the Declaration needed no reference to homosexual behavior or traditional marriage because traditional marriage and family was and is the norm. Mr. Williamson states that, “the Constitution shows clearly that American society was created for a number of reasons not one of which is marriage or family,” but forgets that without family there can be no society and also that the society of that era had no need to make reference to things that were so clear to them. (Further reading of the Federalist papers and correspondence of the founders may prove enlightening about their beliefs). Discrimination against those who speak out in favor of traditional marriage and family by the homosexual community is very evident. The arguments and tactics they use show that they are trying to destroy “straight” marriage. They want to change society and indoctrinate children by making it mandatory that they hear about homosexual behavior and non-traditional families as young as age 6. What 6-year-old should be forced to hear these things and what 6-year-old can make this distinction? Parents who believe in traditional values have no choice in the sensitive area of sex, family or values education. The state and those who protest with emotional arguments of discrimination, unfairness, and threatened lawsuits are pushing and forcing the same-sex “marriage” social experiment on society. Mr. Williamson mentions that discrimination does not exist in the Constitution and at the same time references that no one can vote unless they are 18. Why is this an acceptable definition of the right to vote and not discrimination against 17 yr.olds? Everything in life is not fair and some things should be accepted and not challenged because one can. Mr. Williamson goes on to mention the 50% divorce rate and battered women as a defense to allow same-sex “marriage.” The high divorce rate is partially due to the change in laws and society that allows for so-called no-fault divorce. Before this social experiment (as a result of a change in the laws and a liberal judiciary) the divorce rate was lower and society more “healthy.” Battered women and children partially are a product of a permissive society that has lowered its standards and beliefs. If these costs are high, as he claims, they are not related to the marriage issue. Scientific studies have shown that violence against children increases in a “family” that does not consist of the biological mother and father of a child. These health care costs could certainly go up if the social experiment of redefining marriage and family continues. The sociological, economic and other documented evidence is clear and shows that there are many danger signals to changing the definition of marriage and


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008 family by adopting same-sex “marriage.” The emotional arguments and threatening tactics used by those who wish to make the change should make us pause and evaluate the motives and results that they are trying to achieve. Also, to include children in this issue is wrong. I believe the forceful tactics being used are over the top and are a very real danger signal to society for examining what and how we as a culture respond to these types of proposed historical and sweeping changes. The results of the social experiment forced on our culture by “no-fault” divorce should further give us pause before rushing in to continue to weaken families and society by other sweeping changes in our culture through the rule of law. John Poe Bridgeville

Tax appeal process disappointing

I recently went through the Seaford Property Tax Appeal Process and would like to offer a few comments on “The Seaford Property Assessment Process.” My wife and I purchased a home in Seaford in September 2007. We were very surprised to receive an assessment notice which implied that the market value of our property was $11,200 higher than the purchase price effective January 1, 2008. Anyone who is at all aware of real estate values knows that property values have been on a steady decline for more than a year after peaking in 2006. I immediately decided that an appeal to reduce my assessment to the purchase price was warranted. I made an appointment with the city assessor, Mr. David Hickey, and explained my concern. He advised me he would review the assessment and get back to me. I subsequently received a letter stating current market conditions indicated that the estimated market value for my home was correct and my appeal was denied. There was no explanation of how the estimated market value was determined. If desired, further appeals could be made to the “Board of Assessment Appeal” which consists of the mayor and council. A review of the city charter section 25 clearly states that properties are to be assessed at actual and true market value. There is no definition of market value in the charter. However the definition I found says: “Fair Market Value is the price an interested but not desperate buyer would be willing to pay and an interested but not desperate seller would be willing to accept on the open market assuming a reasonable period of time for an agreement to arise.” Since this definition precisely describes how the price on our house was determined, I was quite sure that, given the charter, this definition of market value and the obvious declines in real estate values, that the board would surely be responsive to my appeal to reduce my assessment to the purchase price. I was very wrong. Mr. Hickey and the board rejected the appeal citing the purchase prices of four similar homes purchased in 2006 when real estate prices were at a peak. Mr. Hickey implied that the assessments for these homes and mine should essentially be the same. Purchase prices, which varied by more that $50,000, do not appear to matter. The fact that the assessments were closer to 2006 values instead of 2008 values

did not matter. The fact that new and existing homes in this neighborhood are listed below the assessed values did not matter. Mr. Hickey said the listings are misleading. It also apparently does not matter to the mayor and council who sit on the “Board of Assessment Appeal.” Based on a conversation with Sharon Drugash, I am at the end of the appeal process as defined in the city charter and state regulations. She advised me to see a lawyer if I wanted to continue my challenge. That of course would be expensive and unjustified in this case. The point of my concern is that the assessor, mayor and council in my opinion do not correctly interpret the rules for assessment as outlined in the city charter. It appears that Mr. Hickey makes the rules and council rubber stamps them. As I interpret the charter, the five properties used as an example by Mr. Hickey should all be assessed based on what I paid for my home which was the most recent sale in my neighborhood and is therefore the best reflection of true market value on or about January 2008. My guess is that this is one case of many where the assessed values of homes are out of line with real estate price reality as of January 2008. Most of us seldom if ever challenge how government works. This is my initial attempt and I did not like it. Most of us quietly complain when things do not go our way, but do little to get involved. We simply pay for decisions and actions we were never aware of. Perhaps more of us need to attend council sessions to see what is going on and perhaps participate in government. It is somewhat sad and undemocratic that we elect our representatives with no opposition as was the case in Seaford. That is how “Old Boy Networks” are created. W. J. Hinz

Seaford

Who is policing the police?

I want to take this opportunity to say thank you for the story on the front page on August 28 about the cop who killed the jogger. I am shocked that nothing has really been done at this point. It seems that if you are a cop or some high official that you are above the law. Recently in another paper we read where a cop was giving tickets to dead people. My question there is if there are not any quotas, why would he have had to do that? I know of a town where a relative of mine went to court. She appeared before a judge and told him she did not do what she was accused of. The judge told her that the cop would say she did, so pay the fine. Isn’t that “guilty until proven innocent?” What is wrong with that picture? I thought that if they have evidence against you, you are allowed to see it. Any fool can say, “You did whatever” and you are guilty. Is that not what the Gestapo did in Germany, accuse people of stuff they never did? In that same town I see the cops doing the same stuff that they give tickets for. In fact I followed a cop from this town on route 24 west and he and I both were doing 65. I am just so frustrated, as I am sure a lot of others are. It just seems that the law goes against some and not others.

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When you are told you are guilty until you can prove otherwise, public officials are given slaps on hands for stuff that you or I would be put away for and cops are like the “gods” of the land. I will be the first to admit that there are some really good cops. And I do know that it only takes a few to ruin a police force’s name. But my main question is still, “Who polices the police?” I really need to know because there is a town that really needs to get rid of some cops that are not really following the same laws that we have to. Jay Reaser

Laurel

Skateboarders unfairly labeled

My younger brothers moved to our area from Colorado a few weeks ago. They are in their early teens and enjoy skateboarding. Unfortunately, there is not much to do around the area for people who have a

passion for skating. Besides their skateboard, skaters also carry around an unfair stereotype. They damage property, cause fights, and their loitering is unacceptable. I use to share some of these beliefs, but after I spent some time with my brothers the other day, I realize that I have been very ignorant. My brothers showed me some videos they had recorded while skating in Colorado, as well as some footage in the area. I saw them falling, landing tricks, and one incident where a police officer informed them that there was a fine for skateboarding if he caught them again (which, by the way, was very kind). Then, one of my brothers started making a movie on his laptop with the clips I had just watched. He added video transitions, music, and eventually uploaded it to the Internet for his friends to watch. I could tell he was passionate as he talked about making a DVD of his skating Continued to page 58

Barack Obama’s new five-layer headache What an interesting election season is upon us. If you are like EV ODD ROFFORD me, constant access to news leaves you feeling a little overwhelmed ...in an election where with election talk, but even the 52% of the voters are most skeptical observer has to admit this election is quite attentionwomen, a shift of a few grabbing. percentage points can For example, the election will be historic no matter which side be crucial. wins. Either we will have our first African-American president or our first female vice-president. Another topic of intrigue for publican camp. Still, in an election where many is the question, “Why isn’t Barack 52% of the voters are women, a shift of a Obama running away with this election by few percentage points can be crucial. now?” With our economy struggling, an Democratic women are still smarting unpopular war, and the shelf life expiring over what they feel has been poor treaton a long hold on government by the Rement of Hillary Clinton and it remains to publicans, Obama should have a 20-point be seen how many will express that dislead by now. Yet if the Republican conpleasure at the polling place. Undoubtedly vention generates even a small bounce for some will. McCain, we will be in a dead heat with She’s got a story. As the public betwo months to go. comes more familiar with Palin, they are Meanwhile, McCain’s pick of Govergoing to like her on a personal level. She nor Palin for vice-president is an absolute doesn’t come from inherited money, she stroke of genius. Here’s a five-layer mihas been part of labor, she has been a graine that just hit Barack Obama. business owner, and she is living through The Republican base just woke up. the difficulties and challenges that a speSeven million dollars in donations poured cial needs child brings. into McCain’s camp in a matter of a While John McCain comes across as weekend following the announcement of unlikable sometimes, Palin’s life story her candidacy. Key conservative leaders softens the ticket considerably. like James Dobson immediately praised The pretty-face factor. We know this the selection and are on board once again. cuts both ways. Obama is an energizing Conservatives who have little trust for political face that can fill a stadium and he McCain’s maverick ways just found the looks pretty appealing when standing next champion for their causes. to a tired-looking old man. (In fairness to Who are the Washington insiders now? McCain he is in great health, he just doesObama is running on a one-word platn’t look so great.) form: change. Who is more of a change Now the balancing factor is that Palin agent? Biden, an entrenched insider, or is going to look much more appealing on Palin, who has contested corruption at stage than Joe Biden. I wish I could tell every level of government where she has you that looks don’t matter in politics, but served. Suddenly the Republicans can let’s be honest, in this country looks matclaim they are the ones whose leaders are ter in absolutely everything. Its unfair, but ready to shake things up a bit, not the Deits true. mocrats. So buckle up for a crazy ride, a ride The female dynamic. It is foolishness that will be much more wild with the into think that large sums of liberal-leaning jection of Sarah Palin into the mix. women voters will move over to the Re-

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Snapshots

REMEMBERING THEIR SILVER YEARS - The 25-Year Club, made up of people who worked for the DuPont Co. nylon plant in Seaford for at least 25 years, held its annual dinner recently. Above, members wait for their dinners to be served. Photos by Pat Murphy

Above, Roy Kellam Jr. and his dad, Roy Sr., both worked at the plant. Below, Ellen Jane Banks and Loren Fuller have a lot of company memories to share.

Father and son George and David Ruff, seated, chat with with Ike Truitt, right, and Henry Bounds left.

IN SUPPORT OF THE BULLDOGS - John Rogers, right, with his grandchildren Nathan and Elizabeth, his wife, Karen, and his daughter, Michelle, and her husband, Craig Moyer, support the Laurel Football Boosters fundraiser at Laurel Pizzeria last week. Photo by Pat Murphy.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

McCain shows courage in selecting his running mate We just never know what will come up next on the surprise list, be it on the world scene, here in our western Sussex town of Laurel, or on the national political scene. Such is the case with the nomination of Sarah Palin as the Republican candidate for vice president of the United States. As we watched all the hoopla presented by the Republican party on television and filling the newspapers and magazines, we were reassured in our feelings that John McCain, the “maverick,” is no dummy when it comes to a running mate. To select the governor of Alaska as the candidate for vice president of this nation in November took great courage. John McCain undoubtedly knew his choice would result in great critics. After all, Sarah Palin is a basic unknown, mother of five children and in particular, she is a woman! To state it quite simply, to nominate her took courage and guts! A few years ago, Hallmark presented a television show entitled “Sarah, Plain and Tall.” The Sarah in the show was a strong woman, faced with seemingly insurmountable challenges, but managed to achieve success due to an inner stamina and determination that was deep within her being. Sarah Palin will never be described as “plain and tall.” She is a young, vibrant, beautiful woman who has already faced many challenges in her life. She will continue to face more challenges than she ever probably imagined, but with the skills she has already displayed in her life will undoubtedly be successful as she faces what lies ahead. Politics and all that it involves bring out the best and worst in lots of people. Those of us who watched both the Democratic and Republican conventions on television saw some of the most ridiculous hats and outfits worn by some of the delegates. Both men and women turned out looking more ridiculous than any circus clown we have ever seen. When we think of delegates to any kind of convention or gathering, we like to think we are sending responsible, intelligent, upstanding representatives of whatever group we are involved with. Yet, some of those costumed men and women make us wonder where we went wrong when they show up looking like freaks. All in the name of politics.

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Moments With Mike VIRGINIA ‘MIKE’ BARTON One thing sure. Politics breeds some strange bedfellows. Think about all of the promises political leaders make. When they are running for office they promise a huge variety of situations that will affect each one of us. When they are giving their speeches they choose words that make us feel that only their candidate will be capable of helping us find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. These politicians are great masters of the English language and as we listen we are totally mesmerized by their words. We believe the speaker will single-handedly cure the problems of the world, cure the worst diseases, make us all law-abiding citizens, have the financial resources to pay all of our bills and have schools without any educational or social problems. Promises, promises, promises. It doesn’t matter whether one is a Democrat or Republican or an Independent. The promises sound wonderful and make us believers. For a few weeks every fall during an election year, we believe we have selected the perfect person to lead our government. We become wrapped up in the speeches and elegant way they are presented that we forget that one human being cannot possibly make it all come true. And, so between now and Nov. 4, each of us absolutely must sit down and quietly think about who we want to lead this nation of ours for the next four years. We need to think about just which direction we want our nation to go, how we can help —each in our own small way. And, most importantly, we need to be sure to vote in November. Male, female, black, white, Democrat or Republican —the choice is ours. And, as Americans, it is our duty to vote. Voting is also our privilege. Give it deep thought.

Kathryn’s FLOWERS

In last week’s column Terry Wright’s name was omitted from the write-up about the Laurel New Century Club’s past presidents luncheon. So sorry, Terry. The Red Hat Ladies group from Christ U.M. Church group, the Chatter Hatters, report that they enjoyed a delectable lunch on Aug. 29 at the Lighthouse restaurant at the Georgetown Airport. Meantime, another of the “Red” groups, the Bonnets and Boas, on Tuesday, Aug. 26, enjoyed dinner and a show at the Theatre of the Arts in Rehoboth, a newly-opened entertainment site. Margaret Coladonato, her sister, Hanna Miller, and daughter, Carolyn, drove to West Virginia for the Labor Day weekend holiday to visit their sister, Tillie Moore. The LHS class of ‘63 will observe the 45th year since graduating, at Riverside Community Center, Long Neck, Sept. 20. Heidi and John Evans avoided all the Florida wet weather recently by coming up from Sarasota to spend some time at their Laurel home on Delaware Avenue. We think they brought some much needed rain this way — finally. The ladies of the Laurel Garden Club will join together for the first meeting of the current season today, Sept. 11, 10 a.m. to tour with Master Gardeners in the Demonstration Garden at the Delaware Cooperative on Rt. 9, Georgetown. Sending speedy recovery wishes to Joe “Bulldog” Hitchens following his surgery this week at Beebe Hospital in Lewes. I’m sure he’ll be out and running soon as he can’t possibly miss any Laurel football games. Get your soft cushion out, Joe, and we’ll see you in the stands. If you’re a member of the Laurel Historical Society, we need some help at the Cook House on Monday, Sept. 15, to help unpack some of our older items. I was saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. Robert Carmean, an old friend for

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I have just learned of the death of Will Stacy in New Hampshire. The Stacys, you may recall, resided in Laurel for 25 years, and had only recently moved to that state where they are closer to other family members. Will was quite active in civic affairs while living here and loved this community. Our sympathy is expressed to his wife, Eleanor, his sons, Dodd and Art, daughter, Susie, and his beloved and constant companion, his dog, Ike. Birthday wishes to Michael Truitt, a Delmar serviceman now stationed at Fort Drum, N.Y., who will celebrate his “day” on Sept. 18. His family sends him loads of love and greetings on this day. Get well wishes to Delmar folks who are under the weather: Gloria Adkins, Bob Christian, Lib Figgs, Darryl Hagar, Louise Foxwell, Joyce Lord and Bob Horn. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of: Bill Stacy, Dr. James Robert Carmean, Vernon Lyons, Joanne Carter, Mary Irene Smith, Joan G. Holloway, Lillian E. Smith, Ronald L. McDowell and Levin S. Dickerson Sr. We continue with prayers for our servicemen and servicewomen and for our friends who are ill: Philip Lowe, Harriett MacVeigh, Patrick Starr, Rosalie Mutchler, June Williams, Donald Layton Sr., Robert D. Whaley, Hattie Puckham, Alvin Lutz, Steve Trivits, David Phillips, Martha Windsor, Pete Henry and Herman Cubbage. I wish my next door neighbor, Bettyann Adams, a very happy birthday on Sept. 13; her family also joins me in this wish. Other happy September birthday wishes to: Frederick Allen on Sept. 12; Barbara Berkeley, Sept. 13; Tom Scott, Sept. 14; Jeanne Berner and Margeret West, Sept. 15; and Fred O’Neal, Sept. 18. “To the world you might be one person, but to one person you might be the world.” See you in the Stars.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

Opinion Editorial ‘Daughters’ of the Revolution promote Constitution Week Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2008, begins the national celebration of Constitution Week. The weeklong commemoration of America’s most important document is one of our country’s least known official observances. Our Constitution stands as a testament to the tenacity of Americans throughout history to maintain their liberties and freedom, and to ensure those unalienable rights to every American. The tradition of celebrating the Constitution was started many years ago by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). In 1955, the Daughters petitioned Congress to set aside September 17-23 annually to be dedicated for the observance of Constitution Week. The resolution was later adopted by the U.S. Congress and signed into Public Law on Aug. 2, 1956, by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The aims of the celebration are to: • Emphasize citizens’ responsibilities for protecting and defending the Constitution and preserving it for posterity. • Inform the people that the Constitution is the basis for America’s great heritage and the foundation for our way of life. • Encourage the study of the historical events which led to the framing of the Constitution in September 1787. The United States of America functions as a Republic under the Constitution, which is the oldest document still in active use that outlines the self-government of a people. This landmark idea that men had the inalienable right as individuals to be free and live their lives under their own governance was the impetus of the American Revolution. Today, the Constitution stands as an icon of freedom for people around the world. “Constitution Week is the perfect opportunity to read and study this great document which is the safeguard of our American liberties,” states DAR President General, Linda Gist Calvin. “We encourage all citizens across the country to take time this week to reflect on our heritage of freedom.” DAR has served America for 118 years as its foremost cheerleader. In 1928, the Daughters began work on a building as a memorial to the Constitution. John Russell Pope, architect of the Jefferson Memorial, was commissioned to design the performing arts center, known as DAR Constitution Hall. Today, DAR Constitution Hall is the only structure erected in tribute to the Constitution of the United States of America. Known as the largest women’s patriotic organization in the world, DAR has more than 165,000 members with approximately 3,000 chapters in all 50 states and 11 foreign countries. The DAR has long promoted patriotism through commemorative celebrations, memorials, scholarships and activities for children, and programs for new immigrants. For more information about DAR and its programs visit www.dar.org or call (202) 628-1776.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

September 11 is now Patriot Day Today marks the seventh anniversary of RYANT ICHARDSON the terrorist attacks on our nation. President Bush pro- The courage was claimed this Thursday demonstrated by the Patriot Day and orpassengers of Flight 93 dered the lowering of our U.S. flags. who were the first to U.S. and Delaware resist the terrorists... flags are lowered to half mast today in memory of those who lost their lives in the their lives as a result of the tragic attacks of September 11, 2001. attacks on our country. Gov. Ruth Ann Minner followed “I would also ask that the people by ordering the lowering of Delaof Delaware keep in their thoughts ware flags and stated: and prayers the survivors of the at“The events of Sept. 11, 2001 tacks, as well as the family memforever changed our nation. Most of bers and loved ones of those whose us remember that day very well, and lives were lost.” it is appropriate we lower our flags Being a patriot does not mean in remembrance of those who lost that you agree with every decision

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of your leadership. It does mean that you agree with the principles upon which this nation was founded and you will work with others for the common good. When our nation was attacked in 2001, the real courage and conviction of our citizens came to the surface. The courage was demonstrated by the passengers of Flight 93 who were the first to resist the terrorists and prevent yet another tragedy in the heart of Washington, D.C. The conviction was demonstrated by our leaders to pursue the enemy and take the fight to their own soil, by our military men and women, who willingly joined the battle, and to citizens everywhere who took new pride in our flag. Fly the flag proudly and remember the sacrifices that have helped our nation stave off other attacks.

Letters to the Editor Continued from page 55

footage to distribute around Christmas time. All I once saw was a bunch of kids who could injure themselves while skating at public venues, eventually chased away by business owners who didn’t care for the commotion. Now, I see a bright bunch of young people who have incorporated media, technology and art into something as simple as riding a wooden board around. They can create movies, network with each other across the Internet, and hopefully stay out of trouble while doing it. I encourage you to let them have their fun. There may be more to it than meets the eye. Bryan Simon Laurel

alike unite and rally to secure the decision to keep the Center open. All of Sussex County will benefit from the ongoing and valuable resources the Center provides. On behalf of the children and youth of Sussex County, I thank you. Wilma Caraway

Georgetown

Thanks for vegetables

I want to take a few minutes to thank those who spent hours raising the wonderful vegetables that I just bought today (and other Saturdays) at Kiwanis Park, (at the Farmers’ Market). This was a wonderful idea and I hope it can be done in 2009. To all those who carried it out, thank you. Frances Freeborn

Learning Center top value

Seaford

I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who supported the continuous operation of the Sussex County Learning Resource Center located at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, in Georgetown. It was heartwarming to see both community members and leaders

SSA thanks supporters

The SSA (Seaford Swim Association) concession stand committee would like to thank every member of SSA for his or her support. Families donated a vast array of fruits, veggies, desserts, candy, and drinks so that our concession stand would have a variety of foods to sell.

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Frank Calio

Donna Huston Carol Kinsley James Diehl Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Ann Wilmer

We would especially like to thank the following businesses for their donations at each of our home meets: Grotto Pizza of Seaford for their donation of pizza, Laurel Food Lion for their donation of hamburger and hotdog rolls, and Seaford Subway for their subs. The committee would like to thank Jay Duke and Bud Simpler for manning the grill at each home meet. We just cannot thank our SSA families and our community enough. You are wonderful. See you next summer. Kathi Adams, Bethany Chaffinch, and Amy Pearson Seaford

Kelly’s Crusaders were tops

Thanks once again to all of my family and friends who supported my MS Walk team, Kelly’s Crusaers, held in Dover in April. I just received notification that my team and I were the top fundraisers in Dover collecting $4,140 in pledges. I’m so proud to have such a wonderful support system. My team and I will be back in 2009, hopefully raising even more. Kelly Griffith

Team Captain, Seaford

Circulation Karen Cherrix Sales George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams

Composition Cassie Richardson Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Treasurer Rita Brex Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Carol James town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 11 - 17, 2008

PAGE 59

Reason for the Civil War should be closely examined In my spare time, one of my favorite things to do is visit Civil War Battlefields. I haven’t been to all that many (only seven so far), but when I set foot on the field, I feel like I am standing on sacred ground. Any lover of United States History knows that a visit to a battlefield where American blood was shed is an experience like none other. Knowing that men fought and died to protect and preserve my freedom is overwhelming to say the least. Unlike every other war in which Americans have fought, the Civil War is a bit ambiguous. Before the Civil War and after it, every American has hoped and prayed that the United States would prevail. In the Civil War, however, America was divided against herself and who was right and who was wrong wasn’t clear. In the years preceding the war, slavery, unfortunately, was an economic issue first and a moral issue second. In truth a majority of the farmers and land owners in the south were not wealthy enough to afford slaves. Business owners and farmers in the north, in many cases, had never even seen a slave. My high school history teachers taught me that the Union invaded the Confederate States to stop the sin of slavery. I was taught that the Confederacy was full of racist men that loved the institution of slavery and hated the laws of God. I was also taught that the Confederate flag was and still is brandished by rednecks that hate the entire African American race. In contrast, a dear friend from college often referred to the Civil War as “The War of Northern Aggression.” She was from North Carolina. Her History books had taught her that the North was full of money hungry invaders that insisted upon imposing their way of life, with the use of force, on innocent people. I believe that many of the soldiers who courageously dedicated their lives to the Union Army did so in protest to slavery, but this war was not waged by the North only to free the slaves. In addition, the South did not form a Confederacy and secede from the Union just to keep their slaves. One hundred and forty-seven years after the Civil War began, people in both the North and the South are still living with the misconceptions and half-truths handed down through generations and propagated by the education system. James McPherson’s “Battle Cry of Freedom” is critically acclaimed as the best Civil War book ever printed. I think every American should read that book in an effort to set aside the misconceptions each of us learned about the “other side.” The American Civil War claimed at least 620,000 lives, which are more than the combined casualties of Americans in every other war from the Revolution to Vietnam. Every death on each side left an American family without a father, a husband, a son, or a brother. Every death was a death suffered by an American who bravely sacrificed his life for his country and if you ever find yourself lucky enough to tour a Civil War Battlefield, take that fact with you when you leave. Laura Rogers Star Staff

Final Word Sarah Palin, part one

Laura Rogers thanked me the other day for not asking before she was hired, whether or not she was planning to have children and how she could handle the job and care for children, too. She was referring to the question some have raised as to the ability of vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin to serve in office while taking care of a family consisting of five children. Jokingly, I told her that Palin said she had returned to work one day after giving birth to her latest child, bringing the newborn to the workplace with her. Laura was not in favor of such a challenge. This would not be our policy, by the way.

Sarah Palin, part two

Sarah Palin’s comment that the difference between hockey moms and pit bulls is lipstick, helped set the stage for an unfortunate comment by presidential hopeful Barack Obama. His comment concerned an old saying that you can put lipstick on a pig, but it’s still a pig. Was he referring to Palin’s candidacy? The great defenders of his campaign, better known as the mainstream media, immediately came to his defense, stating that he was not referring to Palin. Nineteen months on the campaign trail can produce some weariness and not everything you say can be that well thought out. The question in people’s minds concerns Obama’s attitude toward

Tournament will benefit youth at Laurel Boys & Girls Club The Laurel site of Western Sussex Boys & Girls Clubs is slated to benefit from an upcoming charity golf tournament being held in Bridgeville. The annual Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament to be held at Heritage Shores Golf Course will provide support to the area youth development organization. This year’s event is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 18, beginning with a breakfast and registration at 8 a.m. The Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament features a “4-Player Scramble.” The cost per player is $150 and $600 per four-member team. Following the breakfast and registration there will be a 9 a.m. “Shotgun Start.” There will be a box lunch on the course and refreshments, awards and an auction will also highlight the event. Special entertainment will be provided by nationally known comedian Joe Conklin. For more information contact John Evans at 302-398-1018. Also, visit the website at www.johnnyjanosikcharitygolf.com.

Palin entering the race. Is he bitter? I doubt that, but he has to be concerned. Palin knows how to handle herself behind the microphone and she has reenergized the Republican party. John McCain has shown he can think outside the box and is willing to take chances to stir things up in Washington. He deserves the title of maverick. And now he has a barracuda as his running mate. Bryant Richardson Publisher

CNN at the time and missed it. I did look at the Fox News article of August 23 online and failed to find anything in it that supported his allegation. How Frank interprets things often reminds me of the horse race between the American and French horses. After the race the American press reported that the American horse won by 20 lengths. The French press reported that the French horse ran a strong race and finished second while the American horse finished next to last.

Money flowing to Delaware?

Frank Calio wrote a very nice article on Joe Biden in the August 28 edition of the Stars. It was both interesting and informative. However, as he often does, Frank couldn’t leave well enough alone. He let his liberalism show through with his statement, “If the pair is elected, a lot of money through the influence of Biden will come to Delaware.” We should all object to more dollars coming to Delaware or Alaska because Biden or Palin would be vice president. I know that is the system currently espoused by Congress (both Democrats and Republicans) but it is still wrong. States should receive money based on legitimate and prioritized needs. Second, I would appreciate Frank elaborating on how Fox News knocked Obama’s choice of Biden, as I was watching

Bob Wootten New Bern, NC

Why not end with some humor?

From the Internet:Why Athletes Should Not Be Role Models: Football commentator and former player Joe Theismann in 1996: “Nobody in football should be called a genius. A genius is a guy like Norman Einstein.”

Send us your ‘Final Words’

If you have a pet peeve or word of encouragement you can express in a few words, email the item to us at editor@mspublications.com or mail it to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Sign it and include your hometown and a daytime phone number.


Don’t Miss

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 • 7 AM

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September 11, 2008_L