Page 1

VOL. 14 NO. 10

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

50 cents

News HEALTH CARE FORUM - Nearly 80 people turned out to express views and hear others talk about health care and attempts to change it. Page 4 APPLE SCRAPPLE - What are the organizers cooking up for the 18th annual Apple-Scrapple Festival this weekend in Bridgeville? Page 2 NANTICOKE HONORS - Long-time board members and two area doctors to be recognized at annual tribute dinner. Page 11 RObbERy - Police are looking for a man suspected in a knife-point robbery at an area liquor store. Page 24 bENEFIT SING - A performance by the Tri County Chorus will help raise funds for the state’s food banks. Guest entertainers will be featured. Page 26

Sports POP WARNER - The Laurel and Delmar Pop Warner teams were home last weekend. See exclusive photos starting on page 39. FOOTbALL WINS - The Laurel and Delmar varsity football teams earned wins in last week’s action. See results on page 41. STARS OF THE WEEK - A Laurel varsity football player and a Sussex Tech field hockey player are this week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 41

INSIDE THE STAR Business Bulletin Board ChurCh Classifieds eduCation final Word Gas lines Gourmet health letters lynn Parks

6 16 20 32 30 51 24 27 28 50 47

mike Barton movies oBituaries PeoPle PoliCe snaPshots soCials sPorts tides tony Windsor

49 7 22 13 24 48 49 39 7 47

bULLDOG bAND PERFORMS - Members of the Laurel High School band perform during Saturday’s Community Awareness Day, held in Janosik Park. The day featured free food and entertainment and community organizations handed out information. See additional photos, page 14. For a story about the band’s latest award, see page 3. Photo by Tony E. Windsor

State gives OK for new school buildings By Tony E. Windsor Plans to increase capacity with new school buildings in the Laurel School District have been embraced by the Delaware Department of Education. On Monday, Sept. 28, Laurel School District Superintendent John McCoy announced that the Delaware DOE has approved “Certificates of Necessity” for adding new classroom construction in Laurel. During the Monday meeting of the Laurel Mayor and Council, Mayor John Shwed, who also works in the

school district, shared the information with the council and audience. According to Shwed, who announced information submitted to him by McCoy, the DOE and the Laurel School District will work with engineers to develop a timeline for the construction project authorization, funding and eventual construction. “The Laurel School District has overcome a major hurdle with this Department of Education announcement supporting new buildings for our children,” Shwed said.

WHAT’S HAPPENING.... Turn to our Bulletin Board every Thursday to see what’s happening this weekend.

The building plan that has been approved by the state DOE includes the construction of a new elementary school for students Pre-Kindergarten through 5th grade which will house as many as 1,200 students. The plan also includes construction of a new middle school which will provide classrooms for up to 700 students in grades 6 through 8. There are also plans for a new high school to accommodate 700 students. Continued on page 12

Subscribe Today! The Laurel Star www.laurelstar.com 302.629.9788


PAGE 2

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Bridgeville to host Apple Scrapple Festival this weekend Bridgeville’s 18th annual The library’s wildlife show en a 1-pound block of scrapple Apple-Scrapple Festival is set for won’t be the only venue for art and limited time to create the best Oct. 9 and 10. New this year will at the festival. Also new this work of art they can, will take be a Carving and Wildlife Show, year will be sand artist Darrell place Saturday at 11 a.m. in the sponsored by the Friends of the O’Connor, who will create a parking lot behind the fire hall. Bridgeville Public Library and sculpture in the telephone comAnd then there will be the held at the new library on South pany lot near the intersection craft shows — three of them. Cannon Street. The art show will of Delaware Avenue and Laws The St. Mary’s Church Craft be open Friday from 3 to 7 p.m. Street. Festival-goers will be able Show, sponsored by St. Mary’s and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 to watch the artist at work. Episcopal Church, will take place p.m. Proceeds will benefit the The scrapple carving contest, Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in 09CSDB_10ADV_6x10MRNGSTR_1001_00402.indd (Seaford Star & Laurel Star) 6”w 10”H the church new library. in which contestants will be givthe church and Xoutside

Accelerate your savings with October’s CD rates!

2.75

%

APY1

3-Year CD2 As of 10/1/09

3.40

%

APY1

5-Year CD2 As of 10/1/09

For friendly, hometown service, call or stop in today. Open an account in just minutes, and make more money in October.

Lobby

Drive Thru

Monday–Friday Saturday

9:00am–6:00pm 8:30am–1:00pm

8:30am–6:00pm 8:30am–1:00pm

On1Annual OctoberPercentage 3, 2008, FDIC Yielddeposit (APY). This offer applies to personal accounts only. CD rate based on a $1,000 minimum balance and insurance from appliestemporarily to a 3-yearincreased and 5-year term. A penalty may be charged for early CD withdrawal. Fees could reduce earnings on the account. $100,000 to $250,000 perasdepositor Advertised rate is valid of 10/1/09 and subject to change daily without notice. through December 31, 2009. 2 On 10/3/08, FDIC deposit insurance temporarily increased from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor, per deposit category,

through 12/31/13. ©2009 Discover Bank, Member FDIC

Delaware Avenue. Judging of the vehicles will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. and awards will be handed out at the stage area at 3:30 p.m. Scrapple Chunkin’, in which contestants compete for awards by throwing packages of scrapple as far as they can, will start at 1 p.m. in the field behind the high school. This signature event features four categories, adult male, adult female, youth male and youth females, and prizes and medals will be awarded. The Mayor’s Scrapple Sling, an invitation-only contest among town and county leaders, will take place from 2 to 3 p.m. at the stage behind the fire hall. The winner will take home the dubious title of King of Sling. A motorcycle show, the third annual Pig-Out, will take place from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sussex Avenue Extended and Railroad Avenue. Trophies will be awarded at 4:30 p.m. The PigOut, sponsored by the festival and Harley-Davidson of Seaford, will feature bands, food vendors, tattoo contests and motorcycle vendors. It will benefit the Woodbridge School District’s uniform assistance fund. The annual Apple-Scrapple Trade Show will be set up at the intersection of Delaware Avenue and Laws Street from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Individuals as well as businesses will show off their wares and services. The Health and Safety Fair will be set up throughout the day Saturday in the fire hall, with displays from organizations such as the Division of Family Services, Mothers Against Drunk Driving, the Department of Public Health and the Alzheimer’s Association. Also at the fire hall will be a G-scale model train display, set up by the Shore Line Garden Railroad Train Club. The trains will be running from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Throughout Saturday, the stage in the fire hall parking lot will be the center for Apple Scrapple entertainment.

Ford replica to be auctioned

1-302-349-4512 • Toll free: 1-888-765-6654 502 E Market St, Greenwood, DE 19950 MyDiscoverBank.com Banking Hours

along William Street. The Bridgeville Senior Center’s craft show will be held in front of the center on Market Street and will be open Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. And the Trinity Craft Show, sponsored by Trinity United Methodist Church, will be held in the Woodbridge High School Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Vendors will be set up in the cafeteria, the gymnasium and in hallways and classrooms as well as in the high school yard. The first event of the festival will take place Thursday, with the Miss and Little Miss AppleScrapple Pageant in the Woodbridge High School auditorium. The pageant will get underway at 7 p.m. and proceeds will benefit the Apple-Scrapple Scholarship Fund. The festival will get into full swing at 4 p.m. Friday, when the juried food court, centered on Delaware Avenue and Cannon Street, and the carnival, set up along the railroad, open. An entertainment stage will be set up in the parking lot behind the fire hall. Activities get underway bright and early Saturday morning with an all-you-can-eat breakfast at Union United Methodist Church, sponsored by the United Methodist Men. The men will be serving breakfast from 7 until 11 a.m. On the menu, of course, will be scrapple. What could be the world’s one and only Hogg Jogg 5K will start at 9 a.m., with registration from 7:30 to 8:50 a.m. The run will be at the Woodbridge Farm and Athletic Field north of town. Cost to participate is $10 and all runners will be given T-shirts. At the same time that the run gets underway, main festival activities will get into full swing. The food court and carnival will open, as will the car show, sponsored by the Southern Delaware Street Rod Association. Hundreds of street rods, antique and classic cars, new cars, trucks and motorcycles will be parked along

MRNGSTR_1001_00234

Delaware Teen Challenge will auction off a replica of Henry Ford’s first car, Saturday, Oct. 10, during the Apple Scrapple Festival in Bridgeville. Volunteers with the Teen Challenge will start assembling the kit car in a booth near the Bridgeville Fire Hall at 10 a.m. Saturday. The car holds one person and comes with a small cart that attaches to the back that holds two people. The quadricycle has a two-cylinder, four-cycle engine. The car’s gas tank holds three gallons of fuel. Top speed, just as with the original quadricycle, is 20 miles per hour. The auction will get underway at 6 p.m. on the festival stage behind the fire hall, near the corner of Delaware Avenue and Cannon Street. Dave Wilson of Wilson Auctions in Lincoln and state representative for the Bridgeville area, will conduct the auction. Bidders have to be present. Bids will start at $3,500. For more information about the car, visit the web site hfmgv.org/ EXHIBITS/showroom.1896/quad.html. For details about the sale, call 604-4668.


OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 3

Bulldogs band claims blue ribbon in tourney On Saturday, Oct. 3, the Laurel High School Marching Bulldogs placed first in its class at Appoquinimink High School’s Tournament of Bands Invitational. The ensemble’s score of 82.35 is its highest score in the last eight years and is a testament to the hard work and dedication of its 50 marching members. The band is ranked second in Group 2 Regional Class for all of the Tournament of Bands (TOB) which includes programs in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and parts of Ohio, New York and North Carolina. Drum majors Amber Cooper (senior) and Liz Waite (sophomore) led their peers to victory as they conducted the musical selections: Alacran, El Gato Triste, Los Conquistadores and Fiesta Bahia. Section captains Brandon Niblett (junior) and Maura Pusey (junior) were instrumental in preparing their sections for all the performances this season, leading their sections by example and serving as mentors to rookie members. Drumline captains Justin Collins (senior) and Corey Johnson (senior) as well as stationary percussion ensemble captains Taryn Laux (senior) and Heather Melvin (senior) swelled with pride as their sections received the award for Best Percussion. Guard captains Kirstin Cook (senior) and Kari Noftsinger (senior) also demonstrated their Bulldog Pride when the colorguard was recognized as Best Auxiliary in their class. The 2009 staff includes: Director, Brian Cass; Assistant Director, Mary Pierce-Cass; Colorguard Instructors, Lisa Bales and Alexis Musser; Percussion Instructor, John Turner; Videographer, Alan Bales. The band is scheduled to perform at the William Penn Invitational at Frawley Stadium on Saturday, Oct. 10, and the Chapter 9 Championships hosted by Broadneck High School on Saturday, Oct. 24. It also performs at Laurel High School home football games and at the Woodbridge, Indian River and Seaford away football games.

FREE gIFT

gIFT

with any Estée Lauder purchase of 29.50 or more. Worth over 80.00

me!

Modern beauty. Timeless style. Your check list for fall: Choose the lip and eye shades you love, warm or cool. Discover a 10-day supply of new anti-aging breakthrough, Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Recovery Complex. Reflect on your beauty with a deluxe mirror and more. Just say gift me! Offer good while supplies last. Quantities limited. One gift to a customer please.

Choose Your Lip and Eye Shades

N

The LHS band performed Saturday at Community Awareness Day. The ban recently won first place in the Appoquinimink invitational tournament. Photo by Tony Windsor Breakthrough Anti-Aging Serum

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharp-town and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

For your purchase, discover a major skincare breakthrough:

New. Advanced Night Repair Inspired by the latest DNA research.

Start seeing a dramatic reduction in the visible signs of aging. Use it every day to help continuously repair the appearance of past damage caused by every major environmental assault. This is the one formula beautiful skin can’t live without. 1.0 oz. $47.50 1.7 oz. $74.50

N

STORE LOCATOR!

call 1-800-743-8730 or log on at www.peebles.com

E-ALERTS!

Receive advance notice of sales. Sign up at www.peebles.com

Seaford, DE store only -- Clinique & Estée Lauder Cosmetics

GIFT CARDS!* At www.peebles.com 1-800-743-8730 and in all stores.

*Terms and conditions apply.


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Should employers help out with insurance premiums? Most at health care forum say no By Lynn R. Parks

that by 2019, that cost could reach $850 billion. “If employers stop contributing, where The public forum on health care spondo we come up with the $500 billion to sored in Laurel last week by the Delaware Tea Party was without the rancor that char- take the place of that money?” LaPrad asked. acterized similar meetings held this sumIn 2006, Seaford Machine spent mer. Of the nearly 80 people who attended $75,000 on health care insurance, LaPrad the forum in the fire hall, no one brought said. This year, that cost is $120,000. up President Obama’s birth certificate, no According to the National Coalition on one held up a protest sign and only once, when a Dover doctor stated her support for Health Care, employer-sponsored health a public insurance program run by the fed- insurance premiums have increased 119 percent in the last 10 years, at four times eral government, did the audience boo. the rate of inflation. In 2008, they overtook But if there was any doubt where the profits, the coalition says. mostly Medicare-aged crowd stood on the “When I hear people say that they like issues, it became clear when panelist Phil their health care and don’t want the govLaPrad, an owner of Seaford Machine ernment to change it, I don’t believe that Works in Seaford, asked how many bethey have any idea of the financial contrilieved that an employer should contribute to employees’ health insurance costs. Only bution of their employer,” LaPrad added. LaPrad acknowlone man raised his edged that the hand. Nationally, employers responsibility that “Individuals pay about 70 percent of he accepts for his should be able to control their own the cost of employees’ employees’ health care makes it hard health care dolhealthcare insurance, for him to compete lars,” panelist and according to the nonagainst other maDover attorney Ron chine shops that Poliquin told the partisan National Copay as much crowd later. “Those alition on Health Care. don’t for health insurance. dollars should not be controlled by the That amounts to an an- And it means that is hesitant to hire government or by nual cost of about $500 he new employees, your employer. The billion. The coalition even when his shop key to our nation’s success from day estimates that by 2019, has the work for them. one has been freethat cost could reach “I have one dom and we should $850 billion. 28-year-old guy, have the freedom to single, and it costs choose our own prome $5,000 to cover vider and our own him,” LaPrad said. insurer.” “If I can get by without hiring someone LaPrad, who told the crowd that about new, I try to do it. I believe that health in20 percent of his payroll goes to health surance costs are a major component in reinsurance, said that he does believe that ducing the number of jobs in this country.” employers have a responsibility to proThe National Coalition on Health Care vide insurance. Nationally, employers pay about 70 percent of the cost of employees’ estimates that if health insurance premiums continue to rise as they are, small healthcare insurance, according to the businesses will have to eliminate 178,000 non-partisan National Coalition on Health jobs and $834 billion in wages over the Care. That amounts to an annual cost of about $500 billion. The coalition estimates next 10 years.

LaPrad told the crowd that he supports a single-payer plan through which everyone in the country would be covered under the same insurance but health care providers would be independent of the government. He argued that the health insurance system would be better off if everyone, part-time employees and their employers included, paid into the system. And he extended that argument when Fred Silva, Seaford, who was in the audience, asked about the costs of providing care to illegal immigrants. “Why are those people coming here? Because of jobs,” LaPrad replied. “If everybody who works in this country, illegal or not, and their employers pay their portion of health insurance, then the cost of their care is covered.”

Health care costs too high

Panelists Wally Hudson, vice president of corporate affairs for the Beebe Medical Center in Lewes, and Steve Rose, CEO of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford, argued that the costs of health care should be as much a part of the national debate as costs of health insurance. “Health care is costing more and more dollars in this country and we just can’t afford to keep the momentum going,” Rose said.

Those costs include the nearly $13 billion that insurance companies make in annual profit, Hudson said. Health care costs have grown to the point that Medicare pays only 30 percent of the amount it is billed, Hudson said, an amount that is 14 percent less than his hospital’s costs. Total reimbursement, including private insurance payments, to Beebe in 2008 was only 46 percent of the hospital charges and just a little more than hospital costs. That means, Hudson said, that the medical center is cut short on the amount of money it has to invest in new equipment and technology. Hudson suggested several ways to reduce health care costs: Develop protocols for universal treatment, to eliminate unnecessary tests; prohibit advertising of all medical services and drugs, “all designed to increase demand”; and increase the supply of general practitioners. “All Americans should have a primary care physician to work with to keep healthy,” added Rose. Hudson also said that the American people, many of whom are overweight and sedentary, bear a share of the blame in es-

Seasonal Flu Shots Available!

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Is Offering Flu Shots WEDNESDAY

October 14th • October 21st October 28th • November 4th 9 am to 12:30 pm 4 pm to 7:30 pm

(Medicare Part B Billing Available Insurance Card Required)

Location:

Nanticoke Occupational Health

Stop by the Star office

743 Shipley St. Suite F Seaford, Del.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford 302 629.9788

B RIDAL P LANNER

FRIDAY

October 16th • October 23th October 30th • November 6th 9 am to 1 pm (no evening hours)

$10 Fee Per Person (18 & Over)

Planning A Wedding? Pick Up A FREE copy of the Stars’

Continued on next page

Appointment Necessary Call 302-629-6875 to pre-register & schedule an appointment.

www.nanticoke.org


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 5

Nanticoke CEO sees good and bad in committee bill Continued from previous page

Get government out of insurance calating health care costs. Several panelists talked about the neAs for insurance reform, Hudson said cessity of removing the government from that insurance companies should be rethe insurance debate. Some in the audience quired to enroll everyone, regardless of agreed with Poliquin that people should past medical hisbuy their own health tory, people should insurance, without be required to buy ‘Medicine is the only assistance from the health insurance and business that more government or from insurance companies business is a bad thing. employers. Until should be forbidden bear the full to impose lifetime Do you ever hear a gro- people financial responsibenefit maximums cery store owner or car bility for their insuror to purge people ance, Poliquin addfrom their rolls bedealer say that they ed, “they will have cause of illness. have too much busino incentive not to Rose offered go to the doctor.” ness? No, only in health limited praise of the Rich Collins, a most recent health care are we told that Georgetown insurcare bill to make too much is a problem.’ ance agent and exits way through ecutive director of the Senate Finance the Positive Growth Committee. It enRich Collins Alliance, agreed courages medical that people should Insurance agent students to become be able to buy their primary care physiown insurance in a cians, a good thing, free market. And he he said, and prodisagreed with Hudson and Rose that devides incentives for health care providers mand for health care should be reduced. and hospitals to work together to provide “Medicine is the only business that better care and keep costs down. more business is a bad thing,” he said. “Do But he criticized it for not coming up you ever hear a grocery store owner or car with ways to get health care costs down. dealer say that they have too much busiInstead, he said, it talks about cutting reness? No, only in health care are we told imbursements. “Somewhere, somebody is that too much is a problem.” going to have to pay for health care,” he Speaking by phone after the forum, said.

Collins said that only by sticking with the principles of capitalism, even when it comes to health care and health care insurance, will the United States continue to be prosperous. “The free market works, and that applies to medicine as well,” he said. People should be able to research prices before they decide on a doctor and a procedure, he said, and insurance companies, including Medicare, should not set reimbursement rates lower than actual costs. “If there’s no profit in medicine, new advances won’t be there,” Collins said. Poliquin told the forum audience that the current government-run insurance programs, Medicare for senior citizens and Medicaid for the poor, are rife with deceit. The Medicaid program, he said, loses $68 billion a year to fraud. “Do you want the same people who run Medicaid to run your health care?” he demanded. But national statistics show that Medicaid and Medicare experience about the same rate of fraud as do private insurance companies. And the $68 billion in fraud that Poliquin quoted is actually the estimated amount of total insurance fraud, public as well as private, annually in the United States. Louis Saccoccio is executive director of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud, a national alliance of consumer groups, public interest organizations, government agencies and insurers formed in 1993 to fight insurance fraud. Speaking from his

Washington, D.C., office, he said that fraud in the Medicare and Medicaid programs may be a little higher than it is in private programs, because they are both such large programs. Medicare, for example, “is a very big system and it is hard to get the resources you need to go after fraud.” Even so, he said, estimates of fraud in the Medicare program are at about 3 percent, the same as with private insurers. Silva, the Seaford man who attended the forum, said this week that the forum crowd was “definitely anti-health care reform to the extent and degree and way the federal government is planning.” “The public option is out of the question as far as the crowd was concerned,” he added. Silva said that he would have liked to have heard more discussion about the several proposals being discussed in Congress. But overall, he said, he found the forum, in particular the statements by the Positive Growth Alliance’s Collins, interesting. “It’s too bad more people weren’t there,” he added.

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, PO Box 1000, 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Business ACE free battery exchange

Every year more than 500,000 fires occur in homes across the nation. In conjunction with National Fire Prevention week, Rommel’s ACE Hardware introduces a 9-volt battery exchange program to make sure that no home is without a functioning smoke detector. The risk of injury and death in a house fire without a working smoke detector is more than twice as high as in houses with working ones. From now through October 10 at Rommel’s ACE in Seaford, consumers can trade in their smoke detectors’ old 9-volt alkaline battery for a new Ace 9-volt battery for free. All 12 ACE hardware stores will participate in the giveaway. Rommel’s ACE said there are two essential items that could make all the difference when protecting your home from a fire: fire alarms and fire extinguishers. • Fire/smoke alarms: Fire alarms are  your first line of defense when it comes to fires. Make sure that you have one installed on every level of your home – even the attic. To get the most protection, install one in, or near, every bedroom. Once the fire alarms are installed, be sure to test them once a month and change the batteries twice a year. The cost of fire alarms range from $5 to $25. • Fire extinguisher: Every home should  have a fire extinguisher, specifically one that is labeled as “ABC” which means it can be used on all types of fires. It is important to select a size that fits within your appropriate storage location. ACE suggests keeping a fire extinguisher within 10 feet of the stove, on the same side of the kitchen that has the exit. Once you have selected your fire extinguisher, purchase the desired number (one per floor) plus one additional extinguisher for you to try out. You don’t want to have to learn how to use the extinguisher while there is a fire in your home.

KSI helps community

Kent-Sussex Industries, Inc. (KSI) is celebrating “National Disability Employment Awareness Month” in October. KSI, founded in 1962, is a not-for-profit agency, providing vocational training and employment services to individuals with disabilities throughout Kent and Sussex Counties. KSI also provides a valuable resource for the business community. To learn more about KSI, schedule a tour or arrange a group presentation, contact Alicia Hollis, 422-4014, ext. 3015.

Non-profit groups receive grants

The U.S. Small Business Administration has announced that 58 non-profit organizations from 32 states and the District of Columbia will receive grant funding under the Program for Investment in Microentrepreneurs Act (PRIME) to assist low-income and very low-income entrepreneurs with training and technical assistance to start, operate and grow their businesses. “Thanks to larger funding this year, we were able to provide grant dollars to more recipients across more states. These grant recipients are on the front line of helping entrepreneurs in particularly underserved communities with critical tools to help them maximize the potential of their businesses, create jobs and help strengthen the local economy,” said SBA Administrator

Karen Mills. SBA’s PRIME grant funding is intended to establish management and technical assistance, access to capital and other forms of financial assistance, and business training and counseling through qualified organizations to small businesses with five or fewer employees that are economically disadvantaged, and to businesses owned by low-income individuals, including those residing on Indian reservations and tribal lands. This year’s total program funding amounts to $5 million. Grants range up to $250,000 with a 50 percent match required of the recipient organization.

DSU receives $5 million grant

Delaware State University has received a $5 million grant from NASA that will allow the university to establish an Optical Sciences Center for Applied Research (OSCAR). The center will foster new NASA-related science and technology developments based on optical sciences and technology, enhance the aerospace science and technology workforce, and develop partnerships with industry, NASA research centers and other federal laboratories, and minority and non minority-serving colleges and universities. Specific research areas include Planetary Science, Space Communications & Navigation and Astrobiology. “Grants like DSU received foster important research and development work in our colleges and universities that can launch new companies and create good jobs for students graduating from those institutions,” said Governor Markell.

Shopping for a Cause

Tanger Outlets and the Delaware Breast Cancer Association have partnered in the fight against breast cancer. Until October 20, shoppers are invited to purchase a PINK card for $1 at Tanger Customer Service locations and save 25% off a single item at participating stores. Call 644-6844 or visit www2.tangeroutlet.com/ pink/ for a complete list of participating  retailers.

County earns financial award

For the seventh year in a row, Sussex County has earned the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for its comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR) for fiscal year 2008. The award is among the highest forms of recognition for governmental accounting and financial reporting. The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada, based in Chicago, awarded the Certificate of Achievement to the County earlier this month. The CAFR was judged by an impartial panel to meet the high standards of the association’s program. The award is an acknowledgment of Sussex County’s comprehensive annual financial report, or CAFR. The document includes the county’s annual audit, showing assets, liabilities, equity, revenues and expenses. It also contains information about county demographics and the local economy. That information helps those reviewing the report – such as investors – to better gauge the county’s financial condition.

Ridgewood CRossing CelebRates opening - A ribbon cutting ceremony and after business hours mixer was held Thursday, Sept. 10 for Ridgewood Crossing by Sussex Ventures at their model home. Pictured from left to right is Bruce Wardell, JBS Construction; Shawn McIroy, JBS Construction; Don Ward, Sussex Ventures; Drew Ward, Sussex Ventures; Seaford Councilman Mike Vincent and Paula Gunson, Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce. Photo by Daniel Richardson

WITH SO MANY CHOICES, WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE

TO PAY TAXES? Tax-Free Bonds Tax-FreeMunicipal Municipal Bonds

3.94% 5.67%** 3.75%TO - 4.15% Yield effective 10/05/2009, subject to availability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if sold prior to * Yieldand effective 07/27/2009, subject to sale availability. Yield andmay market value may fluctuate if maturity the amount you receive from the of these securities be less than, equal to, or more to originally maturityinvested. and the Bond amount you receive thetosale of these securities thansold the prior amount investments are from subject interest rate risk such thatmay whenbe interest theto, prices of bonds the investor can lose principal value. Any less rates than,rise, equal or more thancan thedecrease amount and originally invested. Bond investments arebond called prior to in reinvestment risk for the owner of rise, the bond. May beofsubject alternative subject to maturity interestresults rate risk such that when interest rates the prices bondstocan minimum tax. and Municipal bonds may issue discount. decrease the investor canhave loseoriginal principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results

in reinvestment for ofthebonds owner the bond. May your be subject to alternative minimum tax.for Some of the availablerisk issues areofcallable. Contact local Edward Jones financial advisor Municipal bonds havedates original discount. more information aboutmay maturity andissue applicable call provisions. of the available issues of bonds are callable. Contact your local Edward Jones financial ToSome invest in tax-free bonds, call or visit your local advisor for more information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions. financial advisor today.

To invest in tax-free bonds, call or visit your local John F Rittenhouse Sr today. 204 Laureltowne 204 Laureltowne Melinda R Tingle financial advisor

Melinda R TingleAvenue Front St & Delaware 204 Laureltowne Laurel, DE 19956 Front St & Delaware Avenue 302-875-0355 Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-0355

Randy O'Neal

Seaford, DE 19973 302-846-3159

John Front F Rittenhouse SrAvenue St & Delaware 204 Laureltowne Laurel, DE 19956 Front 302-875-0355 St & Delaware Avenue Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-0355

www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 10/9 THRU THURSDAY, 10/15 The Informant! . . . . . . . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:40 4:15 7:05 9:30 Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 3D (PG) . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 3:50 6:35 8:50 Love Happens . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:20 4:05 6:45 9:15 Toy Story 1 & 2, 3D Double Feature (G) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 4:40 8:20 Whip It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:50 4:15 6:40 9:05 Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself (PG-13) . . . . . 1:35 4:10 6:50 9:00 The Invention of Lying . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:10 4:30 6:50 9:00 Fame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:45 4:05 6:45 9:10 Julie & Julia . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:30 4:00 6:35 9:10 Surrogates . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:05 3:10 5:15 7:20 9:30 Zombieland . . . . . . . . . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10 3:15 5:20 7:25 9:40 Couples Retreat . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 4:47 7:10 9:35 Capitalism: A Love Story . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:15 4:20 7:00 9:35 **ART HOUSE THEATER** Play The Game . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:05 4:35 7:00 9:20 Michael Jackson’s This Is It - 2 Weeks Only - Starts 10-28 - Tickets on Sale Now All shows subject to change and availability

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 10/9 The Invention of Lying . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:05 4:55 7:35 10:20 Toy Story 1 & 2 in 3D Double Feature (G) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 7:00 Whip It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:50 4:30 7:40 10:25 Zombieland . . . . . (R) . . . 12:25 1:15 2:35 3:25 4:45 5:35 7:05 8:10 9:30 10:30 Fame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:45 4:25 7:20 10:00 Pandorum . . . . . . . . . . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:25 4:35 7:10 9:45 Surrogates . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10 3:20 5:30 7:50 10:15 Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs (PG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:50 5:10 9:35 Open Captioned Showtimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:30 7:25 The Informant! . . . . . . . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:10 4:50 7:30 10:05 Jennifer’s Body . . . . . . . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 3:50 6:45 9:40 Love Happens . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:20 4:00 6:40 9:25 Sorority Row . . . . . . . . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:30 4:05 6:50 9:20 Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself (PG-13) . . . . . 1:55 4:30 7:15 9:55 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:50 The Final Destination . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:35 2:45 5:00 7:45 Inglourious Basterds . . . . . (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:25 3:40 6:55 10:10 OC = Open Captioned For additional dates and showtimes go to www .fandango .com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 CURRENT SCHEDULE NOT AVAILABLE AS OF PRESSTIME . SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 10/2 THRU THURSDAY, 10/8 The Time Traveler’s Wife . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nightly 7:30, Sunday 2:30 & 7:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Closed Monday & Tuesday

TIDE CHART SHARPTOWN

10/09 L-3:24A H-9:09A L-3:20P 10/10 L-4:21A H-10:06A L4:19P

10/11 10/12 10/13 10/14 10/15

L-5:25A L-6:33A H-1:00A H-2:10A H-3:12A

H-11:11A H-12:26P L-7:39A L-8:38A L-9:31A

L-5:28P L-6:42P H-1:42P H-2:49P H-3:47P

H-9:42P H-10:41P H-11:48P L-7:56P L-9:03P L-10:03P

JEFF’S

GREENHOUSES & GIFT SHOP Mum’s the Word!

FALL MUMS

$

3$

50

10 FOR

(9” Pot)

3200

40% OFF All Shrubs & Trees Azaleas & Roses

*Excludes Dwarf Alberta Spruce Good Oct. 1 - Oct. 31Only

Flowering Cabbage and Kale

9” Pot -

$

350

10 for

$

3200

Winter Pansies

Jumbo $225 6-Pk. / $1200 Flat Fall Decorating Favorites Pumpkins, Indian Corn, Gourds, Corn Shucks and Straw Large Selection Of

ROSES, TREES, SHRUBS, AZALEAS, RHODODENDRONS & GROUND COVERS Plant Now for Spring Tulip, Daffodil, Hyacinth, Crocus Bulbs

MULCH: Pine Bark, Hardwood, Cedar, Cypress, Pine Bark Nuggets, Chips and Red Mulch Visit Our Gift Shop For

Fall Wreaths and Arrangements Large selection of silk and dried arrangements, picks, candles, ribbon by the yard & custom designed wreaths.

REASONABLE PRICES

M A I N S T R E E T, B E T H E L , D E L . Open Mon.875-3420 Sat. 8-5; 880000 2 7 6 - 3 4 2 0 Sunday 12-4


PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Today & Tomorrow Conference October 28 The 16th annual Sussex County Today & Tomorrow Conference is schedule for Wednesday, Oct. 28, from 8 a.m. until noon at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. This year’s conference features two keynote speakers: the Honorable Alan B. Levin, secretary of the Delaware Economic Development Office (DEDO), who will discuss the realities of today’s economy, and The Honorable Collin O’Mara, secretary of the Delaware Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Control (DNREC), who will share the state’s vision for the green economy. Other speakers include: Patti Grimes, vice president, Freeman Foundation; Julie Wheatley, director, Sussex County Economic Development, Rodger Levenson, executive vice president and director of

commercial banking, WSFS and Michael Cumming, principal, Miken Builders. In addition, Ed Simon, workforce analyst for DEDO, will provide valuable, up-to-date labor market information. New this year is the opportunity for participants to submit questions online regarding the topics presented by the keynote speakers. Selected questions, along with the submitter’s name, will be read and answered during the Q & A segments of the conference. Remaining questions will be provided to the speakers to help shape their presentations and also may be used when soliciting audience opinion using the interactive keypad technology. Individuals are invited to submit questions online at www.sussexcountyconference.com. The deadline for submission has

been extended to Friday, Oct. 9. A conference of this importance would not be possible without the collaboration and support of various sponsors. As of this date, the sponsors are: Businesses — Perdue Farms and WSFS Bank (lunch); Creative Concepts, Inc., Delaware Electric Cooperative; Delmarva Digital Media; Delmarva Power; Nanticoke Memorial Hospital; Sussex County Association of Realtors; Tidewater Utilities; Chambers of Commerce — Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce; Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce; Lewes Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau; Rehoboth Beach-Dewey Beach Chamber of Commerce; Georgetown Chamber of Commerce; Bethany Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce;

Municipalities — Town of Georgetown; cities of Lewes, Rehoboth Beach and Seaford; Media — Cape Gazette; Delaware Beach Life magazine; Hoy en Delaware; Seaford Star, Laurel Star; Morning Star Business Report; Sussex Post; Organizations — Delaware Community Reinvestment Action Council (table centerpieces); Southern Delaware Tourism.

The Internal Revenue Service wants you to know there may be a scam waiting in your e-mail inbox that looks very official but is dangerous to you and your computer. “We’re getting reports of people getting an e-mail that appears to come from the IRS and tells recipients to respond to get a refund,” said Delaware’s IRS spokesperson Gregg Semanick. Semanick says there are three things the IRS needs people to remember:

• The IRS never sends unsolicited emails about your taxes. • If you get a scam e-mail, don’t access any links or attachments. • If you receive an e-mail scam, forward it to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov. According to Semanick, if you have accessed a link or attachment in a scam email, you may have allowed the scammer to download malicious software to your computer and you should immediately

scan for viruses and spyware, plus be alert for activity on your financial accounts. “If you have actually responded to a scam e-mail by giving out your private information you should immediately take steps to prevent identity theft. You may now be a prime target,” Semanick said “Taxpayers can help the IRS stop scammers by sending the original scam e-mail to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov. The e-mail must be forwarded using special instruc-

tions at IRS.gov or it loses the encoding needed to track it to its source,” Semanick said. For more about tax scams, visit www. irs.gov and check out the Dirty Dozen, a list of tax scams updated each year by the IRS. The IRS also provides information on its website to help taxpayers protect their personal and financial information. Just type Identity Theft in the search feature for additional information.

The conference fee is $25; chamber of commerce members receive a discounted rate of $20. Late registration fee (Oct. 1923) is $35. Pre-registration is required. The conference is traditionally a sold-out event, so early registration is encouraged. Register using VISA, MasterCard or Discover by phone, 855-1659 or online at www.sussexcountyconference.com.

Help the IRS stop the scammers by forwarding phishing scams

IRS extension deadline is Oct. 15

An estimated 24,600 Delawareans who requested the automatic six-month extension to file their 2008 tax return face the upcoming Oct. 15 deadline. Nationwide, an estimated 10.5 million taxpayers filed for an extension to submit their 2008 tax return this year. The extension is additional time to file a tax return, not additional time to pay. Taxpayers requesting additional time during the tax filing season automatically were granted a six-month extension to file their tax return. Taxpayers who have yet to complete their tax return are encouraged to use IRS e-file to submit their return electronically or use IRS Free File to electronically prepare and send their return. Both IRS e-file and Free File will remain available for taxpayers through the extension period. In Delaware, over 277,000 of the 432,000 filers e-filed their tax returns. Nationwide, over 93 million filed electronically. Free File is a private-public partnership between the IRS and a consortium of tax prep software manufacturers who formed the Free File Alliance. The group makes software and electronic filing available free to eligible taxpayers. Any taxpayer whose income is $56,000 or less, which is over 65 percent of all Delaware filers, will find an available software program. Free File is only available at the IRS. gov website. Taxpayers who have purchased their own software program or who are using a paid tax preparer are urged to file their tax return electronically. To learn more about e-filing, taxpayers should contact their tax professional or visit IRS.gov and click on the e-file logo on the IRS home page.

®

We get you in, get you help & on your way in 15 minutes or less

It’s National Cruise Vacation Month and cruise lines have joined with us to offer our clients spectacular deals running through October.

THE WORLD’S LARGEST CRUISE NIGHT October 14, 2009

Our hours are extended Oct. 13, 14 & 15 until 8:00 p.m.

Free Upgrades - Ship Credits Special Pricing - Reduced Deposits NO RISK! We have gathered information for you in one place - so join us for our Virtual Celebration by visiting

www.cruiseevent.net

Don’t miss out on this CRUISE event!

Ambassador Travel, Inc. 413 High Street, Seaford, DE 19973

(302) 629-9604

debbie@traveldebi.com www.TravelDebi.com

Earn ACE rewards with every purchase!

RommelsACE.com 800 Norman Eskridge Highway, Rt. 20, Ames Plaza Seaford, DE•410-742-2127 + 11 other locations including Perry Hall, MD - Stevensville, MD - Cambridge, MD - Salisbury, MD - Severna Park, MD Ocean City, MD - Millsboro - Dover - Selbyville - Exmore, VA and NEW in Chincoteague, VA! Locally owned and operated


Fall Special THURSDAY NIGHTS

Bring the Family

5 PM 'til 9 PM * PER LANE PER HOUR

$

15

* can not be combined with any other specials

SHOE RENTAL INCLUDED

Up to 6 per lane

ADULT YOUTH LEAGUE

Forming Now Call 629-9778 for information

What Better Way to Spend Your Thursday Night than with Friends and Family

SEAFORD BOWLING LANES Nylon Capital Shopping Center 302

629-9778

Operated by Our Family for Your Family


COUPON

COUPON

8” Cheesesteak

COUPON

Lg. Cheese PIZZAS

Scrapple, Egg & Cheese Sand.

1 for $3.49 1 for $6.99 1 for 99¢ 2 for $6.00 2 for $9.50 2 for $1.89 Coupon Expires 11-30-09

Coupon Expires 11-30-09

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

8” Cold Cut SUB

(Route 13 No. just south of Line Road)

FREE DELIVERY

410-896-4471

Coupon Expires 11-30-09

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

NATURAL LIGHT 30 pk Cans

12.99

$

99¢

Coupon Expires 11-30-09

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

Scrapple Sandwiches 99¢

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

PRINCIPATO ROSATO $

7.99

1.5L Each MUST PURCHASE 3

Mix & Match

Coupon Expires 11-30-09

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

LOWEST GAS PRICES AROUND!!

EVERYDAY LOW PRICES ON BEER & WINE

COUPON

2 for $ 2.79

Coupon Expires 11-30-09

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

By The Pound!

Coupon Expires 11-30-09

8” Cheese- Chicken Salad 1/4 lb. burger SUB Sandwich HOT DOG

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

Quality Lunch Meats

2.00

$

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

COUPON

1 for $3.49 1 for $3.49 2 for $6.00 2 for $6.00

HARDEE’S!

Enjoy A Draft Beer & A Delicious Fresh Dough Pizza While Playing Keno

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

COUPON

2 Slices Cheese PIZZA

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

COUPON

9521 OCEAN HWY. DELMAR, MD 21875

Coupon Expires 11-30-09

COUPON

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

PLAY PLACE & PARTY ROOM!

Hand Cut

PIZZAS FRESH DOUGH Made Daily!

Case of Wine

Boardwalk Fries!!

Lottery! Daily! Instant! Keno!

10% Discount We Take Special Orders!

*Prices Subject To Change. Not Responsible For Typographical Errors.

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

FRANZIA Bag In A Box WINE $

COOR’S LIGHT

10.99

Any Variety

30 pk Cans

17.69

$

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

PIZZA BOYS COUPON

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

SmIRNOFF mALT BEvERAGE $

6.59

Per 6 Pack

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09 One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

NATURAL LITE 12 Pack Cans

5.49

$

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09 One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

BUD/BUD LIGHT 30 Pk. Cans

18.29

$

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09 One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer

CORONA & CORONA LIGHT

11.29

$

12 Pk. Btls.

Pizza Boys, Delmar, MD • Coupon Exp. 11-30-09 One Coupon Per Visit Per Customer


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 11

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB DONATION - Regional Builders Inc. of Seaford was recently recognized by the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club for the firm’s support of the youth agency. A banner will be displayed at the Boys & Girls Club site in Seaford honoring Regional Builders Inc. On hand for the official displaying of the banner are (from left): Dave Crimmins, club executive director; Maria Motley, resource development coordinator; Bob Boyd, Regional Builders owner; Connie Mitchell, chairman of the club’s annual campaign; and Chris Couch, Boys & Girls Club program director. Photo by Tony Windsor.

Nanticoke will honor long-time board member and two doctors

Nanticoke Health Services has announced the recipients of the fifth annual Nanticoke Tributes for Healthcare Leadership. The Nanticoke Tributes honors individuals who have made significant contributions to the provision and improvement of health care in the communities of western Sussex County. The awards will be presented at a dinner and reception Thursday, Nov. 5, from 6 to 9 p.m., at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville. The Founders Award will be presented to Lawrence B. Steele III. Mr. Steele is being honored for his dedication and commitment of over 20 years as a member of the board of directors of Nanticoke Health Services. The Charles C. Allen Jr. Philanthropy Award is being awarded to Thurman G. Adams Jr. The late state Sen. Adams is being recognized for the support he gener-

flowers

ated throughout the years to support the provision of healthcare in the community. Sen. Adams “was generous with his time and resources and was a strong advocate for Nanticoke Memorial Hospital within the community,” according to Nanticoke Health Services. This award will be presented posthumously to the Adams family. The Nanticoke Tributes will also recognize the two new inductees into the Nanticoke Physicians Hall of Fame. This award recognizes and honors physicians who have served their communities with dedication and distinction. This year, Rosalina L. DeJesus-Jiloca and Eduardo L. Jiloca will be presented with Hall of Fame awards. Tickets for the ceremony are $100 and may be purchased by calling 629-6611, ext. 2404.

...still a fresh choice for any occasion.

John’s Four Seasons FLOWERS & GIFTS

Stein Hwy. at Reliance • John Beachamp 302

629-2644

754-5835

410

All Major Cards Accepted


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

VISIOn DaYS - Laurel Mayor John Shwed has signed a proclamation declaring that Oct. 15, 16 and 17 are “Lions Vision Days” in the community. The proclamation was presented during a recent Laur’el Town Council meeting. On hand for the presentation were Laurel Lions Club members Brian and Charity Swain. Brian Swain told the council that the Laurel Lions, Lioness and Leo clubs will be taking part in the Lion’s Vision Days effort to raise $100,000 for the Lions’ Low Vision Research and Rehabilitation Center at Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital. From left: Charity Swain, Bryan Swain and Laurel Mayor John Shwed. Photo by Tony Windsor.

LaureL exchange cLub - The Laurel Exchange Club featured a display for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect at last Saturday’s Laurel Community Awareness Day. Above, Exchange Club president Jolene Cross-Morris paints a paw print on Mayor John Shwed. On right, Little Miss Laurel Morgan Gordy paints a bull dog on the hand of Miss Laurel Courtney Hastings. Laurel Community Awareness Day pictures submitted by Barbara Cross.

RT. 13 SOU TH, LAUREL 302.875.4404

OF LAUREL

Mayor will endorse referendum Continued from page one

Finally, the plan calls for the construction of a new athletic stadium and track. Along with construction of the new school buildings and stadium, there are also plans to renovate the historic portion of the Laurel Middle School and convert it to be used as the school district’s central office and conference rooms. That portion of the school building was built in 1921. Shwed said that once the state’s portion of funding is authorized, the residents of Laurel will be asked to support a referendum to provide the local match for the construction project. Shwed said the project will take time, especially given the current economic climate. However, having the state’s support for the needs of the school district is “good news not just for the school district

and students, but the community as well.” Shwed said that when the time comes to seek local funding, the Mayor and Council must be willing to “step to the plate” and help “make it happen,” referring to the potential for a local tax referendum. “This will take some time, but there is no doubt that along with the news of plans to enhance our local school system, once some of these projects that we have been talking about at the council table for some time come to fruition the town will change dramatically,” he said. Currently, the Laurel School District has an elementary school population of about 1,211 students; the middle school has 322 students and the high school has a population of 551. With a current school district population of 2,084 the new buildings would provide an 80 percent increase in capacity.

D y l i inn a er Special D

s

SOFTbaLL TeaM recOgnIZeD - The Laurel Major League Softball team, the District III state champions, were honored during the Laurel Town Council meeting Monday night. Laurel Mayor John Shwed presented 13 members of the team with proclamations declaring Sunday, Oct. 11, 2009 Laurel Major League All Star Softball Team Day in the town. On hand for the ceremony were team members Destiny Atkinson, Savannah Brown, Regan Green, Lauren Hill, Morgan Joseph, Kortney Lee, Shanda Mann, Shelby Murphy, Alison Pusey, Brittany Woods, Sara Jo Whaley, Destinee Banks and Tristen West. Also in attendance were coaches Brade Lee and Mike Atkinson. Photo by Tony Windsor

OPEN DAILY 9 AM TO 9 PM

5 pm to 8 pm

Monday - All You Can Eat Spaghetti, Salad & Garlic Bread $599 Tuesday - Buy A Combo Get Reg. Ice Cream Cone FREE Wednesday $ 00 1 Hamburgs & Hot Dogs $ 00 1 Fries $ 00 1 Sodas $ 00 1 Ice Cream Cones

Thursday - 2 Large Italian Subs $1200 Friday - Beef & Dumplings, 2 Vegs. & Roll $899 Saturday - Ham, Baked Pineapple, 2 Sides & Roll $799 Sunday - Chicken & Dumplings, 2 Sides & Roll $899


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 13

Just Reduced Biff Lee, state representative of 40th District and a friend, gives Geneva Boyce a certificate of tribute from the House of Representatives to recognize her 100th birthday.

Resident of Genesis Seaford Center honored on 100th birthday Russell Boyce and Raymond Whaley held a surprise 100th birthday party recently for Geneva Boyce, who currently resides at Genesis Seaford Center nursing home. Approximately 35 people attended the party, including several friends from Laurel and many nieces and grandnieces from Sussex County. State Rep. Biff Lee presented Boyce with a certificate of honor for being 100 years old. Geneva Victoria Boyce was born in Milford Sept. 23, 1909. She went to Philadelphia to live with friends when she was 10 years old. She worked as an AT&T operator in Philadelphia for 11 years. There, she met Dawson Boyce, who was originally from Laurel. He had moved to Philadelphia to be a trolley car conductor. In 1929, at the age of 20, Geneva married Dawson. Their son, Russell, was born in Philadelphia in March 1938. Geneva, Dawson and Russell moved

to Laurel in July 1938. They built a house on Millsboro Road, and Geneva lived there until November 2007, for 69 and 1/2 years. Geneva’s favorite job was tending to broilers until 1968, when she turned 59. She was an active member of Centenary Methodist Church and the Laurel Senior Center. Dawson worked as a custodian at Laurel School. Prior to his death in 1975, the couple enjoyed a couple of trips to Phoenix, Ariz. In 1942, their daughter, Charlotte, was born in Salisbury Md. In October 1961, Charlotte married Raymond Whaley. In March of 1965, Geneva’s granddaughter Virginia Ann was born. All lived in Laurel. On Dec. 15, 2007, Charlotte passed away. In December 1962, Russell married Victoria Wait. Russell and Victoria reside in Phoenix, Ariz. Geneva has three grandchildren (Christopher, Linda and Victoria) and six great-grandchildren living in Phoenix, Ariz.

570527 Brand New Home in Pond Haven, one of Seaford’s newest waterfront communities. Features vaulted ceilings, recessed lighting, oak cabinets and Corian counter tops. 2 car garage, 3 BR, 2 BA. Appointment only. Please call for showing. $249,000

569012 New Construction in Clearbrooke. Beautiful home with 3 BR and 2 BA. Spacious 1627 sq ft floor plan with large living room, formal dining room and large master suite with walk-in closet and soaking tub. Appointment only. Call for showing. $214,900

“We Like It SOLD”

Geneva Boyce, a resident of Genesis Seaford Center, celebrated her 100th birthday Sept. 23. She is seated in the front. Standing behind her, from left, are: Peggy Wyatt, Isabelle Chandler, Doris Wilson, Sandra Hollaway, Kathleen Hastings, Lorraine Miller and Lorraine Hearn.

552382 Very Nice Wooded Lot. .51 acres in Love Creek Woods. Close to pool. 570312 2.7 Wooded Acres for commercial/industrial use. Located on Route 13 next to Delmar Raceway. 556552 Cleared Residential Lot, ready to build! .75 acres located in Bridgeville. $59,000 570627 1.95 Acre Cleared Residential Lot located on Atlanta Rd in Seaford. $55,000 570629 1.34 Acre Cleared Residential Lot located on Atlanta Rd in Seaford.

562583 Wooded Lot located in Patty Cannon Estates I. .75 acres. $69,000

Contact

Lee Venables for an appointment

phone: 302.536.1403 cell: 302.381.2550 or by e-mail at lee.rlv@comcast.net


PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Community Awareness Day

Community Awareness Day was held in Laurel Saturday, Oct. 3. The event, coordinated by Councilwoman Robin Fisher and members of the Awareness Day committee, was held in Janosik Park and featured public service organizations from the community as well as throughout Delaware. Door prizes donated by local businesses were given away, including a grand prize of a La-Z-Boy recliner donated by Johnny Janosik’s World of Furniture. The Laurel High School band performed and hot dogs, potato chips and soft drinks were given away. Above, Barbara Hudson, Laurel, cooks hotdogs while her husband, Ben, looks on. Photos by Tony Windsor Above, Miss Laurel, Courtney Hastings, and Little Miss Laurel, Morgan Gordy were on hand for the festivities. Below, Star Crockett holds 2-month-old Leah Hill, as the two enjoy Community Awareness Day.

Coordinator Robin Fisher stamps the hand of Edwin Paul Hayes, 20 months, who attended Community Awareness Day with his mother, Pam Hayes, of Milton.

Sean Steward, REALTOR®, GREEN

Cell: 302-381-1085 Fax: 302-628-7747 Office: 302-629-7711 Email: sean@seansteward.com

www.SeanSteward.com

TIME IS RUNNING OUT A tax credit of up to $8,000 is available for first time home buyers purchasing a principal residence before December 1, 2009. Contact me today for details www.4HTR.com 302.629-7711 and information! 800.447-7711 Check out my website for 959 Norman Eskridge Hwy. new listings and updated blog. Seaford, DE 19973


1 Mi. No. of Seaford Walmart

Rt. 13, Seaford, DE

302-628-8978 Best Imported & Microbrewed Beers Around COUPON SPECIALS Cut Out And 10% OFF Sutter Home Use These MIX & MATCH White Zinfandel CASES Coupons For 1.5 Lt. - 6WINE 750 ml - 3 pk $10.99 bottles/Case; 750 ml - 12 bottles/case ________________ Sale Items Excluded Extra Savings! Absolut Vodka COUPON COUPON $33.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Liquor Land

New Amsterdam Gin 2 for $30 1.75 lt. ________________ Lord Calvert

$13.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Bud Family

Miller Lite, Coors Light

$16.79 + Deposit

Loose Bottle Case ________________ Michelob Ultra

$17.79 + Deposit

________________ Seagram VO Loose Bottle Case

$17.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Beringer White Zinfandel

$8.99 1.5 lt. ________________ Mil. Best/Ice/Light

$11.99 30 pk. Cans ________________

CROWN ROYAL

Liquor Land

Regular Only

$26.99 750 ml

Coupon Expires 11/15/09

COUPON

JACK DANIELS

$35.99 1.5 lt $19.99 750 ml

Liquor Land Coupon Expires 11/15/09

COUPON

TANQUERAY GIN

$29.99 1.75 lt

Liquor Land

Coupon Expires 11/15/09

COUPON

E&J Brandy CORONA or Paul Masson Brandy CORONA LIGHT

$18.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Barefoot Wines $9.99 1.5 lt.

2/12 Bottle Case

$25.79 & DEPOSIT

Liquor Land

$13.99 1.75 lt.

Coupon Expires 11/15/09

GREY GOOSE VODKA Liquor Land

CANADIAN MIST

$18.99 750 ml $39.99 1.75 lt COUPON

Coupon Expires 11/15/09

Coupon Expires 11/15/09

Liquor Land Coupon Exp. 11/15/09

COUPON

HEINEKEN or

HEINEKEN LIGHT 2/12 Bottle Case

$25.79

Liquor Land

& DEPOSIT

Coupon Expires 11/15/09

COUPON

SOUTHERN COMFORT

$24.99 1.75 lt.

Liquor Land Coupon Expires 11/15/09

COUPON

MARTINI & ROSSI

ASTI

$11.99 750 ml

Liquor Land Coupon Expires 11/15/09

COUPON

JOSE CUERVO GOLD

$29.99 1.75 lt.

Liquor Land Coupon Expires 11/15/09

*Prices Subject to Change. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.

SPECIALS Bacardi

Light & Gold

$20.99

1.75 lt

________________ Seagram’s Gin

$14.99 1.75 lt.

________________ Captain Morgan

$22.99 1.75 lt.

________________ Popov Vodka

$10.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Smirnoff Vodka $18.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Yellowtail Wines

$9.99 1.5 lt. ________________ Seagram’s-7 Crown $13.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Dewars Scotch

$34.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Bombay Saphire Gin $36.99 1.75 lt. ________________ Yuengling 24 Loose Cans

$15.99 ________________ Yuengling 24 Loose Bottles

$17.79 + Deposit ________________ Tangueray Gin $17.99 750 lt.


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Community Bulletin Board NHS plans Basket Bingo

The Employee Activity Committee of Nanticoke Health Services will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 22, at the Seaford Moose. The filled basket bingo will consist of 20 games and feature several Longaberger baskets as prizes. Advance tickets (which include a chance to win the Hostess Sort & Store Hamper and Blanket basket) are $20 per person; $25 at the door. In recognition of National Breast Cancer Awareness month, attendees wearing pink will receive a ticket for an exclusive Longaberger Horizon of Hope basket. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information, contact the EAC at 302-629-6611, ext. 2404 or MorrisR@ nanticoke.org.

Ladies Auxiliary fundraisers

The Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 is sponsoring a fundraiser for the VFW National Home for Children. Members are selling patriotic bibs in different designs for $4 each. To purchase bibs, contact President Michaele Russell at 349-4220. The Ladies Auxiliary is also sponsoring a community Pizza Night fundraiser at Grottos Pizza in Seaford, on Monday, Oct. 12, from 4 to 9 p.m., to benefit Cancer Aid and Research. You will need to present a coupon from the Ladies Auxiliary at the time of bill payment in order to give 20% of the bill to the Ladies Auxiliary. No coupons can be issued that evening. For coupons, contact Russell at 349-4220.

Longaberger Library Basket raffle

The Friends of the Seaford District Library are raffling a “Longaberger Library Basket” to support the capital building campaign. This commemorative basket is one-of-a-kind with a basket weave “Friends of the Seaford District Library 2009” and filled with a variety of books for the whole family. The basket was donated to the capital campaign by Phil Burtelle Painting with books donated by Seaford Food Lion. Tickets are available at $5 each or 3 for $10 and may be purchased at the circulation desk of the library. The drawing will take place on Friday, Oct. 9.

p.m. The outing will include the following contests: Putting, Longest Drive, Men & Ladies, Low Gross and Closest to the Pin. Sponsorships are available. Funds raised will help Delaware Hospice continue to provide high quality care to the community. For more information, contact Peggy Dolby at 856-7717, ext. 2123, pdolby@ delawarehospice.org; or www.delawarehospice.org.

Friends fundraiser

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library have another delicious fundraiser to promote. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Fill out the comment card, staple your receipt to it and drop it off at The Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or The Providence Sales Cottage at Heritage Shores.

People’s Place Fundraiser

The Red Hat Lady Bugs of Bridgeville are sponsoring a fashion show fundraiser for the People’s Place, an abused women’s shelter. The event, which will take place on Thursday, Oct. 29, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Heritage Shores Clubhouse, includes a fashion show (clothing courtesy of Peebles), lunch, Chinese auction, 50/50 and door prizes. Tickets are $20 per person. For ticket information, call 337-9733.

Bethel Historical Society

From 5 to 9 p.m., on the second Wednesday of each month through December, the Laurel Pizzaria is generously helping the Bethel Historical Society with an on-going fundraiser. You can pick up a coupon at the restaurant and when you pay the society will receive 10 percent.

The Spade & Trowel Garden Club of Seaford invites the public to attend a program on how to sustain wildlife with native plants. Guest speaker will be Dr. Douglas Tallamy, chair of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, who will share techniques from his book, “Bringing Nature Home.” The program will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 13, at the Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford. The program is free, but donations are appreciated. For more information, contact Jackie McPeak at 410-883-3386 or Mary Noel at 337-1054.

Read Aloud training

Knights of Columbus Oktoberfest

The Knights of Columbus St. Molua Council #4075 will be hosting Oktoberfest 2009. Bohemian Pork Roast, Bavarian Casserole (potatoes, sauerkraut, assorted German sausages and beer), Oktoberfest German potato salad (cold), green beans, cole slaw, dark breads and desserts. Warsteiner draft beer and Rhine wine will be available. Where: at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish Hall, 532 Stein Highway, Seaford, on Saturday, Oct. 17, from 7 p.m. to midnight. Admission is $15 per person. Advance reservations required, no tickets will be sold at the door. Call Ernie Davis at 875-2895 or Bob Gay at 302-956-0039.

Read Aloud volunteer training session will be held Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 1 p.m. in the Seaford Public Library, 402 North Porter St., Seaford. Call 856-2527 to sign up for training or for further information. Volunteer readers are needed at various reading sites in Sussex County.

Rabies Vaccination Clinic

Historic Trail Workshop

Holiday bazaar and luncheon

There will be a Public Workshop on Captain John Smith’s Chesapeake National Historic Trail on Tuesday, Oct. 20, at Seaford City Hall, 414 High St., Seaford at 6 p.m. Hear a presentation on alternative concepts for the future of the trail. Come share your ideas.

A Rabies Vaccination Clinic will be held Saturday, Oct. 24, from 10 a.m. to noon at Seaford Fire Hall, rain or shine, $13 Rabies, $10 Distemper. Cash only. Leashes or carriers required. Sponsored by Homeless Cat Helpers Inc. Holiday bazaar and chicken salad luncheon ($6.50 for luncheon), on Friday Nov. 6. Lunch served from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Holiday Shop Bazaar at Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pineapple Boutique and Thrift Shop open, too.

OWN THIS “QUADRICYCLE”!

Bingo for Life

The Trinity Foundation will host a Longaberger Basket Bingo at the Seaford Moose on Thursday, Oct. 15. Doors open at 6 p.m. for seating and bingo begins at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased ahead of time for $20 each or for $25 at the door. Discounted tickets are available for a table of eight purchased in advance for $150. To purchase tickets, call 800-8463400, ext. 3978 or stop by Trinity located at 1201 Bridgeville Highway in Seaford.

HENRY FORD’S FIRST CAR 1896 QUADRICYCLE ½ SCALE REPLICA

CART INCLUDED!

THIS CAR & CART WILL BE AUCTIONED OFF AT

THE APPLE-SCRAPPLE FESTIVAL

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10th, 2009 @ 6:00pm AT THE DELAWARE TEEN CHALLENGE BOOTH BEHIND THE BRIDGEVILLE FIREHALL AUCTIONEER: DAVE WILSON

WATCH THIS CAR BEING ASSEMBLED

Hospice plans golf outing

The Delaware Hospice Golf Outing will be held on Monday, Oct. 12, at Cripple Creek Golf and Country Club in Dagsboro. A team of four is $500 or $125 per person, which includes green fees, cart, lunch, refreshment cart and awards reception with heavy hors d’oeuvres. The format is a scramble and registration begins at 10 a.m. followed by lunch at 11 a.m. The game begins with a shotgun start at noon and the award reception is at 5:30

The Spade & Trowel Garden Club

Yard and Bake Sale

AARP Seaford Chapter 1084 will be holding a Yard and Bake Sale on Saturday, Oct. 10 at 8 a.m. until? Location is 818 Bridgeville Highway, Seaford. Look for a brick house between Nylon Avenue and Virginia Avenue (corner lot). Contact Gladys Bonowicz for further details at 875-1519.

AT THE DELAWARE TEEN CHALLENGE BOOTH BEHIND THE BRIDGEVILLE FIREHALL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10th, 2009 BEGINNING AT 10:00AM

AUCTION TO BENEFIT DELAWARE TEEN CHALLENGE


PAGE 17

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

SHS Class of ‘64 reunion

The Class of 1964 of Seaford High School is having a reunion on Oct. 10, 2009. If you have not been contacted, or need more information, call 629-8806.

SHS Class of ‘74 reunion

Seaford High School class of 1974 will celebrate their 35th class reunion on Saturday, Oct. 10, at the Seaford Fire Hall. Contact Jan at gjmej@yahoo.com for more information.

SHS Class of ‘99 reunion

Seaford Class of 1999 will hold a 10 year reunion on Saturday, Nov. 28, from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Seaford Fire Hall. Cost is $30 per person. RSVP by Nov. 1. For more information, contact Alexis McFarland Spade at biglex04@hotmail.com or 570-274-3098.

2009 Seaford Christmas Parade

Plans are under way for the 2009 Seaford Christmas Parade. Touted as the largest Christmas Parade on Delmarva, Seaford hosts an extravagant evening parade the first Saturday in December. This year, the parade will be on Saturday, Dec. 5; step off is at 7 p.m. The parade is sponsored by the Downtown Seaford Association and the City of Seaford. The Grand Marshall is Dick Collison.We invite everyone who wants to be in the parade. Now is the time to make plans for your float, costumes, etc. To sign up, go online to www. mychristmasparade.com. Entry forms and parade rules are also available at Seaford City Hall, Dick’s Barber Shop, Fantasy Beauty Salon, Seaford Harley-Davidson and Mortgage Network Solutions.

Halloween Parade & Party

& Recreation. For more information and a complete schedule, contact Anna Scovell at 8565239.

Seaford Historical Society raffle

The Seaford Historical Society is offering a raffle featuring a day on the Nanticoke River in the spring of 2010. This allday excursion accommodates a party of six people on a boat ride that leaves from the Marina at Nanticoke River Marine Park in Blades, Seaford. Other festivities included with this trip are mid-morning snacks onboard ship, lunch in Vienna, Md., a selfguided walking tour of historic Vienna, a visit to the Vienna Heritage Museum and refreshments on the ride back to Seaford in the afternoon. A raffle ticket costs only $5 or five tickets may be purchased for $20. Tickets are available at the Seaford Museum which is open Thursdays through Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m., or at the Ross Mansion which is open Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. At other times call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828 for tickets. The drawing will take place at the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion on Dec. 13, 2009.

The Christmas Boutique

The Christmas Boutique will once again be featured in the Ross Mansion gift shop at the annual Victorian Christmas on Dec. 11, 12 and 13. Each member of the Seaford Historical Society is asked to contribute one item. Handmade gifts in the price range of $10 to $20 are most popular. Items may be left in the gray box on the front porch of the Ross Mansion at any time. For further information call Shirley Skinner at 629-9378 or Diane Thomas at 629-2085.

Downtown Seaford Association presents Halloween Parade & Party on Wednesday, Oct. 28. Parade Route: Lineup at 6:15 p.m., Cedar at High Street. Parade starts at 7 p.m., High to Arch Street. Arch to King Street / Seaford Fire Hall. Must be in costume to enter. Goodies at the party. Cash prizes for costume contest.

Blades Events

AARP Tax-Aide volunteers

Council meeting

AARP Tax-Aide, the nation’s largest, free, volunteer-run tax counseling and preparation service is looking for volunteers to help senior and low income taxpayers complete their 2009 federal and state income tax returns. This is a free community service sponsored by AARP in cooperation with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Sites are equipped with computer hardware and software to prepare and file returns electronically. We need volunteers for assignments in Western Sussex County (Delmar to Greenwood). Computer literate volunteers will prepare income tax returns. Other volunteers are needed to greet clients and to check accuracy of results. Volunteers will receive free tax training and are asked to give a commitment of four hours per week over the ten week tax preparation period. For more information contact Bill Watt 262-0516 or Melvin Koster 628-3849.

Stay and Play program

Parents As Teachers announces the free Seaford Stay & Play program. Come have fun playing and learning with your child through a variety of toys and activities. Open to children birth through 48 months and their caregivers, on Mondays from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Seaford Parks

who might not otherwise have the opportunity to visit the library for Story Time. Interested daycare providers are encouraged to contact Becky Norton, Youth Services librarian, by phone at 875-3184 or email at rebecca.norton@lib.de.us for more information.

Laurel Lioness bingo

Laurel Lioness will host a Vera Bradley Bingo on Oct. 20, at the Laurel Fire Department, at 7 p.m.. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets in advance are $20, at the door $25. Tickets also available from any Lioness member or call Cathy, 875-2128 or Erma 875-3055.

Refresher Driving Course

Laurel Senior Center, located at 113 N. Central Ave., will host an AARP Refresher Driving Course on Oct. 19, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $12 for AARP Members, $14 for Non Members. To register for the course call 875-2536.

Sunkissed Tanning food drive

Sunkissed Tanning is currently having a food drive for Laurel families during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. If you bring in five non-perishable items, you wll get a free tan (up to 10 tans). Last year they collected 867 cans and 50 gift bags for children for Christmas. Their goal is to collect 1,000 cans this year. You can donate a toy, too. Sunkissed Tanning is located at Calio’s Plaza in Laurel, and can be reached by calling Margi at 875-1622.

Laurel Library

• The 2nd Saturday Monthly Building Club at the Laurel Public Library begins in

The town of Blades Trick or Treating will be held October 31 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Model train & toy show

A model train and collectable toy show will be held Saturday, Oct. 10, at the Laurel Fire Dept. auditorium from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Featuring refreshments, test track, door prizes and live entertainment. Call Barry Munoz at 875-7408 for more information.

In-home story-time

The Laurel Public Library will offer a 6-session series of weekly in-home preschool Story Times for local day care homes in October. This no-cost pilot program will bring books, poetry, music and fun to children

LHS Class of ‘69

The Laurel Class of 1969 will hold its 40th reunion on Friday, Nov. 27, at the Georgia House in Laurel. Contact leeann561@comcast.net if you did not receive your invitation.

Historical Society books

The Laurel Historical Society announces the availability of a new book, The Odd Fellows Cemetery Laurel, Delaware. This book, compiled by Doug Breen and Chuck Swift, has a complete list of almost 5,000 names that are found within the cemetery. There are maps, histories, stories and interesting information related to the cemetery and the folks interred there. This book can be purchased for $35. Also available is a DVD of the presentation by Jay Hill of the Bacon’s Switch area south of Laurel. Hill, whose presentation was given at the Laurel Historical Society dinner meeting in June, tells stories as passed down to him through his grandmother. This DVD can be purchased

EVERY TUESDAY W F V r a m l e d

Trick or Treat

Due to the Columbus Day holiday observed on October 12, the Town Council meeting in Blades will move to Monday, Oct. 19, at 7 p.m. Contact the Town Hall at 629-7366 with questions.

October. The first meeting will be held on Saturday, Oct. 10, from 11 a.m. to noon. The group is for kids in grades K-6. Kids can try their hand at Legos, Lincoln Logs, Zoobs, Magnets, Pipe Builders and more. • Preschool Story Time will be held at the Laurel Public Library for kids ages 2 to 5. Preschool children and their favorite adults are invited every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for stories, poetry, science, music, math, crafts and fun. For more information call the Laurel Public Library at 875-3184 or contact Becky Norton, Youth Services librarian, at rebecca.norton@lib.de.us.

Doors O pen 5 pm Games Begin 6:45 pm

Tickets on y ., Md Sale Tuesdat. 200 West State St h Nig 10-896-3379 410-896-3722 • 4 *Based on the

Super Bingo Winner nanza Take All Bo Game

$

CASH PAY OUT $

100

50

* over 60 people

T O O H S Y E TURK

number of people. No one under the age of 18 allowed to play. *

under 60 people

SUNday, OCt. 25th

Benefit Dinner for Kyle Dixon

1 to 5 pm Sunday, Oct. 11th Beef & Dumplings $10 person

Friday Night diNNer October 16th - 6 pm

BASKET BINGO COMING SAT. NOV. 7TH!!


PAGE 18 for $5. The History of Nineteenth Century Laurel is a very valuable book that is a collection of stories and information that was written and complied by Harold Hancock with input from many local people. Copies are available for $45. To order any of these items, email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com or call Chuck Swift at 875-7665.

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009 descendants. Flexer will also answer genealogy questions and share information on the Sussex County Genealogical Society. The program is free and open to all, and pre-registration is requested by Oct. 13. For more information, or to register, visit the Greenwood Library or call 3495309.

Card & game night

Book Discussion Series

Savor suspenseful tales and sample sweet treats during Greenwood Public Library’s fall book discussion series, “Delectable Discussions.” Each month a different culinary mystery will be featured. Enjoy a discussion of the book and a sample of one of the book’s recipes. Discussions are free and will be held on Tuesday evenings at 6:30 p.m. in the meeting room at the Greenwood Library. Books for discussion include: Oct. 13 - Blueberry Muffin Murder by Joanne Fluke; Nov. 10 - Sweet Revenge by Diane Mott Davidson; Dec. 8 - Christmas Cookie Murder by Leslie Meier. To obtain a copy of the book in the month before each discussion, visit the Greenwood Public Library or call Robin Miller at 349-5309.

Face and Hand Massage Workshop

On Friday, Oct. 9, at 6:30 p.m., the Greenwood Library will host a Face and Hand Massage Workshop. Licensed massage therapist Diana Carey will demonstrate the proper techniques for face and hand massage and then give an opportunity for participants to practice those techniques with their partner. The event is free and open to all, but space is limited and pre-registration is required. Attendees must bring a partner plus a towel or pillow. To register, visit the library or call 349-5309.

The Greenwood Cheer Activity Center will hold a card and game night on Thursday evenings in October from 6 to 9 p.m. Join us for rook, dominoes and uno or bring your friends to set-up a table of games of your choosing. Beverages and refreshments will be available or you can come early for dinner. For table set-up or more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Greenwood Cheer Dinner Club

The Greenwood Cheer Activity Center will host the Greenwood Dinner Club on Thursdays from 5 to 7 p.m. in October. It will be an evening of fellowship and a delicious dinner entrée, dessert and beverage. Cost for members is $5 and non-members is $6. For menus or more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

WHS reunion planned

Woodbridge High School classes of 1988, ‘89 and ‘90 will hold a combined reunion at the Bridgeville Fire Hall on Saturday, Nov. 7. For details contact Dionne Parker Keeler at dionnepk@yahoo.com or 302-337-3099.

CHEER Golf Tournament

CHEER Golf Tournament will be held Friday, Oct. 23, 9 a.m. start time at Heritage Shores Golf Club, Bridgeville. For more information call Elizabeth Walls or John Argo, 302-856-5187. This is CHEER’s First Annual Golf Tournament. A “Ball Drop” event will take place at 1 p.m. At $5 per ball or 3 for $10, this one is hard to resist. A great luncheon is scheduled at 1:30 p.m. Bid on some great items in the silent auction. Items will be displayed before the tournament as well as during the luncheon. Prizes include closest to the pin, longest drive (male and female) and winning team.

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center will host a Halloween Party on Friday, Oct. 30, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. There will be refreshments, music, games and a costume parade with prizes for best costumes. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Guaranteed affordable! Portions of proceeds will benefit the Newspapers in Education program.

Dinner/Scholarship Benefit

The VFW in Delmar, Md., will hold its second annual “Kyle Dixon Memorial Scholarship Dinner” on Sunday, Oct. 11, from 1 to 5 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. The menu includes beef and dumplings, mashed potatoes, green beans, rolls, choice of dessert, iced tea or coffee. Proceeds will benefit the scholarship fund which is awarded to a Delmar High School senior who plays on either the boys or girls soccer team. Kyle Dixon, a 16-year-old honor student and soccer player, was attending Delmar High School when he tragically lost his life in an automobile accident on Jan. 4, 2008. The Dixon family is also requesting donations of items from local businesses to support a silent auction. In return, the donating business will be recognized in writing, by name at the event. All contributions are greatly appreciated.

Mystery Murder Dinner

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center presents A Mystery Murder Dinner, Honky Tonk Homicide, featuring the Long Neck CHEER Theatrical Players on Thursday, Oct. 8. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. Cost is $6 for members and $8 for non-members. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Ruritan Club buffet Quick holiday appetizers

Delmar Public Library will host an adult program featuring Chef Bonnie Aronson from 1 to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 14. She will have just the right recipes for non-stressful yummies to appeal to your holiday guests. For more information, contact the library at 846-9894.

Movie Night

Miss Pam, Children’s librarian, will show the movie “Land of the Lost” in the Hayman meeting room at the Delmar Public Library at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 15. This program is free to the public so bring your favorite pillow or blanket and join us for a fun time.

Open House Carving & Wildlife Show

A Carving & Wildlife Show sponsored by The Friends of the Bridgeville Library will be held on Friday, Oct. 9, 3-7 p.m.

DelMarVa Model Railroad Club’s 24th Annual Open House, located at 103 East State St., Delmar, Camelot Hall, second floor. Free admission and free parking — Nov. 28 & 29, Dec. 5 & 6, Jan. 9 & 10,

Let Tony Windsor perform for your event Tony Windsor

Jan. 16 & 17; Saturday hours are from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday’s noon to 5 p.m. Operating layouts: N-Scale, N Trak Modules, HO Layout, O Gauge Tinplate, O Scale Lionel, LGB (G Gauge). Train videos to view and raffles.

CHEER Halloween Party

Family Research Program

On Friday, Oct. 16, at 6:30 p.m., Barbara Flexer, a charter member of the Sussex County Genealogical Society, will present a family history program at the Greenwood Public Library, “I’m a What?” Flexer teaches people how to make their own history come alive and how to be the best ancestor they can be for their

and Saturday, Oct. 10, 9-5 p.m., at the Bridgeville Public Library. Individual craftsmen will be selling their work, renowned photographer Kevin Fleming will be featured. For more information, contact Ruth Skala at 858-1534 or rlskala@comcast.net.

Tony Windsor is accepting bookings for entertaining any size event, from the living room to the great outdoors! Singing classic country and rock, with special 50s, 60s and 70s hits! Also, gospel and holiday music available. Booking now for Christmas parties and beyond. Call: 302-236-9886 for info.

All-you-can-eat Sunday Breakfast Buffet served by the Galestown Ruritan Club, on the fourth Sunday of each month now through June 7-10 a.m. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 children 6-12 years, at The Galestown (Md) Community Hall, 5833 School House Road. Buffet features blueberry pancakes, eggs, scrapple, sausage, creamed chipped beef, biscuits, potato casserole, hominy, fruit cup and sticky buns.

AGO seeks members

The Southern Delaware Chapter of the American Guild of Organists (AGO), which seeks to promote appreciation of all aspects of organ and choral music, invites everyone who is interested in music to join the chapter. The local chapter offers workshops, master classes, recitals, concerts, organ crawls and more for members, the community and music students. For more information about the chapter call 629-8033.

We have the perfect gift to give your boss for Boss Day! (Oct. 16) • Fresh Flowers • Snack Baskets • Fruit Baskets • Plants • Candles • Balloons • Extensive Gift Line

WWW.KITTYSFLOWERS.COM SALISBURY, MD

302

LAUREL, DE

875-7600

800

OCEAN PINES, MD

252-8897

204 Delaware Ave • Next to Towne Package Store Monday thru Friday 9 am to 6 pm • Saturday 9 am to 3 pm


PAGE 19

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Party on the Plaza

Join the Centre at Salisbury on Saturday, Oct. 10, for the ”Party on the Centre’s outdoor plaza located in front of Regal Cinemas. “Dawn and the Williams Project” will perform from 4-6 p.m., and “No Byscuyts” performs from 7-9 p.m. Bring your lawn chair, grab some food in the food court, listen to great music and enjoy the evening. And bring non-perishable food items to donate to the “Love Thy Neighbor Community Food Drive” — efforts to feed 500 local families this Thanksgiving. The Centre at Salisbury features more than 100 stores and eateries including Boscov’s, JC Penney, Macy’s, Sears, Dick’s Sporting Goods and Regal Cinemas. It is located on Rt. 13 just north of the bypass in Salisbury, Md.

October is Family History Month

What part in past history did your relatives play? Did they serve in the War between the States or the American Revolution? What health issues did you inherit from your ancestors? Local genealogical societies and groups throughout Sussex County can help you find the answers to these questions and more. October is Family History Month and you can celebrate by visiting one of these groups. The Sussex County Genealogical Society (SCGS) meets at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library the third Saturday of each month from September through May. Greenwood Library will host a special genealogical presentation on Friday, Oct. 16. Bridgeville also has a group. Contact your local library to find out if they have a group and when they meet. For more information, contact Ralph Nelson at 8755418.

Couture & Class Fashion Show

A Couture & Class fashion show and luncheon will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 21, at the Carter Partnership Center, Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. The event benefits Delaware Tech students in Sussex County and is hosted by Owens Campus Development Council. Tickets $25/person; reserved table for 8/$175. Reserve tickets by Nov. 13; call Delaware Tech at 855-1659 or visit www.dtcc.edu/ owens/fashionshow.

Adult Plus day trips

Enjoy day trips in October sponsored by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Celebrate the legends of tap in “Thank You Gregory: A Tribute to the Legends of Tap” seated in excellent orchestra seats on Saturday, Oct. 10, at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia, Pa. On Sunday, Oct. 11, be transported by the uplifting voices of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra with epic film scores from the silver screen. Art lovers will enjoy a guided tour of the “Henri Matisse and Modern Art on the French Riviera” exhibit at the Phila-

delphia Museum of Art on Thursday, Oct. 15. Bask in the splendor of fall during a narrated 2 ½ hour train ride through Red Clay Creek Valley on the Wilmington & Western Railroad on Saturday, Oct. 17. Spend two nights, Oct. 20 and 21, at the Hotel Edison in the middle of New York City’s theatre district within walking distance of a Broadway show, Times Square, or Rockefeller Center. On Saturday, Oct. 24, follow the yellow brick road to the “The Wizard of Oz” at the Dupont Theatre. Enjoy a day shopping, sightseeing or watching a show in New York on Wednesday, Oct. 28. Don’t miss the international blockbuster exhibit “Diana: A Celebration” at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia on Thursday, Oct. 29. Visit the National Aquarium, Maryland Science Center, or Port of Discovery during a day on your own at the inner harbor in Baltimore on Saturday, Oct. 31. For more information or to sign up for these trips, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302-856-5618.

Radio City tickets

Limited tickets are available for a trip to see the “Radio City Christmas Spectacular” on Wednesday, Dec. 9, at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, sponsored by Adult Plus+ at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. The “Radio City Christmas Spectacular” features the world-famous Radio City Rockettes’ signature high-kicks and precision choreography in several showstopping numbers. For more information or to reserve orchestra seats, contact the Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302-856-5618.

Explore Egypt in the 12-day “Splendors of the Nile” trip from Oct. 22 through Nov. 2. The group will travel on a luxurious three-night cruise including visits to ancient temples at Aswan, KomOmbo, Edfu and Luxor. Take an 18-day trip “down under” to Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji from Oct. 21 through Nov. 7. Experience the joy of the season during the nine-day “Christmas Cruise on the Danube” trip to Germany and Austria from Nov. 30 through Dec. 8. Travelers will explore cathedrals and several Christmas markets including Germany’s oldest and most famous, Nuremburg’s Christmas Market, which began in 1628. Celebrate the Christmas season during the seven-day “Nashville Country Christmas at the Opryland Hotel” from Dec. 2-8. Experience the joy of Christmas during the four-day “Christmas Extravaganza” trip to Washington, D.C. and the Homestead Resort in Hot Springs, Va. Take a Christmas tour of Washington, guided by author/historian Antony Pitch. To sign up for a trip call 302-8565618.

Branson

Nanticoke Senior Center and Curran Travel are providing a trip to Branson on Tuesday, Oct. 13, to Wednesday, Oct. 21. The trip includes: round trip motorcoach transportation, eight night accommodations, great sightseeing tours, admission to nine great shows including Mickey Gilley, Lee Greenwood & the Bellamy Brothers and Shoji Tabuci. Cost is $1,075 per person-double occupancy, $1,355 single occupancy. A $200 deposit is required. Call 629-4939 for details.

Seaford AARP

Oct. 16 - Strasburg, Pa. - Lunch on the train & RR museum. Cost: $69; 7 seats available. Dec. 2 - American Music Theater Christmas Show & Millers Restaurant, Cost: $92; 5 seats available. North Carolina Christmas - A 5 day trip to the Biltmore Estates on Nov. 1620. Two hot meals included each day. A candlelight tour of the estate with a candlelight dinner, two dinner theaters with Christmas shows, visit the winery on the grounds and sample their wines. Also visit the Riverbend Farm Village, Folk Arts Center, Smith McDowell House, Chimney Rock Park, a tour of Asheville, and a stop at the famous Moose Cafe. Cost: $589/pp double. For more information, contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180.

Vacation with Del Tech

Take a vacation with the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus.

AARP Chapter 1084

AARP Seaford Chapter 1084 is holding its meeting on Thursday, Oct. 8, at 1:30 p.m. at the Methdist Manor House, next to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Guest speaker will be Brian Posey from the office of the State AARP. Contact Gladys Bonowicz for more information at 875-1519.

Widowed Persons

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 20, at 12:15 p.m. at the Seaford Eagle Diner. There will be a mystery guest speaker. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Sussex County Republicans

The Sussex County Republican Committee invites you and your family to an afternoon of food, fun and games on Sunday, Oct. 18, from 3 to 6 p.m., at Dave Wilson’s Auction on Route 133 in Lincoln. Many elected Republican officials from throughout the state will be there to answer your questions. Cost is $5 per person and children under 10 are free. Event will be held rain or shine.

H.A.P.P.E.N.

The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearn’s Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization will not meet in September. The next scheduled H.A.P.P.E.N. meeting will take place on Thursday, Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Museum.

39th District Democrats Acorn Club

The G.F.W.C.-Acorn Club of Seaford will have a meeting at the Seaford District Library at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 8. The hostess is Ann O’Dea and her committee.

SARA holds meeting

The regular monthly meeting of the Sussex Amateur Radio Association (SARA) will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 21, at the Marvel Museum located at 510 S. Bedford St. in Georgetown. FCC AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

The 39th District Democrats will hold their monthly meeting on Thursday, Oct. 15, at 7 p.m. at Pizza King in Seaford. New members are always welcome. For more information call Maggie Callaway at 629-4846.

Delaware Equine Council

The next meeting of the Delaware Equine Council is 7 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 19, at the Harrington Public Library. Everyone who is interested in horses is welcome to attend. For more information, contact Stan at 302-684-3966 or Peggy at 302-629-5233.

Our Bar Is NOW OPEN

See ‘The Lion King’

Limited seats are available for a trip to see Disney’s breathtaking musical “The Lion King” on Thursday, April 15, 2010, at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia; the trip is sponsored by Adult Plus+ at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. For more information or to reserve orchestra seats, contact the Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program by Oct. 4 at 302-856-5618.

license testing for all levels begins at 6:30 p.m. An informal social starts at 7 p.m. followed by the meeting at 7:30 p.m. This meeting is open to anyone with an interest in amateur radio. For more information, visit www.sussexamateurradio.com.

check out our

BUY ONE LUNCH

Menu Items 1-13

CO RE UPO QU N IR ED

or BUY ONE DINNER Combo Items 1-21

GET SECOND DRINK ALS I 1/2DEPRICE C E P S 501 N. Dual Hwy., Seaford,

MEXICAN BEERS DOMESTIC BEERS DAILY DRINK SPECIALS EVERY MONDAY

Cactus Margaritas

$2.50

REG. $4 Lime Only

Old Englishʼs Bldg.

302-628-9701

Open Mon. - Fri. 11 am - 10 pm, Sat. Noon to 10 pm, Sun. Noon - 9 pm

Visit our new restaurant in North Salisbury

Ocean City, MD Easton, MD 12534 Ocean Gateway, 7813 Ocean Gateway, 410-213-7324 410-770-8550 Chestertown, MD Cambridge, MD Salisbury, MD 715 Washington Ave. 315 Sunburst Hwy. 1045 S. Salisbury Blvd. 410-810-1952 410-228-7808 410-749-4303


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Church Bulletins Davis in concert

Willie Blake Davis will be performing songs from his Christian rock album, “Foundation Solid,” at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 10, at St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford. For more information, contact Chris Rutherford at 888-361-9473 or crutherford@tatepublishing.com.

Christmas Extravaganza

Trinity UMC on Phillips Hill Road in Laurel needs vendors (crafts, home sales companies, etc.) for their Christmas Extravaganza, which will be held at the church on Saturday, Nov. 21, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. There is a $10 charge per table and we have limited availability. For more information or to reserve a table, call 8754741.

Macedonia AME Church events

Macedonia AME Church in Seaford will host the following events: Sunday, Oct. 11, 11 a.m. - Men’s Ministry, Guest Speaker Ronnie Houston; 3:30 p.m. - “Son’s of Thunder,” St. Paul AME, Pleasantville, N.J. and the “Nutone” Gospel Singers from Denton, Md. Sunday, Oct. 18, 5 p.m. “Nichols Family Singers”

The Gospel Café

The Gospel Café at Laurel Baptist Church will be held on Saturday, Oct. 10, at 6 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard (west side of 13A, approximately 2 miles south of town). Praising God with music and song will be

Kali Clucas, Shelby Gray, Molly Spicer, Don White and The Gospel Café Band. Refreshments are catered by the Georgia House Restaurant. Any questions, call Bruce or Nancy Willey at 875-5539.

‘One Day Closer’

“One Day Closer,” group from Cambridge, Md., will be singing at Grace Baptist Church, 805 Atlanta Road, Seaford, at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 11. The public is invited to come and enjoy this wonderful evening of song, praising our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ. Admission is free with a love offering to be taken during the program.

Italian Spaghetti Night

Gethsemane United Methodist Church Sunday Bible Class will be holding an Italian Spaghetti Night, featuring spaghetti with homemade meat-and-marinara sauce, garlic bread, beverage and desert. A special homemade desert table is also available. It will be held at Gethsemane U.M.C., Fellowship Hall, Reliance, Rt. 20, Stein Highway, on Oct. 17, from 4 to 6 p.m. Donations: $7 per adult; $4 ages 6-12; under age 6 free.

Free Community Luncheon

Laurel Baptist will be hosting a free Community Luncheon (vegetable or chicken-noodle soup and tuna-fish sandwiches) On Saturday, Oct. 17, from noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard (west side of 13A, approximately 2 miles south of town). Any questions, call Shirley at 875-2314.

BABY SHOWER - Members of the United Methodist Women (UMW) of Concord United Methodist Church recently held a “baby shower” as a special missions project. Various baby items were donated by the congregation to the baby pantry at Greenwood UMC to help feed infants of families struggling financially. The evening was marked by members from both churches gathering for cake and punch, plus games and fellowship.

Church holds Fall Festival

Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, located on Rt. 13 North and Dorothy Road (3 miles north of MD/DE State Line), will host a Fall Festival on Saturday, Oct. 10, 9 a.m. until ? Featuring: oyster sandwiches, crab cakes, soft crabs, chicken salad, cheese steak subs, hamburgers, hot dogs, soups, baked goods, homemade ice cream and yard sale.

Friends of Concord

The 88th reunion of the Sons, Daughters and Friends of Concord will be held on Saturday, Oct. 17, beginning at 2 p.m. at Concord United Methodist Church. There will be a dedication and memorial service and Pastor Diane Melson will deliver a brief message in honor of the Sons, Daughters and Friends Reunion. The public is invited to the traditional

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S.C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker WorshipServi ces: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

Centenary United Methodist Church

“Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford

Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956

Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: BibleS tudy 7P M


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009 chicken and dumpling dinner at 4 p.m. at the Community House. The cost is $9 for adults, $5 for children 4-12 and age three and under, eat free. For more information call Judy Kohlenberg at 629-0687 or Frances Givens at 629-2659.

Evening of Gospel Music

Jerry Jones Ministries will once again present their “Evening of Gospel Music” at Sam Yoder’s Farm, 89 Hunting Quarter Road, Houston, on Oct. 10. Dove Award winner and former Elvis Presley Aid, Donnie Sumner is returning by popular demand, along with Award-winning Singer-Songwriter, Jerry Jones, wonderful Southern Gospel Group from Christiana, Pa. The Hagans Family, and special guest MC, Jimmy Hoppa, WBOC-TV “This Morning” co-anchor. Food will be available for purchase at 6 p.m. (homemade soups, sandwiches and desserts) and the concert starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at People’s II Restaurant, Rt. 13 South, Harrington, and D&D Deli, 12 West Sewel St., Felton. Also, for tickets or further information, call 302-228-4813, Jerry Jones Ministries.

Mary & Martha Tea Room

On Wednesday, Oct. 21, from 2 to 4 p.m., the Mary & Martha Tea Room, a program sponsored by Take My Hand Ministry, will be held at 102 Maryland Ave. in Greenwood. Guest speaker is First Lady Tyvonia Bull of Faith, Hope and Love Church near Seaford. A freewill offering will be taken for the speaker and light refreshments will be served. For more information, call Take My Hand Ministry at 302-349-4220.

Asbury UMC Homecoming

Asbury United Methodist Church, located near Sussex Tech, celebrates Homecoming on Oct. 11 with two services. The Rev. John Hinkel, Jr. will speak during the 9:15 a.m. worship service. The 2 p.m. Homecoming Service will feature the Rev. Hinkel, Asbury’s new pastor, bringing the message with Phil Davis, formerly of the Ambassadors, providing the special music. A meal will follow the 2 p.m. service. All are welcome.

Galestown UMC 154th Homecoming Galestown United Methodist Church will hold its 154th Homecoming Celebration on Sunday, Oct. 18, at 2 p.m., featuring Guest Speaker: the Rev. Paul Sherwood and Guest Southern Gospel Group, Revived. Come and join us for afternoon of song, praise and fellowship and you

Welcome…

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church

26295 Sussex Highway (south on 13), Seaford, DE

Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Pastor - O. Kenneth Scheller 302-875-0140

All are welcome to worship here every Sabbath.

PAGE 21

will walk away with an uplifted heart that will be full of joy. A buffet style hot meal will be held following the service.

Cokesbury UMC Homecoming

Cokesbury United Methodist Church (near Reliance) will celebrate its Homecoming on Oct. 11, at 2 p.m. Speaker will be Pastor James Penuel III. Special music will be provided by Mrs. Shirley Willin.

Fall Revival & Women’s Day

Booker Street Church of God in Georgetown presents its Annual Fall Revival & Women’s Day sponsored by the Women’s Ministries. The Theme: Virtuous Women Striving for a Higher Purpose in God! Oct. 13-16 at 7 p.m., nightly. Tuesday, Oct. 13 – Pastor Brendell Smack, Agape Tabernacle, Inc., Seaford; Wednesday, Oct. 14 – Pastor Paula Greene, Abundant Grace Ministries, Bear; Thursday, Oct. 15 – Rev. Annette Wilson, Cathedral of Love Ministries, Salisbury, Md.; Friday, Oct. 16 – Overseer Linda Henry, Higher Ground Ministries, New Castle. Women’s Day, Sunday, Oct. 25 – 11:30 a.m. Pastor Carla Wongus United Deliverance Bible Center, Laurel . 5 p.m. – The Rev. Dr. Darlene Bryant, Christ-like Ministries of Deliverance, Vineland, N.J. – Everyone is Welcome! Pastor is Bishop Marvin Morris. For more information call 856-3404 Sister Peggy; 684-0370 Sister Marlene; or 8569097 Church.

Portsville UMC Homecoming

Portsville United Methodist Church, Portsville, celebrates its 62nd Homecoming on Oct. 11, at 2 p.m. Come join the celebration of the church in song, praise and word. Hear music by the Bluegrass group: “Delmarva Ramblers” and Les Bell on Saxophone.

Young to speak at conference

Wm. Paul Young, New York Times and USA Today best-selling author of The Shack will be the featured adult seminar speaker Nov. 21-22, at the Ocean City, Md. Convention Center in conjunction with the ALIVE 2009: UP Conference. Young will share his story and what led to writing his best-selling novel in a threepart series scheduled for: Saturday, Nov. 21, 10:30 to 11:50 a.m. and 9 to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, Nov. 22, 9:30 to 10:15 a.m. The adult seminar, open to the general public, is $50 per person. Seating is limited and is available on a first-come, firstserved basis. Register by Nov. 1 at www. itickets.com/order/new/233516 or by calling 1-877-896-3802.

Union

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

22606 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE

302-359-6331 Weekly Services: Sunday: 10 am Tuesday: Prayer 7-8 pm Thursday: Bible Study 7 pm

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

VICTORY TABERNACLE

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH 532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids-Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12), DivorceCare 7:00 Prayer Meeting, Men’s Group, KidStuf 103 (K-6 Kids & their parents, 1 & 3rd Wed.)

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel

Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries

Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Obituaries Henry E. Nutter Jr., 80 Seaford City Councilman

Henry E. Nutter Jr. “Hank,” passed from this life into a new Dimension on Monday, Sept. 28, 2009 after a brief illness. Mr. Nutter was 80 years young, and the son of Henry E. Nutter Sr. and Lucretia Roberts-Nutter. He attended Seaford Public Schools, graduated High School from Delaware State Laboratory High School; and furthered his education at Delaware State College. Mr. Nutter served his country during the Korean Conflict as a member of the US Army. After completion of his tour of duty, he returned to Seaford and resumed his employment at the E. I. DuPont Company, where he remained as a faithful supervisor for 35 plus years. In 1957, Henry married the love of his life, Vera Leatherberry; and this year they celebrated 52 years of marriage and devotion to each other. Mr. Nutter was a faithful, dedicated and devout member of Macedonia AME Church in Seaford. He was born into this church, and remained there all of his life, and served in the Nutter family legacy. His father was the church organist, and holding true to the legacy, Mr. Nutter Jr. followed in his father’s footsteps in this same position. In addition, for Macedonia AME Church, he served as a Trustee, and for many years he was the Sexton for the church cemetery. Prior to retirement, Mr. Nutter was the owner and operator of Nutter’s Disposal Business for more than 36 years and Henry should be remembered as a man who “did not allow grass to grow under his feet.” He served the city of Seaford in numerous capacities, such as a member of the Seaford City Council, Seaford vice mayor, liaison between the council and various departments of the city, and as an honorary member of the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department. His other community affiliates include membership in the Masons where he served as a Master Mason, member of the Consistory, the Eastern Stars (Prince Hall affiliate), The Shriners, and as a member of the estate Human Relations Commission, appointed by then Governor Sherman Tribbitt. In addition, he was a delegate for the National League of Cities, which afforded him the opportunity to travel extensively, which he loved and which allowed him to indulge in one of his favorite past times, that being photography. Some of his most memorable trips were on the Goodwill tours as a Delegate to Romania, Czechoslovakia, London and Paris. He also enjoyed emailing and corresponding by his computer. It was never too early in the day for him to fire off, or to forward an original email to those on his buddy list. One of the brightest days and most memorable to Mr. Nutter was when the Nutter Park was named and dedicated in his honor in Seaford.

In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by a daughter, Darlene Williams. He is survived by his loving and devoted wife, Vera; a son, Ralph Leatherberry and wife, Marietta; four grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; one niece; one brother-in-law; three sisters-in-law; and a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral services will be Saturday, Oct. 10, at noon at Atlanta Alliance Church, 22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford. Friends may call Friday from 3-8 p.m. at the church, as well as from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday. Flowers will be accepted at the church on Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. • Resolutions and personal condolence messages to the family may be emailed to AmberHarris8604@Peoplepc.com, or faxed to 349-4459. Professional service of compassion provided to the family by Deborah E. HarrisNock funeral Home, Laurel.

Lorene Alberta Winter Messick, 81

Lorene Alberta Winter Messick, of Seaford, died Saturday morning, Oct. 3, 2009, at Genesis Health Care Center. Mrs. Messick was born in Weatherford, Okla. in 1928. She met her future husband on Route 66 while he was with Lorene Messick an outfit exploring for oil. They later married and moved to Seaford. Mrs. Messick and her husband were successful business owners of Bresler’s Ice Cream shop in Salisbury, Md., The Bi-Lo Restaurant and the Oak Rail Restaurant and Lounge in Seaford. She touched many lives in the Seaford area through their businesses. She was a very hard-working woman who raised her family while working and running her businesses. Prior to the business, she worked as a waitress at Monaco’s Restaurant and as a shift-worker for the DuPont Company. She was a person who served and cared for others, putting herself second at all times. She was a member of the Acorn Club, the WPA, the Spade and Trowel Garden Club, the VFW Auxiliary, the American Legion Auxiliary and a birthday luncheon group with her friends. She had a great faith in her God and Savior, Lord Jesus Christ and was a member of St. Johns United Methodist Church. Mrs. Messick had lived at Genesis since 2008, first in the assisted living facility before moving to the skilled care side in September. The family would like to thank the staff of both facilities for all their loving care. Mrs. Messick’s husband, William H. Messick I, passed away in 1995. They had been married 46 years at the time. She is survived by five sons, Gary Winter and Tammy of Mustang, Okla., Danny and Janet, Mark and Karen, Billy and Brenda all of Seaford, Michael of Concord, N.C.; one daughter, Debbie Wood

and Randy of Coral Springs, Fla.; a brother Harry Winter of Augusta, Kan.; a sister Shirley Tolton of Yukon, Okla.; 14 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her two brothers, Marvin Winter and Eldon Winter. A service will be held Thursday, Oct. 8 at 1 p.m. at Cranston Funeral Home in Seaford, where friends may call from noon to 1 p.m. Burial will be in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Seaford. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, a breast cancer foundation, 125 S. 9th St., Suite 202, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (www. komenphiladelphia.org).

John Nelson Blades Sr., 76

John Nelson Blades Sr. of Seaford, died peacefully at his daughter’s home on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009. Born in Bethlehem, Md. on June 30, 1933, he was the son of George N. Blades and Mary Blades Pritchard. John Nelson Blades Mr. Blades attended Preston School through the eighth grade and graduated from Easton High School in 1952. He was employed by Waverly Press in Easton, Md. in 1952 and continued working there until 1987 when he retired. Mr. Blades had become a well-known carver of waterfowl and birds and derived his livelihood from this profession until the time of his death. His carvings sold all over the United States and also in Europe and Japan. The Japanese were especially fond of his work. He began carving by studying with Ed and Esther Burns of Bozman, and later with world champion carver, Mr. Jim Sprankle. Mr. Paul Marshall of Smith Island, a personal friend, also had a great deal of influence on his work. Mr. Blades was an exhibitor at the Waterfowl Festival in Easton for many years and enjoyed it very much.

He was a member of Concord United Methodist Church, The Academy of the Arts, The Ward Foundation, the National Wildlife Federation, the National Woodcarvers Association and Ducks Unlimited. Mr. Blades is survived by two sons, David N. Lankford of Trappe, Md., and John “Jack” Blades Jr. of Lovettsville, Va.; three daughters, Kathryn “Kat” Mitchell of Denton, Md., Dixie Blades of Easton, and Bettse Dodge of Greensboro, Md. He is also survived by one brother, Mark Blades, of Florida, and two sisters, Marion Eaton of Preston, Md., and Jean Chance of Denton. Also surviving are eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. His wife, Janice Betts Blades preceded him in death in 1991. His brother Charles preceded him in death in 2007. The service was held at Helfenbein and Newnam Funeral Home, P.A. in Easton on Monday, Oct. 5. Burial followed at Woodlawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Critchlow Adkins Children’s Centers, P.O. Box 2950, Easton, MD 21601 (eastondaycare.org) and/or the Academy Art Museum, 106 South St., Easton, MD 21601, in John’s name in honor of his love for children and his art.

Ruby Olive Donovan, 67

Ruby Olive Donovan of Bridgeville, died at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford, on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2009. She was born on July 28, 1942, in Philadelphia, Pa., the daughter of Charles Harris and Olive Ida Dolbow Harris. She is survived by her husband, Arthur Donovan and three daughters, Karen Melson of Seaford, Debra Hart of Bridgeville, and Tammy Harris of Greenwood; eight grandchildren; two brothers, Martin E. Harris of Greenwood and Sarah Pauley of Seaford; and several nieces and nephews. Two brothers, Charles D. Harris and Elijah J. Harris preceded her in death. The funeral will be held on Thursday, Oct. 8, at 1 p.m., at Denton Wayside CCCU, with the Rev. Gordon Hayes officiating. Friends may call from noon to 1 p.m. at the church on Thursday.

We are still here to service you… Darnell R. McPherson

Licensed Funeral Director, PA, DE, Maryland (610)721-0128

• Affordable Traditional Funeral Services • Affordable Cremation Services • Memorial Portraits & Doves • DVD Memorial Tribute • Cremation • Serving All of Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania • Serving All Faiths • New Dover Location Coming Soon

308 N. Front St. Seaford, DE

(302)629-9283 1(800)796-4873

• Milford Location Undergoing Restoration • We Guarantee the Lowest Prices – Period! • Funerals should not cost a fortune. Mention this ad or bring it in and receive $500 off Pre-Planning & Traditional Svcs. $250 off Cremation Svcs. • $3,995 Complete Funeral Package • We offer free infant funeral services

“Your loss is still our concern.” Prompt & Efficient Services for All

309 North St. Milford, DE

(302)422-9441


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009 The family has requested that donations be made in her memory to Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Frances Gray Freeborn

Frances Gray Freeborn, of Seaford, died Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2009. She was born in Norristown, Pa., the daughter of Isaac C. and Lillian Irons Gray. Her husband, James Wilson Freeborn died on March 31, 1998. She was a graduate of Ursinus College in Collegeville, Pa. and Penn State University in College Park, Pa. She taught 12 years in the Norristown Schools, both elementary and junior high schools and later in East Norristown Elementary School. Mrs. Freeborn was a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church, the United Methodist Women and a former member of the Administrative Board as Secretary. She had lived in the Manor House since 1991, where she sang in the chapel choir for a number of years. She is survived by her two children, Robert G. Freeborn of Seaford and Faith Elizabeth Freeborn of Georgetown. A memorial service was held on Friday, Oct. 2 at Methodist Manor House. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. John’s United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 299, Seaford, DE 19973 or the Benevolence Fund of the Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973.

David Herbert Daudt, 58

David Herbert Daudt of Bridgeville passed away Friday, Sept. 25, 2009. He was born on June 15, 1951, in Wilmington, the son of Louis and Elizabeth “Betty” Daudt. He lived in Aiken, S.C. until age 14, when the family moved to Seaford. David was active in scouting, earning his Eagle Scout Rank in 1965 with Troop 182, and then continuing in Explorers with Post 381. He was a member of Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church. A 1969 graduate of Seaford high School, he received his associate’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Delaware Technical & Community College. Mr. Daudt worked locally, specializing in Volkswagen repair, owning an auto repair shop on Middleford Road. In addition to his parents, he is survived by his daughter, Kimberlee Elizabeth Lee, her husband Brian and their two sons,

PAGE 23

Anthony and Marcus, two brothers, Rodney and Wendy Daudt and Paul and Jodie Daudt, four nephews and a niece. The funeral was held on Thursday, Oct. 1, at Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church or Troop 182, c/o Mt. Olivet, 315 E. High St., Seaford, DE 19973.

NEW IN TOWN? Get acquainted with your community and all it has to offer by ordering a subscription to the

Emma Stoakley Jones, 81

Emma Stoakley Jones of Laurel, died Saturday, Oct. 3, 2009, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. She was born in Bethel, on Sept. 13, 1928, to Elmo and Nora Stoakley. Emma was a long time employee of Sandy Fork Store. She is survived by her two daughters, Pamela Smith and husband David, Yvette Bourne and husband Jonathan; grandchildren, Catina Goff, Gregory Smith, Christopher Smith and Maegan Bourne; and six great-grandchildren. She is also survived by two brothers, Richard Stoakley, of Salisbury, Md. and Elmo Stoakley Jr. of Bethel. A viewing will be held at Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel, on Thursday, Oct. 8, from 1 to 2 p.m. A graveside service will follow in Laurel Hill Cemetery on 9th Street at 2:15 p.m. The Rev. Ken Huffman will officiate.

Seaford Star OR Laurel Star

Community Bulletin Board! Church Bulletin! Local Sports! Health and Business News! Where To Dine and Shop! ....And more!

Alma Meyer

Alma Meyer of Seaford, and formerly of Philadelphia, Pa., died Thursday, Oct. 1, 2009, at the Methodist Manor House. Born in Philadelphia the daughter of Emilie Diehl and Frank Bernard Meyer, she was a legal secretary for the law firm of Morgan, Lewis and Bockius in Philadelphia, retiring in 1979 after 30 years. Miss Meyer was a graduate of West Philadelphia High School and the Taylor Business School in Philadelphia, and a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Lansdown, Pa. She is survived by two nephews and a niece. In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her brother, David Meyer, and sister, Miriam Partridge. Services and burial will be private. Memorial contributions in her name may be made to the Benidictine School Foundation, 1429 Benidictine Lane, Ridgely, MD 21160. Arrangements are by Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

Kyle Dixon Memorial Scholarship Fund 2nd Annual BEEF and DUMPLINGS DINNER! At The

FEEL LIKE A FISH OUT OF WATER?

VFW Post/Delmar, MD

Sunday, Oct. 11, 2009

1 - 5 p.m. • $10 Per Person CARRY OUTS AVAILABLE!

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR! MENU: Beef & Dumplings, Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, Rolls, Choice of Dessert, Ice Tea or Coffee

SILENT AUCTIONS! MUSIC! 50/50 RAFFLE! LIVE AUCTION!

FOR TICKETS OR MORE INFO, CALL 443-880-4632 All proceeds to benefit the Kyle Dixon Memorial Scholarship Fund.

52 56 Weekly Issues ONLY $19.00 *

Delivered to your home by the US postal service.

PLUS ONE MONTH FREE

Please send

� Laurel Star � Seaford Star

Name _________________________________________

Address: _______________________________________

_______________________________________________ City __________________State _______ Zip __________ Phone __________________

� MY CHECK FOR $19 IS ENCLOSED. Mail to: Morning Star Circulation PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973

or call 302-629-9788 with credit card payment *Sussex County $19, Kent & New Castle Counties $24 Delmar & Federalsburg, MD $24, Out of State $29


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Police Journal Amber Alert hoax

State Police and local law enforcement are receiving numerous calls concerning an Amber Alert involving a 3-year-old boy or infant that was abducted from a Sussex County hospital. The alert is being circulated via cell phone texts. The text indicates the vehicle being sought is a 2006 Mitubishi displaying a Delaware registration. Several different registration numbers have been disseminated through the ruse. No Amber Alert has been issued at this time and no action should be taken by any citizen seeing a vehicle matching the description of the aforementioned text. Anyone with questions or concerns about the hoax should contact the Delaware State Police Public Information Office at 302-672-5352 or via e-mail at dsp_pio@state.de.us.

Package store robbery

On Oct. 5 at 9:05 p.m., Seaford Police responded to a report of a robbery at the Nylon Package Store located on Sussex Avenue, Seaford. Officers determined that the suspect entered the business where he confronted a clerk and demanded money. The suspect displayed a knife which he began waiving around causing a female clerk to receive a minor laceration to her hand. The suspect obtained an undisclosed amount of currency then fled north on Sussex Avenue in a red older 1970’s style vehicle. The suspect is described as a black male, late teens early twenties, 6’2”- 6’4”, 175–200 lbs., wearing a gray zip up hooded sweatshirt with dark gray sleeves, blue jeans, tan work boots, black gloves and a blue bandana covered his face. He is wanted for first degree robbery. The Seaford Police Criminal Investigation Division responded and processed the scene. Officers canvassed the area, unable to locate the suspect. The Criminal Investigation Division is investigating the incident. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Seaford Police Department at 302-629-6648 or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or www.tipsubmit. com. Delaware Crime Stoppers is offering a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of person or persons involved.

Burglary suspect

On Saturday, Oct. 3, at 7:40 a.m., Delaware State Police investigated a burglary at a residence in the 21000 block of Mill Park Drive in Bridgeville. State Police discovered that the victim, a 32-yearold female, came home and discovMatthews ered numerous items out of place inside her residence. The victim walked into her bedroom where she startled the suspect, Terrence Matthews, 36. Matthews exited the residence and the victim followed him but lost sight of him. The victim was familiar with the suspect. When Delaware State Police responded to the area of the residence they observed Matthews walking down the street. Matthews again fled into a wooded area eluding police. Pending charges for Matthew include second degree burglary, theft under $1,500 and resisting arrest. Matthews is homeless, however, frequents the Bridgeville area. Anyone with information on Matthews’ whereabouts is asked to call Troop 5 at 302-337-1090. Tips may also be forwarded to law enforcement through tip lines maintained by Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP3333 or online at www.tipsubmit.com.

Road rage

On Tuesday, Sept. 29, at 7:15 p.m., a 61-year-old male from Lewes was traveling eastbound on Fisher Road, just west of Cool Spring Road. The victim advised an approaching dark color pick-up truck that they had the high beam lights activated. The victim turned on his high beam lights to inform the other operator that their high beam lights were illuminated. When the suspect vehicle failed to dim the lights, the victim kept his high beam head lights on to remind the suspect that his high beam lights were activated. When the two vehicles passed, the suspect threw a chrome colored racket at the victim, which struck the victim in the head, causing a bump. The victim refused

CLIFFORD SHORT

Independent Agent

INSURANCE

412 N. DuPont Hwy., Georgetown, DE

Fraud suspect

Family members perish

Karen Orlandi, 44, of Lewes, began working for a Real Estate Center in Lewes in Nov. 2006. Orlandi’s job position was to deposit rental and security checks into the company account and maintain the business records. Orlandi This past February, the company learned the business checking account had been overdrawn. The business then conducted an internal audit on the accounting records and deposit slips, discovering discrepancies with the transactions. Orlandi is suspected of stealing approximately $30,000 from the business between Feb. 2008 and Jan. 2009. After the Rental Business completed their internal audit and State Police detectives concluded their investigation, warrants were obtained for Orlandi on numerous counts of theft and falsifying business

A fatal accident involving a tractor trailer and a Honda Pilot occurred on Saturday, Oct. 3, at 6:52 a.m., at US 113, Daisey Street in Frankford. A 2002 Volvo tractor trailer was northbound on US 113 approaching the intersection with Daisey Street. A 2007 Honda Pilot was westbound Daisey Street approaching the intersection with US 113. The driver of the Honda Pilot, Brett Pierce, 46, of Wilmington, failed to stop at the stop sign at the intersection of Daisey Street and US 113 northbound. The tractor trailer struck the driver’s side of the Pilot. Pierce’s wife Allison, 50, and son Jimmy, 12, died at the scene. The lone survivor, Brett and Allison Pierce’s daughter, Margaret Pierce, 16, sustained a broken wrist along with other non-life threatening injuries. She was taken by Delaware State Police helicopter to Christiana Hospital. The operator of the tractor trailer, Calvin Davis, 43, of Kittrell, N.C., was transporting mail from the Virginia area and was en route to New Jersey. Davis was treated and released from Beebe Medical Center for lower back strain.

Gas Lines

Prices falling at the pump

For the first time since mid-July, the national average price for gasoline fell below the $2.50 mark last week. The average U.S. retail price for regular gasoline dropped to $2.48 Friday, $1.15 below year-ago prices and $1.63 below the record price of $4.11 set last July. If current trends continue, there is real potential for $2.00 per gallon gasoline to spread to some parts of the country, particularly as the slow fall driving season gets underway and demand remains low, reports the AAA Mid-Atlantic. Crude Oil Prices After dropping more than 8% last week, crude oil took an upturn this week, gaining 5% alone on Wednesday to settle above $70 a barrel. At the

National

Serving Sussex County Since 1983

Let Us Do Your Insurance Shopping For You!

records. State Police Detectives have not been able to locate Orlandi and are asking for assistance with locating this suspect. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call investigators at 302-856-5850, ext. 257 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

close of trading Friday, crude oil settled at $69.95. Oil’s uptake is due in part to a weak U.S. dollar, which makes crude more affordable for buyers using other currencies. Future Outlook In light of last week’s alarming news that Iran, the world’s fourth largest oil producer, has constructed a large-scale secret nuclear facility, global tension rose as Iran fired two long range test missiles last week. If the situation deteriorates rapidly and begins to impact regional stability in the Middle East, oil process will undoubtedly be affected,” said Catherine L. Rossi, manager of Public and Government Affairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic. Local pricing On Tuesday gas stations from Delmar to Greenwood were selling regular gasoline in a range from $2.259 to $2.419 a gallon.

Regular Unleaded Gasoline & Crude Oil prices

Clifford D. Short, Agent

We Sell Home Owners and Business Owners Insurance • Auto • Workers Compensation

medical treatment and the victim’s vehicle did not sustain any damage. Troopers at the scene recovered the chrome racket and are investigating the case. Anyone with information is asked to call investigators at 302-644-5020 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

Let Me Work For You! I’m as close as your phone 302

856-7773

Delaware

Oil Barrel

10/04/09

Week Ago

Year Ago

$2.50

$2.50

$3.55

$2.34

$2.42

$3.34

10/02/09

Week Ago

Year Ago

$69.95

$66.02

$93.88


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Child held at knife point

At 10:23 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 1, troopers were called to the Tobacco Store on Pulaski Highway at the Salem Center Strip Mall in Bear for a knife point robbery. A male suspect came up from behind and surprised the store owner, her husband and her children as they were walking to their car after closing the store. The suspect, who was armed with a large knife, grabbed the store owner’s 3-year-old daughter, held a knife to her neck and demanded money. The mother grabbed her daughter and pulled her away from the suspect. The suspect then wielded the knife and held it toward the mother’s 14-year-old son who subsequently received a superficial wound on his stomach. The suspect, who may have been in the store earlier in the day, obtained the night deposit bag and fled. The 14-year-old boy was treated at the scene and was not transported to the hospital. The suspect is described as a black male, 25-30 years old, wearing a hooded sweatshirt, tan pants and a baseball cap. Anyone with information is asked to call investigators at 302-834-2630, ext. 6 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

Motorcyle accident

On Oct. 5 at 1:30 p.m., Seaford Police officers responded to southbound Sussex Highway at the Seaford Village Shopping Center for an injury accident involving a motorcyclist. Officers determined that a vehicle turning southbound from northbound Sussex Highway failed to yield the right of way to a motorcycle traveling southbound, striking the motorcycle. The motorcyclist, a 40-year-old man from Laurel, was flown to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury for non-life threatening injuries. The operator of the other vehicle, a 76-year-old female from Seaford, was issued a traffic summons for failure to yield the right of way.

4,000 cited for speeding

Over the last three months, thousands of drivers in Delaware have been stopped for speeding violations by officers participating in Delaware’s statewide Stop Aggressive Driving Campaign. Collectively, officers have issued 4,797 citations. The Office of Highway Safety (OHS) launched the highway safety initiative on July 6. For the second year in a row, highway safety and law enforcement officials are focusing specifically on stopping speeding drivers and reducing speed related crashes in the state. In addition to the speed citations issued in the first three months, officers also issued 28 citations for aggressive driving, arrested eight for DUI, apprehended 20 wanted individuals, made 10 drug arrests, five felony arrests, and issued over 17-hundred citations for other traffic violations. Since stepped up speed enforcement began this past summer, speed as a factor in fatal crashes has decreased from 30% to 18%. Collectively, acts of aggressive driving (of which speed is the most frequently occurring behavior) are still listed as a primary contributing factor in approximately 41% of Delaware’s fatal crashes this year – 10% higher than alcohol involvement in fatal crashes at this time.

Increased enforcement of the state’s speed and aggressive driving laws will continue through October. Delaware State Police, New Castle County Police and Dover Police will conduct either single or two-officer team patrols looking for speeders and other dangerous drivers such as those who run red lights or are impaired by drugs and or alcohol. The public is reminded that they can take an active role in this effort by calling 911 to report aggressive drivers.

Arrested for DUI

On Oct. 2, at 8 p.m., a trooper traveling northbound on US 13 at Route 404, drove upon a two vehicle property damage collision that had just occurred. The trooper made contact with both operators involved in the crash and learned the at-fault driver, who had rear-ended the vehicle in front of him, was intoxicated. The trooper made contact with William E. Boulden, 43, of Newark, and could detect a strong odor of alcoholic beverages coming from Boulden’s breath. A DUI investigation was conducted and Boulden was subsequently arrested for DUI. During the investigation, the suspect was patted down and a small bag of marijuana was found in his possession. Boulden has been previously convicted of three DUI offenses, making this fourth arrest a felony offense. In addition to the felony DUI charge, Boulden was arrested for possession of marijuana, driving at an unreasonable speed and failure to have his license in possession. Boulden was committed to Sussex Correctional Institution, after failing to post $5,601 secured bond.

tim later located the motorcycle. He also found an ATV that he recognized as belonging to a neighbor. Police then responded to the neighbor’s house on the 14000 block of Hastings Farm Road to take a report on the stolen ATV and process the scene for evidence. The ATV was recovered and returned to the owner. Later in the morning, troopers responded to the 12000 block of Old Furnace Road for another burglary complaint. The victim reported his chicken house, which is now storage space, was broken into during the night. Several doors were pried open and items were taken. The victim also reported a vehicle on the property was entered and a purse was removed. The suspects also attempted to break into the vehicle via the sunroof, causing damage to the vehicle. Investigators believe all of the crimes are related. State Police detectives are asking for the public’s help in identifying the suspects. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call investigators at 302-856-5850, ext. 214 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

PAGE 25

Hundreds not buckling up

Officers participating in a stepped up statewide enforcement effort to save lives by getting more Delawareans to buckle up, have issued 431 citations for seat belt violations in the first two months of the campaign. The enforcement and awareness mobilization, which launched Aug. 1, is part of a four-month long safety initiative created after results from observational seat belt surveys conducted by the Office of Highway Safety in June revealed that the state’s 2009 statewide use rate declined from 91% last year to 88% this year. To date this year, 56% of drivers and passengers killed since Jan. 1 have not been buckled up. In addition to the seat belt citations issued during the first two months of enforcement, officers have also issued 25 citations for violations of Delaware’s child restraint law, cited 177 for speeding, arrested 4 for DUI, apprehended 4 wanted individuals and cited another 299 for other traffic violations. Seat belt usage declined by 4% each in New Castle and Sussex Counties, while the usage rate increased by 1% in Kent County.

Churches burglarized

On the early morning hours of Sunday, Sept. 27, troopers responded to several reported burglaries and other related crimes that occurred during the night. The reported burglaries include two local Georgetown churches. The suspects broke into Cokesbury Church on Cokesbury Road during the night. The suspects stole three guitars, knocked over electronic equipment, poured cleaning equipment all over items inside the church, and the church was left in disarray. Troopers also handled a burglary complaint at Hebron M.P. Church on Seashore Highway. The church is no longer an active church. The suspects entered the church and caused damage to a wooden cabinet and a Bible, however nothing was taken from the church. While investigating the burglary at Hebron M.P Church, troopers discovered a kiosk located on the church property was also broken into during the night. The kiosk, owned by Georgetown Kiwanis, listed several sodas as being stolen from the refrigerator. Troopers also responded to other complaints in the area, which appear to be related to the church burglaries. The breakins were all within a 10 mile area. Troopers responded to the 14000 block of Cokesbury Road at approximately 4:10 a.m. for an assault. A 17-year-old male victim was assaulted by unknown suspects while he was asleep in a vehicle parked on his property. The victim received minor injuries. Before the assault, the suspects had removed several tools from a shed on the property and took a motorcycle. The vic-

“When Mom’s heart was failing, mine was working overtime...until I called Delaware Hospice.” “Mom was always the strong one. When the doctor said her heart was failing, I was overwhelmed. Delaware Hospice gave me the confidence to care for her. They always made Mom feel like she was their only patient. They brought peace and joy to our home when we never expected it.” Delaware Hospice is dedicated to providing high quality hospice care to patients and families in their home settings or at the Delaware Hospice Center.

Let Delaware Hospice share the care. Call 478-5707 or visit delawarehospice.org


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Entertainment

Chorus show will benefit food banks

The Tri County Chorus will present a Variety Show to benefit Delaware’s three County Food Banks on Sunday, Oct. 25, at 3 p.m. at Heritage Shores’ Ball Room in Bridgeville. The show will include singing, dancing, skits and jokes. Guest entertainers will be Bo Dickerson, Everette Hart, Bob Murphy and Drs. Nancy and Sammy Magrone. Tickets are $10. For more information, contact Tri County Chorus president and music director, Susanne Layton, at 8757809 or Terry Wright at 875-7931.

‘Couture &Class’ fashion show set

Tri County Chorus director Suzanne Layton

Wellness Pet Fair set for Oct. 14

A Wellness Pet Fair will be Wednesday, Oct. 14, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. The pet fair is presented by students in the Veterinary Technology Club in celebration of National Veterinary Technician Week, Oct. 11 to 17. The event will be held outside the Carter Partnership Center and will feature a dog walk around campus to raise awareness of pet obesity and a dog agility course. Pet care information, including nutrition and money saving advice, will be available. There will

also be lessons in cleaning teeth, trimming nails, cleaning ears and training pets. The fair will feature costume and cutest pet contests as well as pet photography. The Kent County SPCA will share information about foster care programs, adoption and dog licenses. The fair is free and open to the public; donations will benefit local animal rescues. All dogs must be on a leash or in a carrier. For more information, contact Lisa Garrison, club advisor and Delaware Tech faculty member, at 856-5400, ext. 5518.

Glamour and style will be center stage during the second Couture & Class fashion show and luncheon on Saturday, Nov. 21, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Carter Partnership Center at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. Proceeds from the show, which is hosted by the Jack F. Owens Campus Development Council, will be used to benefit Delaware Tech students in Sussex County. Presenting men’s and women’s clothing in the categories of casual, business, holiday and resort wear will be Carltons, Rose Garden, Sole and Tickled Pink, all in Rehoboth Beach; That Boutique! in Milford; and Coolspring Cottage, Deanna’s/ Piccolino, Tiara’s Bridal Boutique, Twila Farrell and Aqua Marine, all in Lewes. The featured announcer will be Cacia Batts, of Middletown, the reigning Mrs.

Delaware 2009. New to the event this year will be a historical exhibit of formal gowns that were worn by Elsie Williams, wife of former U.S. Senator John J. Williams of Millsboro. There will also be a silent auction of travel packages to various locations; and at the show’s end, a shopping bazaar from which attendees can purchase their favorite runway items. A portion of the proceeds from that sale will be donated to the college. Tickets are $25 per person and include lunch: $10 of that price is tax-deductible. A table for eight may be reserved for $175. Seating is limited; tickets are available by reservation only until Nov. 13. To purchase tickets, call Delaware Tech at 302-855-1659 or visit the Web site www.dtcc.edu/fashionshow.

2010 Home Show features trends

The Delaware Home Show, Oct. 17 & 18 at Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, is the perfect place to learn about next year’s home design trends, see the latest innovations and engage with manufacturers and contractors that can transform your home into a showplace. Attendees will have many opportunities for great savings with special show pricing and discounts on high quality products and professional services. The Delaware Home Show will be held Saturday, Oct. 17, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 18, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Admission is buy one ticket get a second free; $6 for adults. Children 12 and under are free. For more information and to download the official show program, visit www.delawarehomeshow.com.

No Insurance? We can Help

Writer’s conference set for Oct. 17 The Vine and Vessels Christian Writer’s Fellowship will host its “Connecting Pen to Purpose” writer’s conference Saturday, Oct. 17, at Crossroad Community Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Candy Abbott of Fruitbearer Publishing, local author and publisher, is the keynote speaker. The registration fee is $35 for adults and $20 for youth 11-18 and seniors 62 and over. Included are continental breakfast, lunch and two workshops. Register online at www.vineandvessels.com or mail registration and payment to Vine and Vessels, P.O. Box 1716, Seaford, DE 19973. For more information, contact Betty Jarman at 448-5939 or Joyce Sessoms at 382-9904.

Call today

800-734-2010

Buy 1 Get 1

FREE

Frames and Lenses LIMITED TIME ONLY

For more information please call

1-800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com

Must purchase a complete pair of glasses. Can not be combined with any other discount or insurance. Other restrictions may apply. Expires 12/31/09.

69

Single Vision Package

189

Progressive Package

$

Includes single vision lenses with select frames. Other restrictions may apply. Expires 12/31/09.

$

Includes select frames and select progressive lenses. Other restrictions may apply. Expires 12/31/09.

www.halperneye.com Office Locations in: Bear, Middletown, Smyrna, Dover, West Dover, Milford, Seaford, and Millville


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 27

Fruited kraut and pork are perfect for Oktoberfest

Eating sausage, drinking beer and celebrating the rich culture of Bavaria is what Oktoberfest is all about. Oddly enough, because of practical weather considerations, this wildly popular German festival begins around the third week in September and is over and done with in very early October (this year, Oct. 4). But writing about Oktoberfest in September seems somehow wrong. Six million people will have occupied Munich’s vast beer tents this year, in which they not only enjoyed the beer and sausage but also chicken, noodles, potato pancakes, dumplings and sauerkraut. Finally, whether it’s September or October, cooler weather and hearty Bavarian food go hand in hand. Try this unusual but very yummy German pork meal in a pot. You can almost hear the oompah bands!

Loretta Knorr

Sausages and Pork Chops Baked with Fruited Sauerkraut Bon Appétit, November 1995 Transforming cabbage into sauerkraut was one way the Germans preserved summer’s crop for the hard winter ahead. A combination of rinsing the kraut of its salty brine and baking it with dried fruit mellows its bite. Smoked pork chops can be substituted; just omit the browning step. Offer some dark and light German beers to drink. Serves 4. 1 2-pound jar sauerkraut, drained 5 bacon slices, chopped 4 pork loin chops (each about 1 and 1/4 inches thick) 4 assorted fully-cooked sausages (such as bratwurst and knockwurst) 2 cups chopped onions 1 cup chopped carrots 2 1/2 cups canned chicken broth 1 cup dry white wine

The Practical Gourmet 1/2 cup quartered dried apricots (about 3 ounces) 1/2 cup quartered prunes (about 3 1/2 ounces) Assorted mustards Place sauerkraut in large bowl. Fill bowl with enough cold water to cover; soak 30 minutes. Drain. Preheat oven to 350°F. Cook bacon in heavy large Dutch oven over medium-high heat until brown and almost crisp, about five minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels. Add pork chops to Dutch oven; cook over medium-high heat until golden, about six minutes per side. Transfer to plate. Add sausages to Dutch oven; stir until golden, about three minutes. Transfer to plate with pork chops. Reduce heat to medium. Add onions and carrots to Dutch oven and sauté until tender, about eight minutes. Add broth, wine, sauerkraut and bacon to Dutch oven; stir to blend. Cover and bake 45 minutes. Mix apricots and prunes into sauerkraut. Arrange pork chops and sausages over sauerkraut. Cover Dutch oven; bake until chops are cooked through and most of liquid is absorbed, about 30 minutes. Serve hot, passing the mustards separately.

Habitat looking for used appliances

Sussex County Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore is seeing a greater than usual need for kitchen appliances. ReStore accepts donations of appliances in good working condition that are 10 years old or less and sells them at a reduced price to families in need. “We had five requests for appliances in one morning this week,” said Denise Jackson, ReStore manager. “I think as the economy picks up, many more people will be redoing their kitchens. When they do, we would like them to think of ReStore to recycle their old appliances. It keeps those big items out of the landfill, helps the family purchasing the appliance and the money that comes to ReStore is used by Sussex County Habitat to build new homes with low-income partner families.” In addition to appliances, ReStore accepts new and gently used cabinets, furniture, doors and windows at the warehouse thrift store located near the railroad station at 107 Depot St., Georgetown. ReStore is open to the public Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sussex County Habitat for Humanity operates ReStore to help with funding for

Bethany Travel/Dream Vacations & Princess Cruises invite you to

Princess Alaska Night Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 6:30 pm SPACE IS LIMITED - RSVP 302-933-0955

Refreshments will be served Event will be held at the Georgia House in Millsboro

more Habitat homes. The profits go directly to Habitat’s mission of building simple, decent and affordable homes in partnership with Sussex County families. For more information or to volunteer, call ReStore at 855-1156.

11465 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE • 302-875-6922

(1/2 mi. from Rt. 13) Hrs: Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30; Sun. 12-4

Mums, Gourds Handbags & Pumpkins Willow Tree

Bath & Body Yankee Candles GIFTS & CARDS Garden Flags

for all occasions

CLUCK BUCKS ARE BACK

www.thehenhousede.com

You’ll love our friendly, personal service! SAME PRICE AS THE INTERNET -NO ADDITIONAL BOOKING FEES -- Except on AIR ONLY bookings

28412 Dupont Boulevard (Rt. 113) just south of McDonalds in Millsboro

302-933-0955 or 800-806-8747 cmccabe@dreamvacationinc.com

www.dreamvacationinc.com


PAGe 28

MORNING STAR • OcTObeR 8 - 14, 2009

Health

Most malpractice suit juries find in favor of the physician

By Dr. Anthony Policastro

One of the things discussed in the health care reform debate is medical malpractice. I suspect that if you asked a nonmedical person what malpractice means you would get a variety of definitions, most related to a bad result from a medical procedure. Most of those definitions would be wrong. Medical malpractice has a series of components with a specific definition. When a malpractice suit is filed, it often

does not have all the necessary components. Therefore, most malpractice suits that actually get to a jury are found in favor of the physician. You may wonder then what all the fuss is about related to malpractice. The fuss is related to two things. The first and most important is the emotional trauma that a physician goes through during a malpractice action. The physician has to face a variety of emotions that often continue even after the case is settled. Many times it takes years to come to a settlement, which makes fighting a mal-

Health Briefs Seasonal flu shots offered

It’s time to get your seasonal flu shot. Influenza is a serious disease that affects many people, including the elderly and those with serious, long-term health problems. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will be offering seasonal flu shots to individuals 18 and older at Nanticoke Occupational Health, 743 Shipley Street, Suite F, Seaford, from: 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, Oct. 14, Oct. 21, Oct. 28 and Nov. 4; and 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. on Fridays, Oct. 16, Oct. 23, Oct. 30, and Nov. 6. Cost is $10 per adult. Medicare Part B billing is available with proof of Medicare insurance. Pre-registration is required. Call Nanticoke Occupational Health at 629-6875 to pre-register and schedule an appointment.

New Hope Holiday workshop

Delaware Hospice invites area children and teens who have lost a loved one to a New Hope Holiday Workshop on Tuesday, Oct. 27, from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford. Participants will complete a holiday ornament in remembrance of their loved one, learn helpful coping skills to deal with the upcoming holidays, and meet other children who have had the same experiences that they have. The Holiday Workshop is free and open to the community, thanks to the generous support of donors and volunteers. Registration is required. To register, call Lezley Sexton, 302-856-7717, ext. 3104, by Oct. 19.

Bereavement support group

A new bereavement support group will begin at Nanticoke Cancer Care Center on Tuesday, Oct. 20, at 10 a.m. Compassionate Care Hospice’s Bereavement Coordinator, Mary Van House, will facilitate the monthly support group called, “The Next Step,” in the conference room on the second floor of the Nanticoke Cancer Center. This group focuses on issues of loss

that continue beyond the early stages of grief and is open to family members and friends who have lost a loved one to cancer or other causes. The group will continue to meet on the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. To register for this free program, call Lisa at 629-6611, ext. 2378. For more information, call Mary Van House at 302934-5900.

Family and Friends CPR course

Peninsula Regional Medical Center is offering a “Family and Friends CPR” course from 6 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 14, in the Avery W. Hall Educational Center on the Peninsula Regional campus. The course is designed for all lay rescuers (grandparents, family members of patients at risk for heart attack, and those who want to learn rescue skills for loved ones) who want to learn CPR but do not need a course completion card. This one-time, three hour course teaches rescuers skills in CPR and relief of foreign body airway obstruction for adults, children and infants. The fee is $25. Pre-registration is required. For more information, call 410-5437126.

Video conference at Nanticoke

Thanks to live video conferencing technology, members of the Delaware Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society can stay close to home and still take part in the chapter’s annual meeting on Saturday, Oct. 24, at the Ammon Medical Education Center on the campus at Christiana Hospital in Newark. For the first time, the video conference will include participants at a satellite location at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Like the participants in Newark, Sussex County residents who attend the satellite location will also receive lunch, take part in the chapter’s annual meeting and recognition awards ceremony, and enjoy a client-focused discussion about MS research. Cost is $5 per person, and anyone who wants to attend must register by Friday, Oct. 9, either online at www.MSdelaware. org or by calling 302-655-5610.

practice suit expensive — the second reason why malpractice causes so much fuss. Many times the suit is settled long before it comes to trial to avoid further expense. In order for a malpractice suit to be successful, the plaintiff needs to prove four things. The first is that there is a specific standard of care or agreement on the correct way to treat something. Next is that the physician did not follow that standard of care. The last two items include harm to the patient and that the harm occurred because the physician did not follow the standard. You need to prove all four of these parts which is quite difficult. For example, there are usually several different ways to treat a single condition and, for that reason, experts support different ways of treatment making it hard to decide if there even is a standard. Sometimes, it is easy to show that the standard was not followed. For example, cutting off the wrong leg clearly is not following the standard. However, other times it is not so clear. Some procedures are so intricate that it is hard to prove if the standard was or was not followed. The third thing has to do with injury. If a physician does not follow the standard of care, the patient might get lucky and not be injured. Therefore, there is no malpractice even though the physician did the

wrong thing. The fourth piece is related to proving that something that was done incorrectly caused the injury. Injury might occur without it being related to things being done wrong. For example, if a patient has a diagnosis, a certain medication might be needed. That medication is prescribed correctly. The physician correctly asks the patient if they have ever had an allergic reaction to that medication. That patient answers “no.” The medication is prescribed and the patient has a severe allergic reaction. The result is bad but this is not malpractice. Many malpractice suits are filed with the hope of settlement before a trial. All of the components may not be present to prove malpractice but that does not matter if settlement is reached before trial. Settlements do not prevent the emotional trauma that goes with the lawsuit until it is settled. They do not make all the legal costs disappear. At the Delaware Board of Medical Practice meetings, we review all the malpractice settlements in the state. In most cases, the settlements are not for bad medicine but bad results. It is unfortunate that the patient suffered a bad result. However, it is not usually related to actual malpractice.


MORNING STAR • OcTObeR 8 - 14, 2009

Dr. Pena joins NMH staff

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital welcomes Ivan Pena, MD, FACC to its active medical staff. Dr. Pena, who joins Nanticoke Cardiology as a specialist in interventional cardiology, is accepting new patients at his practice located at 200 Federal Street in Seaford. Dr. Pena is Board Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine for interventional Dr. Pena cardiology, cardiovascular disease, and internal medicine. He completed his postdoctoral training in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular disease, and invasive cardiology through New York University. Dr. Pena has over 20 years of medical experience with nearly six years of experience concentrated in interventional cardiology. His professional memberships include the American College of Physicians, American Society of Echocardiography, American Medical Association, and fellowship with the American College of Cardiology. To reach Dr. Pena’s office, call 302629-9099.

Influenza activity increases

The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) is reporting a modest increase in influenza activity in Delaware. Laboratory confirmed influenza isolations show a clear progression of novel H1N1 cases from the week of Sept. 6 when 14 cases of novel H1N1 were reported to the week of Sept. 20 when 48 cases were reported. Also, reports of influenza-like illness (ILI) have increased. DPH maintains a network sentinel healthcare providers who report cases of ILI weekly. During the week of Sept. 13, five sentinel providers reported an increase in ILI from 3 to 22 cases. This changes Delaware’s assessment of influenza activity as reported to CDC from sporadic to widespread. It is important to note that this technical designation does not imply that Delaware is experiencing the same magnitude of influenza activity as had occurred this spring. DPH recommends the following preventive measures: • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.

Jona Gorra, M.D. FACP 10 West Laurel St. Georgetown, DE 19947

Board Certified in Internal Medicine

302-855-0915

Monday thru Friday 9:00 - 12:00 & 1:00 - 6:00, Sat. 9:00 - 1:00

• Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way. • Try to avoid close contact with sick people. • If you are sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.) For more information, visit www.flu. delaware.gov.

Hospice welcomes staff members

Delaware Hospice welcomes the following new staff members: Belinda Drummond, CNA, of Georgetown, as a certified nursing assistant. Francine Elliott, RN, of Harrington, as a registered nurse. Francine earned her nursing degree from Delaware Technical and Community College in Georgetown and has served as a nurse for Envoy Health of Denton, Md. Lona Elliott, RN, of Seaford, as a registered nurse. Lona attended MacQueen Gibbs Willis School of Nursing in Easton, Md., and has experience as an operating room and emergency room nurse, as well as in case management. Melody T. Jones, BSN, of Smyrna, as a case manager. Melody holds degrees in nursing from Delaware Technical and Community College in Georgetown and from Wilmington University. She has experience in ICU as well as in a step-down telemetry unit. Cherody McInnis, LPN, of Seaford, as a licensed practical nurse. Cherody has several years experience in medical surgical as well as hospice nursing. She graduated from Delaware Technical and Community College in Georgetown. Angela Turley, LCSW-C, of Dagsboro, as a social worker.

Free prostate cancer screenings

If you’re a male over 50, you’re at risk for prostate cancer, the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. And if you’re African-American, your prostate cancer mortality rate just doubled: you should get screened beginning at age 40. Bayhealth Medical Center will offer a free prostate cancer screening on Monday, Oct. 12 from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Cancer Center at Milford, located at Milford Memorial Hospital, 21 W. Clarke Ave. in Milford.

NicholasM . Macharia,M .D. 1501 Middleford Rd. Seaford, DE 19973

Board Certified in Internal Medicine

302-629-4569 Monday thru Friday 8:30 - 12:00 & 1:00 - 5:30

MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED

Accepting New Patients

Walk-Ins Accepted, Appts. Preferred

PAGe 29

To register, call 302-744-7135 or 1-877-453-7107. Bayhealth’s free two-part screening includes a blood test for prostate specific antigen (PSA) and a digital rectal exam (DRE) performed by a urologist.

Professional Caregiver Retreat Day

Delaware Hospice’s Family Support Center invites all those who work or volunteer in a helping profession to attend the Professional Caregiver Retreat Day on Friday, Nov. 13, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Delaware Hospice Center, Milford. Dr. Judy Pierson, licensed clinical psychologist, published author and dynamic speaker, will discuss topics such as: the cost of caring—assess your own wellbeing; understanding vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue; strategies for coping with the stress of this work; and creating your own personal self-care plan. The retreat is $99 per person (continental breakfast and lunch included). Application has been made for 6.0 continuing education hours for social workers and nurses. Participants will leave with information about the impact of their work, specific

coping techniques, and a strategy for improving their work life tomorrow. Due to space limitations, early registration is recommended. To register and for more information, call Vicki Costa, associate director of the Family Support Center, 302-856-7717, ext. 1129.

Hospice offers Grief Support group

Delaware Hospice is offering an eight-week group meeting for adults who have experienced the death of a loved one. The group will meet Wednesday afternoons from 5 to 6:30 p.m., beginning Oct. 14 through Dec. 2, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, 801 Middleford Road, Seaford. Find out what normal grief “looks” like; learn about the “tasks of mourning;” identify your coping style and develop coping skills that feel right for you; share as much or as little as you would like. This activity is provided free to the public by Delaware Hospice; however, registration is required. To register, call Paul Ganster at 302-357-7147.

COLON CANCER SCREENING • Screening exams for early detection & prevention of colo-rectal cancer • Endoscopy for investigation & treatment of digestive diseases • All in a caring, comfortable & convenient outpatient facility

PENINSULA ENDOSCOPY CENTER 9315 Ocean Highway, Delmar, MD

410-896-9005

HOME CARE

“The best care, by the best people, in the best place … HOME”

Compassionate, Medicare-certified care in the comfort of your home

• Skilled nursing services • Physical & occupational therapy • Medical social worker services • Home health aide services

302-629-4914

800-990-3909 toll free 302-629-6542 fax

SENIOR CITIZENS Seaford Center Genesis ElderCare® Network

• Retirement • Assisted Living • Skilled Nursing Care

1100 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-3575 • Fax 302-629-0561

EYE CARE

Azar Eye Institute

“With An Eye In The Future” www.azareyeinstitute.com

Alex Azar, M.D. Peter I. Filipov, M.D. Jason M. Tu, M.D. Diane Lubkeman, M.D. Emerson T. Que, M.D. Tracey Boss, O.D. Jennifer R. Giles, O.D.

Laurel Office: Salisbury: Suite 1 31519 Winter Place Pkwy., 116 E. Front Street Laurel, DE 19966 Salisbury, MD 21804

410-546-2500

302-875-8991

ADVERTISING

Your Ad Could Be Here Call 302629-9788 For Advertising Rates URGENT CARE ORTHOPAEDICS

H. PAUL AGUILLON, MD

Sussex Medical Center

GENERAL & FAMILY PRACTICE INTERNAL MEDICINE • WALK-INS

X-Ray and Lab on Premises Minor Emergencies • Lacerations Office Gynecology - Pap Smears Executive, Sports & Insurance Physicals Orthopedics • Minor Surgery Cardiology • Stress Testing

Se habla español 401 Concord Road, Blades, DE 19973

629-6664 LET PEOPLE KNOW YOU’RE AVAILABLE FOR THEM -- CALL 302-629-9788


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Education Phillips named to dean’s list

Katelyn Phillips of Laurel has been named to the dean’s list in psychology for the summer semester at Regent University, Virginia Beach, Va. To earn this distinction, a student must maintain a minimum 3.85 GPA per semester.

Del Tech offering computer courses

TRIP TO THE LIBRARY - Second graders at West Seaford Elementary recently walked to the Seaford Public Library as an extension of a language arts unit. While walking to and from the library, the students observed various neighborhood activities and sights. At the library, children’s librarian Cindy Smith talked to the students about the opportunities the library affords the public. She is pictured here sharing a story with Beverly Atkison’s and Mike King’s classes. In addition, students were able to obtain their first public library cards.

Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, is offering several computer classes. All courses consist of three-sessions, unless otherwise noted. Students will gain a solid foundation in computer skills by learning Windows XP and Microsoft Office 2007 applications such as Excel, PowerPoint, Word, Access and Outlook in Microsoft Office 2007 Applications Certificate, Level 1. This 10-session course begins Thursday, Oct. 8. Participants of Intro to Microsoft Publisher 2007 will learn to develop printed materials as well as Web-based products. Students in the class, which starts Monday, Oct. 12, will discover the basic functions of the software; develop text and graphic objects; and hyperlink to other pages, files and the Web. In Intro to Microsoft Office 2007 – Level 2, beginning Tuesday, Oct. 13, students will explore Microsoft Word and Excel by learning file management and how to create letters and basic spreadsheets.

Students will learn how to position and insert graphics, create a text box, use WordArt and charts and more in Intermediate Microsoft Excel 2007, beginning Thursday, Oct. 15. The two-session Intro to Photoshop CS3 course will meet Saturdays, Oct. 17 and 24. Students will discover how to improve photographs by removing flaws, correcting poor exposure or adding new elements using the latest techniques Photoshop has to offer. In Intermediate Microsoft Excel 2007, beginning Tuesday, Oct. 20, participants will learn to manage workbook data, plan and create tables and format charts. First Steps to Understanding Computers will provide beginners with the basic foundation necessary to use computers in this one-session course on Wednesday, Oct. 21. Business owners will learn how to turn accounting data into useful information using Excel reporting and charting in What Do These Numbers Mean? Using Excel to Manage Your Business. This two-session course will meet Wednesdays, Oct. 21 and 28. Students will discover how to acquire an e-mail account, send attachments and create an address book in First Steps to E-Mail; this one session course meets Wednesday, Oct. 28. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate & Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

What’s Their Favorite Subject?

Science • Art • History • Literature • Sports • Weather From left are George A. Steward, Benjamin A. Cunningham, Stacey L. Thompson and Brittini Collins.

Agriculture scholarships awarded

tini Collins, Denton, Md., Delaware State University, agriculture/nutrition, consumer sciences and pre-vet major; and Elizabeth C. Steward, Harrington, Del Tech, agribusiness management major. To be eligible for the DEC scholarships students must be a United States citizen; a resident of Delaware or a Delaware Equine Council member; and be enrolled in a Delaware university or college agricultural program in good standing.

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

The Delaware Equine Council (DEC) recently awarded $1,000 scholarships in Agricultural Education to five area students. They are: George A. Steward, Harrington, Delaware Technical and Community College, production agriculture major; Benjamin A. Cunningham, Greenwood, Del Tech, production agriculture major; Stacey L. Thompson, Hartly, Del Tech, veterinary technology major; Brit-

The newspaper has them all! Every day, students can find stories that relate to their interests in the newspaper. They can even use the newspaper for research and homework help. That’s why we’re proud to supply newspapers to local classrooms Please encourage your child to read and use the paper. It will help them better understand the world and themselves.

SPONSOR A CLASSROOM call today 302 302 629-9788 or return form.

The Newspaper In Education program is a very worthwhile program. Every year local businesses, business people and individuals support the NIE Program by sponsoring a classroom in one of the several schools in Sussex County. The students love receiving the newspaper.

YES!

I am interested in becoming a Newspaper In Education sponsor.

NIE

Name___________________________________________________________________________

Contact Person ___________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State ___________ Zip __________________ Phone ____________________________________

Please mail to : Morning Star Publications, Attn: Karen Cherrix, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

FALL CONCERT - Greenwood Mennonite School (GMS) will hold its annual fall concert on Wednesday, Oct. 14, at 7 p.m. Admission is free and an offering will be taken to benefit the GMS music department. The evening will feature the middle school and high school choirs and the GMS Ensemble under the direction of Kevin Yoder. Also featured will be the GMS band performing a number of musical selections under the direction of Lowell Bechtel. For more information, call GMS at 302-3494131.

Real estate courses planned Students will explore the concepts and methods used in the evaluation of a wide range of real estate investments in the financial modeling in real estate series offered at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. This series is beneficial to those involved in investments such as the purchase, sale or brokering of a residential or commercial transaction. Topics covered are suitable for novice and seasoned developers. Participants must have intermediate or advanced knowledge of Microsoft Excel 2007. The first course, Fundamentals of Financial Modeling, is a prerequisite for the other two courses; courses meet Mondays and Thursdays from 6 to 9 p.m. Fundamentals of Financial Modeling will introduce the means of evaluating the profitability of all types of business investments. A solid grasp of algebra is required for this course; this course will be held on

Nov. 2 and 5. In Financial Modeling of Residential Real Estate, students will explore investment opportunities in residential real estate from the purchase or rental of a single home to investment in a major development project. This course will meet on Nov. 9 and 12. In Financial Modeling of Commercial Real Estate Investment, students will explore investment opportunities in commercial real estate from the purchase or leasing of a single storefront to investment in a major development project. This course will meet Nov. 16 and 19. Instructor Douglas Deckmann, MBA, is a principal of Wells Drive Investments which provides financial consulting services to small and medium-sized businesses, specializing in the real estate industry. For more information or to register, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate & Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

PAGE 31

INDUSTRY CERTIFICATION - For the second year, Sussex Technical High School Digital Publishing and Print Design students sat last spring for their PrintED certificate exams. In Level 2, Digital File Prep, seniors who passed the exam were, from left: front row, kneeling – Warren Oney, Seaford; Brian Donahue, Lewes; Michael Edelin, Laurel; Will Fetters, Milton. Second row, sitting – Brandy Dechene, Laurel; Colleen Mahaffie, Lewes; Mary Ryan, Ocean View; Margo Carey, Clarksville; Grace Batten, Milton; Aja Tenerovich, Lewes; Lisa Sekscinski, Millsboro; Katelyn Hamilton, Seaford; and Rachel Haas, Millsboro. In Level 1, Introduction to Graphic Communications, juniors who passed the exam were, from left: back row, standing – Danielle Del Negro, Millsboro; Briana Bolden, Bridgeville; Natalie Hein, Georgetown; Sarah Overman, Georgetown; Jessica Carpenter, Milton; Tim Flynn, Laurel; Brianne McDowell, Greenwood; Daly Pineyro, Bridgeville; Alexandra Cannon, Laurel; and Lauren Welsh, Millsboro. Not pictured are Level 2 – senior Jennifer Pignataro, Milton; and Level 1 – juniors Kaitlin Hardesty, Seaford and Natalie Bennett, Millsboro.

LAUREL LIONESS CLUB

VERA BRA DLEY BINGO Tuesday, Oct. 20 Laurel Fire Hall

7:00 P.M. Doors Open at 6 pm

Tickets $20.00 in advance $25.00 at the door TICKETS AVAILABLE

STUDENTS PASS AYES EXAM - Sussex Technical High School seniors Andrew Hitchens of Selbyville and Tyler Dickson of Bridgeville were awarded certificates of achievement for passing scores on the AYES (Automotive Youth Educational Systems) exit exam suspension and steering skills test. Both are students in the auto/ diesel technical area at Sussex Tech. In photo, from left, are: Troy Ricketts, AYES exit exam advisor; students Andrew Hitchens and Tyler Dickson; and Les Humphrey, automotive technology instructor.

from any Lioness Member or call

302-875-2128 Cathy • 302-875-3055 Erma

LOT S OF DOOR PR IZES


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR

• OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS*

(For Subscribers - Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com HELP WANTED

YARD SALE

TAX PREPARER

YARD SALE, SAT., Oct. 10, 7:30 am. 33789 Gordy Rd., apx. 2.2 mi., Laurel. Boys’ clothing & shoes, women’s plus sz. clothing, all seasons; men’s clothing, coats, toys & children’s books, toddler race car bed, queen bed set, country decor, HH items, misc. 10/8

Free Tax School

Earn extra income after taking course. Flexible schedules, convenient locations. Register Now!

Courses start Oct 14th. Email: libtaxdover@earthlink.net

Liberty Tax Service

Small Fee for Books 10/8/1tp

COMPUTERS

WANTED ARE YOU INTERESTED in joining a Retiree’s Investment Club? Call Bob Nicklas, 875-7119. 9/24 OLD 4-WHEELER to fix up for my son for Christmas. 841-9311 or 875-2567.

SERVICES

Guitar Lessons available for all ages and music styles. Certified teacher (Music K-12) with 15 years of teaching experience and a Master’s degree in Guitar Performance. First Lesson FREE! Call Doug at 941-518-1640 for more details.

DONATIONS OF VEHICLES OR BOATS for nonprofit faith-based charity. Our program produces life changing results with troubled young men. Donation is tax deductible. Please call Delaware Teen Challenge, 629-2559. 9/17

AUTOMOTIVE ’88 FORD RANGER, running cond., new clutch, toolbox. $250 OBO. 875-4321. 10/8

‘87 FORD 150 EXT CAB & cap, very clean & solid truck (bought a car), $1450. 6294348. 10/8 SINGLE BOX UTILITY Pkg for GM truck, incl ladder rack & sliding box, all alum., retails for $1784. Can be viewed on www.gmfleet. com/busineschoice/gmc/ upfitPackages.jsp Like new cond., $600. 875-8505, lv. msg. 10/8 ‘07 MAZDA 3 Hatchback, silver, 5 spd., 47K mi., $11,900. (book price $14,000). 745-7107. 10/1 ‘01 OLDS ALERO, 150k mi., $1000 OBO. 362-6550 or 410-883-3462. 10/1 PERFORMANCE CAR PARTS for small block Chevy. 752-8043. 10/1 ‘86 LINCOLN TOWN CAR, runs good, $600 neg. 8759401. 9/24 ‘85 FORD RANGER, trans rebuilt, needs starter, runs good, $600 neg. 875-9401. 9/24 ‘02 CHEV. CUSTOM VAN “Cobra Conversion,” features many options, 350 eng., newly rebuilt trans., full power, dual air cond., DVD player & more. Only $4900. 875-5907, lv. msg.

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES MOTORCYCLE STAND, Goodyears, 1500 lbs., $75. 875-3115. 10/1 ‘05 SUZUKI EIGER 400, Auto., (ATV), $3500. 443845-9790. 9/24

Enjoy The Star? Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788

TOWN OF GREENWOOD Water Operator / Sewer Operator / Maintenance Full time (40+ hours per week - Pay based on Experience). Requires base level state water operator license. Must be available for emergencies. Will consider training right individual. Must live within 10 minute drive of Greenwood, DE. Applicants must hae a working knowledge of the building industry, and technical skills. Advancement Opportunities in growing Public Works Department. Send SASE to Town of Greenwood, P.O. Box 216, Greenwood, DE 19950 for job description and application form or obtain at Town Hall, 100 West Market St. No telephone calls please, no walk-in interviews. Open until suitable candidate hired.

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS ‘05 COACHMAN 27’6” & 07 Dodge Ram 4x4 Hemi, 16k mi., 2 yr. factory warranty, call for info. Will split. Must sell or take over payments, $22,000 for camper. 8753115. 10/1

BOATS 16’ FIBERGLASS CANOE, 2000 Old Town “Camper”, used only 5 times); incl. 2 paddles, extra seats, 3 life vests, also canoe car carrier kit & transport wheel kit. Total new: $1388. Selling for $600. 875-9558. 10/1 ‘03 17’ BASS TRACKER 40hp, w/trailer, $4000. 443845-9790. 9/24 16’ ROWING SHELL GATED MARTINOLI, oar locks, 9.5’ Dreyer carbon fiber oars, dolly; cost new $3700; asking $1750. 3494107. 9/10

FOR SALE SUCCESS WOODSTOVE, Wood/coal kit./cabin cook stove, $325. 846-9788. 10/8 UPRIGHT FREEZER, like new, $75. 628-4537. 10/8 ELEC. POWER CHAIR, good cond., $1000 OBO. 877-9217. 10/8 WOOD OR COAL STOVE, Faney upright 1897 model $100 Chain saw, PolounPro 16”, $50. 629-4348. 10/8

2 CHEST FREEZERS: Sm. $135. Lg. $200 OBO. 2452278. 10/1 VISIONWARE, 6 pcs. w/ lids, asking $40. 875-4570. LUXURY ADJ. BED, twin, elec. w/massage. $1800 new, sacrifice for $600 OBO. 841-5102. 10/1 2 TYPEWRITERS, one italic, $25 ea. 410-883-3462. 10/1 WOODBURNING STOVE w/pipes (lg. size); approved for mobile homes. asking $175. 280-5845. 10/1 BL. LEATHER SOFA & CHAIR and end table $175. Pub table w/stools (like new), $150. Deser w/mirror $50. Queen sz bed, mattress & box springs, fairly new, $200. Microwave, $20. 448-0048. 10/1 TRAMPOLINE $30. Play house $20. Wooden play set $50. 448-0048. 10/1 DOOR FOR HOUSE w/ window, 82” x 33.5”, new, $100. Computer & extras $50. 448-0048. 10/1 HEADBOARD, Solid oak, single bed, exc. cond., $30. Sm. oak computer desk & chair, $40. 410-896-3433. 10/1 ELEC. AIR COMPRESSOR, 12 gal., 2 hp, $75. 7 gal air tank storage $25. Poulon Pro gas pole chain trimmer & pruner $60. Pr. of heavy duty car ramps, $25. 875-2454. 10/1

BLOND DOUBLE BED, matching 6-drawer bureau w/lg mirror, lavender 4-drawer bureau. 875-0152.

2 COMPOUND BOWS, 1 Browning 50 lb., 1 Bear Ltd., $100 for both. 8752454. 10/1

WASHER & DRYER, Fisher & Paykel, white, exc. cond. 349-4103. 10/8

SCOOTER, Battery Operated, working cond. 8753115. 10/1

SAKRETE CONCRETE Mix, 5 bags (80 lbs. ea) & 100 red bricks, $30 for all. Call Ted or Leigh, 8759480. 10/1

WURLITZER SPINET PIANO w/leather top, matching bench, mahogany finish, good cond., needs tuning, $250 424-0601. 9/24

DELMAR SCHOOL DISTRICT TEACHING OPPORTUNITY:

Delmar School District is seeking a highly qualified, licensed/certified teacher of Secondary English/ Language Arts. Applicants must complete a Delmar School District paper application, participate in Direct Deposit of Pay, have a satisfactory Criminal Background Check/Child Protection Registry, have PPD/Mantoux skin test documentation, and be a team player with a strong work ethic. The position is ongoing until filled. Interested candidates may obtain an application by contacting Human Resources @ 302/846-9544 x111. EOE

DR HUTCH, nice, wooden, top has 2 glass shelves, glass doors & lighted. Bottom has 3 drawers & a compartment/door on ea side. 77” tall, 16” deep, 50” wide, $200 OBO. 302-536-7802. LIFTCHAIR, elec. controls, tan/brown tweed fabric, 40” H x 30” D, VG cond., $300. 424-0601. 9/24 KENMORE FRIDGE - 22 cf., ice maker/water on door. $250 OBO. 875-8677. 9/17 ROLL TOP DESK, $250. Coffee table, flip top style, oak, 17”h x 50”l x 30”w, $175. 629-0899 9/17 5 OLD 6+9 WOOD PANE WINDOWS, can be sued for mirror & pict. collage, $5 ea. 500 sq. ft. Old Wood Barn horz. lap siding, clean, no nails. $430. 846-9788. SEWING MACHINE, Kenmore, almost new w/seat & access. $75. 628-8546. GAS FIREPLACE INSERT, never used, $300. 6290899. 9/17 FAINTING COUCH, green, good cond., $300. 3370572. 9/10 TRANSPORT CHAIR, red, w/swing away & removable leg support, padded seat & back rest, folds down for storage, 8” front wheels. Only used 6 or 7 times, asking $175. If interested call 629-4246 eves. 9/3 KITCHEN TABLE, Heavy pine wood, X-type legs, 2 10” leaves, overall 86” x 44”, $200. 875-4740. 9/3

ANIMALS, ETC. BLUE-POINT SIAMESE CAT, male, 1 1/2 years old, long hair, $75. 430-2040. DOG CAGE for large dog 42x30 $30. 875-7312. 9/3

HOME FOR RENT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE for rent in MILLSBORO, Available Immed. $900/mo. + $900 Sec. Dep. required. Call 302-841-0251 for details. 10/1/2tp

ROOM FOR RENT FEMALE ROOMATE Wanted. Own BR, all house privileges & washer/dryer. All utilities included in rent. Sec. dep. No pets. 8755558. 10/1


MORNING STAR

LEGALS BLADES PUBLIC NOTICE

Due to the Columbus Day Holiday Observed on October 12, 2009, the Town Council Meeting of the Town of Blades will meet on Monday October 19, 2009 at 7pm. Any questions please contact the Town Hall at 302-629-7366. 10/8/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the Town of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing on October 28, 2009 in the Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, DE at 7:00 P.M. The Commission will consider and receive public comments on a Preliminary Development Plan Review for the commercial development known as Heritage Commercial Centre, Phase 1, Section 2. Written comments will be received by the Planning and Zoning Commission no later than October 26, 2009. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE TOWN MANAGER BONNIE WALLS 10/8/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING

Northwest Fork Hundred Case No. 10512 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hear-

ing will be held on request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-40, Item A of said ordinance of VINCENT KAYE who is seeking a special use exception to operate a concrete batching plant, to be located northwest of Road 525, 2,640 feet south of Route 18. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, NOVEMBER 2, 2009, at 7:00 P.M. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 10/8/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING

The Commissioners of the Town of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing during their monthly Commission meeting, which begins at 7:00 P.M., on November 9, 2009 in the Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, DE. The Commissioners will consider a recommendation from the Planning and Zoning Commission and receive public comments concerning a Preliminary Development Plan Review for the commercial development known as Heritage Commercial

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION

Title of publication: Seaford Star Publication number: 016-428 Date of filing: October 1, 2009 Frequency of issue: Weekly Number of issues published annually: 52 Annual subscription price: $19 in county, $24 out of county, $29 out of state Complete mailing address: Morning Star Publications, Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 199731000 Publisher: Bryant L. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973. Owners: Bryant L. & Carol A. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973; John Patrick Murphy, 28342 Discountland Road, Laurel, DE 19956; Mrs. Douglas J. Mordes, 901 Short Lane, Seaford, DE 19973, Christina M. Reaser, 34804 Susan Beach Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Extent & Nature of circulation:

Avg. copies per issue during preceding 12 months A. Total no. copies (press run) 4300 B. Paid and/or Requested circulation: 1. Outside-County Mail Subscriptions 351 2. In-County Mail Subscriptions 2756 3. Newsstands, Other Non-Mail 565 C. Total Paid Distribution 3672 D. Free Distribution, Mail In-County 112 E. Free Distribution, Non-Mail 393 F. Total Free Distribution (D+E) 505 G. Total Distribution (C+F) 4177 H. Copies not distributed 123 I. Total (G+H) 4300 J. Percent Paid/Requested Circulation 87.91

Actual no. copies published nearest to filing date 4300

354 2761 559 3674 0 487 487 4161 139 4300 88.30

I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Bryant L. Richardson, Publisher

• OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Centre, Phase 1, Section 2. Written comments will be received by the Commissioners of Bridgeville no later than November 6, 2009. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE TOWN MANAGER BONNIE WALLS 10/8,11/5/2tc

PUBLIC HEARING

The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing to afford interested parties of 13 Gum Street, Bridgeville, Delaware, an opportunity to show cause why the building investigated by the Dangerous Building Inspection Committee should not be declared to be a hazard to life and property and why it should not be ordered to be demolished. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 7:00 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter at the monthly Commission Meeting on Monday, October 12, 2009, at Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE TOWN MANAGER BONNIE WALLS 10/1/2tc

IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY

In Re: Change of Name of Abigail Virginia Trice Slacum, A Minor, to Abigail Virginia Trice.

PETITION FOR NAME CHANGE NOW COMES Darren W. Trice (hereinafter, “Father”), the natural father of the minor child, Abigail Virginia Trice Slacum, by and through his counsel, Rebecca L. Trifillis, Esquire, and hereby states the following: 1. Father is the natural father of Abigail Virginia Trice Slacum, d/o/b July 15, 2009 (hereinafter, “the minor child” or “the child”). 2. Father resides at 6975 Reliance Road, Federalsburg, Maryland. 3. The minor child has been a resident of the State of Delaware since her birth and currently resides with her Mother, Cheri R. Ware (hereinafter, “Mother”), at 16513 Arvey Road, Laurel, Delaware. 4. Father seeks to change the minor child’s name from Abigail Virginia Trice Slacum to Abigail Virginia Trice. 5. The reason for the proposed change of name is: Against Father’s strongly held opinion, Mother selected a name for the child that does not reflect the minor child’s heritage whatsoever. Father strongly believes the minor chid should share his surname. 6. There are no creditors or other persons who will be defrauded or adversely affected by said change of name. 7. There are no criminal proceedings pending against the minor child. 8. Notice of this Petition has been published in the Seaford Star and Lau-

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION

Title of publication: Laurel Star Publication number: 016-427 Date of filing: October 1, 2009 Frequency of issue: Weekly Number of issues published annually: 52 Annual subscription price: $19 in county, $24 out of county, $29 out of state Complete mailing address: Morning Star Publications, Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 199731000 Publisher: Bryant L. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973. Owners: Bryant L. & Carol A. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973; John Patrick Murphy, 28342 Discountland Road, Laurel, DE 19956; Mrs. Douglas J. Mordes, 901 Short Lane, Seaford, DE 19973, Christina M. Reaser, 34804 Susan Beach Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Extent & Nature of circulation:

Avg. copies per issue during preceding 12 months A. Total no. copies (press run) 3300 B. Paid and/or Requested circulation: 1. Outside-County Mail Subscriptions 300 2. In-County Mail Subscriptions 2022 3. Newsstands, Other Non-Mail 589 C. Total Paid Distribution 2911 D. Free Distribution, Mail In-County 74 E. Free Distribution, Non-Mail 98 F. Total Free Distribution (D+E) 172 G. Total Distribution (C+F) 3083 H. Copies not distributed 217 I. Total (G+H) 3300 J. Percent Paid/Requested Circulation 94.48

Actual no. copies published nearest to filing date 3300

330 2025 610 2965 0 172 172 3137 163 3300 94.52

I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Bryant L. Richardson, Publisher

PAGE 33 rel Star newspapers, published in Sussex County, Delaware, once a week for three weeks prior to the filing of this Petition. An Affidavit of Publication is annexed hereto as Exhibit A, and incorporated herein by reference. WHEREFORE, Father prays that this Honorable Court enter an Order changing the minor child’s name from Abigail Virginia Trice Slacum to Abigail Virginia Trice, pursuant to 10 Delaware Code, Sections 5901 to 5905. By: Rebecca L. Trifillis, Esquire (#4010) GRIFFIN & HACKETT, P.A. 116 W. Market Street Georgetown, DE 19947 (302) 856-9066 Attorney for Darren W. Trice By: Darren W. Trice, Father of Abigail Virginia Trice Slacum 9/24/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Ray J. Elzey, Sr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Ray J. Elzey, Sr. who departed this life on the 23rd day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Myra G. Elzey on the 29th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 23rd day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Myra G. Elzey 600 W. 8th St. Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 10/8/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Mary Lee Nelson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Mary Lee Nelson who departed this life on the 26th day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Edwina A. Harris, Terry L. Carpenter on the 25th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to

the said Executrices on or before the 26th day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrices: Edwina A. Harris 12983 Whitesville Rd. Delmar, DE 19940 Terry L. Carpenter 3705 S.W. 27th Street Apt. 1114 Gainesville, FL 32608 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 10/8/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Viola L. Sinnett, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Viola L. Sinnett who departed this life on the 17th day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Diana L. Bruni on the 28th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 17th day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Diana L. Bruni 36716 Bi-State Blvd. Delmar, DE 19940 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 10/8/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Lois V. Foxwell, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Lois V. Foxwell who departed this life on the 20th day of September, A.D. 2007 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Diana Foxwell on the 16th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 20th day of May, A.D. 2008 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Diana Foxwell P.O. BOx 1404 Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 10/1/3tc See LEGALS—page 35 Subscribe Today!

629-9788


ATTORNEYS

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You�Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

FUQUA and YORI, P.A. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777 *Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

CONCRETE

• DRIVEWAYS • GARAGES • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS

MR. CONCRETE 410-742-0134

Mark Donophan

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

FITNESS

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY

ATTORNEYS

BANKRUPTCY FREE CONSULTATION

Gerry Gray

Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

PHOTO COPIES COPIES Self Service PHOTO COPIES

Photo ¢ Copies 10 EACH 10¢ per pg

Morning Star Publications The Seaford/Laurel Star 951 951Norman NormanEskridge EskridgeHighway Hwy. BehindSeaford, County Bank DE302-629-9788 19973 302-629-9788

HANDYMAN

EXTRA HANDS C. Jay Reaser

“Strengthening Women.” 216 LAURELTOWNE LAUREL, DEL. 302-875-4541

LAWN CARE

A & C Lawn Care Since 1997

Residential & Commercial

Grasscutting, Mulching & Fertilizing

Insured • Owner On Every Job

302-258-9775

SEAFOOD

302

629-0444

800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

Healthy Hair Clinique

Healthy Hair with a Healthy Glow Men - Women - Children

877-0777

302-875-3099

jayreaser@gmail.com

40 Years of “Handy Man” Experience. Our Rates Are Great! Call us to compare!

302-629-4281 Seaford, Delaware

ELECTRICIAN

Ken’s Electrical Service All Residential Wiring

No Job Too Small! 20 Years Experience

629-3795

Millstone River Lawn Care LLC

OWNER OPERATED ~ LAUREL, DEL.

Lawn Mowing, Pruning, Spring & Fall Clean Up, Bed Renovations, Garden Rototilling

CARPET CLEANING Traffic Areas Up to 5 rms: $99.95 2 rms: $54.95 Scotchgard: $10/room $10/furn. item

CARPET REPAIRS UPHOLSTERY CLEANING: Sofa: $55 * Loveseat: $45

ORIENTAL RUG CLEANING: Pick-up & Delivery 10% OFF Exp. 9.30.09 Licensed & Insured * Over 20 years’ experience

Leave a Message!

PAYDAY LOANS for up to $1000 NO CREDIT CHECK

Big Lots S/C Seaford, DE 628-0800

Laurel Sq S/C Laurel, DE 875-0400

Toll Free 877-297-0011

ezloansdelmarva.com

EMPLOYMENT

FARM & HOME M-F 7:30-6; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

302-628-0767

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2, Millsboro, DE 19966

302-934-9450

U.S. 13 N., Seaford 302-629-9645 • 800-564-5050

INTERNET

IRRIGATION

MetLife Home Loans

R & L Irrigation Services Access, Design & Services

888-432-7965 / www.ce.net

Finish Site Work Complete Irrigation Systems Sod Laying & Seeding Exterior Lighting Ponds, Mulching, Concrete Pavers

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS

28 Old Rudnick Lane, Dover, DE

302-530-3376

MORTGAGES

REAL ESTATE

MORTGAGES

���������

���������

������������������

������������������ PURCHASE • REFINANCE DEBT CONSOLIDATION Call 628-2828 Apply Online:

EZ LOAN$

302.628.0416

HOME LOANS

> $8,000 tax credits available for first-time homebuyers > Great refinancing rates and options Call: Treg Adams (302) 858-1332

CASH ADVANCE

Payday advances should be used for short-term financial needs only, not as a long term financial solution. Customers with credit difficulties should seek credit counseling.

Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales

Cell 228-5435

* This advertisement does not constitute tax advice; please consult a tax advisor regarding your situation. All loans subject to approval. Certain restrictions may apply. Mortgage financing provided by MetLife Home Loans, a division of MetLife Bank, N.A. Equal Housing Lender. 2000 METLIFE, INC. L0509039380[exp0510][All States][DC]

LAWN CARE

CARPETS

BARBER/BEAUTY

REVERSE MORTGAGES Call 628-2828 Apply Online:

LAUREL REALTY

“Making A Difference” 1128 S. Central Ave. Laurel, Delaware

Directly Across from the Laurel Senior High School

302-260-2679

E-Mail: Frank.Rask@comcast.net

E-Mail: Frank.Rask@comcast.net

302-875-3000 800-887-3001

TAX SERVICE

TAX SERVICE

WATER TREATMENT

WEDDINGS

302-629-4548

Get a Basic tax return fast $79.00 refund! 420 Pennsylvania Ave.

Delmarva’s #1 Water Treatment Dealer

www.easy-loan-application.com

Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Fax: 302-628-0798 - www.jacksonhewitt.com

Independently Owned & Operated 320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2 31A Creamery Lane Millsboro, DE 19966 Easton, MD 21601

302-934-9450

410-819-6990

SEAFORD MANAGEMENT (302) 990-9003

Suite 1 Seaford, DE 19973 www.seafordmanagement.com

www.easy-loan-application.com

Also Offering Premium Spring Water

410.742.3333 800.439.3853 sharpwater.com

To Advertise In This Directory Call

302-629-9788

Only $10.00 Per Week (3 Month Minimum)

Getting Married?

Stop By The Star Office Pick Up A FREE copy of the Stars’

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford

6299788

B RIDAL P LANNER


LEGALS - from Page 33

NOTICE

Estate of George B. Truitt, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of George B. Truitt who departed this life on the 16th day of September, A.D. 2009 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Loveyann T. Calloway on the 23rd day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 16th day of May, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Loveyann T. Calloway 12307 Welling Lane Bowie, MD 20715 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 10/1/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Viola E. Cannon, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Viola E. Cannon who departed this life on the 16th day of May, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Gary N. Cannon on the 9th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 16th day of January, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Gary N. Cannon Apt. #89, Seaford Meadows Dr. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 9/24/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Marilyn H. Morris, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Marilyn H. Morris who departed this life on the 19th day of July, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Scott Morris, Thomas F. Morris on the 15th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Administrators with-

out delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Administrators on or before the 19th day of March, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Administrators: Scott Morris 12416 Shorthorn Rd. Wilton, CA 95693 Thomas F. Morris 25111 Oak Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 9/24/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Margaret Bonenfant, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration WWA upon the estate of Margaret Bonenfant who departed this life on the 28th day of July, A.D. 2009 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Gary J. Mathews on the 11th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator WWA without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 28th day of Mach, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Gary J. Mathews 25027 Trinity Dr. Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 9/24/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Eulalie Wilson Elliott, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Eulalie Wilson Elliott who departed this life on the 20th day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Vicki Lee Givens on the 14th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 20th day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Vicki Lee Givens 22220 Brinsfield Ave. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 9/24/3tc

MORNING STAR NOTICE

• OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Estate of Clara E. Scull, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Clara E. Scull who departed this life on the 25th day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Greenwood, DE were duly granted unto Barbara W. Willey on the 11th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 25th day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Barbara W. Willey 16128 Abbotts Pond Rd. Milford, DE 19963 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 9/24/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Anna D Collins, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Anna D. Collins who departed this life on the 27th day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Bev C. Riedel on the 15th day of September, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 27th day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Bev C. Riedel 3417 Hawthorne Ave. Richmond, VA 23222 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 9/24/3tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being on County Road 74, Broad Creek

Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware and being more particularly bounded and described in a survey prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc., Registered Surveyors, dated July 24, 1995, Plan No. 950719-B. BEING the same lands and premises which Roy E. Harding and Betty Jean Minnick, by Deed dated August 2, 1995 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2066, Page 286, did grant and convey unto Tulsie P. Chandradat and Lilowtie Chandradat. Tax Parcel: 2-32-15.0049.02 Property Address: 18052 SHILOH CHURCH ROAD, GEORGETOWN Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TULSIE P. & LILOWTIE CHANDRADAT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20,

PAGE 35 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described in accordance with a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plot Book 46 page 314. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Dual Exchange Land Company a/k/a Dual Exchange Land Co. by deed dated June 22, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3466, Page 133 did grant and convey unto JEAN G. SAINTFORT AND MARJORIE SAINTFORT. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.15133.00 Property Address: 502 EAST SIXTH STREET A/K/A 502 ARCH STREET, BLADES Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will

be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JEAN G. & MARJORIE SAINTFORT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, lying on the easterly side of County Road 535. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed to John Johnson by Deed from Amy M. Syester (also known as Amy M. Byers) dated July, 2005, and recorded July 22,2005, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3174, Page 268. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00151.00 Property Address: 10042 MIDDLEFORD ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser See LEGALS—page 36


PAGE 36 LEGALS - from Page 35 will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN JOHNSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being on the South side of High Street and the East side of Pine Street in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed to Tanko A. Mohammad, by Deed from Givens Flowers and Gifts, Inc., dated August 29, 2006, and recorded October 27, 2006, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, and the State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3376, Page 277. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00292.00 Property Address: 327 HIGH STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by

MORNING STAR the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TANKO A. MOHAMMAD and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known as Lot 231 on the Easterly side of Clearbrooke Boulevard, “Clearbrooke Estates” as will more and largely appear upon reference to a plot prepared by McCann, Inc. dated November 1989, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 43, page 350. BEING the same land and premises which by Deed dated January 30, 2004 and recorded February 2, 2004, among the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware, in Book 5584, Page 2938, was granted and conveyed by William Travis Butler and Kristen Hope Butler unto Kristopher T. Johnson and Mary Beth Johnson, his wife, the Grantors herein. Tax Parcel: 3-31-1.00246.00 Property Address: 206 CLEARBROOKE BOULEVARD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register.

• OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KRISTOPHER T. & MARY BETH JOHNSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and located on the north side of East Sixth Street. SUBJECT to any and all restriction, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Larry Scott Breeding and Deborah Lynn Breeding, his wife, by Deed of Lane W. Joseph and Rebecca A. Joseph, his wife, and Evalyn Joseph, dated May 28, 1999, and

recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2394, Page 247. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Jerry W. Sammons, by Deed of Larry Scott Breeding and Deborah Lynn Breeding, dated July 20, 2004, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3018, Page 176. Tax Parcel: 3-32-1.11-54 Property Address: 323 EAST SIXTH STREET, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JERRY W. SAMMONS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hun-

dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Broadcreek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, located on the North side of County Road 437A (50 foot RIW) as shown on a survey prepared by Walter R. Todd, Registered Land Surveyor, dated December 29, 1994. BEING the same lands conveyed to Shannon Bower and Jennifer Bower, husband and wife, by Deed of Jerry Davis and Christine Elizabeth Davis, husband and wife, dated September 26, 2005, recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3217, Page 211. Tax Parcel: 2-32-20.005.01 Property Address: 16645 ADAMS ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JENNIFER & SHANNON BOWER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain Unit situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known and designated as Unit No. 604 on a recorded plat of “The Townes of Laurel Court” prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc., Professional Land Surveyors dated May 17, 2006, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 105 at page 24, as will more fully and at large appear upon reference to the aforementioned recorded plat. BEING the same lands conveyed to Rebecca Cropper by deed from Dewey Street, LLC, dated April 20, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 3441, page 56. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.10158.00 Property Address: 604 DEWEY STREET, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at See LEGALS—page 37


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36 the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of REBECCA CROPPER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, as shown on a plot prepared by Adams- Kemp Associates, Inc” Registered Surveyors, dated June 15, 2006 and revised July 25,2006 and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware in Plot Book 107, page 196 and being more particularly described as follows: BEING the same lands conveyed unto John R. Sammons and Iara Sammons by deed of John R, Sammons, dated September 19,2006 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3364, Page37. Tax Parcel: 5-31-5.0025.03 Property Address: 2669 WILD TURKEY ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court

on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN R. & TARA SAMMONS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All That Certain Lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware and lying on the Easterly side of Delaware Route No. 13A, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Callaway, Farnell, and Moore, Inc., did grant and convey unto H. Paul Aguillon and Joyce L. Aguillon, by deed dated June 7, 1991 and recorded on June 7, 1991 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 1786 at Page 92. Tax Parcel: 1-32-12.0078.02 Property Address: 28529 SEAFORD ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register.

• OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of H. PAUL & JOYCE L. AGUILLON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Alias Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being all of Lot 43 in Nanticoke Acres Annex, as the same now appears of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware in Plot Record 2, page 23 and being more particulary bounded and described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation did grant and convey unto Terry Wayne Johnson by deed dated February 1, 1999 and recorded on February 9, 1999 in the Office of the Recorder

of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2361 Page 001. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00236.00 Property Address: 1421 CONCORD ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TERRY W. JOHNSON A/K/A TERRY WAYNE JOHNSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware as is more fully described

PAGE 37 as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Harold S. McTeer, III and Jeanie F. McTeer, did grant and convey unto Harold S. McTeer, by deed dated October 29,1999 and recorded on December 1,1999 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of De1aware, in Deed Book 2443 at Page 89. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.1218.00 Property Address: 8634 CONCORD ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of HAROLD S. MCTEER, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State

of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN PIECE, PARCEL AND TRACT OF LAND LYING AND SITUATE IN BROAD CREEK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY, AND STATE OF DELAWARE AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOW, TO-WIT: Being the same lands and premises which James F. Long, III, did grant and convey unto Joseph W. and Kirsten K. Robinson, by deed dated February 10, 2004 and recorded on March 12, 2004 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2953 at Page 67. Tax Parcel: 1-32-8.0039.00 Property Address: 12512 CONCORD ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 16, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 20, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KIRSTEN K. & JOSEPH W. ROBINSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/8/2tc

Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

The Delaware State Fair will receive Kent County’s 2009 Tourism of the Year award.

PAGE 38

State fair to be recognized by tourism office

Calling all cowgirls and cowboys to the 18th annual celebration of Tourism in Kent County, set for Friday, Nov. 6, at Dover Downs Hotel and Casino’s Rollins Center. This year’s event will recognize the Delaware State Fair, which is celebrating its 90th anniversary. The event will get underway at 6 p.m. with cocktails and heavy hors d’oeuvres. Western wear is optional. “The Draw,” an eight-piece classic rock ‘n’ roll band, will provide dance music. A mechanical bull will be “ready to ride” for those craving the wild west. There will also be a silent auction. Highlight of the evening will be the presentation of the 2009 Tourism of the Year award to Delaware State Fair’s president and CEO, Bill Dimondi of Dover. Also presented will be the Kent County Tourism Partner of the Year and Tourism Volunteer of the Year. The public is invited to join the Kent County Tourism staff and board of directors for this year’s salute to tourism. Tickets are $40 per person. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Kent County Tourism at 302-734-4888.


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 39

Laurel’s Katie Espenlaub, right, dribbles the ball up field as teammate Logan Green looks for the pass during last week’s game in Bridgeville. Photo by Mike McClure

Schuyler Minton follows his blockers on a run during the Laurel Pop Warner Mitey Mite team’s home contest against Smyrna last weekend. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel varsity field hockey team falls to Woodbridge By Mike McClure

After defeating Caesar Rodney last Tuesday, the Laurel varsity field hockey team was unable to remain hot when it faced Woodbridge last Thursday in Bridgeville. The Bulldogs netted a goal early in the second half to cut the deficit to a goal before the Raiders connected on a penalty stroke for the 3-1 win. Woodbridge’s Brittany Joseph scored on a feed from Rachel Doyon with 22:14 left in the first half. Kelsey Johnson later followed a shot by Doyon, which was stopped by Laurel goalie Taylor Oliphant, to score the second goal of the game

(5:27). The Raiders held a 4-3 edge in shots while the Bulldogs had a 5-4 edge in corners in the first half of play. Woodbridge goalie Kelli Warner made three saves and Oliphant was credited with one stop. Alexis Hudson followed a shot by Kelsey Oliphant to put Laurel on the board with 27:29 left in the contest. Taylor Oliphant later made a save on a shot by Woodbridge’s Danielle Griffin, but the Raiders netted one more goal on a penalty stroke by Johnson with 13:35 left. Woodbridge out shot Laurel, 10-8, and held a 9-8 edge in corners. Oliphant and Warner each made seven saves in goal.

Laurel’s Chris Burroughs grabs the Smyrna quarterback during Saturday’s Pop Warner Mitey Mite football game. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee team hands Smyrna its first loss

The Laurel Pop Warner Pee-Wee football team celebrated its homecoming with a 25-6 win over a previous unbeaten Smyrna Eagle squad. The Bulldogs started the scoring with a 19-yard run by Leon West. In the second quarter, Gary Warren returned an Eagle punt 28 yards for a touchdown to make the half-time score 12-0. In the third quarter Alonzo Cannon scored on a 44-yard run and Justin Revel threw to Skyler Chaffinch for the extra point to make the score 19-0. Smyrna scored on a four-yard run to make the score 19-6 with eight minutes to go in the game. That’s when the Bulldogs went on a six play, 62 yard scoring drive capped off by Gary Warren’s 18-yard end around to finish off the scoring to make the final 25-6. Alonzo Cannon had 13 carries for 105 yards, Warren added two carries for 31 yards and a touchdown, and West carried the ball six times for 24 yards and a touchdown. Amari Cannon led Laurel with six tackles, West had four tackles and an assist, Zack Baynum and Skyler Chaffinch each added four tackles, Bragg Davis contributed three tackles and two assists, and Tyler Whitby had three tackles and an assist. Alonzo Cannon and Johnny McGinnis made three tackles apiece and Warren had a tackle, a fumble recovery, and a punt return for a touchdown. The next game for the Bulldogs will be for first place in the Pee-Wee Division of the Henlopen Conference next Saturday vs. the Berlin Seahawks (7-0). The game will take place in Laurel at 1 p.m.

RACE TO THE BALL- Delmar’s Amanda Campbell, left, and Sussex Tech’s Courtenay Rickards go to the ball during last Wednesday’s showdown in Georgetown. The Ravens won the varsity field hockey match up, 1-0, in overtime. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 40

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

LOOSE BALL- Seaford’s Jahiem Godwin jumps on the loose ball to prevent a turnover as Delmar’s Nathan Quillen and Edward Webb go for the recovery in the Pop Warner Mitey-Mite football game played in Delmar last weekend. Photo by Lynn Schofer HOCKEY BATTLE- Sussex Tech’s Isabella Delario, left, and Delmar’s Bethany Parsons battle for the ball as Delmar’s Carlee Budd, right, looks on during last week’s game in Georgetown. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmarva Christian girls’ volleyball team defeats Sussex Central The Delmarva Christian girls’ volleyball topped Sussex Central, 3-1, last Wednesday. The Royals won the first game, 25-11, and took the third and fourth contests, 2514 and 25-18, after falling to the Knights in the second game, 25-22. Emily Pentoney had six kills and three aces, Mallorie Parsons added five kills, Sierra Parsons contributed seven kills and three aces, Lauryl Berger chipped in with 18 assists, and Jessica Hassett had five kills and three aces. Delmarva Christian fell to Wilmington Christian, 3-0, on Saturday. Pentoney had eight kills, Mallorie Parsons added six kills and three blocks, and Berger dished out 12 assists.

Luxury in Beaver Dam Priced To Sell ce

Pri y c n a N l l a C Re/Max Eastern Shore Owners Relocating

8956 Middleford Rd., Seaford, DE 19973 302-628-SOLD (7653)

RAIDERS AND BULLDOGS- Laurel’s Tomorrow Briddell, left, looks to take the ball away from Woodbridge’s Leslie DeRoche during last Thursday’s game in Bridgeville. The Raiders netted a pair of first half goals and held on to win, 3-1. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech boys’ soccer team defeats Delmar, 7-2

Jacob Williams

The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ soccer team earned a 7-2 win over Delmar last Thursday in Georgetown. Aris Reynoso scored a pair of goals and Ryan Moore, Dylan Pepper, and Jacob Williams each had one goal and one assist for the Ravens. Ariel Espinoza and Zimri Gomez netted one goal apiece and Sam Spellman had an assist. Jimmy Whaley and Casey Bellamy each scored a goal to lead the Wildcats.

Jimmy Whaley

Cell 302

236-3619

nancyprice@remax.net

Water vieWs With private access for canoeing! 2700 sq. ft. - 3 full floors - completely remodeled - new everything! 5 Brs, 2 1/2 Baths, granite counters, all hardwood floors, eat-in kitchen with bar & cozy sitting area with fireplace. interior decorated with exquisite taste to welcome your family home. perfect for the large family or just for those who love to entertain family and friends! MLs# 556968 reduced 45K. now being offered at $297,900 owners must move. fha available.


PAGE 41

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Laurel Stars of the Week

Male Athlete of the WeekLuke Hare- Laurel High Laurel senior Luke Hare paced the Bulldog defense with eight tackles in last Friday’s home win over Lake Forest. Hare also recovered a pair of Spartan fumbles to help Laurel move to 3-1 on the year.

Female Athlete of the WeekAbby Atkins- Sussex Tech Sussex Tech junior Abby Atkins netted the game-winner in overtime to help the Ravens to a win over Delmar last Wednesday in Georgetown. Atkins, who entered this week with six goals and seven assists, is from Delmar.

Honorable mention- Chris Jones- Laurel; Chris Cutsail- Laurel; Kyle WestLaurel; Joe McGinnis- Laurel; Nick Munoz- Laurel; Dominique Showell- Delmar; Jimmy Whaley- Delmar; Casey Bellamy- Delmar; Corey Phillips- Delmar; Josh Morris- Laurel; Brad Sensenig- Delmar; cameron Mattox- Delmar; Alex Ellis- Delmar; Herbert Troyer- Delmarva Christian; Aris Reynoso- Sussex Tech; Jacob Williams- Sussex Tech; Desmond Sivels- Sussex Tech; Justin Allen- Sussex Tech; Mariah Dickerson- Laurel; Alexis Oliphant- Laurel; Alexis Hudson- Laurel; Amanda Fields- Delmar; Crystal Loudon- Sussex Tech; Emily Pentoney- Delmarva Christian; Caitlin Stone- Sussex Tech

CONGRATULATES

THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

Laurel Star varsity sports scoreboard (for the week of Sept. 28)

Football- Delmar 13, Archmere 7 (OT)- Delmar’s Alex Ellis completed a 13-yard touchdown pass to Brad Sensenig with 13 seconds left in regulation to help send last Saturday’s game into overtime. The Wildcats’ Cameron Mattox ran the ball in from three yards out in overtime to seal the win. Laurel 19, Lake Forest 7- Laurel’s Chris Jones ran for 124 yards and a touchdown, Chris Cutsail completed a 29-yard touchdown pass to Joe McGinnis, and Nick Munoz ran the ball in from two yards out to help lead Cameron Mattox the Bulldogs to the conference win last Friday in Laurel. Munoz had 33 yards rushing and eight tackles, McGinnis caught two passes for 28 yards and made eight stops, and Brad Sensenig Luke Hare recorded eight tackles and recovered two fumbles. Cutsail completed eight of 12 passes for 154 yards, Kyle West caught two passes for 69 yards, and Zach Exume added a 31-yard run for the Bulldogs. Boys’ soccer- Worcester Prep 6, Delmar 1- The Wildcats fell to Worcester Prep last Wednesday. No additional information was provided. Cape Henlopen 3, Laurel 1- The Bulldogs fell to the Vikings in last Tuesday’s game. No additional information was provided. Dover 3, Laurel 0- Josh Morris recorded 17 saves in the Bulldogs’ loss last Wednesday. Seaford 2, Smyrna 1 (OT)- Jose Cortez netted the game-winning goal off a feed from Tim Halter to pace the Blue Jays. Dustin Venables also scored a goal and Nazaret Garcia added an assist for Seaford. The Eagles out shot the Blue Jays, 10-7, while Seaford held a 4-1 advantage in corners. Cortez also had six saves in the contest. Sussex Central 7, Woodbridge 1- Jorge Jerez netted the Raiders’ lone goal and Abraham Leon recorded 12 saves in Thursday’s game. Woodbridge 6, Conrad 1- Micah Idler and Jorge Jerez each netted a pair of goals, Eric Willey had one goal and one assist, Frank Ortega scored one goal, and Patrick Davis added two assists for the Raiders, who held a 16-10 advantage in shots. Abraham Leon made eight saves in the win last Saturday. Field hockey- Seaford 0, Smyrna 0- The Blue Jays and Eagles finished in a 0-0 tie last Thursday. Molly Cain recorded eight saves for Seaford. Smyrna held a 14-9 advantage in shots and a 14-8 advantage in corners.

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

Laurel Pop Warner Midget football team tops Smyrna, 26-6 The Midget Bulldogs gave the 2009 Homecoming crowd something to cheer about with a 26-6 victory over the visiting Smyrna Eagles last Saturday. Laurel scored early and often in the first half through the air, as Brice Bristow threw for three touchdown passes. Josh Downey had touchdown catches of 44 and 29 yards and Jerron Tull added a 34-yard touchdown reception. Brett Marine added a 5-yard TD run. Dylan Bunner and Daylin McCauslin led the way for the Bulldogs’ defense with seven tackles apiece. The win extended the Bulldogs’ winning streak to 83 straight conference victories. Up next for the Bulldogs is a showdown with the Dover Raiders on Saturday. Oct. 17. Game time is 11 a.m.

Laurel High alumni field hockey game to take place Oct. 14

The Laurel High School alumni hockey game will take place Wednesday, Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. at the high school hockey field. Admission will be $1 and registration will cost $10 (including t-shirt). All alumni hockey players are welcome and all youth hockey teams will be invited. There will also be a concession stand and games. For further information or to register contact Donna Ward (249-6060, 875-6113, dward@laurel.k12.de.us) or Marsha Murphy (381-7250, 875-6103, mmurphy@laurel. k12.de.us).

Laurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee team earns 13-7 win The Laurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee football team defeated Smyrna, 13-7, last Saturday as Timaun Williams rushed for 139 yards and two touchdowns to keep the Bulldogs undefeated. The defense was led by Donnell Briddell (nine tackles), Cole Collins (eight tackles), and Elijah Kellam (five tackles).

DELMAR SOCCER- Delmar freshman Levi Gilmore, left, battles a Sussex Central player for the ball during last week’s game in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

YOUR IMAGE BUILDER

22876 UNIT 6, SUSSEX HWY.

www.towerssigns.net


PAGE 42

 MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Delmar’s Caroline Phillips takes a shot on goal which Sussex Tech goalie Caitlin Stone stops during last week’s game in Georgetown. Stone had 10 saves in her team’s 1-0 win in overtime. Delmar’s Sara Ellis and Sussex Tech’s Logan Pavlik are also pictured. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech holds off Delmar with goal in overtime, earns sixth win

RAIDERS AND DOGS- Laurel’s Alexis Hudson, left, and Woodbridge’s Kate Mullett go for the ball during last week’s game in Bridgeville. Hudson had her team’s lone goal in the 3-1 loss. Photo by Mike McClure

By Mike McClure

On paper the Delmar-Sussex Tech field hockey game looked to be a battle as both teams entered last Wednesday’s contest with a 5-1 mark. The two teams didn’t disappoint the spectators as the game went into overtime before Sussex Tech’s Abby Atkins knocked in the winning goal for the 1-0 victory. “It felt really good to do it because its my home school and I’m the only one to come (to Sussex Tech) from Delmar,” Atkins said after the game. “I love my hockey team, they’re my family.” In the first half, Delmar had the early advantage, out shooting the Ravens, 7-2, and holding a 5-1 edge in corners. Amanda Campbell took a shot on goal early on, but Sussex Tech goalie Caitlin Stone, who had five first half saves, kept it out of the goal. Sussex Tech’s Maxine Fluharty took a shot on goal with under two minutes left in the opening half, but Delmar’s Amanda Fields turned it back. As the two teams switched fields in the second half, the momentum shifted in favor of the Ravens. Sussex Tech had four straight corners before the Wildcats called a time-out with 19:32 left. The Ravens would get six more corners, but the game remained scoreless. Delmar’s Mallory Elliott took the ball to the goal with over six minutes left in the half before the play was broken up by Sussex Tech’s Taylor Kieffer. Fields made a pair of saves with a little over two minutes left in the contest and the game went into overtime. Sussex Tech took the first shot on goal with under 10 minutes left in the seven on seven overtime period. Three minutes later, Stone made a save on a Wildcat shot. Elliott’s shot with 6:40 left also went wide right. Two minutes later Atkins followed Fluharty’s shot with a goal off the rebound (4:31) to give the Ravens the win.

BIG WIN- Laurel field hockey players Madi Chaffinch, Lauren Hitch, and Brooke Evans celebrate following last Tuesday’s 3-2 win over Caesar Rodney. The win marked the Bulldogs’ first win over the Riders in many years. ON THE RUN-

Delmar senior Mallory Elliott dribbles the ball during her team’s game against Sussex Tech last Wednesday in Georgetown. Photo by Mike McClure

“It’s do or die, it’s a major adrenaline rush as soon as we go out there,” said Atkins. “I knew it had to be done and there was no time to waste.” Sussex Tech out shot Delmar, 18-10, and had a 12-3 advantage in corners. Fields recorded 14 saves while Stone had 10 saves. The Ravens moved to 4-1 in conference play and 6-1 overall with the win. Delmar is now 3-2 in the conference and 5-2 overall.

laurelstar.com

Laurel’s Jacob White looks to run through a hold during his team’s Pop Warner Mitey Mite football game last Saturday in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure\

Delmar Youth Basketball League to hold signups in November Signups for the 2009-2010 Delmar Youth Basketball League, for boys ages 7-12 and girls ages 7-12, will be held on the first three Saturdays in the month of November. These dates are: November 7, 14, and 21 from 10 a.m.-noon at the north entrance of Delmar High School by the gym. The cost is $30 per child, or $45 per family. Children must be a resident of the Delmar School District. Any question please call Odell Jones Jr., president of Delmar Youth League Basketball, at 410-251-6570 cell or 302-846-9544 ext. 141 (work).


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 43

DEFENSE-

HEADS UP-

Delmar’s Ryan Batson and Nathan Quillen push Seaford’s Jahiem Godwin to the sidelines to stop the run in Saturday’s Mitey Mite division of play in Pop Warner football.

The Wildcats’ Trevor Johnson looks to head ball toward the goal in last week’s loss to Sussex Central. Photo by Mike McClure

Photo by Lynn Schofer

LAUREL POP WARNER- Laurel’s Dominick Conquest runs with the ball during last Saturday’s Pop Warner Mitey Mite game in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Star to hold second annual story of the year contest The Laurel Star will hold its sports story of the year contest at the end of the year. Readers will be able to vote for their favorite sports story of the year. One lucky reader will win a free one year subscription to the Star. Everyone who votes will be entered into a drawing for the one year subscription. Nominate your favorite sports story and sports team today. The contest will begin later this year with the results to be printed in the sports year in review edition. Send nominations to sports@ mspublications.com or 302-6299243 (f).

Subscribe to the Star for the best sports coverage.

DAY & NIGHT Delaware’s seatbelt use rate is down, and more than half of the Delawareans killed in car crashes this year were not wearing seatbelts. So we’re stepping up enforcement, especially after dark. Buckling up can save your life both day and night. Buckle up. It’s the law.

BUCKLE UP OR PAY UP


PAGE 44

         MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Raven Roundup- Ravens move to 3-1 with 35-12 win By Mike McClure

WILD ONE IN GEORGETOWN- Above, Sussex Tech’s Logan Pavlik, Abby Atkins, and Maxine Fluharty celebrate Atkins’ game-winning goal in overtime following last Wednesday’s game against Delmar. Below, the Ravens’ Logan Pavlik dribbles the ball as Delmar’s Sara Ellis defends during last Wednesday’s game. Defense was the name of the game as neither team could find the net in regulation. The Ravens won in overtime, 1-0. Photos by Mike McClure

The Sussex Tech varsity football team defeated Cape Henlopen, 35-12, last Friday night to move to 3-1 on the year. Desmond Sivels carried the ball 27 times for 303 yards and three touchdowns and Justin Allen caught a pair of touchdown passes from Jesse Swanson. Allen caught a 19-yard touchdown pass from Swanson, Sivels added touchdown runs of 18 and 19 yards and also had a two-point run, Allen added a six-yard touchdown reception from Swanson, and Sivels scored his third touchdown of the night with a 17-yard run. Raven kicker James Smith also booted three extra points. Allen caught four passes for 35 yards, Brandon Lewis carried the ball 13 times for 49 yards, and Shane Marvel ran the ball four times for 41 yards in the Sussex Tech win. Sussex Tech soccer team wins one of two- The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ soccer team fell to Indian River, 2-1, last Tuesday before defeating Concord, 4-0, on Saturday. Sussex Tech goalie James Smith made five saves in the loss to Indian River. The Indians held a 15-4 advantage in shots. Jacob Williams scored a pair of goals, Ariel Espinoza and Ryan Moore each netted a goal, and Aris Reynoso had two assists to lead Sussex Tech in the win over Concord. The Ravens held an 11-7 edge in shots and an 8-3 advantage in corners. Smith made four saves in the shutout.

Delmarva Christian boys’ soccer team loses three games The Delmarva Christian boys’ soccer team fell to Salisbury School, Worcester Prep, and Wilmington Christian in games last week. Herbert Troyer netted a pair of goals in the Royals’ 5-2 loss to Salisbury School last Tuesday. Todd Hurley recorded eight saves in goal for Delmarva Christian. Delmarva Christian fell to Worcester Prep, 7-2, on Thursday. Shayne Ivory and Garrett Menoche each had one goal, Herbert Troyer added an assist, and Hurley had nine saves. The Royals lost to Wilmington Christian, 5-2, on Friday. Troyer netted a pair of goals and Hurley made 12 stops.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Morning Star Publications

Holiday Marketing Plan This week in Star sports history

10 years ago (1999)- The Delmar varsity field hockey team improved to 6-0 with wins over Smyrna and Polytech. Katie Ditmer and Brittany Elliott each had a goal in the 2-0 win over the Panthers and Lindsey Elliott netted four goals and Erin Budd added two goals in a 7-0 win over the Eagles. The Woodbridge varsity football team moved to 3-0 with a 27-0 victory over Perryville as C.J. Pitts ran for a pair of touchdowns. The Seaford boys’ and girls’ cross country teams upped their record to 3-1 with wins over Sussex Tech. Cameron Fitzgerald placed second and Nathan Rose was third for the Jays. Kristin Irwin came in first and Jennifer Willis finished second to lead the girls’ team. Five years ago (2004)- The Laurel Bulldogs defeated the Delmar Wildcats, 35-15, in the Lions Bowl as Christian Horsey ran for 112 yards and Devvery Hill added 164 yards rushing. Last year (2008)- The Seaford varsity football team earned its first win of the season with a 33-32 win over Lake Forest in the homecoming game. Mykeal Purnell ran for three touchdowns to pace the Jays. The Sussex Tech varsity soccer team advanced to 5-1-2 on the year with a 1-0 win over Caesar Rodney. Sebastian Borror netted the goal and Ryan Moore had the assist for the Ravens.

Lady Royals tie Worcester Prep, fall to Wilmington Christian The Delmarva Christian varsity field hockey team tied Worcester Prep, 2-2, and lost to Wilmington Christian, 9-0, in games last week. Devan Taylor and Sarah Betts each had one goal and Christie Betts recorded 18 saves for the Royals last Thursday. Worcester Prep held a 20-13 advantage in shots and Delmarva Christian held a 9-8 edge in corners. Betts made nine saves in her team’s loss on Friday.

The Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers want to help you with your holiday marketing plans. We have affordable ad rates, special packages and promotions that will help increase sales for your business this shopping season. Contact Bryant Richardson or your sales representative for details. email - brichardson@mspublications.com or call 302-629-9788


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 45

Bradford scores second straight win in Super Pro at U.S. 13 By Charlie Brown

Perseverance paid off for Maria DeMott when she scored the tying goal in Tuesday’s high school field hockey game. DeMott is shown celebrating after she pushed and fought hard with the Caesar Rodney goalie. Seaford would end the game in a 2-2 tie with the Riders. Story in next week’s Star. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Seaford/Laurel Star Tuesday high school sports scoreboard

Boys’ soccer- Sussex Tech 7, Woodbridge 1- Aris Reynoso and Zimri Gomes each netted a pair of goals and Dylan Pepper, Ryan Moore, and Brock Little had one goal apiece for the Ravens. Micah Idler tallied the Raiders’ goal. Abraham Leon made 17 saves in goal for the Raiders while Sussex Tech goalie James Smith made two saves. Caesar Rodney 7, Delmar 1- Trevor Johnson netted the Wildcats’ lone goal in the loss. Laurel 1, Milford 0- Roosevelt Joinville scored the game-winning goal at 26:46 in the second half to help lead the Bulldogs. Laurel’s Alexander Asher made 12 saves. Seaford 2, Sussex Central 0- Evan Lee netted the Jays’ first goal off a feed from Nazaret Garcia. Joe Mitchell found Oscar Castrejon in the second half for the 2-0 win. Seaford held a 10-5 advantage in shots while Sussex Central had a 6-4 edge in corners. Christian Gosnell made five saves for the Blue Jays. Field hockey- Sussex Tech 5, Laurel 1- Abby Atkins had two goals and one assists, Maxine Fluharty added one goal and one assists, and Taylor Kieffer and Kayla Krause each tallied one goal for the Ravens. The Bulldogs’ goal came on a penalty stroke. Taylor Oliphant had four saves for Laurel and Sussex Tech’s Caitlin Stone made three stops. Woodbridge 1, Dover 1- Woodbridge’s Danielle Griffin scored a second half goal to knot the score while Kelli Warner made eight saves in goal for the Raiders. Campus Community 1, Delmarva Christian 0 (OT)- Christie Betts made 22 saves in the Royals’ overtime loss on Monday. Volleyball- St. Thomas More 3, Sussex Tech 0- St. Thomas More won by the scores of 25-20, 25-13, and 25-22. No additional information was provided. Delmar 3, Dover 2- The Wildcats came back from a 2-0 deficit as the Senators won the first two games, 25-14 an 25-15. Delmar won the next two games, 25-18 and 25-22, as well as the deciding game, 15-9. Sarah Smith had 16 assists and four aces, Ashley Matos made five kills and had two aces, and Shanna Hearn added three kills and five aces.

The Super Pro final had all the makings for a family feud but mechanical woes found Alan Bradford of Salisbury watching from the sidelines as Jay Bradford of Newark, Md., drove to his second straight win Sunday at the U.S. 13 Dragway. Ben Garnett of Houston found victory lane for the first time in winning in Pro as did Tony Mumford of Berlin in Pro Bike. Other winners on the day included: Andy Davenport of Seaford in Street; Holly Passwaters of Bridgeville in Import; Troy Maoll of Millsboro in Bike Trophy, Michele Creed of Camden in the Cheswold Connection; Herby Sullivan of Ridgely in Jr. Dragster 1 and Trevor Post of Delmar in Jr. Dragster 2. Brothers Jay and Allan Bradford advanced to the Super Pro finals but the match up for bragging rights in the family was not to be as Allan lost the brakes on his dragster in a bye run in the semi-finals and could not make the final round. Jay, in his ’94 Lumina made the solo run a full pass as he ran an 8.786/153.81 on an 8.71 dial for the win. Semi-finalist was W.R. Ketterman of Salisbury. Garnett, in his ’71 Ford, faced Keith Mayers of Fruitland in his Chevy powered Porche in the Pro final. The pair were close at the starting line but Garnett was on his dial to take the win with a 9.918/133.45 on a 9.91 dial. Mayers ran a 9.152/142.63 on a 9.13 dial. Semifinalist was Buddy Layfield of Snow Hill. Mumford rode up against Steve Murray of Exmore, Va., in the Pro Bike final. The pair were even at the start but Murray was way off his dial and Mumford got the win with an off the throttle run of 10.253/96.24 on a 9.49 dial. Murray ran a 13.196/104.38 on an 11.84 dial. Semi-finalists were Kris McLaughlin of Burlington, N.J., and Elliott Boyce of Somerdale, N.J. The Street final matched Andy Davenport in his ’71 Maverick against Dennis Davis of Seaford in his ’71 Camaro. Davis tried to make up for a slow start and broke out with an 11.388 on an 11.39 dial and Davenport took the win with an 11.718/112.58 on an 11.70. Passwaters moved from Street to Import and was paired against Mack Poley of Ocean View in the all-Honda final. Passwaters had the better reaction and posted her first Import win with an 18.025/76.51 on a 17.98 dial. Poley ran a 13.342/107.74 on a 13.29 dial. Maoll rode up against Troy Wongus, Jr. of Cambridge in the all-Suzuki Bike Trophy final. Maoll took the double break out win with a 10.227/131.42 on a 10.30 dial. Wongus was out by more with a 10.286/138.03 on a 10.48 dial. The Cheswold Connection Ford Racers were in action. Creed in her ’06 Mustang faced Laura Ridgeway of Dover in hier ’80 Mustang. Ridgeway had a red light foul and Creed took the win with a 14.008/98.12 on a 13.90 dial. Sullivan was back in the Jr. Dragster 1 finals this time facing Tyler Powell of Delmar. Sullivan added to his wins this season with an 8.969/71.01 on an 8.97 dial as Powell had a red light foul. In Jr. Dragster 2 it was Trevor Post getting his firs win of the season over Jordan Dill of Ellendale. Dill had mechanical problems and fouled and Post ran an 8.051/78.79 on an 8.09 dial.

'09 Holiday Gift Guide don’t miss out on the shopping event of the season to be published

November 12 COACH ENNIS- Laurel High and Wesley College graduate Eston Ennis talks to the Raiders’ Donta Mitchell during last Friday’s game. Ennis and Tyler Downes, a graduate of Delmar and West Chester, are assistant coaches at Woodbridge. Photo by Mike McClure

ReStore is proud to sponsor this page of Local Sports Scores.

855-1156

Donated Appliances, Doors, Cabinets, Windows & Furniture at Low Prices!

Open To The Public Wed. - Fri. 10-5 & Sat. 10-3

107 Depot St. Georgetown

supplement to the Seaford and Laurel Star

reserve your advertising space today

call 302-629-9788


PAGE 46

Mardel

 MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Seaford Bowling Lanes

Team Dynasty 36-12 Sandbaggers 34-14 Henry’s Furniture 32-16 Spicer Electric 27-21 Wroten’s Rollers 26-22 Jaws 21-27 3 Plus 1 20-28 Three Men and a Babe 18-30 Four Horseman 18-30 High games and series David Perdue 303 Wayne Sammons 765

Baby Blue Jays

New Beginnings 9-3 Girl Power 8-4 Hot Shots 6-6 Strikers 6-6 Strikes and Spares 4-8 Just Starting 3-9 High games and series Harrison Barnes 179, 316 Dallas Slavin 184 Delaney Quillen 311

Star

Pin Smashers 11.5-4.5 Strikers 10-6 Strikemasters 8.5-7.5 Late Comers 8-8 Dead Eyes 7-9 Spare Timers 7-9 Pin Destroyers 6-10 Ten Pins 5-11 High games and series J.R. Whitelock 231 Robert Bay 624 Michelle Massey 235, 619

Young Adults

Just For Fun 12-4 Lucky Charms 10-6 Toy Soldiers 9-7 Strikes and Spares 8-8

Pinbusters 7-9 Lightening 6-10 Dust Balls 6-10 New Beginnings 6-10 High games and series Seth Shockley 231, 642 Katie Hickey 243 Kristyn Parlier 666

Senior Express

Just Us 12-0 Attitude with Spares 11-1 Curves Chicks 9.5-2.5 Mighty Pioneers 9-3 Strikers 8-4 Pin Pals 7.5-4.5 Mission 3 7-5 Senior Survivors 6-6 Blue Stars 6-6 ABC 6-6 Rack Attack 5-7 Guys and a Doll 5-7 Chick’s Rollers 5-7 Kellam’s Crew 5-7 Pinbusters 4-8 Russ Morgan DDS 4-8 New Crew 3-9 Just the Guys 3-9 High games and series Carl Young 287, 744

Friday Trios

James Gang 14-2 Norm’s Crew 12-4 Woodworkers 11-5 Comebacks 10-6 Terry’s Tigers 10-6 Sugar and Honey 9-7 Touch of Class 9-7 Three Alive 9-7 Wolf Pack 8-8 3-Da-Hardway 8-8 All in the Family 7-9 The Uh Oh’s 7-9 Strikes and Spares 5-11 7-Up 5-11

Fear the Handicap 4-12 BKB FAB 4-12 Pins Astounding 4-12 High games and series Jennings Kellam 290, 661 NormaLee Horne 247, 693

Seaford City

Palmers Construction 9.5-2.5 Ruff Ryder 7-5 Seaford Lanes 7-5 Guardian Angels 6.5-5.5 Phillips Construction 6-6 Git-R-Done 5-7 Easy Pickins 3-9 High games and series Robert Donati 300, 842

Weds. AM Mixed

Left Left 13-3 Seaford Lanes 11-5 Bee Movie 9-7 Jean and the Guys 8.5-7.5 Two Plus One 7.7-8.5 ABC of It 6-10 Lucky Strikes 6-10 High games and series Tim Beers 297 Myron Hayes 818 Martha Brannock 260, 708

Tuesday Early Mixed Killer Bees 16-4 Empty Pockets 12-8 Bass Ackwards 12-8 Cross Fire 12-8 Vacationers 11-9 Down N Out 10-10 Seaford Moose 8-12 B Attitudes 7-13 Just Chillin 7-13 Dreamers 5-15 High games and series James Howell 267 J. Stanley Howell 732 Melynda Hitchens 246

Denise Smith

711

Eastern Shore Men

Spicer Electric 13-3 Who Cares 10-6 3 Men and a Handicap 10-6 Hoobers 9-7 Always Second 8-8 Delmarva Consignment 7-9 DAZK 6-10 Pain 4 1-15 High games and series Todd James 291 David Casselbury 836

Club 50

Lucky Strike 13-3 Pinbusters 12-4 RRK 12-4 The Zips 11-5 Gamblers 9-7 Pretenders 8-8 Magic Markers 7-9 Cowboys 7-9 Three B’s 7-9 7-9 2-1 The Untouchables 6-10 Deal or No Deal 5-11 Three Buddies 4-12 3 Wise Men 4-12 High games and series Bill Newlon 291, 738 Doris Barron 289, 730

Sun. Night Mixed

Advanced Aerosol 13-3 Fun In It 13-3 Hit or Miss 8-8 Gutter Cleaners 4.5-11.5 Mischief Makers 4.5-11.5 2 Fer the Gutter 4-12 High games and series Delton Johnson 288, 800 Crystal James 286 Linda Thomas 752

SEAFORD BOWLING LANES Home of Galactic BowlinG

629-9778

302

Nylon Capital Shopping Center Seaford, DE

Boys and Girls Club of Western Sussex to form indoor soccer league

The Boys and Girls Club of Western Sussex is forming an indoor soccer league for the winter season. This is a co-ed league ages 3 through 18. The age groups are as follows: Under 6: ages 3, 4, 5 (session one Nov. and Dec., session two Dec. and Jan.); Under 9: ages 6- 8; Under 12- ages 9-11; Under 15- ages 12-14; Under 19- ages 15-18. The registration fee is $25 for club members (U6 $15 per session or $25 for both) and $40 for nonclub members ($15 covers one year membership dues at the club). Participants may register at the club Monday through Friday, 1:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information call the club at 628-3789 and ask for Karen Schreiber.

Sports at the Beach hosts Beach Wipeout Tournament The following are the championship results for the Beach Wipeout Tournament which took place last weekend at the Sports at the Beach complex: 10-year-olds- Delaware Blue Hens Gold (Georgetown) 8, Delaware Warriors (Dover) 2; 11-year-olds- Tri State Arsenal Blue (N.J.) 9. Delaware Express (Smyrna) 7; 12-year-olds- Tri State Arsenal Blue (N.J.) 8, Delaware Hurricanes (New Castle) 0; 13-year-olds- Delaware Blue Hens Gold (Wyoming) 5, Oregon Ducks (N.J.) 4; 14-year-olds- Tri State Arsenal Red (N.J.) 6, Team Extreme (Pa.) 3; 15-16 year-olds- Tri State Arsenal Blue (N.J.) 8, Forest Hill Storm (Md.) 0 For more information, visit www.sportsatthebeach.com.

POP WARNER- The Delmar Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee team’s defensive line of Elijah Bethel, Jacob Richardson, Carson Phillips, Trae Collins, and Eric Chestnutt tackle Cape Henlopen’s running back in Saturday’s Pop Warner football game. Photo by Lynn Schofer

CLUES ACROSS 1. Proof of pymt. (abbr.) 5. A baby carriage 9. Elephant’s name 14. Honolulu’s island 15. Walks with a cane 16. Ancient Greek marketplace 17. Mimic 18. From a distance 19. Rutilus 20. Filled with melancholy 23. Pesetas 24. Emmet 25. Older in years 28. Misleads 33. S____e: apoplexy 34. Gives off a strong smell 35. Black tropical American cuckoo 36. Am. composer Ned 38. Hole punching tool 39. Wrap 41. Electronic warfare support measures 42. Mythological titan 44. Be in want of 45. More highly nacred 47. Tips 49. ___P: senior organization 50. Goidelic language 51. 36th president 58. Central Dravidian 59. Leopold & ___ 60. German car 61. An abundant supply 62. Food grain 63. Palin’s youngest 64. Foundations 65. Summer sandwiches 66. Things considered individually

CLUES DOWN 1. Street or highway 2. Organized crime head 3. Stinks! 4. Toll road 5. Two-dimensional 6. Floating structures 7. An Indian wet nurse 8. Nothing more than specified 9. Wife of a baron 10. Genus Dasyprocta 11. Small water vessel 12. Instep 13. Exclamation of approval 21. Intl. Trade Organization 22. Baseball great Connie 25. Throat infection 26. Irregularly notched 27. _____ Jean Baker, M. Monroe 28. Vacuum flask 29. Soft-finned fishes 30. Monitor lizard 31. Establish by law 32. Kitchen basins 34. Abnormal breath 37. Illnesses 40. Estrange 43. Beginner 46. Persistent irritation 47. Investigations 48. ___kosh, WI 54901 50. Put out by force 51. Tibetan priest 52. Putting nightmares 53. Mediation council 54. Pus-filled sore 55. Chapter of the Koran 56. Of an ode 57. Being on the left side 58. Tag the base runner out

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 30


MORNING STAR • OcTObeR 8 - 14, 2009

PAGe 47

Community unites to support singing fundraiser

I wanted to break from my traditional column topics which usually ony indsor chronicle the days of my youth back in Crisfield, Md. This week In the spirit of the oldI want to simply share a few basic words of appreciation for what I fashioned street musiconsider just good old niceness. First of all, over the summer cian, people would I have been involved in a special come up and drop fundraising project for the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club. It is a money in the bucket project that has been supported by and smile, wave or this newspaper’s publishing company, Morning Star Publications, share a word of support with me. in conjunction with Boys & Girls Clubs. Hence my first “thank you” of the stores’ doors. Instead I just stood to Bryant and Carol Richardson of Morning Star Publications, who along with their off to the side and played my music. There was a small bucket on a table next to me outstanding staff are so generous to offer with a sign that read “Thank You,” and a in-kind support to promote this project. sign made by Tower’s Signs of Seaford I have been playing music for the past positioned behind me explaining why I 35 years, in bands and more recently as a was there. No pressure, just an opportunity solo performer. I love music and I love to to contribute. perform, so the Parking Lot Tour to Send I was completely blown away by the a Kid to Camp project was right up my algenerosity of the people who patronized ley. My thanks to Western Sussex Boys & these businesses. In the spirit of the oldGirls Club executive director Dave Crimfashioned street musician, people would mins and resource development coordinator Maria Motley for embracing the project come up and drop money in the bucket when I took the idea to them at the start of and smile, wave or share a word of support with me. Most recently, I performed the summer. in front of the Dollar General Store in the During the summer I have performed Sav-a-Lot shopping center on Stein Highat the Seaford Grotto Pizza, the Seaford Sears Store, Dollar General on Stein High- way. Store manager Cindy Moore was wonderful in welcoming the fundraiser. way, The Vineyards at Nassau in Lewes I played in front of the store on Friday and Old Navy in Salisbury. My heartfelt evening and Sunday afternoon. I was total“thank you” to these businesses for allowly amazed as literally hundreds of people ing me to play music to help raise money for the Boys & Girls Club. The stores were filed up and dropped money in the bucket as I performed. They would stop their so gracious and I appreciate it very much. vehicles as they were driving through the Words alone cannot express my overparking lot and jump out and put money whelming appreciation to each and every in the bucket, they would send their young person who stopped by to drop money in children, some as young as a year or two, the bucket to help youth programming up with dollar bills in hand. People who at the Boys & Girls Club. It was not my lived nearby and were not even planning intention to put people on the spot and hit to come to the store came out and donated. them up for money as they came in or out Some even dropped money in and then

T

W

From right: Cindy Moore, Dollar General store manager; Lisa Sellers, assistant manager and singer/fundraiser Tony Windsor. Photo by Shelly Lowe.

parked their vehicles and ate snacks as they sat and listened to the music. I saw so many faces, representing every walk of life, every socio-economic level, every age group, race, ethnic and cultural background. So many different types of people, but all demonstrating a common trait – generosity. These people were not just generous, they were friendly and kind. Each of you totally made my year! You should look in the mirror and be proud of who you are! As I have played these venues throughout the area I do not think that the people who have been kind enough to stop by and share a supporting comment realize how much that means to me. I will say that during my performance Friday night someone dropped by to tell me my music was too loud and she could hear it at her home in Woodside Manor. To her and anyone else I may have unin-

tentionally offended with the volume of the music, I apologize. I decided when I came back on Sunday to drop my speakers and keep them on the sidewalk next to me and pointing away from the residential area. I had no complaints, so hopefully that took care of the problem. I hope to continue playing music to raise money for the Boys & Girls Club, so I welcome any business to give me a call at 302-236-9886 or Maria Motley at 302628-3789 to schedule. It is free to the business and a great community spirit project. On behalf of the children at Boys & Girls Clubs please let me share a collective THANK YOU for each of you who have been a part of this project! In times when it seems we are surrounded by negative news about our society and our economic welfare, each of you represents what is so great about our country, especially in our communities here in Sussex County!

‘If you’re burning garbage, you’re making poison’ It was a beautiful autumn day. The sun was warm, the breezes ynn arks were cool and I wanted to open all our windows to take advantage of I don’t understand peoboth. Sadly, when I pushed the windows open, something besides fresh ple who burn garbage. air floated in through the screens. Someone in our neighborhood was It’s illegal and has burning garbage and the distinctive odor of plastic and paper on fire soon filled the upstairs bedrooms. been since the 1960s. If the cats had been listening, they would have heard some lanwas still strong. Determined to find the fire guage that they shouldn’t. Because I was and present to its tender one of the state furious. pamphlets on “Facts about Open Burning” “When people find a way to keep the that we keep on hand just for such cases, smoke their fires produce to their own I hurried inside, pulled on a pair of shoes lungs, they can burn as much as they and went back out to the car. For five want,” I stormed. “Until then, they must minutes or so, I drove around, looking for stop it!” smoke or for anyone tending one of those Admittedly not much profanity in there. all-too-common burn barrels. I cleaned it up for a general newspaper I found neither. And I returned home reading audience. when I realized the contradiction of drivWhen I walked into the front yard to ing through the countryside, spewing see if I could spot any smoke, none was greenhouse gases and other pollutants visible. But the unnatural chemical odor along the way, to find someone else who

L

P

was polluting. That’s another tree I owe the Earth. I don’t understand people who burn garbage. In the first place, it’s illegal and has been since the 1960s. And in the second place, how can they believe that their need to get rid of refuse and their dislike, apparently, of disposing of it properly trumps the health of all around them, including their families, maybe even their children? “If you’re burning garbage, you’re making poison,” says a publication from the state of Minnesota. This isn’t the trash your grandfather burned. Today’s trash contains multitudes of chemicals that, when incinerated, release toxins that end up in the air, water and earth. Of particular concern is dioxin, a wellknown carcinogen that can also affect human reproductive, developmental and immune systems. Modern garbage, when burned, releases dioxins into the air. And the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that one burn barrel, with a relatively low burn temperature and no pollution controls and in which garbage from a

family of four is burned, can put out more dioxin than does a full-scale municipal waste incinerator burning 200 tons of garbage a day. The dioxin settles on crops, pastures and waterways and eventually ends up in the food we eat and the water we drink. In at least one case, that of a burn barrel not far from our neighborhood, the poison ends up on the family garden and strawberry patch right next to the barrel. Strawberry pie, anyone? You wouldn’t give your child a glass of dioxin for dinner or a plate of dioxin for dessert. Why would you persist in a practice that ends up putting dioxins in the milk she drinks? Our Earth and its environment are suffering from a multitude of problems. This is one problem that with a minimum of effort we could easily eliminate. Please, please, stop burning your garbage. I don’t want to smell it anymore. And the other creatures, children included, who live in our corner of Sussex County don’t want to breath in any more of its dioxins.


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Community Snapshots

Lifelong Delmar resident Bill Brittingham states his reasons for supporting the proposed casino during a recent town meeting at the Delmar Fire Hall. The town will hold another public hearing on the casino project on Oct. 21 at 7 p.m. at the fire hall. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel residents enjoyed a day in the park during last weekend’s Community Awareness Day. A large number of community service organizations set up tables in Janosik Park for the event. Photo by Mike McClure

Area children take a “motorcycle” ride during the Fall Carnival, an event held last week which was sponsored by the Laurel Chamber of Commerce. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Councilwoman Robin Fisher announces the winner of a door prize during the Laurel Community Awareness Day event which was held last Saturday. Photo by Tony Windsor

Shown are members of the Laurel High School class of 1962 at a class birthday party which was held at the Georgia house on Saturday, Sept. 26. Submitted photo.

Brittany Pruitt and Johmir Levan of Seaford enjoy a ride on the slide at the Laurel Chamber of Commerce’s Fall Carnival which was held last week.


PAGE 49

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

Critical letter stirred many to appreciate Laurel band As Americans we are guaranteed the four freedoms, with freedom of speech at the top of the list. The Letters to the Editor is undoubtedly one of the most important sections of any printed publication. It is in this section that the readers have an opportunity to voice their individual, or collective opinion. These opinions may refer to something that is happening within the national government, the town government, life in the community where one lives, or some phase of life in the realm of the writer. Letters to the editor are the true pulse of the community, and always spark the attention of the reader. It is not necessary to agree with the writer, but if a single letter written to the editor captures a spark within the writer, so much so that he feels he must voice his opinion and possibly spark some form of enthusiasm in other readers, then the writer has not only exercised his freedom of speech but has caused others to consider in earnest just what is happening within their community. The editor of any publication may spend hours and hours on a single article relating to the news, an issue involving the residents of the community, the town government, or many other phases of life in general. But, let the editor or a reporter, or Mr. Average Citizen present an adverse opinion pertaining to either the high school athletic department to the high school music department or to a major change in the community in general (arrival of a new enterprise), and residents have an uprising of emotions. This is the best thing that can possibly happen because it causes one person to be so emotionally stirred within that they voice their opinion to the editor. That one letter causes many others to take a good look at what is happening and either take a supportive position or an offensive position stronger than the late Coach George Schollenberg ever set up for the Laurel Bulldog football team. In the case of the Laurel High School band, a single criticism riled a great many readers, this writer included. The response from Brian Cass, director of the Band and Theater at Laurel High, was outstanding and reminded the public of just how involved the department is in the life of not only the students, but in the life of their families and residents of this community. Buddy Boughknight brought great pride to Laurel during the 1970’s when he was

Where Can I Make Those Copies I Need? ¢

10 each*

*8 1/2 x 11 white copy

Morning Star Publications, Inc. 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788

Moments With Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton director and took the band to march in the St. Patrick’s Day parade in New York City for the first time. It was my good fortune to be one of the chaperones on this memorable trip. However, Buddy, like several who followed him as a strong force in the music department, was not appreciated by some in the community and left the Laurel School District. The music department has suffered many ups and downs through the years, but thanks to Brian Cass and those who work with him and support him, the students can hold their heads high and proudly let one and all know that they are a part of the Laurel High Band. Unfortunately, the music department far too often does not receive the support that the athletic department in a high school receives. Brian Cass, the strong volunteer staff that works with him, and the parents of the young musicians deserve every plaudit they can get. This group works diligently, spends many after school hours perfecting their performances, traveling to athletic events, competitive marching and performance, musical presentations, hours of at-home practice, all the while maintaining the proper grade average of their school studies. Brian Cass and his musicians deserve the total support of the entire school district. Any parents who has ever had a son or daughter be a band or theater participant knows exactly how many hours of dedicated service are required on their part and on the part of their offspring. A few words of support can accomplish a great deal of pride and self-confidence in a young participant and those who lead their group. A critical letter to the editor may be the best thing that ever happened to the Laurel Band and all involved. One thing for sure, it stirred the souls of readers, and made a lot of them realize just how fortunate residents of this school district are to have Brian Cass, his support staff and the young musicians.

K a t h r y n ’s

Doing the Towns Together LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS Sarah Marie TriviTS • 875-3672

During recent pretty fall days Juanita and Richard Stone indulged themselves in a bit of a vacation traveling and visiting. Their daughter, Bonnie Fischer, flew in from St. Louis, Mo. for a short visit, before the three of them took to the road which led them to Charleston, W. Va., for a visit with Dick’s brother, Jack. From there, on the road again, the trio attended the Drake family reunion, (Juanita’s branch of the family tree) followed by a short vacation with Bonnie and husband, Jim, and the Stones visiting the Fischer’s daughter, Stacey, her husband, David Phillips and their children, Kyle and Daisy in Crown Point, Ind. Back to St. Louis for a breather before heading back to Delaware, with a stop at the home of Greg and “Mo” Stone in Laytonsville, Md., and back to Laurel. Gene and Fran Wootten enjoyed a week’s visit from daughters Debbie and Patty recently and I understand that while here; for recreation (?) all three ladies had a ball “just ‘a’ shoppin’. For the last few weeks Darrell and Charlene Meade have entertained house guests, Mike and Lori Platt and family whose home is in Kansas, but for much of every year the Platts perform Mission duties in Turkey. As Missionaries they spend much of their time out of this country and following this visit, after spending some brief time with another family, will return to Turkey for the remainder of this year and next.

The Laurel Lioness met for their monthly session at the Georgia House on Thursday, Oct.1. They entertained three guest speakers from Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Dr. Kathleen Gordon, Dr. Yvonne Reid and Renee’ Morris, Director of Marketing and Development. They gave a power point presentation concerning the importance of yearly mammograms and explained the new, digital version of mammography versus the ones previously performed. The Mears Campus hopes to obtain this newer equipment in the near future when funding becomes available. As you all know by now October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month - so wear your pink-conspicuously! The Laurel Garden Club will have a Membership Social on Sunday, Oct. 11, at 1:45 p.m. at St. Philip’s Parish House on Central Avenue. The topic of the day will be “Container Gardening.”

Soaps & Lotions Powders & Creams & Other Little Luxuries to Please the Feminine Spirit

FLOWERS 10 in. pot

Potting Soil $2 (1.5 CU. FT.) MULCH Peat Moss $850 (4 CU. FT.) $300

OPEN 9-5 - 7 DAYS A WEEK

We continue with prayers for our service men and women and our friends who are ill: Tom Wright, “Bobbi” Shwed, Walt Dorman, Calvin Hearn, Joe Messick, Patrick Starr, Conner Niblett, Hattie Puckham, Alvin Lutz, Bob Christian, Matthew Littleton, Jean Henry, Gene Littleton, Jean Foskey, Donald Layton Sr., Steve Trivits, Mary Wilson, Dot Murphy, Robert Truitt, June Williams and Martha Windsor. Very happy wishes for a great celebration to Homer and Verna Disharoon as they observe another wedding anniversary on Oct. 10, from their many Laurel friends. Happy October birthday wishes to: Donald Hoover and Betty Lynch on Oct. 7; Frances Fisher and Martha Pusey, Oct. 8; Doris Shenk and Natasha Singleton, Oct. 9; Jay Feldman and Jane L. Givens, Oct. 10; Paige Carson and Kathleen Coulbourne, Oct. 11; Barbara Buffington and Charles Schultes, Oct. 12; Golda Williamson, Oct. 13; Bryan Norris, H. Rick Elliott and Vernon Perdue, Oct. 14. “Forgive everyone everything.” See you in the stars.

Dutch Country Market Hrs: Thurs. - Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5

11233 Trussum Pond Rd. (Beside Johnny Janosiks)

302-875-1678

12 COLORS

Shrubbery, Trees, Perenials, Grasses

We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of: Oliver F. Whaley and The Rev. Bruce Oliver LeCates.

a pennsylvania Dutch Market in laurel

Ornamental Cabbage $200

1

All you Bingo Buffs must know by now that the Laurel Lioness are hosting a Vera Bradley night at the Laurel Fire Hall on Tuesday, Oct. 20. There will be a variety of refreshments, door prizes and, of course, the envied Vera Bradley products to lucky winners. Tickets are $20, both in advance and at the door and are available now from any Lioness. Doors open at 6 p.m.

Reg. Lebanon Bologna.........................$2.99 lb. Country Swiss......................................$3.69 lb. Chow-Chow .........................................$1.59 lb.

MuMs $250 Pansies)

Oct. 10 is the Melson’s Fall Bazaar at the Community House in Delmar and they offer all things good to eat, plus homemade ice cream — A fun Saturday is in store for all.

SpecialS for ocToBer 8-9-10

8400 Bethel Rd., Laurel • 875-2055

$ 50 6 pack

Seems I can’t pass up one week with reminders of “things-to-be” so-here goes — the Tri-County Chorus’ musical production to be held at Heritage Shores on Sunday, Oct. 25. Aside from the chorus members performing, there also will be “Bo” Dickerson, Bob Murphy, Everett Hart and dance numbers by Drs. Nancy and Sammy Magrone. Reservations are necessary and for more information you can call Suzanne Layton at 875-7809.

Come and See, Feel and Smell The Quality!

The Bath & Body Shop 2 Cats In the Yard 110 S Conwell St. Seaford 628-1601 Open Wed, Thur, Fri, & Sat 10-5

DUTCH COUNTRY

HEIRLOOM FURNITURE Located Next to Dutch Country Market

October Furniture of the Month

Shaker Table & 6 Chairs

SAVE $350

00

New Styles

Free Delivery & Set Up of our Play Sets up to 25 mi.

dutchcountryfurniture.com


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

This overwhelming response is a reflection of what it means to live in a great, small community where neighbors care about neighbors.

Letters to the Editor

Folks in small town are the greatest! My wife Barbara and I want to thank the members of the community for all the thoughts and prayers offered in her behalf while she was hospitalized at Johns Hopkins for four continuous months. During that time, she received hundreds of cards which I took daily to her bedside and then displayed around room. Thanks also to those who sent beautiful flowers and plants. The doctors and nurses were amazed at the outpouring of affection for her. At times when she was unable to read, but interested in what was going on back home, I would read her articles in the Laurel Star. This overwhelming response from all segments of the community is a reflection of what it means to live in a great, small community where neighbors care about neighbors. Barbara received prayers from people in many organizations representing various faiths, including a Jewish synagogue, a Catholic church, our Episcopal church family, and a host of other churches and prayer circles within the Laurel community. I am convinced your prayers are what brought her through this difficult experience. If you talk to “Bobbie” as she is known within our family, she will tell you that she “saw the bright white lights four times” during her lengthy stay at Johns Hopkins. Her surgeon calls her “his miracle patient.” I told her God has some unfulfilled purpose for her so we are graced with her continued presence. Thanks to the Star columnists, Pat Murphy, Mike Barton and Sarah Marie Trivits for keeping the Laurel community informed of her status. I apologize for perhaps not returning some phone calls, but my days were pretty long. I did not return from Baltimore until late at night and then it was back in the car for the return trip the next morning. Each morning as I now approach my car, it breathes a nice sigh of relief! Thanks also to Punch Whaley and neighbor Frank Calio for cutting my grass

Stars’ Letters Policy

All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or you may email editor@ mspublications.com

and keeping the Mayor out of hot water with the Town Code Officer. I want my fellow citizens to know that my laptop computer and cell phone kept me in touch with town government while I was in Baltimore and on the road. Bobbie is now recovering at home. On Sept. 12, she was treated to a very pleasant and welcome sight, a bright, red and white Laurel Fire Company ambulance and two friendly, familiar faces, Mike Lowe and Deanna Brown who brought her closer to home to LifeCare at Lofand Park Rehabilitation Center in Seaford. Thanks also to Laurel Fire Company Ambulance Captain Wendy Lowe for coordinating her transfer. After two weeks of intensive rehabilitation at Lofland, she returned to our home for the first time since May 13 where she is making good progress. We appreciate the delicious meals delivered to our home during her recuperation while I am playing the role of “Mr. Mom.” Throughout this journey, Bobbie and I met many dedicated, health care professionals at Johns Hopkins, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, and LifeCare at Lofland Park. We are thankful for their skill and compassionate care. A DuPont job offer brought Bobbie and me to Laurel in 1966. We raised a family and discovered a larger, loving, caring family here in this wonderful community. To borrow a line from the late comedian Jackie Gleason – Laurel people - “you’re the greatest!” Mayor John J. Shwed

Laurel

Band could give back more

First, let me say the members and director of Laurel High School Marching Band are to be congratulated for their success (third place) in the competition at Lake Forest High School on Saturday, Sept. 26. I know first hand the work involved in preparing for such an event. Next, I am compelled to address the matter of the band performing sans uniforms and Mr. Calio’s comments expressing shock at seeing the published picture of the band performing without uniforms. Having been a proud member of the Laurel High School Marching Band myself in the remote past, I must admit that I had the same reaction as Mr. Calio upon seeing that picture. Perhaps, though, the criticism leveled at Mr. Calio was misplaced. Perhaps the person responsible for publishing the picture without an explanation as to the reason for lack of uniforms at that particular event should be taken to task for their lack of attention to detail. As to the reason for the lack of uniforms, Mr. Cass should be given a pat on the back for caring so much about protecting what is obviously a large investment in attire and equipment. However, in my opinion, more could be done by the band to give back to the community for the support they receive from the community, i.e., participating in more community events such as parades. Linda Kittiltz

Laurel

Band performance was excellent

I would like to thank the Laurel High School band for their excellent performance and participation in last Saturday’s Community Awareness Day. I enjoyed listening to them and watching the color guard perform. By the response of the crowd, I can only conclude that everyone there enjoyed it as much as I did. Thanks to the band, Mr. Cass, and the parent volunteers for taking time to stop by on their way to a competition out of town. Barb Hudson

Seaford, DE 19973

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Liberals Wrong About Rights

Saw this in a letter to a local newspaper and wanted to share. Thought it was right on point. “Regarding the right to health care mentioned in your recent editoral: What you call a right I call a hard day’s work. The point being, our Declaration of Independence brilliantly points out the fact that true rights are God-given. Your editorial staff, our nation and President Obama would be wise to recognize what our founders knew to be true. Nothing that requires one person to work for another can be called a right.” Bob Wootten

New Bern, NC

Vital Stats Vital Stats is a new feature that will present statistical comparisons for vital factors that influence our lives. As time goes on, previous week and annual comparisons will be added. We welcome your comments and suggestions for other categories.

Five bills that greatly affect gay and transgender citizens are before the U.S. Congress. One would topple the so-called Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which bans federal recognition of same-gender marriage even in states where it is legal. Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

editor@mspublications.com

Milton

Bills seek equal rights

President Bryant L. Richardson

629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax)

Douglas Marshall-Steele

Laurel

Morning Star Publications Inc.

P.O. Box 1000 • 951 Norman Eskridge Highway

Another would prohibit anti-gay and anti-transgender discrimination in the workplace. Another would allow foreign same-gender spouses of American citizens the same immigration rights as binational heterosexual couples. Another bill would allow gays to serve openly and without lying in the military. Another would protect from hate crimes. These five bills represent rights so basic they are taken for granted by heterosexual Americans. Far from the sinister motives our opponents impute to us, we who are gay and transgender American citizens only want to marry and live with our spouses, to be employed, to serve in the military and to be safe from hate crimes. This is that frightening Gay Agenda. Put even more succinctly, the Gay Agenda is simply this: equal rights in every state. Sounds pretty American to me.

Editorial Lynn Parks

Sussex October temperature records High 97 in 1941 Low 19 in 1969 Federal Debt as of October 2, 2009 $11,916,674,901,264 Population of United States 307,027,416 Each citizen’s share of debt $38,813

Carol Kinsley Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Composition Cassie Richardson Rita Brex

Sales Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Brandon Miller

Morning Star Publications Inc. Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Tony Windsor has been serving the Delmarva Circulation Treasurer Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Cathy Shufelt Karen Cherrix Peninsula since 1996. town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 8 - 14, 2009

PAGE 51

Final Word

Scholarships encourage youth to stay motivated By Sen. Harris B. McDowell III

Years ago, while researching information about education in America, I came across this shocking statistic: Well over 50 percent of children in public schools have been told at some point by a parent or guardian that they “should not even think of going to college,” because their family can’t afford it. That statement has a devastating effect on a young person. If you know your family can’t help put you through college it’s awfully hard to stay motivated and try to keep doing well in school. Motivating students to do well in and out of the classroom is an important, but often overlooked, factor in developing a successful education policy. My firm belief that all students in Delaware deserve the opportunity to go to college, regardless of their economic standing, drove my efforts to create the SEED scholarship program. Although SEED is only beginning its fourth year, its positive effects are already being seen throughout our state even though we will not truly see the program’s impact for years to come. Since it began, approximately 3,700 students have received SEED scholarships to Delaware Technical and Community College and to the University of Dela-

ware. And students are taking advantage of the chance SEED gives them. Delaware Tech’s retention rate of 68 percent for SEED students is better than the regional community college average, and UD has a retention rate of better than 50 percent for its SEED Students. Additionally, students must apply for all other forms of financial aid when they apply for the SEED program. Many times a student will only receive partial funding from SEED because they will be receiving other forms of financial aid, such as federal Pell grants. That’s had another beneficial side effect – many of the students applying for those grants qualify for them. Because SEED is used to fill in the gaps not covered by other grants, those successes allow us to help even more students. All this good comes at a relatively low cost to the state as SEED represents less than 1 percent of the state’s current budget. For that modest investment more Delawareans can go to college, earn a degree, get a job that pays a decent wage, and contribute more to our local economy. That beats the alternatives born out in statistics showing that high school dropouts can become a drag on society either through taking low-paying jobs that require some type of public assistance or

by turning to crime and winding up in a prison system whose costs dramatically exceed the cost of the SEED program. So as we decide how to utilize our limited state funds on the many demands confronting us, it is critical that we invest in our future, through effective “results driven” initiatives such as the SEED program. About the author

Sen. Harris B. McDowell III is a Democrat representing the First Senatorial District which covers Wilmington’s north side.

Punishment for the brain

• The roundest knight at King Arthur’s round table was Sir Cumference. He acquired his size from too much pi. • I thought I saw an eye doctor on an Alaskan island, but it turned out to be an optical Aleutian. • A small boy swallowed some coins and was taken to a hospital. His grandmother telephoned to ask how he was. A nurse said, “No change yet.” • She was only a whisky-maker, but he loved her still.

We Service All Models

Sales • Service • Installation Visit our website to design your custom door!

www.yoderdoors.com

302-875-0663 Route 13 Laurel, DE

Submit items by email to us at editor@ mspublications.com. Include your name, hometown and a daytime phone number.

REAL ESTATE RENTALS

INSURANCE

Atlanta Estates—Seaford, DE

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

www.wilgusassociates.com VISIT OUR WEBSITE ... SEE OUR HOMES WITH ‘VIRTUAL TOURS’

$289,000 GEORGETOWN - REDUCED AGAIN… NOW $38,000. BUSINESS & SUPPLIES Teresa has the details 855-0500.

SEAFORD - SPACIOUS DBLWIDE $65,000. 3 BR 2 BA, EXCELLENT CONDITION. Teresa will show 855-0500. LAND FOR SALE, SEAFORD, DEVONSHIRE WOODS, REDUCED TO $41,300

BETHANY BEACH 32904 S. Coastal Hwy. 302-539-7511 1-800-441-8118

BETHESDA RD, GEORGETOWN GREAT LOW PRICE $149,000. 3 BR 2 BA, COUNTRY SETTING. Call Donald Kellicutt 855-0500.

NEW LISTING!

GEORGETOWN, 2 STORIES, 2 BR, 2 BA, 2 car gar. Room for more BR on 2nd floor. Ready to show today. $199,900. 2 LOTS & 1 MOBILE: BRIDGEVILLE $60,000. Each lot 100’x160’ Call Donald Kellicutt for info.

GEORGETOWN 210 West Market St. 302-855-0500 1-888-421-6521

LEWES 1520 Savannah Rd. 302-645-9215 1-800-421-6521

GORGEOUS home in Atlanta Estates. This home boasts 3,100 sq ft of living space. Home is located in a well established neighborhood in Seaford, DE. Home features 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, ceramic and hardwood flooring. Kitchen has been updated. This home is close to town without the town taxes. MLS# 565028 Bobby Nibblett, REALTOR®/Broker Cell: 302-236-2164 Fax: 302-628-7747 Office: 302-629-7711 Email: bobby@4htr.com


22350 Sussex Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 just south of Dukes Lumber.

302.629.5575 302.628.9000 The Gold Standard

www.century21tullramey.com

Trey Hardesty September Top Producer

MAN CAVE

567522 . $349,900. Reduced 20K! 3 BR 2 BA on almost 5 acres! Large shop, in ground pool, hot tub, sauna & sunroom. Barn for horses, close to the bays and beach, close to everything but just far enough away from anything and no restrictions. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-4620710. www.9832SunnysideRD.com

569845. $149,900. Fantastic den w/ great wet bar & open beams in knotty pine setting. Move in condition. Concrete driveway, ample back yard. Not new but upgraded & well maintained. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289

568593 $154,900 Exceptionally well maintained estate sale. Many built in shelves. Pecan cabinet doors. Shade trees, rear patio w/ large backyard. Carport w/ concrete driveway. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-5420289.

REDUCED 10K

NEW LISTING

570615. $285,000. WOW! Custom built home with plenty of room. This 2700 sq. ft. ranch features bamboo hardwood floors, whirlpool tub in master bedroom and a hot tub to relax for those quiet evenings. Plenty of storage with 24x28 garage and a 12x20 storage shed. Call Trey Hardesty’s cell 302-236-3344.

572148. $229,000. Wonderful community of Branchview. Wellmaintained rancher with full basement. Beautiful lot of almost an acre. 3BR, 2BA, 3-season room with much more!! Call Dana Caplan’s cell 302-2495169.

571776. $285,000. Completely updated in 2004. Home has all the modern conveniences, but retains the character of this charming neighborhood. Antique radiators, radiant floor heating & a fireplace. Designer kitchen w/ custom cabinets & premium appliances. Call Kevin Thawley’s cell 302-258-6455.

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

572926 . $499,900. This has to be one of the nicest homes on the market in Western Sussex. Unbelievable new kitchen w/ lg island, wine fridge, granite counters w/ tile backsplash. 2 story living rm., sunrm, massive game rm, 2nd flr laundry. Shows like a model home! Call Kevin Thawley’s cell 302-2586455.

572894. $381,900. Fabulous home on large lot w/ all the extras & golf course views. Gourmet kitchen w/ granite countertops, center island & double ovens. Formal dining & living rms., office & sunroom, 1st fl master suite & a large guest suite. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710. www.118WidgeonWay.com

572718 . $359,000. Unique 1 owner home, large windows off back of living rm. Irrigation system w/ beautiful landscaped lot. 2 sided fireplace, custom made cherry cab. Master BR opens to deck. Slate foyer. Sound proof laundry Rm. 1 yr home warranty. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660

558203. $239,500. Priced to Sell! Beautiful home for a growing family. 3 bd 2 1/2 bath Colonial. Upgraded, brand new kitchen, flooring, wiring, insulation, plumbing. Great house! In ground cement pool. Extra large lot 3/4 acre. A must see! Call Dana Caplan’s cell 302-249-5169.

565150. $110,000. Owner says SELL! 3/4 acre lot with 2BR, 1BA home. 2 enclosed porches. Home ready to move in. Estate sale being sold “as-is”. Home is located on rural country road yet close to everything! Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710.

571644. $339,900. Beautiful Model Home ~ Grand entrance. Open floor plan, great for entertaining, gas fireplace, sunroom, rear deck. Call Angie Zebley’s cell 302-228-7653.

569828. $189,500. Well-maintained rancher on 1.21 beautiful country acres. Front porch and enclosed rear porch. 2 sheds, large patio and circular blacktop driveway. Wonderful landscaped yard. Call Wanda Rash’s cell 302-542-8024

565721. $345,000. Beautiful 3BR, 3BA home w/ 2-car garage on the 15th hole over looking the water in Heritage Shores. Upgrades everywhere, flooring, kitchen, lighting w/ bay window, 2 master suites & plenty of extra storage. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-4620710. www.132WidgeonWay.com

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

572995. $169,900. Lovely country setting surrounded by trees. Large 4 bedroom home ~ new flooring, fresh paint, large eat in kitchen with abundance of cabinets! Call Angie Zebley’s cell 302-228-7653.

572993. $184,900. Very attractive new 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home. This home features a spacious kitchen and walk-in closet in the master bedroom. Great home for small family or just starting out. Call Trey Hardesty’s cell 302-236-3344

571628. $219,900. Practically new home on country acre! Large 3BR, 2BA, stainless kitchen package, island w/ breakfast bar. Master suite w/ 2 closets, garden tub, sep. shower. New large deck. Many upgrades. Home warranty included! Home being sold fully furnished. Call Dana Caplan’s cell 302-249-5169.

571378. $168,900. Property has been renovated inside & out. New appliances, on corner lot just outside city limits. Driveway to be blacktopped. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-7456489.

560733. $175,00. Never lived in. Class C near Rehoboth Bay. Salt treated 27x10 deck. Oak Cabinets, utility room work table. Nice area w/out restrictions, beach activities, fenced back yard. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

567124. $357,888. Sparkles like new! This 2900 sq. ft home sits on a corner lot in a attractive upscale golf community w/ all the extras!! Hardwood flooring, crown molding, recessed lighting , tray ceiling in dining room, & granite counter tops & more! Call Patti Haney’s cell 302462-0710. www.5canvasback.com

556179. $85,000. Seven Acres! Near Seaford, mostly clear. Room for horses, no restrictions. Believed to be sub-dividable. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

563553. now $39,900. Reduced for quick sale! Nice building lot in preferred neighborhood. Call John Williamson’s cell 302542-0289.

REDUCED

569575. $54,000. 2004 Clayton River Run 3BR, 2BA double wide in gated community of Cool Branch. Includes range, refrigerator-side by side, dish washer, washer, dryer and partially furnished. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

566329. $119,900. Come see this 2 bedroom and 1 bath home. Home has vinyl siding,replacement windows,new carpet and spacious rooms. Great price! Call Dianne Reece’s cell 302745-1151.

564749. $199,500. Counrtyside,Great location near schools,shopping and beach area. Den could be used as a 3rd bedroom. New porch,back deck and stone drive. Room to roam and watch the wildlife. Class C home with home warranty. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489

554721. $20,999. Must see! This cozy 3BR 1995 Skyline Mobile on Large Corner-Tree lined lot. Split bedroom plan gives master needed privacy. Lot rent $365 per month & Includes Sewer, water, & trash. Buyer subject to park approval. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710.

Call Trey Hardesty’s cell 302-236-3344

567719. $100,000. Located with-in walking distance of the Nanticoke River Public Marine Park & boat ramps entrance. Features all new windows, doors & siding, rm for 4-cars to park, security system, fenced in back yard. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710.

570806. $349,900. Walk into a dramatic vaulted living rm! No expense has been spared in this home ~ Granite and stainless kitchen, fully landscaped w/ irrigation. Hardwood flrs, climate controlled walk in storage, 3000 sq. ft. home on wooded acre. Call Dana Caplan’s cell 302-249-5169.

Greenwood: Country lot $55,000 3 Secluded lots $79,900 (each) 2 In-town lots Starting at $45,000 Seaford: Development $112,000 Waterfront lots Starting at $159,000

BridGeville: 9 Country lots Starting at $55,000 Development lots Starting at $64,900

ellendale: 32 acres $650,000 4 Lots with acreage Starting at $109,900

October 8 2009 L  

Turn to our Bulletin Board every Thursday to see what’s happening this weekend. Business 6 Bulletin Board 16 ChurCh 20 Classifieds 32 eduCat...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you