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VOL. 13 NO. 12

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2008

50 cents

NEWS HEADLINES BETHEL - Bethel is holding a Maritime Fall Festival on Saturday, Oct. 18, on the Bethel Museum grounds. A 5-K Run/Walk begins at 8:30 a.m. Breakfast is available at the museum from 8 to 10 a.m. Music by Big Hats & No Cattle and the Jones Boys from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oyster sandwiches, Flannery’s BBQ and other treats. Call 8753791 for more information. KIWANIS - Delmar Kiwanis recognize those who contribute to the community. Page 5 VINE - An Internet-based system that allows crime victims to receive real-time information about the custody status of inmates. Page 11 ATHENA - Renee’ Morris provides leadership, excellence and innovative support to improve the quality of life for others. Page 13 STATION - The construction work on the interior renovations of the Laurel Train Station are moving closer to reality. Page 57

Sports CELEBRATE Delmar’s Kelsey Murrell, left, and Elise Breda celebrate last Thursday’s win over Cape Henlopen. Delmar moved to 4-2 in the H e n l o p e n Conference and 5-2 overall with the win. See page 47. Photo by Mike McClure STARS OF THE WEEK - A Delmar volleyball player and a Delmar field hockey player are this week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 47

INSIDE THE STAR BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT FINAL WORD FRANK CALIO GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS MIKE BARTON MOVIES

6 21-24 28 34-43 14 32 63 59 33 26-27 58 61 7

OBITUARIES OPINION PAT MURPHY PEOPLE PUZZLES SOCIALS SPORTS TIDES TODD CROFFORD TOMMY YOUNG TONY WINDSOR

30 62 25 44 24 61 45-52 7 43 49 59

Laurel High School math teacher, Tom Stetina (right) is shown with "Jeopardy" television game show host Alex Trebeck at Sony Studios, Los Angeles. Stetina was a contestant on "Jeopardy" and will be featured on the Thursday, Oct. 23 episode. Photo courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc.

Laurel man to be contestant on ‘Jeopardy’ By Tony E. Windsor The Town of Laurel seems to be earning the reputation of having a pool of intellectuals finding their way to the national television game show circuit. Recently Patrick Pugh, son of Charles and Karen Pugh of Laurel, was a contestant on the game show, “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?” Pugh left the show with $25,000, but was later alerted by the show’s producers that a spelling error on his game

viewing monitor has allowed him a second chance to come back on the show. He will return with all his “Life Lines” in place and at a starting point of $16,000. If that is not enough to make Laurel proud, there’s more! A Laurel High School math teacher is being featured on the national game show “Jeopardy.” Tom Stetina, former Math Department Chair at Laurel High School, will be on the “Jeopardy” show Thursday, Oct. 23.

Interestingly enough, Stetina actually showed interest in being a contestant on Jeopardy over a year and a half ago, but never heard from the show’s producers until this past summer. “I never really watched Jeopardy on a regular basis,” he said. “But, friends of mine said I would be good at answering the questions. So, I watched the show and saw that you could take a quiz online to see if you were contestant material.” Stetina took the online quiz at the Continued on page four

Invista will reduce its workforce by 80% INVISTA’s Seaford manufacturing site announced restructuring plans Tuesday which will involve the relocation of several manufacturing operations to other INVISTA facilities in the U.S. and Canada by mid-2009. When the restructuring is complete, INVISTA’s Seaford site will have a focused mission of producing nylon staple fiber for technical applications such as military apparel, conveyer belts used in paper manufacturing, and other specialty products.

By mid-2009, total employment at the Seaford site is expected to be about 100, down from approximately 500 INVISTA employees at Seaford today. “Many factors are compelling the Seaford site to reinvent itself,” said Gary Knight, Seaford site manager. “We have seen clear shifts in customer demand, changes in the economy, and significant increases in raw material and energy costs. “In addition, the site has a footprint and utilities that are oversized for the

site’s needs. While transitions are challenging, we must make these tough decisions now to help ensure the viability of Seaford’s industrial nylon staple manufacturing operation.” “INVISTA’s Seaford site and its past and present employees have been a part of an operation with historical significance, have served the fiber and polymer industry with quality and innovation, and have played an important role in the economy,” said Dan Continued on page four


r e b o t c O

is CENTURY 21 Open House Month!

562691 Buckingham Drive, Yorkshire Est, Delmar HOST: Conrad Boisvert Cell 302-3815184 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13 & Rt 54, turn East onto Old Stage Road. Follow to community entrance on the right.

®

560773 31155 S. Shellbridge Rd, Laurel HOSTESS: Brenda Rambo Cell 302-236-2660 DIRECTIONS: Rt 13 South from Seaford. Turn right on Camp Rd. Cross over Alt 13 into Bethel. Go over bridge & turn left on Shellbridge Rd. House 1 mile on the left. (Reduced)

Stop i n ou r open houses for do or prizes a nd a cha nce to wi n the Gra nd Prize.

Flat Screen TV

563916 405 S Winding Brooke Dr, Clearbrooke Est, Seaford HOST: Jamie Steelman Cell 302245-7925 DIRECTIONS: Rt 13 North from Seaford. Turn left on Elk Rd, turn right into Clearbrooke Est. Turn right @ 1st intersection, home on cul-de-sac on left. (Considering all offers)

559998 202 S. Winding Brooke Lane, Clearbrooke Est, Seaford HOST: Jim Demas Cell 302858-6668 DIRECTIONS: Rt 13 North of Seaford. Turn left on Elk Rd, turn right @ 1st intersection, 2nd home on the right.

Open Houses - SUNDAY, OCT. 19

557998 28864 Seaford Rd, Seaford HOST: Brandt Garner Cell 302-249-4659 DIRECTIONS: Rt 13A South of Seaford just North of Laurel. Property is on the West side.

556368 Ship Builder Dr, Cypress Pointe, Laurel HOST: Scott Venables Cell 302-5592333 DIRECTIONS: Rt 13 South of Seaford to a right on Camp Rd. Right on Woodland Ferry Rd, Cypress Pointe is approx. 1 mile on the left.

559528 713 Hurley Park Dr, Woodside Manor, Seaford HOSTESS: Tina Rix Cell 302448-5448 DIRECTIONS: West on Stein Hwy, turn right @ Pizza King, right at stop sign, straight to Hurley Park Dr. Home is straight ahead.

TH

562547 7277 Clark Road, Seaford HOST: Wayne Dukes Cell 302-236-7753 DIRECTIONS: From Alt 13 South of Blades, turn on River Road,. left on Clark Road, in approx. 3 miles. Home is on the left.

554691 6966 Pine Branch Rd, Delmar HOSTESS: Patti Haney Cell 302-462-0710 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13 in Laurel, take Rt 24 West thru Laurel to left on Horsey Church Rd, left on Providence Ch Rd, left on Pine Branch Rd, 4th home on the right.

2 TO 4 PM

560355 38 Amanda’s Teal Dr, Heritage Shores, Bridgeville HOSTESS: Sabrina Marland Cell 302-542-3619 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13 North of Seaford, turn West into Heritage Shores. Turn on Wills Island. Turn left @ stop sign onto Amanda’s Teal Dr.

560787 500 N. Arch St, Seaford HOSTESS: Melissa Citro Office 302-629-5575 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13 South turn right onto Middleford Rd which becomes High St. Turn right on Arch, home is 2nd to last on the left before Stein Hwy.

Tull Ramey Limited Open Sunday, Oct. 19th 2- 4 pm

561773 10468 Foxtain Ct, Clearbrook Acres, Seaford HOST: Ed Higgins Cell 302841-0283 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13 in Seaford, turn East on Middleford Rd. Pass the VFW into Clearbrook Acres. Home is on the right.

562059 122 Pondview Lane, Mearfield, Seaford HOSTESS: Jessica Bradley Cell 302-2457927 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13 in Seaford, turn west @ Lowes. Community is 1.5 miles on left.

562715 36450 Tina Ave., Villa Park Est, Delmar HOST: Dan Bell Cell 302-841-9750 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13, turn East on Rt 30 (Whitesville Rd). Go 4.2 miles. Tina Ave. is on the right. 1st home on the right.

563019 31813 Gordy Rd, Laurel HOST: Kevin Thawley Cell 302258-6455 DIRECTIONS: Rt 13 South to Laurel. Turn right on Trussum Pond Rd. At end, turn right on Gordy Rd. 3rd home on the right. (Reduced)

563613 35 Amanda’s Teal Dr, Heritage Shores, Bridgeville HOST: Lee Marland Cell 302-5420347 DIRECTIONS: Rt 13 North of Seaford, turn West into Heritage Shores. Turn on Wills Island, left @ stop sign onto Amanda’s Teal Dr., home on the rt.

Downtown Seaford

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302-628-9000

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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 3

County Councilman Vance Phillips takes exception to ‘spending spree’ By Ronald MacArthur Distribution of councilmanic grants by members of Sussex County Council doesn’t usually cause much controversy. It’s the time for each councilman to give back money to worthwhile community endeavors. Nonprofit groups throughout the county solicit their councilmen to tap into those accounts asking for grants of $50 to $10,000. This past fiscal year councilmen were given $61,000 to dole out as they see fit. Votes to approve the grants are always unanimous – until Tuesday, Oct. 7, when Councilman Vance Phillips took exception to what he called a spending spree by retiring Councilman Dale Dukes, who is leaving office Dec. 1 – halfway through the fiscal year. With three grants Tuesday totaling $10,500, Dukes’ coffer is down to $30,405 as of Oct. 7 with six meetings remaining before he steps down. Since July 1, Dukes has handed out $82,600 – $36,000 more than any other councilman and $56,000 more than Phillips has granted. Phillips said Dukes should leave at least half of the fund – about $30,500 - for his replacement. “You promised you would not spend all the money and you are going back on your word,” Phillips said to Dukes. “That is being irresponsible. You are not leaving any money for the taxpayers because of your spending spree.” Dukes, who was visibly upset by Phillips’ comments, said it was none of Phillips’ business. “I did not promise what amount I

Fire School scholarship

The Delaware State Fire School and Home Health Corporation have been awarded scholarships to participate in a national training conference dedicated to “Remembering When: A Fire and Fall Prevention Program for Older Adults,” developed by the National Fire Protection Association, NFPA. The conference will be held Dec. 3-5, in Boston, Mass. NFPA has selected two-member teams from 41 communities across the country to participate. Teams are comprised of one fire department member partnered with an individual from an agency within the community that serves older adults through home visits. Michael Lowe of the Delaware State Fire School and a representative of Home Health Corporation will participate in the workshop. After the workshop, Delaware State Fire School will conduct a minimum of five group presentations and at least two train-the-trainer sessions for Home Health Corporation.

would save in the account because I’m not sure what requests I will still get in,” he said. On one of Dukes’ three requests, Phillips said he was willing to chip in $2,000 from his fund if Dukes would reduce his grant to $3,000 and split up the donation of $5,000 for the Laurel

Public Library security system to save some money in his account. Dukes said no. Phillips voted for that grant as well as a $5,000 grant for the Town of Blades to purchase park equipment, but he voted against a $500 donation from Dukes’ account for God’s Food Wagon to

purchase supplies. “I just want you to know I put you on notice,” Phillips told Dukes. Also retiring are Finley Jones, president, and Lynn Rogers, but they are not following the same track as Dukes. Rogers has more than $90,000

remaining in his account and Jones has more than $86,000 left in his account. All councilmen have unspent funds remaining from previous fiscal years. Phillips has more than $72,000 remaining and the most frugal of all, Councilman George Cole, has $124,553 to spend.


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

‘Jeopardy’ contestant from Laurel has eyes set on ‘Millionaire’ Continued from page one

Jeopardy website and did well enough that producers called to tell him that he was definitely someone who could be considered as a television contestant. He was told to go to Philadelphia and take part in some “fake” Jeopardy games. After visiting Philadelphia, Stetina heard nothing for almost two years and figured he had been pretty much “written off.” Then in July, Stetina was notified by Jeopardy producers that he had been selected for the show and taping would take place at the end of August. On August 27, Stetina and his small entourage of family and friends, including his mother, flew out to Los Angeles. Unfortunately, the timing of the Jeopardy show coincided with the start of the new school year. “I left materials for the students and a note explaining that I would be missing the first couple of days of school because I was appearing on Jeopardy. I know that a lot of my students are going to be watching the show and I am sure they will be giving me a hard time,” he said laughing.

According to the rules of the Jeopardy game show, Stetina is not allowed to discuss any particulars of the show or the amount of money he may have won. He does however, have good things to say about the trip in general. “It was a whirlwind trip,” he said. “We flew out on a Wednesday and the show taped on Thursday. We spent the weekend with my sister who lives in Southern California and then flew back in time for school on Monday.” Stetina said when you are one of three contestants on Jeopardy, there is guarantee for at least some money. He said the third place contestant gets $1,000, the second place contestant gets $2,000 and of course the winner takes all of their earned money. “I knew that at minimum I would get enough money to pay for the costs to travel out to Los Angeles. So, it was a great way to visit family and be on the show,” he said. Stetina said he does not think there is any proven way to prepare for Jeopardy. He believes based on what the category is almost anyone could have a “good day” on Jeopardy. “I think if you do well in your living room, you would do well on the televi-

sion show,” he said. He said the major challenge is developing good timing when it comes to hitting the buzzer to answer a question. “They say you should practice by using the clicker on a ballpoint pen while watching the show in your living room. I’m not sure that is helpful, but I do know that it is important to get in a good rhythm when it comes to hitting the buzzer,” Stetina said. He said at the beginning of the show, he found himself hitting the buzzer earlier than was allowed, which gave him a slight delay and enabled enough time for other contestants to get in ahead of him with their responses. “You can’t see it when you are watching the show on television at home, but there is a series of lights that circle near the main board. When they have completed the series, you can hit the buzzer. If you do it too soon, it makes your buzzer have a secondary delay; not much of a delay, but enough to give other contestants a chance to get in ahead of you. I eventually developed a rhythm and got more familiar with the timing.”

Though there is a degree of pressure about competing on television, Stetina said the people who work at Jeopardy are very helpful. He said the show staff treats contestants and their families wonderfully and made the experience less stressful. “They are some of the nicest people you will ever meet,” he said about the crew. “I know people wonder if being on television and in front of the camera and lights makes it hard to concentrate and play the game. But, I have to say that the show moves so fast-paced that I had little time to consider that I was on television. I was in the moment, in a zone, didn’t really have time to process everything around me. I just focused on answering the questions and staying on the show as long as I could.” Stetina said he thoroughly enjoyed his stint on Jeopardy, but also commented that seeing how well Patrick Pugh performed on “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” has given him pause for thought. “I think after seeing Patrick on television I think he has caused me to consider taking a shot at being on “Millionaire” next,” he said.

Invista plant is reducing workforce from 500 to 100 next year Continued from page one

Stone, president of INVISTA Performance Surfaces & Materials. “The Seaford site should be proud of its contributions and accomplishments for the past seven decades. We will build on this legacy as we transition to a smaller operation in 2009.” While restructuring will not begin until the first quarter of next year, INVISTA will soon begin bargaining in good faith with the Seaford Nylon Employees’ Council over the effects of the changes. Additionally, INVISTA will work closely with state agencies, the Department of Labor and business councils to ensure that Seaford employees affected by the restructuring in 2009 will have access to available resources. INVISTA is making the announcement far in advance of the changes to ensure that employees, contractors, and the community have as much time as possible to plan for the future, as well as to allow the site to make the capital investments required to make modifications to the site and ensure that the site will be in full regulatory compliance, the company said. Many carpet mills are moving away from the type of staple carpet fiber manufactured at Seaford toward bulked continu-

ous filament (BCF) carpet fiber. This shift in demand creates an opportunity to capture volume for other INVISTA sites that manufacture BCF, but it represents a loss of staple production volume for Seaford. This loss of volume, when combined with the burden of Seaford’s large infrastructure, has created challenges that cannot be overcome without significant action, Knight shared with employees in meetings at the site on Tuesday. In contrast to the situation with staple carpet fiber, INVISTA is optimistic about the Seaford site’s ability to be competitive and create long-term value in the industrial nylon staple market. As a result of the restructuring, INVISTA will no longer pursue construction of a natural gas pipeline through the City of Seaford as announced earlier this year. The smaller natural gas line currently serving the site should provide adequate volumes following the restructuring and INVISTA’s conversion from coal to natural gas. INVISTA will work closely with customers through the transition in an effort to minimize disruptions. Throughout the transition and beyond, the site will maintain its commitment to safety, compliance and environmental excellence, the company said.

Laurel Star GIFTS HOPPE

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Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

“Our sincere thanks and appreciation go to our employees, retirees, contractors, customers, suppliers, government officials, and this community, all of whom have made us proud and helped put Seaford on the map,” stated Gary Knight in meetings with employees at the site. “We look forward to working together as we reinvent

the Seaford site and position it for the future.” INVISTA is one of the world’s largest integrated producers of polymers and fibers, primarily for nylon, spandex and polyester applications. INVISTA employs approximately 16,000 employees and has a business presence in over 20 countries.

2008 GENERAL ELECTION EXTENDED HOURS FOR ABSENTEE BALLOT VOTING IN THE OFFICE Thursday Saturday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Saturday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Saturday

October 16 October 18 October 20 October 21 October 22 October 23 October 25 October 27 October 28 October 29 October 30 November 1

8:00 AM 9:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM

- 6:00 PM - 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 6:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Normal week day hours: 8 AM - 4:30 PM For information regarding voting by mail, call 856-5367 or visit the department’s web page at electionssc.delaware.gov to print the necessary affidavit requesting a ballot. 12 Noon, MONDAY, NOV. 3, 2008 - Deadline to vote an absentee ballot in person in the office of the Department of Elections.

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS FOR SUSSEX COUNTY 119. N. Race Street, Georgetown, DE 19947 Phone No. 302-856-5367


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 5

Delmar Kiwanis Club honors members at dinner By Pat Murphy The Delmar Kiwanis Club held its annual induction dinner and program on Monday, Oct. 13, at the Delmar VFW. Among those honored were the "Outstanding Kiwanian of the Year" which was presented by Past President Joe Pfarr. This year there was a tie and the award is shared by members Pete Overbaugh and Jim Levadnuk. They have a combined service of over 10 years and have been involved with many of the club's various projects.

The club's year-end report given to each of the members of the banquet gave an indication of the Kiwanis support of the community of Delmar. A total of $10,348 and 1,411 man-hours were donated by the organization last year. Among the many projects were community services, human and spiritual aims, youth services and priority one, young children. The biggest award is two scholarships for Delmar High School graduates totaling $3,000 yearly. Most of their man-hours were spent on the Mason Dixon Woodworkers and the

Lifetime Achievement Awards were given to Jim Robinson, left and Wayne Bradley, right, at the Kiwanis awards dinner. Presenter is Past Lt. Gov. Ralph Chinn. Photo by Pat Murphy

Recognized as "Outstanding Kiwanian of the Year" at their annual banquet were Pete Overbaugh, left and absent, Jim Levadnuk. Presenting the award is Past President Joe Pfarr. Photo by Pat Murphy

Delmar Little League. Ralph Chinn, Past Lt. Governor from the Ocean Pines Club, presented Lifetime Achievement Awards to Jim Robinson and Wayne Bradley. Chinn elaborated on the special meaning of the Lifetime Achievement Award. Chinn said that they are forever recognized as members of the organization even after their passing away and

are remembered as foundations of their local chapter. Officers and board of directors for 2009 are President Keith Jones, Secretary Jack Lynch, Treasurer Ron Davenport, Past President Joe Pfarr. Board of directors are Al Bozman, Bob Boody, Gary Horseman, Jim Levadnuk, Joe Pfarr, Jim Robinson and Pete Overbaugh.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Business Conference set for entrepreneurs

Del Tech offers new HR class

The first annual Sussex County Entrepreneurship Conference will be held Wednesday, Oct. 29 from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. This free conference is sponsored by the college’s Entrepreneurship Program in collaboration with the Division of Corporate and Community Programs. The conference begins immediately after the 2008 Sussex County Today & Tomorrow Conference held that morning in the Carter Partnership Center. The conference is designed to provide potential and existing entrepreneurs with the opportunity to discuss topics of interest to the small business owner and to provide access to resources that meet their individual needs. Scott Kidner, Delaware director for the National Federation of Independent business (NFIB), will be the keynote speaker. A panel discussion will focus on the challenges of small businesses to survive in a slow economy. Panel participants are Jayne Armstrong, Small Business Administration; Jane Stayton, CPA; and Matt Parks, Discover Bank. Time will be allotted for questions and answers and for attendees to visit the exhibits set up by vendors of small business solutions. Seating is limited and pre-registration is required by Friday, Oct. 24. To register by phone, call 302-855-1617.

Learn the basics of human resources (HR) for small businesses through a new course being offered at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Human Resources for Small Business: Safeguarding Your Future will help business owners and managers who are considering hiring employees or want to comprehend employment law changes and requirements. Participants will gain an understanding of recruitment and hiring practices, insight into planning and metrics, and confidence in their ability to manage people. This six-session course will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nov. 6 to 25 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Owens Campus. For more information, call 302-8546966.

Cooper joins Home Team Realty Home Team Realty welcomes Holly Cooper as an associate broker. Cooper, a Seaford native, is a 1989 graduate of Seaford Senior High School. She earned a bachelor’s degree in interpersonal/organizational communication at the University of Delaware in 1993. She has 15 years of exCooper perience in real estate as a realtor, broker and managing broker. Cooper can be reached at 629-7711, 302-236-3352 or Holly@4HTR.com.

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CFM announces top producers Kathy Farnell, vice president of Callaway, Farnell and Moore Real Estate, announces the firm’s top producers for September. Fran Ruark was the top selling agent and Terry Scott was the top listing agent. To reach Ruark, call 302-629-4514. To reach Scott, call 302-628-8500.

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DelDOT operators now covered Department of Transportation (DelDOT) Secretary Carolann Wicks was recently joined by Senator Margaret Rose Henry and DelDOT employees as she announced the inclusion of DelDOT responders to those covered by the Move On Over law. Senator Henry, primary sponsor of Senate Bill 274, conveyed her concern about the risks emergency responders face daily on Delaware’s roadways. SB 274 was signed by Governor Ruth Ann Minner on July 16, and amends the previous Move On Over law that applied to police,

fire, and other emergency vehicle operators. The bill extends the Move On Over law to DelDOT vehicle operators. Senator Henry stated, "Frequently, DelDOT personnel are requested to provide support to fire and police officials at an incident scene. The Move On Over law is helping to reduce the risk of serious injuries and death to all public servants who are working in harm's way." New signage will be installed on roadways entering the State to inform motorists of the law.

Julie Klein Cutler manages the Office of Anti-Discrimination, which investigates and mediates approximately 650 charges of employment discrimination a year. Trina Gumbs serves as acting mediation director and supervisor of the Kent/Sussex Anti-Discrimination Office. The presentation will be held at the Georgia House Restaurant, 18 S. Walnut St., Milford. Reservations are required by emailing, delmarvashrm@deshrm.org.

rodeo designed to qualify them as “Certified GrowMaster Applicators” at Southern States Cooperative in Laurel. Southern States’ certified applicators are tested annually for equipment application accuracy and participate in product and application technology training. GrowMaster services include crop input recommendations, preparation of state-approved nutrient management plans and soil and nutrient analysis interpretation. For more information, visit www.southernstates.com.

Two qualify in truck rodeo William Harris and Spence Messick recently participated in an annual truck

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888.291.2400ÊÊUÊÊ`i>Ü>Ài˜>̈œ˜>°Vœ“ i“LiÀÊ  °Ê I"˜Ê"V̜LiÀÊÎ]ÊÓään]Ê  Ê`i«œÃˆÌʈ˜ÃÕÀ>˜ViÊÌi“«œÀ>ÀˆÞʈ˜VÀi>Ãi`ÊvÀœ“Êf£ää]äääÊ̜ÊfÓxä]äääÊ«iÀÊ`i«œÃˆÌœÀÊ̅ÀœÕ}…Ê iVi“LiÀÊΣ]ÊÓää™°Ê II˜˜Õ>Ê *iÀVi˜Ì>}iÊ9ˆi`Ê­*9®ÊL>Ãi`ʜ˜Ê“ˆ˜ˆ“Õ“Ê`i«œÃˆÌʜvÊfÓ]xääÊ>˜`Ê>ÃÃՓiÃÊ«Àˆ˜Vˆ«>Ê>˜`ʈ˜ÌiÀiÃÌÊÀi“>ˆ˜Êœ˜Ê`i«œÃˆÌÊ՘̈Ê“>ÌÕÀˆÌÞ°Ê ,>ÌiʈÃÊÛ>Àˆ>LiÊ>˜`ʓ>ÞÊV…>˜}iÊ >vÌiÀÊ̅iÊ>VVœÕ˜ÌʈÃʜ«i˜i`°Ê Ê«i˜>ÌÞÊ܈ÊLiʈ“«œÃi`ʈvÊ܈̅`À>Ü>Êˆ“ˆÌ>̈œ˜ÃÊ>ÀiÊiÝVii`i`°Ê iiÃʓ>ÞÊÀi`ÕViÊi>À˜ˆ˜}Ã°Ê ,>ÌiÊ>˜`ʜvviÀÊ>ÀiÊÃÕLiVÌÊ̜ÊV…>˜}iÊ>˜`Ê “>ÞÊLiÊ܈̅`À>ܘÊ܈̅œÕÌʘœÌˆVi°ÊÊ*9ʈÃÊ>VVÕÀ>ÌiÊ>ÃʜvÊ"V̜LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓään°ÊÊIIIÊ,i>̈œ˜Ã…ˆ«Ê >˜Žˆ˜}Ê>VVœÕ˜ÌʈÃÊÀiµÕˆÀi`Ê̜Êi>À˜Ê̅iÊ>`ÛiÀ̈Ãi`Ê*9°ÊÊ


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 10/17 & SATURDAY 10/18 Beverly Hills Chihuahua . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:00 Max Payne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 Closed Sunday

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 10/17 THRU THURSDAY 10/23 Max Payne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:35, 7:05, 9:30 City of Ember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:25, 6:30 Nights in Rodanthe . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:10 Sex Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45 Secret Lif of Bees . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:05, 7:00, 9:20 Blindness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9:30 Beverly Hills Chihuahua . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 3:50, 6:30, 8:50 Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:45, 7:10, 9:05 Religulous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8:45 Eagle Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 9:15 Appaloosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:15, 7:10, 9:35 The Duchess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:20, 6:45, 9:00 The Express . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:45, 6:35, 9:10 Body of Lies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:00, 6:40, 9:20 Quarantine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:40 Art House Theater W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:45, 6:35, 9:15 all shows subject to change and availability

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CURRENT SCHEDULE WAS UNAVAILABLE AS OF PRESS TIME SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 10/10 THRU THURSDAY, 10/16 Body of Lies* . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:30, 3:45) 7:00, 10:00 Quarantine . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:45, 2:00, 3:00, 4:30, 5:30) 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 10:25 The Express . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:00, 4:00) 7:15, 10:15 City of Ember . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:45, 4:30) 7:30, 9:50 The Duchess . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:30, 4:15) 7:20, 10:00 Beverly Hills Chichuahua . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:20, 2:45, 5:15) 7:45, 10:05 Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:30, 3:00, 5:30) 8:00, 10:20 Appaloosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:15, 4:00) 7:05, 9:45 American Carol . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3:30) 9:20 Flash of Genius . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:45) 6:30 How To Lose Friends and Alienate People . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(2:00) Blindness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3:30) 9:40 Eagle Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1:30, 4:15) 7:15, 10:05 Fireproof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:15, 4:05) 6:45, 9:35 Nights In Rodanthe . . . . . . .PG13 . .Fri (4:450 7:45, 10:10, Sat (1:45) 7:45, 10:10 Sun (4:45) 7:45 Lakeview Terrace . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:00, 3:45) 6:45, 9:25 My Best Friend’s Girl . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (4:45) 7:30, 9:55 Wed-Thu (4:45) Tyler Perry’s: The Family That Preys . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:50) 6:30 Death Note II: The Last Name (NR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wed-Thu 7:30 Advance Tickets on Sale : H.S Musical 3: Senior Year* (G) Saw V* (R) * Pass Restrictions Apply Discounted Show Times in Parenthesis ()

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

County looks to secure land for dredging spoils By Ronald MacArthur Most agree that dredging the Nanticoke River is critical to maintaining the route as a viable transport route. The debate over the past decade has been where to put the spoils. The process moved forward Tuesday, Oct. 7, when Sussex County Council voted to allow the county administrator and staff to enter negotiations for the possible purchase of 50 acres of land for placement of spoils. Under the federal navigation program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for dredging and the municipality, Sussex County, is responsible for securing the spoils site. In addition, on the request of Councilman Vance Phillips of Laurel, the county will ask the state, which owns about 3,000 acres of protected land along the river, for a possible donation of 50 acres of land. “I think we are making a mistake by even negotiating,” Phillips said. “It’s foolish to spend taxpayers’ money when the state has 3,000 acres on the Nanticoke. We get no revenue stream from the river – the state gets all the revenue. The least they can do is set aside a small portion of land.” Even if the donation of land does not work, the purchase is not a bad idea, said Councilman George Cole of Bethany Beach. “This land could be added to the 3,000 acres. It’s not like it’s not money

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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008 well spent,” he said. Even if the county secures a site, don’t look for the project to begin anytime soon. There are no federal funds budgeted for Nanticoke River dredging in the 2009 federal budget. “This will be the most critical issue,” said Monte Franklin, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers Navigation Branch. “Getting funding is more challenging all the time.” He said once he gets word from the county that a parcel has been secured, the Corps will take

the next steps: securing funding; engineering; and bidding out the project. Franklin would not provide an estimated cost of the project, but said it would be in the millions of dollars. According to an Army Corps of Engineers 2002 survey of the river, shoaling has occurred to a depth of 9.5 feet. The project will provide for a channel 12 feet deep and 100 feet wide the entire length of the river with a slight widening of the channel between the bridges in

the harbor in Seaford to a depth of nine feet. Paula Gunson, executive director of the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce, said local officials have been waiting and watching for the start of the dredging project for years. “The Nanticoke River is vitally important to the Seaford area,” she said. “There is a tremendous economic impact from industry, recreation and leisure activities on the Nanticoke.” The Nanticoke is busy. Ac-

PAGE 9

cording to a 2006 report released by the Army Corps of Engineers, 1.3 million tons were shipped on the river, an increase of more than 200,000 tons from the year before. There were 1,372 trips made by commercial barges and tugs on the Nanticoke in 2006, for an average of about four a day. Commodities shipped include fuel oil, sand and gravel, wheat, corn, barley, rye, soybeans and vegetable products. The biggest increases have been in sand and gravel since the

opening of a sand plant on the south side of the river near Blades. Of the annual total, sand and gravel comprise 1 million tons of commodities being transported. Franklin said there is no doubt, even with multiple requests for dredging projects in the Chesapeake Bay region, that the Nanticoke River project has a high priority. “The Eastern Shore is dependant on water-borne commerce to transport bulk commodities,” he said.

Darbys keep a watchful eye on Nanticoke River By Ronald MacArthur Tom and Kristina Darby are keeping a cautious eye on plans to dredge the Nanticoke River. Dredging could open up the river to more and larger barge traffic, but Tom is more concerned about the damage being done today. The couple moved to their home on a small bluff overlooking the Nanticoke seven years ago and not long after set out on a crusade to alert the public and officials about the problems caused by increased boat traffic on the river – erosion of the riverbank and damage to wetlands. He said boats going at excessive speeds and those too close to the shoreline cause most of the damage. They have a website, nanticokeriver.net, filled with photographs and information to prove it. Tom said he is not opposed to dredging as long as it’s done in the right locations along the river. “This area depends on the river,” he said. “There is no way the roads could handle the traffic.” He said the average barge some are up to 400 feet long can hold the equivalent of 150 tractor-trailer loads. As long as barges and tugs stay in the channel, there are no problems, he said. But, occasionally, and not always in the daylight when people are watching, barges get out of the channel and that’s when problems occur. He has a detailed list of barge

accidents and groundings compiled on his web site. A barge destroyed his dock. “Barge captains need to take responsibility when they cause problems,” he said. In his opinion, some barges are simply too big for the river. “There are places where the river is 100 feet wide and some of the barges are 70 to 80 feet wide. It’s amazing to me how some of the tug captains make turns with no space,” he said. He said the vast majority of barges and tugs follow the rules and stay in the channel and cause no problems. In fact, the wake produced by the large tugs and barges is marginal. There is more wake produced by large, speeding pleasure boats, he said. In conjunction with the dredging, regulations, especially those dealing with wake zones, need to be updated, Darby said. Tom Darby has appeared before the Delaware General Assembly, spoken at several hearings, written numerous letters, sent photographs and emails to officials, spoken with just about every elected official who represents the area and met with Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Coast Guard and Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control officials. The Darbys have won a few small battles - the state and Coast Guard have stepped up enforcement along the river – but they maintain a constant vigil for larger victories in their quest to protect the river.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Clock ticks for three retiring You’ve Got Questions Sussex County Councilmen By Ronald MacArthur The clock is ticking for three retiring members of Sussex County Council. After more than 40 years of combined service, councilmen Dale Dukes, Finley Jones and Lynn Rogers have six meetings remaining before they step aside. They will serve until Dec. 31, but the election and holidays cut into the county council schedule. There are two more meetings in October, only one scheduled meeting in November and three meetings scheduled in December. Because county government sometimes moves at a snail’s pace, time is running out for the councilmen. Council President Jones, of Greenwood, said with plans to clear the docket of any pending land-use matters, time has been set aside the last week in December just in case special meetings are needed. He said Lawrence Lank, director of planning and zoning, has a hit list of about 10 projects that require action. Jones said planning and zoning commissioners must set a drop-dead date when no more public hearings can be scheduled that will require additional hearings before the current council. “And that needs to be done real soon,� he said. One key matter in Dukes’ district is the proposed David G. Horsey & Sons borrow pit in the Hardscrabble area. “The residents are very upset that we are not waiting until January for the legislative report on borrow pits, but we are going to act on this before we leave,� Dukes said. Many residents in the Hardscrabble area are opposed to another borrow pit in their neighborhood. They asked the council to delay the Horsey’s request for a conditional use for the land to construct the pit until after the findings of a legislative committee were made public. Rogers, of Milton, said the top items on his to-do list are two L.T. Associates’ requests on Gills Neck Road. He promised to get the requests for a zoning change and a conditional use back on an agenda before the end of October. The zoning change from AR-1 to CR-1 could pave the way for Townsend Village Centre, a 68-acre, 521,000-square-foot commercial project at the corner of Gills

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Neck Road and King’s Highway. Planning and zoning commissioners recommended denial of the request. The conditional use would allow for the use of 186 acres of AR-1 land for the Governor's housing project. Planning and zoning recommended that the council approve a scaled-back version of the project – from 472 units to 258 units. Dukes, of Laurel, said he would also like to see the trio take part in as many discussions as possible dealing with pending ordinances that are part of the updated comprehensive land-use plan. There are more than 20 potential new ordinances contained in the plan. Jones said action on an open-space ordinance is a priority. He anticipates that ordinance will resurface in early November. Council recently passed a new forested-buffer ordinance. Others on the table include Super Design regulations and a Super Green initiative to reward developers who follow strict environmental standards. But the vast majority of new ordinances will not make it to the table before the end of the year. “Some, like transfer of development rights, are just too complex and will require a lot of debate,� Jones said. Rogers echoed what all three are saying – they want full agendas. “We were elected to do four-year terms, and we are not going to sit back on our laurels,� he said. For the next three months, it’s business as usual, but there is not enough time for all matters to get addressed. Dukes said he would like to see the county streamline its bidding process to make it easier for local contractors to bid on county projects. “There are many good, local contractors looking for work who won’t bid on county projects because it’s too hard – too much expense and paperwork,� he said. Jones said there is unfinished work in the county’s airport and industrial park. He said he would like to see more jobs created and the airport facility expanded. “But there is only so much money,� he said. All three said they would miss their jobs as county councilmen. “But no one has an idea how much time the job requires,� Jones said.

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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 11

VINE system allows the public to check on status of inmates Gov. Ruth Ann Minner and Safety and Homeland Security Secretary David B. Mitchell recently unveiled a new Internetbased system that allows crime victims to receive real-time information about the custody status of inmates. Delaware’s Victim Information Notification Everyday (VINE) system makes information about prison transfer, release or escape accessible 24 hours a day. Crime

victims and other concerned citizens can access the free, anonymous service by calling 1-877-DE8-VINE or visiting www.vinelink.com. “The implementation of the VINE system further enhances Delaware’s victim rights services. This will restore peace of mind and help citizens reestablish control in their lives,” Minner stated. Another important feature of the VINE

system is that it provides informational alerts to registered users. The system will call or email a victim when an inmate’s custody status changes due to transfer, release or escape. Victims can register multiple phone numbers and email addresses for the alerts. VINE was developed in 1993 by Appriss, a private organization, following the death of Mary Byron, a 21-year-old

woman who was shot and killed by a former boyfriend. Bryon expected to receive notification when her offender was released from prison. Unaware of the offender’s release, Mary was unable to get to a safe place. Following her death, her parents worked to make the VINE system operational in hopes of saving other women from a similar attack.

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

CARE PACKAGES - Wilgus Associates' community outreach committee is sponsoring a holiday care package drive for troops overseas. Wilgus Associates will pay for packaging and shipping. Requested items include: personal hygiene (soap, body wash, deodorant and lip balm), entertainment (playing cards, batteries, crossword puzzles and magazines), sports equipment (baseballs, Frisbees and squirt guns), food (hard candy, individual powder drink packets and gum) and miscellaneous items (pens, calling cards, white socks and Ziploc bags). Donations may be made in the Georgetown office at 210 W. Market St. between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The deadline for donations is Sunday, Nov. 30. For more information, call 302-855-0500.

DANNY SHORT F OR S TATE R EPRESENTATIVE • “As your State Representative, I’ve worked hard to improve the economic, educational and environmental health of Western Sussex. We need to keep strong leadership in Dover to maximize our opportunities and improve our way of live.” •

“Education and improving our schools is important. We trust our teachers with our children. This year, the DELAWARE STATE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION has put their trust in Danny Short.”* You can too! • “I’ll fight for you in Dover. I AM ASKING FOR YOUR VOTE ON NOVEMBER 4TH. Vote for me, DANNY SHORT for State Representative!”

★ ENERGY ★ ENTHUSIASM ★ EXCELLENCE

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*The DELAWARE STATE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION has recommended that their membership vote for DANNY SHORT in the upcoming election!

Nanticoke River Marine Park named Delaware Clean Marina The Nanticoke River Marine Park in Blades has been certified as a Delaware Clean Marina – a new partner in the efforts to protect and preserve the Nanticoke River. DNREC Deputy Secretary David S. Small presented the Clean Marina flag and certificate signed by Governor Ruth Ann Minner to Carlyle Windley, Nanticoke River Marine Park manager and president of the Blades Economic Development Corporation. "The Nanticoke is an exceptional river, supporting some of the most biologically diverse habitats in the region,” said Small. “By implementing pollution prevention practices, the Nanticoke River Marine Park protects the natural heritage of this beautiful river and helps ensure its healthy and sustainable future.” Nanticoke River Marine Park is the eleventh marina in the state – the first marina on the Nanticoke River in Delaware – to be certified as a Clean Marina. To meet the requirements, the marina voluntarily

implemented environmentally-sound operating and maintenance procedures that include fueling, pumpout and maintenance services. With the assistance of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary and Power Squadron, the marina will provide boater education programs and free safety inspections to vessel owners. Certified clean marinas can display the Clean Marina certificate and flag and use the logo on advertising and promotional materials. In addition to publicity, marinas receive technical assistance and possible grant opportunities through the program. The Delaware Clean Marina program is a cooperative effort between the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the University of Delaware’s Sea Grant Marine Service Advisory. For more information, visit www.dnrec. delaware.gov/ or contact Crystal Nagyiski, pollution prevention manager, at 302-7399909 or crystal.nagyiski@state.de.us.

J.D. Butler Custom Homes Stop by and see why we’re “Sussex County’s #1 Builder!!”

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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 13

Renee’ Morris named ATHENA winner by Seaford Chamber Renee’ Morris contributes “to Seaford and the neighboring communities by consistently providing leadership, excellence and innovative support to improve the quality of life for others,” according to the information submitted in her nomination for the ATHENA award. Renee’ has worked for Nanticoke Memorial Hospital for 17 years. She started out in a temporary position and within six months was offered a permanent job in the patient services area. She worked in the nursing education department as an administrative assistant and, for the past 15 years, she has been in her current position, director of marketing and development. Renee’ attributes her unselfish, caring attitude to her 94-year-old grandmother, Christina Paquette. Renee’ gets satisfaction from helping in her community and from making a difference to the people who use Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. She sees the child in the emergency department who has no health insurance being treated by top-notch physicians. She is proud of the funds raised to help those with limited resources who cannot afford prescription medications. Renee’ never seeks the spotlight, but her imprint is on hospital events from the annual golf tournament and the dinner and auction, to the community Women’s Health Day in 2006. Her resourcefulness and leadership have been demonstrated through these and other efforts which have made a tremendous impact on quality healthcare in the community. Renee’ Morris is a cancer survivor. Sixteen years ago she had her cancerous thyroid removed. Just a year and a half ago, she had another scare. She is involved in the Celebrating Hope Program that funds breast cancer research. In the next year fundraising efforts for Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will focus on women’s health, including obtaining digital mammography, which Renee’ is proud to be a part of. In addition, through Longaberger, she has been involved in programs that provided new cancer patients with a special Longaberger basket. She has chaired an annual breast cancer awareness dinner for several years which brought women together to raise the awareness of breast cancer and the importance of early detec-

tion education, and treatment options. This past year the program traveled through a bus trip to Pennsylvania. Renee’s mother gave her a keepsake Longaberger Americana basket each year for her July 4th birthday. So after much urging from her sister Michele 10 years ago, Renee’ became a consultant for the company. In less than 18 months, she realized that she wanted to move to a leadership group level. In just four years, she became a branch leader and now has 24 consultants on her team. For the past several years, Renee’ has earned National VIP awards for sponsoring and sales. She finds satisfaction in seeing the women achieve their goals, overcome obstacles and realize their full potential. In addition, and through Longaberger, Renee' works with many local organizations to help them reach their fundraising goals. Over the past few years, organizations such as the Nanticoke Senior Center, Seaford and Blades Volunteer Fire Departments, Seaford Lions Club, Fraternal Order of Police, AMVETs and the softball leagues have achieved fundraising success with Renee’s assistance. Renee’ graduated from Milford High School and has taken courses at Delaware Tech and Wilmington University. She has been married to Gary for 15 years and has two stepdaughters. Renee’ and Gary are competitive in hunting, fishing and golf. From the time Renee’ was 10-years-old, she rode and showed Arabian horses and from her high school years until age 30, she trained Arabian show horses professionally and competed on the national level. She enjoyed interaction with older people and had the opportunity to sell horses internationally. Renee’ Morris epitomizes what ATHENA stands for: creativity, initiative and excellence in her profession, assisting women to reach their full potential and providing valuable service to the quality of life in her community. The ATHENA award will be presented at the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce Fall Dinner and Awards Ceremony on Thursday, Oct. 16, at the Seaford Fire Hall. For more information, call the Chamber office at 302-629-9690 or 800-416GSCC. 800 S. Market St., Blades, Del.

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PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Education Del Tech holds online auction of license plates Delaware Technical & Community College’s Alumni Association is holding an online auction from Oct. 13 to Nov. 16, for Delaware Tech specialty license plates which are approved for use by the Division of Motor Vehicles. The auction will raise money for the Association and the College’s Educational Foundation which funds scholarships and programs that benefit students. According to President Orlando J. George Jr., “Participants are not just pur-

chasing a license plate; they are making an investment in the success of our students. We have many students who are struggling and working hard to make ends meet.” Participants can bid on license plates numbered 1-9999 at a starting bid of $50 except for single-digit plates which begin at $100. Winners can claim their purchase as a tax deductible donation. To bid on a license plate, visit www.dtcc.edu/ia.

Del Tech's Alumni Association is auctioning specialty license plates to raise money for the association and the Educational Foundation.

Del Tech students celebrate the birth of Constitution Students learned about the events that led up to the signing of the Constitution during a presentation at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. To celebrate the 221st anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution, Dr. Ellen Marshall, instructor in the criminal

justice faculty program, spoke. Marshall said, “While performing my research, I was surprised to see how connected we are now as a people to our past.” Marshall is a prime example of those connections to early settlers. Mary Dyer was her tenth generation grandmother and

three of her ancestors traveled to America in the Mayflower. Marshall ended her presentation by quoting Sen. Robert Byrd: “I encourage everyone to read the Constitution and to read the Federalist Papers as well as other writings by our Founding Fathers. “Read deeply in history and biography, and read the newspapers and follow what is happening in Washington.

“Do not believe everything you see and hear, but view it through the prism of the Constitution. “Be your own Supreme Court, and decide if the arguments put forth by the White House, the Congress, the press and the pundits are in accordance with the Constitution and the intent of the Framers. Then you will become that most valuable of all things, a true defender of liberty – an informed citizen.”

Sussex Academy: Rated ‘Superior’ Six Years in a Row The Sussex Academy of Arts & Sciences invites parents, guardians, and other interested persons to learn more about our unique public school opportunity for middle school students in grades 6-8. As the only charter school in Sussex County, we provide a challenging accelerated academic curriculum based on the design principles of Expeditionary Learning. Dr. Ellen Marshall, Delaware Tech Criminal Justice faculty member, stands with her mother, Katherine Marshall and Dean of Student Services H. Terry Johnson.

In order to introduce interested parents and fifth grade students to our school, we are holding the following events: •

Getting Married Soon? Know Someone Who Is? Stop By The STAR Office 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford (Next to Medicine Shoppe)

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PUBLIC INFORMATION meetings at the school on November 18 and November 19, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.

Convenient Location: Bethel Road, Seaford, DE

875- 2055 Open 7 Days A Week 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Brighten Your Season with Beautiful Fall Plants MUMS $250 PANSIES $

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SCHOOL TOURS on November 17, 19, & 20, 2008 at 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, or 10:30 a.m. No appointment necessary.

The APPLICATION PERIOD for incoming sixth grade students for school year 2009-2010 begins November 24, 2008 and ends January 9, 2009. Applications are available online at http://www.sussexacademy.org For more information, please visit our website or email us at: info@saas.k12.de.us Sussex Academy of Arts & Sciences 21777 Sussex Pines Road Georgetown, DE 19947 302.856.3636


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 15

Tech has new assistant principal Sussex Technical High School welcomes Jason Peel as its new assistant principal. Peel will be in charge of students whose last names start with the letters H through O and will have several other duties at the high school. Peel received his bachelor’s degree in spanish education from Elon University. He

earned a master’s degree in Spanish language and literature from Middlebury College, Vt., by way of Madrid, Spain. He also holds another master’s degree in school administration from the University of North Carolina. Peel began his career as a high school Spanish teacher. He has taught elementary

school, middle school, high school and at the University of North Carolina. He also has previous experience as a high school principal. A native of North Carolina, Peel and his wife, Lisa, came to Delaware in 2006 to be near her parents in Milford. They have two children.

Peel

Del Tech offers online courses

Would you like to take classes without having to worry about the daily commute or the price of gas? Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus has partnered with Gatlin Education Services and Education to Go (Ed2Go) to offer you online training courses. Options include the following: • Administrative Professional with Microsoft Certified Application Specialists provides administrative professional training and instruction on the new Microsoft Office 2007 suite of programs and Vista operating system. • Management for IT Professionals is for anyone employed in information technology who has recently assumed management responsibilities, those who manage IT professionals or want a perspective on some of the unique issues facing management in that field. • Sigma Black Belt integrates online learning with hands-on data analysis. • Interior Design teaches students how to create spaces for living, working and enjoyment. • Certified Wedding Planner provides all the tools to work as a professional wedding planner or start a wedding planning business. • Project Management teaches the basics of project management and includes preparation for the Project Management Professional national certification exam. • Purchasing Management is for anyone working or interested in the field of purchasing, supply chain management or procurement. • Records Management teaches students how to manage electronic records and conquer the pile-up. • Technical Writing is designed for anyone who wants to develop their technical writing abilities to a professional level. Courses offered include Intro to Crystal Reports 10, Microsoft Access 2007, Microsoft Excel 2007, Microsoft Publisher 2003, Microsoft Visio 2003, Microsoft Word 2007, PC Security, PC Troubleshooting, and QuickBooks 2007 as well as performing payroll in QuickBooks 2007 and wireless networking. For more information and a complete course list of Gatlin courses offered through Delaware Tech, visit www.dtcc.theelearningcenter.com. For more information about Ed2Go courses, www.ed2go.com/dtccowens.

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At PNC, we understand your situation. That’s why we work with you to show you the best options to fit your life. Right now, qualifying homeowners get a low fixed rate on select Home Equity Installment Loans, which lasts the life of your loan. To qualify, a portion of your loan must be used for Home Improvement, your requested amount must range from $1,000 to $15,000 and you must meet the income guidelines listed above. Offer only good September 1–October 31, so act now.

Student named finalist

The Society for Science and the Public recently named Annie Imbrie-Moore a finalist in the 2008 SSP (Society for Science and the Public) Middle School Program — America's premiere science competition for middle school students. Annie is the granddaughter of Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Moore and niece of Bob and Jane Larkin, all of Seaford. Annie, a ninth grader, is one of 30 finalists selected from over 75,000 students who entered local science fairs nationwide during the 2007-2008 school year.

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Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) shown are for loans up to 85% Loan to value (LTV) and were accurate as of 7/29/08. Property insurance is required. Offer may be modified or discontinued without prior notice and may vary by market. Loans are subject to credit approval. Minimum loan amount for 5.99% APR is $1,000 up to an 84-month term and $10,001 up to a 180-month term with an automatic payment from a PNC Checking account. APRs may range from 5.99% APR to 7.74% APR with an automatic payment from a PNC Checking account; your actual APR will be based on a review of your credit application. Other APRs available for loans with different repayment terms and conditions. The monthly payment on $ 1,000 borrowed at a rate range of 5.99% APR–7.74% APR for 84 months may range from $14.60–$15.46 and $8.43–$9.41 for 180 months based on 30 days to first payment. Prepayment. A prepayment fee of $350 applies to all loans in excess of $50,000 that close within 36 months of account opening. You will be required to pay the prepayment fee if you sell your home or refinance your loan during the first three years. Offer good from 9/1/08 through 10/31/08. Portion of loan proceeds must be used for home improvement. Income guidelines subject to change. ©2008 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved. PNC Bank Member FDIC.


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Local Hunger Walk benefits area food closets The Western Sussex CROP Hunger Walk, which is planned for Sunday, Nov. 2, raises funds to help stop hunger and poverty right here in our community and around the world through self-help initiatives. Twenty-five percent of the funds raised will go to the food closets of participating communities, including the Seaford Community Food Closet at St. John’s United Methodist Church. This year Western Sussex County and some 2,000 cities and towns nationwide are joining together in interfaith community CROP Hunger Walks around the theme, "We walk because they walk." According to U.S. and international reports, more than 862 million people in the world go hungry. In the United States, one in 10 households - including 11.7 million children sometimes do not have enough food for regular meals. The need has also increased significantly locally. Cheryl Coffin, who helps coordinate the operation of the Seaford Community Food Closet, reports that more individuals have been served this year through September than were served in all of 2007. Individuals are screened and referred through social service agencies such as the Shipley State Service Center. According to Coffin, volunteers are seeing cases that have not been as frequent as before when

primarily the chronically poor were referred. Now families facing recent unemployment and larger families are seeking assistance. Before volunteers would shop for items once a month, now there is a need to shop once a week. In order to highlight this need for donations and support, walkers for the Western Sussex County CROP Walk are asked to bring a canned good or food item to carry. This year the walk will begin at West Seaford Elementary and proceed through Seaford to the Pine Street entrance of St. John’s Church where walkers will be invited to present the food and pray for the elimination of world hunger. The community is also invited to meet walkers on the walk and donate food items along the way. In addition to people who can take pledges and walk, help is needed to take pledge money at the donation table and be available for clean up. Walkers can bring pets to accompany them on the walk as long as they are carried or leashed. Children and youth are required to have adult supervision and signed parental permission on the pledge form in order to participate. In the event of rain, plans are being made to have the walk in a large, sheltered area. To support the Western Sussex CROP Walk, call John Blevins at 302-841-7450.

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The Western Sussex CROP Walk will benefit the Seaford Community Food Closet at St. John's Church. The closet now needs to be refilled on a weekly basis.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19 -- 2-4 PM

MLS# 559644 $349,900. 6 Amanda’s Teal Drive, Bridgeville. Spectacular house! Enjoy views of the pond, golfers & the club house from your 3 season porch, 1st floor has master BR w/full bath & walk-in shower, guest BR/den & full bath. 2nd floor has a 3rd full bath, private guest BR, suite w/sitting room plus bonus/BR, 3 zone gas hot water heat. A must see! Directions: Heritage Shores entrance is on the southbound lane, just south of Rt 404, turn into community, pass clubhouse & sales office, left on Willis Island, next left go to end. Turn onto Amanda’s Teal Dr, look for sign. HOSTESS: Jenn Weir, 302-381-8417.

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 563836 $149,000. 21324 Dupont Hwy., Greenwood. This home features 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, completely redone and ready to move in today. $3,000 provided to buyer for settlement costs. Directions: Go north on Route 13, house is on the south bound side of Rt 13, about 1/4 mile before Farmington fire house, address is Greenwood. HOST: Ryan Horne, 302 -381-8438 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 562217 $209,900. 11022 Concord Road, Seaford. Beautiful new home. Ready to move in! This home features hardwood and ceramic tile floors, breakfast bar, mud room, 2 car garage with storage area, solid wood cabinets, rear deck and much more. This is one to see! Directions - From Rt 13, turn left onto Rt 20 (Concord Rd), home is about 2 miles on the right, past curve. HOST: Rick Bennett, 302-228-1760 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 563623 $209,000. 11579 County Seat Highway, Laurel. Completely remodeled charming home, neat as a pin! Home features 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, 14x9 side deck, detached garage is 24x24, shed is 20x15. Sunroom is 15x11. Extra room could be 4th bedroom/ office. Beautifully landscaped. Pride of ownership shows! Won’t last long. Directions - From RT 13, travel east on County Seat Highway, property is on the left. HOSTESS: Donna Neithardt, 302-858-7298 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 563439 $155,000. 5 Tiffany Village D r i v e , Seaford. Looks can be deceiving! Don’t overlook this unique townhome loaded with ample space and storage. Must see to appreciate this 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath with upper and lower 3-season rooms, updated fireplace and windows, separate Dining Room, stainless steel appliances and best of all NO HOA fees. Walk to shop, play or dine. Directions: Seaford, Rt 20 W (Stein Highway), right on Porter Street @ Pizza King, right on Tulip, property just ahead on your left. HOSTESS: Trina Joyner, 302-745-3840.

MLS# 563879 $399,900. 10368 Fox Glen Drive, Bridgeville. Great house, ready to move in! Home offers 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, 2 car detached garage and a 2 car attached garage. Great to keep all cars out of the weather! Private lot with sunroom on back with view of the wild life. Directions - go north on 13, turn right on Camp Road, go to Eskridge Road, turn right follow to Fox Glen, turn right, house is at the end. HOSTESS: Carol Crouse, 302-236-4648.

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 563595 $449,900. 107 Rivers End Drive, Seaford. New construction in gorgeous waterfront community - Rivers End. Home features 9’ ceilings on 1st floor, hardwood floors, ceramic tile, granite countertops, whirlpool tub in masterbath, upgraded appliances and paved drive situated on 3/4 of an acre. Directions - From Seaford, 13 south, turn left onto Middleford Rd, turn right onto Old Furnace Road, turn right onto Old Meadow Road, left into Rivers End, left at first Y and home is on the left. HOSTESS: Holly Cooper, 302-236-3352

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 562174 $272,500. 7831 Grace Circle, Seaford. Terrific cape cod style home offering a sunken living room, open kitchen with corian countertops. Vaulted ceiling and “loft” master bedroom. Large detached garage (24x32), vinyl fencing, great landscaping with motion sensor lights all situated on a corner lot in a great development. Directions - From Market Street in Blades, turn west onto River Road, turn left into “Hill-n-Dale”, take first left onto Grace Circle, follow around to rear of development. House is last on the right before “New” phase. HOSTESS : Judy Rhodes, 302-841-3725

MLS# 549789 $138,000. 6 West Third, Blades. Completely remodeled - new electric, plumbing, roof, siding, windows, appliances, flooring and more. Quiet town lot with nice backyard. Walking distance to the Nanticoke River Marina. Directions - From RT 13, turn west on Concord Road, at stop sign turn left (Market Street), turn right onto W. 3rd, home is on the left. HOST: Bobby Nibblett, 302-236-2164.

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

NEW LISTING

600 CYPRESS DRIVE, SEAFORD - Finish this new ranch style home to your specifications. Newly constructed home being sold as is and to be finished by the Purchaser. Great opportunity for sweat equity savings. Picture is of recently sold model home. Register HERE for $100 gas card drawing. $139,900 (MLS# 561893) Directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, go West on Rt. 20. Turn Right on Porter St. just after RR Bridge. Go Right on Tulip La., and Left on Cypress Dr. Your Host: The Builder COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

9384 RIVER VISTA DRIVE, SEAFORD - Add your touch and move right in! Well maintained, landscaped home just east of Seaford. Nice river view and the conveniences of being near a town. Above ground pool with a family room overlooking the back yard! $2500.00 sellers help to buyers! $172,400 (MLS#561892) Directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, go East on Rt. 20 (Concord Rd.) to first Left, River Vista. House on Corner. Your Host: The Owner COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

21108 ATLANTA RD., Seaford - SELLER SAYS BRING OFFERS! JUST REDUCED $15,000!! Brand New 2 Story, 3BR, 2.5 BA Colonial in Quiet Country Area! Home has an inviting second story balcony, 17’ vaulted ceiling in foyer, DR, KIT combo, huge master bath, walk in closets. A Paved driveway and a 14 x 22 detached 1 car garage with electric. Bring your furniture and move right in! $2,500 Sellers Assistance! $224,900 (MLS#557265) Directions: From Rt. 13, go West on Rt. 20 (Stein Hwy) to Right on Atlanta Rd. Go approx. 3 miles and the home is on the right. Your Host: John Allen

COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

HALL ST., SEAFORD - Lovely 3 BR rancher with attached garage on a corner lot in Seaford. This home has hardwood floors, a fireplace in the living room, a large kitchen full of cabinets, and a family room. $179,900. (MLS#563290) Directions: From Rt. 13, go West on Rt. 20 (Stein Hwy) to Left on Hall St. Home is on corner of Hall & Poplar St. Your Hostess: Mary Harding COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

REDUCED

305 CHRISTOPHER DR., CRESTFIELD, Seaford - Lovely 3 BR, 2.5 BA home. Nice floor plan with spacious rms. New kit. in 2004, hardwood flrs. & more on a nicely landscaped lot. $288,500. Directions: From Shufelt Rd. west of Seaford, turn left into Crestfield. Turn right, then first left. Home on right.

106 WILLOW BROOKE CT., Seaford Quality workmanship abounds in this 3 BR, 2 BA home. Many custom features including custom tile in master bath. Kit. includes range, microwave, & dishwasher. Ready for occupancy soon. $224,900. Directions: Enter Clearbrooke at 2nd entrance from Rt. 18. Take next right & home is on right on Willow Brooke.

736 MAGNOLIA DR., Seaford - Located in Woodside Manor, this 3-4 BR, 2 BA home is freshly painted and has new carpet, new roof, a full bsmt. & a 2-car det. garage. $225,000. Directions: From Stein Hwy., enter Woodside Manor on Ivy Dr., bear right and turn left on Magnolia Dr. Home is on left.

14473 SHILOH CHURCH RD, LAUREL Contemporary home w/view of private pond & wildlife on apx. 36 acres. LR w/ fireplace, 3 BRs, 2.5 BAs, double garage, basement, & more! Reduced! $689,900 (MLS #562182) HOSTESS: Mona Wright DIRECTIONS: From Rt 24E turn onto Shiloh Church Rd 74, pass Johnson Rd, home sits on left, back from road.

GLENN SIZEMORE REALTORS • 629-3066

GLENN SIZEMORE REALTORS • 629-3066

GLENN SIZEMORE REALTORS • 629-3066

CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514


A Message From INVISTA To Our Employees, Retirees, Friends, and The Community On Tuesday, we announced plans to pursue a significant restructuring of INVISTA’s Seaford nylon plant in an effort to strengthen our business and address long-term issues of non-competitiveness at our site. In the wake of that news, I would like to offer some thoughts and express appreciation to our employees, the retirees who have served the Seaford site over the years, and this great community. For more than four years, INVISTA Seaford’s dedicated workforce has undertaken various initiatives aimed at enhancing the viability of our manufacturing facility and helping the site compete favorably in our challenging and globally competitive industry. Despite these efforts, we have not been able to achieve a level of competitiveness that is sustainable. The underlying issues that challenge the Seaford operation include: • Shifts in customer demand for certain products manufactured here • Dramatic changes in the economy that have resulted in industry-wide economic challenges • Significant increases in raw material and energy costs • Oversized infrastructure relative to the site’s needs These are tough issues that require significant actions. INVISTA’s Seaford site has no choice but to reinvent itself. When the restructuring is complete in 2009, the “new” INVISTA Seaford operation will have a very focused mission of producing nylon staple fiber for technical markets including military apparel, the paper manufacturing industry, and other specialty products. Much of the other work currently done at Seaford will be transferred to other INVISTA locations in the U.S. and Canada. While the scope of operations at Seaford will be narrowed, the restructuring is designed to improve the site’s future competitiveness and place INVISTA Seaford in a position to deliver innovation, value and quality to its customers for the long term. INVISTA remains fully committed to profitable long-term growth, but in order to accomplish this, we must make a step-change in response to the challenges that prevent the Seaford site from being successful. While restructuring won’t begin until the first quarter of next year, INVISTA will soon begin bargaining in good faith with the Seaford Nylon Employees’ Council over the effects of the changes. We expect the staged transition to be substantially complete by mid-year 2009, with total employment at our Seaford site expected to be about 100. We have issued the announcement far in advance of the changes to ensure that our employees, contractors, and the community have as much time as possible to plan for the future, as well as to allow us to make the capital investments required to make modifications to the site and ensure that the site will be in full regulatory compliance. Throughout the transition, every employee affected by the restructuring will be treated with dignity and respect. INVISTA will work closely with state agencies, the Department of Labor, and business councils to ensure that INVISTA employees affected by the restructuring in 2009 will have access to available resources for re-employment. INVISTA also pledges its cooperation and encouragement to economic development officials in attempting to attract new industries that could join us and take advantage of the industrial amenities our site could potentially offer. INVISTA’s Seaford site and its past and present employees have been a part of an operation with historical significance, have served the fiber and polymer industry with quality and innovation, and have played an important role in the global economy. The Seaford site should be proud of its contributions and accomplishments for the past seven decades. We will build on this historical legacy as we transition to a smaller operation in 2009. Our sincere thanks and appreciation go to our employees, retirees, contractors, customers, suppliers, government officials, and this community, all of whom have made us proud and helped put Seaford on the map. We look forward to working together as we reinvent the Seaford site and position it for the future. Respectfully,

Gary Knight Site Manager, INVISTA Seaford


STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 19

Hollis, Parker winners of Moore award The John A., Jr. and Helen M. Moore Community Service Award was established in 1987. John Moore was a businessman and developer in the area for many years. Each year, the Moore family has the privilege of honoring someone who has performed outstanding volunteer service to the Seaford area community over a period of many years. This year’s recipients are activists in the best sense of the word. Both Linda Hollis and Clem Parker provide leadership and weekly support to the local community food closet. That includes working with others to raise funds, shopping for food and organizing the process of providing food for needy local people. Linda and Clem also provide leadership by serving on the board for the “Walk to Emmaus,” a spiritual leadership program that has benefited hundreds of Seaford residents from area churches. Linda and Clem are also very active in service to their respective churches. They have both served on church councils as leaders. Linda led fundraising efforts to remodel an old local bar into the Nellie G. Allen Curiosity Shop on Middleford Road. As a member of Soroptimist International of Seaford and the Soroptimist Foundation, she took on the responsibility of procuring grants and donations to make the club’s dream of owning their own shop building a reality. Linda continues her active involvement in the club in various areas. Clem is a charter member of Better Homes of Seaford and continues to be an active member of the board. These two women are shining examples of how faith and determination make things happen in the community. They have devoted countless hours to their community and have never received recognition for those efforts. The award will be given at the Fall Dinner and Awards Ceremony for the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, Oct. 16. For more information, call the Chamber office at 302-629-9690 or 800-416GSCC.

Two honored by the National 4H

Two Delaware 4-Hers distinguished themselves at the National 4-H Engineering, Science and Leadership Event held Sept. 28-30 in West Lafayette, Ind. Adam Board of Bridgeville placed fourth in the Small Engines Contest and J.T. Robbins of Harrington finished fifth in the Tractor Contest. The Engineering, Science and Leadership Event, now in its 58th year, drew 53 contestants from 12 states. Areas of competition included aerospace, bicycle, computer, electric, lawn tractor, small engines, tractor and welding. All of the contestants had won county and state competitions to qualify for the national event. Board and Robbins, along with the other contestants, took a field trip to Purdue University, where they took part in a variety of educational workshops. They also toured a Subaru assembly plant and a Caterpillar engine plant.


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Senator Adams inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame Delaware State Senator Thurman Adams was inducted into the National 4H Hall of Fame in a ceremony on Oct. 10 at the National 4-H Center in Chevy Chase, Md. Adams is being recognized for his many contributions to 4-H, both as an adult and as an active 4-Her during his youth. The National 4-H Hall of Fame was created in 2002, during the 4-H Centennial, to acknowledge and celebrate the people who have made a significant impact on the 4-H youth development organization. Nominees are evaluated based on career accomplishments and on their activities in the areas of citizenship, leadership and character. Adams, who was elected to the Delaware State Senate in 1972, is the longest serving senator in state history. From 1999-2002, he was senate majority leader. Since 2003, he has served as president pro tempore of the Delaware State Senate. Growing up, Adams was a member of his local 4-H club, the Dublin Hill Yellow Jackets. As the president of T.G. Adams and Sons, a feed and grain business, he has provided feed for livestock projects. He also purchased thousands of dollars of youth livestock projects at the annual 4-H Jr. Livestock Auction. Jan Seitz, associate dean and director of University of Delaware Cooperative Extension, says that Sen. Adams has played an integral role in the success of Delaware 4-H. The National 4-H Hall of Fame can be viewed online at www.nae4ha.org/hof/.

Bridgeville Charity Open benefits three local organizations The Second Annual Bridgeville Charity Open benefitted the Bridgeville Lions Club, the Kiwanis Foundation, and the Bridgeville Senior Center. Checks for $6,000 were presented to representatives of each of the organizations. Shown (l to r) following the check presentation are Bridgeville Commission President Joe Conaway; Tournament Chair Ed Lewandowski; Lindsey Collison, Lions Club; Tom Carey, President of the Kiwanis Foundation; and Fran Smith, Executive Director of the Bridgeville Senior Center. Photo by Mike McClure

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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 21

Community Bulletin Board Pampered Chef bingo

Dinner-theater

The Seaford Elk Lodge will present a buffet dinner-theatre on Friday, Nov. 7, and Saturday, Nov. 8. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m. The play is titled, “A Distasteful Murder at the Bus Station.” This is the fourth play written and directed by Elk member and native of Laurel, Janice Cecil. This is a way of making money for charitable donations made by the lodge. Tickets are $15 for adults, and $5 for children seven to 10. The cut-off date is Nov. 3. This event is not suitable for children six and under. Call 875-3810 for tickets.

Lead safety

There’s more to worry about than just lead paint in old houses. Find out about prevention, sources of lead poisoning, how it affects growth & development, toy recalls, lead in pregnancy, home remodeling concerns and other toxins, on Friday, Oct. 24, 6:30 p.m., at Seaford District Library. For information call Chris Henderson at 875-2781, or Anna Scovell at 856-5239. The program will also be presented at Grace United Methodist Church at 330 Church St., Millsboro, on Friday, Oct. 17, at 6:30 p.m.

Laureate Epsilon Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi will be sponsoring a Longaberger Basket and Pampered Chef bingo on Thursday, Oct. 23, at the Seaford Moose Lodge. Doors open at 6 p.m. Games start at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. For tickets call Joanne at 302-877-0275. All baskets will be filled. Proceeds to benefit Delaware Hospice Festival of Trees.

Basket bingo

The Seaford Lions Club will hold a Longaberger basket bingo on Thursday, Oct. 30, starting at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Moose, located on Rt. 13A in Seaford. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Hostess Sort & Store Hamper and the Multi-colored Triangle basket set. For ticket information contact any Seaford Lions member or call at 302-236-2225.

St. Luke’s gala

On Friday evening, Oct. 24, 7-9 p.m., there will be a gala evening of wine, hor d’oeuvres and auction at St. Luke’s parish hall. Tickets are $15 and may be obtained by calling Nancy Harper at 629-7272 or the church at 629-7979. The evening will include a Chinese auction and silent auction. Many items will be available for auction including Longaberger baskets, Noritake stemware, Lenox vases, and much more.

SHS alumni social

The Seaford High School Alumni Association is sponsoring its annual Fall Social at the Seaford Golf & Country Club on Friday, Nov. 28, from 6-9 p.m. The executive board invites you to spend time with classmates and fellow alumni to revel in fond memories of times spent at SHS. Light snacks and a cash bar will be available. Call Donna Hastings Angell at 629-8077 with any questions.

NHS basket bingo

The Employee Activity Committee of Nanticoke Health Services will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, Nov. 6, starting at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Moose, located on Route 13A in Seaford. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Hostess Sort & Store Hamper and the Multi-Colored Triangle basket set as door prizes. Refreshments will be available. For tickets call 629-6611, ext. 2404 or MorrisR@nanticoke.org.

Eat, meet & greet

Eat, meet and greet with Christine O’Donnell will be held at Grotto’s Pizza, Rt. 13, Seaford, on Tuesday, Oct. 28 from 6-8 p.m. You pay for your own meal (tip is included in your cost), and get to meet the candidate for United States Senate representing the state of Delaware, Christine O’Donnell. Please, only homeschool families for this event, as she will address the

needs of homeschoolers. If you can, leave the children at home. To RSVP call Rebecca Jones co-leader of Hand in Hand Homeschoolers at 628-8172 no later than Friday, Oct. 24.

Read Aloud Delaware

Read Aloud Delaware volunteer training will be held Wednesday, Oct. 29, at 1 p.m. in the Seaford Public Library, 402 North Porter St., Seaford. Call 856-2527 to sign up for training or for further information. Volunteer readers are needed at various reading sites in Sussex County.

‘Hard Hat Bash’

The Seaford Library and Cultural Center is celebrating its groundbreaking event with a “Hard Hat Bash” on Saturday, Nov. 1, rain or shine, from 4 to 6 p.m. on-site at Pine St., Ext,. adjacent to the Ross Mansion in Seaford. BBQ and cash bar. Entertainment by the MEDICS. Cost is $25 per person. Age ten and under free, RSVP and money payment must be received by Oct. 24. No payment will be accepted for admission at the event. Send RSVP with name and number of adults, and children under ten, with a check made out to the Seaford District Library to Marlene Warford, 132 Meadow Drive, Seaford, DE 19973. For further info, call the library at 629-2524.

Basket bingo

Seaford Golf & Country Club will hold a Longaberger basket bingo on Thursday,


PAGE 22 Oct. 23, starting at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Golf & Country Club. Proceeds to benefit Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Women’s Health Services. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the hostess sort & store hamper and the multi-colored triangle basket set or one of the several door prizes. For details call 629-9064, ext. 0.

Family night

Join us for family night each Friday night from 6:30-8:30 p.m. We set aside Friday nights for all families in the community. There is no charge to families. Enjoy the swimming pool, gym, computer lab, etc. Each Friday evening we’ll have a theme and will have activities according to the themes. Beginning Friday, Oct. 17, Learn the basics of ballroom dancing. Oct. 24 – College Football Night Wear your team colors. Football trivia, etc. Oct. 31 – Halloween party. Wear your costume and enjoy a safe trick or treating; costume contests, games, etc. Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club is located on 310 Virginia Ave., Seaford. Call 628-3789 or 629-8740 for details.

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008 to $20 are especially popular. Items may be left in the gray box on the front porch of the Ross Mansion at any time. For questions call Diane Thomas at 629-2085 or Shirley Skinner at 629-9378.

more. Sponsored by the Laurel Lions Club. Contact Lion David Hare for pledge sheets and team registration forms at 8752837 or 245-2966.

Halloween parade

Laurel Chamber events

The Downtown Seaford Association presents a Halloween parade and party on Wednesday, Oct. 29. Line-up at 6:15 p.m. on Cedar Avenue at High Street. Parade steps off at 7 p.m. Route: High to Arch Street, Arch to King Street to Seaford Fire Hall. Must be in costume to enter. Cash prizes for costume contest.

Breakfast cafe

VFW 4961 breakfast cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

Seaford class of ‘73

The Seaford class of 1973 reunion will be held on Saturday, Nov. 29, at 6 p.m. For more information and reservations call or email Mike Wheatley, 629-2498 or wheatley5@comcast.net.

Victorian Tea

Seaford Historical Society’s annual fall Victorian Tea will be Saturday, Oct. 18, at 2 p.m., at the Ross Mansion on Ross Station Road (formerly North Pine Street Extended). This event is reminiscent of the preCivil War days when Governor Ross’s wife entertained her friends with a lavish display of “savories” and sweets. Jeanne Conner does extensive research on Victorian era recipes and plans a different menu for each tea. Volunteers dressed in period gowns will serve tea. Guests may tour the 13-room mansion and the outbuildings, including the only original slave cabin in Delaware in its original location. Seating is arranged in tables of four people each. Reservations in multiples of two are required and may be made by calling Ruthe Wainwright at 629-8765. Tickets are $10 per person.

Class of ‘88 reunion

The Seaford High School class of ‘88 20-year reunion will be Saturday, Nov. 29, at the banquet center next to Jimmy’s Grill Restaurant in Bridgeville. The reunion will be from 6 - 10 p.m. with a cocktail hour from 6 - 7 p.m., and dinner at 7. The cost is $75 a couple and $37.50 for a single. This includes dinner and entertainment. Contact Cathy Hastings (Maas) at dcat5186@hotmail.-com, Lexie Ketterman (Kingree) at lexketterman@gmail.com or Angie Zebley (Mitchell) at angie@tullramey.com with contact information.

Historical Society raffle

The Seaford Historical Society raffle offers a luxurious condo in either Williamsburg or Myrtle Beach for a week in 2009 as the prize. Raffle tickets are $5 each or five tickets for $20 and may be purchased at either the Ross Mansion on Saturday or Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. or at the Seaford Museum on Thursday through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. The drawing will take place in the afternoon of the last day of the 2008 Victorian Christmas, which is Sunday, Dec. 14. You do not have to be present to win.

Victorian Christmas

The annual Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion, Dec. 12, 13 and 14, will once again feature a Christmas Boutique. Each member of the Seaford Historical Society is asked to contribute one item. Handmade gifts in the price range of $10

Nov. 6 – Business Person of the Year Dinner (TBA) Nov. 18 – Board meeting, 5:30 p.m., Chamber office Nov. 18 – General meeting, How To Invest by John Downes of Insurance Market, 6:30 p.m. Dec. 5 – Christmas parade, 7 p.m. Dec. 9 – Open house/ribbon cutting, Members Christmas Party, Laurel chamber office 4-7:30 p.m.

Soup and salad luncheon

Experience the “Fruits of the Spirit” as you eat and fellowship at our soup and chicken salad luncheon and enjoy tasty morsels from our bake sale and “Country Corner.” Come to Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel on Saturday, Oct. 18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Luncheon take outs are available. Call 875-4233 for more information.

Hope Lodge Oyster Sandwiches

Hope Lodge 4, located on West 6th Street, Laurel will be selling oyster fritter sandwiches and crab cake sandwiches for $6 each, on Saturday, Oct. 18, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

LHS class of ‘83

LHS class of 1983 is planning a reunion on Saturday, Oct. 18, at the Laurel American Legion Post 19. Time is 6 p.m. Contact Brian Dayton, briandayton@mail.com, or call 302-7454476 for details.

LeCates Family reunion

Daniel Burton LeCates Family reunion will be held Oct. 19, at 2 p.m., at the Laurel Grange Hall off of Rt. 9. If family members have any questions they can call 302-245-6851. Ask for David.

Laurel Trick or Treat

Laurel’s annual Halloween “Trick or Treat” event will be held Friday, Oct. 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. for ages 12 and under. The Town of Laurel will host its own “Jack-O-Lantern Contest.” Laurel staff members are taking on a challenge to create the most impressive Jack-O-Lantern display at Town Hall. The teams can only spend up to $100 on their entry and all Jack-O-Lanterns will be on display at Laurel Town Hall during the week of Oct. 27 through 31.

Senior Center fall festival

Laurel Senior Center Fall Festival, at 113 N. Central Ave., Laurel, will be held Friday, Nov. 14, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Luncheon, served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., will include homemade chicken salad, soup and desserts. There will be crafts, baked goods, quilt chances, and a white elephant table. Call 875-2536 for more information.

Free luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (spaghetti) on Saturday, Oct. 18, noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard. Any questions, call Shirley at 8752314.

Mentors needed

The Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program is seeking dedicated adults to spend one hour per week with a fifth, sixth, or seventh grader. Typically, mentors and students meet after school at the Laurel Library. Contact Kim Trivits or Lynne Betts at 629-7790 for details. The program can also offer a mentoring presentation to groups and organizations.

LHS class of ‘98

Laurel High School class of ‘98 is planning a class reunion. Contact Megan Jones at megj22@comcast.net or phone 8415835 with contact information.

NightLife

NightLife at the library will be held on Saturday, Oct. 18 from 7-9 p.m. Teens are invited to an after-hours, teens-only evening of movies, games and pizza. For more information, please call the library at 875-3184 or email Becky Norton at Rebecca.norton@lib.de.us.

AARP driving course

Laurel Senior Center, will hold an AARP driving course, Oct. 20, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $10. To register for the course call 302-875-2536.

Old time toys & games

Grades K-6 are invited Thursday, Oct. 23, 4:15 p.m. to an afternoon of fun, as the Laurel library makes old-time toys and games. This program is free and open to the public, but requires pre-registration. To pre-register, call the 875-3184, find us on the web at www.laurel.lib.de.us, or email Becky Norton at rebecca.norton@lib.de.us

Journey for Sight

A fund raising opportunity, the 21st annual Pet Culver Memorial “Journey for Sight,” on Sunday, Nov. 2, at scenic Trap Pond State Park, Laurel. A 50 percent rebate on all funds collected by your organization. Registration is at 12 p.m. Walk/run begins at 1 p.m. In case of inclement weather, the event will be held at the Laurel Senior High School. Walk as an individual or participate as a team of five or

Charity Lodge #27 Cemetery House Residents are ready for you.

16th Annual Cemetery House Home of the Grave Digger

Fridays & Saturdays

October 17-18, 24-25, & 31st Park next to the Laurel w e N n u F Firehouse on 10 St. & ride ! s n o i t c the wagon to the Haunted House. Attra th

Sponsored by C harity L odge #27. Tickets sold from 7 pm to 11 pm, admission $8.00 or $7.00 with a non - perishable food item under 6 free.

Benefits: Boy Scouts, and other worthwhile charities.

Thanks to everyone for your support!!!


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Annual fall auction

Searching for ancestors

Are you searching for your ancestors? The Bridgeville Public Library will provide genealogy consultations facilitated by Alice duBois Min on Saturday, Oct. 25, from 10 a.m. to noon. Sign-up is required. Call the library at 337-7401, or e-mail famgen88@comcast.net. For special needs contact Karen Johnson at 337-7401.

Historical Society Museum

The Bridgeville Historical Society Museum is open to the public on the first Sunday of each month through October from 1-4 p.m. The museum is located at 102 William Street.

Biden’s sister featured speaker

The Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club’s annual Truman Kennedy chicken-and-dumplings dinner will take place Oct. 25, at the Bridgeville Fire Hall, at 6 p.m. Dinner, door prizes and an auction with our Democratic candidates will take place. The featured speaker is Joe Biden’s sister Valerie Owens. Cost is $20 and seating is limited to 250. For more information, call 875-7091 or 280-6048.

Meet the Candidates Forum

The 35th Representative District Committee is hosting a “Meet the candidates forum,” featuring Aaron Chaffinch, candidate for the 35th District House of Representative seat, Second District Sussex County Council candidate Mike Wyatt, and Clerk of the Peace candidate Greg Fuller on Tuesday, Oct. 28, starting at 7 p.m. in Bridgeville. This open forum - with a candidate question and answer session - is meant to help voters in the Bridgeville and Greenwood areas find out where our Democratic candidates stand on the issues most important to this region of Sussex County. It will be held at Woodbridge High School, 307 S Laws St., Bridgeville, Oct. 28 from 7-9 p.m. Media is encouraged to attend this event. For more information or to confirm that you will be attending, please contact Pat Ewing at 628-4563.

Post Office cancellation

The Bridgeville Post Office will have a special cancellation to commemorate the 2008 Apple Scrapple Festival. Requests can be mailed in over the next 30 days to obtain the 2008 cancellation.

‘Oceans’ at Greenwood Library

On Tuesday, Oct. 21, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Greenwood Library’s Bound by Books discussion group will be discussing one of Karen Kingsbury’s classic inspirational books, “Oceans Apart.” The program will be held in the library meeting room and is free and open to all. To obtain a copy of the book, drop by the Greenwood Public Library or call Robin Miller at 349-5309.

Greenwood Mennonite School announces their annual benefit All-You-CanEat-Breakfast and Fall Auction on Saturday, Nov. 1. The breakfast is from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. The cost for the all-you-can-eatbreakfast is $6 for adults; $4 for children ages 4 to 11, and free for children under 3 years of age. Live and silent auctions will begin at 9:30 a.m. Scrumptious Mennonite baked goods and delicious lunch items will be available. A preview of the items available for bidding is available prior to the auction. The admission and parking are free. The school is located at 12802 Mennonite School Road between Routes 16 & 36 just east of Greenwood. For details, call the school at 302-349-4131.

Halloween party

The Greenwood CHEER Center, located at 12713 Sussex Hwy, in Greenwood, will be having a Halloween party on Friday, Oct. 31 from 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. There is a variety show at 10:30 a.m., please pre-register, and a costume parade with judging and prizes after a noon lunch.

Delmar, sponsored by the Ladies Auxiliary, Oct. 18, from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. We will have breakfast and lunch food for sale. Shop or rent a table for $10. To reserve a table call 302-238-7239 or 302-236-9083. All money will be used to support our programs.

Delmar’s Trick or Treat

Delmar’s Annual Trick or Treat night, sponsored by the Key Club at Delmar High School, will be held Thursday, Oct. 30, from 6 to 8 p.m. All Elementary kids are welcome.

Halloween safety

Bring your children to “Trunks of Treats” at the Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, Rt. 13 and Dorthy Road, three miles north of the MD/DE state line. Cars will be lined up in the church parking lot, their trunks filled with safe treats, from 57 p.m. Free snacks plus games and fun. Dress up in costumes. For more information call 875-7824.

Yu-Gi-Oh night

On Friday, Oct. 31, at 6 p.m., kids are invited to the Greenwood library for YuGi-Oh Night. Bring your dueling deck, join in the fun and possibly win a Yu-GiOh card or two. For more information, call Donna or Rebekah at 349-5309.

Two bands, Big Hats No Cattle, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and the fabulous Jones Boys from 1 to 4 p.m.

Carols for Christmas

The Southern Delaware Choral Society Christmas concert, “A Newborn Child: Cantatas and Carols for Christmas,” will be presented Saturday, Dec. 13, at 7 p.m. at the Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church in Seaford, and on Sunday, Dec. 14, at 3 p.m. at St. Edmund’s Roman Catholic Church in Rehoboth Beach. The cost for tickets will be $15 for adults and $10 for students. Tickets are available after October 15 by contacting SDCS at 226-5231 or online at www.brownpapertickets.

Fried chicken buffet

A fried chicken buffet will be held Saturday, Oct. 18 at Bethany Church, Lowes Crossroads near Millsboro. Adults and carryouts are $10; children $5. Serving from 2-6 p.m. A bake table will be available.

Genealogical Society

Video game night

On Friday, Oct. 24, at 6 p.m., kids are invited to the Greenwood library to play video games on an XBox 360. Games available for the evening include: Guitar Hero II, Tony Hawk’s Project 8, Burnout Revenge and Street Homecourt. For more information, call Donna or Rebekah at 349-5309.

PAGE 23

Bethel fall festival

Bethel Historical Society presents Bethel’s Maritime Fall Festival on Saturday, Oct. 18, at the museum grounds in Bethel, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Breakfast rolls, muffins, coffee, Odd Fellows oyster fritters, pizzas, ice cream, lemonade, boardwalk fries and lots more will be offered. Lots of kids activities.

The Sussex County Genealogical Society will meet at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 18, in the meeting room of the Rehoboth Beach Public Library, 226 Rehoboth Ave. The program will feature Andy Nunez, a native of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, a graduate of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and an employee of the State of Maryland. He is an author and editor of the military simulation magazine, Against the Odds. His topic will be “The Ghosts of Delmarva” (with a genealogical spin). For additional information call 8755418; or go to the Sussex County Genealogical Society web site: http://scgsdelaware.org/, for information on the Society.

Basket Bingo EXTRAVAGANZAV

Delmar VFW Post #8276 200 W. State St., Delmar, MD

Longaberger sale

The Delmar Lions Club is holding a Longaberger basket sale with all proceeds going to the community and the visually impaired. Baskets, with blue and orange trim and Wildcat paws, cost $49 each. The price of the lid, with a Delmar and Wildcat logo, is $30. Liners and dividers are available upon request. For more information or to order a basket contact Mildred Riley at 846-3846 or kragera@verizon.net

Book & bake sale

The Friends of the Delmar Public Library will sponsor a book sale on Friday, Oct. 17 from 4 to 7 p.m. and a book and bake sale on Saturday, Oct. 18 from 8 a.m. to noon. The sale will be held in the Hayman Room of the Delmar Public Library on Bi-State Boulevard (across from the Delmar Fire Department). There will be lots of books for all ages and baked goods (on Saturday only) of all types at very good prices. All money raised goes to support new programs and materials for those who use the Delmar Public Library. For more information contact Veronica Schell, director of the Delmar Public Library at 846-9894.

Inside yard sale

Inside yard sale will be held at the Delmar VFW Post 8276, 200 West State St.,

Big g O n e e st Ye t !

(on the left before the Old Mill Restaurant)

to benefit Delmar High Softball Teams

Saturday, Oct. 25 Doors open at 11 am & Session One begins at 1 pm (Pizza will be available to purchase for lunch)

Session two begins after dinner (intermission)

Over $20,000 Worth of Longaberger Prizes! Baskets are filled with Longaberger & Vera Bradley Purses & Items

Pulled Tab Games - Chance to win Longaberger Coffee Tables, Tall Baker’s Unit and Baskets will be played! COME EARLY! Tickets are $55 each which includes: One book of 20 reg. games for session one - One book of 20 reg. games for session two. One free catered dinner at Intermission. Beef and dumplings and Baked Chicken Special book of 5 games: $5 per book (per session) 2 Jackpot Games - $1 per sheet. Extra books (reg. games) will be available to purchase To Purchase Tickets Contact Ronnie: 410-726-7450 Nancy: 443-235-4463 or VFW: 410-896-3722 Sorry, but we are unable to accept reservations without a prepaid ticket. All tickets will be available for presale; any remaining tickets, if any, will be available at the door on the day of the event for $60. Everyone in the building must have an admission ticket, including all children. Tickets are non-refundable. Tickets are only sold for both sessions; you cannot buy a ticket for only one session. Age 18 or older to play bingo (MD Law) This bingo event is in no way affiliated with the Longaberger® company.


PAGE 24

Free winterization seminar

On Saturday, Oct. 25, Short’s Marine Inc., will provide a free winterization do-it-yourself seminar at the Short’s Marine Show Room on Long Neck Road. Instructor Steve Stearn and Greg Biener, Master Technical Consultant of Short’s Marine, will conduct the 2-hour seminar providing free instruction and free materials for do-it-yourselfers to learn how to winterize their boats safely. Instructors will also discuss the effects of ethanol gas and the precautions that should be taken. Reserve your seat today by calling 945-7378.

Covered dish supper

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008 or the registration tent on Legislative Mall anytime between 7 and 10 a.m. on Oct. 25. Cost is $30 for adults and $15 for children under 16. The official start time is 8 a.m., though cyclists may begin anytime between 7 and 10 a.m. Return to Nature Kayaking will offer a sunset kayaking adventure from 5 to 7 p.m., launching from the beach on Silver Lake in Dover. The cost is $25 per person, which includes the guided tour, equipment and kayak usage.Proceeds will benefit the Central Delaware YMCA and the Amish Schoolhouse. For more information, visit www.visitdover.com or call 800-233-5368.

On Oct. 27, Reliance Grange #58 will be having a covered dish supper at 6:30 p.m. at the Gethsemane United Methodist Church, Reliance. Guest speaker will be Ed Banning. For more information call 337-3615.

Fall fashion show, luncheon Wednesday, Nov. 12, “Couture & Class,” premier fashion show and luncheon, 11:30 a.m., Carter Partnership Center, Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. Benefit for scholarships; hosted by Owens Campus Development Council. Fashions by Carltons, Cool Spring Cottage, Deanna’s, That Boutique, Tiara’s Bridal Boutique, Twila Farrell. Tickets $25/person; reserved table for 8/$175. Reserve tickets by Nov. 5; call Delaware Tech at 8551607.

Fall craft show

The Farmington Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary will be holding their annual fall craft show on Oct. 25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There are still a couple of spaces available for crafters. The kitchen will be open during the show selling chicken salad, soup, and various other foods. Contact Angela for more information at 302-222-0754 or ckiemnstr79@aol.com.

Pancake supper

Cokesbury Community Center (near Reliance) will hold a pancake supper, on Nov. 1, from 4 to 7 p.m. Order United American Mechanics, for their scholarship fund. Price is $7 for adults, children 12 and under are free.

4-H computer club

The Sussex 4-H Computer Club now has openings for children ages 9-12 at its Thursday night meetings held the first Thursday of the month at Georgetown 4-H Carvel Center at 7 p.m. and check it out. Next meeting is Nov. 6. Contact the 4-H office at 8567303 for details.

Bike tour rescheduled

The 22nd Annual Amish Country Bike Tour has been rescheduled for Saturday, Oct. 25. The bike tour will begin at Legislative Mall in Dover. To register, visit www.visitdover.com,

Seaford AARP

Money has to be paid in time to make reservations for all trips. • Nov. 19 - Rainbow Dinner Theater in Pennsylvania to see the comedy, “Deck The Halls And Clean The Kitchen.” Cost is $65. Bus leaves Seaford Peebles parking lot at 7:30 a.m. • Dec. 5 - The American Music Theater to see “Christmas Show.” Cost is $65. Enjoy holiday songs and comedy sketches. Also an appearance of Santa. There will be time to Christmas shop at the Rockvale Outlets and have lunch on your own before going to the theater. • Feb. 9-11 - Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun Casinos, three days, $240. Deluxe accommodations at the Great Cedar Hotel. Visit the new MGM Grand Hotel casino (all connected). Breakfast and dinner buffets included, plus more. Bus leaves Peebles parking lot in Seaford. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180 for more on these trips.

Sight & Sound

Laurel Senior Center Trip to Sight & Sound, “Miracle of Christmas,” on Dec. 9. Cost is $90 and includes transportation, show & dinner at Shady Maple Smorgasbord.

Englishtown

Bus trip to Englishtown Flea Market in New Jersey on Saturday, Nov. 29, at 5 a.m. Cost is $35 for adults, children, nineyears old and under is $17.50. Money is due by Saturday, Nov. 15. Bus leaves from Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 108 First St., Bridgeville. Deacon James Stewart at 337-7003.

Radio City

Seaford Recreation’s 17th annual Radio City Christmas Spectacular is set for Sunday, Dec. 7, and is now taking registrations. Cost is $145 and seats are in orchestra section. There will be a few hours after the show to tour New York City. Call 629-6809.

Embroiders’ Guild

The Sussex Chapter of Embroiders’ Guild meets on the second Monday of the month at the CHEER Center in Georgetown. All levels of stitchers from beginner to advanced are welcome to attend. For details call 302539-9717.

Olde Seaford Block Watch

Olde Seaford Block Watch invites you to a covered dish dinner meeting, Thursday, Oct. 23, at 6:30 p.m. at the Seaford Police Station. The program will be “Scam Awareness.” Drinks and desserts will be furnished. Call 629-5643 for information or ride.

Delaware Equine Council

Next meeting of the Delaware Equine Council, Monday, Oct 20, 7 p.m. at the Harrington Public Library. All those interested in horses are welcome. Contact Peggy at 629-5233.

Widowed Persons Service

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 21, at 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral. The planned guest speaker will be John Allen, vice president of Bay Region Delaware Power & Light. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Republican Women’s Club

The Seaford Republican Women will meet Thursday, Oct. 23, at the Seaford Country Club. The meeting begins at 10:30 a.m. Lunch is optional. The speaker will be Ron Sands, Sussex County Republican Chairman. The public is invited. For further information, call Anne Nesbitt, at 628-7788.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 6296337 for details.

Acorn Club

The G.F.W.C.-Acorn Club of Seaford is having a “Halloween Party” and business meeting at the Wesley United Methodist Church on Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. The hostess is Debbie O’Bier and her committee. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

SUDOKU

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle! See Answers Page 50.


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 25

Charity Lodge Haunted House attracting good crowds Charity Lodge #27, the Odd Fellows in Laurel, are currently in AT URPHY the midst of presenting their 16th Annual Haunted House. Volunteer farmers usually The House operates weekends through Oct. 30. It is believed to be drive the thrill seekers to the only one left in Sussex County. the Haunted House site Several years ago there were severand without them the projal, but for a number of reasons most have stopped. ect would be doomed. Jerry Lynch is the chairman of the event and he has been so for the past 10 years. Before I forget it, how much fun it is to be around certain I must say that the Rebekah Lodge 21 in people. Laurel gives solid support for the event Volunteer farmers usually drive the and Jerry’s wife, Maxine, is certainly one thrill seekers to the Haunted House site who is very much a part of this tradition. and without them the project would be Before I go much further with this, and I hope Jerry doesn’t mind, but I know he’s doomed. I do not want to start mentioning them, a year or maybe two older than me (and or the many lodge members who give their that’s not 39 either). A lot of the members time, for I shall surely leave someone out. are in their 60s, 70s and older. They offer support with things such as directing park- I can’t take any credit for this project as I have been busy with football games and ing, as ticket takers, prop makers and all other things up to this year, but I have a other kinds of tasks. great memory of the event and one of the The patrons of the Haunted House usumembers passed it on to Tony Windsor, ally park their cars at the Fire House and who was there for a visit Friday night. enjoy a hayride out to the West Street site. One particularly cold night at the For most of those 16 years, several house, I had to visit the “Port-a-Potty,” stood in the cold with flashlights to direct you know those restrooms without all the people to parking areas. One of the backconveniences. After locking the door and bones of this part of the function has to be taking care of business, there came this Bob Truitt. Bob’s humor and great stories earth-shaking sound and it felt as if I and made it a lot easier to come out and help the port-a-potty were in a hurricane, as and by the end of the evening you realize

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New business opens There is a new business called Bi-State Motors & Sports on Rt. 13, south of Laurel. The owner is Ray Beauchamp and he is involved with the sales, parts, and service of mopeds, motorcycle, autos and ATVs. I was made aware of this due to an e-mail from Sheila Lockerman, sister of Sherry Beauchamp, and wife of Ray. Sherry is also planning on moving her “Just For Kids” business in the complex in the very near future. Sherry has a tremendous business in selling gently used kids clothes. She currently is located on Bi-State Boulevard in Delmar.

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someone slammed a two-by-four piece of lumber against the building. In an instant, I was in complete darkness as my valued flashlight went down the hole. It seemed like minutes for me to recover and I exited the toilet amid much laughter, minus one flashlight. At our annual Christmas party, here was this wrapped gift for me. As Stan “The Man” Whitaker presented it, I could tell they had pulled another one on me. You guessed it, my flashlight reappeared! My hat is off to my dedicated Lodge brothers for their tenacity, spirit and dedication to their projects. With the Haunted House they are trying to have some fun with people of all ages and the money they collect goes to Lodge projects and the Boy Scouts of America in Laurel and Delmar, who are also involved with the annual fall project. Friday and Saturday, close to 700 showed up for the first weekend and there are five more days of the event, so support them.

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PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Health Is there a link between cell phone usage and brain cancer? By Anthony Policastro, M.D A few years ago, there was a study that suggested that cell phones cause brain tumors. Subsequent studies did not support that finding. More recent studies suggest that it may indeed be true. One of the problems when dealing with cancer causing agents is the long time period between the event and the start of the cancer. For example, it takes many pack years of cigarettes to produce lung cancer. The new cervical cancer immunization is given early in life. It needs to be given that early to prevent a cancer years later. It took many years for us to find a relationship between asbestos and cancer. At this point, the issue of what relationship there is between cell phones and cancer is still somewhat vague. However, there are a number of things in the studies that are disturbing. One has to do with the fact that telephones do not give radio wave energy. Cell phones do. It is not clear what that energy can do. There are two types of cancer that seem to be higher in cell phone users. The first is what is called a glioma. That is one of the more common types of brain tumors. Therefore, trying to link that to cell phones is hard. What researchers seem to

be finding is that the frequency of glioma has always been relatively steady in the population. The frequency seems to be higher than expected in cell phone users. The second type of cancer is called acoustic neuroma. This is a growth on the nerve that goes to the ear. It is not that common. Therefore, its appearance in higher numbers is disturbing. What is the most concerning thing about these cancers is that they appear on the side of the head where the person most often uses the cell phone. Other factors that were observed were related to the length of use and age of individual. Those people who were heavy cell phone users for more than 10 years were more likely to develop tumors. Those individuals who were under age 20 were also at greater risk. The lessons in this should be obvious. The first is that cell phone use should be limited in the first place. The second is that using a hands free or speaker type phone causes less risk. The third is that children under age 20 should avoid cell phone use when possible. The younger the child, the stronger the warning should be. There is really no reason for someone who is not yet of driving age to be carrying around a cell

phone. Under that age, you should have a pretty good idea of where your children are without the need for a cell phone. That is harder once they begin driving.

Once we have more information on this, we can relax the standards. However, for now, the danger seems like a real possibility and we should respect that danger.

AUCTION PLANNED - Nanticoke Health Services Dinner & Auction planning committee recently held a kick-off party for the 2009 event, "Viva Las Vegas". The committee is betting the April 4, 2009 event, to be held at Heritage Shores Club, Bridgeville, will hit the jackpot. Winnings will be used to benefit Women's Health/Digital Mammography Services at Nanticoke Memorial. Last year's auction drew a record crowd and raised over $94,000. Shown here are Auction Chairperson Ronda Banning and Nanticoke Vice President Thomas E. Brown at the kick-off party at Heritage Shores.


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 27

Health Briefs Breathing support group held

A support group for those suffering with breathing problems will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 28 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital's Medical Staff Conference Room. If you or loved ones suffer from breathing difficulties, attend this support group and learn how to breathe, get tips on exercises and share experiences in a group setting. To access the Medical Staff Conference Room, attendees should use the Cardiac Rehab/Wound Care entrance, located in the rear of the hospital. For more information, call Angie Howard, RRT at 302-629-6611, ext. 3815.

Look-In Glass Shoppe holds sale

Shop early for the holidays at the LookIn Glass Gift Shoppe's "In Design" sale featuring the latest in fashion jewelry and handbags on Thursday, Oct. 16, from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday, Oct. 17 from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. All jewelry items are $6 each and other select items range from $12 to $48. Proceeds from The Look-In Glass Gift Shoppe benefit Nanticoke Health Services.

Nanticoke offers flu shots

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital's Occupational Health will offer flu shots to the public at Nanticoke Mears Health Campus (across from Seaford Post Office) on the

following dates: Wednesday, Oct. 29 and Wednesday, Nov. 5 - 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; 4 to 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 31 and Friday, Nov. 7 - 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6 - 4 to 7:30 p.m. The cost is $20. Medicare billing is available with proof of Medicare insurance. Pre-registration is required. The vaccine is not recommended for anyone under the age of 18; it is recommended for elderly and high-risk individuals. To schedule an appointment, call Nanticoke Occupational Health at 629-6611, ext. 8682.

Women's Expo planned

The Women's Wellness Expo, "Powerful Women: Shaping Our Lives, as We Shape Ourselves," is Friday, Oct. 24 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Dover Downs Hotel. The cost is $30 which pays for lunch, screenings, speakers, educational sessions and handout materials. For more information or to register, call the Expo at 302744-4700.

Program to help manage disease

The Chronic Disease Self Management Program (CDSMP), developed at Stanford University, has proven effective at enabling people to take more control of their own health. CHEER will begin this program at the Greenwood Activity Center. The program consists of six, two and a half hour work-

shops. The first class begins Monday, Nov. 3 at 1:30 p.m. and runs through Dec. 8. This class is free but registration is required. For more information and to register, call Cindy Mitchell at 302-856-5187.

A Pink Ribbon Tea

On Oct. 17, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., the community is invited to join Nanticoke's Cancer Care Center, the Delaware Breast Coalition, and The Wellness Community for "A Pink Ribbon Tea – From Surviving to Thriving" event. Our panel of experts will answer your nutrition, exercise and health questions. Light refreshments will be served. Seating is limited. During the month of October, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Campus and Mears Health Campus will be "turning pink." Several activities will be planned to provide cancer awareness. For more information and to register, call 302-645-9150.

Annual Redden Ride/Walk planned

The 6th Annual Fall Redden Ride/Walk will be held on Sunday, Oct. 19 at Redden State Forrest Park in Georgetown. Rain date is Sunday, Oct. 26. This event benefits Southern Delaware Therapeutic & Recreational Horseback Riding, a non-profit organization that provides equine-assisted therapy to people with disabilities in Sussex County.

It’s Flu Season! Don’t Go Unprotected!

Nanticoke Occupational Health Is Offering Flu Shots

October 29th November 5th (Wednesday)

November 6th (Thursday)

October 31st November 7th (Friday)

9 am to 12:30 pm 4 pm to 7:30 pm

4 pm to 7:30 pm

9 am to 1 pm (no evening)

Appointments Necessary Location: Nanticoke Mears Health Campus - Occupational Health (Rt. 13a - Across from Seaford Post Office) $20 Fee Per Person (18 & Over) Medicare Billing Offered - Insurance Card Required)

To schedule an appointment or for more information call 629-6611, Ext. 8682 www.nanticoke.org

Registration begins at 10 a.m. and lunch is provided by Jimmy’s Grille. There will be raffles, trivia games and a Finders Keepers Trail. The registration fee is $30 for riders ages 14 and up, $20 for riders ages 13 and under and $20 for walkers. Lunch is included. For more information, call 302-644-1920 or visit sdtrhr.com. If you are unable to participate but would like to make a donation, you may do so online or through the mail at SDTRHR, P.O. BOX 219, Nassau, DE 19969.

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X-Ray and Lab on Premises Minor Emergencies • Lacerations Office Gynecology - Pap Smears Executive, Sports & Insurance Physicals Orthopedics • Minor Surgery Cardiology • Stress Testing

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Alex Azar, M.D. Peter I. Filipov, M.D. Jason M. Tu, M.D. Diane Lubkeman, M.D. Emerson T. Que, M.D. Tracey Boss, O.D. Jennifer R. Giles, O.D. Laurel Office: Salisbury: Suite 1 31519 Winter Place Pkwy., 116 E. Front Street Laurel, DE 19966 Salisbury, MD 21804

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PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Church Bulletins Concord 87th reunion Sons, Daughters & Friends of Concord 87th reunion will be Saturday, Oct. 18, at 2 p.m. at Concord United Methodist Church. There will be fellowship, a dedication and memorial service to honor those sons, daughters and friends of Concord who have passed away since last year’s reunion. The Rev. Diane E. Melson will deliver a brief message and guests will be entertained with special music by vocalist Mikki Madden. A chicken and dumpling dinner will follow. Cost is $8 per adult, $4 for children ages 6-12, ages 5 and under are free, take-outs are $9. For details contact Frances Givens at 629-2659 or Judy Kohlenberg at 629-0687.

Mt. Olivet Preschool openings Mt. Olivet Preschool has added another three-year-old class to its program. There are limited openings in the three and fouryear-old classes. Call Linda Stephenson at 629-2786 for details.

Missions Conference 2008 “Our Torch to Carry; God’s World to Win,” at Calvary Baptist Church, 22860 S. DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown. Guest missionaries are Steve and Janet Rutledge serving under Baptist Mid-Missions on the Jewish Outreach Team in North America; Travis and Becky Gravely serving under Baptist Mid-Missions to North West Romania and Mike and Renee Skibinski serving under ABWE to Cape

Verde, Africa. The conference kicks off on Sunday, Oct. 19 at 10:30 a.m., worship; and an evening service at 6 p.m.; continuing through Wednesday at 7 p.m. each evening. For details call 856-3773.

Gospel Café Centenary United Methodist Church, corner of Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, hosts its Gospel Café every Saturday night from 6-9 p.m., Featuring Bruce and Nancy Willey Music Ministry; live Christian music; fellowship and refreshments. Oct. 18 - Bill Primrose, Amanda Jones, Don White and Rob Harman. Oct. 25 - Kaila Clucas, Milton Foskey, Aunt Ruth & Buddy. For more information contact Bruce and Nancy Willey at 875-5539 or 8757339.

living within one’s means, and finally achieve financial freedom. The doors of The Lighthouse Church will be open during certain hours of the day and evening so that anyone can come and pray. For more information, call 875-7814, or visit the church at 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel.

Annual Womens Day revival Booker Street Church of God Annual Women’s Day theme is God bringing women together in unity. The revival will be held through Oct. 17, at 7:30 p.m. featuring Pastor Baroness Martin. Annual Women’s Day black/gold will be Sunday, Oct. 26 at 11:30 a.m., Pastor Brenda Smack at 5 p.m., Pastor Arlene Taylor. For details call 302-856-9097.

‘God Thing’

Gospel concert

Our country should not be surprised at the recent downturn of the nation’s economy, according to Pastor Timothy Jones of the Lighthouse Church of Laurel. According to Second Chronicles, God promises to heal a nation if we humble ourselves, pray and turn from what we as a nation have been doing. Pastor Jones is calling upon Delmarva’s churches to participate in 40 days of prayer and supplication ending Nov. 23, to ask for God’s Divine Intervention, God’s wisdom and as a call for repentance. Pastor Jones is preparing to present a program designed to help people get out of debt, to help people achieve practical methods of

The Harvester’s Quartet from North Carolina, will be appearing on Saturday, Oct. 18, at 7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church located at 501 Bi-State Boulevard, in Delmar, Md. Come out and enjoy an evening of great gospel music. For details call 410-8963284.

Soup and salad luncheon Experience the “Fruits of the Spirit” as you eat and fellowship, at our soup and chicken salad luncheon and a bake sale and “Country Corner.” Come to Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel on

Saturday, Oct. 18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Take-outs are available. Call 875-4233 for information.

Galestown homecoming Galestown United Methodist Church homecoming will be held Sunday, Oct. 19. Speaker will be the Rev. Lou Bradley with special music by Joe Bradley. A hot buffet will be after the service. For details call 410-883-2149.

Chaplain’s Chapel Chaplain’s Chapel will hold its fall Celebration with special music and a hymn sing, followed by dinner on Sunday, Oct. 19 at 3 p.m.

Macedonia AME Church Macedonia AME Church, 431 North St., Seaford, on Oct. 19, will host the Nichols Sisters, at 5 p.m. A revival will take place on Oct. 24 at 7 p.m., and Oct. 25 at 6 p.m. Guest is Elder Bernita Shockley, of Rehoboth Temple of Praise in Laurel. The Rev. Dania R. Griffin is pastor and the Rev. Zakiya Y.B. Griffin is assistant pastor. For details call 629-3116.

Womens conference “Women of Power” conference held Oct. 25, will convene at St. Luke’s Parish Hall, 202 North St., Seaford. For information contact 629-6046, registration is $20. Featured speakers: Pastor Peggy M. Briggs, John Wesley United Methodist Church of Seaford. Sharon B. Parker of Mt. Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church of

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, D el. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary) Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S .C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker WorshipS ervices: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Pastor www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956

Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road6 8, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008 Chesapeake, Va. presenting “Woman at the Well.” Deborah Waller of New Zion United Methodist Church of Laurel will present “Health Issues.” Apostle Catherine Camper, United Deliverance Bible Center of Laurel will present “Alabaster Box.” Minister Olivia Bivens of Clarence Street Church of God of Seaford will present “The Ten Virgins.” Sister Vera Worthy, Dickerson Chapel, Millsboro, keynote speaker will present “Esther.”

AWOL celebrates anniversary All Walks of Life Outreach Ministries (AWOL) located at 30599 N. Sussex Hwy. in Laurel will celebrate its fourth pastoral anniversary on Oct. 14-19. Pastors are Apostle Randy and Pastor Lorrie A. Jones. Friday, Oct. 17, 7:30 p.m. - Pastor Brendell Smack of Seaford; Saturday, Oct. 18, 5 p.m. - Honorary banquet at the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club in Seaford (tickets are $15 per person); Sunday, Oct. 19, 11 a.m. - Pastor Emmanuel Davis, Harrisburg, Pa.; 4 p.m.-Apostle Lamont Jones, Wilmington. For tickets call 302-875-7772.

Chicken and dumplings The women of the Woodland United Methodist Church will serve a chicken and dumpling dinner on Saturday, Oct. 18, at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $10; children 6-12 years are $4; 5 years and under are free. Woodland Church is located 4.5 miles west of Seaford next to the Woodland Ferry house. No carry-outs. For additional information call 629-5404 or 629-4662.

Macedonia AME services Macedonia AME Church located at 431 North St., Seaford, will have special services: Women in Hats Service on Oct. 18, at 6 p.m.; and the Nichols Sisters, on Oct. 19, at 5 p.m. A revival will be held Oct. 24 and 25. The theme: “Restoring the Joy of our Salvation,” on Oct. 24, at 7 p.m. and Oct. 25, at 6 p.m. Guest speaker will be: Elder Benita Shockley of Rehoboth Temple of Praise, Laurel. The Rev. Dania R. Griffin is pastor and the Rev. Zakiya Y.B. Griffin, is assistant pastor.

Latin mass

brated on Oct. 19. The mass is always a Missa Cantata using traditional Gregorian chant. For further information, call 302-674-5781.

Fall Fundraiser begins Christ the Cornerstone Community Church is starting its fall fundraiser. A selection of crafts, gifts, and decorations available until Dec. 15. To view these items, stop by the church, or call 875-8150 for time availability. Church is located at the corner of Seaford Road and Bethel Road, Laurel.

‘Travel The Road’ Central Worship Center presents Tim Scott & Will Decker from “Travel The Road,” Nov. 2, at 6 p.m. Doors will open at 5 p.m. No tickets needed; a Love Offering will be taken. The location is 14545 Sycamore Road, Laurel. For more information call 8757995.

Eming’s dinner Trinity United Methodist Church is sponsoring an Eming’s dinner for Friday, Nov. 7, from 4-7 p.m. Tickets are $8.50 and can be purchased from any member, or by calling Tina Wharton at 238-7147. There will be drinks available for purchase and a bake table for dessert. You can eat-in or carry-out. Proceeds will support our ministries and missions.

OLD Address

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Christ the Cornerstone Community Church presents a dinner gala featuring the special music of John and Linda Murphy and Laura Mitchell, Nov. 8, at 5:30 p.m. Advance ticket sales only. Donation is $12. For information call 875-8150.

Christmas extravaganza Trinity United Methodist Church will have a Christmas shopping extravaganza on Saturday, Nov. 15, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Rev. Lee Elliott building. Home-based vendors such as Pampered Chef, Avon, Longaberger Baskets, Home Interiors, Discovery Toys, Premier Design Jewelry and others will be there for one day of shopping. Orders taken from the catalogues will be there in time for Christmas. Lunch will be available for purchase and there will be free activities for children. Free give-a-ways too. Call 875-4741 for more information.

Name: _________________________________________ Old Address: ____________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ Name: _________________________________________ New Address: ___________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

Mail to the Seaford/Laurel Star Circulation, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE or call Karen at 302-629-9788

Messiah’sV ineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302- 875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591 MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Church School -All Ages - 9:15 a.m. Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Rev. Rick Elzey Wings of Prayer - Tues. 7:00 p.m. Come Join Our Family

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

Dinner gala with music

CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS TODAY. DONʼT HESITATE!

NEW Address

MOVING?

A Latin mass according to the Missal of 1962 is celebrated on the third Sunday of every month at 3 p.m. at Holy Cross Church in Dover. The mass will be cele-

PAGE 29

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755 Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:30 AM • Sunday School 9:30 AM • Traditional Worship 11 AM

ROCK CHURCH

Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids-Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12), DivorceCare 7:00 Prayer Meeting, Men’s Group, KidStuf 103 (K-6 Kids & their parents, 1 & 3rd Wed.)

30320 Seaford Road, Laurel, Del. Ph: 875-7275 • Pastor Bill Konkel Sunday School: 9a .m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. & 1st & 3rd Sunday Evening: 5 p.m. Thurs Evening Prayer: 7p .m.

COKESBURY CHURCH

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’sP astor:M arilyn Searcey

629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


PAGE 30

Obituaries Marion Pete Henry, 82 Marion W. “Pete” Henry of Laurel passed away on Oct. 6, 2008, at his home in Laurel. He was born in Laurel on June 6, 1926 and was a son of Charlie K. and Julia Hitch Henry, who predeceased him. He was also preceded in death by a brother, James Henry. Pete has been disabled since Feb. 1, 1977. He is a member of Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel. He proudly served his country in the United States Navy as a medic and was a member of the American Legion Post #19 in Laurel. Mr. Henry was Past Noble Grand of Charity Lodge #27, IOOF in Laurel, where he was also a charter member of the Martha Rebekah Lodge #21, Marion Pete Henry IOOF Laurel. A charter member of the Laurel Alumni Association and Delaware Campers Association. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Katherine, two sons: Steven D. Henry and wife, Teresa of Seaford, and Fred A. Henry and wife, Betty of Cumberland, Va.; six grandchildren, Douglas S. Henry and wife Michelle, of Seaford, Kathy Hill and husband Randy of Seaford, Donna H. Meding and husband Scott of Seaford. Jennifer H. Jones and husband James of Pittsville, Md., PFC David Lee Henry who is stationed at Fort Picket in Blackstone, Va. and Casey Henry of Cumberland, Va.; seven great-grandchildren, Justin Lee Hill, Brittany Hill, Victoria Henry, Tyler Meding, Alexander West, Andrew West and Christopher Jones; three step-grandchildren and four step-great-grandchildren; two sisters, Nellie Justice and husband, Hoyet of Laurel and Jean Holston and husband, Jerry, of Laurel, several nephews and one niece. A funeral service was held at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel, on Oct. 9. Internment with Military Honors followed in Laurel Hill Cemetery. The Rev. Wayne Grier officiated. Memorial contributions can be sent to Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963; or the Laurel Alumni Association Scholarship Foundation, PO Box 382, Laurel, DE 19956; or Centenary United Methodist Church, 200 W. Market Street, Laurel, DE 19956.

Edward H. Ralph, 74 Edward H. Ralph of Laurel died on Oct. 8, 2008, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. Ed was born in Laurel, a son of Edwin B. Ralph and Pauline Dickerson Ralph, who predeceased him. An infant brother, Albert Ralph, also preceded him in death. Mr. Ralph graduated from Laurel High School class of 1951, and attended the

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

University of Delaware where he received his B.S. degree in horticulture in 1955, and where he later received his M.S. degree in horticulture in 1957. He was the director of Delaware Substation Division, UniEdward H. Ralph versity of Delaware, during this time of service he also served as the executive secretary of Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. In 1984 he retired from the University with 29 years and seven months of service. He later was the executive director of the Delmarva Poultry Industry. In 1990, he was the assistant to the vice president for advancement at the University of Delaware and the Southern Delaware assistant to the president of The University of Delaware. In 1993, he was appointed by the governor as the Delaware Deputy Secretary of Agriculture. Ed also proudly served his country in the Delaware National Guard where he was a lieutenant. He was extremely active in the Laurel Community, serving on many boards and committees. A member and administrative board member of Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church in Laurel. He also held many positions on agriculture boards, where he was a long time board member for the Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. His many memberships included Delaware Farm Bureau, Delaware Poultry Improvement Association, Delaware Grange, a charter member of the Laurel

High School Alumni Association, the Sussex County Independent Libraries Trustees Association and University of Delaware Agriculture Alumni Association where he was past secretary-treasurer and president. Ed was a founding member of the Tussocky Tax Ditch. He has also received many awards and honors, including Aggie of the year, Certificate of Distinguished Service from the National Association of County Agriculture agents, George M. Worrilow Award for outstanding service to agriculture by a University of Delaware alumni, along with many additional awards from the agriculture community, University of Delaware and Sussex County government. In 1979 he was the Laurel’s Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Citizen of the Year. In 1997 he received the Order of the First State Award, which is the highest award presented to a civilian by the Governor and Lieutenant Governor. Ed is survived by his wife Peggy J. Ralph; his sons: Alan R. Ralph and a daughter-in-law, Valerie Eskridge, and stepson Mark H. Bramble and his wife Brenda, all of Laurel; and his grandchildren: Jami Gordy, Casey Jo Ralph and Dylan Eskridge. A funeral service was held at the Laurel Fire Company, Laurel, on Oct. 11, with the Rev. Dale Evans officiating. Interment followed the service in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel. Memorial contributions can be made in his memory to: Laurel Fire Department, 205 W. Tenth St., Laurel, DE 19956; or Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church, c/o Ellen Hearn, 36197 Susan Beach Road., Delmar, DE. 19940. Arrangements were in the care of the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

Diann E. Cooper, 63 Diann E. Cooper of Delmar, died Friday, Oct. 10, 2008, at her home. She was born June 24, 1945 in Delmar, a daughter of AnnaBelle Jester Pusey and the late

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 HandicapF riendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

John M. Pusey. Diann loved cooking and sewing and treasured the time spent as a homemaker raising her family. In her early years she also worked at the English Grille, NCR and Perdue. She was an avid NASCAR fan and rooted for Dale Earnhardt, Jr. In addition to her father, she was preceded in death by an infant brother, John M. Pusey, Jr. In addition to her mother, Diann E. Cooper she is survived by her husband of 44 years, Larry Cooper; a daughter, Linda Birney and her husband John; two sons, Ronnie Cooper and Michael Cooper and his wife Lisa; and five grandchildren, Amber and Staci Birney, Dean Griffin and Caitlyn and Courtney Cooper; four brothers, Richard Pusey, Wayne Pusey and his wife Sharon, Jeffery Pusey and his wife Brenda, Craig Pusey and his wife Kristin, and many nieces and nephews. She is also survived by her special dog “Puggie”. A graveside memorial service was held on Wednesday, Oct. 15, at St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar. The Rev. Richard Bridge officiated. Arrangements were handled by Short Funeral Home, Delm

Barbara Burket, 72 Barbara Burket, of Seaford passed away peacefully after a long illness with her beloved family at her side on Saturday morning, Oct. 11, 2008, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. She was born in Portsmouth, Va., on Nov. 28, 1936. She was the proud wife of James Burket with whom she shared 50 wonderful years. They had moved to Seaford in 1963

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701B ridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008 with their daughter Amy and son Jeff. She was a member of Grace Baptist Church and the former secretary of the Seaford Community Concert Association. She had a love for music and the arts and sang with several Barbara Burket local groups, especially the choir at Grace. She is survived by her husband of 50 years, Jim Burket, a son Jeff of Seaford, a daughter, Amy Draper and her husband Marck, of Aylett, Va., a sister, Jessie Holloway of Suffolk, Va., a granddaughter, Kristin Draper of Millsboro, and many nieces and nephews throughout the U.S. and abroad. We would like to thank all of our friends and extended family for their love and support over the last few years. Memorial services will be held on Saturday, Oct. 18, at noon at Grace Baptist Church, 805 Atlanta Rd, Seaford. The family suggests donations may be made to Grace Baptist Church, 805 Atlanta Rd, Seaford, DE 19973. Arrangements were by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Purily Dixon, 62 Purily Dixon of Seaford passed away on his birthday, Oct. 2, 2008, in the Wilmington Medical Center, Wilmington. Prior to his disability, he was an Environmental Services Technician at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. He leaves to cherish his memories, a son, Todd and daughter, April Dixon, of Baltimore, Md.; as well as four brothers; and two sisters. A memorial service was held Oct. 11, at St. John’s 2nd Baptist Church, Millsboro. Interment was in the church cemetery. Professional services by: Deborah E. Harris-Nock Funeral Services, Greenwood.

Mary Frances Hill Owens, 87 Mary Frances Hill Owens of Laurel and Lynnhaven, Fla., passed away Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008, at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford. She was born June 12, 1921 in Mountain City, Tenn., a daughter of Thomas and Beulah Meadwell Hill, who predeceased her. Mrs. Owens was a good Christian woman who provided loving care in her home for war veterans. She was an excellent cook and everyone wanted a seat at her table. She was a highly skilled seamstress; an avid reader; and had a green

thumb for gardening. She collected and read cookbooks. During World War II, she worked at the Elkton, Md., munitions plant and following the war, she was a waitress in the New Castle County area for several restaurants. She was an active member of the Shiloh Community Church in Laurel, and the Temple Baptist Church in Panama City, Fla. She was loved by all who knew her and will be sorely missed. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Wayne L. Owens (2004); her daughter, Audrey Tucker; and her three brothers. She is survived by three daughters, Alice Guida and her husband Frank of Stanley, N.C., Deana Neugdbauer and her husband Jerry of Houston, Texas, and Ouida Carpenter and her husband Arlan of Laurel, with whom she lived; three sons, Kenneth Owens, Larry L. Lemon and his wife Jacque all of New Castle County, and Steve Owens and his wife Terry of Bevlaville, N.C.; 16 grandchildren; and 24 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Sunday, Oct. 12, at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Dodd-Carey Chapel, Georgetown. Graveside services held at the Evergreen Memorial Gardens, 3733 U.S. Highway, 231 N., Panama City, Fla., Thursday, Oct. 16, 11:00 a.m. The family suggests memorial contributions be made to: Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Frederick Jacobs, 52 Frederick Jacobs of Dover passed away on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008, at Kent General Hospital due to complications from a stroke. He is survived by three sisters and two brothers and for most of his life he was self-employed as a lawn care specialist. To honor his wishes, a memorial service was held Thursday, Oct. 9, at Victory Chapel Church, on Rt. 8 in Dover. Burial was private and at the convenience of the family. Professional services were by: Deborah E. Harris-Nock Funeral Services, Greenwood.

Judy M. McDowell Derrickson, 61 Judy M. McDowell Derrickson of Bridgeville passed away Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008, at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford. She was born April 21, 1947 in Milford, a daughter of Marion McDowell of Bridgeville and the late Evelyn Willoughby McDowell. Mrs. Derrickson’s hobbies included genealogy and collecting post cards. She was a 1965 graduate of Bridgeville High School and worked as a legal secretary in

PAGE 31

Gethsemane plans fundraisers By Andrew Richardson Jr. Kim Graves, a 17-year-old Gethsemane United Methodist Church member, was moved by what she learned about the Congo four years ago. Her heart went out to those who were unable to have access to fresh water. In the Congo, drinking water is the same water that is used to bathe, do laundry and use the bathroom. Graves vowed to do something about it when she became an adult. Gethsemane UMC in Seaford is helping her realize her goal now. A “Wishing For Water” fundraiser will be held on Saturday, Oct. 25, at Gethsemane UMC, 2701 Woodland Ferry Road,

west of Seaford. The fundraiser will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and includes an auction, food, entertainment, games and a petting zoo. Vendors and items to auction are needed. Plenty of free parking will be available. The fundraiser will be held in conjunction with the annual Race for Faith, a 5K event that begins at the Woodland Ferry. Registration for the race will be held at the church and all funds will be divided equally between the Seaford Mission and “Wishing for Water.” Registration must be completed by Thursday, Oct. 23. For more information or to offer your support, contact Kim Graves at 629-3145 or Dawn Wallace at 858-1669.

Wreaths available to honor vets Wreaths Across America, a non-profit organization, is offering an opportunity to any individual or organization who would like to add some red, white and blue to the holiday colors of red and green. A program that began as a wreath-laying event for our Nation’s veterans at Arlington National Cemetery has expanded to over 200 state and national cemeteries across the country, 24 foreign cemeteries and abroad naval ships in all seven seas. On Saturday, Dec. 13 at noon a wreath-

laying event will take place at the Delaware Veterans Cemetery near Millsboro. The public is invited to attend this moving service. Sponsorship of a wreath is $15 and sponsors may buy multiple wreaths. For more information, visit www.wreathsacrossamerica.org or contact the Dept. of DE Veterans and Family Support Program Chairman Michaele S. Russell at 302-3494220.

the Georgetown area for many years. She was loved by all who knew her; especially her aunts, uncles, and cousins. In addition to her father, Mrs. Derrickson is survived by her husband of 37 years, Dennis B. Derrickson, and many aunts, uncles and cousins. The family wishes to thank Delaware Hospice for their compassion and assistance. Funeral services were held Oct. 14, at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel, Bridgeville, with the Rev. Bruce Legates officiating. Interment was in Bridgeville Cemetery The family suggests memorial contributions may be made to Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

in 1981. He was a member of St. Michaels Catholic Church, Georgetown. He was a member of the teamsters and enjoyed dancing. In addition to his parents, Mr. Foskey was preceded in death by his first wife, Dorothy in 1989; a sister, Littian Lecates; a brother, John Foskey and a grandson Steven T. Adkins. He is survived by his wife, Gladys Gillman Foskey; children Virginia Dodson of Laurel, Edgar Foskey Jr. of Laurel and Judith Adkins of Georgetown. Three stepchildren, Patricia Bunting, Georgetown, Nancy Lesco, Houston, Texas, and Vincent LaCourt, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., and a niece, Anna Marlette of Laurel, and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Oct. 14, at St. Michaels the Archangel Catholic Church, Edward Street, Georgetown. Interment was in Laurel Hill Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Delaware Hospice Milford, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Edgar T. Foskey, Sr., 89 Edgar T. Foskey, Sr. of Dagsboro passed away at this home, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008. Mr. Foskey was born in Dagsboro, a son of Francis and Mary McMullen Foskey, who predeceased him. Mr. Foskey was a truck driver for Red Star, Salisbury, Md., for 28 years retiring

Secondhand smoke exposure causes bronchitis and pneumonia in infants and young children. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Entertainment Charlie Daniels, Randy Owens to perform at Punkin Chunkin The award winning Charlie While Owens was performDaniels Band and Randy Owens ing with Alabama, the group will highlight the first night of sold 73 million albums, includPunkin Chunkin on Friday, Oct. ing 21 gold, platinum and multi31, with a concert that will rock platinum albums and 42 No. 1 Bridgeville and set the stage for singles. a weekend of time-honored Owens prompted the Country gourd hurtling. Cares for St. Jude Kids radioThe Charlie Daniels Band, thon nearly 20 years ago, when returning for its second concert he challenged other artists to at the World Championship raise funds for the children’s Punkin Chunkin, is best known hospital after learning about Daniels for hit songs, “The South’s founder Danny Thomas’ death. Gonna Do It Again” and “The Since then, the radiothon has Devil Went Down in Georgia.” raised more than $315 million Band leader Charlie Daniels for St. Jude Children’s Hospital, has remained an active singer, which is among the primary resong writer, guitarist and fiddler cipients of the Punkin Chunkin since beginning his career in the charity donations. Owens re1950s. leased his first single, “Braid Daniels, who serves on the My Hair,” earlier this year, and board at St. Jude Children’s Reall proceeds have been donated search Hospital, was named a to St. Jude Children’s Research living legend during the The Hospital. Nashville Network Music City Concert tickets, which inNews Awards in 1999. clude free admission to the Owens He and the band have also Chunk on Friday, are $40 per been honored numerous times for videos, person. books and their extensive humanitarian Admission to the Chunk is $7 per percontributions. Randy Owens was best son in advance and $9 at the gate daily. known as the lead singer for Alabama beChildren younger than 10 are free. Parking fore starting his solo career. is $2. Concert gates open at 5:30 p.m. and

A PLANNED RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY

the show starts at 7 p.m. For more information, call the Punkin Chunkin Association office at 302-6848196. Tickets are now available at www.punkinchunkin.com, Lewes Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau, Seaford Chamber of Commerce, Harley Davidson of Seaford, Cape Gazette or by calling Frank Shade at 542-5582. This year’s World Championship Punkin Chunkin, set for Friday, Oct. 31 through Sunday, Nov. 2,

will be at the Dale Wheatley Farm in Bridgeville. This is the second year at its new location, which has close to 1,000 acres to accommodate the 55,000 people who attend the annual pumpkin-pitching contest. Camping is available at the site, and this year there will be parking available behind the firing lines for the first 300 vehicles. For more information about the event, visit www.punkinchunkin.com.

Del Tech hosts ‘Don Quixote’ Delaware’s first, full-length production of the world-renowned ballet “Don Quixote” will premiere on Saturday, Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. in the theater of the Arts & Science Center at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. The First State Ballet Theatre, Delaware’s only professional ballet company, will perform this much-loved story. The cast will feature 50 to 60 dancers and costumes made in the Moscow studios of a professional who designs costumes for the famed Bolshoi Theatre. Based on the Miguel de Cervantes novel, which was popularized on Broadway in the musical “Man of La Mancha,” “Don Quixote” tells the poignant tale of one man’s quest for youth, beauty, nobility and

passion. This ballet is one the entire family will enjoy. General admission tickets are on sale now and may be purchased or reserved by calling Delaware Tech at 302-858-5475. Ticket prices are $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors. First State Ballet Theatre invites patrons who would like to receive e-mail notifications regarding future performances to send an e-mail to executive director Robert Grenfell at robert.grenfell@verizon.net and put “Sussex E-Mail List” in the subject line. First State Ballet Theatre is a 501(c)(3) corporation. The company is headquartered in Wilmington’s historic Grand Opera House.

GRAND OPENING WEEKEND

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Food & Fun for the Whole Family


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 33

Every family has its favorite casserole dish What’s more appealing to a ORETTA NORR busy cook than a complete, satisfying meal in a dish? Layer meat, vegetable and a starch, bake and voilà, the casserole is created and dinner is ready. According to the Oxford Ency1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon clopedia of Food and Drink in chili powder (according to how America, casserole cooking has hot you like it) been around since prehistoric 3/4 pound grated cheddar times when cooking food in cheese tightly covered clay vessels soft1 to 2 small cans of tomatoes ened tough meats and blended Directions tasty juices. Line bottom and sides of a It’s hard to believe that by greased 3-quart casserole with a 1896, the Fannie Farmer Cooklayer of tortillas. Sprinkle with a book contained only one casserole recipe – a “Casserole of Rice tablespoon or two of chicken stock. Make a layer with 1 can of and Meat” that was steamed for undiluted cream of mushroom 45 minutes and served with soup, half of the diced chicken tomato sauce. Casserole popularity increased and half the green pepper, onion, chili powder and cheddar cheese. with the Depression when cooks Cover with tortillas and sprinwere struggling with ways to kle with 2 more tablespoons of stretch meat and fish and for crechicken stock. Make a second ative ways to use leftovers. layer with 1 can of undiluted Today every family has a facream of chicken soup and the vorite. In our house the memory remaining ingredients. Top the of a gourmet experiment gone last layer of cheese with the horribly awry could be erased in canned tomatoes. Bake at 350 dea flash by the appearance of my grees for 1 hour. tuna casserole. There’s always room for a few Chicken Noodle Casserole more casseroles in your recipe Quick Cooking Magazine box. Try these winning combina6 Servings tions. Ingredients 1 can (10 3/4 ounces) conKing Ranch Chicken Casserole densed cream of chicken soup, Serves 4 undiluted Variations of this recipe have 1/2 cup mayonnaise been around for a long time. This 2 tablespoons lemon juice one was given to me by way of a 2 cups cubed cooked chicken Texan who vouches for its Tex1 small onion, chopped Mex authenticity. 1/4 cup chopped green pepper Ingredients 1/4 cup chopped sweet red 3-4 pounds chicken breasts pepper (boiled until tender and diced) 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded chicken stock (reserved from Monterey Jack cheese, divided breasts) 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded 1 dozen fresh flour tortillas sharp cheddar cheese, divided 1 can cream of mushroom 12 ounces medium egg noosoup dles, cooked and drained 1 can cream of chicken soup Directions 1 cup chopped green pepper In a large bowl, combine soup, 1 cup chopped onion mayonnaise and lemon juice. Add

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

Hard Hat Bash

On Saturday, Nov. 1, from 4 to 6 p.m. the new Library and Cultural Center is celebrating with a Hard Hat Bash. The festivities will take place rain or shine at the site of the new facility on Ross Station Road (formerly North Pine Street Extended) next to the Ross Mansion. The public is invited to participate in this casual affair to see the exact layout of this greatly expanded and improved library. A pork barbecue with all of the trimmings will be served along with non-alcoholic beverages. Beer will be available for

purchase. The Friends of the Library are donating homemade cookies. The musically talented group of medical personnel known as The Medics will provide entertainment. Cost of the event is $25 per person. Children age 10 and under are free. Reservations are required and must be made before Oct. 24. No tickets will be sold at the door. To make a reservation send a check payable to Seaford District Library and mail to Marlene Warford, 132 Meadow Drive, Seaford, DE 19973. Indicate names and number of adults, and children under 10.

the chicken, onion, peppers, 1/2 cup of Monterey Jack cheese and 1/2 cup of cheddar cheese; mix well. Add noodles and toss to coat. Transfer to a greased 2-quart baking dish. Bake, uncovered, at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes. Sprinkle with remaining cheeses. Bake 10 minutes longer or until vegetables are tender and cheese is melted.

1 bay leaf 1/2 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper 1 cup ricotta cheese 1 1/2 cups grated, packaged mozzarella cheese 1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese 1/4 cup store-bought or homemade pesto Directions Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Oil an 8-by-8-inch baking dish. In a large pot of boiling, salted water, cook the pasta for 7 minutes. It will be partially cooked. Drain. Rinse with cold water and drain again thoroughly. In a medium saucepan, heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of the oil over moderately low heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add the

Baked Ziti with Pesto

Source: Quick from Scratch Pasta Serves 4 Ingredients 1/2 pound ziti 2 tablespoons cooking oil 1 onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 cups canned crushed tomatoes in thick puree 1/4 teaspoon salt

tomatoes, salt and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer over moderate heat and cook until very thick, about 10 minutes. Stir in 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper. Remove the bay leaf. In a small bowl, combine the ricotta, 1 cup of the mozzarella, about half the parmesan, the pesto and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Put half of the cooked pasta into the prepared baking dish and top with about a third of the tomato sauce. Spread the ricotta mixture on the sauce in an even layer. Cover with the remaining pasta and then the remaining sauce. Top with the remaining 1/2 cup mozzarella and the remaining parmesan. Drizzle with the remaining 1/2 tablespoon oil. Bake until bubbling, about 30 minutes. Let sit 10 minutes before cutting.

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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Classifieds COLLECTOR ‘58 EDSEL hard top 2-dr. car, $35. Collector ‘342 Chevy Truck, $10. 629-5192. 10/16

*Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

‘96 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO, great cond., new brakes & more, orig. owner, asking $2400. 875-1778. 9/11

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch

RIM & TIRE fr 2000 Saturn, P195/65R15, $35 OBO. 628-0871. 9/11

US MINT PROOF & SETS, & Commemorative Sets. 1978-2008, various prices. 398-0309. 10/9

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch

‘96 EXPLORER, 4 DR., dark gr., 4 whl. dr., power door locks & windows, V6, 135k mi. Very nice SUV, $3000. 629-4348. 9/4

ANTIQUE TEETER-TOTTER, 1931; wooden rocking horse fr. 60-70’s; great shape. $90 for both. Will separate. 398-0309. 10/9

FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only)

Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES

LOST

WANTED

MALE BLACK LAB, missing from Fawn Rd., Bridgeville since Sept. 14. Reward offered! Blk. collar w/tags. 236-9806. 10/2

POWERWHEEL BARBIE JEEP, in exc. cond., for a Christmas gift. Can pay up to $75. Call Sherri, 410430-5764. 10/9

BELOVED CAT at A&K Enterprises, Laurel, is missing. Last seen Sun., 9/14. Grey tabby w/white on face, stomach & feet. Answers to Baby Kitty. We miss him very much! 875-5513. 9/25

GOOD USED KAYAK & paddle, reasonably priced. 398-0309. 9/4

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS

AUTOMOTIVE

‘05 COACHMAN 25’ long Travel TrAIler. Very good shape, $11,000. 875-9480. 9/25

GIVE-AWAY 6 PUPPIES, mixed, mostly black lab, about 8 wks. old & looking for goodhome. 629-4930. 10/16 FREE HORSE MANURE, mixed w/shavings. You load, great for flower beds or gardens. 337-7200. 5 FREE INDOOR KITTENS to good home. Litter box trained. 875-7323 or 8559185. 9/25

SERVICES YARD WORK: Racking leaves, guter cleaning. 6297056. 10/16/2t

NOTICE FOOD & CRAFT VENDORS NEEDED For 1st annual Wings & Wheels Fall Festival in Georgetown, Oct. 25, 10 am - 8 pm. Craft spaces, $40-$50; Food spaces $10$115. 856-1544 or visit www.wings-wheels.com for more info. 9/4

YARD SALE GARAGE SALE, Sat., 10/18, 8 am - 1 pm, 38372 Robin Hood Rd., Delmar, Del. (off Line Rd.). 10/16 YARD SALE, Fri., 10/17, 8 am, Mt. Pleasant Rd., Laurel. Tools, Christmas items, pool table. 10/16

1 MICHELLIN RADIAL Tire 215/60/R15. 629-8745. 10/16 JUMP START with air compressor, $40. 629-5192. 10/16 3 CARS: 2 - ‘63 Fords, 1‘68 Mustang. All for parts, $1000 for all. 542-0695. 10/9 4 NEW BF GOODRICH P185/70R14 tires on Z racing, alloy, 5 lug rims. $300 for all. 628-0690. 10/2 ‘03 KIA SORENTO. Gold w/tan int. 4 dr., 6 cyl., many extras. 75k mi. Well maintained & rides great. Priced to sel below KBB. 6294072. 9/25 8’ LEER TRUCK CAP, fits Ford or Dodge, $475. 2586553. 9/11

SADDLE BAG GUARDS & stock mirrors off of ‘03 HD Road King Motorcycle, $40 & $20, like new. 628-4151. 9/25

‘92 TERRY RESORT CAMPER, 25’ awning stabilizer hitch & new stabilizer jacks. Full bed & bunk sleeps 6, Del. tagged till 3/31/10. $3500. 846-0178.

HARNESS HORSE LOVERS old magazines for sale. Trainers, drivers, owners, fans, 34 issues, May’83 - Dec. ‘83. 51 issues, Jan. ‘84-Dec. ‘84 (Nov. 17 missing). 3 odd copies, July ‘80, Octy. ‘81, Jan 85. 8419845. 10/2 21 HESS TRUCKS, new in box, 1988 - 2007. All for $450. 875-1877. 9/18 ANT. OAK SEWING MACHINE Cabinet, $50. 6286953. 9/11

FOR SALE WASHER $120; DRYER $120. 628-1320. 11/29/tnc

POWER CHAIR, Jazzy 600, 20” seat, leg rest, new $1000. Model 3800 Compression Sequential Circulator for legs, $500. 3377140. 10/16 COLEMAN GENERATOR, 5000 Watt, 10 hp, on wheels. Used very little. $450. 629-7834.10/16 LG. AIGNER PURSE, new. Dbl. Bowl Stainless Steel Sink. Other items. 6298745. 10/16 LADIES’ HORTON WOOL Sport Coat, charcoal, sz. 10P. Sag Harbour 2 pc. Pant Suit, grape, 10P. Leslie Fay 2 pc. Career Dress, long sleeve jacket, 2-tone blue, sz. 8. $7 ea. 875-5086. 10/16 BLACK & DECKER BAND SAW, 12” variable spd., extra blade incl., exc. cond. Scroll Saw, Delta 16”, variable spd., takes 5” tinless blades, exc. cond. 3377359 home; 559-8061 cell. MUSICAL BABY SWING, $10. Car-shaped Bouncer Jumper Seat, $15. Cosco High Chair, $20. 3 Safety approved Car Seats, $10 ea. 629-6575. 10/9

2 PAINTED, DECORATED Landscape Saws, $20 ea. 1 Painted, Decorated Bow Saw, $25. 228-6202. 10/9 MIXING BOWL SET, silver or chrome, Sunbeam, nice shape, $20. 398-0309. 10/9 OFFICE CHAIR, executive style, black, poly covered seat & high back, like new, $40. 875-5086. 10/9 MAPLE TABLE, solid, 48” round, 2 15” leaves, custom pads, $65. Love seat, floral print, $50. 337-8768. 10/2 ACOUSTIC GUITAR, Jasmine by Cakamine, $100. 875-3744 or 856-4031. 18 VT. BATTERY DRILL CASE, $40. 10” Black & Decker Saw, $40. 8758677. 10/2 CORD OF WOOD, cut May 08, $140. 875-3744 or 8564031. 10/2 2-PC. SECTIONAL SOFA, Drexel, lt. red, good cond., $300. 628-5479. 10/2 TOTAL GYM XL, new, with access., $1000. 410-8963857. 10/2

Major Auction Event - Home Improvement & Building Materials Blowout!! All items to be sold regardless of price with no minimums and no reserve!!

Friday Oct. 17th, 2008 at 11:00 AM – 11055 National Blvd Laurel, DE BOATS 18’ KAYAK ‘Perception Sea Lion’ has everything - for the quality-oriented person. A must see. $1600 OBO. 875-9775. 9/4

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES FENTON SET OF 4 COMMEMORATIVE Plates, lg. Fire King bowl, sm. old crock, oil lamp wall hanger, other items. Call 629-8745, 10/16

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANTS NEEDED

for several of our locations. Guaranteed highest pay on East Coast. Must be licensed in the state of Maryland or Delaware. All out patient locations are brand new with state of the art equipment. Full time or part time positions available. No evenings or weekends. Great benefits. Check our website for a complete list of locations. www.atlanticptrehab.com Fax confidential resume to Robin at 410-208-3632

Selling all remaining new & old stock for the nearly 40,000sq. ft. National Supply Co. Hundreds of Doors, Thousands of Plumbing parts, Toilets, Sinks, Vanities, Tubs, Showers, Lumber, 8 tractor trailer bodies, Clark 7,800lb Fork Lift. Major Manufacturers to include: Andersen, Kinkaid, Kohler, Georgia Pacific, Keller, Moen, Delta, American Standard, Samson, Lasco, and more!! This will be a cataloged sale. Catalog available the week of the sale on the website or by calling 410-835-0383 to receive by fax. Auctioneers note: This is a very large auction sale with thousands of lots of inventory. Loading times will be available Friday after the auction, Saturday 9 AM-5 PM & Sunday 9 AM – 4 PM. Additional loading times may be added by request. Directions: Route 13, just south of Trussum Pond Rd., 1st right on National Blvd. Doors/Windows: Hundreds of interior doors and exterior doors, steel entry doors, patio, double and sliding door units, bi-fold doors, closet doors and others, windows by Andersen, Perma Shield, hundreds of doors handles, door locks and more! Trim: Selection of trim/moldings to include oak, pine, cherry, pre & unfinished, casing, baseboard, chair rail, spindles & stair parts. Kitchen/Bath: Hundreds of sink and tub faucets including 24kt gold and crystal handled fixtures, kitchen cabinets to include maple, oak and birch, hundreds of cabinet and drawer pulls, countertops of all sizes, lg. qty. of tubs, one and two piece tub/shower combos, many whirlpool/Jacuzzi tubs, shower panels, shower pans, toilets, hundreds of toilet seats, bathroom and kitchen sinks, vanities, vanity tops, towel bars, medicine cabinets, mirrors and more!! Plumbing: Thousands of brass/copper fittings, lavatory plugs, faucets, drains, boxes & cases of Johnny Rings, toilet supplies & more. Interior: 500+ hood vents and Nutone Range Hoods, water heaters, hundreds of interior doors, hundreds of sheets of paneling including White Ice and Bombay Till, lighting units, and more. Exterior: Very lg. qty of shutters, siding, soffit, 200 boxes of alum. & fiberglass screen from 24”-48”, salt treat lumber and more!! Special Interest: 1986 Clark 7,800 lb fork lift, nine tractor trailer bodies of all sizes, several showcases, nails, screws, industrial shelving, and much more to be discovered. Terms Personal Property: Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 13% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold "As Is" with no warranties of any kind. Auction conducted inside & outside of the 40,000 Sq. Ft. facility. Two Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Food served by Station 7 Restaurant of Pittsville.

View the Guide or Website for Additional Information, Terms, Description & Pictures!

Five Generations of Combined Auction Experience Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers 410-835-0383 or 302-856-7333 www.marshallauctions.com


MORNING STAR LEATHER COUCH, dark blue, matching lounge chair & bone white lounge chair, end table, 2 coffee tables, small throw rug, lamp, curio cabinet. 875-2460. 10/2 FISHER PRICE Baby Swing & Evenflo Exersaucer, both only used 3 mos., $50 ea. 258-3589. 9/25 SPLIT FIREWOOD, seasoned mixed, 4.5 x 6’ heaping PU load, delivered, $45. 519-0441. 9/25

AIR COND., Whirlpool 10,200 BTU, window unit, exc. cond., $99. 519-1568.

RITEWAY WOODSTOVE, auto thermostat, $350, 8754700 after 5 pm. 9/11

DISHWASHER, Whirlpool, 24” portable, exc. cond., $249. 519-1568. 9/18

DK. BLUE LEATHER COUCH & 2 leather chairs (1 dk. bl., 1 white), 1 end table, 2 coffee tables, 1 lamp & rug, perfect shape, limited use, $850. 8752460. 9/11

DIGITAL CAMERA, Sony FD Mavica, older model, 2.0 megapixels, mint cond., $40. 875-1877. 9/18

SCHWINN 301D Stairstepper, like new. Pd. $340, asking $95. 519-0441. 9/25

TAYLOR MADE GOLF BAG, Voi-Tech, like new, $20. Datrek Bag, like new, w/set of Epic-500 irons, $25. 3 Sandwedges, $10 ea., call for info. 629-3537. 9/18

3 SEATER SOFA, salmon pink, w/matching recliner, lov seat & stool. $400. 6280690. 9/25

COMPAQ COMPUTER & Hewlett Packard 4 in 1, hardly used, $300. 433359-7215. 9/18

SEASONED HARDWOOD, ready to burn, $150 per cord. 853-5095. 9/25

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

SCOOBYDOO BOWLING BALL, 8 lb. & bag, $15. 875-4700 after 5 pm. 9/11

2 GOLF PULL CARTS, $50 ea. Nordic Track treadmill, self propelled, exc. cond., $100. 628-5388. 9/11 HEDGE TRIMMER, antique 2-handle manual type, $10. 628-5388. 9/11 GE ELEC. RANGE, freestanding, immac. & mint, self-cleaning, bisque color, $200. 875-1778. 9/11 ROOFING SHINGLES: 2 squares & 1 bundle,a 30 yr. warranty, asking $135. 8750766 after 6 p.m. 9/11

PAGE 35

POOL TABLE, used, 3x6, $150. 258-6553. 9/11

DOG HOUSE, DURABLE plastic, $20. 875-4486. 10/9

$250 GIFT CERT., Nascar Racing Store. Will sell for $75. 629-7674. 9/11

DUCKS, DUCKLINGS, Chicks & chickens, reasonable. 41-873-3036. 9/18

PROPANE/LP GAS HEATER, Vanguard 1400-2800 BTUs, vent free, floor or wall mount, $125. 3377494. 9/11

MOBILE HOME FOR SALE

SOFA, 3 cushions, beige, exc. cond., $100. 2 Matching wing-back chairs, plaid fabric, $200 for both. 6296337. 9/11

12x34 MOBILE HOME, 1 BR, exc. cond., 875-4387. 10/9 ‘89 14x70 MOBILE HOME, 3 BRs, 2 baths, $20,000. 433-359-7215. 9/18

GRILL WITH HOOD, $75. 628-6953. 9/11

ANIMALS, ETC. MINIATURE SCHNAUZER pups for sale, AKC. 8 wks old, 1 blk., 2 salt/pepper. Wormed & first shot. Health guarantee, $450 ea. 2585710. 10/16

FOR RENT

FOR RENT CONDO AT CROSSGATE DRIVE 2 BRS, 2 baths, den, kitchen, dining area, living room, all appls. Avail. Nov. 1. 302-629-4196

Maryland

Home & Garden Show and Holiday Craft Show

October 17-19, 2008 Maryland State Fairgrounds, Timonium

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PAGE 36 NEW POWER WHEELCHAIRS, HOSPITAL BEDS AND SCOOTERS. IMMEDIATE DELIVERY CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-9984111 TO QUALIFY. Help Wanted: Truck Driver Driver - $5K SIGN-ON BONUS for Experienced Teams. Dry Van & Temp Control. Solo Lanes also avail. O/Os & CDL-A Grads welcome. Call Covenant (866) 684-2519. EOE. Homes for Sale New Single-Family Homes in active adult (55 plus) community in historic Smryna, Delaware, near Beach and Bays. From $99,900. 302-659-5800 or see www.bonayrehomes.com A Bank Repo for Sale! 5bd. 3ba. $25,000 only $199/mo! 5% dn, 20 yrs @ 8.5 APR! FOR Listings 800-585-3617 ext 8414 Land Auction Major Land Auctions – 27,212+/- Acres in Indiana & Kentucky. Managed hardwoods – 70,000,000+/- BD Ft. Sawtimber – World-class hunting – Over 4 miles of Ohio River frontage – Pasture & tillable land. Sold in 191 Tracts - 3 Day Event: November 6, 7, 8. Woltz & Schrader Real Estate Auctions. For more information, call 800-551-3588 or on the web at www.woltz.com. James Woltz IN# AU10600094, KY#RP 2042. 3500sf Home, Guest Cottage on 2.11 acres on Stoney Creek in Apple Valley (Bedford, Va) Waterfall, wooded. Auction: Saturday, October 25, 10am. 800780-2991. www.countsauction.com (VAAF93) Land For Sale LAKE LOT 3+ acres only $39,900. Wooded & private. Convenient Northern Neck location. EZ terms. Buy now, build later. Hurry, limited supply. 888-774-5765 5 AC- $79,900. Secluded, wooded acreage w/private access to James River. Great bank terms. Call now 866-764-5238, x 1918 Miscellaneous ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance, Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-858-2121 or visit www.CenturaOnline.com RV For Sale Lake Somerset Camp Ground, Maryland Eastern Shore. Leave your RV on site all year. $1300 includes water, electric & sewage. Call for brochure 410-9571866 or 410-957-9897.

Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108. Tickets REDSKINS TICKETS www.brucehallsports.com tickets@ brucehallsports.com 703-904-0647 Vacation Rentals Autumn Savings Deep Creek Lake, MD - Long & Foster Resort Rentals Rent 3 nights/get 4th free! Fall is the perfect time to visit the mountains. Hiking, biking, golf, fishing, relaxing. Mountain top homes with gorgeous views. 800.336.7303 DeepCreekResort.com Waterfront Homes Beautiful New 2-bedroom condominium with 20’ private boat slip on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Must sell at $264,000. Call Brent 843-446-9144.

LEGALS BIN SALE NOTICE On Saturday, 11/15/08 at 11:00 a.m. Peninsula Mini Storage located at 40 S. Market St, Blades/Seaford, DE. will hold a public auction pursuant to the State of Delaware Self-Storage Facility Act Title 25 Chapter 49. The following storage units will be sold or disposed of for Non-Payment of storage rent. Tenants name and last known address are listed below. Barbara Kilgoe, Seaford, DE, Unit 336; Charles Allen, Kinston, NC, Unit 153. Bidding guidelines available on request. Frank Passwaters, Storage Manager, Peninsula Mini Storage, 302-6295743. 10/16/2tc THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR THE STATE OF DELAWARE IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY In Re: Change of Name of Anthony Johnson, Petitioner to: Anthony C. Oliver. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Anthony Johnson intends to present a Petition to the Court of Common Pleas for the State of Delaware in and for Sussex County to change his name to Anthony C. Oliver. Anthony Johnson, Petitioner 10/16/3tc

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• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PUBLIC NOTICE

premises. The protest(s) must be filed with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner at the 3rd Floor, Carvel State Office Building, 820 North French Street, Wilmington, DE 19801. The protest(s) must be received by the Commissioner’s office on or before November 10, 2008. Failure to file such a protest may result in the Commissioner considering the application without further notice, input or hearing. If you have any questions regarding this matter please contact the Commissioner's Office at (302) 577-5222. 10/16/3tp

You are hereby notified the below applications will be before: The City of Seaford Board of Adjustment and Appeals for their determination on Wednesday, November 5, 2008 at 12:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: Case No. V-06-08: Seaford School District, property owner of 399 N. Market St. (Seaford Senior High School) Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.00 6.00 is seeking a special exception as required by the Municipal Code, Chapter 15, Sec. 15-14(5)/Sec. 15-20 Uses by Special Exception. The School District wishes to construct a green house, shed and sidewalk in support of the Agricultural Science classes to be offered in the upcoming school year. Case No. V-19-08: WalMart, 22899 Sussex Highway, Tax Map and Parcel 331 6.00 4.01, is seeking a special exception as required by the Municipal Code, Chapter 15, Sec. 1540A/ Sec. 15-31 Uses by Special Exception, in order to place 12 storage containers on site for the 120 days. If any of these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, pease attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 16th day of October 2008 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 10/16/1tc

LEGAL NOTICE Vaalvod, L.L.C., trading as Wine & Spirits Outlet, has on October 10, 2008, applied with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner for a package store liquor license for the sale of alcoholic beverages for a premises located at 22949 Sussex Highway, Seaford, Delaware (19973), not for consumption on the premises where sold. Persons who are against this application should provide written notice of their objections to the Commissioner. For the Commissioner to be required to hold a hearing to consider additional input from persons against the application, the Commissioner must receive one or more documents containing a total of at least 10 signatures of residents or property owners located within 1 mile of the premises or in any incorporated areas located within 1 mile of the

NOTICE OF PETITION TO OBTAIN TITLE TO ABANDONED PROPERTY JP19-08-001379 A petition has been filed to obtain title to the following abandoned property: 2003 Mazda Protege, Vin: JM1BJ 245X31187236. The petition was filed by: Frederick Ford Mercury, Inc. The following persons have been identified as owners or other persons with an interest in the property: Aaron Edward Piper, 381 Addison Rd., Smyrna, DE 19977; USAA Federal Savings Bank, PO Box 660986, Sacramento, CA 95866. If judgement is entered for the Property Holder/ Petitioner, the Petitioner will be awarded complete and absolute title to the property pursuant to 25 Del. C. §4002 and any existing liens or other interests against it will be void. Anyone with a legal interest in this property may contest the petition by filing an Answer (J.P. Civ. Form No. 53) by 11/17/08 with Justice of the Peace Court No. 19, 408 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Date: 10/10/08. 10/16/2tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BROAD CREEK HUNDRED Subd. #2007-20 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, NOVEMBER 20, 2008, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of GOLDEN ACRES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 85.77 acres into

86 lots, located east of Road 449, 835 feet south of Route 24. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 10/16/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 10295 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-25, Item C of said ordinance of ALFRED THOMPSON who is seeking a variance to from the front yard setback requirement, to be located south of Road 535, 280 feet east of U.S. Route 13. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, NOVEMBER 17, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 10/16/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Little Creek Hundred Case No. 10299 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article VI, Subsection 115-42, Item B of said ordinance of GLADYS E. RAMOS who is seeking a variance to from the front yard setback requirement, to be located north of Delmar Road,

1,652.44 feet east of Susan Beach Road. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, NOVEMBER 17, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 10/16/1tc

PUBLIC BID The Town of Laurel is accepting sealed bids for a 2004 Honda Civic LX 4Door, tan in color. The Honda has 47,098 miles, automatic transmission, equipped with power windows and door locks and AM/FM Stereo CD Player. Anyone interested in submitting a bid must obtain a Bid Submission Form. The car is available to be viewed at Laurel Town Hall and the Bid Submission Forms can be picked up at Laurel Town Hall, 201 Mechanic Street, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Minimum bid is $5,000.00 with all bids being sealed. Bids are due by 5:00 p.m. Thursday, October 23, 2008. 10/2/3tc

CITY OF SEAFORD DEMOLITION ORDER Name of Property Owner: Troy Roberts Address: 424 Sandy Courtrail, Macon, GA 31217 The City of Seaford has ordered the Demolition of the below said structure, as per the Notification to Owner dated July 31, 2008 and pursuant to Section 423-29 of the City of Seaford Housing Code. The structure has become so out of repair as to be dangerous, unsafe, unsanitary or otherwise unfit for human habitation so that it would be unreasonable to repair the same. Description of Structure: Tax Map and Parcel 4-31 5.00 363; 309 North Street, Seaford, Delaware 19973. Remedies: The owner is to demolish the structure within thirty days. Failure to comply will result in the City demolishing the structure. Joshua E. Littleton Building Official 10/2/3tc See LEGALS—page 38


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PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 36

CITY OF SEAFORD DEMOLITION ORDER Name of Property Owner: Humberto Ramirez Address: 22233 Tanyard Road, Preston, MD 21655 The City of Seaford has ordered the Demolition of the below said structure, as per the Notification to Owner dated June 17, 2008 and pursuant to Section 423-29 of the City of Seaford Housing Code. The structure has become so out of repair as to be dangerous, unsafe, unsanitary or otherwise unfit for human habitation so that it would be unreasonable to repair the same. Description of Structure: Tax Map and Parcel 4-31 5.00 420; 806 Third Street, Seaford, Delaware 19973. Remedies: The owner is to demolish the structure within thirty days. Failure to comply will result in the City demolishing the structure. Joshua E. Littleton Building Official 10/2/3tc

CITY OF SEAFORD DEMOLITION ORDER Name of Property Owner: Emma Coulbourn, Est./ Arthur Cohee Address: 12316 Ridgely Road, Ridgely, MD 21660 The City of Seaford has ordered the Demolition of the below said structure, as per the Notification to Owner dated January 25, 2008 and pursuant to Section 4-23-29 of the City of Seaford Housing Code. The structure has become so out of repair as to be dangerous, unsafe, unsanitary or otherwise unfit for human habitation so that it would be unreasonable to repair the same. Description of Structure: Tax Map and Parcel 4-31 4.00 101; 120 E. King Street, Seaford, Delaware 19973. Remedies: The owner is to demolish the structure within thirty days. Failure to comply will result in the City demolishing the structure. Joshua E. Littleton Building Official 10/2/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Alberta Wilson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Alberta Wilson who departed this life on the 14th day of September A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Barbara Ann Mullins, Alice Marie Elliott, Michael John Wilson on the 2nd day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said de-

MORNING STAR ceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 14th day of May, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Barbara Ann Mullins P.O. Box 315 Lewes, DE 19958 Alice Marie Elliott 3138 Old Sharptown Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Michael John Wilson 3208 Old Sharptown Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Attorney: Ellis & Szabo P.O. Box 574 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/16/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Gladys F. Lee, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Gladys F. Lee who departed this life on the 22nd day of September A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Doris N. Banks on the 6th day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 22nd day of May, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Doris N.Banks 26894 Bethel Concord Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/16/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Nora Lee Hopkins, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Nora Lee Hopkins who departed this life on the 3rd day of August, A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto William T. Hopkins, Jr. on the 3rd day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 3rd day of April, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

this behalf. Administrator: William T. Hopkins, Jr. 7305 Main St. Queenstown, MD 21658 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/16/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Janice Elizabeth DeHart, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Janice Elizabeth DeHart who departed this life on the 23rd day of June, A.D. 2008 late of Venice, FL were duly granted unto Kristeena Sheets on the 6th day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 23rd day of February, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Kristeena Sheets 673 Carls Bad Court Lusby, MD 20657 Attorney: Susan Pittard Weidman, Esq. Susan Pittard Weidman, P.A. P.O. Box 1131 Millville, DE 19967 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/16/3tc

NOTICE Estate of David George Johnson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given

that Letters of Administration upon the estate of David George Johnson who departed this life on the 2nd day of September, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Diana L. Johnson on the 17th day of September, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 2nd day of May, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Diana L. Johnson 26842 Bethel Concord Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/2/3tc

NOTICE Estate of George Kenneth Trammell, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of George Kenneth Trammell, Jr. who departed this life on the 17th day of September, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto George Kenneth Trammell, III on the 25th day of September, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the

same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 17th day of May, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: George Kenneth Trammell, III 25328 Haven Dr., Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/9/3tc

19801. The protest(s) must be received by the Commissioner’s office on or before October 27, 2008. Failure to file such a protest may result in the Commissioner considering the application without further notice, input or hearing. If you have any questions regarding this matter please contact the Commissioner’s Office at (302) 577-5222. 10/2/3tp

LEGAL NOTICE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware and on the South side of Eighth Street, adjoining lands now or formerly of Sirman D. Marvil, Mary Owens, Howard E. Russel, H.K. Fooks, heirs and Lizzie Lloyd, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SAID Sirman D. Marvilland on the South side of Pavement and at a pipe at seam in pavement and run from thence with

SHERIFF SALE Vaalvod, L.L.C., trading as Wine & Spirits Outlet, has on September 26, 2008, applied with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner for a package store liquor license for the sale of alcoholic beverages for a premises located at 22949 Sussex Highway, Seaford, Delaware (19973), not for consumption on the premises where sold. Persons who are against this application should provide written notice of their objections to the Commissioner. For the Commissioner to be required to hold a hearing to consider additional input from persons against the application, the Commissioner must receive one or more documents containing a total of at least 10 signatures of residents or property owners located within 1 mile of the premises or in any incorporated areas located within 1 mile of the premises. The protest(s) must be filed with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner at the 3rd Floor, Carvel State Office Building, 820 North French Street, Wilmington, DE

See LEGALS—page 39

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION

Title of publication: Seaford Star Publication number: 016-428 Date of filing: October 16, 2008 Frequency of issue: Weekly Number of issues published annually: 52 Annual subscription price: $19 in county, $24 out of county, $29 out of state Complete mailing address: Morning Star Publications, Inc., 628 W. Stein Hwy., P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000 Publisher: Bryant L. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973. Owners: Bryant L. & Carol A. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973; John Patrick Murphy, 28342 Discountland Road, Laurel, DE 19956; Mrs. Douglas J. Mordes, 901 Short Lane, Seaford, DE 19973, Christina M. Reaser, 34804 Susan Beach Road, Laurel, DE 19956

Title of publication: Laurel Star Publication number: 016-427 Date of filing: October 16, 2008 Frequency of issue: Weekly Number of issues published annually: 52 Annual subscription price: $19 in county, $24 out of county, $29 out of state Complete mailing address: Morning Star Publications, Inc., 628 W. Stein Hwy., P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000 Publisher: Bryant L. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973. Owners: Bryant L. & Carol A. Richardson, 215 Elm Drive, Seaford, DE 19973; John Patrick Murphy, 28342 Discountland Road, Laurel, DE 19956; Mrs. Douglas J. Mordes, 901 Short Lane, Seaford, DE 19973, Christina M. Reaser, 34804 Susan Beach Road, Laurel, DE 19956

Extent & Nature of circulation:

Avg. copies per issue during preceding 12 months A. Total no. copies (press run) 4000 B. Paid and/or Requested circulaiton: 1. Outside-County Mail Subscriptions 355 2. In-County Mail Subscriptions 2640 3. Newsstands, Other Non-Mail 580 C. Total Paid Distribution 3575 D. Free Distribution, Mail In-County 154 E. Free Distribution, Non-Mail 132 F. Total Free Distribution (D+E) 286 G. Total Distribution (C+F) 3861 H. Copies not distributed 139 I. Total (G+H) 4000 J. Percent Paid/Requested Circulation 92.59

Actual no. copies published nearest to filing date 4300 345 2731 595 3671 0 479 479 4150 150 4300 88.46

I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Bryant L. Richardson, Publisher

Extent & Nature of circulation:

Avg. copies per issue during preceding 12 months A. Total no. copies (press run) 3500 B. Paid and/or Requested circulaiton: 1. Outside-County Mail Subscriptions 299 2. In-County Mail Subscriptions 1973 3. Newsstands, Other Non-Mail 611 C. Total Paid Distribution 2883 D. Free Distribution, Mail In-County 229 E. Free Distribution, Non-Mail 220 F. Total Free Distribution (D+E) 449 G. Total Distribution (C+F) 3332 H. Copies not distributed 168 I. Total (G+H) 3500 J. Percent Paid/Requested Circulation 82.37

Actual no. copies published nearest to filing date 3300 300 2009 690 2999 0 212 212 3211 89 3300 90.88

I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Bryant L. Richardson, Publisher


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 the south side of the pavement southeast 81 Y2 degrees 50.2 feet to a seam in the pavement and the middle of a 10 foot wide driveway; thence from thence to the south end of the said driveway a distance of 87 feet and a pipe; thence continuing the said same course a further distance of 115.8 feet to the said H.K. Fooks heirs lands and a pipe, from thence northwest 81 ? degrees 55 feet to a pipe and the lands of Howard E. Russell, from thence with the said Howard E. Russell Land, Mary Owens land and Sirman D. Marvilland in a northern direction a total distance of 202.8 feet to the pipe and place of Beginning. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Centex Home Equity Company, LLC, by deed of James D. Goodwin and Linda D. Goodwin dated May 22, 2006 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in deed Book 8761 page 103. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.1056.00 Property Address: 236 West 8th Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be

forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LINDA D. & JAMES D. GOODWIN, II and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, designated as LOTS NINETEEN (19), TWENTY (20), TWENTY ONE (21) AND TWENTY TWO (22) on a plot of “Lands of Charles G. Friedel” more particularly described in accordance with a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., dated September 8, 2000, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the South side of Road No. 534 (25 feet from the centerline thereof) a corner for this land and Lot 24; thence by and with Road No. 534, North 72 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East 101.64 feet to a concrete monument found, a corner for this land and Lot 16; thence turning and running by and with Lots 16, 17 and 18, South 27 degrees 55 minutes 00 seconds East 175.40 feet to a pipe found on the North side of Pine Street (20 feet from the centerline thereof) a corner for this land and Lots 18, thence turning and running by and with Pine Street, South 62 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds West 100.00 feet to a concrete monument found, a corner for this land and Lot 23; thence turning and running by and with Lots 23 and 24 North 27 degrees 55 minutes 00 seconds West 193.60 feet to the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Joseph S. Morris and Stacie V. Morris by deed of Roger E. Hammond and Althea Gail Hammond Trustees under revocable trust agreement of Roger E. Hammond and Althea Gail

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Hammond dated 11/23/94, deed dated October 6, 2000 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2528, page 17. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00271.00 Property Address: 9674 Tharp Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOSEPH S. & STACIE V. MORRIS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Venditioni Exponas, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot,

piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, described more particularly as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe in the eastern side of the Meadow Highway, distant southerly along said highway, two hundred sixty feet from the MiddlefordGeorgetown State Highway; thence easterly at right angle to said Meadow Highway, two hundred ten (210) feet to an iron pipe; thence southerly, parallel to the Meadow Highway, two hundred ten (210) feet to an iron pipe; thence westerly, parallel to the first mentioned line, two hundred ten (210) feet to the aforesaid Meadow Highway; thence with same, northerly, two hundred ten (210) feet to the place of beginning, containing one acre of land, be the same more or less. It being part of a larger trust conveyed to these Grantors by deed of Rafe Griffith, said deed being now duly of record in the Office for the recording of deeds for Sussex County, reference being has thereto will more fully and at large appear. Tax Parcel: 2-31-12.0098.00 Property Address: 23615 Old Meadow Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these

PAGE 39 terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARY LONDON, INDIVIDUALLY, DENNIS W. FRIEDEL, INDIVIDUALLY, & DOLPHIN PUBLISHING, INC., D/B/A THE DOLPHIN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All THAT CERTAIN lot, piece and parcel of land situate lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a stone and stake located at the intersection of County Road 541 and a proposed 50 foot private road; thence along the Easterly right-of-way line of County Road 341, North 31-1/4” West 100 feet to a concrete monument, thence continuing the same course 100 feet to a concrete monument, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of John A. Moore, Jr.; thence along the Moore lands, North 60 degrees East 390.5 feet to a point; thence turning and running South 31-1/4” East a distance of 200 feet to the Northerly right-of-way line of the aforesaid proposed 50 foot road; thence along the proposed road, South 60 degrees West 390.5 feet back to the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may, and being shown on a plot drawn by John G. Watson, and improved with a 1968 American mobile home w/Registration #MH 19940. Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Sussex County Deed Record Book 7964, Page 173-183 Recorded August 18, 2005 at 12:33 p.m. Tax Parcel: 5-31-15.0030.02 Property Address: 26867 Lonesome Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sus-

sex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BRUCE R. FRASER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, with the improvements erected thereon situate in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being bounded on the southeast by Baker Road (50 feet wide), on the Southwest by lands now or formerly of Juan and Patricia Lawson (1395/19), on the West by land now or formerly of Gilda M. Nichols (1006/117), on the North by lands now or formerly of Randall and Pauline Handy (680/778), on the East by lands now or formerly of See LEGALS—page 40


PAGE 40 LEGALS - from Page 39 William and Betty Hughes (699/741). BEING the same land conveyed unto Luz F. Morris by deed of Andrae L. Butler dated December 13, 2004, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3073 at Page 170. Tax Parcel: 5-31-3.0027.03 Property Address: 4717 Baker Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LUZ F. MORRIS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit:

MORNING STAR All that certain piece, parcel, lot or tract of land designated District Map Parcel No. 1-32-13.00-30.00, known and addressed as 12493 County Seat Highway, lying on the northerly side thereof, 4,700 feet, plus or minus, easterly from Highway Route No. 479, situated in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, the State of Delaware, and being more particularly located and ascertained in the following metes and bounds description, by the P.E.L.S.A. Company, Inc., Land Consultants and Surveyors, in accordance with the location as given and shown on a plan and survey prepared by said P.E.L.S.A. Company, Inc., dated August 29, 2006, referenced and filed M006112, thus, bounded and described, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which KwangSuk Hall, Michael Edward Hall and Kendra Leigh Hall did grant and convey unto Charles A. Merson, Jr. by deed dated August 31, 2006 and recorded on October 13, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3372 Page 140. Tax Parcel: 1-32-13.0030.00 Property Address: 12493 County Seat Highway, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHARLES A. MERSON, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Bridgeville, North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the northeastern right-of-way of Cannon Street, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a found iron pipe, said iron pipe located on the aforesaid northeastern right-ofway of Cannon Street; said iron pipe also being located at a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Leonard Harris; said iron pipe also being located 196.74 feet, from the intersection of Cannon Street and Mill Street; thence running by and along the northeastern right-of-way of Cannon Street, North 42 degrees 30’00” West 45.00 feet to a found iron pipe; thence turning and running North 47 degrees 30’00” East 154.77 feet to a found iron pipe; thence turning and running South 42 degrees 30’00” East 45.00 feet to a found iron pipe; thence turning and running by and along the common boundary line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Leonard Harris, South 47 degrees 30’00” West 154.77 feet home to the place of beginning, and said to contain 6,965 square feet (0.16 Acres) of land, together with all improvements thereon, as surveyed by Peninsula Surveying & Site Design, Inc., registered surveyors, on June 17, 1998. Being the same lands and premises which Phyllis Handley Parker did grant and convey unto Ray H. Millman and JoAnna Millman by deed dated 6/29/1998 and recorded 6/30/1998 Office of the

Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02299P208. Tax Parcel: 1-31-10.1518.00 Property Address: 113 North Cannon Street, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RAY H. & JO ANNA MILLMAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain piece, parcel and tract of land being situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, described more particularly described

as follows, to wit; BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the Southerly right of way line of Broad Creek Drive (50 foot right of way) said point being 455 feet, more or less, from River Road, said point also being a common corner for lands now or formerly of Mark W. Kinnikin; thence leaving said right of way line and with Kinnikin lands, South 05 degrees 54 minutes 19 seconds West a distance of 309.55 feet to a pipe found in the line of Phillips Landing Estates; thence turning and with said Phillips Landing Estates, North 76 degrees 40 minutes 07 seconds West a distance of 110.00 feet to a concrete monument round at a corner of lands now or formerly of Diana T. Watkins; thence turning and with said Watkins lands, North 02 degrees 41 minutes 31 seconds East a distance of329.85 feet to a concrete monument found on the southerly right of way line of Broad Creek Drive; thence turning and with said right of way line of a curve to the right having a radius of 2,283.40 feet, the central right angle being 03 degrees 18 minutes 47 seconds, the arc distance being 132.04 feet, the chord bearing South 69 degrees 10 minutes 16 seconds East a distance of 132.02 feet home to the point and place of beginning said to contain 37,658 square feet, more or less, of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by TempleSellers, Inc., dated March 21, 2003, together with any and all improvements located thereon. The improvements thereon being known as 5488 Broad Drive, Laurel, DE 19956 TAX ID NO. 4-322.00-6.09 Being the same lands and premises which Alan Shoultes did grant and convey unto Alan Shoultes and Selina Lederman by deed dated 2/22/2007 and recorded 3/26/2007 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03429P00255. Tax Parcel: 4-32-2.006.09 Property Address: 5488 Broad Drive, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited

to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ALAN SHOULTES & SELINA LEDERMAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: The land referred to in this policy is situated in the State of DE, County of SUSSEX, City of SEAFORD and described as follows: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a pipe found on the northeasterly side of Sussex County Road No. 483 (50 right of way), a corner for this lot and lands of Gerald J. and Linda W. Howard, said beginning point being 285 feet from County Road No, 484; thence turning and running by and with lands of Gerald J. and Linda W. Howard, in part and lands of Dwayne C. and Shally O. Swafford in pad North 43 degrees 19 See LEGALS—page 41


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 40 minutes 00 seconds East 290.58 feet to a pipe found, a corner for this lot; thence turning and running by and with lands, of Daniel J. Shea, South 48 degrees 43 minutes 00 seconds East 150.00 feet to a pipe found, a corner for this lot; thence turning and running by and with lands of William R. Frank III, South 43 degrees 9 minutes 00 seconds West 290.58 feet to a pipe found on the northeasterly side of Sussex County Road No. 483; thence turning and running by and with Sussex County Road No.463. North 4.8 degrees 43 minutes 00 seconds West 150.00 feet to the place of beginning, containing 1.00 acres of land, more or less as surveyed by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated August 22, 2000. APN 2-31-17.00-67.08 Being the same lands and premises which Gregory T. Dill and Christine M. Dill did grant and convey unto Thomas R. Baker by deed dated 11/2/2005 and recorded 11/4/2005 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03226PG294. Tax Parcel: 2-31-17.0067.08 Property Address: 12905 Baker Mill Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid

at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of THOMAS BAKER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that lot, piece or parcel of land situated, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and lying on the east side of Brooklyn Avenue in said town, adjoining lands of Evelyn J. Hastings and Lot No. 2, Beginning at a concrete post on the east side of the sidewalk of Brooklyn Avenue and at a corner of the Evelyn J. Hastings land and run from thence an interior angle from Brooklyn A venue of 89 degrees 10 minutes in an eastern direction 180 feet to Brooklyn Avenue, from thence with the east side of the pavement on Brooklyn Avenue, northwest 20 ? degrees 60 feet to the concrete post and place of beginning said to contain 10,440 square feet of land, be it the same more or less with improvements thereon. It being Lot No.1 as surveyed by Harold L. Cook in August 1946. Being the same lands and premises which Mark D. Lowe and Michael Lowe did grant and convey unto Mark D. Lowe by deed dated 7/23/2004 and recorded 9/8/2004 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03031PG293. Tax Parcel: 2-32-12.1963.00 Property Address: 128 Brooklyn Avenue, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARK D. LOWE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known as LOT TWENTY-FOUR (24) on a plot of MARATHON ESTATE, which plot is recorded in Plot book 49, Page 106, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County at Georgetown, Delaware, which supersedes a Plot recorded in Plot Book 46, Page 266. This conveyance is subject to all the easements, covenants and restrictions as shown on the foregoing Plot and the Marathon Estates Agreement of Restrictions, Covenants and Conditions recorded in Deed Book 18778, Page 211, and the First Amendment to the Agreement of Restrictions, Covenants and Conditions in Deed Book 2148, Page

53. Being the same lands and premises which MJM Realty Company, LLC did grant and convey unto Martin J. Bush by deed dated February 2, 2007 and recorded on February 6, 2007 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3414 Page 009. Tax Parcel: 3-31-4.00143.00 Property Address: 34 Marathon Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARTIN J. BUSH and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State

PAGE 41 of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Delmar, County of Sussex and State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows to wit: Beginning at a point where the north side of Jewell Street intersects with the west side of North 6th Street; thence westerly by and with the north side of Jewell Street, North 81 degrees 18’ 00 west, 57.20 feet to a pipe set; thence, northerly, along lands now or formerly of Richard V. Platter and Bonnie J. Platter, husband and wife, and lands now or formerly of John E. Collins in Block C, north 08 degrees 31’ 40 east, 258.34 feet to a monument located on the southerly side of Delaware Avenue, thence, easterly along Delaware Avenue, south 81 degrees 44’ 22” east 54.18 feet to a mark in the sidewalk, a corner where Delaware Avenue and North 6th Street intersects, thence, southerly along the west side of North 6th Street, South 7 degrees 53’ 00” west, 268.78 feet to a mark in the sidewalk, the point and place of beginning. Said to contain 14,9555 square feet of land more or less, known as Lots 4 and 8, Block C, as surveyed by Miller Lewis, Inc. dated September 30, 1992, and referenced in Deed recorded 1874, Page 208. There is a 5 foot sidewalk on North 6th. Street, it is the intention of this Deed to convey all of Lots 4 and 8 in Block C. Subject to: Rehabilitation Agreement as recorded in Deed Book 2103, Page 292, Sussex County records. Being the same lands and premises which Ronald Lewis and April Lewis did grant and convey unto Ronald Lewis by deed dated November 30, 2004 and recorded on January 31, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03095 Page 157. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.1511.00 Property Address: 507 East Jewel Street, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified

Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RONALD LEWIS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the town of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known as Lot No. 5, Block C, of “Martin Farms” subdivision, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at an iron rod found on the westerly right of way line at Rodney Street (50 foot right of way) at a corner for this lot and lot No .4, said point of beginning being 418 feet more or less to Farms Street; Thence with the westerly right of way line of Rodney Street (50 foot right of way) South 17 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds West 100.00 feet to an iron rod found at a corner for this lot and lot No.6. Thence turning and running with Lot No. 6 North 72 degrees 55 minutes 00 secSee LEGALS—page 42


PAGE 42 LEGALS - from Page 41 onds West 150.00 feet to an iron rod found at a corner for this lot, Lot No. 6 and in line of Lot No. 17, Thence turning and running with Lot No. 17 and Lot No. 18 North 17 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds East 100.00 feet to an iron rod found at a corner for this Lot No. 4 and in line of Lot No. 18, Thence turning and running with Lot No. 4 South 72 degrees 55 minutes 00 seconds East 150.00 feet to the northerly right of way line of Rodney Street (50 foot right of way), the point and place of beginning, said to contain 15,000 square feet of land, more or less, together with improvements, as shown on a survey prepared by MillerLewis, Inc., dated May 17, 2004. Being the same lands and premises which Brian S. Taylor and Stacey B. Taylor did grant and convey unto Stacey B. Taylor by deed dated 8/25/2005 and recorded 9/26/2005 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03206PG226. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.05131.00 Property Address: 23 Rodney Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid

MORNING STAR at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of STACEY B. TAYLOR and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land, situated in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware and lying on the northwest side of the state road leading from highway No. 13 to Middleford by way of Dulaney’s Bridge adjoining lands now or formerly of Maurice Dineau and now or formerly of the Scotteu heirs, beginning for hie out lines at a state on the northwest side of the above mentioned road and a corner for the lands now or formerly of Maurice Dineau; thence with the line of said Dineau lands northeast 15 west 710 feet to a stake on the southeast bank of the main run of Clear Brook Branch; thence across the run north 6 degrees east 101 feet to a state a corner for lands now or formerly of Scotten heirs; thence with said line binding with its several courses in a southwest direction to the northwest, side of the abovementioned road; thence with said road binding with its westerly side back to the place of beginning, containing 20 acres of land more or less. Excepting and reserving from the aforesaid real estate a certain tract of land which was conveyed to Martin L. Sammons and Bonnies Sammons by indenture of Ruth N. Friedel, dated the 10th day of October, A.D. 1972 and which is a record in the office of the recorder of deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in deed book 690 at page 801 et. seq. Also excepting and reserving from the aforesaid real estates a certain tract of land which was conveyed to Robert O. Williams and Estelle E. Williams by indenture of James E. Friedel and Ruth Friedel, dated the 14th day of March, A.D. 1950 and

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

which is of record in the office of the recorder of deeds, aforesaid, in deed book 393 at page 423 et seq. Also excepting and reserving from the aforesaid real estate a certain tract of land which was conveyed to Alexander Mackey by indenture of James E. Friedel and Ruth Friedel which is of record in the office of the recorder of deeds, aforesaid, in deed book 551 page 212 et seq. Also excepting and reserving from the aforesaid real estate a certain tract of land which was conveyed to Charles Gray Friedel and Mildred A. Friedel by indenture of James E. Friedel and Ruth Friedel dated the 21st day October, A.D. 1953 and which is of record in the office of the recorder of deeds, aforesaid, in deed book 431 page 332 et seq. TAX ID#: 3-31-6.00-94.00 Being the same lands and premises which Charles Gray Friedel and Mildred A. Friedel did grant and convey unto Richard Alan Wilson and Raquella A. Wilson by deed dated 1/22/1997 and recorded 1/23/1997 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02177PG 166. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.0094.00 Property Address: 9651 Tharp Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confir-

mation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RICHARD ALAN & RAQUELLA A. WILSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIEC’E OR PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN THE TOWN OF LAUREL, COUNTY OF SUSSEX AND STATE OF DELAWARE, BORDERING ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF 206 WEST SIXTH STREET; BEGINNING AT A MARBLE MONUMENT’ LOCATED 177 FEET WEST OF THE WEST RAILS OF PENNCENTRAL RAILROAD; THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 152.25 FEET TO A MARBLE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 74 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 64.83 FEET TO A FENCE POST; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 151.00 FEET TO A STAKE, THENCE ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE CONCRETE WALK, SOUTH 75 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 65.09 FEET TO A MARBLE MONUMENT AND PLACE OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 9,743 SQUARE FEET, MORE OR LESS. BEING THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES WHICH CHRISTINE MILLER, WIDOW, BY DEED DATED JULY 3,1978, AND RECORDED IN THE OFFICE FOR THE RECORDING OF DEEDS IN AND GRANTED AND CONVEYED UNTO DELMAR FEEDS, INC., A CORPORATION OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE, IN FEE. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 206W. 6TH STREET LAUREL, DE 19956 Being the same lands and premises which Delmar

Feed Mills, Inc., a corporation of the State of Delaware, did grant and convey unto William P. Short, III and Bonnie M. Short by deed dated 5/10/1989 and recorded 5/19/1989 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK1648PG140. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.06147.00 Property Address: 206 West 6th Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before November 3, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BONNIE & WILLIAM P. SHORT, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

TAX SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following

described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel, situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the westerly light-of-way line of U.S. Route 13. BEGINNING at a point located on the westerly R.O.W. of U.S. Rt. 13, said point being a corner for other lands of Cove Enterprises, Inc.; Thence by and with other lands of Cove Enterprises, Inc., N70°14’28”W, a distance of 301.76’ to the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the left, having a radius of 1,569.86’ and having a chord bearing of N06°32’59”E, 245.69’; thence along the arc, through a central angle of 08°58’35”, a distance of 245.95’; thence N02°02’23” E, a distance of 499.05’; thence S76°12’29”E, a distance of 22.91’ to a point of curve to the left having a radius of 300.00’, a central angle of 08°47’29”, and a chord bearing of S80°36’14” E, 45.99’; thence easterly along the arc a distance of 46.03’; thence S84°59’58”E, a distance of 9.04’ to a point of curve to the right having a radius of 15.00’, a central angle of 90°00’00”, and a chord bearing of S39°59’58”E, 21.21 ‘; thence southeasterly along the arc a distance of 23.56’; thence S05°00’02”W, a distance of 37.00’ to a point; thence S84°59’58”E, a distance of 45.00’ to a point; thence N05°00’02”E, a distance of 10.00’ to a point of curve to the right having a radius of 30.00’, a central angle of 90°00’00”, and a chord bearing of N50°00’02”E, 42.43’; thence northeasterly along the arc a distance of 47.12’; thence S84°59’58”E, a distance of 100.02’ to a point of curve to the right having a radius of 40.00’, a central angle of 59°43’50”, and a chord bearing of S55°08’03”E, 39.84’; thence southeasterly along the arc a distance of 41.70’; thence S02°00’00”W, a distance of 444.75’ to the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the right, having a radius of l,869.86’ and having a chord bearing of S07°26’51 “w, 338.16’; thence by and with the westerly R.O.W. of US. Rt. 13, along the arc, through a central angle of l0°22’34”, a distance of 338.63’ to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 5.24 acres, more or less. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.0053.00 Property Address: 12500 Sussex Highway, Greenwood See LEGALS—page 43


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 42 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DISTINCT HOMES, INC. (S06T-08-005) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

TAX SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the westerly right-of-way line of US. Route 13, containing 1.39 acres of land more or less. BEGINNING at a point located on the westerly R.O.W. of US. Rt. 13, said point being a corner for other lands of Cove Enterprises, Inc. Thence by and with other lands of Cove Enterprises, Inc., N68°33’52”W, a distance of 299.40’ to the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the left, having a radius of 1,569.86’ and having a chord bearing of N 13°35’’47”E, 140.14’; thence along the arc,

through a central angle of 05°06’59”, a distance of 140.19’ to a point; thence S70°14’28”E, a distance 301.76’ to the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the right, having a radius of 1 869.86’ and having a chord bearing of S14°54’48”W, 148.62’; thence by and with the westerly R.O.W. of US. Rt. 13, along the arc, through a central angle of 04°33’19”, a distance of l48.66’ to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 43,126 square feet, more or less. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.0054.00 Property Address: 12570 Sussex Highway, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DISTINCT HOMES, INC. (S06T-08-006) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

TAX SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork

• OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Hundred, near the Northern edge of the Town of Greenwood, Sussex County and the State of Delaware, described more particularly as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a stake at the western side of a street or thoroughfare known as the Barwick Road, distant Southerly along said road two hundred fifty-six feet (256) from the center of a large ditch and which is a corner for lands now or formerly of William Fisher; thence from said beginning stake, three new lines as follows, to wit: North 72° 50’ West, four hundred twenty (420) feet to a stake; South 17° 10’ West, one hundred five (105) feet to a stake; South 72° 50’ East, four hundred twenty (420) feet to a stake at the Western side of the aforesaid road; thence along and with said road, North 17° 10’ East, one hundred five (105) feet to the place of beginning, containing one acre of land, be the same more or less. Tax Parcel: 5-30-9.0017.00 Property Address: 314 North First Street, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PATRICIA DUKER & ROBERTA HARMON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc

TAX SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on:

PAGE 43

A lesson in humanity Like me, you've been watching with interest, and a little trepidaEV ODD ROFFORD tion, the slide of the stock market. You've heard politicians speak for and against the bailout. You've This crisis is because wondered if either candidate has average people who the magic pill to get us back on should have known track. (hint: don’t count on it…) Like most of you, I confess I they could only afford a am not an expert on our national $150,000 mortgage economic system, but much of what we are seeing in the headtook twice as much. lines can be traced to some very basic human issues. These anyterm solution for anything? body can understand. Let me cover a few. I remember I once had a car that was Greed. There’s enough to go around, deeply rusted. No matter how many times that’s for sure. Greedy lenders made big money on loans. Greedy companies lever- I painted it, the rust always came back. The problem was I never found a way to aged debt to continue risky practices. go deep enough to remove the rust itself. Real estate agents, builders, suppliers As painful as it sounds, until we actualand the rest all had “bumper-crop” years. ly take our lumps and let the market (and While each were doing their jobs, they all our thinking) correct, we won’t really profited from the greediest of all — the solve this problem. everyday Joe. It's time to return to living within our That’s right. This crisis is because avermeans instead of looking to borrow our age people who should have known they way out of crisis. could only afford a $150,000 mortgage Along the way some will lose their took one for twice as much. homes and move in with family, quit eatEven though the payment didn’t make ing out, have to cut their own hair, drop sense, many believed that the natural proout of private lessons, forego vacations, gression of increased prices would allow shop generic, not buy new clothes, etc. us to resell our home for even more This sounds like a bitter pill, but somemoney and profit from that. It’s like a where we have to break the debt dependPonzi scheme where each person thinks, ency. “I’m fine as long as I’m not the last one Fear. This may be the biggest battle of in.” all. The stock market may be falling, but Sadly, the scheme is ending and milthe sky isn’t. There is enough industry and lions have a mortgage on a home that’s opportunity and potential in this land to too big with a number bigger than the see our way through difficult financial value of that home. Welcome to Economics 101: don’t bor- times. If everyone deals with their investrow on tomorrow’s dream if you can’t pay ments with an attitude of fear and pulls with today’s reality. out, we will have a full scale crash. Denial. The next problem is that we I recognize that due to age, not everydon’t want to face reality. We have to find a plausible way out of this mess. The “res- one has the window of recovery in the market that I have. Nonetheless, even cue bill” is an attempt to stem the consethose retiring can ill afford to cash out quences of our greed by having the govnow and lose so precipitously. ernment swallow our excesses. Only through patient plodding will we When was the last time we discovered recover and go forward. that bigger government was a good long-

R .T

Tuesday, October 21, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: TRACT I. ALL those four (4) certain lots, pieces and parcels of land located, lying and situate in a development known as “Crawford’s Addition: in the Town of Greenwood, Sussex County, Delaware, known and designated as Lots Numbered Five (5), Six (6), Seven (7), and Eight (8), fronting on the county road to Farmington between Broad Street and Green Street for a distance of Two Hundred Seven and Threefourths feet (207 ? ‘). TRACT II. ALL those three (3) lots, pieces or

parcels of land in Crawford’s Addition in the Town of Greenwood, Sussex County, Delaware, hereinafter mentioned and described as Lot No. Six (6), Seven (7), and Eight (8) as marked on Plot of said “Crawford’s Addition” and lying in Section D of the said Plot which is of record. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.0918.00 Property Address: 209 North First Street, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. Sale subject to con-

K. C

firmation by the Superior Court on November 7, 2008 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MABEL HEDGEPETH and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 10/9/2tc


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

People Smart, Betts to be married

Pictured with Mrs. Wilson are her children (from left) Agnes "Kathleen" Wilson-Sypniewski, Mike David-Wilson, Cindy Kuerner, Frank Wilson, Kathy McLaurin, and David Wilson.

Michael Betts and Sara Smart

Bruce and Susan Smart of Laurel and Clayton and Angie Townsend of Georgetown announce the engagement of their daughter, Sarah Rachel to Michael “Moosie” Adam Betts, son of Danny and Pam McCumbers of Laurel. The bride to be is a graduate of Laurel High School and is currently attending University of Delaware. She will be graduating in the spring of 2009 with a degree in finance. The groom graduated from Laurel High School in 2004 and is currently in the U.S. Marines and attending Chaminade University. He is stationed in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A 2010 wedding is being planned.

Wilson family holds reunion Condon family welcomes son A reunion was held, on Saturday, Sept. 20, at the family home on North Pine Street in Seaford, of the descendants of Mrs. Stella E. Wilson and her late husband, Benjamin T. “Tom” Wilson. A total of 28 family members, coming from Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Ohio, attended. In addition to the couple's six children and the spouses of four of them, seven grandchildren, the spouses of two of them, the fiancé of another, as well as seven great-grandchildren, were in attendance. The family reunion doubled as a belated surprise 92nd birthday party for

Mrs. Wilson, who was born in Baltimore in 1916 to Frank and Agnes (Kaniecki) Lewandowski. Her late husband was born in Lewes in the same year to Benjamin O. and Ella E. (Knowles) Wilson, the latter who was originally from Woodland. The Wilson children’s roots in Sussex County reach deep into the 1700s through several old area families. Mrs. Wilson is the grandmother of nine (including one deceased), the great-grandmother of 16, and the great-great-grandmother of one. Mrs. Wilson’s late husband Tom passed away in 1988.

Nathan Gregory Condon

Richie and Nicole Condon welcomed a baby boy, Nathan Gregory, on Friday, Sept. 19, 2008 at 6:35 a.m. He weighed 8 lbs. 9 oz., and was 221/2 inches long. His paternal grandparents are Ralph and Darlene Condon of Laurel, and George and Joyce Jefferson of Seaford. His maternal grandparents are Greg and Carla Johnson of Laurel, and Dave and Sandy Brown of Mardela Springs, Md. Nathan was welcomed home by his two big brothers, Tre, 9 and T.J., 7.

L ooking fora safe harborin a sea oftu rm oil? Sussex County Federal Credit Union is a member-owned financial institution insured by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), a branch of the federal government. NCUA is backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.

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in 2009. That’s a lot of history.

Visit One Of Our 4 Branches Or Check Us Out On Our Website At SussexCFCU.com.

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216 Washington Street Millsboro, DE 19966


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 45

Laurel varsity field hockey team gives Cape Henlopen a battle in 2-1 loss By Mike McClure

LEADING THE WAY- Laurel’s Tyler Robertson carries the ball as teammates Zach Toadvine, left, and Kegan Yossick lead the way during last Saturday’s Pop Warner Midget football game. Photo by Mike McClure

The Laurel varsity field hockey team rallied from a two goal deficit to give undefeated Cape Henlopen a battle in last Wednesday’s game in Laurel. The Bulldogs trailed the Vikings, 2-0, at the half before scoring a second half goal to make it 2-1. A second goal was waved off and Cape held on for the 2-1 win. “They are getting better. They had a real nice practice last night. I was just hoping they’d take last night’s practice into today’s game and they did,” Laurel head coach Margo Morris said following Wednesday’s game. In the first half, Cape’s Molly Desmond’s shot was stopped by Laurel goalie Ashley Zarello but the Vikings’ Caroline Judge followed the shot up and gave her team a 1-0 lead with 23:18 left. On a Cape corner, Judge took a pair of shots on goal which were stopped before Kaci Coveleski scored on a followup with 20:42 remaining in the first half. Cape out shot Laurel, 6-1, and held a 6-2 advantage in corners in the first half. Laurel’s defense, which kept Cape off the boards for the remaining 20 minutes in the first half, blanked the Vikings in the second half to keep it close. Laurel’s Tykia Briddell knocked the ball in the goal from outside the circle but the Bulldogs didn’t touch it and it was waved off. Back to back corners resulted in Laurel’s first goal of the game as Desirea Williams scored on a feed from Kirsti Continued on page 47

Laurel’s Trent Hearn, left, returns a kickoff for a touchdown during his team’s win over the Cape Sharks in Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee action last weekend. Above, Laurel Pop Warner Mitey Mite quarterback Mitchell Moyer looks to pass the ball downfield during his team’s home game against the Cape Sharks. Photos by Mike McClure WILDCAT WINThe Wildcats’ Brittani Scott goes in for the kill as teammates Kelsey Murrell, Meghan Gordy, and Jayme West look on during the Delmar girls’ volleyball team’s home win last Thursday. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel’s Kirsti Knight dribbles the ball past the Cape Henlopen defense during last Wednesday’s game in Laurel. Knight had an assist in the 2-1 loss. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel scores 21 second quarter points, tops Easton 49-22 The Laurel varsity football team advanced to 4-2 with a 49-22 non-conference win over Easton last Friday night. Tyler West ran for a pair of touchdowns, Chris Jones had a touchdown run and a touchdown reception, and Brandon Hearne threw a pair of touchdowns for the Bulldogs. Jones started the scoring with a five-yard touchdown run and Kyle Brown booted the extra point to make it 7-0. In the second quarter, Easton kicked a 22-yard field goal before West rumbled four yards for a touchdown. Brown’s PAT gave Laurel a 14-3 lead. Easton scored on a 61-yard touchdown pass, but Hearne came back with a pair of touchdown tosses. Hearne found Josh Kosiorowski for a 22-yard touchdown and later completed a 33yard pass to Jones for the score. Laurel held a 28-9 lead at halftime. Jules Cannon West ran four-yards for a touchdown, Jules Cannon had a nine-yard touchdown run, and Brown made two more extra points as Laurel outscored Easton, 14-7, in the third quarter. Josh Rubino capped the scoring for the Bulldogs with a fumble recovery in the end zone and Brown made his seventh PAT of the night for the 49-22 win. Jones ran for 131 yards and a touchdown on 15 carries and had the 33-yard touchdown reception; West carried the ball 15 times for 153 yards and two touchdowns; Kosiorowski caught two passes for 47 yards and a touchdown; David Albert caught one pass for 41 yards; Hearne completed four of seven passes for 121 yards and two touchdowns; and Cannon added 87 yards Kyle Brown rushing. Justin Rife paced the Laurel defense with five tackles and an assist; Nick Munoz had two tackles, one sack, and an interception; Kosiorowski added four tackles and an assist; and Albert made three tackles. Laurel hosts Woodbridge this Friday night in the Homecoming game.


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

IN PURSUIT- Seaford’s Jamie Swain, left, and Delmar’s Caroline Phillips pursue the ball during last Thursday’s varsity field hockey game in Delmar. Delmar netted a pair of second half goals to win the game, 3-1. Photo by Mike McClure

MOVING UPFIELD- Laurel’s Courtney Evans controls the ball during her team’s 2-1 loss to Cape Henlopen last week. Cape jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the first half before the Bulldogs stormed back to net a goal in the second half. Photo by Mike McClure

VOTE FOR GREG FULLER SUSSEX COUNTY CLERK OF THE PEACE

Indian River’s Cameron Travalini, left, and Delmar’s Casey Bellamy go for the ball during last Thursday’s game in Delmar. Indian River scored a second half goal for the narrow 1-0 win. Photo by Mike McClure

Indian River edges Delmar, 1-0, with second half goal The Delmar and Indian River boys’ soccer teams squared off in a battle of Henlopen South contenders last Thursday in Delmar and the two teams did not disappoint. After a scoreless first half Indian River scored the game’s only goal with 20:47 left for the 1-0 win. Each team had a number of scoring opportunities, especially in the second half. Delmar goalie Sean Scovell made three saves early in the second period to keep the Indians off the board. Delmar’s Denny Murray followed a shot by Casey Bellamy, but IR goalie Kevin Rowe made the save. On a corner kick, Indian River’s Chris Conover headed the ball over the goal. Murray later took a shot on goal which was once again stopped by Rowe. Following another great stop by Scovell, Indian River finally found the net. Jake Buchler scored off a pass from Peter Mais on a corner (20:47). Delmar’s Cory Phillips had a shot just miss wide right and Rowe made a save on a Delmar corner with around five minutes left in the contest. Indian River had an opportunity to add to its lead on a penalty kick by Mais, but Scovell made a pair of saves to stop the Indians short. IR held on to win the game, 1-0, despite seven saves by Scovell.

Democratic Candidate for Sussex County Clerk of the Peace Greg Fuller has been endorsed by Senator Thurman Adams. In addition, he has received endorsements from the Sussex County Democratic Party, the Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club and the Eastern Democratic Club.

Greg firmly believes that, “Strong marriages make strong families.” For more information, go to www.gregfullersr.com Paid for by Friends for Greg Fuller


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 47

Laurel Stars of the Week

Delmar senior Gabby Andrade makes a dig as teammate Jayme West looks on during last week’s win over Cape Henlopen. Andrade had five kills and eight digs for the Wildcats. Photo by Mike McClure

Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Shannon Wilson- Delmar

Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Brittani Scott- Delmar

Delmar’s Brittani Scott had four Delmar senior goalie Shannon Wilkills, 10 aces, and six digs in her team’s son made 10 saves in her team’s 2-0 win over Lake Forest last Tuesday. Scott loss to Dover last Monday. Wilson also also paced the Wildcats with five kills, stopped 13 shots in a 3-1 win over two aces, and three digs in Thursday’s Seaford on Thursday. win over Cape Henlopen. Honorable mention- Desirea Williams- Laurel; Kirsti Knight- Laurel; Diane Paul- Laurel; Mariah Dickerson- Laurel; Gabby Andrade- Delmar; Jayme West- Delmar; Kelsey Murrell; Lindsay Lloyd- Delmar; Christina Parsons- Delmar; Carlee Budd- Delmar; Maxine Fluharty- Sussex Tech; Sara Adams- Sussex Tech; Rebecca McMillan- Sussex Tech; Justin Rife- Laurel; Nick Munoz- Laurel; Chris Jones- Laurel; Tyler West- Laurel; David Albert- Laurel; Josh Kosiorowski- Laurel; Kyle Brown- Laurel; Daronte DeShields- Delmar; David Bradshaw- Delmar; Jamel JonesDelmar; Tevin Jackson- Delmar; Cody Webster- Delmar; Denny Murray- Delmar; Casey Bellamy- Delmar; Sean Scovell- Delmar; Roosevelt Joinville- Laurel; Aaron Givens- Laurel; Sebastian Borror- Sussex Tech; Evan Lee- Sussex Tech; Christian Espinoza- Sussex Tech; Desmond Sivels- Sussex Tech

CONGRATULATES THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

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Laurel field hockey continued Knight with 22:59 left in the game. Laurel appeared to knock in the tying goal later in the game, but that goal was also waved off. “There is no such thing as a good loss but we’ve come a long way,” said Morris. “Their record does not in any way reflect what kind of team they are.” Morris was pleased with the way her players are looking for each other and passing the ball instead of “playing hit and chase”. She said she is working with her team on hitting skills and capitalizing on scoring opportunities. Cape Henlopen was held to 10 shots and 10 corners. Laurel had two shots and six corners and Bulldog goalies Zarello and Taylor Oliphant combined to make six saves. Laurel hosts Seaford on Monday, Oct. 20. Laurel’s Alexis Oliphant looks up as she dribbles the ball during last Wednesday’s home loss to Cape Henlopen. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar girls’ volleyball team picks up a big win over Cape Henlopen By Mike McClure If there was any question about whether the Delmar girls’ volleyball team is a true contender in the Henlopen Conference, the Wildcats answered it with a 3-1 win over Cape Henlopen last Thursday in Delmar. The win, coupled with a non-conference victory over St. George’s on Monday, moved the Wildcats to 4-2 in the conference and 6-2 overall. “The girls just played so well together. They just came together as a team and they stayed together as a team,” Delmar coach Karen Lewis said. “They were very, very determined and they stayed with it.” Delmar jumped ahead early in the first game of Thursday’s home contest against Cape and led, 16-10, before picking up five more points with Jayme West serving. The Wildcats went on to win the game, 25-14. In game two, the Vikings jumped out to a 7-2 lead, but the Wildcats battled

back. West served up a pair of aces, Brittani Scott had a kill, and Annika Nichols added an ace to pull Delmar within one (11-10). Delmar’s Elise Breda had a kill off a set from Kelsey Murrell (15-12) before Breda and Murrell each had a kill to make it 16-15. West later served up an ace to give the Wildcats a brief lead before the sideout knotted the score at 1919. Murrell had a block and Nichols added another ace to extend Delmar’s lead to 22-19. Up 23-21, Meghan Gordy delivered a pair of aces for the 25-21 win. Cape Henlopen held an 8-4 lead before Scott had a kill and Gordy served up an ace to close the gap. Down 13-8, Delmar rallied again as Murrell had a pair of aces. Cape was up, 15-13, before scoring six straight points to take a 21-13 lead. The Vikings went on to win, 25-17, to cut the Wildcats’ lead to two games to one. Delmar jumped out to a 4-0 lead in Continued on page 48 Laurel’s Tomorrow Briddell looks to get past Cape Henlopen’s Kelly Smith during last Wednesday’s game in Laurel. The Vikings edged the Bulldogs, 2-1, to remain undefeated. Photo by McClure

Mike


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Wildcats score four first quarter touchdowns in 47-7 win The Delmar varsity football team advanced to 5-1 with a 47-7 road win over Lake Forest last Friday night. The Wildcats bounced back from a loss to Indian River and will face Seaford this Friday in their second straight road game. On Friday, Delmar’s Tevin Jackson scored on a 39-yard touchdown run and Daronte DeShields had an 18-yard run for a touchdown in the opening quarter. The Wildcats’ defense also put points on the board as David Bradshaw had a six-yard fumble recovery for a touchdown and Jamel Jones returned an inDavid Bradshaw terception 28 yards for a score. Casey Bellamy made all four PATs for a 28-0 Delmar lead through one quarter of play. Lake Forest got on the board with a two-yard touchdown run early in the second quarter (28-7), but Delmar answered with a one-yard touchdown run by quarterback Kevin Forse and a three-yard touchdown run by Jamison Jones. Bellamy made the first extra point but a bad snap and incomplete pass on the second try kept the score at 41-7 going into half-time. DeShields added a 67-yard touchdown run in the third quarter as the Wildcats went on to win, 47-7. DeShields had three carries for 96 yards and a touchdown and Jackson carried the Jameson Jones ball five times for 127 yards and two touchdowns. Jamel Jones added four runs for 43 yards and Forse ran the ball four times for 32 yards and a touchdown as Delmar had 356 yards rushing. Alex Ellis also completed an 11-yard pass to James Lee.

Delmar senior Elise Breda, left, goes for the kill during last Thursday’s win over Cape Henlopen. Above, Delmar’s Annika Nichols looks to return a Cape Henlopen serve during her team’s 3-1 win last week. Nichols had two aces and three assists in the game. Photos by Mike McClure

Delmar volleyball continued game four, but Cape quickly moved within one (6-5) before great hustle by Gabby Andrade and Murrell gave the Wildcats the sideout. Scott later served up a pair of aces to extend Delmar’s lead to 15-9. Cape Henlopen rallied to score six straight points on game point and match point, but the the Wildcats got the win with a sideout, 25-22, for the 3-1 win. “A winning season just means everything to them,” said Lewis, whose team is looking to earn a berth in the state tournament and win the Henlopen South. “My

seniors, I just wanted it so much for them. It’s their time, it’s their season.” West had five kills, four aces, two blocks, one dig, and one assist; Scott contributed five kills, two aces, three digs; Murrell added five kills, two aces, one block; Andrade chipped in with five kills and eight digs; Gordy had two kills and four aces; and Nichols added one kill, two aces, and three assists. Delmar topped St. George’s, 3-1, on Monday, Oct. 13. The Wildcats face Smyrna on Thursday and Lake Forest on Saturday after a showdown with Indian River on Tuesday (see page 52).

Laurel’s Elijah Snead is sandwiched between a pair of Cape players during last weekend’s Pop Warner Pee Wee football game. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Pee Wee team moves to 6-0 with 25-6 win over Cape In a hard fought battle of two unbeaten teams the Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee Bulldogs beat the Sharks from Cape, 25-6, and extended their record to 6-0 while the Sharks slipped to 5-1. Laurel’s Justin Revel scored on a one-yard touchdown run to open the scoring in the first quarter. Cape knotted the score at 6-6 with a 14-yard touchdown run. Cole Gullett caught a 13-yard touchdown pass from Tarez White and Justin Revel completed a pass to Elijah Snead for the extra point to make it 13-6 going into half-time. Laurel’s Johnny McGinnis added a 49-yard touchdown run in the third quarter and White returned a fumble 87 yards for a touchdown in the fourth quarter. White had 12 carries for 56 yards and an extra point, Snead ran for 56 yards on seven carries, McGinnis added seven carries for 52 yards and a touchdown, and Christian Ellsworth contributed 40 yards rushing on five carries. Laurel’s defense held Cape to 111 total yards as Leon West recorded six tackles, White had six tackles and a fumble recovery, and Ellsworth made four tackles. Travon Milton and Ethan Cahall chipped in with three tackles each and Justin Taylor, Bobby Townley, and Roland Wheatley had two tackles apiece. Laurel’s next game is Saturday at home against Wicomico. Laurel’s Cole Gullett tackles a Cape player in the backfield during last Saturday’s Pop Warner Pee Wee game in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

h e r i ta g e s h o r e s club


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 49

Delmar Sports Scene By Tommy Young The Delmar field hockey team split their two matches last week. After being shut out by Dover 2-0 on Tuesday, even though Shannon Wilson made 10 saves in goal, on Thursday they defeated Seaford 3-1. The soccer team also had a win and a loss as they were shut out by Indian River on Tuesday 1-0 as both teams had great games. This performance carried over for the Wildcats beating one of the best teams on the Shore, Worcester Prep on Thursday 4-2. Denny Murray had two goals while Cody Webster and Casey Bellamy had one goal each. Sean Scovell had six saves in goal. Then for the first time this year, the volleyball team won both of their games in the same week as they defeated Cape Henlopen 3-1 on Tuesday and came back on Thursday to win by the same score, 3-1, over Lake Forest. Boy, what an improvement over last year’s team’s record. Then, on Friday night the Wildcats bounced back from their only loss of the year by trouncing Lake Forest 42-7. hey scored 28 points in the first quarter, and from there on, it was everybody gets to play time. The Delmar scoring went like this: Daronte Deshields scored twice on runs of 19 and 67 yards and Tevin Jackson scored from 39 yards out. The other two scores were made by the defense. David Bradshaw caused a fumble with a hard tackle and then picked up the ball and ran it in for a touchdown and Jamel Jones picked off a pass and also ran it in

for a touchdown. Casey Bellamy continued to be very accurate when he had a chance to kick the ball; he made five extra points Friday night. ASSISTS AND ERRORS- The football program at Lake Forest has gone south in the past few years, and I think this year’s team is the weakest I have ever seen up there. I know that Division II in the Henlopen Conference gets tougher every year, but Lake Forest has always had good athletes and were tough, especially at home, but not in the last few years. The same thing is happening at Seaford, Delmar’s next opponent this Friday night, so we will get a chance to check them out. I ran into Linda Wells at the Delmar shopping center last week. It was the first time I had seen her since the Railroad Café closed, and I told her how much she was missed. She said she missed her regular customers just as much as they missed her, but she didn’t have a choice. At least her husband, Russell, who has some health problems, is feeling much better now that she is home and taking a little better care of his needs. I understand she received a special award from the State of Delaware via Representative “Biff” Lee out at the Delmar VFW the other morning when she was checking out their breakfast menu. Nobody is more deserving because people like her so not come along too often. Good luck, Linda and Russell, and enjoy your time together.

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DELIVERED WEEKLY *Sussex County $19 LEAPING GRAB- Indian River goalie Kevin Rowe leaps up to make a save during his team’s 1-0 win over Delmar last week. Rowe and Wildcat goalie Sean Scovell each made some key stops in the close contest. Photo by Mike McClure

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PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Raven Roundup: Tech soccer, hockey teams earn wins By Mike McClure

Seaford’s Alexis Carey, left, and Delmar’s Alyssa Martin battle for the ball during last week’s game in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar hockey tops Seaford, 3-1, with a pair of second half goals By Mike McClure The Delmar varsity field hockey team moved to 5-3-1 in the Henlopen Conference and 7-4-1 overall with a 3-1 win over Seaford last Thursday in Delmar. The Wildcats netted a pair of second half goals after the score was deadlocked at 11 at the half. Delmar’s Carlee Budd scored off a feed from Lauren Ruark on a corner with 25:11 left in the first half. Seaford had a number of near goals later in the first half, but Delmar goalie Shannon Wilson and the Wildcat defense held tough. Seaford’s Jamie Swain nearly knocked one in and teammate Courtney Torbert took a pass from Kelsey Hoch and shot one off of Wilson. Delmar also shot one wide right before the Blue Jays’ Maria

DeMott connected with 5:04 left in the half. Seaford goalie Molly Cain stopped a shot by Delmar’s Lindsay Lloyd and another Delmar shot sailed wide left as the score remained 1-1 at the half. Seaford held a 10-9 edge in shots and Delmar had a 4-3 advantage in corners. Wilson made six saves and Cain had four saves in the opening half. Lloyd opened the second half with a goal (28:29) to give Delmar the lead. Wilson had a save on a Seaford corner and Caroline Phillips made a nice clear for the Wildcats. Christina Parsons upped Delmar’s lead to 3-1 as she followed up a shot by Lloyd with a goal with 5:26 left in the game. Seaford finished with an 18-16 edge in shots, but Wilson recorded 13 saves. Cain had six saves for the Blue Jays.

The Sussex Tech boys’ soccer team extended its winning streak to four in a row with wins over Sussex Central and William Penn. The Ravens enter the week at 6-1-1 in the Henlopen Conference and 8-1-2 overall. Sussex Tech blanked Sussex Central, 4-0, last Thursday as Sebastian Borror had a goal and an assist; Ryan Moore, Christian Espinoza, and Evan Lee each tallied a goal; and Nathan Zanks dished out an assist. The Ravens outshot the Knights, 19-5, and Evan Lee scored all four goals in the second half. Sussex Tech’s James Smith also made three saves in the shutout win. On Saturday, Borror scored the game-winning goal in the second half in a 2-1 nonconference win over William Penn. Aris Reynoso added the assist and Christian Espinoza scored the Ravens’ first half goal. Smith also had three saves in the win. Lady Ravens earn a pair of shutout wins- The Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team blanked Dover and Caesar Rodney in a pair of Henlopen North contests last week. The wins advanced the Ravens’ winning streak to six in a row and upped the team’s record to 6-1 in the conference and 7-2 overall. Rebecca McMillan scored the only goal in Thursday’s game against Dover in a key Raven win. Sussex Tech outshot Dover, 15-8, and held a 9-7 edge in corners in the 1-0 win. Caitlin Stone recorded eight saves for Tech while Jessica Zebley had 14 saves for Dover (8-1). Sara Adams and McMillan each tallied second half goals and Maxine Fluharty added an assist in Sussex Tech’s 2-0 win over Caesar Rodney on Saturday. Stone had four saves for the Ravens, who outshot the Riders, 24-5, and held a 14-5 advantage in corners. Dover outscores Sussex Tech in second half for 42-29 win- The Sussex Tech varsity football team got touchdown runs of two and three yards from Desmond Sivels and a pair of extra points by Seth Hastings for a 14-7 lead over Dover in the first quarter of last Friday’s game. Dover added a second quarter touchdown to knot the score going into half-time. Dover scored a pair of third quarter touchdowns before Sivels scored his third touchdown of the night with a three-yard run. The Senators scored two more touchdowns in the fourth quarter and Sussex Tech’s Deshawn Sheppard added a touchdown run and a two-point run to cap the scoring.

Seaford’s Leonel Lopez races to get off a shot before Laurel defenders close in on him during last Thursday’s game in Laurel. Laurel goalie Aaron Givens is shown in the goal. Photo by Daniel Richardson

Seaford soccer team nets a pair of goals in win over Laurel

Delmar’s Christina Parsons looks to dribble past the Seaford defense during last Thursday’s game in Delmar. Parsons netted the Wildcats’ final goal in the 3-1 win. Photo by Mike McClure

Covering all the local sports teams, the Seaford/Laurel Star.

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

The Seaford varsity soccer travelled to Laurel on Thursday, Oct. 9 for Seaford's third game of the week. Seaford’s offense maintained possession of the ball for most of the game, keeping Laurel defenders busy and preventing the Laurel offense from scoring any goals. Abraham Cruz's first shot on goal for Seaford was successful, sending Seaford up 1-0 early in the first half. Udiel Perez scored Seaford's second and final goal with an assist coming from Leonel Lopez, making the final score 2-0. Seaford took 19 shots on goal, many of them were overshot, and Laurel took eight shots on goal.


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 51

Seaford Bowling Lanes Nite Owl High games and series Russell Murray 270 Paul Bennington 757

Tuesday AM Mixed High games and series Steven Dempsey 237 Mike Baker 656 Marion Terry 231 Erma Baker 607

Mardel ABC High games and series C.J. Graleski 299, 786

Wed. AM Mixed High games and series

Rip Penuel Dot Dulis

323, 762 258, 718

High games and series Calvin Ellis 291, 801 Martha Brannock 271, 752

High games and series Frank Jones 290 Ray Loose, Sr. 743 Brenda Layton 241 Frankie Griffin 648

Eastern Shore Men

Christan Fellowship

High games and series Phil Casselbury 309, 784

High games and series Eddie Joyner 226, 642 Karen Jerread 260, 698

Club 50

Young Adults High games and series Keith Parlier 246 Ben Hearn 669 Courtney Sherman 236 Cassie Wooters 642

Star Shown not in order are the Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament morning session winners: Mike Mcphail, Joe Aurillo, Mike Sturgeon, and Allen Rilley.

Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament sees successful year The Fifth Annual Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament was held October 5 at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville. The tournament is a charity event to raise money for the Trinity Foundation, a non-profit organization founded in 2005 by the employees of Trinity Transport, Inc. Despite facing a tough economy, the event raised over $32,000 for the Foundation. Top sponsors for 2008 included Discover Bank, Trinity Port Services, Trinity Distribution Services, and Trinity Transport, Inc. “I want to extend a special thanks to Shirley Massey for her hard work. She volunteered many personal hours this year to ride door to door and calling businesses to get sponsorships. She was able to get 102 of the 140 sponsors this year,” said Lance Massey, tournament organizer. The Foundation uses funds from their two annual fundraisers to focus donations to three main causes: DYLA (Delaware Youth Leadership Academy), the American Cancer Society, and the American Heart Association. Other community support is provided to community causes such as the Seaford Mission, Down Syndrome Guild, DE Humane Society, and Muscular Dystrophy to name a few. The winning team from the morning session included Mike Mcphail, Joe Aurillo, Mike Sturgeon, and Allen Rilley. From the afternoon session, winners included Keller Hoch, Frank Parks, Chris Benjamin, and Dan Penrod. For more information on participating in the sixth annual tournament in 2009, e-mail foundation@trinitytransport.com.

Pictured not in order are the Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament afternoon session winners: Keller Hoch, Frank Parks, Chris Benjamin, and Dan Penrod. Also shown, right, is tournament organizer Lance Massey. Laurel’s Tyler Givans hauls in a touchdown reception on a pass from Joe M c G i n n i s during last week’s Pop Warner Midget football game against Cape. Photo by Mike McClure

Friday Trios

High games and series Robert Bay 226 James Staton III 620 Kim Zoller 237, 619

Baby Blue Jays

High games and series Travis Collins 171, 320 Abigail Ayers 168, 303

Tuesday Early Mixed High games and series Jesse Evaristo, Jr. 245 J. Stanley Howell 245 Steve Blocker 679 Travis Sirman 255 Carole Hubbard 666

Seaford City High games and series Tom Koontz 292 Richard Wadkins 793

Senior Express

High games and series Earl Radding 300 Gilbert Williams 786 Dorothy Strozier 291 Yvonne Royster 824

Thurs. Nite Mixed High games and series Wayne Smedley, Jr. 270, 710 Rebecca Hudson 254, 649

Sunday Nite Mixed High games and series Michael Berg 303, 858 Bonnie Safrit 272 Helena Tharp 760

Sunday Adult/Youth High games and series Doug Avery 270 Gordon Hearn 753 Sherry Hastings 268, 733 Ben Hearn 309 Tyler Wells 791 Taylor Richey 258 Brittany Hastings 747

Eric Fairbee takes Footbrake Nationals at U.S. 13 Dragway By Charlie Brown The in-car electronics were turned off and it was all up to the driver in Sunday’s Footbrake Nationals at the U.S. 13 Dragway. Coming out on top at the end of the day was Eric Fairbee of Georgetown. Ryan Groton of Salisbury took the win in Combo Eliminator and Chris Waters of Easton won in Pro Bike. Other winners on the day included: Lou Phillips of Delmar, Md. (Street Eliminator); Bandon Darling of Laurel ( Import); Irvin Bonneville of Laurel (Bike Trophy); Shelby Bireley of Salisbury (Jr. Dragster 1) and Ashley Parsons of Delmar (Jr. Dragster 2). It was Eric Fairbee in his ’73 Vega facing Eddie Baker of Salisbury in his ’82 Malibu in the Footbrake final. Baker left early and fouled and Fairbee got the win with a 8.800/137.53 on a 9.74 dial. Semi-finalists were Steven Truitt of Parsonsburg and Tim Foskey, Jr. of Rhodesdale, Md. Quarter-finalists were Ernie Fisher of Laurel, Bill Bradford of Pittsville, Mike Willey of Whaleysville, Md. and Jesse Long of Preston. Ryan Groton met Daryl Beauchamp of Princess Anne in the all-Camaro Combo final. Groton had a slight advantage at the start and that turned out to be the winning factor as he took the victory with a 10.449/122.31 on a 10.43 dial. Beauchamp was about a 10th of a second behind at the line with a 9.217/144.30 on a 9.20 dial. Semi-finalist was Clinton Mills of Kennedyville, Md. Quarter-finalists were Vernon Russell of Dover and Ronnie Bishop of Salisbury. Chris Waters rode up against Doug Thomas of Ellendale in the all-Suzuki Pro Bike final. Waters had a little better start and the better run to take the win with a 9.005/140.44 on an 8.89 dial. Thomas ran a 9.728/140.60 on a 9.54 dial. Semi-finalists were Charles Nock of Frankford and Earlee Corbin of Salisbury. Quarter-finalists were Tyrone Dale of Salisbury, Sherell Blake of Delmar, Md. and Turon Davis of Berlin. Lou Phillips took advantage of a red light foul by Brian Riebert, Jr. of Berlin to win in the Street Eliminator final. Phillips ran a 13.833/70.41 on an 11.99 dial. In Import it was Brandon Darling in his Honda against the Jetta of George Berckman of Millsboro. Darling had the better reaction and drove to the win with a 16.532/84.23 on a 16.00 dial. Berckman ran a 17.453/72.24 on a 17.10 dial. Irvin Bonneville once again topped Bike Trophy with his win over Willie Blank of Snow Hill. Bonneville had the better start and ran a 14.731/76.98 on a 14.50 dial. Blank ran a 10.234/116.80 on a 10.00 dial. In Jr. Dragster 1 it was Shelby Bireley facing Brandon Layfield in an almost heads up run. Bireley had the better reaction and drove to the win with an 8.965/69.57 on an 8.90 dial while Layfield had a solid 9.005/71.73 on an 8.96 dial. In Jr. Dragster 2, Ashley Parsons was paired against Amy Jo Jackson of Newark, Md. Jackson left too early and fouled and Parsons drove to the win with a 7.980/81.49 on a 7.95 dial. This Sunday will be the Delmarva Powersports Bike Show plus the Outlaw 10.5 and Street Radial cars and the Jr. Dragster Challenge. Gates open at 10 a.m. with time runs at 11 a.m. and eliminations at 2:30 p.m.

Laurel Midget football team extends streak, clinches title The Laurel Midget Bulldogs extended their winning streak to 76 games with a 40-7 romp over the Cape Sharks. With the win the Bulldogs won their eighth straight conference title and is the only team to win the championship since 2000. Tyler Givans (six carries for 110 yards) opened the scoring with a 40-yard touchdown run and Joe McGinnis (6-for-10 for 115 yards passing) ran it in from two yards out. In the second quarter, Cape scored on a 67-yard touchdown pass and the extra point run made it 12-7. Laurel’s Tyler Robertson (10 carries for 199 yards) added a 10-yard touchdown run and McGinnis found Givans for the extra point. Shawn Miller added a two-yard run and McGinnis completed another pass to Givans for the extra point to make it 26-7 at the half. Robertson scored on a 12-yard touchdown run and Brandon Scott (four carries for 79 yards) ran in the extra point for the first of two Bulldog touchdowns in the fourth quarter. Scott also had a 32-yard touchdown run and Brett Marine (five carries for 65 yards) ran for the extra point. Kegan Yossick also had four carries for 48 yards.


PAGE 52

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Laurel/Seaford Star sports predictions: week 7

Seaford/Laurel Star Tuesday night high school scoreboard

High school football- Woodbridge at Laurel- Laurel 35-21 Delmar at Seaford- Delmar 28-7 Caesar Rodney at Sussex Tech- Caesar Rodney 42-28 High school field hockey- Seaford at Laurel- Laurel 2-1Seaford gives every team it plays a tough battle, but I have to go with the homestanding Bulldogs who recently gave Cape a scare. College football- Michigan at Penn State- Penn State 35-14Penn State is coming off a strong win over Wisconsin, is back home, and is playing the struggling Wolverines. As a Penn State and West Virginia fan I wouldn’t be heartbroken if the Nittany Li- Mike McClure- 5-4 last week, 33-20-1 ons blew out the Rich Rodriguez led team. overall NFL- Baltimore at Miami- Baltimore 17-14 Cleveland at Washington- Washington 28-21

Soccer- Seaford 3, Milford 1- Seaford’s Tim Halter netted a second half goal to tie the score at 1-1. Oscar Castrejon and Abraham Cruz each netted a goal in overtime for the win. Jose Cortez also recorded 10 saves in goal for the Blue Jays. Sussex Tech 4, Smyrna 0- Sebastian Borror netted a pair of goals, Ariel Espinoza dished out two assists, and Billy Seuss and Nathan Zanks each had a goal to pace the Ravens. James Smith also had seven saves for Sussex Tech, which outshot Smyrna, 29-10. Delmar 2, Lake Forest 0- Denny Murray netted a goal in each half and Cory Phillips added an assist in the Wildcats’ win. Jose Cortez Field hockey- Dover 2, Laurel 1- Laurel’s Tomorrow Briddell scored with under a minute left to break up the Senators’ shutout. Taylor Oliphant recorded four saves for Laurel, which kept Dover off the board in the second half. Sussex Tech 11, Smyrna 3- Maxine Fluharty netted three goals and had four assists, Becca McMillan scored a pair of goals, and Sara Adams added two goals and an assist for the Ravens. Lauren Joseph, Leanne Rowe, Logan Pavlik, and Hannah Small also scored one goal apiece in the win. The Ravens outshot the Eagles, 28-4, and held an 18-1 advantage in corners while Caitlin Stone made two saves. Delmar 6, Polytech 2- Amanda Campbell and Lindsay Lloyd each scored a pair of goals and Taylor Elliott and and Christina Parsons added one goal apiece for the Wildcats. Hunter Causey and Alyssa Martin each had an assist in the Amanda Campbell Delmar win.

High school football- Woodbridge at Laurel- Laurel 35-10. Coming off its big win over Easton, Laurel will be working hard this week. The Bulldogs will score easily off of the Woodbridge defense. Delmar at Seaford- Seaford 7-3- I am going to go with loyalty and with the underdog, Seaford. Caesar Rodney at Sussex Tech- Caesar Rodney 41-7 Field hockey- Seaford at Laurel- Seaford 4-2- Seaford went through a tough schedule for a couple of weeks, but now have had time to regroup and focus. College football- Michigan at Penn State- Penn State 21-10- Lynn Schofer- 5-4 As a Nittany Lion fan I’m pulling for Penn State all the way to a last week, 30-23-1 overall national championship for Joe Paterno. NFL- Baltimore at Miami- Baltimore 14-10. Cleveland at Washington- Washington 24-10 High school football- Woodbridge at Laurel- Laurel 28-13 Delmar at Seaford- Delmar 31-14 Caesar Rodney at Sussex Tech- Sussex Tech 21-20 High school field hockey- Seaford at Laurel- Seaford 4-2 College football- Michigan at Penn State- Penn State 28-21 NFL- Baltimore at Miami- Miami 21-20 Cleveland at Washington- Washington 21-10- At this point I would like it if anyone beat Washington, but I just don’t think that Cleveland has it in them. Daniel Richardson5-4 last week, 25Congratulations to Sylvia Milburn of Laurel, this week’s 20-1 overall winner in the Fall Sports predictions.

Seaford boys’, girls’ cross country teams compete in dual meet The Seaford boys’ cross country team fell to Sussex Tech, 20-35, and topped Cape Henlopen, 35-42, in a dual meet at Sussex Tech last Wednesday. Lee Mayer (18:34) was Seaford’s top finisher followed by Spencer Noel (18:36), Kirk Neal (18:53), Chris Wilkerson (18:59), and Tim Fields (19:17). The Blue Jays’ other runners were: Brian Wright (19:51), Zach Hearn (20:04), Terry Wooters (20:27), Zach Cain (21:54), Jon Schwinn (22:33), James Betts (25:16), and Adam Caldwell (29:13). The girls’ team fell to Sussex Tech and Cape Henlopen. Jenn Hoffman (24:17), Megan Jones (24:45), and Kacey McCane (25:00) were Seaford’s top finishers. Macey Cordrey (28:41) and Kaitlin Norman (28:42) also competed for the Lady Jays.

WEEKLY WINNERSylvia Milburn of Laurel is this week’s Fall Sports predictions winner. Sylvia won a pass to the Diamond State Drive-In Theater for winning the Star’s weekly contest. Photo McClure

by

Mike

FA LL S P O R TS P R ED IC TIO N S Fill in this form, circling the teams you think will win & pick a score for the tie-breaker. Make sure you include your info so we can contact you if you win. WEEK 8 (Oct. 23): Turn in your predictions by Wed., Oct. 22, 5 p.m. 4 ways to get it here: Fax it: 629-9243; Mail it: PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973; E-mail it: sports@mspublications.com; or drop it by the office, 628 W. Stein Hwy.

High School Football: Milford at Delmar High School Soccer:

James M. Bennett at Seaford Lake Forest at Woodbridge

Delmar at Seaford

CollegeF ootball: Penn State at Ohio State NFL: Atlanta at Philadelphia Oakland at Baltimore Washington at Detroit Tiebreaker: H.S. Football: Indian River at Laurel __________________ Name:___________________________________ Daytime Phone #_____________________ The Star is offering prizes such as Free Movie Tickets to the winner each week.

ON THE RUN- Laurel Pop Warner Mitey Mite running back Noah Waldridge looks for room to run during his team’s home game against Cape on Saturday. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 53

‘Smoke testing’ will detect leaks in sewer system By Tony E. Windsor Laurel Public Works officials are informing town residents about a new test being conducted to help determine any leaks in the sewer system that would allow wastewater to seep into the municipal treatment system. During the Monday, Oct. 6 meeting of Laurel Mayor and Council, Public Works supervisor Woody Vickers said that a special “smoke test” will begin in the southern area of the town. The process uses non-toxic, non-noxious smoke to locate faulty connections to the municipal sewer system that allows rainwater to enter the sewer treatment system during heavy rainfalls. This is costly to the town because the wastewater treatment plant then must treat rainwater along with the traditional wastewater, creating a heavier than necessary load on the system. Vickers said Laurel sewer customers will receive a notice announcing the testing along with detailed information about the project and the process. Once receiving the notice, customers can expect the testing to be done within 24 to 72 hours. However, weather conditions such as rain or frost as well as weekends could move the testing beyond the 72 hours. It is not necessary for homeowners to be at home during the testing. Vickers said it is possible that if property owners have leaks in their sewer pipes

and system, the smoke could come into their home or business. He said it is unlikely, but should it happen, there is no reason to be alarmed. The smoke is not dangerous and will not irritate the eyes or stain clothing or furniture. In the informational material being provided to sewer customers at the time of the smoke testing, the material points out that smoke coming into a private building is “normal” and nothing to become alarmed about. “Smoke could enter your home if you have a dry trap within the premises,” the material states. “This may be a basement floor drain or some other unused plumbing fixture. Pouring water down these drains or other seldom-used fixtures will help assure that smoke does not enter your dwelling.” The material also states that a plumbing defect is another reason that smoke can enter a building. “The homeowner may want to address this plumbing defect since odors sometimes develop in the sewer system and could possibly enter the home through the defects,” the information says. Vickers said if smoke does come into the home the property owner can open the windows and doors to ventilate and then contact personnel doing the testing who will most likely be nearby. There will also be a phone number given out on the informational flyer to reach the testing supervisor who will be onsite in

Laurel during the smoke testing. Vickers said the smoke testing will cover 65,000 linear feet of municipal sewer lines and 257 manholes. He said preliminary investigation shows that the most immediate source of problems in the system are located in the southern area of the town. He said this area will be tested during this initial process and the northern area will be done at a later time. Councilman Don Phillips said he is happy to see the testing finally being done in the town. “This process has been in the works for a couple of years,” he said. “The results of this testing will make our wastewater treatment process much more efficient in the use of our taxpayers’ dollars. It will point out where we need to put taxpayer dollars in the future and will give us the best bang for our buck.” In other Mayor and Council business, Laurel Mayor John Shwed expressed his appreciation for the sidewalk installation along Sussex 468 near the Hollybrook Apartments complex. He said the sidewalk is necessary because of the heavy pedestrian traffic, much of which is children, along that section of the road. He also pointed out that the sidewalks were installed at no cost to the town. He said costs for the sidewalks were taken care of by the owners of Hollybrook Apartments.

Drought disaster declaration sought Governor Ruth Ann Minner is requesting a drought disaster declaration for Delaware farmers from the United States Department of Agriculture. “If this request is granted, Delaware farmers affected by this year’s drought can receive federal assistance and become eligible for additional disaster relief funds,” Gov. Minner said. “Our farmers are vital to the continued success of our agriculture industry.” Gov. Minner’s request was based on a recommendation from Delaware Department of Agriculture Acting Secretary Austin Short. An assessment by the Farm Service Agency’s Delaware Emergency Board, which estimated two-thirds of the state’s farmers have sustained losses in excess of 30 percent of their expected production in crops including corn, soybeans and hay. Minner submitted her request through a letter to USDA Secretary Ed Schafer.

RE-ELECT

BIFF LEE IT’S ALL ABOUT EXPERIENCE!

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Time and Service to My Community Are Foremost. I Am Your Full Time Representative

Have a concern involving state government? www.RepBiffLee.com Call me at home: (302) 875-5119 Paid for by Friends for Biff Lee.


PAGE 54

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Grandmom’s dream comes true in Alaska By Evelyn Baker On a windy night in 1932 in Plainfield, N.J., everyone was awakened to loud cries, “Extra, extra, read all about it!” The Lindbergh baby had been kidnapped from his nursery in the Sourland Mountains near Hopewell. The kidnapping held first place on the radio and our RCA was seldom turned off. I began saving clippings from the newspapers. A few months later we moved to Bridgeville. Newspapers and the radio were teeming with so much excitement. Events encouraged me to dream. I flew with Amelia, Will Rogers and Willey Post, covered the tales of Bonnie and Clyde. My scrapbook grew. I wanted to pick an orange, see the Alamo, go to Europe and Alaska. The years passed and life allowed me to pick oranges, go to the Alamo, spend time in Europe — all but Alaska. Well, three out of four wasn’t too bad! In May 2005, my granddaughter and her Army husband transferred to Alaska. Modern technology, the cell

phone, allowed an old grandmom the luxury of experiencing her great-grandchildren’s excitement. “We’re crossing the Great Divide; we’re 20 miles from the Canadian border.” Weeks passed. They were living in a hotel, two children and three dogs at a place called Palmer. House hunting in Alaska isn’t easy. Anchorage was too expensive. They bought a home in a place called Wasilla, which is 40 miles north of Anchorage. “Grandmom, come see us. It is so beautiful,” my granddaughter said. My reply, “I’d love to see your new home, but I’m too old to fly alone. I’m just too old for the trip.” All the while, I was saying it, I knew that I was going. My sister took me to the Salisbury Airport. Once again, I became aware that one is never too old to fly the friendly skies. Someone always asks you in an airport, “where are you headed?” Salisbury was no different, for a lady replied, “Wasilla. I’ve been there. You will love it. It’s so beautiful and is growing so fast that it may become as large as Anchorage.” The author’s dream came true when she went to visit her great-granddaughter in Alaska.

ELECT

VOTE

AARON CHAFFINCH

Jerry “Doc” Semper StateR epresentative 39th District E L E C T I O N D AY Tu e s d a y , N o v. 4 , 2 0 0 8 A veteran and former police officer who promotes honesty and integrity. He believes in focusing on the issues currently impacting the family, education, social and economical status of the residents in the 39th District. A VOICE FOR THE PEOPLE. “I care about your issues”. Jerry “Doc” Semper a public servant, not a politician.

VOTE ‘08

Endorsed by The Manufactured HomeownersP AC Paid for by Citizens for Semper www.JerrySemper.com”

DEDICATED LEADER SERVICE & EXPERIENCE PROVEN PERFORMANCE

CHAFFINCH th

FACTS ABOUT YOURC ANDIDATE AFFILIATIONS: • Honorary Commander - 436th Security Forces Squadron, Dover Air Force Base - 2003 • Law Enforcement Torch Run for Delaware Special Olympics Honorary Chairman - 2003 • Hiram #21 Masonic Lodge Member since 1984 • 33rd Degree Mason - Northern Masonic Jurisdiction since 2004 • Lower Delaware Shield & Square Club, Past President - 1987 • International Association of Chiefs of Police • FBI National Academy Alumni Associates MD/DE Chapter - past President2 001 • Past Member- Lower Delaware Investigators • Past Chairman of The Camp Barnes Board of Directors • Past Member of Delaware Police Chiefs Foundation • Member of Association of Retired Del. State Police • Past Coach - Woodbridge Little League Basketball • Executive Board Member of The Bridgeville Adult Softball League from its inception in 1975 until 1999 • Director - Delaware State Fair since 2001

35 District

Representative

“I have been close friends with State Representative Ben Ewing for over 35 years. It would be an honor and privilege to succeed him in the State Legislature.” L. Aaron Chaffinch

The Right Choice for Our Community & State Paid for by Friends for L. Aaron Chaffinch


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008 I overheard my sister saying to the ticket agent, “Take care of her. She’s 83 years old.” The agent came over and placed a tag on my coat. I flew U.S. Air to Seattle and changed carriers for the remaining three hours. Upon approaching Alaska, Continental’s pilot announced that he was descending so that we could get a view of the mountains of Alaska and the coastline. The view was worth the price of the ticket. My daughter flew into Anchorage many times and kept interesting conversations going. “Mom, when you arrive make sure you see the huge polar bear in the lobby.” The airport had grown over the years and the huge, white Polar bear still remained, but in the old terminal, too far for me to walk. My family took me to a restaurant nearby. The lobby was filled with pictures of the building after the great earthquake. It was not pretty. Huge boulders remained. We headed for Wasilla. The dual, blacktop highway looked new, uncrowded and the view — mountain ranges as far as one could see. A sense of the remoteness prevailed. The vastness and rugged terrain was overwhelming.

Wasilla is situated between two mountain ranges. It’s very beautiful. The town of Willow, just north of Wasilla, is much higher and the cold winds blast down upon Wasilla. (A young man who works in the Seaford Post Office told me that. He’s from Willow.) The first night we went to Jordan’s football meeting at the new sports stadium. Believe me, Alaska needs projects like this one. There was an indoor soccer field. If they didn’t have this stadium, where would children and adults play? How would they function? It’s bitter, bitter cold. Sure, one leaves home from the heated garage, gets into a heated car and drives, but just getting out of the parking lot into the stadium will freeze your “tush.” I learned that you must pick up any person walking or stranded. One cold, early morning, a Wasilla school bus driver picked up a lady. Once she was aboard, she attacked the school bus driver. The school children quickly subdued her until help arrived. Another day, a school bus became stuck in the snow. The event occurred within walking distance for the remaining chil-

Public forum on the Nanticoke Watershed planned for Oct. 23 A report card on the health of the Nanticoke Watershed will be presented at a public forum on Thursday, Oct. 23, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Seaford Public Library. The forum is free and open to anyone interested in learning more about the watershed's diverse ecological resources - wetlands, habitats and wildlife species — and the stressors that impact its environmental health. The Nanticoke Watershed is an area of exceptional biodiversity. Located primarily in western Sussex County, the watershed includes the land area that expands from as far north as Harrington, south to Delmar and east to Georgetown. At the forum, DNREC's Division of Water Resources will present the results of an extensive wetland assessment and monitoring program. DNREC's Division of Fish and Wildlife will present information on the migratory bird species and the rare and uncommon amphibians and reptiles that inhabit the watershed. In collaboration with other conservation agencies, DNREC is designing a restoration plan for the watershed.

Displays, highlighting restoration and protection projects, landowner incentives and financial assistance opportunities, will be exhibited by several organizations – the Division of Fish and Wildlife Landowner Incentive Program; Division of Soil and Water Conservation; Adopt-aWetland; Natural Resources Conservation Service; The Nature Conservancy; Ducks Unlimited; Nanticoke River Watershed Conservancy; Delaware Forest Service; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Easy tips on the everyday things people can do to protect the watershed will be provided. Guidebooks, covering restoration options and the health of the watershed, the value of wetlands, and the ways people can improve their backyard habitat, will be available. Each attendee will receive one free native tree or shrub for planting. Walk-ins are welcome, but seating is limited. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. To register, contact Rebecca Rothweiler at 302-739-9939 or Lynne Staub at 302-735-3600. For more information, visit www.wr.dnrec.delaware.gov.

PAGE 55

The sun rises in Alaska over the bitter cold landscape.

dren, so they all walked the rest of the way home. Wasilla’s commercial business and services are well established. I noticed that each business was located on a large track of land. People are moving into Wasilla, Anchorage and Kenai from every state. There

they refer to the States as the lower 48. Wasilla is getting a new hospital and there are several churches. The buildings in the town of Palmar reminded me of one of the buildings straight out of an old Matt Dillon show. After my stay, I strongly suggest that if you are able to go — go “north to Alaska.”

219 N. Rehoboth Blvd. Milford, DE

(302) 424-1999

Send us your news items Send items to editor@mspublications. com. Send photos as attachments in the jpg format. Items may also be mailed to Morning Star Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Deadline is one week before preferred publication date. Items are used on a first-come basis.

* subject to credit approval. Finance charges accrue from the date of the sale unless the Same as Cash plan balance is paid in full prior to the Same as Cash expiration date. Regular credit terms apply after Same as Cash period. Terms subject to change without notice. Terms apply to purchases made on the American Dream credit plan. See agreement for complete information. Annual Percentage Rate: 185. Minimum finance charge: $1.00 (may very by state). Offer ends 10/26/08. Offer available through American General Financial Services or AIG Federal Savings Bank at participating dealers only. Prior sales are excluded Cannot be combined with any other offer or discount. Must take deliver within 45 days after sale. See store for details.


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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Local teen arrested for murder

UNITED WAY FUNDRAISER - The United Way of Delaware recently held a fundraiser at Peninsula Golf & Country Club in Millsboro. From left, Ernie Needam, Derek Leggins, Harmon Wilson and Donnie Brooks from the Delaware River and Bay Authority display their awards after the tournament.

Michelle A. Taylor, president and chief executive officer of United Way of Delaware, speaks to golfers before they go out on the course. The fundraiser was held at the Peninsula Golf & Country Club in Millsboro.

Deer present challenges to drivers this fall Most car crashes with deer occur from October through December. Each year, crashes account for more than 150 human and nearly one and a half million deer fatalities. “More drivers are on the road at dawn and dusk, the very time of day when deer are most active,” cautioned Ray Palermo, director of public relations for Response Insurance, a national car insurer. “A car striking a 200-pound adult deer can not only result in the death of the deer, but also incur an average of $2,000

in damage to the vehicle.” Palermo suggested a few basic cautions for drivers. • Scan a wide swath of the roadside. Slow down when approaching a deer standing near the side of a road and be prepared. If startled, the deer can bolt onto the road and into your path. If necessary, honk your horn and flash your lights to try to scare it away. • In many instances, it is best not to swerve around the deer since the deer

may move in the same direction. You may also inadvertently hit another vehicle, or go off onto a dangerous shoulder. Unless certain of those road factors, it is often best to simply brake and continue in your lane of traffic. • Deer whistles or ultrasonic deer avoidance systems attached to vehicles have never been proven to work by independent studies and may give drivers a false sense of security. More driver safety information is available at www.Response.com.

The Delaware State Police (DSP) Homicide unit has arrested a 19-yearold Seaford man who was wanted in connection to a recent murder in Salem County, N.J. During the course of the investigation by New Jersey authorities, Thairen Brittingham, Brittingham 19, Seaford, was named a suspect as being involved in the homicide which occurred on Friday, Oct. 3 in Salem City. Arrest warrants were obtained in New Jersey for Brittingham on murder and related charges. DSP was contacted and DSP homicide detectives secured a search warrant for Brittingham’s residence. On Tuesday, Oct. 7 at 9:30 p.m., a warrant was executed at Brittingham’s home in the 25000 block of BethelConcord Road, Seaford. Brittingham was taken into custody at the residence without incident. A subsequent search of the property yielded the recovery of a weapon possibly used in the homicide. Brittingham was charged as a fugitive from New Jersey and has been incarcerated at the Sussex Correctional Center with no bond pending extradition to New Jersey where he will face murder and related charges.

FOR

STATE REPRESENTATIVE “Barb Hudson is committed to taking our state in a new direction toward a brighter future. As a teacher, she knows how important education is and will not rest until our children’s schools are the best in the world. She’s committed to growing our economy and giving businesses the climate they need to thrive and create thousands of good-paying jobs. Please join me in supporting Barb Hudson on Nov. 4.” Jack Markell, Candidate for Governor “I remember most about our discussions was how respectfully Mrs. Hudson handled our disagreements. She always listened to and considered the other side of the debate and never once did I feel as if my opinions weren’t being heard.” John Conner, Educator and Former Student “Barbara has taught my children at Delmar and has made a permanent impact on their lives. She has instilled in them that one person can make a difference and that we all have a responsibility to take part in the process of government..” Peggy Mitchell, Resident of 40 th District

302-875-2209

www.barbhudson.com

Highlights • Social Studies teacher for 15 years, currently at Delmar High School • Graduateo fL aurel HighS chool • BA in History / Secondary Education from Salisbury University • Mastersd egreef rom University of Delaware • Married for 35 years to Ben Hudson, retired farmer and teacher. • Niece of former 40th DistrictR epresentative, Bill Gordy. Paid for by Friends for Barbara Hudson


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 57

Contractor chosen for renovations of interior to Laurel Train Station By Tony E. Windsor The construction work on the interior renovations of the Laurel Train Station are moving closer to reality as a contractor has now been picked to do the job. During the Monday, Oct. 6, meeting of Laurel Mayor and Council, Town Manager Bill Fasano said the architect working on the Train Station project on behalf of the town has given his recommendation.

In a letter dated Oct. 3, Philip E. Franks, of Philip Franks Architects, Philadelphia, told Fasano that a bid opening was held in the Laurel Town Hall on Tuesday, Sept. 30. Fasano said two bids were received in regard to the Train Station project. Franks has recommended that the low bidder, Palmer Construction, Inc. of Felton, be awarded the project contract for the

SQUARE

HIGH

NOT ON THE LIST

BREAD

ELKS LODGE WINNER - The Seaford Elks Lodge 2458, under the direction of ER Bill Buttrill, sold chances on a Vera Bradley pocketbook. The pocketbook was donated by Elk member Pat James (left) and was given to the proud winner, Travis Sirman, at the Elks Family Picnic on Sept. 14. The proceeds are going to help beautify the Lodge. The lodge would like to thank everyone for their participation.

the work. He said he concurs with Franks and recommends to the Laurel Mayor and Council that Palmer Construction be awarded the contract for the Train Station interior renovations. The Mayor and Council voted unanimously to accept the bid. After the vote, Laurel Mayor John Shwed added that he hopes with the awarding of the bid the town will see “construction activity very soon.”

bid price of $214,999. He said this is within the budget estimates. “We have reviewed their (Palmer Construction’s) qualifications and references and are satisfied that they can perform the required work to the standards and schedule that are specified and expected,” Franks said. Fasano said Palmer Construction has listed a project period of 170 days to do

LEFT

RIGHT

Seaford Museum presents talk entitled ‘The Nanticoke River’ On Saturday, Oct. 25, at noon in the Seaford Museum Jeanne Conner will present a talk entitled “The Nanticoke River, a Natural Boundary and Root of Civic Development.” Conner has had an interest in the history of this area since moving here from Baltimore at the age of 10. Her fascination was intensified after finding Indian artifacts in the ground when she and her husband were building their house along the Nanticoke River in 1965. While obtaining B.S. and Master’s degrees from the University of Delaware she concentrated on the architecture of the area and the AngloSaxon influence in the history of the Nanticoke Watershed. She published a book, “Footprints on the Nanticoke,” which further demonstrates her interest in and knowledge of the Nanticoke River. She serves on the board of the Nanticoke Watershed Alliance and works as a Creek Watcher. This lecture is in conjunction with the Smithsonian exhibit, “Between Fences” which is on display in the Seaford Museum at 203 High St., through Nov. 16. The exhibit is co-sponsored by the Delaware Humanities Forum as part of the Museum on Main Street project. The public is invited. There is no charge. Light refreshments will be served. For details call 628-9828.

Trunk or Treat at Wal-Mart

On Halloween night there will be an event in front of Wal-Mart’s known as “Trunk or Treat.” Heather Vadakin and Jennifer Griner of WalMart are heading up this event. “Trunk or Treat” will take place at the fence next to Exxon from 5 to 8 p.m. The interiors of car trunks and pickup beds will be decorated. Last year there were displays of spider webs, various lighting schemes, lanterns, etc. entered in the competition. There are three prizes: first place is a Sony stereo, second place is RCA DVD and third place is a full service oil change. Parents will be on hand to judge the contest. Registration deadline is October 27.

1 BANANA

Before age five, every room is a classroom. Fun learning opportunities are everywhere. Simple things like counting and identifying shapes activate a child’s learning ability, and help them enter school more prepared. That’s why PNC founded Grow Up Great and its Spanish-language equivalent Crezca con Éxito, a 10-year, $100 million program to help prepare young children for school and life. Pick up a free bilingual Sesame Street™ “Happy, Healthy, Ready for School” kit at a PNC branch. It’s filled with all kinds of simple, everyday things you can do to help a child learn. Together, we can work with our communities so an entire generation won’t just grow up... but grow up great.

To find out more, go to pncgrowupgreat.com or call 1-877-PNC-GROW.

TM /©2008 Sesame Workshop. All rights reserved. ©2008 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Letters to the Editor John’s Hay Day a success

The friends and family of the John Benson Benefit Committee would like to take this opportunity to thank the community for their generosity and support for the fundraiser held on Sunday, Sept. 28, at Chickberry Farms. ‘John’s Hay Day’ was a huge success thanks to all of you. A special thank you goes out to our T-shirt sponsors, all the organizations, businesses and individuals that donated items for the live auction and meals and to all the volunteers that gave their time and commitment. The success could not have been achieved without everyone’s help. John Benson Benefit Committee Laurel

Support Rep. Danny Short

As Mayor of the City of Seaford, I am proud to submit this column in support of reelecting Danny Short as our State Representative from the 39th District. Representative Short is responsive to the legislative and project needs in his 39th District. He has made himself available to all his constituents. Updates are submitted frequently allowing the voters of the 39th District to be informed as to what the General Assembly is acting upon prior to votes taken. He consults with many persons to be better informed on how the prospective legislation may help or hinder them. In addition he is very willing to work in obtaining needed funding for capital improvements in his district whether it be a new library, road improvements, or storm drainage projects. He has first hand knowledge of issues in his district by being a past Mayor and City Councilman, an active member of the fire service, an insurance agent, and his ability to work closely with other elected officials to see that the needs of this district are met. I would encourage each one to consider Danny’s commitment and service to the public, not just as our Representative, but throughout the years as an active volunteer in our community. I plan to cast my vote for Representative Danny Short and encourage you to do so, too. Edward H. Butler, Jr. Seaford Mayor

Elect Sam Wilson

I am going to vote for Sam Wilson for the Second District of Sussex County Council. There are several reasons to consider in choosing Mr. Wilson. Sam Wilson is a life-long resident of Sussex County and devoted family man. Unlike many in government, he is of good character and will consider what is best for the county, not just his own interests in the spirit of being a true public servant. He wants to preserve our county and prevent it from becoming another New Castle County with uncontrolled growth, sprawl, congestion, a strip mall for every corner, and unfulfilled promises of developers. Sam will see that we keep our property rights, and our ability to do business is not destroyed by an over burdensome local government. He will also work to ensure that the state does not usurp the rights of the local government and its people, believing that local government is usually better than a central government control.

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net Farming is very important to Sussex and being a farmer he will work to ensure the importance of farming remains strong. Despite what the media and others will tell you, character of a person is important. Sam is honest, hard working, holds good conservative values, family values and moral values. These values will help ensure that Sussex County remains a good place for families, business and to raise children. If you can’t vote for Sam Wilson, consider working to see that he is elected. If you live in the second council district and care about Sussex County, then Sam deserves your vote. John Poe Bridgeville

Vote the candidate, not the party

As a registered Republican, I have never voted a straight ticket. I do not know Dave Wilson. I do know Aaron Chaffinch. I’ve known him and his family for 40 years. I have eaten at his parents’ table. His sisters babysat my brother and me. His father was a Fellow Kiwanis community servant. When my mother was very ill before her death, Aaron’s parents were elderly and ill in the same facility. Who did I see when I visited my mother? Aaron Chaffinch, who spent more than 20 years protecting and serving us in the Delaware State Police? Aaron Chaffinch, who got bad press from reporters and lawyers as a result of some who couldn’t handle the job? Aaron Chaffinch. Believe half of what you hear and most of what you see. Let’s continue the tradition of accessible representation in the 35th District with Aaron Chaffinch. Ralph Scott Bridgeville

Halloween Parade schedule

The Downtown Seaford Association is getting everything in order for the 2008 Halloween Parade. The parade will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 29. The parade lineup starts at 6:15 p.m., with the parade starting at 7 p.m. at the corner of High Street and Cedar Avenue. That is Dr. Wolf-

gang’s office. It goes down High Street to Arch Street, and then up Arch Street. Just one block up Arch Street, it turns at King Street. The Parade ends at the Seaford Fire Hall. There will be a costume contest at the fire hall, with candy for all. Yes, there will be prizes for the winners. You may ask, “What if it rains?” Well, the ladies and men of the fire company will still have their facilities ready for us, so we will just go straight to the fire hall. The party and costume contest will begin at 7 p.m. Get you costumes ready, and join us for lots of fun! Sara Lee Thomas Seaford Parade Committee Chairwoman

What about Possum Point?

Congratulations on Delaware Tech’s efforts to increase quality theater offerings in central Sussex County. I believe the citizens of this community deserve a wide variety of artistic endeavors and Delaware Tech is an ideal place to offer them. I must say, however, that after reading the article in the Sept. 29 issue of the News Journal, I was dismayed. From the article, I think people may get the impression there is no quality theater in the area, but Del Tech was working to change that. It was particularly distressing to me that there was no mention of the theatrical offerings of the Possum Point Players (PPP), a group which has been in existence for over 40 years, not only in close proximity to Delaware Tech, but, on occasion, actually within the facility, where more than 30 musicals, dramas, comedies, champagne-dessert and dinner theaters have taken place. From 1975, when we performed 1776 on the Delaware Tech stage to sold out audiences and rave reviews, until our dinner theater in 2000, PPP has enjoyed a strong and mutually beneficial relationship with Delaware Tech. The extraordinary cooperation that we received, and the special rental pricing when we needed to occupy the theater area for over two weeks at a time, has always been appreciated. And we particularly appreciated the significant honor bestowed on us years ago when we were selected to receive Delaware Tech’s Arts and Humanities award. Even today, Delaware Tech and the Possum Point Players are in a mutually satisfying arrangement with the children’s educational theater programs coordinated by our Executive Administrator Mary Cahill. And it was with some regret several years ago, when, following a commitment to over $800,000 in renovations to our theater, that we were not receptive to preliminary discussions about becoming Delaware Tech’s resident theater company. Our current facility offers the most financially and logistically advantageous location for our major productions. For that reason, I for one, understand and support Delaware Tech’s search for alternative artistic programming. But, I think Del Tech’s failure to mention what Possum Point Players has done for arts in this community, as well as other theatrical and artistic organizations within reasonable proximity to Georgetown (Second Street Players, Southern Delaware Choral Society and the Milton theater group to name a few) seems to send a message, particularly to the new residents

that were mentioned in the article, that Delaware Tech is the only place to see quality artistic programming in Central Sussex County. I think that is doing a disservice to those new residents and others. While some Possum Point Players members and supporters share my sentiments, I am not speaking on behalf of them or the organization. Jim Hartzell Georgetown

An Equation for success

Epworth Christian School’s partnership with Nemours and the Sussex County Health Prevention Coalition is proving to be a winning combination. In this year’s efforts to solidify the partnership and to make true on their commitment to partner with Nemours in the fight against childhood obesity and their pledge to healthy living, ECS has taken great strides to ensure students and families are afforded every opportunity to live out these principles. Determined not to contribute to unhealthy diets, the school launched its assault by removing soda machines, eliminating candy from the school’s snack store, increasing physical activity beyond state requirements, and instituting a Nutrition and Healthy Cooking class. Building on the mind-body research and considering the challenges of adolescents, ECS is excited to have implemented, this year, a segregated physical education curriculum that meets four days a week. A class where middle school boys and girls are separated enables efforts to be focused on sports-specific skill development while eliminating some of the pressures that come from having boys and girls together. ECS vendor, Pepsi, was very cooperative and happily replaced the soda machines with water – plain and flavored, juice and G2 from Gatorade. The students seem to be adapting well and there are only a few teachers going through chocolate withdrawal with the new additions to the snack store. This commitment to healthy living has also given us an opportunity to partner with and reach out to our medical community. Last month, Dr. Lehman of Seaford provided a small grant to the school enabling them to purchase the Catch Kids Kit for Grades K-2. This gift was a seed that blossomed last week when unexpectedly the school was granted the entire Catch Kids Equipment and Curriculum set for Grades K-8 – a gift valued at over $5,000. The ECS family consists of 165 students and like any caring family we want our kids to be healthy and strong. We are excited about this partnership and the benefits that it will provide for our students and their families as well as our staff. The decision to take it up a notch in this year’s curriculum was preceded by the ECS Summer Camp where daily snacks included fruits, vegetables and other healthy snacks. In addition to the physical activities included in the camp program, students walked one-half mile, three days a week to a neighborhood pool where they swam for two hours. For more about Epworth Christian School call the school office at 875-4488. Ivy Bonk School Administrator


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

PAGE 59

Bail out plan probably won’t help the middle class I don’t think I understand the $700 billion bailout plan just RANK ALIO passed by Congress and signed by the President. I have a gut feeling I am disappointed in it’s not going to help me or anyone in the middle class. I am always suspect when Presi- both political parties dent Bush comes out with a proand both presidential gram that is good for me. As Bill candidates for backing Maher said on the View last week, “I feel the president is good for one this bill. more screw up.” He has looked out for me, or so he says, for almost eight years and self in a hole and when you looked around I have a lot less to show in my retirement for help your rich uncle was nowhere to be account and pocketbook than I did in the found? You had to dig yourself out of that eight years of the Clinton administration. hole. Since I left Delaware two weeks ago Yet we have to pay taxes to bail out for a trip, Americans have lost $2 trillion greedy big businesses who took advantage in their 401K accounts. I’m so glad those of home buyers, and corporations and Wall liberal Democrats didn’t allow Bush to pri- Street for their stupid investments and lavvatize Social Security and I hope Ameriish spending habits. cans won’t allow John McCain to pick up I am disappointed in both political parthe pieces. ties and both presidential candidates for The only winners with having your Sobacking this bill. They tried to sugar coat cial Security account with a stock broker the deal saying that taxpayers could make will be the brokers who make money sella profit. Yeah, who’s cutting me a check? ing and buying your stocks. Imagine your The bill has stink written all over it, esSocial Security account in the market topecially when the Republicans, including day. the president, wouldn’t support the first The average “Joe Six-Pack” is how draft because the “Golden Parachute” Sarah Palin describes her America. Pete (million dollar bonuses given to exiting DuPont once described Delawareans in the corporate CEO’s) would no longer be alsame way. I wonder if Republicans think lowed. we are drunks? Drunk or sober Americans Republicans used several excuses, all of who are hurting in the pocketbook think which centered on the middle class not bethe deal stinks. ing taken care of. Hogwash. After AIG How many times have you gotten your- went belly up, they spent $400,000 on a

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retreat. The CEO of bankrupt AIG, who was only on the job 17 days, left with a departure bonus in the millions. Barack Obama wants that money returned and the employees who went on that junket fired. Good luck with that. Republicans stormed the walls to vote for the second version. I’ve heard nothing more of the parachute provision. That’s what has me worried. Chalk up another shafting for the American public. The bill went from three pages to a manual script. When I was in the retail business and we went through a difficult business season, whether it be the result of the weather or the economy, and we had clothing and shoes that would be going out of style sitting on the shelves, my rich uncle didn’t hand me a check to cover my losses. The business term is, “I ate them.” Every time the stock market has shown a little sign of recovery, either Bush, the Treasury secretary or the Federal Reserve chairman, raises their ugly heads and the market goes to hell in a hand basket. What confidence the American public has in these guys! The bailout was supposed to give confidence to Wall Street and bolster the stock, but the opposite has happened — down 5,000 points since last year. Brokers are saying don’t panic, stay the course, you know the market always goes higher than the peak before stocks drop. Easy for you to say. What little savings Americans have is all they have and they can’t afford to lose it.

I think Americans have finally had enough of George Bush’s economic and foreign policies and are willing to take a gamble with the Democrat Party. Polls indicate enough is enough. I’m afraid what four more years of the same will do even to the rich. Have you noticed that during this election very little has been said about abortion, guns or environmental issues? During the debate, on CNN, they have a scroll at the bottom of the screen which shows voters reactions to the questions and answers. The chart rises and falls depending on the level of interest. When McCain brought up about staying the course in Iraq, his scroll almost flat lined like someone who just died. It was the same case when he spoke about health care. When Obama spoke of the economy and his plan for recovery, his scroll hit the top bar. History is repeating itself. When Clinton took office America was hurting from the leadership of another Bush and Clinton’s campaign manager James Carville told his workers the election was about, “the economy stupid!” On a side note, I understand the Secret Service is canvassing Georgetown in preparation for Return Day and is already making changes in the way the event is handled. Joe Biden will be there either as vice president or senator. He wouldn’t miss that day for anything and, who knows, he may bring a guest.

Getting ready for Trick-or-Treat was not a Hollywood production There was something about the chill of autumn that did not set ONY INDSOR well with me when I was growing up. As an adult, October is by far We looked like we were my favorite month of the year. It is the crisp autumn air and the changing of the leaves that seem to make more likely to be robbing for some type of magic in the air. It a convenience store than is chilly, but not cold; warm at times, but not hot. It is just perfect. going Trick-or-Treating. However, as a young boy it signaled the end of outside weather as we had come to know it. It meant the days were getting shorter and not like Christmas where even though it is the air colder as night fell. It was too far just one day, actually one morning, that from Christmas and gave me little to look brings so much excitement, Halloween did forward to in an immediate sense. not come with a week’s vacation from And even though I had this love for the school. Once we woke up the day after first week or so of school because I could Halloween, we were right back in school. show off my new “back-to-school” However, there was something exciting wardrobe and reunite with some old about sharing stories with your friends the friends, by October I was tired of school. weeks and days before Halloween about So, October did not necessarily represent who “you are going to be” for Halloween. my favorite time of the year. There were the traditional witches, devils, As a youngster I had to improvise and batman and superman. find something to take my mind off the I of course, had no choice but to chime fact that there would be three months till in about what my plans were. But, I knew Christmas and at least a month until the in the scheme of things, it would ultimateSears Wish Book came out. ly be up to my mother to decide what my So, I set my sights on Halloween. I costume would be. The fact is I cannot know that a lot of people tend to see Halever recall wearing a costume for Halloween as a very negative and almost sacloween. I wore a mask. That’s right. I was rilegious holiday, but to a child it means many different characters for Halloween nothing except “trick or treat” and bags during my childhood. I was Superman, full of candy! It means dressing up and Batman, a devil and even once I was looking silly or scary and getting bags full Casper the Ghost. All of these characters of candy! Walking for what seems like had one thing in common: they dressed miles just to get bags full of candy! Do like Tony Windsor. you sense a common denominator here? Mom would proudly come home with a The only negative to me was the fact mask for me and my brother. We could that Halloween was only one night. It is choose what we wanted to be, however,

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the only consideration was whether the mask I chose was big enough to fit over my unusually large head. You would think it would be simple to just take an old sheet and cut a hole in it and drape it over my body to make the perfect Casper the Ghost costume. The only thing is, though there were a few “old sheets” in my house, they were all covering a few old beds. I would have just as soon asked Mom to cut a hole in the living room curtains as I would have one of her bed sheets. I knew that was out of the question. So, off I went, grinning, white, plastic

Casper face and all. Friends would come by dressed as witches with black pointed hats and black nylons and ghosts peering from under, long, white, flowing sheets. I would be walking down the sidewalk with my older brother, both of us wearing our 10-cent store mask, dressed in work shoes and a pair of jeans. We looked like we were more likely to be robbing a convenience store than going Trick-or-Treating. But, as Mom would say when we complained about the lack of a full body costume, “How about you don’t go at all?” So, I suppose given that option, we were very satisfied with our attire.

Gas Lines Gas prices continue downward trend As of Tuesday, the Delaware gas average fell to $3.02. Area diesel fell to $3.84. In Dover, gas on Tuesday was averaging $2.92 a gallon, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic. There are currently 10 states with averages below $3 a gallon: Oklahoma: $2.71; Kansas: $2.78; Missouri: $2.79; Iowa: $2.86; Minnesota: $2.90; Ohio: $2.90; Arkansas: $2.95; Texas: $2.98; Nebraska: $2.98 and New Jersey: $2.99.

Price comparison for Regular Unleaded Gasoline 10/14/08

Week Ago

Year Ago

National

$3.16

$3.48

$2.76

Delaware

$3.02

$3.28

$2.61


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MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22 2008

Snapshots

Pictured are the 2008 Laurel High School Homecoming contestants. Back row, seniors, Sharay Smith, Patience Whaley, Morgan Johnson, Kenzie Matthews and Diane Paul. Front, junior Taylor Littleton, sophomore Torrey Edwards, and freshman Jenna Pinson. Homecoming is this Friday, Oct. 17 versus Woodbridge. Photo by Pat Murphy

Everett and Cathy Warrington and Marie and John Clawson enjoy ice cream cones together on a beautiful fall day outside a local store last week. Photo by Pat Murphy

On Friday, Sept. 26, Angie Warrington, left, and Emily Pusey, right, donated a total of 22 inches of their hair to “Locks of Love” in the memory of Donna Hitchens who passed away in December 2006 from cancer. Donna was a sister to Angie and an aunt to Emily. She has been greatly missed by everyone she touched during her short life. In the center is Lisa Culver of Salon Evolutions in Salisbury. Submitted photo.

Members of Charity Lodge do a little practicing before their haunted house event. From left, Arnold Hearn, Jerry Lynch, Ernie Allen and Richard Hutchinson. Photo by Pat Murphy

Jerry Lynch, (left) chairman of the Charity Lodge #27 Haunted House event checks out long time volunteer Arnold Hearn’s spider. Photo by Pat Murphy.

A day of fun: On a Saturday afternoon, four ladies, Mary Ellen Conaway, Mary Brown, Star Conaway and Harriet MacVeigh sat in a farmer’s watermelon field and feasted on watermelon and good conversation. Life is good! Submitted photo.


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

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The good old days were tastier, Doing the Towns Together cheaper and less complicated LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS

The grocery cart was piled high with instant potatoes, chicken flavored dressing, macaroni and cheese, frozen pizzas, family sized containers of beef and vegetables, and an assortment of other quick to prepare foods, with two under-40 young housewives chatting together and laughing as they discussed the shortness of time for food prep at their homes. The wide variety of quick to prepare foods caught my eye and I could not help but hear their discussion as they waited in the checkout line ahead of me at a local large grocery store. One lamented to the other on the high cost of food, the ever increasing appetites of her teenaged children, the rushed pace of her life and life in general. All the while she was placing her purchases on the conveyor belt for the cashier to checkout her purchases. As the basket emptied, she commented to her friend, “All of this food will be gone in a few days, I will have run out of food ideas, and I am so rushed all of the time I barely have time to read the latest cookbooks anymore.” It wasn’t that I was intentionally eavesdropping as I waited my turn to pay for groceries, it was that last comment about reading a cookbook and the sight of the fast prep foods that caught my attention. The friend of the purchaser agreed with her dilemma as far as a shortage of time and her interest in the latest cookbooks by television cooks. As these two young women chatted, I knew they were of the generation that had definitely not had either sewing or cooking classes as a required class while they were in either junior or senior high school. Sometimes it only takes a little comment or situation to make one realize just how great the difference is in generations of women. For many generations home economics was offered to strictly female students while male students enrolled in shop or industrial classes. Females learned how to thread a needle, use a sewing machine, hem a skirt, sew on a button, make a simple skirt or blouse, advancing to more elaborate garments as they entered high school. Young male students learned to use a hammer, a saw, pliers, jigsaws and more complicated tools as they constructed small stools and bookcases, advancing to more complicated pieces of furniture. The basic sewing and construction classes would enable many students to advance in the food, clothing or furniture construction fields once they graduated from high school. Older graduates of Laurel High well re-

Moments With Mike

SARAH MARIE TRIVITS • 875-3672

VIRGINIA ‘MIKE’ BARTON member classes and skills taught by Carolyn Leh, Mabel Moffitt Evans, Jean Mears Kelley, Colleen Moore, and Mr. Baytop. As adults, these former students look back on their classroom instruction period with mixed emotions. Some remember having to rip out stitches and re-sew a garment, or sand a rough edge over and over, or even remove a coat of incorrectly applied stain or varnish. These same students also remember the joy and pride they felt when their project was completed and passed inspection. They still give credit to those junior high and high school teachers who helped them prepare for life and learn skills they employ as adults. Those classes are long gone from the curriculum. In today’s world, the main task is finding someone to repair a garment or piece of furniture and do it properly. Iron-on tape, quick-stick buttons, safety pins, are readily available, or, in many cases, the garment that needs repair is tossed into the throwaway pile. In the case of furniture repair, many younger males haven’t a clue as to how to improve a wobbly leg on a chair or stool. Hanging a picture on the wall is a major production nowadays. First one must get a special gadget that scans the area and focuses a beam of light on the wall where the picture will hang, making sure the wall is smooth and square. Then comes the tape (metal) to measure accurately the distance from top to bottom, up and down from ceiling to baseboard. Then the drill, the wire, the hanger, the hammer, tape and a whole slew of other items. Finally the nail is inserted in the wall with a fancy gadget or hammer. Gets a bit complicated, but any housewife with a nail and hammer can complete the hanging up the new wall treatment in 20 seconds. No fancy gadgets or measuring devices. The finished installation, the preparation and the treatment whether it be food or clothing or constructed items, are all a generational thing. Glad to be a part of the aging population. It is much simpler in many ways. And, in the case of food prep, it’s cheaper and so much tastier.

Let me just untangle here some erronous information I reported here last week. It seems that I stated something about the class of ‘59-wrong-it is the Laurel class of ‘60- preparing, well ahead, for a fiftieth reunion and members of that class will meet at the Georgia House on Nov. 5, 11:30 am. For more details and information call Carolyn Calio at 875-3770 and leave recorded message if no answer. A recent few days visit to Carroll, Oh. was much enjoyed by Molly Collins, her son and wife , Paul and Linda, as they were guests of Paul’s son, Paul, Jr. his wife, Charity and their four children, Lindsay, Chelsa, Trey and Cameron. The visit was highlighted by a big, celebration for Chelsa’s sixteenth birthday. The members of the Laurel New Century Club met at the Georgia House on Oct. 6 for their first meeting of the year. Following lunch and a business meeting they presented guest speaker, Norma Jean Fowler, president of the Laurel Historical Society, who related the Society’s events and activities of the past year, including activities at the Cook House and up-dates on restoration of the Studley house. She stated that there will be interesting programs coming up for the present year, two of them in November, one on the history of fire fighting and another later in the month on quilt documentation. These programs are noted in the membership letter and more will be published concerning them just ahead of the dates for said programs. I presume that Robert Wheatley had a great birthday celebration on Oct. 6 as he and Billie Jane were in Chicago with their daughter, Celeste, her husband, David, and their two “favorite” grand children, Hunter Jane and Rider. They have now returned home just in time for early fall harvesting. The Red Hat ladies “Lunch Bunch” had their monthly breakfast at the Laurel Dutch Inn on Saturday, Oct.11. They are now planning a Halloween celebration at the Laurel Pizzeria on October 21. Their only member to have a birthday this month was Golda Williamson on Oct. 13. Jane Burlingham has requested that I inform members of the Laurel class of ‘69

there will be a meeting on Sat., Oct. 25, 12:30 pm at the Georgia House, concerning making plans for a fortieth reunion. They need a good group so please plan to attend if possible. Members of the Laurel Garden Club held their monthly meeting at St. Philips’ Parish Hall on Sunday, Oct. 12. This was “new member” social with many goodies furnished by the members and after enjoying them the president introduced guest speaker, Vicky Thompson of Seaford who discussed with the group her subject, “What it takes to be a Master Gardner.” The next meeting for this group will be on Nov. 13. Plan to visit Laurel’s Haunted House for thrills and scares, Friday’s and Saturday” till halloween and then on Halloween night Oct. 31. That will wind it up for this year. Another Banner week for special birthday wishes. For Joe “Bulldog” Hitchens, Oct. 20. For Rachel Waller from The Knitting Circle, Oct. 21, to David Elliott on Oct. 21, happy birthday from, Mom and brothers Joe and Mark. To Ann Jones of Delmar, best wishes, with love from husband, Keith. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of: Edward H. Ralph, Marion “Pete” Henry, Gloria Clara Cooper, Ralph J. O’Day, Minnie E. Jackson, Myka Shea Johnson, Mary Elizabeth Murphy, James Junior Beatty,Sylvanus Baker, Mary Frances (Hill) Owens. We continue with prayers for our servicemen and servicewomen and for our friends who are ill, Robert Parsons, Elmer Hearn, Harriett MacVeigh, Steve Trivits, Herman Cubbage, Martha Windsor, Donald Layton, Sr.,Alvin Lutz, and Hattie Puckham. Happy October birthday wishes to: Ernestine Brown, Irma Ellis (17) Elma Nystrom (18) Carl Wilkins (21) and Grace Blackmore (23). Nineteen more days to decide who you’re voting for! See you in the stars.

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PAGE 62

MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Opinion Bus safety questions and answers

Editorial School Bus Safety Week National School Bus Safety Week is October 20-24. Susan B. Messick, Transportation Specialist for the Seaford School District, is trying to get parents and students to understand the benefits of riding a bus to school instead of traveling by personal vehicle. She notes that the American School Bus Council has information on its website that shows that students are 13 times safer traveling to school in a bus, than by other modes of transportation. Additionally, it is “Green,” more environmentally sound. She submitted the following advice from the American School Bus Council on what parents can do to help keep kids safe on and off the school bus: • Walk your child to and from the bus stop. If possible, wait with him or her until the bus arrives. • Be alert to traffic. Check both ways for cars before stepping off the bus. • Wait for the bus driver’s signal before crossing the street. • Walk in front of the bus; never walk behind the bus to cross the street. • While waiting for the bus, stay in a safe place away from the street. • Before leaving the sidewalk, look for the flashing lights. • Never go under the bus to retrieve something you’ve dropped. • Teach your child the importance of staying seated on the bus. • Get to know your bus driver. He or she is a trained professional who sees your child every day; he or she would be happy to tell you about the safety features on the bus and the responsibility drivers have for keeping their young passengers safe. • Get to know the parents of other riders. You will learn about the other children your riding along with your child. • Sign up for American School Bus Council updates (americanschoolbuscouncil.com) to stay informed about the latest news and information on school buses.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

Following are some facts about school buses and the complexities of the bus driving profession. Check out the following website for more: americanschoolbuscouncil.com. Q: Why does it matter how kids get to school? A: School bus ridership addresses a variety of major concerns. Safety: School buses are the safest form of transportation for students – and many times safer than riding in the family car. Traffic: Every child riding a school bus represents one fewer car on the road, especially in the congested area in and around schools, where children are at highest risk. Environment: Students riding in the school bus instead of the family car means fewer car trips and less pollution. School buses are school readiness vehicles, providing free access to an education for millions of children in America through healthy, safe and secure transportation to schools. Every day, more than 470,000 school buses deliver 25 million students to school safely and reliably, so they arrive at school ready to learn. School buses provide over 10 billion passenger trips each year. Q: How safe is the school bus? A: The National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of Transportation and other authorities agree that school buses are the safest form of transportation for getting children to and from school. Some 475,000 school buses transport 25 million children – more than half of America’s school children – each day, and complete 10 billion passenger trips and 4.3 billion miles per year, almost always without a serious incident. Riding in a school bus is much safer than using any other form of transportation – including personal vehicles and railroad and airline travel. According to the Transportation Research Board, part of the National Academy of Sciences, a child is 13 times safer in a school bus than in other modes of travel. Children

driving to school or riding with other teenage drivers are 44 times more likely to be fatally injured than in a school bus. (“The Relative Risks of School Travel,” 2002.) The American School Bus Council works to keep school buses safe, secure and reliable. Q: Why don’t school buses have seat belts? A: School buses are the safest way to transport your children to and from school. The color and size of school buses make them easily visible and identifiable, their height provides good driver visibility and raises the bus passenger compartment above car impact height; and emergency vehicles are the only other vehicle on the road that can stop traffic like a school bus can. School buses are carefully designed on a different transportation and protection model than the average passenger car. The children are protected like eggs in an egg carton – compartmentalized, and surrounded with padding and structural integrity to secure the entire container. The seat backs are raised and the shell is reinforced for protection against impact. There are other differences to consider between your car and your child’s school bus. In your car, you can supervise your child and ensure that your child’s belt remains properly secured. School buses use what is called “passive restraint,” meaning all a child must do to be protected is simply sit down in a seat. School buses also must be designed to be multi-purpose, fitting everything from a six year-old to an 18 year-old senior on the high school football team in full uniform. Sometimes it’s two to a seat, other times three. Because of this, emphasis is placed on protecting the entire valuable cargo. Q: Is it healthy for my child to ride the school bus? A: The school bus keeps children – and the environment – safe. By providing convenient transportation

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Frank Calio

Donna Huston Carol Kinsley James Diehl Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Ann Wilmer

for millions of school children, school buses reduce the number of cars that would otherwise be on the road. The school bus helps parents save money on gasoline, reduces traffic congestion (especially around school walking zones, where our children are most vulnerable) and also reduces the nation’s dependence on oil. Model year 2007 school buses are 60 times cleaner than those built before 1990, and, as older buses are replaced with newer, cleaner burning ones, they will further reduce our pollution and fuel usage. In addition, since 2003 school bus operators have retrofitted more than 12,000 school buses with emissions-reduction technology through the help of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean School Bus grants. If all 25 million children who ride the school bus each day were driven by their parents instead, a substantial amount of additional carbon monoxide would pollute the air each year. School bus manufacturers also are making large investments in new diesel, natural-gas, electric hybrid and other engines to further reduce pollution. Q: Why should I get involved? A: Our children are our nation’s most precious resource; protecting them is our highest priority. Many people are not aware that the school bus is the safest way for children to get to school, and the more children who ride the school bus, the fewer who are injured and even killed traveling to and from school. Many parents erroneously believe that driving their own children to school helps protect them from injury, yet thousands of children are injured each year, many fatally, traveling to and from school in cars. No matter how careful parents are, they cannot predict or control other drivers, and personal vehicles just can’t protect children the way a school bus can. The school bus is driven by a professional driver with extensive training, and the school bus is designed for maximum student protection. Circulation Karen Cherrix Sales George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams

Composition Cassie Richardson Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Treasurer Rita Brex Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Carol James town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2008

Bridgeville: If you lived here, you would be (having fun) now Bridgeville Commission President Joe Conaway said Monday: “If it's the fall and you’re not in Bridgeville, you're not doing anything.” Between 35,000 and 40,000 people were attentive to his advice this past weekend as they filled the streets of Bridgeville for the 17th annual Apple Scrapple Festival. Conaway said he was somewhat upset that Seaford Mayor Ed Butler won the Mayor’s Scrapple Sling “King of Sling” title this year. He was the winner last year and plans to come back. The best part of the Apple Scrapple Festival is that it benefits local non-profit organizations that in turn provide special services to help improve the quality of life in Bridgeville. Alma Fleetwood, secretary of the event for the first 16 years, said the library, churches, school groups, senior center and

Final Word fire company are a few of the ones who benefit. One problem this year concerned the traffic patterns. Conaway said DelDOT suggested the limiting traffic to one route into and out of town. “Success depends on being able to get people in and out of town,” Conaway said. He said this will improve next year as road projects are completed. Bridgeville’s next big event is Punkin Chunkin starting on Friday, Oct. 31, with the award winning Charlie Daniels Band and Randy Owens. Conaway may be right: “If it's the fall and you’re not in Bridgeville, you're not doing anything.” Bryant Richardson Publisher

FOOD LION WEEKLY SPECIALS

CAT COUNTRY ‘2008 Delmarva Star’ winner Danielle McTeer performs at the AppleScrapple Festival in Bridgeville

Send us your Final Words The Final Word is a compilation of thoughts and ideas from Star staff members and members of the public. We encourage readers to submit items. If you have a pet peeve or word of encouragement you can express in a few words, email the item to us at editor@mspublications.com or mail it to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Sign it and include your hometown and a daytime phone number. Readers may want to pass along a favorite quote or something cute from the Internet.

Ask your local Food Lion Manager how you can receive the Food Lion Weekly Specials Flyer. We need your help to get the Food Lion’s Weekly Specials Insert in the Laurel Star and the Seaford Star.

Dr. Kevin Carson, superintendent of Woodbridge School District, “won?” the Kiss the Pig contest. A $1,000 donation from state Rep. Ben Ewing helped him top Bridgeville Commission President Joe Conaway (looking on) and Bridgeville Police Chief Allen Parsons for the privilege. Conaway said he was rooting for Carson to win. “I have aspirations for a lot of things in my life, but kissing a pig is not one of them.” Friends of the Bridgeville Library benefitted from the fundraiser.

PAGE 63


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BUSINESS 6 BULLETIN BOARD 21-24 CHURCH 28 CLASSIFIEDS 34-43 EDUCATION 14 ENTERTAINMENT 32 FINAL WORD 63 FRANK CALIO 59 GOURMET 33 HEALTH 26-...

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