Issuu on Google+

THURSDAY, november 4, 2010

vol. 15 No. 28

50 cents

News HEALTH - Nanticoke Tributes honor best in the community. Page 4 DEL TECH - Conference talks about the economy, county’s future. Page 6 HEROES - Father and daughter team volunteer at Nanticoke. Page 8 BUY BACK - Dentist practice participates in ‘Candy Buy Back’. Page 12 RED KETTLE - Seaford concert will kick off ‘red kettle’ campaign. Page 20 NEW STORE - Teen Challenge’s Thrift Store opens along Middleford Road. Page 24 33.

VETERANS - Veterans Day activities on pages 30 -

FALL BACK - Turn Clocks back one hour Saturday before retiring.

Chip Flowers

Winning season - The Woodbridge varsity field hockey team clinched a winning season with a victory over a Henlopen North foe. Page 37 Seaford soccer - The Seaford soccer team hosted the 2010 Henlopen Conference champions from Indian River. See page 37 to see how the Blue Jays fared. Stars of the Week - A Seaford soccer player and a Woodbridge field hockey player are this week’s Seaford Stars of the Week. Page 39

Index 13 6 17 48 28 59 47 26 21 58 25

Movies Obituaries Police Puzzles Sports Tides Tony Windsor

7 19 45 35 37-44 40 47

Tom Wagner

Cynthia Green

Vance Phillips

Jeff Christopher

GOP fares better in Sussex County races By Bryant L. Richardson

Sports

Bulletin Board Business Church Classifieds Education Final Word Gas Lines Gourmet Health Letters Lynn Parks

Democrats take the U.S. Senate and House seats John Carney

The voters have spoken. Democrat Chris Coons will fill out the remaining four years of Vice President Joe Biden’s term in the Senate. Biden stepped down from his seat after his election in November 2008 as vice president. Former Biden aide Ted Kaufman was named as an interim replacement, and said at the time he would not run to finish out the term of office. Despite national attention, Republican Christine O’Donnell was only able to capture 40 percent of the vote. Coons captured 173,900 votes or 56.6 percent and O’Donnell 123,025 votes. Democrat John C. Carney Jr. is Delaware’s next U.S. Representative, capturing 173,443 votes, just 457 fewer votes than Coons. Glen Urquhart was given 125,408 votes, a couple of thousand more than O’Donnell, in his race for Delaware’s lone Representative seat.

seafordstar.com

Top vote getter in Delaware was Democrat Beau Biden, who was reelected as Attorney General with 203,824 votes. His only challenger was Independent Doug Campbell, who collected 54,485 votes, or 21.1 percent of the vote. In a very close race, Republican R. Thomas Wagner Jr. won re-election as state auditor by a vote of 150,110 or 50.4 percent over Democrat Richard Korn, who captured 147,504 votes. The difference of 2,606 votes in this statewide race. State Senator Joseph W. Booth (R) was unopposed. Voters gave him 10,554 votes for his re-election to the 19th District. The only local contested race for the state House of Representatives was in the 35th District where David L. Wilson (R) was re-elected by a vote of 4,719 to 1,995 over Democratic challenger James J. Westhoff. Unopposed in western Sussex County were state Reps. Danny Short of Seaford and Biff Lee of Laurel, both

Republicans. Short captured 4,562 votes and Lee 5,342 votes. Republicans won all the contested seats in the county races. Cynthia Green won the Register of Wills race by a vote of 39,443 to 29,270 over Gregory Fuller Jr. Scott M. Dailey won the office of Recorder of Deeds by a vote of 34,916 to 33,300 over John F. Brady, who ran not only as a Democrat, but also as a Working Families Party candidate. As a Working Party candidate, he was given 755 votes. When you add his two totals together, his vote count is 34,055, just 861 under Dailey. Vance Phillips of Laurel won reelection by a vote of 8,141 to 5,330 over Dennis V. Cordrey in the District 5 County Council race and George B. Cole won re-election in the District 4 race by a vote of 10,562 to 6,849 over Russell K. Melrath. In the race for Sussex County sheriff, challenger Jeffrey S. Christopher beat incumbent Eric. D. Swanson by a vote of 36,900 to 31,635.


PAGE 2

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Sussex County redistricting forum scheduled for November 8

The League of Women Voters of Sussex County will host a public forum on “Redistricting: What it means for Sussex County,” at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 8, in County Council Chambers. The forum will focus on how the 2010 Census will affect the reformulation of County Council Districts. “Both the 2010 Census and the outcome of Nov. 2 elections will have a significant effect on the shape of Sussex County Council districts and the direction of our county government for the next 10 years,” stated Esther Shelton, president of the League of Women Voters of Sussex County.

Fashion show benefits Del Tech scholarships

From casual to elegant, fashion will be center stage during the third Couture & Class on Saturday, Nov. 20 at 11 a.m. in the Carter Partnership Center at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. Proceeds from the fashion show and luncheon help to fund international education scholarships for Owens Campus students. These opportunities enable students to acquire an international outlook, provide them with a competitive edge in the global job market and prepare them to work and live in a culturally diverse world. Delaware Tech offers study abroad programs to countries as diverse as Scotland, Russia, Mexico, Vietnam, Turkey, Ireland and Ecuador. The fashion show has proven to be a successful way to raise scholarship funds – nearly $3,000 was raised in 2008 and profits more than doubled to $7,100 in 2009. Presenting men’s and women’s clothing in the categories of casual, business, holiday and resort wear will be Carltons, Pineapple Princess, Rose Garden, Sole, all in Rehoboth; Coolspring Cottage, Deanna’s, Tiger Lili and Twila Farrell, all in Lewes. Attendees will be able to purchase clothing and store items at the show’s shopping bazaar; participating stores will donate 15 percent of all sales to the scholarships. New this year and adding another element of excitement is an online auction, with the proceeds also designated for scholarships. Items — including timeshares, resort vacations and unique experiences — can be viewed online at www.dtcc.edu/

Panelists who will engage attendees in exploring the implications of redistricting include Edward Ratledge, director of the University of Delaware’s Center for Applied Demographics and Survey Research. An expert on census data who has been involved in numerous earlier redistricting processes in the state, Ratledge will outline the timeline, procedures and how redistricting generally is performed. Harold “Hal” Godwin, deputy county administrator and a student of redistricting practices, will focus on implications for Sussex County. Sandra Spence, president of the League of owens/fashionshow. Participants will have the opportunity to make final bids on auction items during the show. The event is chaired by Sue Saliba, college trustee and member of the Owens Campus Development Council. The planning team is comprised of community members and college staff. Tickets are $35 per person and $225 for a table for eight. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.dtcc. edu/owens/fashionshow or call 855-1659.

Women Voters of Delaware, will outline national League recommendations on essential principles for redistricting developed by a panel of experts and grass roots representatives at a national conference in 2009. “At this session, we hope to stimulate the public’s interest in the significance of the redistricting process that will take place in 2011, explain some basic legal

10CSDB_10ADV_6x10_MRNGSTR_00646

iPad raffle at Nanticoke

The Look-In Glass Shoppe at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will raffle an iPad just in time for the holiday season. Tickets are on sale for a 16GB Wi-Fi Apple iPad with case and adapter, retailed at $540. Tickets are available for sale at The Look-In Glass Shoppe (located at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital) through Dec. 17 and cost $5 each or five for $20. The drawing will be held at noon on Dec. 17. For more information, call 629-6611, ext. 4955. Payroll deductions are available for eligible employees.

bers are located in the county administration building at #2 The Circle in Georgetown. The forum can also be viewed via webcast at www.sussexcountyde.gov/eservice/broadcast/. For more details, directions, carpooling possibilities or membership information contact Esther Shelton at 645-1797, email sussexlwv@gmail.com or visit www.sussexlwv.org.

6”w X 10”H

Accelerate your savings with November’s CD rates!

1.90

%

APY1

3-Year CD2 As of 10/26/10

Book Fair at Look-In Glass

Shop for that bookworm in your life, or get a little something to read for yourself in the lobby of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 4, and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 5. The Look-In Glass Shoppe at Nanticoke Memorial is hosting a “Books Are Fun” fair featuring quality books and unique gifts at great savings. Join us for huge savings. For more information, call 629-6611, ext. 4955. Payroll deductions are available for eligible NHS employees. Payment is expected at time of order.

requirements and how maps are developed, and discuss such issues as ‘gerrymandering’ - what it is and isn’t. We will also explore how the process could be made transparent so that the public can understand what is done and how it will affect the future direction of our county,” said Spence. The event is free and the public is welcome. Council Cham-

2.60

%

APY1

5-Year CD2 As of 10/26/10

For friendly, hometown service, call or stop in today. Open an account in just minutes, and make more money in November. 1-302-349-4512 • Toll free: 1-888-765-6654 502 E Market St, Greenwood, DE 19950 MyDiscoverBank.com Banking Hours

Lobby

Drive Thru

Monday–Friday Saturday

9:00am–6:00pm 8:30am–1:00pm

8:30am–6:00pm 8:30am–1:00pm

On October 3, 2008, FDIC deposit insurance fromThis offer applies to personal accounts only. CD rate based on a $1,000 minimum balance and 1 Annualtemporarily Percentageincreased Yield (APY). $100,000 to a $250,000 per5-year depositor applies to 3-year and term. A penalty may be charged for early CD withdrawal. Fees could reduce earnings on the account. through December 2009. Advertised rate 31, is valid as of 10/26/10 and subject to change daily without notice.

Accounts are insured up to $250,000 per depositor, per deposit category. ©2010 Discover Bank, Member FDIC

2

MRNGSTR_00707


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 3

City Council approves plans for Hampton Circle Plans for additional housing for lowincome senior citizens are finally moving ahead. Following a public hearing, the Seaford City Council last Tuesday night approved preliminary plans for Hampton Circle, a three-story apartment building near the Ross Business Park. Better Homes of Seaford plans to construct the building, which would have 35 apartments. Access would be through Yorkshire Woods, a Virginia Avenue senior citizen complex also owned by Better Homes of Seaford.

Seaford Star

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Seaford Star (USPS #016-428) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $21 a year in county; $26 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown, and Federalsburg, Maryland; $31 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

Plans for the apartment building have been in the works since 2007, when the city sold 12 acres in the Ross Business Park to Better Homes. In December 2008, the federal government refused Better Homes’ request for funding, citing several “technical difficulties” with the purchase of the property. The land had to be subdivided and rezoned for high-density residential development and covenants regarding construction in the business park had to be removed. All of that was accomplished in March 2009 and Better Homes director William

Roupp reapplied to the federal government for funding. Hampton Circle would provide housing to senior citizens (62 or older) as well as to disabled people whose income is 50 percent or less than the U.S. median income. City building official Josh Littleton told council members that the building would be 36,000 square feet in size and would be attached to the city’s water and wastewater systems. Storm water would be gathered on the site and would eventually end up in Her-

ring Run, which leads to the Nanticoke River. Plans for the project have to be brought back to the city council for a final OK. They also have to be approved by the state fire marshal’s office, the Sussex County Conservation District and the State Accessibility Board. Better Homes of Seaford already has 99 units for low-income, elderly citizens in the city of Seaford, 88 at Yorkshire Woods and 11 at Charleston Place in the former Kim Manufacturing sewing factory on Phillips Street.

into one of several apartments that Seaford Housing, the complex owner, has throughout the city. David Layfield with Seaford Housing told council members that the renovation would take about three months. Seaford Housing is in the midst of renovating the Seaford Apartments complex near the Nylon Capital Shopping Center. Under the plan, all of the apartments in Greenside Manor would get new patios, balconies and windows. The Seaford Board of Adjustment granted a variance to the developer to allow the new balconies to jut out into the required 25-foot setback around the

property. The new community building, however, will adhere to the setback requirements. In addition to the community building, Seaford Housing plans to construct a new maintenance building that will include storage room for the residents. The existing playground will get new equipment and the number of apartments that are accessible to handicapped people will be increased to 20 percent. The plan still requires final approval from the city council. It also requires approval from the state fire marshal’s office, the Sussex Conservation District and the State Accessibility Board.

Plans to Star renovate Greenside Manor Apartments Laurel Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

By Lynn R. Parks 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, 19973 in SeaGreenside ManorDE Apartments (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 ford could get an upgrade. The Seaford CityThe Council lastStar Tuesday night approved Laurel (USPS #016-427) preliminary for the is publishedplans weekly by renovation, Morning Star which would Inc., include of a Publications 951construction Norman Eskridge new community building for apartment Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Perioditenants. cals postage paid at Dover, DE. The approval followed public hearing Subscriptions are $21 aayear in counon the plan. ty; $26 a year in Kent and New Castle The complex on Tulip Place has five Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharpapartment buildings, all of which would town and Federalsburg, Maryland; $31 be redone, inside and out. During renovaelsewhere. Postmaster: Send address tions, the residents would be moved into changes to LaurelManor Star, P.O. Box 1000, vacant Greenside apartments or Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

There’s always something new at...

The

ANNUAL HOLIDAY Hen House OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND

“The friendliest store on the shore!” Mon-Sat 10-5:30, Sun. 12-4 302 11465 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE

875-6922

Friday-Sunday November 5-7

10% SAVINGS STOREWIDE

“The friendliest little store “The friendliest on the Shore!” little store

on the Shore!”

ANNUAL HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND ANNUAL HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND Friday–Sunday, November 5–7 Friday–Sunday, November 5–7 10% SAVINGS STOREWIDE Good Open House Weekend Only! 10% SAVINGS STOREWIDE Good Open House Weekend Only!

Good Open House Weekend Only!

Redeem Your Valuable Cluck Bucks

Now thru October 31st Earn Valuable Cluck Bucks Now thru October 31st Earn Valuable Cluck Bucks Redeem Your Valuable Cluck Bucks Charming Tails s le December 3rd–5th nd Sn YankeeFrCa owpinion s by De es nc Redeem Your Valuable Cluck Bucks ra ag on Cluck Buck Weekend er 50 Snowbabies pt. 56 e From ese koo nCh Charm g Tails aTo YOv s le December 3rd–5th nd Ca ee nk ag Snowpinionin YaWood Wick Candles Camille Beckman Bath & Body s by m es nc Dept. 56 ra S e Fr l D 50 n on Cluck Buck Weekend er& Body Ca Wood Wick Candles • Camille Beckman Ov Bath SnCh owbaar COLLECTIBLES ESPECIALLY FOR YOU bies ing se From oo Ch To Donna Sharp Handbags & Accessories • Rowe Pottery • Bauble Lulu Beads Tails Over 50 Jim Shore • Willow Tree •Pottery Birch Hearts Bauble Lulu Beads Donna SharpCandies Handbags & Accessories Rowe Hand Blown Glass Balls • Fashion Jewelry • Handmade byWood Hammond Wick Candles •Home Camille Beckman Bathin&Bluejeans Body Grown • Forever Sn COLLECTIBLES ESPECIALLY FOR YOU es ow nc pi Gourmet Foods • Wreaths • Decorations • Flags nions Fragra Donna Sharp Handbags & Accessories • Rowe Pottery • Bauble Lulu Beads Hand Blown Glass Balls Fashion Jewelry Handmade Candies by Hammond Jim Shore • Willow Tree • Birch Hearts Sn e ow os ba ho bies C Hand Blown Glass Balls • Fashion Jewelry • Handmade Candies by Hammond To 10–5:30, Sun. 12–4 • Flags Check Home Grown • Forever in by Bluejeans 302-875-6922 ♥ Mon.–Sat. Cards & FREE Gourmet Foods • Wreaths • Decorations Dept. 56 Website for From Gifts for All GiftGourmet Foods Wreaths Decorations 11465 Sycamore Road ♥ Laurel, DE Valuable Flags

December 3rd-5th on Cluck Buck Weekend

wrapping

Occasions

www.thehenhousede.com

Coupon!

FREE ColleCtibles espeCially For you! Gift11465 Sycamore Road Laurel, DE FREE Cards & wrapping www.thehenhousede.com Jim Shore Willow Tree Birch Hearts Home Grown Forever in Bluejeans Gifts for All Gift Ad Name: The Hen House 4061470 Size: 4x4.5” Process Pub(s)/Run Dates: Holiday Catalogue 10.25 Wrapping Check Our Website Valuable Coupons www.thehenhousede.com Occasions File Location: Pubs/Holiday Catalogue October for ‘10/The Hen House Cards & Gifts for All Occasions

302-875-6922 ♥ Mon.–Sat. 10–5:30, Sun. 12–4

Ad Name: The Hen House 4061470

Check Website for Valuable Coupon!


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Nanticoke Tributes honor best in the community By Lynn R. Parks

When he was just 9-years-old, Rex Mears developed a severe lung disease. “I couldn’t walk 10 feet without coughing my head off,” he said. His mother, Frances, took him to Seaford doctor John W. Lynch, who referred him to Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. There, he had lung surgery and was released “in good health.” “I am here today because of the wisdom of Dr. Lynch,” Mears said. “He was right here in Seaford. Wasn’t I lucky?” That incident was one of several that inspired Mears, who is 69, to support healthcare in his hometown. Last Thursday, he was given the Charles C. Allen Jr. Leadership in Philanthropy Award, handed out annually by Nanticoke Health Services, of which Nanticoke Memorial Hospital is a part. “Rex gives a tremendous amount of time and service to the community,” said Charles C. Allen III, “Chick,” in introducing Mears. “He really is extraordinary. It is a pleasure to be a part of the things Rex is involved in.” Mears was among four honorees at Nanticoke’s Tributes for Healthcare Leadership dinner, held at Heritage Shores clubhouse in Bridgeville. Also honored were Soroptimist International of Seaford, a 60-year-old civic club, Sister Rosita Alvarez of La Esperanza and Dr. Louis Ow-

Nanticoke Health Services held its annual Tributes Dinner Thursday. Honorees were, the Soroptimist Club of Seaford, retired radiologist Dr. Louis Owens, advocate for the poor Sister Rosita Alvarez and former Nanticoke board member Rex Mears. Seated, from left: Nancy Hickman, president of Soroptimist International of Seaford, Owens and Alvarez. Back: Michele Procino-Wells, Nanticoke board member, Charles “Chick” Allen III, Mears, Nanticoke CEO and president Steve Rose, Dr. Anthony Policastro and Dr. Joaquin Cabrera. Those in the photo who did not receive awards were presenters at the ceremony. Photo by Steve Theis

ens, retired radiologist. Mears, who has been on the Nanticoke board of directors for 20 years and is a member of the new Nanticoke Health Ser-

vices Foundation, told the crowd of about 220 people that when he suffered from his lung ailment, Seaford did not have a hospital. But years later, when his 8-year-

old daughter fell and banged her head on the corner of a step, he was able to turn for help to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, which opened in 1952. “Today, we hear complaints about waiting rooms and long waits,” he said. “But that day, we got very fast service. You see, I had been working in the hog pen and smelled like it. We were fast-tracked before that term was even invented.” In 2003, Mears sold his family home and part of the farm to Nanticoke Health Services, for its Mears Health Campus. The campus, at the intersection of Bridgeville Highway and Herring Run Road, is dedicated to the memory of his parents, Ray and Frances. “So many influences have led me to be a strong supporter of Nanticoke,” Mears said. “How many people can say that they have a good hospital in their backyards? Aren’t we lucky?” Michele Procino-Wells, the newest member of the Nanticoke board of directors and an eight-year member of the Soroptimist Club of Seaford, presented the Founders Award to Nancy Hickman, current club president. Procino-Wells said that in its 60-year history, SI of Seaford has given $1.2 million to local community causes; $100,000 of that has gone to Nanticoke. SI of Seaford operates the Curiosity Shop, a thrift store that employs 19 people and that generates money for club members to donate to the community.

NEW LISTING! FA R M H O U S E O N 3 . 5 A C R E S

Good Rental Property, 2 BR 1 BA, With Outbuildings. Great Location, County Seat Hwy., Georgetown. Mls#582401 Priced to sell! Only $109,000

Call Donald Kellicutt today for details!

Visit our website and see this home on virtual tour. www.wilgusassociates.com

REAL ESTATE • RENTALS • INSURANCE • PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BETHANY BEACH 32904 S. Coastal Hwy. 302-539-7511 1-800-441-8118

210 West Market St., Georgetown, DE

302-855-0500 • 1-888-421-6521

LEWES 1520 Savannah Rd. 302-645-9215 1-800-421-6521


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010 “Any other civic organization would have a tough time competing with Soroptimist,” Procino-Wells said. “The club and Nanticoke have been partners in the community for 60 years.” “We do not seek recognition for our work,” Hickman said in her acceptance speech. “But all 50 of our members are absolutely thrilled to receive this award.” Quoting from a history of the club written by member Ruth Sneller, Hickman said that the original members would be pleased with what their club has become. “The original 16 women have come and gone, but their work lives on in us,” she said.

Dr. Joaquin Cabrera, Seaford obstetrician and gynecologist, introduced Alvarez to the crowd. She and other sisters of the Carmelite order opened La Esperanza in Georgetown in 1995 to help poor people of the Sussex County Latino community. “Sister Rosita is an angel of charity,” he said. “She has dedicated her life to the service of others and is a committed advocate for the poor and for those whom society has forgotten. Hers is a true representation of what a Christian life should be.” Alvarez, who is 81 and a native of Spain, said that she visits patients in Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at least twice a week. “Nanticoke is a blessing for our

community,” she said. “I feel at home there.” She also had kind words for the people of the Latino community with whom she works. “They are very poor, but they are a loving and beautiful people,” she said. Owens, who was inducted into the Nanticoke Physicians Hall of Fame, joined the hospital staff as a diagnostic radiologist in 1984 and retired in 2007. A native of Columbia, S.C., who grew up in Whaleysville, Va., he told the crowd that when he told his mother that he wanted to be a radiologist, she asked why he didn’t become a real doctor instead. Owens is retired from the U.S. Air

PAGE 5 Force, where he worked as a flight surgeon and radiologist. He serves on the board of trustees of Delaware Technical and Community College and is chairman of the Owens Campus Educational Foundation Development Council. Owens told the crowd that he has two hopes for Nanticoke Health Services. “First, that health care will continue to be delivered by men and women who love the profession,” he said. And second, “that the hospital and medical staff will continue to work respectfully with each other to improve the quality of care we provide to people here in Sussex County.”

Future of Nanticoke includes ‘a great step forward’ By Lynn R. Parks Every year at its annual Tributes for Healthcare Leadership dinner, Nanticoke Health Services president Steve Rose offers a brief update on the status of the healthcare provider. At this year’s dinner, held last Thursday night at Heritage Shores clubhouse in Bridgeville, Rose announced what he called “a great step forward.” Next year, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital plans to add a second heart catheterization lab, at a cost of $1.5 million to $2 million, he said. To jump start fundraising for the new lab, Seaford residents Charles Allen III, “Chick,” and his wife, Barbara,

have donated $200,000. “Two people in the community have stepped up to the plate with seed money,” Rose said. Along with its second catheterization lab, Nanticoke plans to hire a second cardiac interventionist, Rose said. Interventionist Dr. Ivan Pena joined the cardiology practice of doctors Alicea, Buenano, Laurion and Simons in October 2009 and since then, Rose said, Pena “has done a wonderful job for us.” Pena’s patient load is “exceeding expectation,” Rose added. “We are reaching the community and more people are coming to us for the care they need.” Cardiac interventionists use balloon

catheterization to treat heart attacks caused by blood clots: A catheter is inserted into an artery in the groin and pushed through the artery into the heart. At the site of the clot, doctors inflate a small balloon carried into the artery by the catheter. The balloon pushes the plaque to the sides of the artery, allowing the clot to pass and blood flow to resume. Doctors then put in place a stent, a tiny tube of non-magnetic wire mesh, at the former site of the clot to hold the plaque in place. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association have established a goal of 90 minutes for “door to balloon,” the time that elapses between

a heart attack patient reporting to an emergency department and elimination of the blood clot. The average door to balloon time at Nanticoke is about an hour. Rose told the more than 200 people at the annual tributes dinner that Nanticoke Health Services is a strong institution. He said that as more people become insured because of health care reform, Nanticoke will be able to handle them. “We are making plans — we are getting ready,” he said. Rose also praised the formation of the Nanticoke Health Services Foundation, put together this year to help raise awareness of Nanticoke and the services it offers and to generate funding.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Business Conference talks about the economy, county’s future By Lynn R. Parks This year’s Today and Tomorrow Conference at Del Tech in Georgetown took a look at what organizers called the “basics” of the Sussex County economy — agriculture and the trades industry. According to the conference program, “It is this bedrock of our county that maintains jobs that are here now and that will be needed tomorrow.” This was the 17th year that the college has hosted the Today and Tomorrow Conference. This year’s conference, titled “Getting Back to Basics,” featured keynote speaker Ed Kee, Delaware’s secretary of agriculture, and two panels, one representing the agriculture industry and the other trades. Speaking as part of the trades industry panel, Mike Covey of Seaford said that during the tough economic times that the county is facing, a good reputation is invaluable. “Our long-standing reputation as being honest has helped us,” said the president of Covey’s Car Care on Middleford Road. “A reputation takes a long time to build up and no time at all to tear down.” Covey’s, founded in 1965 by Mike Covey’s father, Ken, has seven employ-

Redbox opens in Laurel

Redbox, the bright red fully-automated DVD rental kiosk, announces the opening of a new location at Walgreens, 30182 Sussex Hwy., in Laurel.  Redbox delivers convenient, affordable access to new release DVDs and catalog titles. With a rent and return anywhere policy, consumers can now rent DVDs from the kiosk at Walgreens in Laurel and return them to any of the more than 21,000 Redbox locations nationwide. New users are invited to register their email address at www.redbox.com to receive a free one-night rental code. Also, as part of the Free Movie Monday promotion, every Redbox consumer can register their mobile phone at www.redbox.com to receive a free one-night rental the first Monday of every month.

SBA seeks nominations

The U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Delaware District Office seeks applications for its 2011 Small Business Week Awards. The awards will be presented at SBA’s Small Business Week Awards Dinner next May in Wilmington. The awards recognize Delaware’s outstanding small business owners and champions in the following categories: Small Business Person of the Year, Young Entrepreneur, Small Business Exporter, Family-Owned Small Business of the Year, Women in Business Champion, Veterans Small Business Champion, Minority Small Business Champion, Financial Services Champion, Small Busi-

ees. “This is not just a job for me,” Mike Covey said. “It’s a hobby as well. I enjoy helping people and earning a living at the same time.” Ed Simon, workforce analyst with the Delaware Economic Development Office, told the more than 200 people attending the conference that wages in the trade industry are among the higher wages in the county. In 2009, they ranged from $32,670 for auto service technicians to $38,260 for plumbers. The average annual wage in Sussex County was $33,300. On the agriculture side, the county has more than 8,000 workers employed in its food manufacturing industry, Simon said. Food processing jobs represent two-thirds of all of the county’s manufacturing jobs and $236.1 million of its annual wage payroll. Average annual wage for someone working in food processing is nearly $30,000. “These basic industries sustain us,” Simon said. In boom times, he added, they might not expand as quickly as jobs in other sectors. But on the other hand, “they are not as bad in bad times.” Covey said that one of the biggest challenges faced by his company is keeping up with new technology. “Our technology

is changing so fast, with alternative fuels, hybrids and more efficiency,” he said. “In this computer era, you can be left behind in an instant.” Continuing education for his employees is very important, he said. “It used to be that you didn’t need much formal training; you could learn on the job,” he said. “But now, without training, you can’t get a firm hold on what you’re doing.” Robert Light, CEO of Flexera, an innovative energy system design and installation company based in Harbeson, said that keeping up with technology, as well as with government regulation, is also important for his 30 employees. Another significant challenge, he added, is countering misinformation about alternative energy. For example, the cost of solar energy is lower than is often reported, he said. And while the argument is often made that alternative energies like solar and wind power can succeed only if they are subsidized by the government, people forget that oil and coal industries also receive subsidies, he said. Oil companies, he added, get one and a half times the subsidies that solar companies get; coal companies, two and a half times. Both Covey and Light praised com-

ness Journalist and Home-Based Business Champion. “SBA’s Small Business Week awards are the most prestigious awards in the nation recognizing small business success,” said Jayne Armstrong. “Last year, Delaware businesses went on to be awarded three regional awards and for the first time, a Delaware business won a national award.” Anyone is eligible to nominate a small business owner or champion and selfnominations are encouraged and accepted. An independent selection committee will judge the nominations. After the selection of the state winners, honorees will be judged at the regional and national levels for additional recognition. The deadline for nominations is Friday, Nov. 12. For more information or to request a nomination form, contact the SBA Delaware District Office at 302-573-6294 or visit www.sba.gov/de.

ment firms. It also gives the company a full-time dedicated representative devoted to growing the business through one-onone contact and personal service. Dykes began his new position with Whayland on Oct. 18, after five years as manager of the Bank of Delmarva’s Laurel branch. His experience and knowledge of Sussex County’s business climate will prove beneficial in his new role with the Whayland Co.

Dykes joins Whayland Co.

The Whayland Co. has announced the hiring of former bank manager Don Dykes as its new business development coordinator. The addition of Dykes allows Whayland to further emphasize its standing as one of Dykes Sussex County’s premier construction and project manage-

Joyner

Knopp

Commission approves office

Sperry Van Ness – Miller Commercial Real Estate announces that the Seaford office, located at 604 Porter St., has been approved by the Real Estate Commission.  Rodney Joyner is managing broker and Tom Knopp serves as advisor. Both Joyner and Knopp specialize in the sale and lease of industrial, retail, office and commercial investment properties, as well as land sales.  For more information, email Rodney. Joyner@svn.com or Tom.Knopp@svn. com.  

promise as the road to a thriving business. “You have to be able to work with customers and adapt to their concerns,” Covey said. “We need to work together to solve our energy problems,” Light added. “Hostile relationships are not the answer.” Orville Mills, general manager of the George Sherman Corp., a plumbing and heating and air conditioning business in Milton, Lewes and Dover, was the third man on the trades panel. He said that one of the biggest challenges facing his industry is the lack of trained workers. “A lot of people don’t want to go into plumbing and HVAC,” he said. “It’s not fancy work, or pretty, and you have to go into attics and dig ditches.” Asked what lessons he had learned from dealing with the recent recession, Mills said that his company learning the importance of tightening its belt. “We got rid of some workers that we should have gotten rid of before,” he said. “Now, we’ve just got workers who will do a better job.” As for the lesson the recession taught Covey: “You’ve got to do everything right the first time,” he said. “Folks don’t want to bring a car back two or three times.”

SCAOR now 501c(3) organization

The Sussex County Association of Realtors Community Service Foundation, the charitable organization created by area realtors, announces that the foundation is now a fully recognized 501c(3). The foundation’s goal is to raise money for the needy families of Sussex County.  “This is fantastic news for our organization. Our annual auction has generated over $400,000 in funds in the last 5 years. That money has gone directly to the needy families in Sussex County,” said Dave Lambert, foundation president.  The Foundation partnered with Habitat for Humanity this year and raised $7,500 for a brick and mortar foundation for the Women Build home now under construction in Laurel. For more information about the SCAOR Community Service Foundation or to make a cash or item donation, or to sponsor this year’s annual auction, contact David Lambert, realtor, Jack Lingo, Inc., at 226-6606.

2010 Tourism Recognition Award

Southern Delaware Tourism has begun accepting nominations for the 2010 Southern Delaware Tourism Recognition Award. Eligible nominees must work in Sussex County. Nomination forms must be received by Southern Delaware Tourism by Monday, Nov. 15, to be considered. For more information on the awards and for nomination forms, visit http:// visitsoutherndelaware.com/2010_Nomination_Form.htm.


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 11/05

Saw: The Final Chapter........R............................................... 2:20, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 .............................................................................3D: 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 8:05, 10:30 Paranormal Activity...............R.1:20, 2:00, 3:35, 4:40, 5:55, 7:35, 8:30, 9:55,10:50 Hereafter (2010)............ PG13........................................... 1:210, 4:15, 7:15, 10:20 Jackass 3 ............................R.............................3D 12:45, 3:05, 5:25, 8:15, 10:40 Jackass 3 ..........................2D . ............................................ 2:05, 4:25, 7:10, 9:30 N-Secure..............................R............................................. 1:50, 4:30, 7:30, 10:10 Red................................ PG13......... 2:10, 4:00, 5:05, 7:50, 9:25, 10:35, 1:05, 6:50 Life As We Know It........ PG13 .......................................... 12:55, 3:40, 6:35, 9:15 Secretariat ........................ PG....... 12:40, 1:15, 3:25, 4:10, 6:20, 7:00, 9:10, 10:00 The Social Network....... PG13............................................ 12:50, 3:45, 6:40, 9:35 Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole ...PG................................................ 1:30 3:55 6:30 9:00 Devil ............................. PG13.............................................................. 1:40, 10:05 The Town..............................R.................................................................. 4:05 7:05

E E R F

DID YOU SAY

Classifieds For Subscribers

We offer Free Personal Classifieds to our subscribers. Just call 302-629-9788 to place your free ads or use the coupon below.

ONE YEAR SUBSCRIPTION ONLY

OC = Open Captioned & Descriptive Audio Showtimes www.fandango.com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

$

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 11/05 TO TUES. 11/09

Due Date............................. R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Megamind............................ PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D For Colored Girls................. R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saw..................................... R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D Conviction............................ R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hereafter............................. PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paranormal Activity 2.......... R . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10, Red...................................... PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jackass............................... R . . . . . . . . 3D 1:05, Secretariat........................... PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Life As We Know It.............. PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Social Network............. PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps........... PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1:50, 1:45, 1:20, 2:05, 1:30, 1:00, 3:15, 1:20, 3:10, 1:10, 1:40, 1:35,

4:30, 4:15, 4:00, 4:35, 4:00, 3:40, 5:20, 3:45, 5:15, 3:50, 4:20, 4:10,

7:00, 6:30, 6:45, 7:15, 7:05, 6:35, 7:30, 6:45, 7:25, 6:35, 6:50, 6:40,

9:40 8:45 9:30 9:40 9:30 9:15 9:35 9:05 9:45 9:10 9:20 9:15

1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:20

The Town . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:25, 4:05, 6:50, 9:35 Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 11/05 TO THURS. 11/11 - CLOSED MON. & TUES. Secretariat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightly: 7:30, Sun: 2:30, 7:30

2 OFF

$ Family Restaurant

LUNCH ENTREE Buy One and Get $2 Off the 2nd One

Authentic Mexican Cuisine

23437 Sussex Hwy., Seaford 302-628-9701 Open Mon. - Fri. 11 am - 10 pm Sat. Noon to 10 pm Sun. Noon to 9 pm Salisbury, MD • 410-677-3391 2715 N. Salisbury Blvd. Salisbury, MD • 410-749-4303 1045 S. Salisbury Blvd. Easton, MD • 410-770-8550 7813 Ocean Gateway Cambridge, MD • 410-228-7808 315 Sunburst Highway Chestertown, MD • 410-810-1952 715 Washington Ave. W. Ocean City, MD •410-213-7324 12534 Ocean Gateway Elkton, MD • 410-996-1003 881 E. Pulaski Highway

Please Limit 1 Coupon Per Table. Eat-In Only. Cannot Combine Coupons. Expires 12/31/10

3 OFF

$

50

DINNER ENTREE Buy One and Get $3.50 Off the 2nd One

Please Limit 1 Coupon Per Table. Eat-In Only. Cannot Combine Coupons. Expires 12/31/10

Children 1/2 Price Lunch & Dinner

SUBSCRIBE TO THE STARS

DELIVERED WEEKLY

C o m m u n it y E v e n ts & N e ws PLU S FR EE P e rs o n a l C la s s if ie d s

Please send the Laurel Star

Seaford Star My 1 year subscription payment is enclosed.

Name________________________________

Address:______________________________

City ____________ State ____Zip _________ Mail to: Morning Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or Call 302-629-9788 with Credit Card Payment

I would also like my FREE PERSONAL CLASSIFED in the next issue of the Seaford / Laurel Stars.*

Please Limit 1 Coupon Per Table. Eat-In Only. Cannot Combine Coupons. Expires 12/31/10

Lime Margaritas Mexican Imports Domestics 32 oz. XX Draft

BAR ONLY $2.50 $2.00 $1.75 $3.75

2100*

Phone * Some restrictions apply. Ads run 4 to 6 weeks as space is available.

*Sussex County $21 Delmar, MD & Federalsburg, MD $21 Kent & New Castle Counties $26 Out of State $31


PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Father and daughter team volunteer at Nanticoke By James Diehl

W

atching Bob and Becky Kripaitis walk through the halls of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, you’d never think anything was all that different. Here’s two people, one a bit older pushing a cart and another traveling behind handing complimentary newspapers to staff, patients and loved ones. But take a closer look and you’ll notice a bond unlike any other in the world – the bond between a father and his child. It matters not that Becky Kripaitis was born with Down Syndrome 44 years ago, nor does it matter that Kripaitis, at 87 years young, isn’t getting around as good as he used to. They’re a team, and they will remain a team as long as each one can physically continue. “What Becky does is very repetitious, but she’s pretty smart,” says Bob Kripaitis, smiling at his youngest child. “She’s very capable and she can do most things. She’s also a very loveable child, and she’s very outgoing.” Hearing in 1966 that their eighth child had been born with Down Syndrome certainly wasn’t the news that Bob and Carolyn Kripaitis wanted to hear. But when the so-called experts suggested institutionalizing the toddler a short time later, they refused to even consider it. Becky was their daughter and they were going to give her the best life possible. Forty-four years later, their efforts have been nothing less than extraordinary. Today, Becky continues to volunteer many hours a week at her hometown hospital, though she has cut back in recent years. She is one of only a handful of workers to be inducted into the organization’s volunteer hall of fame, only possible after reaching the 5,000 volunteer hours plateau. Since beginning her volunteer duties in 1990, the same year her father began spending much of his free time at the hospital, Becky Kripaitis has logged more than 7,000 hours at Nanticoke. She’s copied documents, stuffed envelopes, delivered newspapers and generally just put hundreds of smiles on hundreds of faces. And she’s done nearly all of it with her father by her side. “After Becky graduated from [the Howard T. Ennis School] when she was 20, my parents needed something for her to do

Heroes Series

If you know of someone who has dedicated his or her life to service to others, suggest their names for this series. Contact James Diehl at 302-222-2685 or email Bryant Richardson, brichardson@ mspublications.com other than just sitting around,” says Lisa Schappell-Parsons, one of Becky’s sisters and an employee of Nanticoke Health Services. “They thought this would be good for her, both socially and physically. Volunteering at the hospital is really just a way to keep both of them busy and have them both feel like they’re being productive.” Bob Kripaitis retired from Seaford’s DuPont plant in 1986 and admits a part of him began volunteering because he would “drive his wife crazy” otherwise. But watching him push his newspaper cart around the hospital, often hand-in-hand with his youngest child, pulls on many heartstrings. But the World War II veteran and longtime DuPont employee is often overshadowed by his daughter, who has developed quite a following at Seaford’s community hospital. “I used to be an aide over here and I noticed that when Becky went down the hallway, nurses and visitors and patients would all stop to hug her,” says SchappellParsons. “It probably took her twice as long to get her job done because of that, but I really think Becky brings a lot of joy to the people here at the hospital.” Bob and Carolyn Kripaitis have a long history with Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Five of the couple’s eight children have been born on-site, and many other medical-related issues have been taken care of through the years along the shores of the Nanticoke River. Pondering the past 20 years, Bob Kripaitis says he can sum up his decades-old relationship with the hospital in one threesyllable word – intimate. “This hospital has been a big part of our lives; at one time, we got so that we knew pretty much everybody who worked here,” says Kripaitis. “Our connection with the

CLIFFORD SHORT

Independent Agent

INSURANCE Clifford D. Short, Agent

Serving Sussex County Since 1983

We Sell Home Owners and Business Owners Insurance • Auto • Workers Compensation Let Us Do Your Insurance Shopping For You!

606 E. Market St., Georgetown, DE

Let Me Work For You! Iʼm as close as your phone

302

856-7773

Bob and Becky Kripaitis hand a pile of newspapers recently to Rena Warrington, a nurse in the Pediatric Short Stay Unit at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. The father and daughter team have been volunteering at the hospital for the last 20 years.

hospital is tremendous, and it has remained so. I feel good about devoting a lot of my time off to coming out here.” Bob Kripaitis has logged more than 3,000 hours since beginning his volunteer mission in 1990, most of it spent in the pharmacy before the computer age all but made his job obsolete. That’s a lot of hours to commit to volunteerism, though less than half that of his daughter. There have been times through the years when the father and daughter team has been forced to put their volunteerism on temporary hiatus for one reason or another. Thankfully, those times didn’t last for long. “My mother will tell you that she’d likely kill my dad if he didn’t keep himself busy here,” says Schappell-Parsons with a chuckle. “He stresses her out at home, and Becky tends to withdraw a little bit without someone to talk to. So, it’s good for both of them to stay active.” It’s hard to watch the “Bob and Becky” show meander through the halls of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital without smiling. Father and daughter, together, making a difference in the lives of hospital employees, and often perfect strangers. They love what they do, and they love having the opportunity to do it together. Becky Kripaitis is living proof that chil-

dren with disabilities don’t need to be locked away and institutionalized in order to lead productive lives. She’s also living testimony to the vast difference the love of a parent can make in the difference of a child. “I think Becky really stands out today because of how friendly and warm and loving she is,” says Schappell-Parsons. “She’s always been very popular and very well known; growing up, she knew all of our friends and came to all of our functions with us. “People in this community who know Becky aren’t afraid to reach out and touch her,” Schappell-Parsons continues. “There’s nothing dirty or contagious about having Down Syndrome. They’re very loving and giving and productive human beings.” Becky Kripaitis may not be changing the world by handing newspapers to people in a hospital waiting room. But she’s doing what she can to make a difference, with her father by her side. “It’s just fantastic to see Becky with the nurses and other volunteers here at the hospital,” says Kripaitis. “Nearly everyone has accepted her for what she is.” Their story is nothing short of inspirational – one complimentary newspaper at a time.

‘World War II Heroes of Southern Delaware’ and ‘Remembering Sussex County’ Titles from Award Winning Writer

James Diehl are available for purchase at

www.ww2-heroes.com


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 9

Nanticoke River gets high grades on its report card By Tony E. Windsor

The Nanticoke River took center stage at a special presentation held by a river watchdog group to release a report card of the waterway’s water quality. The Nanticoke Watershed Alliance is dedicated to protecting and preserving the waters along the more than 725,000 acres that make up the river’s watershed, which covers two states. The Alliance includes partners from Maryland and Delaware including representatives from industry, agriculture, environmental, business, community, state, local and federal governmental organizations; all dedicated to protecting the river. Recently, members of the Alliance and local, state and federal dignitaries gathered at the home of John and Linda Hollis along the banks of the Nanticoke River, in Seaford. John Hollis told the crowd that in Delaware the Nanticoke River watershed covers 250,000 acres, or roughly 25 percent of Delaware’s total land mass. Starting just south of Harrington, the Nanticoke runs 25 miles southwest through Delaware where it meets at the Maryland line near Sharptown. Hollis, who is Sussex County manager of Community and Government Affairs for Nemours Health and Services, said the Nanticoke River is a prime resource for education and recreation in Delaware. He shared a story about his wife teaching their daughter to swim in the river and using the current as a way to help her gain strength and control in the water. He said today he and his grandson spend time navigating the river in the family’s pontoon boat. He said as part of the Nemours Health and Prevention Service’s strategy to make Delaware children the healthiest in the United States by the year 2015, the Nanticoke River can play a significant role. Nemours HPS has partnered with the Delaware Department of Parks and Recreation and other community agencies to develop the special “No Child Left Inside” project. The campaign promotes the increased use of trails, parks and playgrounds throughout Delaware as opportunities for family-style, outside physical activities. Hollis said the current generation of children may be the first generation to have a shorter lifespan than their parents. Citing obesity and diabetes as results of inadequate physical activity, Hollis said the area park lands, like those at Trap Pond State Park and the waters of the Nanticoke River can provide opportunities for outside family activities. Hollis said the Nanticoke River is home to the northernmost stands of bald cypress trees on the Atlantic Coast and also has the highest concentration of bald eagles in the northeastern U.S. He said in order to assure its preservation and healthy availability to future generations, the river needs to be monitored and protected from elements that can cause it to be contaminated and polluted. This is where the Nanticoke Watershed Alliance provides the support for protection and preservation of the river. In the past there have been concerns along the river regarding increased levels of nutrients, primarily nitrogen and phosphorus. These can make their way into the river from groundwater pollution that runs off into the waterway from yards, roads

and farms. The nutrients can set off a chain of events which devastate the Bay’s ecosystem. The excess nutrients act like a fertilizer to algae, quickly causing enormous growths, called blooms, which block out light. When algae blooms die, they settle to the bottom and decompose. As decomposition occurs, oxygen is removed from the water. As part of the Nanticoke Watershed Alliance, community volunteers joined to form a group committed to monitoring the health of the Nanticoke River. Called the “Nanticoke Creekwatchers,” these volunteers collect data from different points along the river. Every two weeks from April to November, the data is collected by 30 volunteers who cover 37 points in two states and five counties throughout the Nanticoke Watershed. This collected data has now been used to develop a special official report card which grades the water quality of the river. The extensive training and strict adherence to scientific protocol has resulted in the national Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) granting approval of the data collected by the Creekwatchers to be used in Chesapeake Bay restoration efforts. The Creekwatchers have also been recognized by the State of Delaware, receiving both the Governor’s Outstanding Volunteer Award and the Jefferson Award for Service. At the meeting, the most recent Nanticoke River Report Card was unveiled. E.B. James, executive director of the Watershed Alliance, said the report card indicates that based on the on-going data collection, “the Nanticoke River is the healthiest tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.” James said most of the tributaries of the Bay are in a state of restoration, having succumbed to the impact of pollution. “The Nanticoke River is the last big tributary that has something to lose,” he said. James introduced Bill Dennison, a professor at the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science, who gave an overview of the 2009 Nanticoke River Report Card. Dennison has helped with the development of waterway report cards for the past 12 years in locations in the United States and Canada. He said although there has been an executive report developed in regards to water quality in the Nanticoke River, this represents the first offering of a formal report card. Dennison said the water quality has a grade scale of A to F. An “A” would indicate that water quality is at the desired levels. An “F” would indicate that few or no water quality indicators are at desired levels. The report card grades on two areas, River water quality and Creek water quality. The “River” grade deals with the health of the mainstream of the Nanticoke River. The “Creek” grade reflects the health of the creeks that feed into the Nanticoke. The final River Grade is a B-, while the Creek Grade stands at C+. In terms of the River quality, Dennison said the oxygen scores were generally high, but the nitrogen scores were low, especially in the upper Nanticoke, which is predominantly in Delaware. The Creek Grade reflects high oxygen scores in all creek regions, very high water clarity scores, with the exception of the Lower Creeks in Maryland. The nitrogen scores were also low in all creek

Bill Dennison, professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, shares an overview of the overall health index of the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay as part of the 2009 Nanticoke River Report Card. The new water quality report card was unveiled at the home of John and Linda Hollis along the banks of the Nanticoke in Seaford. Photo by Tony Windsor

regions. A “C” grade indicates that there is a mix of healthy and unhealthy water quality indicators. In terms of providing a quality habitat for fish and wildlife the water quality is judged as “fair.” Given the fact that the overall scores reflect grades of “B” and “C” there is still a need to find ways to reduce the nitrogen levels in the water. The lowest score along the watershed came in the area of “Fishing Bay,” in the Dorchester County area of Maryland, where a water quality grade of “D+” was recorded. The Watershed Alliance points to pollutants such as soil pollution that enters the water through bank erosion and groundwater runoff from nutrients in lawn and farm fertilizers. It is recommended that steps be taken to help reduce the potential for pollutants entering the waterways. These suggestions include planting cover crops which help reduce soil erosion and take up excess nutrients and developing stream buffers made up of strips of trees and other vegetation which helps to filter pollutants. Upgrades to municipal wastewater treatment plants and septic systems can also be beneficial in helping to assure that human waste does not enter the river and to help remove harmful bacteria. Dennison said the 2009 Nanticoke River Report Card provides a very optimistic view of the river’s water quality. “This is the best body of water in the watershed. It is not perfect, but certainly very good quality,” he said. “This report is not the end of the story. It is just the beginning.” He said the Nanticoke River Watershed Alliance and the volunteer “Creekwatchers” will continue to collect data. “We can see what role we all can play in helping to protect the Nanticoke River and we will be excited to release the next Report Card,” he said. The Nanticoke Watershed Alliance 2009 Nanticoke River Report Card project was funded by the Chesapeake Bay Trust. The funding for data collection and water monitoring came from the Chesapeake

Bay Trust and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. For more information, visit www.nanticokeriver.org.

SAM’S

We Sell

SHEDS & GARAGES All Sizes!

FURNITURE New & Pre-Owned

MATTRESSES

And Almost 200 k c o t In S s! Anything of Value (No Pets) Alway

APPLIANCES & REPAIRS

SAM’S

934-1777

30203 Mitchell St. Millsboro Open 9-6 Tues.-Fri., Sat 9-4, Closed Sun & Mon


PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

GMS Annual Fall Benefit Auction

La Esperanza is the 2010 recipient of the Arts & Humanities Award presented by Delaware Technical & Community College. From left are Dr. Orlando J. George Jr., Delaware Tech president; Dr. Ileana Smith, Delaware Tech vice president and Owens Campus director; Zaida Guajardo, La Esperanza executive director; Lili Kohr, La Esperanza board president; Fernando Guajardo; Pastor Israel Figueroa, board member; Neda Biggs, staff member; Doris Gonzalez, board member; and Allison Burris Castellanos, former board member.

La Esperanza is honored by Del Tech

Annually since 1997, Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus has honored an individual, business or organization for outstanding accomplishments in artistic or humanitarian endeavors which have positively impacted our community. This year the Arts & Humanities Award recognizes La Esperanza, an organization which helps empower people to become worthy, productive, and contributing residents and citizens of Sussex County. The award was presented Sept. 29, to Zaida I. Guajardo, executive director. Founded in 1996 in Georgetown, La Esperanza’s primary focus was to provide support to the increasing number of immigrant workers who were coming to Sussex County from Mexico and Guatemala. As with all good organizations and institutions, La Esperanza has evolved to keep pace with the times and the needs of its clients. It is now a multi-service support organization that assists with the assimilation of Latino people into the greater Sussex County population and it does so in ways that honor its faith-based origins. Current services provided by La Espe-

Planning A Wedding? Stop by the Star office 629.9788

302

Pick Up A FREE copy of the Stars’

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford

B RIDAL P LANNER

ranza include family development — assistance with transportation, translation, and/or interpretation services; victim services — assistance for non-English speaking victims of crime; education — English as a Second language classes for adults, Spanish literacy classes, citizenship classes, computer literacy, Girl Scouts and physical fitness for youth; immigration — assistance with transition into local society; and pre-natal care support — assistance for low-income pregnant Hispanic women and their children to obtain access to health care During its 13 ½ -year history, La Esperanza has served more than 75,000 clients and currently serves 8,000 individuals and families, including children, annually. Maintaining its office in the heart of the Latino immigrant community in Georgetown makes the services readily accessible to those in need. La Esperanza also has established service organizations that now function independently. La Red Health Center began in 2001 as the area’s first health center for Latinos; now it is a federally recognized center for health care for all lower-income county residents. First Steps Primeros Pa-

sos is the only multicultural, early care and education program in the community; it’s designed to prepare pre-school children for academics in elementary school. Another very important facet of La Esperanza is its partnerships. A prominent example is the association with El Centro Cultural, an organization dedicated to promoting Latino art and culture. The organization has forged partnerships with Spanish and English-speaking media and broadened its scope to include mainstream organizations and elected officials. La Esperanza builds bridges between cultures and empowers individuals of Hispanic heritage to become productive and contributing residents of Sussex County and our state. The organization now joins the illustrious group of 13 previous award winners: Howard Schroeder, Jack Lewis, Howard Pyle, WSCL Public Radio, Gonzalo Martinez, Esq., Rehoboth Art League, Possum Point Players, Delaware Music School, Laura Hickman, Rehoboth Beach Film Society, Joseph McCarron, David Moore, and the Carl M. Freeman and Joshua M. Freeman foundations.

Dutch country Market

11233 Trussum Pond Rd.

875-1678

302

(Beside Johnny Janosiks)

Hrs: Thurs. - Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5

Pennsylvania Dutch FooDs

RotisseRie BBQ (HealtHy CHoiCe) FResH Meats - Deli salaDs - Bulk FooDs - CanDy JaMs BakeD GooDs inCluDinG suGaR FRee Pies

$ 98 SPECIALS Pickle & Pimento loaf ................................ 2 lb NOVEMBER HoRSeRaDiSH cHeDDaR ............................... $499lb 4-6 PePPeR caBBaGe .................................................... $139lb

REALTOR™

236-1651

302

CELL

www.cfmnet.com

Located Next to Dutch Country Market

The Quality!

ut Our heck O INgS C d n a d n Delivery Come I ragE BuIl & Free Set Up oF oUr O t S W play SetS Up to 25 mi. E N dutchcountryfurniture.com $ 98

DEDO announces new loan fund

Lieutenant Governor Matt Denn and the Delaware Economic Development Office have announced that the State of Delaware has created a new $1 million revolving loan fund to help jump-start businesses specializing in energy efficiency. The fund was made possible by a $500,000 grant from the United States Department of Commerce, which was matched by a contribution from the state’s Strategic Fund. The new fund, known as the Small Business Energy and Facilities Revolving Loan Fund, will be overseen by the same Council on Development Finance (CDF) that oversees the state’s Strategic Fund. The fund will make loans at marketto-below-market interest rates to small businesses or businesses that cannot otherwise obtain capital, provided that those businesses will create or retain jobs in industries that promote energy efficiency and/or recycling. The loan fund was formally established November 1, and the Delaware Economic Development Office will create a consolidated application process for the loan fund that will allow businesses to simultaneously apply for funding from the revolving loan fund and existing state economic development funds.

WOW! Can you believe? A WATERFRONT home priced at ONLY

$129,900?

Come and See, DUTCH COUNTRY Feel and Smell

HEIRLOOM FURNITURE

Greenwood Mennonite School announces their annual benefit Fall Auction and All You Can Eat Breakfast on Saturday, Nov. 6. The breakfast, which is from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m., is $7 for adults, $4 for children ages 6 to 11 and free for children under 5. Live and silent auctions will begin at 9:30 a.m. A preview of the items available for bidding is available before the auction. There will be a “Kid’s Christmas Shop” for the little shoppers of the family. Mennonite baked goods and lunch items will be available for purchase. Items available for purchase include handmade comforters & quilts, handmade crafts, autographed items, class theme baskets, collectibles, household items, furniture, toys, hunting supplies, sporting goods, tools, landscape items, service donations, gift certificates to local businesses & restaurants, Shorebirds tickets, a vacation getaway and many other items. Proceeds benefit Greenwood Mennonite School. Admission and parking are free. For more information, visit www. gms-flames.org or call the school office at 349-4131.

500 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Ph: 302629-4514 Fax: 302536-6259

3-BR, 2 BA home situated on Records Pond in Laurel. Features a 3-season room overlooking the pond so you can enjoy the activity and wildlife. For Rent or For Sale! Call Eileen Craft (302) 236-1651 (cell) for info. on MLS #556585.


BC Concord Pet Foods & Supplies 10-0021 929800 P

FALL PRICING

“Locally Owned & Operated”

Wild Bird Suet Cakes

THAT WILL KEEP THEM

FOR MORE! 44

99

#21 e r Sto hip N O s O G S Town ey N I s n COM Loga w Jer Ne

5

• 4 Lb.

799

Nature’s Best Kitten & Cat Food BC Only • 3 Lb.

9

99

Dog Food Only

Buy 2, Get 1

21

99

• 13 Oz. • Little Italy, Gameday Tailgate, • 12" length Autumn Left Overs, • Highly palatable, this Homecoming Holiday treat becomes chewy when wet, helps keep Critter Trail Homes teeth clean and provides hours of long lasting enjoyment

• 31.1 Lb. • Perfect balance of real, wholesome ingredients and quality nutrition

8

99

Bully Sticks

9999 2/ 29

21

9

999

3999

26

99

or 15.5 Lb. Indoor Adult formulas

FREE

Shredded Pig Ears Blend Natural Dog Food Treat

9999¢ 29 ¢

enjoyment

Dog & Cat Treats Dog Food

Dog & Cat Treats

% Off 20 99 21

2999 20% Off • 35 Lb. • Including Weight Management & Large Breed • $5.00 off all specialty formulas

• Made with only 1 Ingredient • Available in a variety of flavors • 31.1 Lb. • Perfect balance of real, wholesome ingredients and quality nutrition

• Made with only 1 Ingredient • Available in a variety of flavors

Wee-Wee Pads

24

99

• 34 Lb. • All flavors including Large Breed • Formulated with high-quality ingredients, including real meat

Wee-Wee Pads

99 29 99

29

• 35 Lb.

• Including Weight Middletown Crossing 302-376-1616 Management & • 100 Ct. Large Breed Rehoboth, DE 302-226-2300 • Used for training• $5.00 or asoff analleveryday formulas alternative to the specialty outdoors when Milford, DE 302-424-8373 pets are housebound Smyrna, DE 302-653-1515 Seaford, DE 302-628-1001Knife

Seaf. Commons S.C., 22836 Sussex Hwy.Edge

Pillow Bed pm Dog Food

Mon.-Sat. 9 am - 9 10 am - 5 pm

Dog Chow Sunday

21

99

• 44 Lb. Not 23 responsible • Contains vitamins for typographical errors. and minerals

Knife

19 24

99 99

• 27" x 36" Rectangle bed • 34 •Lb.

• AllPillow flavors Beds including Large Breed • Formulated with

• 25 Lb. • Attracts the greatest variety of birds

99

• Choose fromCafe AdultLatte or

Page 4

Bully Sticks

9 24 1999 2/ 99 99

Dog Food

• 12" length • Highly palatable, this treat becomes chewy • 34 Lb. Dogit Mind when wet, helps Games keep • All flavors teeth clean and provides including Large Breed hours of long lasting • Formulated with enjoyment high-quality ingredients, • Interactive Smart Toy for Dogs including real meat • Provides your dog with a fun, engaging experience that challenges both his physical and mental abilities. • 3 games in one (Hide-and-Seek; Spin-a-Whirl; Sliding Puzzle)

Dogit Mind Games

19

99

and minerals • Great taste • High quality protein • Continuously heats water for maximum cleaning Page 2 • Strong spray and suction removes even the grossest stains • Stores ready to use Wee-Wee

Yikes! Compact Pads Deep Cleaner

9999

• 100 Ct. • Used for training or as an everyday • Continuously heats water alternative to the outdoors when for maximum cleaning pets are housebound Bark spray • Strong and suction

59

Ea.

99 20%Off

or

• Extremely appetizing to dogs with its SMOKEY smell and flavor • A fun-to-eat way to add variety and activity to BC Concord your pet’s dietPet Foods & Supplies

12 Fie

3/$

• Choose from Nuts for An Knots Rope 12.5”, Cafe Latte 8” or Dazzle Flying Ducks 8”

2

• Pr ve

10-0021 929800 Pag off

fun

Littermaid Elite Automatic Litter Box

My Dog

Buy 1,E 302-376-1616 M 302-324-0502 N 610-364-1100 T 302-672-9494 S 610-701-9111 S 302-226-2300 L 302-838-4300

Middletown Crossing Community Plaza Aston, PAMind Games Dogit Edgehill s/c, Dover West Chester, PA Rehoboth • Interactive Smart Toy for Dogs Fox Run • Provides your dog with a fun,

19

8” or

engaging experience that challenges both his physical and abilities. Canned Kitty Cactus • mental 3 games in one (Hide-and-Seek; Cat Food Shampoo & With Pom PomSpin-a-Whirl; Sliding Puzzle) Cleaners Not responsible for typographical errors. Some items are limited to stock on hand and will be available while supplies Assortment

3492999

Mon. - Sat. 9 am-9 pm; Sun. 10 am-5 pm TOYS OF THE MONTH

920% O

1499

24/ 00

of Multipet Toys

499

• 5.5 Oz. cans • All flavors • Excludes Friskies Selects

• 16" with pom pom • 20 Lb. • 100 Ct. • Carpeted scratching • Moisture-activated • Used for training or as an everyday post with spring Ea. odor-control alternative to the outdoors when • Carpet colors will vary

My Dog Toys Pig Ears Buy 1, Treat Get 1 Natural pets are housebound

¢ FREE

99

My Dog Toys

Each • Extremely appetizing to dogs with its SMOKEY smell and flavor

Buy 1, Get 1

99 FREE 24 Cat Litter

• 42 Lb. • Odor-controlling antimicrobial agent

% Off 20 20 19 Prices Good 2199 Nov. 1 - 30, 99 99 2010 % 19 99 2020Off%Off

99

499

¢

3499 12

Controleven the grossest stains removes System Collar • Stores ready to use

2

TOYS OF TH

Assortment • As of Multipet Toys

Pig Ears Natural Treat Fiesta Medley Treat Sticks Each

302-478-8966 Shoppes of Red Mill 302-737-8982 • Made with only 1 Ingredient 3/$ • Available in a variety of flavors Chicken Meal • 35 Lb.& Rice Ea. Plaza 302-836-5787 • 99.6% dust free DogPeoples Foodor • Choose from Nuts for • Long-lasting 302-234-9112 OnlyHockessin Knots Rope 12.5”, odor control 3/$ LattePlaza 8” or Suburban 302-368-2959 orCafe Dazzle Flying Ducks 8” Shoppes Graylyn 302-477-1995 • ChooseOf from Nuts for Knots • 30 Lb. Chestnut Rope Run12.5”, 302-995-2255

9929

Wi Fee

• With purchase of any 40 Lb. or larger bag of bird food • Bring color and fun to feeding wild birds

• Automatically rakes waste into sealable container 10 minutes after use • Detachable litter tray • 4 Waste receptacles

Shampoo &Knife Cleaners Edge Dog & Cat • Interactive Smart Toy for Dogs Treats Pillow Bed Seaford Commons Shopping DE • Provides yourCenter, dog with aSeaford, fun, Shredded engaging experience that chal• 100 Ct. Dog Chow lenges both his physical and Blend • Used for training or as an everyday alternative to the outdoors when mental abilities. Dog Food • Made with only 1 Ingredient • 27" x 36" pets are housebound • 3 games•Yikes! in one Compact (Hide-and-Seek; Available in a variety of flavors Shampoo•& Rectangle bed Spin-a-Whirl; Sliding Puzzle) Dogit Mind Games Deep Cleaner • 44 Lb. Cleaners Pillow Beds • Contains 23 vitamins

2999

Dog Food

Pig Ears Natural Treat

Assortment Cat Litter of Multipet Toys Ea. Concord Pike

Fat formulas Dazzle 10-0021 Flying Ducks 8” BC Concord Pet FoodsLow & Supplies 929800 Page 2 smell and flavor Wee-Wee Conventional Authorized BCI Retailer, Copyright 2010 Circulars Unlimited www.circulars.com Cat Litter Pads

10-0021 BC

13

• 20 • At va • All ye • An th

Concord Pet 99Foods & 149 99 % Off 410 99 20 12 FRE 499 99 TOYS OF THE MONTH

• 33 Lb. Assortment • Choose from Large Breed Dog & Puppy, Large Breed Adult Treats ofScooping Multipet Toys or Large Breed Senior formulas

Cat MONTH TOYS OF THE

• 12" length Only • Highly palatable, this • 35 Lb. treat becomes chewy 31.1 Lb.from Advanced Fitness, •• Choose • 38.5 Lb. bonus bag Each when wet, helps• keep • Large PerfectBreed, balance of Bites or Light formulas Choose from Lamb & Rice, Adult Large • 12" length Small Extremely appetizing to teeth clean and provides • 35•Lb. Breed, Large Breed Lamb & Rice Adult real, wholesome • Highly palatable, this Science dogs with its SMOKEY • Including Weight hours of long lasting ingredientsDiet and Cat Food Feline Greenies treat becomes chewy enjoyment smell and & flavor Management quality nutrition Each when wet, helps keep Large Breed • Extremely to Only • $5.00appetizing off all teeth clean and provides • 3 Oz. • Choose from 17.5 Lb. Adult or Light, dogs with its SMOKEY specialty formulas hours of long lasting • With purchase of any Nutro cat food

Shredded Blend Dog Food

25%Off 4999 Large Breed Dog Food

Only • The complete critter house for all Page 2 hamsters, gerbils and mice

• 6.6 Lb. • From antibiotic-free chicken • With no added hormones Sticks• Enriched with omega 3 fatty acids

2/ 99 Dog Food

Bully Sticks

FREE2/999

Dog Food

BC Concord Pet Foods & Supplies 10-0021 929800

Bully

6

99

FREE

Fall Seasonals Canned Dog Food

Concord Pet Foods & Supplies 10-0021 929800 Page 2

Science Diet Adult Dog Food Dog Food

• 40 Liter • Provides a soft, comfortable and clean nesting area

Val Wi

Choose From Bird Luvers’ Blend or Black Oil Sunflower Seed

Funky Seed Feeder 10-0021 929800 Page 2 BC Concord Pet Foods & Supplies

• Foundation 30 Lb. or larger • Designed to give your dog an ideal standard of nutritional excellence

Nature’s Best Puppy & Dog Food

99

• 30 Lb. • Delivers optimum natural nutrition for daily whole-body health

00 Off

With MFG's IRC • Choose from select 7-8 Lb. Cat Food or select 15.5-17.5 Lb. Dog Food

499

39

Dog Food

300 Off Only

Only

• 30 Lb. • Choose from Puppy, Chicken, Lamb, Fish, Healthy Weight and Senior formulas

Science Diet Select Cat & Dog Special Needs Products

Pine Bedding

Holistic Select Dry Dog Food

• 10 •A fo si fin •A fo w

• 11.5 ounces • Great for year-round wild bird feeding • Choose from Orange, Berry, Nutty or Seed

• 60 Liter • Great for small pets • The safest, healthiest pet bedding

New Everyday Low Price

1

99¢

Pet Bedding

99 15 BEGGIN’ Super5Mix Dog Food

Ny

% Off 99 Sale

• Interactive Smart Toy for Dogs Assorted varieties to a fun, • •Provides your dog with choose from engaging experience that challenges both his physical and mental abilities. • 3 games in one (Hide-and-Seek; MIDWEST Homes solve Spin-a-Whirl; Sliding Puzzle) behavioral problems

Fold & Carry iCrates All Sizes

20

and cut housebreaking time in half!

%

Yowsa! Grooming Vacuum Off Attachment Yikes! Compact Deep Cleaner

19

99

9999

• Shedding blade grabs loose hair and the vacuum suction captures the • Continuously heats water

Compact 12 Yikes! Deep Cleaner 99 Comfort Zone

or

3/$

99

• Choose from Nuts for Knots Rope 12.5”, Cafe Latte 8” or Dazzle Flying Ducks 8” Canned With Feliway • Continuously heats water Cat Food for maximum cleaning • Strong spray and suction removes even the grossest stains • Ends urine marking • Stores ready to use and scratching

3999

1175

24/

• 3 Oz. cans • All flavors • Excludes Elegant Medleys

• Comforts cats in stressful environments

3 Off FREE 00 Buy Bark 1, Get 1 My Dog Toys

Control System Collar

59

99

Picky Cat Trial Size Discovery Box

Yowsa! Grooming Vacuum Attachment

99 19 FREE

• Shedding blade grabs loo

• With purchase of hair and the vacuum Any $5.00 or more suction captures the • $3.00 coupon inside for a fly-aways as you groom Frontline • Uses a vibration sensor to future detectpurchase barking of 3 lb. bag • Hose bends and swivels • Waterproof Flea & Tick collar to move around your • Weighs just 1.5 ounces pet with ease Control

KennelCOUPON Cab Shampoo & Cleaners Off

Nature's

Miracle Pet Spray Concord Foods & Supplies

% 99 20 19 $ %Off00 20 ®

5 30Off

• Features a safety seat belt slot, shoulder strap eyelets, a storage compartment and quick-latching system for easy assembly

Purchase of

• Gallon • Eliminates all stains and odors from pet accidents permanently

$

or more

Expires 11/30/10. Limit 1 offer per coupon. 1 coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or on prior purchases. May not be used on: *Moonlight Madness Sale *Anniversary Sale *Big Bag Sale. CPFS reserves the right to limit quantities. STAR H


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Dentist practice participates in ‘Candy Buy Back’ By Lynn R. Parks

Deidre Howard of Laurel has four children, and they all like to go out trickor-treating. But for health reasons, none of them are allowed to eat much candy. “I have to monitor their sugar intake very carefully,” Howard said. In past years, Howard has arranged swaps with the children, giving them rings, stickers, toy cars and other small toys in exchange for Dots, candy beads and gum balls. This year, she and three of her four children took the candy that they collected Saturday night in Laurel to the dental office of John Lynch and Janette Rodriguez and turned it in for money. At $1 a pound, they left the office with $9. Howard said that they would use the money to buy gifts for Operation Christmas Child, which distributes holiday presents and evangelizes to children in poor nations. The candy buy-back, held Monday afternoon from 4:30 to 6:30 at the dental office in Seaford, was organized by Ginny Felin, office manager at Lynch and Rodriguez, and dental assistant Lori Hoch. They were assisted by Seaford High School Key Club members Bailey Hoch and Nadine

Trigo, both 15. At the end of the two hours, they had collected 37 pounds of sugary, toothrotting candy. All of the candy will be donated to Operation We Care, which will include it in boxes that are being sent to troops serving in Afghanistan and Iraq and to support troops serving on ships. The candy will be packed up and sent out from HarleyDavidson of Seaford, which supports Operation We Care. Jill Murphy of Seaford said that the fact that the candy is going to soldiers was one reason that she wanted her children to sell their treats to the dentist’s office. “We have a friend who spent a year in Iraq and we know from him that these gift boxes mean so much,” she said. “Getting things like cookies and candy really brightens their day.” Murphy’s children, Hannah, 7, Elijah, 5, and Molly, 1, went trick-or-treating three times, at Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes, at the Laurel Wesleyan Church and in Seaford. They turned in seven pounds of their haul, about two-thirds of what they collected, Murphy said, and left the dental office with $7. Magdalene Walker, 6, of Millsboro,

Magdalene Walker, 6, of Millsboro, selects an apple from a basket at the dental office of John Lynch and Janette Rodriguez in Seaford. In her other hand, she holds a toy car from the office’s gift basket and money that she and her brother got in exchange for their Halloween candy. Photos by Lynn R. Parks

said that she was happy to give up her Halloween candy, “because it’s going to the soldiers.” She and her 2-year-old brother, Miles, collected more than 10 pounds of candy trick-or-treating in Lewes and turned most of it in for cash. “I’m glad to have all of that out of the

house,” their mother, Jennifer, said. Jill Murphy echoed her sentiments. “We have fun going trick-or-treating, but I don’t want all that candy in the house,” she said. “We don’t need it, and this way it’s going to people who can enjoy it.”

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Rt. 13 & Discountland Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-4646

www.messiahsvineyard.org

Dr. Carl G. VincentSenior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes – Senior Pastor

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Will be Ministering

“The House of Praise” Musical Miles Walker, 2, of Millsboro, goes through the gift basket at the dental office of John Lynch and Janette Rodriguez in Seaford. On Monday, the office paid $1 for every pound of Halloween candy that was turned in. Miles and his sister, Magdalene, left the office with $10.

AARP Driver Safety Program

An AARP Driver Safety Course for any and all drivers will be given from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 15 and Tuesday, Nov. 16, at the Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Rd., Seaford. The 2-day program, sponsored by AARP, stresses how older drivers may operate vehicles safely. Upon completion of the program, participants receive a certificate entitling them to a 10% reduction in their auto liability insurance. A 15% reduction is given to anyone repeating the program within three years. For information and registration, call Mr. Devone at 629-8081, Monday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost of the program is $12 for members and $14 for non-members.

RAM DELI MARKET & Central Ave. Package Store

302

875-9233

511 North CeNtral ave. laurel, De 19956

Full Line of Groceries Beer - Wine - Liquors hot & CoLd deLi

New Releases Starting at & Hot Movie $ 4.99 Hits VIDEO GAMES Starting at $

7.99

Nintendo Wii Play Station 2 • Play Station 3 X Box • X-Box 360

OVER 600 TITLES!

We Receive New Titles Every Month!

A Thanksgiving Community Celebration

We would like to invite the entire community to raise up grateful hearts before the Lord to thank Him for his awesome goodness. Saturday, Nov. 20 at 7:00 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21 at 9:30 a.m. Refreshments will be served after Saturday’s Performance


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 13

Community Bulletin Board comment card after eating and give it to the cashier as you pay. You will be given a special receipt which you then take to the Greenwood Library on your next visit.

AARP Driver Safety Program

Bethel Christmas House Tour

The Bethel Christmas House Tour will be held on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 5 p.m. Pick up your map at the museum located on First Street. Tickets are $10 each. For tickets, call Pat at 875-2793 or email annilawrie@hotmail.com.  Proceeds benefit the Bethel Historical Society.

Charity fundraiser

There will be a charity fundraiser to help with the mounting medical costs and related expenses of the Mike Cherrix’ family of Laurel. Mike is recovering from cancer treatment/orthopaedic surgery. The event will be Sunday, Nov. 21, from 1-5 p.m. at Station 7 at the Laurel Junction, located at the corner of Rts. 13 and 9, formerly Bargain Bill’s. The cost is $10 per ticket in advance or at the door. There will be live and silent auctions and entertainment by the Bo Dickerson Band. Snacks will be provided. A cash bar and full menu will also be available. For more information, ticket purchase, or to contribute items for auction call Laurie Short at 236-7642, Karen Cherrix at 875-7460 or Cheryl Macklin at 875-8505.

Flapjack Fundraiser

Applebee’s Flapjack Fundraiser Breakfast on Saturday, November 13th, 8-10am, to benefit the Barracuda Swim Team.  Tickets are available through swim team members or at the door for $5 each.

Wheaton’s special sale

Come join the Bethel Historical Society and be part of the specials that Wheaton’s will be offering to our guests on Thursday, Nov. 18, from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $5 per ticket. Specials include: discounts on all items except for furniture, door prizes and light refreshments. Wheaton’s is located on Stein Highway in the old Tull’s location. Call Helen at 877-0231 for tickets.

Eat pancakes, help the library

The friends group of the Bridgeville Public Library is raising money through area IHOP restaurants. Patrons can eat at IHOP in Seaford, Rehoboth Beach, Salisbury, Md. and Dover and then take their receipts and restaurant comment cards to the library or to Bridgeville Town Hall. The library will receive a payment from IHOP for every receipt and card that is collected. For details, call Pat McDonald, 337-7192.

Eat at IHOP to help the library

Enjoy a meal any time at the IHOP restaurant in Seaford and support the Greenwood Library. Simply fill out a

held, check the website at www.seafordhistoricalsociety.com. There is no charge for this event. No reservations are required. For further information call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828.

Historical Society cookbook

The Seaford Historical Society has collected more than 340 recipes in the traditional, old-fashioned style and compiled them into an attractive, hardcover, keepsake cookbook, “A Recollection of Recipes.” Books are now on sale for $12. Featured are heirloom recipes, Civil War era recipes and Victorian Tea recipes. Books will be sold at the gift shops of the Gov. Ross Mansion at 1101 North Pine St. Ext. and the Seaford Museum at 203 High St., Seaford. For more information, call 6289828.

Holiday Shop Bazaar

Manor House Annual Holiday Shop Bazaar, Friday, Nov. 5, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Manor House is located at 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford. Start your holiday shopping early. Crafts, quilting items, holiday decorations, bake table, collectable dolls, etc. Thrift Shop and Boutique also open. Chicken Salad Luncheon Platters served in the dining room from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. for $6.50. For more details or questions, call 628-5631.

Star Gazing at the Ross Mansion

Anybody who would like to go star gazing is offered a unique opportunity on Friday, Nov. 5, from dusk until 9 p.m. at the Ross Mansion and Plantation. Signs will be posted indicating the exact location on the grounds. Scott Davidson, president of the Seaford Historical Society, will provide guidance for viewing the constellations, planets and stars and will lead group discussions. This is an event for the whole family to enjoy. No special equipment is needed. Very few people in this busy world take the time to look upward and marvel at the sights in the sky. This will give each and every one a great appreciation for this earthly planet and the visible bodies from here. It was in October 1860 that Governor William Henry Harrison Ross sent an invitation to his friends “to visit his newly completed cottage,” the structure now called the Ross Mansion. This is what is being celebrated all of this year of 2010 by the Seaford Historical Society. An amazing thought is that this is exactly the same sky that wold have intrigued the Ross Family 150 years ago. This activity will be impossible in inclement weather or in excessively heavy clouds. To learn whether or not it can be

An AARP Driver Safety Course will be given from 1 - 4 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 15 and Tuesday, Nov. 16, at the Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Rd., Seaford. The 2-day program, sponsored by AARP, stresses how older drivers may operate vehicles safely. Upon completion of the program, participants receive a certificate entitling them to a reduction in their auto liability insurance. For information and registration, call Mr. Devone at 629-8081. The cost is $12 for members and $14 for non-members.

Seaford Library

• There is a Pre-K and Kindergarten “Story Time” at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center on Thursday, Nov. 4, at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 6292524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • “Lights, Camera, Action!” The Seaford Library and Cultural Center will have a movie night on Thursday, Nov. 4, at 5:30 p.m. We provide the refreshments, you take a seat and enjoy the show. For

more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • The Seaford Library and Cultural Center will have “Baby Bookworms” on Tuesday, Nov. 9 and Tuesday, Nov. 16, at 10:30 a.m. This program introduces infants through 36 months old to the world of nursery rhymes and books. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www. seaford.lib.de.us. • The Seaford Library and Cultural Center will have Magic Cards Club on Tuesday, Nov. 9, at 3 p.m. This is for teens who like to play Magic Cards. • There is a Pre-K and Kindergarten “Story Time” at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center on Thursday, Nov. 4 and Thursday, Nov. 18, at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www. seaford.lib.de.us. • There will be a Seaford Library and Cultural Center Board meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 9, at 6 p.m. • On Wednesday, Nov. 10, the Seaford Library and Cultural Center will have its Children’s Book Discussion sign-up and craft at 4 p.m. This program, which is for children in 2nd through 4th grades, offers kids a chance to read a great book and discuss them with friends and do a fun craft. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • The Science and Religion Book discussion will meet at the Seaford Library

O’Neal’s Antiques Rt. 13 at the light Laurel, Del.

Open Mon. thru Sat. 10 am to 5 pm Evenings by Appt.

& Estate Jewelry

302

875.3391

30549 Sussex Hwy.

Holiday Open House th 10 am to 5 pm Friday Nov. 19 Saturday, Nov.20th

Hourly Door Prizes Grand Prize $30000 Gift Certificate

SPecial SaleS all Day Refreshments

Dan Gaffney from WGMD will be here Friday from 10-12

Fine Estate Jewelry

Discover Gold and Platinum Timeless Treasures Engagement Rings

Large Furniture Selection

Louis & Shirley O’Neal, Certified Appraiser, CAGA Members


PAGE 14 and Cultural Center on Monday, Nov. 15, at 6 p.m. For more information, call 6292524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • There will be no “Baby Bookworms” on Tuesday, Nov. 23. • There will be no “Family Fun Night on Wednesday, Nov. 24. • The Seaford Library and Cultural Center will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 25, for Thanksgiving. The library will open for its regular business hours on Friday, Nov. 26.

Homeschool Book Clubs

The Laurel Public Library monthly book clubs are designed especially for homeschoolers. Children must be at least 5-years-old to participate. Each club meets once a month on Wednesdays at 1 p.m. For details, call Becky Norton at 875-3184 or email rebecca.norton@lib.de.us. Space is limited.

LHS Class of 75 reunion

Laurel High School class of 1975 is planning their 35th class reunion and volunteers are needed. For more information, call Melinda Rogers Tingle, 875-0355; Debbie Calloway, 875-4160; or Denise Elliott Cugler, 245-5631.

Pet Culver Journey for Sight

The Laurel Lions Club will hold their 23rd annual “Pet Culver Memorial Journey for Sight” on Sunday, Nov. 7. The event will take place at Trap Pond State Park. Registration is at 12 noon. The walk will begin at 1 p.m. (In case of inclement weather, the walk will be held at Laurel High School).The walk is a fundraiser sponsored by the Laurel Lions Club. The funds generated are used for the purchase of eye exams, eyeglasses, hearing aids and diabetic needs. This year, the walk will be approximately five miles in length. All clubs or organizations with teams of five or more will receive a 50% rebate on all money turned in on November 7. This is an excellent opportunity for groups to raise money for their treasuries and help the local community via the Laurel Lions Club.For more information, call Lion Ron Scott at 875-2823.

The Portsville Annual Fall Bazaar Saturday, Nov. 13, 2010 Dogwood Lane, Laurel

8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Lunch Starting at 11 a.m. Menu: Oyster Fritters, Chicken Salad, Vegetable Soup, Hot Dogs, Baked Goods & Homemade Pies White Elephant Table & Raffles!

Hand-Crafted Items On Sale!

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Veterans Day

The Laurel American Legion Post 19 invites all Laurel area residents to Veterans Day celebration at the Post Home on Thursday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. Guest speaker will be Sen. Robert Venables. Boy Scout Troop 90 will take part in the service and singing will be provided by Mary Ann Young.

Cub scouts seeking memorabilia

This year (2010) is the 100th anniversary of scouting. Cub Scout Pack 90 is looking for former scouts interested in joining then for an upcoming show and tell. They would love to see your scout uniforms, books, photos, patches, and hear your stories about your adventures with scouting. Contact Cub Master, Clifford Alpert at 228-2390.

hot dogs, homemade vegetable beef soup, sodas and pie. There will be a bake table, white elephant table and hand-crafted items for sale, as well as raffle tickets available. The church is located on Dogwood Lane, Laurel. For information, call Karen at 841-3596.

Daniel Burton LeCates reunion

The Daniel Burton LeCates family reunion will be held at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 7, at the Laurel Grange Hall, off Route 9. If family members have any questions, they should call 245-6851 and speak with David.

Chinese Auction at St. Philip’s

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, 600 S. Central Avenue, Laurel, is holding a Chinese Auction this Saturday, Nov. 6. The doors open at 6 p.m. and the auction begins at 7 p.m. There will be a wide variety of items, food and fun. Geraldine Taylor, Jane Givens and Cheryl Martin are the cochairs. All are welcome.

Portsville UMC Bazaar

Portsville United Methodist Church is holding their annual Fall Bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 13, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch, starting at 11 a.m., features oyster fritter sandwiches, chicken salad sandwiches,

CASINO NIGHT Laurel American Legion Post 19 Located on Rt. 24 Friday, November 19, 2010 7:00 pm til 12:00 am Black Jack - Money Wheel - Poker Tables Tickets = $5.00 Tickets include Sandwiches, Hot Dogs Snacks, Soda and Draft Beer Cash Bar Available MuST Be 21

OPEN TO PUBLIC

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center located at 41 Schulze Rd. in Greenwood, will have a Fall Bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 6, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be crafts, a clothing sale, baked goods and a soup and sandwich luncheon. Table space is available for a fee. Donations will be accepted. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Women’s Service at Greenwood UMC

Laurel Pride in bloom

You can now donate to purchase or maintain planters that change with the seasons, displaying Laurel’s community pride year round. There are several levels of giving. Adopt a planter - as a business - to give back to your customer base; as an individual or family - to memorialize loved ones; as an organization - to promote group recognition. You can also donate for seasonal plantings or toward maintaining a planter in general. Any amount you contribute will help maintain and add interest to the already beautiful town of Laurel. Beauty creates interest and interest creates promise; and Laurel has opportunity. For more information, contact Barbara Wise at 875-5537. Contributions of any amount can be made to Laurel Pride in Bloom, c/o The Bank of Delmarva, 200 E. Market St., Laurel, DE 19956.

Fall Bazaar

Delmar Christmas Parade

The 2010 Delmar Christmas parade is Saturday, Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. with a rain date of Sunday, Dec. 12. Participation in the parade, which is sponsored by the Greater Delmar Chamber of Commerce is free. Trophies will be awarded to the winners. This year’s theme is “What Christmas Means to Me.” For a parade application, call the chamber of commerce voicemail at 846-3336, pick up an application at Delmar Town Hall, or download from www.delmar-chamberofcommerce. com. The application deadline is Dec. 8.

All area women are invited to attend a special service at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 7, at Greenwood United Methodist Church. The speaker for the evening is Harriet Smith Windsor, who will talk about Joy vs. Happiness. We will join together in praise songs led by Kim Willey and listen to special song selections by Joanne Jones. Come out and be blessed by a wonderful message, inspiring music and the fellowship of your sisters in Christ. Light refreshments will follow the service. For more information, call 3494222.

Dinner Club

Join us for Dinner Club with the Good News Tour Ministries at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center on Thursday,


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010 Nov. 18, from 5 to 8 p.m. Cost is $6 per member and $8 for non-members. For more information, call 349-5237.

Bridgeville Library

The following events will be held at the Bridgeville Public Library. • Story time - Tuesdays 11 a.m.- 2 to 4-year-olds; Thursday 11 a.m. - 4 to 6-year-olds; Lap Sit on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for ages 3 months to 2 years • Family Nights - Third Tuesday of each month, 6:30–8 p.m.; Nov. 16 Thanksgiving Delight; Dec. 21 - Holiday Extravaganza • Genealogy Discussion Group - Our Genealogy Discussion Group meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 10:30 a.m. For more information or special needs, contact the library at 3377401.

Literary readings by Mr. Reynolds

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library present Bridgeville’s own Norman Reynolds at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at the Bridgeville Library. Reynolds was the honoree of the Friends’ 2009 fundraiser, “For the Love of Books.” Having taught English and French for 35 years in the Bridgeville/ Woodbridge School District, Mr. Reyn-

the afternoon visiting museums or strolling through the National Mall. The tour will be held on one of the following dates: Tuesday, Dec. 7; Thursday, Dec. 9; or Tuesday, Dec. 14, pending White House confirmation. Registrants will need to provide personal information for a background check. Bring photo identification on the day of tour. Adults ages 50 and up can become Adult Plus+ members for $18 per year. Benefits of membership include unlimited use of the Stephen J. Betze Library located on campus; exclusive advanced registration and special discounts on trips, courses and events; and a free drink with purchase of a meal in the dining hall on campus. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302856-5618.

Delmar Alumni trip

Delmar Alumni Association members will be traveling with Holloway Tours to attend the American Music Theatre’s Christmas Show 2010 on Saturday, Nov. 13. Cost is $107 per person which includes bus transportation to Lancaster, Pa., smorgasbord lunch at Hershey Farm Restaurant and tickets to the Christmas Show. For more information or to request a reservation form, call Dot Wolfgang at 846-2366 or Jean Maloney at 875-2337.

Caribbean trip

Dr. Marie Wolfgang is sponsoring a winter getaway cruise to the Southern Caribbean as a fundraiser for Relay for Life, sailing from Port Liberty, New Jersey on Jan. 16, returning on Jan. 28. The itinerary includes Labadee, Samana, St. Thomas, Basseterre, St. Kitts, Antiqua and St. Maarten. Call 629-4471 for brochure.

Travel with Del Tech in November

olds had a significant impact on many lives.

Seaford AARP trips

Dec. 6-8 - Wheeling Island Casino Hotel in Wheeling, W.V. Two meals per day including a dinner show. Tour the Glass Museum, Colonel Oglebay’s Mansion Museum, addmission to the park for a bus tour of the Festival of Lights. Also a stop at the Kruger Street Toy & Train Museum. Bus driver tip included. Cost: $349 per person/doubles; $435 single. Dec. 16 - “A Holiday Tradition Christmas Show” at the American Music Theatre sponsored by the Georgetown AARP. Cost: $90. Contact Hilda Parker at 856-2760. For more information, contact Rose at 629-7180.

Tour the White House

Limited tickets are available for a White House Holiday Tour with the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. This trip is open to the general public. Delight in the beautiful holiday decorations during this wonderful tour. Enjoy an independent lunch and spend

Limited seats are available for upcoming trips sponsored by Corporate and Community Programs at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Delight in the new Broadway musical “The Addams Family” in New York on Saturday, Nov. 6. Witness the chaos that occurs when the Addams are forced to host a dinner for Wednesday’s “normal” boyfriend and his family. Observe animals from around the world at the National Zoo in Washington D.C. on Sunday, Nov. 7. Tour a Victorian house and eat lunch in Lewes on Tuesday, Nov. 9. This historic house features original gingerbread as well as English porcelain collectibles, artwork and period furnishings. Feel the passion and excitement of 20 championship dancers as they dance ballroom styles including the waltz, Rumba and much more in “Burn the Floor” at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia on Friday, Nov. 12. Enjoy the zany musical “Seussical” based on the stories of Dr. Seuss and lunch at the Candelight Dinner Theatre in Ardentown on Sunday, Nov. 14. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 854-6966. Find out what happens when a village tries to raise money for a tiny English

church by gambling without the vicar’s knowledge in “Pool’s Paradise” on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at Rainbow Dinner Theatre in Lancaster, Pa. Visit Shady Maple Farmers Market in Lancaster, Pa., on Saturday, Nov. 20. Enjoy a smorgasbord of authentic Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine for lunch. View or buy original gifts, artwork and fair-trade items from around the world at the Holiday Gift Bazaar on Tuesday, Nov. 23, at Salisbury University. Delight in the special holiday exhibits at Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, Pa. on Sunday, Nov. 28. A Brandywine Christmas features an extensive model railroad, a Victorian dollhouse and thousands of ornaments.

‘White Christmas’ show trip

Laurel Senior Center is sponsoring a trip to the Christmas Show at Lancaster Apple Theater to see “White Christmas” on Wednesday, Nov. 24. Cost is $72 and includes transportation, meal and show.

Miracle of Christmas trip

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center is offering a motor coach trip to see the Miracle of Christmas at Sight & Sound Theater in Lancaster, Pa., on Tuesday, Dec. 7. Cost is $90 per person for members or $100 for non-members and includes transportation, show ticket and smorgasbord dinner at Hershey Farm Restaurant. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

PAGE 15

Needlepoint Guild 

The Delaware Seashore Chapter of the American Needlepoint Guild meets on the first Monday of each month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cheer Community Center in Georgetown. For details, call Linda at 644-1523.  

Sussex County Marines

Marine Corps League Detachment #780, Devil Dog Detachment, meets the first Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at American Legion Post #6, “the log cabin,” in Seaford.

USPS

United States Power Squadron (USPS) meets at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. For more information, contact C.M. Kohlenberg at 629-0687 or Rob Hutton at 628-0312.

H.A.P.P.E.N. to meet

The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearns Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization, will meet at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11, at the Seaford Museum. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Basket Bingo Extravaganza IX Benefit: Delmar High School Girls Sports Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010 Doors Open at 11 am

PIZZA WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR LUNCH.

Session One Begins at 1 pm

All Baskets are filled with a Vera Bradley Purse

Session Two Begins after Dinner (intermission)

Over $30,000 worth of Longaberger Prizes!

Tickets $55 00 each which includes: One book of 20 reg. games for session one One book of 20 regular games for session two A Free Catered Dinner at intermission

DELMAR VFW POST 8276

SUPER BINGO EVERY TUESDAY

WINNER TAKE ALL Bonanza Game $1000 00 Jackpot!

Doors Open 5 p.m. Games 6:45 p.m. CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION

410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Spade and Trowel Garden Club

The Spade and Trowel Garden Club invites the public to attend its Nov. 9 meeting to hear guest speaker Val Box, president of Grow Tech Inc. of Chicago, Ill., share how to “Commit Hori-Hori in your Garden.” Hori-Hori means “dig-dig” and the stainless steel Hori-Hori knife, along with ergonomically designed tools to help minimize fatigue and stress for gardeners, will be part of a hands-on demonstration. Other featured items are hand pruners and long-handled pruners that let you deadhead without bending or trim high without climbing. The meeting will be held at the Seaford Public Library, 600 North Market Street Ext. at 12:30 p.m. For more information call Mary Noel, president, at (302) 337-1054.

Alumni Association meeting

The Seaford High School Alumni Association will hold their monthly board meeting Thursday, Nov 4, beginning at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Museum. For more information contact Donna Angell, 629-8077.

Seaford AARP board meeting

AARP Seaford Area Chapter 1084 of Western Sussex County will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11, at the Methodist Manor House Fellowship Hall in Seaford. This chapter is open for membership to all persons 50+. Come and join us to decide if you would like to become a member of the local chapter. Also, visit the tour table at the meeting and sign up for our upcoming trips to the Festival of Lights in Wheeling, W.V., on Dec. 6-8 and the Christmas Show at the American Music Theatre on Dec. 16. After the meeting, refreshments are served. For more information, call Gladys Bonowicz, chapter president, at 875-1519.

Laurel Cub Scouts

Laurel Cub Scout Pack 90 holds their weekly meetings at 6:30 every Monday night, in the basement at Centenary UMC in Laurel. The Cub Scout program is designed for boys from 1st grade through 5th grade.

Seaford Widowed Persons meet

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 16, at 12:15 p.m. at the Georgia House in Laurel. The planned guest speaker will be Richard Hutchinson.

All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Please come join us – we all enjoy the trips, lunches, dinners, etc. that we do.

Sussex Tech reunion

The Sussex Tech Class of 2001 is planning a class reunion. If you are a member of the class of 2001, send your contact information to Sussextech2001@hotmail. com and join the Facebook group, Sussex Technical High School Class of 2001.

Saturday Morning Breakfast

The Community Civic League of Federalsburg is having a fundraiser, a Saturday Morning Breakfast, on Nov. 6 from 7 to 10:30 a.m., at 3439 Laurel Grove Rd., Federalsburg.  Breakfast includes meat, eggs, potatoes, applesauce, bread, coffee and orange juice. Eat in or carry-out. Cost is $6. For more information, call 410-754-9992 or 410-200-4935.

Genealogical Society events 

On Wednesday, Nov. 10, the Sussex County Genealogical Society (SCGS) will hold an Antiques and Collectibles Road Show at the Georgetown Fire Hall. Appraisals begin at 4 p.m. and continue until all have been evaluated. Funds raised will be applied to obtaining top-rated genealogical speakers for an all-day Conference to be held next April.  For more information, check the SCGS website, www.scgsdelaware.org.  On Saturday, Nov. 20, the society will hold a membership meeting. Matt Metz, a local surveyor, will speak on the aspects land records play in family research. This meeting will be held at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library at 10:30 a.m. Anyone interested in family history is welcome.In recognition of November being Family Health Month, we recommend that everyone talk to family members about health issues at upcoming holiday family gatherings. Many illnesses have been passed down through generations.   At the Dec. 18 meeting, come and hear our research stories and share yours in a

Nancyann M. Price, Realtor nprice8@comcast.net

236-3619 (cell)

302

Ramey Real Estate

1507 Middleford Road Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-628-7653

New Name, Same Location... but Twice the Company to Serve You!

holiday setting with refreshments. For more information, call 875-5418 or visit www.scgsdelaware.org.

Couture & Class Fashion Show

Couture & Class, Saturday, Nov. 20, 11 a.m., Carter Partnership Center, Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. Proceeds fund international education scholarships. Participating stores: Carltons, Pineapple Princess, Rose Garden, Sole, Coolspring Cottage, Deanna’s, Tiger Lili and Twila Farrell. Event includes shopping bazaar, online auction. Tickets are $35/person; $225/table for eight. For information or to purchase tickets, visit www.dtcc.edu/owens/fashionshow/ or call 855-1659.

Adult Plus activities in November

Form friendships, improve computer skills or develop a new hobby by participating in activities offered in November by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Beginners can acquire basic computer skills in courses offered on Tuesdays, Nov. 9 to 30, from 6 to 9 p.m. Learn how to set up an e-mail account, send attachments and create an address book in First Steps to E-mail on Nov. 9. Discover how to use the Internet in First Steps to the Internet on Nov. 16. Develop the knowledge needed to create professional documents in First Steps to Microsoft Word on Nov. 23. Learn to use text and graphics to create presentations in First Steps to PowerPoint on Nov. 30. Women can learn self-defense techniques to enhance their personal safety on Wednesdays, Nov. 10 to Dec. 1, from 7 to 8 p.m. Acquire the skill needed to shoot multiple targets in Firearms Training: Tactical Safety on Saturdays, Nov. 6 to 13, from 9 a.m. to noon at the instructor’s shooting range in Georgetown. Advanced Firearms Training is a prerequisite for this course. On Thursday, Nov. 11, the Couples Club will meet at noon. Singles shouldn’t feel left out; the Mixed Singles Club offers the opportunity to share a meal, meet new people and plan social outings on Wednesday, Nov. 17 at 12:30 p.m. Have fun learning about the art and history of hot air ballooning on Thursday, Nov. 11 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Discover another perspective from a hot air balloon; delight in the spectacular view of the picturesque countryside on Saturday, Nov. 13 from 7 to 9 a.m. Novice to intermediate artists can receive informal instruction in Portrait Workshop on Thursdays, Nov. 16 to Jan. 6, from 1 to 4 p.m. Discover how to add a special touch to celebrations with easy to create hors d’oeuvres specialties on Tuesday, Nov. 16 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy hands-on

demos and prepare tasty recipes in Easy & Elegant Desserts on Tuesday, Nov. 16 and Wednesday, Nov. 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. Improve coordination, balance and flexibility with an energizing, low-impact aerobic workout that includes toning exercises and stretching in Senior Cardio/Tone on Mondays and Wednesdays, Nov. 17 to Dec. 6, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Examine Lincoln’s political genius in creating the most unusual cabinet in history in Abraham Lincoln and His Team of Rivals on Thursday, Nov. 18 from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Build strength without excess bulk to create a sleek, toned body in Pilates on Mondays, Nov. 22 to Jan. 10, from 6 to 7 p.m. Adults ages 50 and up can become Adult Plus+ members for $18 per year. Membership benefits include unlimited use of the Stephen J. Betze Library located on campus; exclusive advanced registration and special discounts on trips, courses and events; and a free drink with purchase of a meal in the dining hall on campus. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 856-5618.

Fall yard sale, bake sale

A yard sale and bake sale will be held at Bethel Worship Center on Saturday, Nov. 6, from 7 a.m. until. There will be scrapple and egg sandwiches, soda and coffee and goodies at the bake table. Visit the raffle table for three chances to win a quilt, afghan and crock. Proceeds go toward the building fund.

Antiques and collectables show

The Sussex County Genealogical Society will hold an Antiques and Collectables Road Show on Wednesday, Nov. 10, at the Georgetown Fire Hall. The show begins at 4 p.m. Expert appraisers will be available to suggest values on your items. Items will be appraised for $5 each. A $3 entrance fee will be waived with an appraisal. Refreshments and a bake sale will also be available.  Funds raised will be applied to the costs associated with an upcoming all-day educational conference on genealogy scheduled for next April. More information can be found at www.scgsdelaware.org or by calling 856-7904 or 875-5418.

Country breakfast buffet

A country breakfast buffet will be held every fourth Sunday each month September through June, from 7 to 10 a.m. at Galestown Community House. Adults, $7, ages 6 to 12, $4, under age 6, no charge. The buffet includes eggs, scrapple, sausage, pancakes, potato casserole, hominy, biscuits, toast, fruit cup and sticky buns. The community house is located on School House Road at the intersection of Galestown and Reliance Roads in Galestown, Md. The next breakfast is November 28.

Submit Bulletin Board items by noon Thursday, at least one week before. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email to ­editor@mspublications.com.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 17

Church Bulletins ‘Fresh Connection’ services

Centenary UMC, located at the corner of Market and Poplar Streets in Laurel, is starting a new service, “Fresh Connection.” This service will be held the third Saturday of each month through May, at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. For more information, contact Blair Hall at 875-8106.

200 Years of Christian Service

Christmas yard sale

Operation Christmas Child

Christmas Extravaganza

Sailors Bethel United Methodist Church will celebrate its 200th anniversary on Nov. 14. The service will begin at 2 p.m. There will be special music featuring the Jones Boys. The Rev. Randy Booth of Wisconsin will be our special speaker. Fellowship will follow at the community house following the service.

This is the fifth year that St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seaford will be participating in filling shoe boxes for Operation Christmas Child, which is a project of Samaritan’s Purse.  All boxes are designated for either a boy or a girl within a certain age group. They should be brought to the church by Sunday, Nov. 14.   

Free weekly soup social

‘A Heavenly Rainbow’

A free weekly soup social is held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel. All are welcome. For more information, call the church office daily, 9 a.m. to noon, at 875-4233.

Magi Choral Festival tickets on sale Tickets for the 2010 Magi Choral Festival are available at several locations. The Magi Choral Festival features the National Christian Choir and the Magi Children’s Choir. The event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 20, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 21, at 2 p.m. at the Wicomico High School Auditorium in Salisbury. Tickets are $15 and are available in Salisbury at The Gospel Shop and all

All teens are invited and there will be games including basketball and board games.

branches of First Shore Federal Savings and Loan. Ticket proceeds go directly to the Christian Shelter and Joseph House Center, two Christian crisis ministries serving the needy on the Lower Eastern Shore. For more information, call Bonnie Luna at 410-749-1633.

Antioch A.M.E. Church in Frankford and St. Jude the Apostle Church of Lewes present “A Heavenly Rainbow,” a multicultural experience bringing God’s people together to worship in song. The event, which will be held on Sunday, Oct. 31 at 3:30 p.m. at Antioch A.M.E. Church, features Brother Bryan Clark and other singers. Cost is a $15 donation which benefits the Pledge Reduction Fund. For tickets, call 644-6933.

Recreational Night at Trinity UMC Trinity UMC near Trap Pond in Laurel will be having Recreational Night (Rec night) every Tuesday when school is in session. These events will start at 6:30 p.m. and end at 8. 

Christ United Methodist Church in Laurel will hold a Christmas Yard Sale on Saturday, Nov. 13, from 7 to 11 a.m. Trinity United Methodist Church will have their 3rd Annual Christmas Extravaganza on Saturday, Nov. 6, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event is open to all vendors and the cost is $10 per table. For more information and to reserve a table, contact Karen Rogers at 875-2078.

Parish Mission at Our Lady of Lourdes Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Seaford is sponsoring a “Parish Mission” at the end of November. The Parish Mission begins Sunday, Nov. 28, at 6:30 p.m. and continues each of the next four evenings at 6:30 p.m., concluding on Thursday evening. For details call the church office at 629-3591.

Evening worship and Bible study

A study, “Revelation and The End Times: Unraveling God’s Message of Hope,” will be offered on Sunday evenings beginning Oct. 31 at Union United Methodist Church in Bridgeville. Each session is from 6 to 7:15 p.m. and will be held in the Colonial Room. Nov. 7: The Return of the King Nov. 14: The Other World: Heaven and Hell

Nov. 21: Raising the Dead Nov. 28: The Afterlife: The Rapture, the Millennium, and the New Heaven and the New Earth The book, which accompanies the study, is available in the church office. Sign-up is not required and attendees are invited to come to individual sessions as their schedule allows.

Family and Friends Day

Mt. Calvary United Methodist Church in Bridgeville, will observe Family and Friends Day on Sunday, Nov. 14, at 4 p.m. The theme is, “Letting Go of the Past and Embracing the Future,” from Phillipians 3:13. A fellowship meal will be served before the service at 2:30 p.m.  Guest preacher is Pastor C. Guy Robinson of Jones Tabernacle Baptist Church, Baltimore. Pastor Robinson received formal music training at Morgan State University. As a composer, his music has been recorded by numerous gospel music artists. He is also the lead organizer of Authentic Revelation Ministries.  The public is invited to join in this celebration of family and friends.  There will be a free will offering. For more information, call 337-8198 or 542-5752.

Advent and Christmas worship

Union United Methodist Church in Bridgeville will hold the following Advent and Christmas worship opportunities. All events are free and the public is cordially invited. Come and bring a friend.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Centenary UMC

www.laurelcentenaryumc.org

875-3983

200 W. Market Street, Laurel, Del. Contemporary Worship, 8:45 a.m. Traditional Worship, 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, for ALL Ages, 9:45 a.m. Wednesdays: Bible Study 1 p.m.; & Youth Ministry 6:45 p.m.

Stein Highway Church of God

425 E. Stein Highway, at Market Street Seaford, DE 19973 Lighted Pathway Pre-School, Infant to age 6

Mrs. Casey Davis, Director Worship: Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study & Youth Service 7:00 p.m. E-mail: SteinHwyCOG.gmail.com Web page: www.steinhwychurchofgod.com Facebook: Stein Highway Church of God Pastor Robert W. Clagg • Church 302-629-8583

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Seaford

C H R IST IA N C H U R C H of

22581 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship 10:30 (Nursery & Jr. Church)

Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Service 7:00 p.m.

Know, Grow, Show & Go in our Walk with Jesus Christ

Centrally located at

14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org Pastor Timothy Dukes, Senior Pastor Pastor John Lanzone, Youth/Family Pastor

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: Bible Study 7 PM


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Nov. 28 - Blue Christmas Gathering, 2 p.m. Dec. 5 - Capital Ringers Concert, 3 p.m. Dec. 12 - “Star Journey” - a dramatic children and youth Christmas program Dec. 19 - Choir Cantata, 7 p.m. Dec. 24 - Silent Holy Communion, 6 p.m.; Christmas Eve worship, 7 p.m. For more information, call 337-7409.

St. Luke’s Church news

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church offers its newsletter online and also via email. “Luke’s Letter” is published quarterly and will be available online at www.stlukesseaford.org. You can also join the email list if you send a request to StLukesEpis@ comcast.net. St. Luke’s services are Sunday, Holy Eucharist at 9 a.m., and Thursday evenings, Holy Eucharist and Healing at 6 p.m.   

Weekly Bible Study

A weekly Bible study is being held every Wednesday night from 7:15-8:15 p.m. at the Days Inn, Rt. 13 South, Seaford (next to KFC). Family oriented Bible lessons for all ages. Sunday worship service is at 12 noon. Elder Cornell Johnson, of Jesus The Christ Apostolic Ministries, is pastor. Call 628-0349 or 302-344-9672 for more information.

Bible Study

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seaford is conducting a Bible Study every Tuesday morning from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. in the Parish House.  

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seaford meets every Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Parish House. They are also studying the booklet, The Story of Scripture.  For more information, call St. Luke’s church office at 629-7979.

Music Dinner Gala Concert

Christ the Cornerstone Community Church is having their Annual Music Dinner Gala Concert on Saturday, Nov. 13, featuring Jim and Patty Jennette. Tickets are $7.50 per person. Reserve your ticket in advance by calling 875-5415. Dinner includes roast beef and ham and will start promptly at 5:30 p.m. No tickets will be sold at the door.

St. John’s indoor yard sale

St. John’s UMC in Seaford will hold an Indoor Yard Sale on Saturday, Nov. 6, from 7 a.m. to noon. Tables cost $20 for vendors; $10 for yard sale items; and $5 for extras. Set up is on Friday from 4 to 7 p.m. For more information, call Janet Hackett at 628-0329.

Woodland Homecoming service

The Woodland United Methodist Church annual Homecoming service is Sunday, Nov. 14, at 2:30 p.m. Guest speaker is the Rev. Barbara Wilson and Reunion gospel group will provide special music. A covered dish dinner will follow in the Fellowship Hall. There will be no morning worship service.

Hymn Sing

Asbury United Methodist Church is holding a Hymn Sing on Sunday, Nov. 7, at 2 p.m. The O’Day Family, Sounds of Joy and Amanda Jones will be featured. Light refreshments will follow the service. Pastor John Hinkle Jr. invites all to attend. The church is located on Rt. 9, near Sussex Tech. For more information call 856-7480.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

What must I do to be saved?

Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. ~ Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. ~ Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ~ Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. ~ Romans 10:9

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the whole family 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY EVENING

8:30am Worship / Nursery 9:45am Classes for all ages 11:00am Worship / Kids Church & Nursery 7:00pm Evening Service

6:45 AWANA (K-grade 6), Catalyst Youth (gr. 7-12), DivorceCare support group, 7:00 Intercessory Prayer, Men’s Group

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE

(302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburyworship.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458

United Methodist Church

Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. Nursery Provided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s

Episcopal Church Front & King St., Seaford, DE

629-7979

Holy Eucharist: Sunday, 9:00 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Pastor

2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

GETHSEMANE

Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Pastor - O. Kenneth Scheller 302-875-0140

A Safe Sanctuary & Stephen’s Ministry Church Rev. E. S. Mallozzi

All are welcome to worship here every Sabbath.

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

Union

Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church

26295 Sussex Highway (south on 13), Seaford, DE

302-875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Welcome…

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Chinese Auction at St. Philip’s

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, 600 S. Central Avenue, Laurel, is holding a Chinese Auction this Saturday, Nov. 6. The doors to Memorial Hall open at 6 p.m. and the auction begins at 7 p.m. There will be a wide variety of items, food and fun. Geraldine Taylor, Jane Givens and Cheryl Martin are the co-chairs. All are welcome.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Contemporary Services ... 8:45 & 10:30 a.m. Nursery Care & Children’s Church Provided Corner of Woodland Ferry Rd. & Stein Hwy., 4 miles West of Seaford • 629-2862 Jeans Expected! No Halos Required!

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouseld.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 1:30 p.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 19

Obituaries Mamie Wright Bradley, 92

Mamie Wright Bradley of Delmar, died peacefully at her home on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010, surrounded by her loving family. She was born in Hebron, Md., on Dec. 2, 1917, a daughter of the late Warner Mitchell Wright and Katie D. (Holiday) Wright. Mamie farmed all of her life, first as a youth, then with her late husband Marvin. She attended Hebron schools through the 10th grade, then graduated from Delmar High School in 1935. In the 1980’s she worked as a clerk for Hecht Co. in Salisbury. She was a longtime member of Mt. Hermon United Methodist Church in Columbia. She is survived by three sisters, Agnes W. Mathey of Ft. Myers, Fla., Anna L. Wright of Wilmington and Miriam Carey of Ft. Myers; several nieces and nephews, great nieces and nephews and great great nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Marvin E. Bradley, who passed in 1985; a sister, Nora Bennett; and three brothers, John Wright, Wallace Wright and W. Lee Wright. A funeral service was held on Friday, Oct. 29, at Short Funeral Home. Interment followed at St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar. Memorial contributions may be made to Mt. Hermon United Methodist Church, c/o Judy Cooper, 36195 Columbia Rd., Delmar, DE 19940 or Compassionate Care Hospice Foundation, 28467 Dupont Blvd., Suite 6, Millsboro, DE 19966. Arrangements are in the care of Short Funeral Home of Delmar. To send online condolences to the family, visit www. short.com. 

S. Grace Dudley, 76

S. Grace Dudley passed away on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010, at Genesis Health Care – The Pines. Born in Caroline County on July 23, 1934, she was the daughter of the late James and Lena Esther Stack Walls. She graduated from Wicomico High School in 1952. On Sept. 21, 1963, she married the late Hiram Goodhand Dudley III. She worked for over 20 years as a paper carrier for the Star Democrat and the News American. Mrs. Dudley was a member of the VFW Post 7937 Women’s Auxiliary in Greensboro. She loved to spend time every Thursday at Andrews American Corner. She is survived by her children, Linda S. Wright, Nellie B Christopher and Edward L. Dudley; her brothers, Charles Edward Walls and James Gardner Walls; two stepsisters; two stepbrothers; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents and husband, she was preceded in death by two brothers and one sister. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7937, 11348 Greensboro Rd., Greensboro, MD 21639. Arrangements are in the care of Fellows, Helfenbein & Newnam Funeral Home, PA in Easton. For online tributes, visit www.fhnfuneralhome.com.

Marlene E. Owens, 76

Marlene Elizabeth Owens of Chestertown, Md., died Thursday, Oct. 28, 2010. Born on Oct. 21, 1934 in Laurel, she was the daughter of the late Warren and Kathalene Hastings Boyce. Mrs. Owens was a loan review specialist for People’s Bank of Kent County until 1984. She

was a member of Christ United Methodist Church in Chestertown. Mrs. Owens enjoyed sewing, reading, traveling and crafts, especially dolls. She loved collecting lighthouses and other related items. Mrs. Owens is survived by her husband, E. Roy Owens; a daughter, Susan Broyles and her fiancé Charles Ashley of Chestertown; a son, Jeffrey Elliott and his wife Cheryl of Seaford; a stepson, Alan Owens and his wife Melissa of Columbia, S.C.; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her brother, Thomas Boyce. Funeral services were held on Monday, Nov. 1, at Christ United Methodist Church, Chestertown. Interment was held in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel, on Tuesday, Nov. 2. Arrangements are in the care of Fellows, Helfenbein & Newnam Funeral Home.

Efrain Santiago Sr., 63

Efrain Santiago Sr. of Bridgeville, died suddenly on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. He was born Dec. 5, 1946, in Guanica, Puerto Rico, son of the late Francisco Santiago and Leonor Tardy. Mr. Santiago was employed since 1992 as a facility assistant at Life Care at Lofland Park. He enjoyed fishing, reading health and science books, watching baseball, boxing and Santiago old western movies. He also liked the outdoors and nature trails. He was a loving father and grandfather. He is survived by six children, Efrain Santiago Jr. and his wife Jocelyn of Blades, Luz M. Santiago and Suhady A. Santiago both of Bridgeville, Isabel Santiago of Salisbury, Md., Winnie Claudio and her husband Shane of Knuckletown, Pa. and Diana Santiago of Howell, N.J.; many grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and his former wife, Enelida Vidal-Santiago. Funeral services were held on Saturday, Oct. 30, at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Bridgeville. Deacon Arcy Passwaters officiated. Interment was private. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions to Ronald McDonald House of Wilmington, 1901 Rockland Rd., Wilmington, DE 19803.

Jerome M. Slavinskas Jr., 62

Jerome ‘Jerry’ M. Slavinskas Jr. of Laurel, passed away at home on Thursday, Oct. 28, 2010. He was born on March 14, 1948 in Seaford, a son of the late Jerome Sr. and Dorothy Smith Slavinskas. Jerry proudly served his country in the United States National Guard and was a member of Laurel American Legion Post #19. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and bowling. Jerry is survived by his son, Jerome “Jerry” Slavinskas III and his companion Stacey of Laurel; his daughters, Tracy L. Hopkins and husband Roy of Delmar and Sherry D. Palinkas of Emmaus, Pa.; grandchildren, Jerome M. Slavinskas IV, Owen E. Hopkins, Quinn I. Hopkins, Hannah B. Palinkas and Zachariah S. Palinkas; and stepgrandchildren, Monica and Neil Small. A graveside service was held on Tuesday,

Nov. 2, at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel. Pastor Ken Deusa officiated. Arrangements are in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

Arintha W. Heller, 91

Arintha Willey Heller of Seaford, died Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010, at her residence. Born in Seaford, the daughter of the late Ella Mae Watson and Edwin Shard Willey, she was a dental assistant for Dr. Charles Moore before retiring. Arintha was a member of St Luke’s Episcopal Church and the Altar Guild at the church. She was also a member of the Ladies Auxiliary Virgil Wilson Post 4961, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Seaford. She is survived by a son, Homer W. Turner and his wife Jan of Rehoboth Beach; a stepdaughter, Theresa A. Lanza of Hammonton, N.J.; 5 grandchildren; 9 great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her first husband, Walter Turner who died in World War II; her second husband, Charles Morris who died in 1972, her third husband, Roy R. Heller who died in 1984; and her son, Edward C. Morris. Services were held on Wednesday, Nov. 3, at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Front Street, Seaford. Burial was in St. Luke’s Cemetery. The Rev. Jeanne W. Kirby officiated.

Ann S. Lewis, 64

Ann S. Lewis of Seaford, died Friday, Oct. 29, 2010. Ann retired from the Dupont Company in Seaford after 27 years of service. She was a member of Diamond State Health Club, an avid golfer and gardener, loved flowers, was active in the Choices Program and did line dancing.  She was preceded in death by her father and mother, Albert and Carrie Shipley; brother-in-law, Sam D. Ervin; nephew, Bruce Lewis; and mother-in-law and father-in-law, M. Madeline and Whitely S. Lewis. Ann is survived by her husband of 47 years, Don W. Lewis; daughter and son-in-law, Amy and Danny Gambrill; granddaughter, Carrie Gambrill; sister, Anita Ervin of Mt. Vernon, Wash.; sisterin-law, Alva L. Lewis; 7 nieces; a nephew; and numerous great-nieces and nephews. Funeral services and burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations to Delaware Hospice Inc., 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963 or the American Cancer Society. Arrangements are in the care of Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Sally W. LaValley, 79

Sally W. LaValley peacefully passed away on Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010. Sally was born in Grosse Pointe, Mich., on Jan. 29, 1931, to the late Dr. and Mrs. Jessie Paul Walker. She lived most of her life in lower Michigan where she met and married her best friend, Ronald LaValley in 1974. Ron and Sally retired to Seaford, 11 years ago, where she was a member of Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church. Sally started her college education in pre-law at the University of Detroit, then because she had a loving and compassionate heart, she transferred to the University of Michigan Nursing School where she received her RN. She furthered her education with a BA in Nursing from Madonna College in Lavonia, Mich. After 25 years, she retired from the State of Michigan as

an Inspector of Care for the Department of Mental Health. Sally loved her family, swimming and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Ron LaValley; 6 children; 13 grandchildren; and 3 great-grandchildren. A viewing will be held at Cranston Funeral Home in Seaford from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 4. Funeral services will be held at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church at 11 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 5. Burial will be in Our Lady of Lourdes Cemetery.

Death Notices

Cornelius N. Anderson, 95

Cornelius Nathaniel Anderson of Delmar, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2010, at Delmar Nursing Home. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 5, at St. Matthews First Baptist Church in Laurel, where friends may call one hour before the services. Burial will follow in the church cemetery.

Beatrice ‘Bea’ E. Young, 99

Beatrice ‘Bea’ E. Young, of Salisbury, Md., and formerly of Delmar, passed away on Thursday, Oct. 21, 2010, at Anchorage Nursing Home in Salisbury. A graveside service was held in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel, on Oct. 29. Arrangements are in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home. Online condolences may be made by visiting www.hsdfuneralhome.com.

A Loving Tribute

Family Owned Since 1898

Full Service MonuMent Dealer Engraving • Setting Design • Cleaning

Quality Monuments At A Discount Price

E.G.A. Certified Monuments

Buy From us & save The salesman’s Commission

30653 Sussex Hwy., Rt. 13 North One mile north of Johnny Janosik

Laurel, Delaware 875-9510 Toll Free 1-888-875-9510


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Seaford concert will kick off ‘red kettle’ campaign By Lynn R. Parks

To kick off its annual fund drive, the Salvation Army in Sussex County will sponsor the Pendel Brass, Singers and Timbrelists in concert. While admission is free, the performance is intended to draw attention to the Salvation Army and to its needs not only of contributions during the Christmas season but also of volunteers to ring bells next to its familiar red collection kettles. Taking part in the concert will be Debbie and Chas Engel, coordinators of the two Salvation Army sites in Sussex County. They both are members of the band; Debbie, who has a degree in music education from the University of Delaware, played French horn in the Delaware Symphony Orchestra for 24 years and served as the orchestra’s executive director. She plays the alto horn with the Pendel Brass. Her husband, whose family has been involved in the Salvation Army for four generations, learned to play the trombone through music lessons offered by the Salvation Army. Also featured in the concert will be 13 students, aged 7 to 17, who are taking lessons from the Engels through the same program that gave Chas his training. The children will perform two pieces with the band. The concert, set for Nov. 13 at St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford, will include testimonies from members, or “soldiers,” of the Salvation Army. In Seaford, the Army’s church is on U.S. 13, next to the Food Lion. Children as young as 7 can join the church as junior soldiers. Members of the evangelical Christian church sign a pledge not to smoke, drink alcohol or use drugs. The Pendel Brass is made up of 40 musicians from eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware. The musicians sing and play brass instruments as well as tambourines. The band plays a varied repertoire, including marches, hymns and classical transcriptions. The Seaford concert will feature Christmas music and will include a carol sing-along, Debbie Engel said. Director is Dr. Harold Burgmayer, who has served as the division music director for the Salvation Army in eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware since 1981. Burgmayer, who lives in Philadelphia, has a master’s degree and a doctorate of musical arts in music composition from Temple University. He has written more than 350 arrangements and compositions, from children’s songs to a symphony for full orchestra. Under Burgmayer’s direction, the band has recorded 15 albums and traveled throughout the United States, including to California, where they played in the Rose Parade, and the world. In May, members will go to South Africa, where they will play and lead music workshops as well as help Salvation Army churches in that country with plumbing,

painting and other repairs. Last fiscal year, from October 2009 through September, the Salvation Army in Sussex County helped nearly 7,000 people, Engel said. During the same time period, it received about $180,000 in cash and in-kind gifts. All of that money went to help people in the county. Of that amount, about $100,000 was raised in the six weeks before Christmas, during the Salvation Army’s annual kettle drive. For your information: The Pendel Brass, Singers and Timbrelists will perform Saturday, Nov. 13, 6 p.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford. Admission to the concert, sponsored by the Salvation Army in Sussex County, is free. For details, call Debbie Engel, 628-2020.

Class of 1965 45th Reunion - The Seaford High School Class of 1965 held their 45th class reunion on Saturday, Oct 9th 2010 at the Seaford Fire Hall. They had 57 classmates in attendance, as well as former teacher Mr. Gary White, former Superintendent Dr. Ken Madden and wife Mabel and Mrs. Mary Mahan, widow of their class adviser, Mr. Ralph Mahan. The SVFD Ladies Auxiliary prepared a delicious meal after which there was plenty of time to mingle with old friends, while listening to the music of the 1960’s. The Reunion Committee is already thinking ahead to their 50th reunion to be held in 2015. Front Row (L-R) : Fran Williamson Ruark, Joyce Fleetwood, Rose Mary Fairchild Dean, Donna Hastings Angell, Brenda Jackson Hearn, Rose Medford Fluharty, Betty Jean Jennette Milligan, Pam Lindell McLaughlin, Sylvia Sammons Boyer, Maria Hocker, Frances Shane Murphy, Peggy Myers Boyd. Row 2: Ralph Thomas, Susan Livingston Manlove, Teresa Pegelow Wilson, Cheryl

Harper Bennett, Ginny Bice Hartman, Doug Smarte, Diana Stevenson, Norma Huston Dukes, Vicky McCutchan Rolph, Gerry Riddle Wiberg, Lorraine Bowden Schwartzkoff, Bobby Jean Dunham Heuberger, Joy Eisenhauer Elzey, Judy Foskey Beckert-Jones, Doreen Handy Bumpass, Leanne Phillips Lowe, Carolyn Somers Calhoun. Row 3: Daniel Thomas, Joe Parker, Phillip Travatello Jr., Larry Passwaters, Bill Rugg, Judy Christopher Thoroughgood, Jill Hickey White, Wayne Hastings, Joanne Conaway Mitchell, Vicky Snigier Birch, Phyllis Warren Messick, Melissa Parker Short, Kay Morrison Harris. Row 4: Tony Lowe, Barry Calhoun, Larry Manlove, Dennard Hill, Ray Harris, Dave Lovelace, Randy Larrimore, Doug Catts, Glenn Rolph, Donald Kampe, Donald Birch, Wilbert Bowden, Bill Windley, George Theofiles, Jim Ellett. Picture by Tom McLaughlin, article submitted by Donna Angell

The Salvation Army Pendel Brass and Singers will be presenting a special concert at St. John’s United Methodist Church on Saturday, Nov. 13, at 6 p.m. as a kick off to the annual “red kettle” campaign.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 21

Health ‘Coping with the Holidays’

A special workshop on “Coping with the Holidays,” offered by Delaware Hospice will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 16, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Cancer Care Building, Seaford. The grief journey can be difficult to navigate, especially during the holiday season. Participants will find help in coping through the discussion and ideas presented at this workshop, and each will receive a free copy of James Miller’s book, “How will I get through the Holidays.” There is no fee for this workshop which is offered as a community service by Delaware Hospice. However, registration is required. Register by calling Paul Ganster, LCSW, at 357-7147 or email pganster@ delawarehospice.org.+

CPR training opportunities

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will offer community CPR classes to anyone interested in learning CPR at the Nanticoke Training Center located on Water Street in Seaford. Participants will learn how to perform the basic skills of CPR on adults, children and infants and how to help an adult, child or infant who is choking. Classes are open to participants 12 years old and up. This program is specifically designed for those who prefer to learn in a group environment with feedback from an instructor. The target audience is those who have a duty to respond to a cardiac emergency because of job responsibilities or regulatory requirements. Cost is $30. Late registrations (if seating is available) will be an additional $5. To register, or for details, contact the Nanticoke Hospital’s Training Center at 629-6611, ext. 8919. Pre-registration is required.

Mammography Van back on the road

The Women’s Mobile Health Screening van, newly retrofitted with state-of-the-art digital mammography equipment, was rededicated on Oct. 4 at Legislative Hall in Dover. State Senator Nancy Cook and the Delaware General Assembly sponsored the upgrade. The Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition (DBCC) manages and operates the van, which provides free or reduced cost mammograms to eligible uninsured or underinsured women. Digital technology (Hologic Lorad Selenia) replaced x-ray film equipment on the 2002 Airstream Commercial medical vehicle. Digital technology provides greater image resolution, while allowing health providers to access mammograms from any workstation. Digital records are also easier to store. The Delaware Cancer Consortium recommends annual clinical breast exams for all women, with mammograms by age 40, and annual mammograms and clinical breast exams afterwards. Women at greater risk for breast cancer may need earlier and more frequent screenings, and should discuss those options with their doctors. For more information about arranging a screening mammogram, call DBCC at 1-888-672-

9647 weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Van staff works some Saturdays and early evenings. Women should have a mammography prescription from their doctor and if possible, a copy of their previous mammogram films for comparison. Van staff will help those without a prescription or a primary care provider.

Breast cancer support group

Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition, Inc. (DBCC) has expanded its Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey, a program for women newly-diagnosed with breast cancer, by partnering with Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center in Seaford. The free, monthly program is offered at the Cancer Center located at 801 Middleford Road, Seaford, the third Thursday of each month from 3 to 4 p.m. The program is facilitated by Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center professional staff - Terri A. Clifton, MS, NCC, Cancer Care coordinator; Mary Brown, RN, DSN, manager Cancer Care Center; and Wendy Polk, nutritionist – with assistance from Lois Wilkinson, DBCC special projects manager, who helps facilitate the program at Bayhealth. Of particular value to newly-diagnosed women is DBCC’s Peer Mentor Program through which they are paired with a long-term survivor for one-on-one support. To learn more about Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center, call Lois Wilkinson at 672-6435. Registration is required and light refreshments and small gifts are provided.

Cancer Support Group

The Wellness Community-Delaware offers a general cancer support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones held at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. The monthly support group meets in the second floor conference room of the Cancer Care center on the third Monday of each month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. The next meeting takes place on Nov. 15 at 4:30 p.m. The Wellness Community, an affiliate of the Cancer Support community, is dedicated to helping people affected by cancer enhance their health and well-being through participation in a professional program of emotional support and hope. Facilitators are trained mental health professionals with a master’s degree or more. Call 645-9150 for information or to register. All support groups offered at the Wellness Community are free of charge. This program is made possible by the support of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital.

Competition to improve school meals

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced the Recipes for Healthy Kids Challenge to improve school meals and the health of children across the nation through the creation of exciting new recipes for inclusion on school lunch menus. The competition will draw on the talents of chefs, students, food service professionals, and parents or other community members working together to develop

tasty, nutritious, kid-approved foods. There will be a grand prize chosen by the judging panel as well as a Popular Choice winner based on public voting. The judges will also choose award winners for the top two recipes in each category. Winning teams will be invited to prepare their nutritionpacked meals alongside White House chefs. The top ten recipes in each category will be published in a Recipes for Healthy Kids Cookbook to share with students and families. To learn more about the First Lady’s Let’s Move! campaign, visit www. LetsMove.gov. The deadline for recipe submissions is Dec. 30. For more information, visit recipesforkidschallenge.com.

Bereavement luncheons

Delaware Hospice’s “New Beginnings” bereavement luncheons are an informal way to meet and talk with others, who have had similar loss experiences.  Lunch begins at noon and is followed by a brief program. The location rotates each week of the month according to the following schedule:  • 1st Thursday: Grottos Pizza, Rte. 26, Bethany Beach; • 2nd Thursday: Georgia House, 300 Delaware Ave., Laurel; • 3rd Thursday: Millsboro Pizza Palace, Rt. 113-southbound lane, Millsboro;  • 4th Thursday: Blue Ocean Grill (formerly Milton House), 200 Broadkill Rd., Milton;

• 5th Thursday (when applicable): Texas Grill (formerly Ocean Point Grill), 26089 Long Neck Rd., Millsboro. “New Beginnings” luncheons are open to the public. Registration is not required. There is no fee except the cost of your lunch. For more information, call Carol Dobson or Paul Ganster at 8567717.

Survivors of Suicide Day program

Delaware Hospice and Exceptional Care for Children will host the 12th Annual Survivors of Suicide Day Program on Saturday, Nov. 20, with a program at the Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, from 10 a.m. to noon. A panel of local survivors of suicide loss will begin the program, which will be followed by the 12th National Survivors of Suicide Day Video Conference, sponsored by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. There is no fee for this program, but registration is required by Nov. 10. Register online at: www.deolc.org/events, or contact Vicki Costa, LCSW: 302-4785707 or 302-856-7717, or vcosta@delawarehospice.org. Sponsored by the Delaware End-ofLife Coalition and the Mental Health Association.


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

How will changes brought about by health care legislation affect seniors?

Barbara Allen and Charles “Chick” Allen III (center) made a generous donation to help Nanticoke Health Services expand their cardiac catheterization capabilities to meet the ever-growing needs of the community. From left are Steven A. Rose, president and CEO of Nanticoke Health Services; Angel Alicea, MD, cardiologist; Barbara Allen; Charles “Chick” Allen III; Ivan Pena, MD, interventional cardiologist; and Lyndon Yearick, Nanticoke Foundation executive director.

Allen family donates to hospital

Time is the leading factor in reducing death due to heart attack and stroke. Cardiac catheterization enables physicians to perform lifesaving procedures within a limited period of time. Barbara Allen and Chick Allen, lifetime residents of Sussex County and longtime supporters of Nanticoke Health Services, want the community to have sufficient equipment, physicians, staff and space to receive these time-sensitive, lifesaving procedures.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen recently made a significant financial contribution to help Nanticoke Health Services Foundation expand their cardiac catheterization capabilities to meet the ever-growing needs of the community. A plaque will read, “Given by Barbara and Chick Allen - For those who

need and for those who provide.”  “Nanticoke Health Services’ Cardiac Catheterization Lab has combined the most advanced technology with an experienced team of physicians, nurses and technicians who are on call 24/7,” said Steven A. Rose, president and CEO of Nanticoke Health Services. “We reached a point where we need to expand our facilities. The Allens have been very generous with their time, treasures and talents.” For 30 years, Chick held a variety of roles from chairman of the board of directors, vice chairman, and chairman of the governance and management committee for the board at Nanticoke. Barbara was the co-chair with the capital campaign for the Seaford Library and Cultural Center.

How the pain scale can help you By Dr. Anthony Policastro One of the current requirements of hospital certifying agencies is to ask patients whether they have any pain at the time of each visit. There is a lot more to pain than just asking if it is present. The more detailed a description you can give of your pain, the more likely it will be that it will suggest a specific diagnosis. For that reason, whenever you go to the doctor with a complaint of pain, you should be prepared to give as much in the way of particulars as you can. There are seven major things that you can use to describe the pain. I use a mnemonic to remember them. I took Latin for six years so I use a Latin name to remember them. I think of a Roman gentleman that I have named Quintus Quintus Scala or Q.Q.SCALA for short. The first question to be asked about pain is the Quantity of the pain which refers to how severe it is. The severity is usually based on a scale of 1 to 10. A score of 1 represents just noticeable pain. A score of 10 represents the worst pain you have ever had in your life. Since this is a question that you know will be asked, it is a good idea to have an answer when you arrive to be seen. The second question refers to the Quality of the pain which refers to the kind of pain. It might be burning, stabbing, a pressure, sharp or heavy. Each of these things represents a different kind of cause of the pain. The third question is about the Setting of the pain which involves the circum-

stances under which it occurs. It might occur between meals or at night. Pain that wakes people up from a dead sleep is frequently due to a serious illness. That is especially true if it happens for a period of weeks to months. The fourth question is Chronology which refers to how long the pain lasts. It also refers to whether it comes and goes or is steady in nature. The fifth question is Associated Symptoms which refers to whether or not the individual is experiencing anything else besides the pain. For example, migraine headaches are often associated with nausea or vomiting. The sixth question is Location which refers not only to where the pain is but whether it moves. It also refers to whether it seems to shoot to another location briefly. The seventh question is Aggravating/ Alleviating circumstances. This asks two questions. The first has to do with what makes the pain worse. The second has to do with what makes the pain better. It is a good idea to consider all these questions and write down the answers to them before you go to the doctor. This will allow you to give him/her as accurate description as possible. It will also ensure that important facts are not left out. A good description might not always suggest the exact cause of the pain. However, it will help the physician rule out some things that do not fit with the story. You can help yourself by providing an accurate description of exactly what is going on.

For American seniors, their retirement years are supposed to be about relaxing, getting out and enjoying the freedom they’ve earned. In reality, though, even retirement has its challenges, especially when it comes to health insurance. Linda Nemes, senior insurance research analyst for the Delaware Department of Insurance, will be the featured guest speaker at the November meeting of the Sussex County Advisory Committee for the Aging & Adults with Physical Disabilities. Nemes’ appearance has been rescheduled from a previous meeting. Nemes will discuss recent changes to Medicare supplemental insurance, also known as Medigap, sold by private insurers to Medicare recipients. The plans provide gap coverage between the amount paid by Medicare and the total amount

ACCIDENT? INJURY? Massage / Physical Therapy Chiropractic Therapy Laser / Traction Therapy Spinal Injections Pain Management

Comprehensive Spine Center

8957 Middleford Rd., Seaford, Del.

302-628-9100

Injury Hot Line: 302-724-6484

EYE CARE

Azar Eye Institute

“With An Eye In The Future” www.azareyeinstitute.com

Alex Azar, M.D. Peter I. Filipov, M.D. Jason M. Tu, M.D. James Gallagher, M.D. Emerson T. Que, M.D. Tracey Boss, O.D. Jennifer R. Giles, O.D.

Laurel Office: Salisbury: Suite 1 31519 Winter Place Pkwy., 116 E. Front Street Laurel, DE 19966 Salisbury, MD 21804

410-546-2500

302-875-8991

SENIOR CITIZENS Seaford Center

Genesis ElderCare® Network • Retirement • Assisted Living • Skilled Nursing Care

1100 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-3575 Fax 302-629-0561

billed. Nemes will also discuss this year’s national health care legislation, and the anticipated effects the new reforms will have on senior citizens. The public is invited to attend the committee’s next meeting at 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 15, at the Roxana CHEER Center, 34314 Pyle Center Rd., Roxana. An open discussion will follow the featured presentation. The Sussex County Advisory Committee for the Aging & Adults with Physical Disabilities is an 11-member panel established by the Sussex County Council to be an advocate for programs and policies that benefit older and disabled residents. The committee meets every other month, in January, March, May, July, September and November. All meetings are open to the public.

COLON CANCER SCREENING • Screening exams for early detection & prevention of colo-rectal cancer • Endoscopy for investigation & treatment of digestive diseases • All in a caring, comfortable & convenient outpatient facility

PENINSULA ENDOSCOPY CENTER 9315 Ocean Highway, Delmar, MD

410-896-9005

INTERNAL MEDICINE

“Medicine for Adults” with emphasis on prevention and early detection of disease

Over 20 Years of Service and Experience

Darius S. Sypek, M.D.

Diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine

DelMar Medical Center P.A.

at Park Professional Center 1350 Middleford Road, Suite 501, Seaford, DE 19973 302-628-4370 - by appointment only www.delmarmedicalcenter.com

URGENT CARE ORTHOPAEDICS H. PAUL AGUILLON, MD

Sussex Medical Center

GENERAL & FAMILY PRACTICE INTERNAL MEDICINE • WALK-INS

X-Ray and Lab on Premises Minor Emergencies • Lacerations Office Gynecology - Pap Smears Executive, Sports & Insurance Physicals Orthopedics • Minor Surgery Cardiology • Stress Testing

Se habla español 401 Concord Road, Blades, DE 19973

629-6664 LET PEOPLE KNOW YOU’RE AVAILABLE FOR THEM -- CALL 302-629-9788


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 23

Trap Pond Nature Center ‘epicenter’ of education By Tony E. Windsor

With the scenic Trap Pond millpond as a backdrop, Delaware dignitaries dedicated the new 4,000-square-foot Baldcypress Nature Center, located on the grounds of Delaware first state park. Charles Salkin, Delaware Director, Division of Parks and Recreation served as master of ceremonies for an event that attracted a full room in the buildings multipurpose meeting hall. Salkin introduced Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary, Collin O’Mara who told the group that the new nature center and Trap Pond Park can be an epicenter of recreational and educational opportunities for residents and visitors to Sussex County. He also boasted of the opportunity that the park provides for youth in the state. He lauded the partnership between Trap Pond State Park and Nemours Health and Prevention Services and its annual “Healthy Kids Day “activities for fourth graders. The event allows young people to spend a day of recreation and education with structured physical activities focused on the outdoors and the park’s amenities. “This park and nature center is the perfect epicenter for education and recreation occurring simultaneously,” he said. “We need only look at the partnership with Nemours and Healthy Kids Day. Kids in western Sussex County are getting outside and healthy at the same time. We want to replicate this up and down the state,” he said. In the interest of environmental concerns, O’Mara also pointed out that the new nature center has been built with energy efficiency in mind. The construction utilizes energy efficient heat pumps with programmable thermostats, energy recovery ventilation systems and insulation with soy-based spray on foam. There are also high tech insulated glass windows and doors and a reflective roof to reduce heat absorption. “The new Baldcypress Nature Center is as beautiful as it is energy efficient,” he said. “It’s a special place to connect with our natural world in so many ways, and its energy efficient construction and features are financially and environmentally responsible. Buildings like this help bring people together to connect with nature.” Salkin introduced State Sen. Bob Venables who he characterized as a “champion” for the revitalization efforts at Trap Pond. He said that at one point the park waters became overwhelmed with high concentrations of bacteria and what was

ARCHITECTS

ENGINEERS

once a large volume of visitors to the park began to dwindle. Over the last 10 years, Salkin said Venables has worked hard to help “bring the park back to life.” He said Venables led an effort to get Delaware Department of Transportation funds to help construct the Loblolly Trail, a 4.6 mile hiking trail in the heart of the park. “With Senator Venables one great idea led to another and even during tough economic times he has made sure we were able to get the resources needed to revitalize the park,” Salkin said. The former Venables family construction company built the rest room facility that was torn down to make way for the new nature center. Salkin remarked that the septic system that was installed at that time was preserved and after more than 40 years is still operating for the new facility. Venables, an avid fisherman, hunter, hiker and bicyclist, said he has spent many hours in and around the waters and lands that make up Trap Pond Park. “When I was in discussion about work being done to promote the park and revitalize it, I made one request and that was that no big trees be cut down. Those trees are part of what makes this park so great for the families who come here and ride, walk and even run the trials,” he said. It was Venables who envisioned a massive water park, much like the one at Killens Pond State Park near Dover, for Trap Pond Park. He set out to attempt to secure funds to build a water park which was estimated to be at a cost of between $5 and $6 million. Venables said he had hoped to see the necessary funds appropriated over two years. In the first year he was able to get about $2.5 million secured for the project. Unfortunately, after that, the state began suffering severe budget issues and money became less available. The water park project was stymied. With the water park project on hold, Venables supported the construction of the Loblolly Hiking Trail at Trap Pond Park. “When the hiking trail was built I got calls from people who were upset because they wanted to see a horse trail in the park,” Venables said. “I told the state park people that I was happy to support the hiking trail, but if there was any money left over, I wanted them to promise me they would use it to build a horse path. I hope they still remember that promise.” Venables said projects like the Nature Center and hiking trail do not get done by just one member of the legislature. He also said these projects cannot get done without

FACILITIES SOLUTIONS

Dignitaries dedicated the Baldcypress Nature Center at Trap Pond on Wednesday morning, Oct. 27. Helping to cut the ribbon were: (from left, front row): Anne Allan, president of the Trap Pond Partners; Cheryl Branagan, project coordinator, Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network, National Park Service; Greg Kindig, architect with the Division of Parks and Recreation who designed the facility; State Sen. Bob Venables, State Rep. Biff Lee and Director of Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation, Charles Salkin. Behind Kindig and Venables is Secretary Collin O’Mara, of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Photo by Tony Windsor

bi-partisan support. He said he is dismayed by the television ads during election season that demonstrate partisan politics. “I know that the only way to get things done is to get support from colleagues on the other side of the aisle,” Venables said. “I am fortunate to have a good friend who works with me on projects that are in the interest of Laurel. Without [Rep.] Biff

The

Lone Elm Country Shop

10 -50 Off %

%

The Shop will be open for a

Clearance

e l a S Christmas Hours

www.studiojaed.com

(Lee) and I talking it is amazing how close our votes are.” Lee took to the podium and kept his remarks short. After expressing his excitement about the new Nature Center, Lee gave his own welcome to the visitors who attended the dedication. “Welcome to the 40th District. Welcome to the most beautiful park in the state,” he said.

Will Vary Thurs., Fri., Sat. 12 - 5:30 Sun. 1-5

Arrangements, Wreaths, Baskets, Hanging Lights and Antique Items

22507 Bridgeville Hwy. Seaford, DE

Ph: 302-629-4165 (leave message) Cell: 302-245-0744 (for appt.)


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

ACE Rewards

Friends and Family Sale SAVE

20%

Taking part in the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the grand opening of Delmarva Teen Challenge Thrift Store on Middleford Road in Seaford on Oct. 30 were, from left, Paula Gunson, executive director of the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce; Judy Watson; Mike Vincent, vice president Sussex County Council; Rusty Dukes; Ralph Artigliere, store general manager; Seaford Mayor Ed Butler; Allen Penrod; Chris Redman; Wanda Miller; and Robert Carey, DTC executive director. Watson, Redman, Miller, Dukes and Penrod are on the board of directors; Penrod is president.

Teen Challenge’s Thrift Store opens along Middleford Road By Carol Kinsley

A dream became a reality last week as the ribbon was cut at the grand opening of the Teen Challenge Thrift Store at 1401 Middleford Road in Seaford. “We’ve been working on this for 10 months,” said Delmarva Teen Challenge Executive Director Robert Carey. Delmarva Teen Challenge, which evolved from the former Seaford Mission, is an affiliate of Teen Challenge USA which has more than 175 Teen Challenge programs in the United States and another 150 around the world. The centers are designed to provide individuals with a faith-based solution to life-controlling drug and alcohol problems. As a rule of thumb, Carey said, most Teen Challenge centers have a thrift store, which helps underwrite expenses of the organization. Teen Challenge students helped with the total renovation needed in the old Edgehill Pharmacy building, which had stood vacant for about 15 years. They also will work in the store in the afternoons. Ralph Artigliere is the thrift store’s general manager. A retired executive who worked for 26 years at Playtex in Dover, he heard of Carey’s vision to have a thrift store and is now a full-time employee of Teen Challenge. “Ralph has a vision to open ten stores,” Carey said. “This is number one.” The store is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 till 4. It is closed on Sundays. Donations may be brought to the front of the store during store hours.

Tax donation slips are availalbe. Anyone with quality used appliances or furniture may call 302-629-3733 to schedule pick up. “We are always looking for good, committed volunteers,” said Carey. Anyone who would like to help with the thrift shop may apply through Artigliere at the store.

‘I Love to Write Day’ essay contest

Entries are sought for the 2010 “I Love to Write Day” Essay Contest, sponsored by Vine and Vessels CWF. The theme is “My Dream is Bigger than My Environment,” ranging from 300 to 500 words. The contest is open to youth between the ages of 10 to 16. “I Love to Write Day” was founded by Delaware author, John Riddle, to motivate people of all ages and backgrounds to write, whether it’s a poem, letter to the editor, short story or essay. Submissions must be submitted by Nov. 13 and mailed to Vine and Vessels, P.O. Box 1716, Seaford, DE 19973. Essays will be judged on the following criteria: creativity, content, grammar and spelling, and topic/subject consistency. Participants must include their name and age on their entry. The event takes place at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center on Saturday, Nov. 20, from 10 a.m. to noon. Monetary prizes will be awarded to the top three winning essayists. Other participants will receive certificates or a book selection. Winners must be present to win. For more information, contact Betty Jarman at 448-5939 or Joyce Sessoms at 382-9904.

storewide by showing your Ace Rewards Card Bring a friend or family member and they save too!

We can get you in, get you help & on your way in 15 minutes or less!

OnE nly dAy O y a Saturd nov. 6

800 Norman Eskridge Highway, Rt. 20 (next to Big Lots), Seaford, DE • 302-628-7890

RommelsACE.com

10% discount on all Power Tools - Power Equipment - Whirlpool Appliances

Thank You! For Re-Electing

BIFF LEE COMMITMENT: My Only Job Is Being Your State Representative In The 40th District

I promise to continue that!

Time and Service to My Community Are Foremost. Your Full Time Representative,

Have a concern involving state government? www.RepBiffLee.com Call me at home: (302) 875-5119 Paid for by Friends for Biff Lee.


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 25

20689 SuSSex Hwy.

This year’s long-campaigned, well advertised election is over

Those of you who are reading this have the advantage over ynn arks me: It’s already Thursday and this year’s long-campaigned election is finally over. On Monday, I still have For me, though, it’s only Monday. I have two mail deliveries and Return Day, that respite who-knows-how-many telephone from back-biting and calls to get through before the dirty politics, to look polls close tomorrow night. Our recycling bin, which my forward to. husband emptied not too long ago, is already full again, mostly with campaign flyers. (Caution to the Well, I won’t worry about that now. people who waste their money on them: On Monday, I still have Return Day, that Those flyers go into the bin under the sink respite from back-biting and dirty politics, without one word — one word!! — being to look forward to. Many of you, I guess, read. I prefer to make my election deciare reading this after Sussex County’s sions based on real information.) unique tradition, held in the county seat And while I was answering calls that two days after every election, is over. come up on the telephone’s screen as “UnMaybe I saw you there. I hope my hair available” in hopes that someone was calllooked OK. ing to ask me my opinion, I’ve recently I love a parade, whether in the heat of given up on that. One call did start out summer or on a cold, blustery fall day. in that direction, with the recorded voice And I will enjoy the Return Day parade. naming politicians and asking whether I But my favorite part of the day is the viewed them favorably or unfavorably. burying of the hatchet, that lovely and oldBut then the voice segued into a lecture on fashioned symbol of putting all campaign taxes, explaining that one candidate will rhetoric aside and working together for the cut taxes to the barest bone and the other good of all. will send them skyrocketing. I quickly There exists the possibility, I have read, disconnected. that this year’s Return Day will not be as You readers also have an advantage amicable as others have been. That some over me because you know the winners politicians won’t even take this day off in and the losers. I’m still in white-knuckled their race to ensure their power and undersuspense, hoping for one outcome and mine their opponents’. fearing the other. I, of course, stuck in Monday, am still Perhaps, when you read this, you can hoping that that doesn’t happen. But if it channel your mind to reach back in time proves to be the case, and you, already to me and give me a sign. You’ll find me in Thursday, are aware of it, please don’t in the kitchen, sitting in front of my comuse those channeling powers to reach back puter and typing the words that you’ve three days to me at my kitchen table to just read. (Maybe, too, you can tell me give me a hint. what I’ve written, making my job in comI really don’t want to know. ing up with it much easier.) The thing is, I’m pretty sure that as soon as this election is over, the next one will get underway. Sen. Mitch McConnell Desserts taste testing has already made that clear, with his stateThe Look-In Glass Shoppe at Nantiment that his goal over the next two years coke Memorial Hospital will hold a Fanwill be to ensure that President Obama is tastic Desserts Taste Testing Day. Visit not reelected. Nanticoke’s lobby on Wednesday, Nov. “The single most important thing we 10, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to taste test want to achieve is for President Obama desserts including, pumpkin cobbler, apple to be a one-term president,” said the Kencrisp and cherry cobbler. Gift sets, perfect tucky senator, a week before Tuesday’s for the holidays, will be available for sale election. Never mind, I guess, all the prob- in the Look-In Glass Shoppe.  lems facing the nation and all the work For more information, call 629-6611, that could be done in those two years to ext. 4955. Payment is expected at time of solve those problems. order.

L

3 MILeS NORTH OF SeAFORD

302.629.9645 1.800.564.5050

Mon. - Fri. 8-6, Sat 8-5, Sun. 9-3 • Lawn/Garden • Full Line of Shrubs, Trees & Bedding Plants • Pet Supplies • Horse Access. • Giftware • Feed & Seed

P

OPEN HOUSE

Large Dog House

SAVE $10

49

$

(066-37652)

Reg. $15.99

99

Reg. $59.99

24”x18”x19”

(066-16337) Other sizes available

Each Reg. $34.99

SAVE $10

Soft Touch Plaid Fleece Pet Bed

14

$

2499

$

Southern States Complete Dog Food

38”x29”x30”. Complete with rear ventilation, a rain-diverting rim and raised interior floor. (066-50030)

iCrate Single Door Pet Crate

SAVE $10

SAVE 35% ®

29

40 lbs. Tasty, high-protein formula for normally active adult dogs.

36”x48”

(066-37648)

(588-90066)

ASST. COLORS AVAIL.

WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF PET SUPPLIES INCLUDING TOYS, COLORS, TREATS & FEEDS We Carry

K31 GRASS SEED

Large Selection of

SALE!

2995

$

50 lb. bag

CLOTHING

Men’s, Women’s Children’s Carhartt® Hooded Jacket 100% cotton sandstone duck. Quilted flannel lining. Med - 2XL. Reg. $89.99 (Style #J130)

79

$

99

Flags, Banners & Stepping Stones!

WE HAVE A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF HOLIDAY HOME DECOR & GIFTS! STOP IN TODAY TO SEE HOW WE CAN HELP YOU!

1999

Nyjer® Seed $

Large Selection of

20 lbs.

Attracts goldfinches, purple finches & more (102-11080)

59¢

Wild Bird Seed

1199

$

Reg. 99¢

SAVE 40%

11 oz. Attract wild birds all year. (102-01879)

40 lbs.

Attracts chickadees, grosbeaks, juncos & more (102-09930)

Fall & Holiday Fragrances

YANKEE CANDLES

PUT THE HEAT WHEREVER YOU NEED IT! BACKYARDS & TAILGATING!

500 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Ph: 302-629-4514 Fax: 302-536-6259

LP Tank Top Heater

22128 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Ph: 302-628-8500

6999

$

Fax: 302-536-6280

www.cfmnet.com

Broker, CRS, e-Pro, GRI, SRES Cell

381-7408

302

dee@deecross.com

Portable Forced Air Propane Heater

35K BTU/hr. CSA certified, heat approx. 800 SF.12 hrs. on 20 lb tank.

7999

$

(059-05442)

PRICES ARE FALLING! SAVE OVER

25%

Poly Leaf Rake

24” Hrdwd handle w/cushion grip.

SAVE 25%

(059-00997)

(067-92206)

Reg. $14.99

1099

$

(105-11650)

Adjusts from 8K-14K BTU/hr. Safety shutoff & direct connect to 5 - 20 lb cylinder.

Dee Cross Enter Rivers End from Old Meadow Rd., bear left & turn left at the first side road, bear right on Hidden Hills Dr. #579344 $386,900

9

27”x36”, Reversible.

PELLET FUEL, PORTABLE HEATERS, SALT PELLETS!

Sunday, Nov. 7th 2-4 pm

6 Hidden Hills Dr., Rivers End, Seaford, DE

Soft Touch Pet Bed

$ 99

Brown Jersey Gloves

7

$ Dozen 49 Pairs

Reg. $9.99

More Than A Farm Store, We Have Gifts Galore WWW.SOUTHERNSTATES.COM

SALE PRICES GOOD THRU NOV. 7TH


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Cooked carrots provide important vitamins, minerals “Some guy invented Vitamin A out of a carrot. I’ll bet he can’t invent a good meal out of one.” Will Rogers Carrots aren’t only a rich source of beta carotene which the body converts into Vitamin A, they’re also rich in Vitamins C and B6 as well as thiamine, folic acid and magnesium and several other important vitamins and minerals that promote healthy skin, prevent cancer, impede infections, regulate blood sugar, aid in colon health the benefits go on and on. Some nutritionists contend that carrots are one of the few foods that are healthier when cooked than when eaten raw. This is because, unless it’s juiced, a raw carrot is harder to digest thus vitamins are lost as a result. So if you’re eating a raw carrot, chew slowly and don’t peel it - the greatest mineral content lies closest to the skin! When cooking carrots, leave them whole and then slice afterwards to retain the most vitamins. When selecting carrots, bigger is not better. They should be less than 8 inches in length, relatively uniform in shape, with smooth skin and a firm feel. The heavier and the deeper orange they are, the more beta carotene they contain. A dark stem end indicates they’ve been around for a while. If your carrots get a little limp in the fridge, you can restore them by placing them in ice water for about a half hour. Avoid storing them near fruit which can give them a bitter taste and shorten their storage life. Putting them in a plastic bag with a little water will keep them hydrated. One other bit of carrot trivia: there are indeed baby carrots but the ones we’re used to seeing are “manufactured” baby carrots. They’re carrot-shaped slices of peeled carrots invented in the late 1980s by Mike Yurosek, a California farmer. Yurosek was tired of throwing away 400 tons a year of twisted, knobby, imperfect carrots so he found an industrial green bean cutter and shaped his carrots into 5 centimeter lengths, placed them into an industrial potato peeler and voila, the “baby” carrot was created. Still, the poor carrot suffers underserved unpopularity. There are really myriad ways to make them taste good - that cheap shot by Will Rogers notwithstanding. Even Rogers would like these examples. Barefoot Carrot Salad 2 to 3 servings Recipe courtesy of Ina Garten 1/3 cup golden raisins 1 pound carrots 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/4 cup sour cream 1/4 cup mayonnaise 3 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/3 cup diced fresh pineapple

Loretta Knorr

The Practical Gourmet Place the raisins in a small bowl and cover with boiling water. Allow to sit for 5 minutes and then drain. Fit a food processor with the grating blade. Cut the carrots in half and place in the feed tube so they are lying on their sides. Process in batches. Place the grated carrots in a medium bowl, add the lemon juice and toss. For the dressing, whisk together the sour cream, mayonnaise, sugar and salt. Pour the dressing over the carrots and add the pineapple and raisins. Toss together and serve. Ginger Carrot Soup Recipe courtesy of Guy Fieri 8 servings Ingredients 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup chopped sweet onion 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more for seasoning 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon minced ginger 2 pounds carrots, peeled and chopped into even pieces 1 medium russet potato, peeled and chopped 4 cups chicken stock or vegetable stock for vegetarian version 1/4 cup pine nuts 1 1/3 cups plain yogurt 1 teaspoon honey 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme 1/2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, plus more for seasoning In a heavy Dutch oven, (prefer porcelain covered cast iron), over medium-high heat, add the olive oil and the sweet onions. Sprinkle with salt and sweat for 10 minutes, until just starting to caramelize. Add in the garlic and ginger and sauté for 2 minutes more, being careful not to burn the mixture. Stir in the carrots, potatoes and the chicken or vegetable stock. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook until carrots and potato is very tender, about 15 to 18 minutes. Keep warm. In a small sauté pan, over high heat, lightly toast the pine nuts and set aside to cool. In a small bowl, combine the yogurt, honey, thyme and black pepper. With a stick blender, puree the carrot mixture and gradually add in the pine nuts and the yogurt mixture. Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper, to taste, and serve immediately. Cook’s Note: You can prepare the soup 3 or 4 days ahead, refrigerate, and add the nut and yogurt mixture when ready to serve.

For the cake: Beat the sugar, oil, and eggs together in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment until light yellow. Add the vanilla. In another bowl, sift together 2 1/2 cups flour, the cinnamon, baking soda and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients. Toss the raisins and walnuts with 1 tablespoon flour. Fold in the carrots and pineapple. Add to the batter and mix well. Divide the batter equally between the 2 pans. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Allow the cakes to cool completely in the pans set over a wire rack.

Carrot and Pineapple Cake Recipe courtesy of Ina Garten One of the best carrot cakes you’ll ever taste! 8 servings For the cake: 2 cups granulated sugar 1 1/3 cups vegetable oil 3 extra-large eggs, at room temperature 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 1/2 cups plus 1 tablespoon allpurpose flour, divided 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 cup raisins 1 cup chopped walnuts 1 pound carrots, grated 1/2 cup diced fresh pineapple For the frosting: 3/4 pound cream cheese, at room temperature 1/2 pound unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1 pound confectioners’ sugar, sifted

For the frosting: Mix the cream cheese, butter and vanilla in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment until just combined. Add the sugar and mix until smooth. Place 1 layer, flat-side up, on a flat plate or cake pedestal. With a knife or offset spatula, spread the top with frosting. Place the second layer on top, rounded side up, and spread the frosting evenly on the top and sides of the cake. Decorate with diced pineapple.

For the decoration: 1/2 cup diced fresh pineapple Preheat the oven to 350°. Butter 2 (8-inch) round cake pans. Line with parchment paper, then butter and flour the pans.

NEW VASCULAR SURGEON IN SEAFORD NOW SCHEDULING PATIENT APPOINTMENTS

FOR ACCESS TO GREAT PHYSICIANS CLOSE TO HOME, Farouk Marzouk, MD

Director, Vascular Surgery

CHOOSE NANTICOKE.

Providing Services In:  A Variety of Vascular Diseases  Endovascular Descending Thoracic Aneurysm Repair  Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm  Injections for Varicose Veins

 Carotid & Renal Artery Stenting  Dialysis Access With Endovascular Maintenance  Venous Endovascular Thrombectomy for DVT THE

VASCULAR CENTER

801 Middleford Road Seaford, Delaware 19973

302-629-0452

NANTICOKE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

nanticoke.org

Always Caring. Always Here.

801 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-0452 • 1-877-NHS4DOCS


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 27

Buying now makes perfect sense By Judy Dean

As a real estate professional, and particularly in my role this year as president of the Sussex County Association of Realtors (SCAOR), I feel it’s my responsibility to stay up to date on news affecting America’s real estate markets. After all, how can I adequately advise my clients, as well as SCAOR’s board of directors, without being fully aware of what’s going on in the often volatile world of real estate? While reading through the Wall Street Journal’s online edition recently, a headline suddenly caught my eye – “10 Reasons to Buy a Home.” I’ve been preaching for months that there may never be a better opportunity in our lifetimes to purchase a home here in Sussex County than right now. So, this article really got my attention. I’d like to go over some of the 10 main points the Wall Street Journal writer makes and translate them to our lives, and our real estate markets, here in southern Delaware. So, here we go: 1. You can get a good deal. Truer words have never been spoken. Right now in Sussex County, we have more than twice as many homes for sale as we do during a normal market cycle. This translates to exceptional deals and a buying opportunity unlike any we’ve ever seen here in “Slower Lower.” If you’re interested in purchasing a home, spend a day or two looking around and you’ll definitely see what I mean. 2. Mortgages are cheap. Right now, qualified borrowers can get a 30-year fixed rate mortgage in Sussex County for a little more than 4 percent interest. Over the course of three decades, this will save the average homeowner thousands of dollars in interest fees. 3. You’ll save on taxes. Mortgage interest, real estate taxes, breaks on capital gains taxes – all are advantages to buying and keeping your own home here in beautiful southern Delaware. Not to mention our already low property taxes. 4. It’ll be yours. You can do whatever you want to do; there’s no need to ask a landlord for his or her permission to tear down a wall, to paint your bedroom your favorite color or to redo the landscaping. Do with it what you will – it’s your castle and you are the king and/or queen of that castle. 5. You’ll get a better home. That’s be-

Ramey Real Estate

22350 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Office: 302-629-5575

NEW LISTING

318 Clearbrooke Blvd., Seaford

cause you’re more motivated to take care of something that belongs to you than you are something that belongs to someone else. A new home is likely the biggest investment you’ll ever make – you want to take care of it, which will improve your quality of life and the quality of your primary residence. 6. It’s forced savings. The portion of your monthly mortgage payment that goes to principal is really a way to pay yourself in the form of increased equity in your home. Sometime in the future, when you decide to sell your home after years of rising property values, that will equate into real money in your pocket. There are more points to be made, but I think you get the idea. While things may still seem a bit bleak at the moment, anyone who buys a home in this market will reap the benefits in the long-term. The economy is cyclical and this one, like all the others before it and all of the ones yet to come, will rebound. I encourage anyone who doesn’t already own their own home to take a serious look at the opportunities that are literally around every corner of our county right now. When the market does turn around – and trust me, it will – you’ll likely be rewarded with thousands of dollars in near instant equity, money that can be used to help insure your future. Drive the neighborhoods of your town, or the town you think you may want to live in, and write down the addresses of the homes you’d like to learn more about. Then give buying a home some serious thought – there may never be a better opportunity to do just that.

Be thankfuL for a Warm home this Winter

Craft fair at Del Tech

Get a head start on holiday shopping at the 27th Annual Craft & Art Fair on Friday, Nov. 12 and Saturday, Nov. 13 at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Admission is free; there will be door prizes and refreshments. From 3 to 7 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday in the William A. Carter Partnership Center, numerous crafters will offer everything from floral arrangements, country gifts, glasswork, and ceramics to needlework, woodcarvings, jewelry, dolls and more. This two-day event is the perfect place to find something special for everyone on your gift list. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus + program at 856-5618.

October Top Listing Agent For all your real estate questions and needs, call

Russ Griffin, Realtor Cell

302

745-1083

NEW LISTING

9023 Riverside Dr., Seaford

- Est. 1935 -

50 Gallons FREE with

first delivery to new customers, plus

FREE hook up & gas check. Ask about our Easy-Pay Budget Programs.

302-629-3001 • 888-410-WARM www.penoil.com

Make the Switch to a Locally Owned Propane Company Proudly serving Sussex and Kent Counties in Delaware, and Caroline, Dorchester, Queen Anne’s, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties in Maryland.


PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Education Delaware Tech’s new medical sonography lab The diagnostic medical sonography (DMS) lab at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus was officially dedicated on Sept. 29. College administration, staff and program students gathered to express their gratitude to Beebe Medical Center, Bayhealth Medical Center, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and Peninsula Regional Medical Center for their generous funding of the lab equipment and the program coordinator’s position for the newest health program at the campus. Jeffrey Fried, president and CEO of Beebe Medical Center, is credited with asking the question several years ago about why the college did not have an ultrasound program although it has a radiology program. The answer was simple: Delaware Tech did not have the financial resources to fund the program director and specialized equipment.

Through his efforts the four hospitals came together and validated the need for qualified sonographers in medical facilities. Their collaboration led to the establishment of the DMS program which is now in the process of acquiring national accreditation. DMS Department Chair Christy Moriarty and Program Coordinator Elena Guyer worked with the DMS instructors at the college’s Wilmington campus to develop the curriculum that is being used for the associate degree program. Ultrasonography is the process of using sound waves to create images of the human body for diagnostic purposes. The new scan lab will provide students with access to the latest technology in sonographic imaging, learning first-hand the scanning procedures that will be performed in clinical education facilities.

The new diagnostic medical sonography (DMS) laboratory at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus was dedicated on Sept. 29.  From left are: Gary Shaw, vice president of operations northern region, Bayhealth Medical Center; Cindy Lunsford, executive vice president and COO, Peninsula Regional Medical Center; Dr. Lonnie George, Delaware Tech president; Dr. Ileana Smith, vice president & Owens Campus director; Jeff Fried, president and CEO Beebe Medical Center; and Steve Rose, president and CEO, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital.

PEACE BUILDING SESSION - Charito Calvachi-Mateyko discussed peace building in Latin America during a recent Tuesdays Around the World program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Tuesdays Around the World programs encourage students and staff to share experiences and insights as a native of, or visitor to, countries around the world. The September program was funded by the Delaware Humanities Forum. Calvachi-Mateyko is a restorative justice practitioner, peace builder, activist for racial justice and promoter of the Latino culture. She also serves on the Governor’s Advisory Council for Hispanic Affairs. Shown here, Charito Calvachi-Mateyko (front row center) and Cindy Mitchell, language instructor (far left), stand with Delaware Tech students (from left) Valeriano Canastuj, Almothanna Alkhail, Brenda Vargas Mora, Carina Braemer, Marcela Morillo and Samauntha Benjamin. The five recipients of the initial Sportsmanship Essay Award are, from left: Matt Taylor, Junior Cross Country and Swimming athlete; Christian Daniels, Cross Country athlete; Deanna Sigai, Cross Country and Track athlete; La’Shyra Williams, Cross Country and Basketball athlete; and Ethan Lee, Soccer, Indoor Track and Swimming athlete.

Sportsmanship beyond the field Students are being asked in the Seaford District to internalize the tenets of sportsmanship beyond the playing field, course or track. In the first round of Sportsmanship Essay Contests, students were asked, “How have the terms ethics, integrity and sportsmanship played a major role in your life?” A second essay is due in December, asking, “As a Seaford High School athlete, fan or student, I display good sportsmanship by...?” As Athletic Director Artie Uhlich

elaborated, “This award is part of the Seaford initiative to be chosen for the DIAA Sportsmanship Award. There will be four essay contests pertaining to how sportsmanship has played a role in the student athlete’s life.” While many students participating come from an athletic background, all students are being asked to participate to encourage the tenets of sportsmanship and involvement in the community, in and out of the school. All entries are decided by the Seaford Sportsmanship Committee.

Sussex Academy: Rated ‘Superior’ Eight Years in a Row

The Sussex Academy of Arts & Sciences invites parents, guardians of current fifth grade students to learn more about our unique public school opportunity for middle school students in grades 6-8. As the only charter school in Sussex County, we provide a challenging; accelerated academic curriculum. In order to introduce interested parents and fifth grade students to our school, we are holding the following events: • PUBLIC INFORMATION meetings at the school on November 16 and 17, 2010 at 6 p.m. • SCHOOL TOURS on November 15, 16, 17, & 18, 2010 at 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, or 10:30 a.m. No appointment necessary. The APPLICATION PERIOD for incoming sixth grade students for the 2012 school year begins November 19, 2010 and ends January 7, 2011. Applications are available online at www.sussexacademy.org For more information, please visit our website.

Sussex Academy of Arts & Sciences

21777 Sussex Pines Road • Georgetown, DE 19947 • 302.856.3636


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 29

Dramatist leads students in a production at DCHS The young mother on the stage raised her voice in prayer as she held her infant son tightly in her arms. She pleaded with God to send people into his life that would influence him. “Let the voice he listens to be your voice spoken from people he can trust,” said Christian dramatist and musician Karen Knight in a performance that resonated with guests attending the Ninth Annual Setting the Standard Banquet at Delmarva Christian High School. In the past, the school has attracted well-known Banquet speakers including pediatric neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson, major league pitcher and cancer survivor Dave Dravecky and political commentator Cal Thomas. Last year, in lieu of a speaker, attendees were treated to an eclectic vocal and instrumental performance by The Annie Moses Band. This year’s Banquet deviated even further by introducing DCHS student performers in an hour-long theatrical production, “Royal Faces,” written and directed by Knight, and in cooperation with DCHS Performing Arts teacher Jonathan Douglas. With 300 people in attendance, Royal Faces told the story of what DCHS means

to students, parents, grandparents and the local community. Knight led the students in a tribute that honored those who have helped them lay the stepping stones needed in building a firm foundation. Throughout the performance the students shared how DCHS works alongside families in devel-

Improve your driving skills, get fit or discover a new hobby in special interest courses offered in November at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Learn simple defensive driving strategies and earn a 10 percent reduction on the liability portion of your automobile insurance for three years by completing the basic defensive driving course on Monday, Nov. 1 and Wednesday, Nov. 3 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Three years after completing the basic class, graduates can participate in Advanced Defensive Driving on Monday, Nov. 8 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. or Saturday, Nov. 20 from 9.a.m. to noon to receive additional strategies for road safety and earn a 15 percent reduction on their insurance for another three-year period. Discover how to capture the perfect picture in a photography class on Wednesdays, Nov. 3 to 24, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Participants will learn the importance of exposure and composition. Divorcing parents can satisfy Delaware’s legal requirements for parent education and learn what children experience when parents divorce by participating in the Divorcing Parent Education Program on Saturday, Nov. 6 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or Tuesday, Nov. 16 and Thursday, Nov. 18 from 6 to 9 p.m. Make a quilt in Creative Interiors: Fast Quilt on Saturdays, Nov. 6 to Dec. 4, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Create new holiday décor in Creative Interiors: Holiday Placemats/Table Runner on Wednesdays, Nov. 10 and 17, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Discover how to prepare delicious meals in only 30 minutes in 30-Minute Gourmet Meals on Monday, Nov. 15 from 6 to 9 p.m. Students will prepare meals in class and receive recipes to take home. Women can learn helpful basics that will keep them safe on the road in What

Every Driver Should Know for Women on Friday, Nov. 19 from 7 to 9 p.m. Participants will learn how to check auto fluid levels, change a flat tire and the correct way to attach and use jumper cables. Fitness and wellness classes can help to improve health and lower stress levels. Discover basic and fun belly dancing moves while getting an aerobic workout in Belly Dance Aerobics on Thursdays, Nov. 11 to Jan. 20, from 6 to 7 p.m. Learn about the culture of the Middle East through dance technique and music in Belly Dance Choreography on Thursdays, Nov. 11 to Jan. 20, from 7 to 8 p.m. Have fun while exercising with Zumba, an hour-long, calorie-burning workout which fuses hypnotic Latin rhythms and easy-to-follow moves on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nov. 23 to Dec. 14, from 5 to 6 p.m. Horseback riding is offered for beginners at Singletree Stables in Seaford on Saturdays, Nov. 27 to Dec. 18, for ages 8 to 14 and on Wednesdays, Nov. 24 to Dec. 15, for ages 15 and up. Participants will learn the basics of safety, stable management and equestrian skills. Limited spaces are open in interactive Day of Discovery youth camps on Saturdays. Future architects or designers, ages 13 to 16, will use design concepts to translate their ideas into three-dimensional designs in Design with Sketch Up on Saturday, Nov. 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pet lovers, ages 6 to 10, will enjoy the chance to learn about the needs of different types of pets from an expert at Burns Tropical Fish & Pet Shop in Georgetown on Saturday, Nov. 20 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants will receive tips on grooming, feeding and becoming a responsible pet caretaker. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 854-6966.

The DCHS Royal players and Mrs. Karen Knight close the performance of Royal Faces by singing an adaptation of the song, We’re All In This Together. 

Del Tech special interest courses

oping essential Christian characteristics. The Banquet serves as the school’s most important fundraiser. Money raised will be used for student scholarships. School principal Scott Kemerling said he was grateful for the community support and for God’s faithfulness and providence. The school continues to grow and expand its facility to allow more youth in Sussex County to benefit from a Christ-based education. Currently, DCHS has 185 students. As the production came to an end, Knight represented an aged mother who took pride in having raised an honorable man. During a visit back to the school, she

reflected on how her son discovered himself at DCHS. “He found You along the way…he saw You in a hundred different ways…in classrooms surrounded by teachers who weren’t afraid to teach the hard lessons and cared enough to show that they cared…in community service projects that he grumbled about at first until he learned how fulfilling it is to serve,” she said. “It was them… but it was You.” Knight is a Pennsylvania-based concert artist, dramatist, and speaker. She is best known for her performances at Sight and Sound’s Millennium Theater.

Sussex Technical High School 17099 County Seat Hwy., Georgetown, DE (located on Rt. 9, just 5 miles west of the Rt. 113 intersection)

A National Blue Ribbon School and A Delaware Superior Rated School

Quality ‘Techademic’ Education All 8th-grade students residing in Sussex County and their parent(s)/guardian(s) are invited to attend Sussex Tech's

Eighth Grade Open House Saturday, November 6, 2010, at 9:00 a.m. Open House registration begins at 8:30 a.m.

Tour the facilities, meet the teachers, and find out why Sussex Tech has been the recipient of numerous National and State education awards. Students will receive information to plan their educational future. The Open House will include information on Sussex Tech’s: • Technical Areas • Academic Classes • Integrated Curriculum • Athletics • Academic Skills • Extracurricular Activities • Techademic Coaching • Admissions Process For more information, call Steve Persolio at 302 854 2820 or e-mail at spersolio@sussexvt.k12.de.us


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Veterans Day 2010

‘Vanishing Voices’ premieres on Veteran’s Day

Local author James Diehl and Watermark Productions have announced the first three showings of “Vanishing Voices of World War II; Southern Delaware’s Humble Heroes,” an hour-long documentary featuring many of Sussex County’s brave World War II veterans. At 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11 (Veteran’s Day), the premiere showing of the film is being sponsored by the faculty and staff of Delaware Technical & Community College, located on Route 404 just west of Georgetown. Admission is absolutely free and a public reception will follow the showing of the film. “[Watermark Productions owner] Bill Sammons and I are both former students at Delaware Tech and we know the college always does something extraordinary for our veterans on their special day,” says Diehl. “We felt this was a perfect place to show the film for the very first time, and we can’t wait to do so.” Subsequent showings during “premiere week” will be held at Laurel Wesleyan Church on Saturday, Nov. 13, and at the Clayton Theater in Dagsboro on Monday, Nov. 15. Both showings are free of charge and scheduled for 7:30 p.m. “Vanishing Voices of World War II; Southern Delaware’s Humble Heroes” features two dozen of the

100 veterans included in Diehl’s two books, “World War II Heroes of Southern Delaware,” released last year, and “World War II Heroes of Coastal Delaware,” scheduled for a May, 2011, release. It is narrated by Tom Carper, Delaware’s senior United States senator, and is released through a partnership between Diehl and Milford-based Watermark Productions. “This film has been a long time coming, and I’m very excited about the way it has all come together,” says Diehl, a near lifelong resident of Sussex County. “To not only hear, but to see, the very real emotions on the faces of these men as they recount their stories from so long ago is very special. I hope the public will join me in recognizing our past heroes by way of this important documentary.” Told from the perspective of men, and one woman, who served our country during World War II and today call Sussex County home, “Vanishing Voices” will allow our veterans’ stories to be preserved forever. From Pearl Harbor, to Iwo Jima, D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge, among many other parts of the war, they are told with passion and an enormous amount of pride in the United States of America. A two-and-a-half minute video

trailer of the documentary can be viewed by visiting Diehl’s website, www.ww2-heroes.com. The site also features brief bios of the first 50 World War II veterans, several of whom have already passed on, as well as much more information about southern Delaware’s humble heroes of World War II. “A lot of time and effort has gone into the making of this film, but we wanted very much to keep it free for

the public,” says Diehl. “This documentary is a tribute to our humble heroes from World War II. Please join me in paying tribute to these brave souls by watching the film and saying ‘thank you,’ in your own way, for their service more than six decades ago.” To learn more about Diehl’s ongoing project honoring Sussex County’s World War II veterans, visit www. ww2-heroes.com.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

at the Post Home - Rt. 24, Laurel at 11 a.m. Guest Speaker: Del. State Senator, Robert Venables Vocalist: Mary Ann Young Special Guests: Boy Scouts of America Troop 90

Lite Fare and Refreshments will follow... ALL ARE INVITED

We Will Remember Our Veterans


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

‘Vanishing Voices’

The following area veterans are included on the website, ww2-heroes.com. William Fleischauer (Greenwood) - European Theater of Operations; United States Army Air Corps – 1941-1945 Just “wanted to fly” Traveled to Europe aboard the Queen Mary 438th Squadron of the 319th Bomb Group Tail gunner on a B-26 Shot down on his 11th mission POW in Italy William Flynn (Bridgeville - deceased) Pacific Theater of Operations; United States Army – 1943-1945; 1948-1968 Advance Scout for the 43rd Infantry Nicknamed “The Killer” by men in his unit Two Bronze Stars; One Silver Star Killed 15 Japanese soldiers, most at close range Vivid memories of Cabanatuan Sam Harris (Seaford) - European Theater of Operations; United States Army – 19431946 Survived the Battle of the Bulge Member of the 69th Infantry Division First American regiment to meet the advancing Russian army on German soil Worked with explosives Awarded the bronze star Helped clear the famed Siegfried Line John D. Hill (Seaford) - European Theater of Operations; United States Army – 1943-1945

Sergeant in the 3140th Quartermaster Service Co. Black soldier in a white man’s world Supplied the 101st Airborne during the Battle of the Bulge “I just thanked God that I survived” On his way to Japan when the bombs were dropped Ken Madden (Seaford)- European Theater of Operations; United States Army – 1941-1946 105th Anti-Aircraft Battalion Served as a battery clerk Participated in several landings, including Oran and Sicily Fought at Kasserine Pass Narrowly escaped being captured by Germans in an ambush; felt “nothing could hurt” him after that day Retired from the National Guard in 1969 as a brigadier general Charles Peck (Seaford) - European Theater of Operations; United States Army – 1941-1945 Enlisted the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor 42nd Division of the 3rd Army Assigned to an A-6 machine gun Patrol ambushed by Germans Captured by Germans and later escaped Met men from the Dachau Concentration Camp Lee Riggin (Laurel) - European Theater of Operations; United States Army – 19431945 Drafted in 1943 Survived the Battle of the Bulge 7th Regiment of the 3rd Infantry Survived an attack by a German jet Occupied Munich

OPEN HOUSE

After Ceremony Noon - 2 p.m.

Veterans Day

Virgil Wilson VFW Post #4961 & Auxiliaries

Middleford Road, Seaford, DE PO Box 496 • 302-629-3092

Nearly killed by a land mine Member of the first unit to arrive in Berchtesgaden Vaughn Russell (Seaford) - Pacific Theater of Operations; United States Marine Corps – 1942-1945 Survived the battle for Iwo Jima One of only 17 survivors of his unit, which numbered more than 300 at the onset of the battle Terrible survivor’s guilt for decades after the war Lost many friends and colleagues on the island Received three presidential citations Suffered permanent hearing loss later in life as a result of combat John Shenk (Laurel) - Pacific Theater of Operations; United States Navy – 19431945 Enlisted at age 17 Assigned to the U.S.S. Dickerson Maintained evaporators on board the ship Stole ice cream packets belonging to the officers to make milkshakes Transported underwater demolition teams in support of the attacks on Saipan and Guam Survived kamikaze attack on April 2, 1945; 54 crewmates killed Richard Stone (Laurel) - Pacific Theater of Operations; United States Navy – 19431945 Received draft notice in 1943 Served aboard the U.S.S. New Jersey as a radio man Took down codes coming in from Honolulu Survived multiple attacks Protected American minesweepers during

PAGE 31 the bombardment of Saipan and Tinian “Beat up pretty bad” by kamikazes Crew expected treaty to be signed aboard their ship, not the U.S.S. Missouri Jane Watson (Seaford) - Homefront; United States Army – 1943-1945 Member of the dietician corps Changed her college major so she could enlist Commissioned as a second lieutenant in April, 1944 Stationed at Fort Belvoir, Va., and Stationed at Fort Belvoir, Va., and Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Worked one-on-one with wounded soldiers Celebrated in Washington, D.C. the day the war ended James Whaley (Concord) - Pacific Theater of Operations; United States Navy – 1943-1963 Served on the U.S.S. Leonard Wood during the war Participated in eight invasions Was a cook aboard ship Served as a stretcher bearer while on land Stranded on Makin Island after the U.S.S. Liscome Bay was destroyed Saw MacArthur while on Makin Island Joseph Wheatley (Bridgeville) - European Theater of Operations; United States Army Air Corps – 1943-1945 Served on a B-17 during the war Flew 27 missions against Germany Shot down on Aug. 24, 1944 Spent several months as a POW before being liberated by the Soviets in April 1945 Endured the 86-day “Black March” Veteran of the 457th Bomb Group Earned three oak leaf clusters

Pride. Dedication Honor. These are the ideals displayed by the fine men and women of our armed forces through the generations. On November 11th let us honor those who fought by reflecting on the values, rights and dreams which they served to protect. It is with great appreciation that we salute them.

DELMAR MEMORIAL POST #8276 VFW 200 W. State St., Delmar, MD

Veterans Day Service & Dinner Nov. 13th 6 pm


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Veteran’s Day at Seaford Kiwanis Park The Seaford Veteran’s Day Ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, at the Veterans’ Memorial in Kiwanis Park located at Stein Highway and Atlanta Road. The event is sponsored by the Seaford Veterans Committee. U.S. Army Major Wendy SammonsJackson, a veteran of Iraq and a past resident of Seaford, is the scheduled guest speaker. A salute and recognition will be paid to all military personnel past and present, as well as any Gold Star Mothers in attendance.

After the ceremony, there will be a short dedication of “memorial bricks” that have been placed along the walkway at the monument site honoring those who have served their country. In case of inclement weather, the Veteran’s Day Ceremony will be held in the auditorium of Seaford High School at 11 a.m. On behalf of the Seaford Veterans Committee, consisting of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4961, American Legion Posts 6 and 37, AMVETS Post 1694,

Marine Corps League Detachment 780 and Disabled American Veterans Chapter 9, co-chairmen Joe Tune and Pete Bohn extend an invitation to the public to attend as the community honors the service and sacrifice of all veterans who have or are serving our country. After the ceremony, American Legion Post 6 (Log Cabin) on Front Street, Seaford and VFW Post 4961 on Middleford Road, Seaford, will hold open houses, with lunch being served, that are free and open to the public.

American Legion celebrates Veterans by Jim Allen As Veterans Day approaches, the Laurel American Legion invites all Laurel area residents to attend the Veterans Day Celebration at the Post Home on Thursday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. Post 19 was organized in November 1945, so this is their 65th anniversary. The Veterans Day service is the American Legion’s way of thanking everyone for their fabulous support over these many years. I have done a little math and it ap-

pears that Post 19 has contributed nearly a million dollars to the community over these past 65 years. And speaking for all the veterans, I can truthfully say that we are very proud of our accomplishments. This year we are planning another gala celebration. Our guest speaker will be our State Sen. Robert Venables. I am sure that he will have some very interesting remarks. This year is the 100th birthday of the Boys Scouts of America and we have invited Boy Scout Troop 90 to take part in

the service . This is a great organization and we are honored to have them with us. After all, they are our future generation. Post 19 wishes the Boy Scouts of America a very happy 100th birthday. Congratulations! As in past years, the highlight of our Veterans Day Service will be the beautiful singing by Mary Ann Young. She is an inspiration to all and we are so fortunate to have her entertain us. So again, I urge everyone to come out and celebrate Veterans Day with us.

Civilian Veterans

Following is a listing of the number of civilian veterans living in each town in western Sussex County, according to the latest Census information. Also listed is the percentage of overall population. The national average is 12.70%. Civilian Veterans in Greenwood 90, or 15.7 percent of the total population Civilian Veterans in Bridgeville 145, or 14 percent of the total population. Civilian Veterans in Seaford 671, or 13.9 percent of the total population. Civilian Veterans in Laurel 298, or 12 percent of the total population. Civilian Veterans in Bethel 26, or 17.4 percent of the total population. Civilian Veterans in Delmar 156, or 15.1 percent of the total population.

A Salute

to Those

Who Have

Served.

We recognize the many sacrifices made by our men and women in uniform both today and throughout our nation’s history. We honor their courage and dedication, and we thank them for their contribution to our country.

Thank You, Veterans. Mike Vincent

Sussex County Council

Veterans Day, November11, is a time to remember all those men and women who have served our country with honor and bravery.

If not for their courage, we might never know the freedoms we enjoy today. Please join us in offering a sincere message of thanks to our dedicated veterans today.

Danny Short Delaware State Representative, 39th District


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

VETERANS DAY

REMEMBER WITH LOVE

The men and women who served our country deserve our respect. Honor and remember their sacrifice for us and our freedoms.

NOVEMBER 11, 2010 Disabled American Veterans, Chapter #9 Disabled American Veterans, Auxiliary Unit #9

PAGE 33

Paid for by Friends for Lee.

Biff Lee

40th State Representative

We honor those who fought for us, and those who are serving now at home and abroad.

OPEN HOUSE AFTER CEREMONY

AMERICAN LEGION AMERICAN LEGION SONS OF THE POST 6 AUXILIARY UNIT 6 AMERICAN LEGION

Front St., Seaford, DE • 302-629-9915

Their Bravery Will Not Be Forgotten

The American Legion and

Morning Star Publications, Inc. join in saluting our military veterans of all wars this November 11 - and every day. Thank you for serving America with honor, courage and commitment.

Veterans Day 2010 The American Legion - Serving America’s Veterans Every Day

www.Legion.org


PAGE 34

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Annual conservation poster contest

The Sussex, Kent and New Castle Conservation Districts are sponsoring a conservation poster contest. This year’s theme is “Conservation Habits = Healthy Habitats.” Posters will be judged in the following grade categories: K-1, 2-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. First, second and third place winners in each category will receive a prize valued at $50, $25 and $15 respectively. Deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 8.  This year’s theme reminds people that conservation of our natural resources is important in every community. Plenty of conservation habits can help conserve water, provide shelter for animals, birds and insects as well as increase their food supply. Each of the Conservation Districts will submit their first place posters in each category for judging at the state level. State level winners will then be submitted to the national contest. Last year, the winning Delaware poster for the 10-12 category, created by Noah Link of Kent County, went on to win first place in the 10-12 category in the national contest.  Posters must include the name of the student, teacher and school along with the grade level, and must be hand delivered or mailed flat in time to meet the deadline to the conservation district in the county in which you reside. The Sussex Conservation District is located at 21315 Berlin Road, Unit 4, Georgetown, DE 19947.  For more information, contact Michelle Jacobs at 302-739-9135 or email Michelle. Jacobs@state.de.us.

CROP Walk accepting donations

On Sunday, Oct. 3, the 16th Western Sussex CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Walk was held in Seaford. Even though the rains came, the spirit of the walkers was not dampened. Funds raised will be used to battle hunger around the globe and right here in Seaford. Over $1,500 has been raised so far for the Western Sussex CROP Walk. Because the weather did not cooperate and kept some walkers at home, we are extending the donation period through the end of October. Twenty five percent of the donations from this year’s walk will be returned to The Seaford Food Closet. To donate to this year’s walk, contact Eleanor Terrell at 628-1515 or John Blevins at 841-7450. You may also donate online at www.cropwalk.org and designate your donation to the Western Sussex CROP Walk.

FIREFIGHTERS HONORED - At the meeting of the Sussex County Firefighters Association held in Rehoboth Beach on Oct. 22, firefighters and EMS personnel were honored for their role in saving the life of a fellow firefighter. At the Rehoboth Beach July 4th fireworks show a Seaford firefighter went down in cardiac arrest. The group all played a role in his survival. From left are SCEMS Holly Mitchell Donovan, Chris Boyer, Jordon Dattoli, Wayne Jester; Rehoboth Beach Vol. Fire Co. - Don Mitchell Jr., Chuck Snyder, Joe West, Rob Shinn, Kristen Quigley; Seaford Vol. Fire Dept. - Chief Mark O’Bier, J.C. Willin, Carter Moore, Kyle Mitchell and John Kimbler; and Delaware State Police - Matt Warrington.

‘Waging War on Hunger’ food drive this Saturday On Saturday, Nov. 6, Mountaire Farms, HALO (Hope & Life Outreach Ministries) and select American Legion Posts, will be “Waging War on Hunger,” by holding one of the largest one-day food drives in Delmarva’s history. The drive will serve as the kickoff to the 2010 Mountaire Thanksgiving for Thousands program, with all food and monetary donations going to help fill over 6,500 meal boxes to serve the more than 45,000 local residents in need this Thanksgiving. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., hundreds of volunteers from HALO and the American Legion Post(s) will be manning the entrances of grocery stores across the Peninsula, handing out donation lists and collecting goods as they come in. Among the items needed are 16 oz. cans of corn, peas, string beans, pork & beans, yams, cranberry sauce & gravy, plus boxes of stuffing mix, bread crumbs, cake or brownie mix and boxed icing. Monetary donations will also be accepted, which will be used to purchase more staple food items for the program. Participating stores will have all staple food items readily available for a quick and easy purchase, and carts will be placed in front of each store for customers to drop off food bags as they exit.  Local participants are the American Legion Post 6 and Walmart, both of Seaford.

The clocks are changing and so are we. We will be closed Nov. 7 & 8 and Reopen Nov. 9 with NeW houRs

Tues. Thru saT. 9-5 Closed sun. & Mon.

875-0500

Fresh Deli Sandwiches

302

SPECIALS GOOD THRU NOV. 16

Dietz & WatSon ColDCutS

Dietz & Watson Ham ....................... $6.50 lb. Dietz & Watson White American Cheese ................. $4.50 lb.

30661 Sussex Hwy. (Rt. 13), Laurel, De 19956

by the lb. or as a Sub

CALL AHEAD FOR GET-TOGETHER PLATTERS

In its 16th season, the Mountaire Thanksgiving for Thousands program will provide balanced meals to less fortunate households across Delmarva.  In 2009 the non-profit effort helped feed more than 40,000 people. Each Thanksgiving meal box will contain a Mountaire roaster, (2) 16 oz. cans of corn, string beans, peas, pork & beans, yams, gravy and cranberries; plus a box of cake mix, icing, stuffing mix, bread

crumbs and a loaf of bread.  The 2010 Mountaire Thanksgiving for Thousands Packing Day will be held Monday, Nov. 22, at three locations: in Selbyville, at the Mountaire Warehouse; in Oak Orchard, at the American Legion Post 28 facility; and in Salisbury, at the HALO facility on Snow Hill Road. To contribute food, volunteer to help pack or make a contribution, contact Roger Marino at 9343123 or rmarino@mountaire.com.  


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 35

Mary Ann Nichols recently published the first edition of her memoirs which covers her life growing up in Dover and Wilmington until the age of 18.

Stand-up comic writes about her childhood in Delaware By Ronald MacArthur

Mary Anne Nichols of Seaford has worn many hats during her lifetime, but she never thought she would end up an author. The 75-year-old who has moved 21 times recently self-published the first edition of her memoirs, “A Nichols Worth . . . . Growing up in Delaware.” The first book covers her life growing up in Dover and Wilmington until the age of 18. “The book was written primarily for my kids because they really never knew their family because we were moving around so much,” she said. “But I’m having a great time with it, and now I want to write everything down, and I only see things funny.” That’s true, for Mary Anne, the lady with blue hair, was a stand-up comic for 20 years. “I was always the class clown and have a big mouth,” she said. She discovered she could deliver one-liners better than performing comedians, so she decided to give stand-up a shot. It became her vocation for two decades when most people were making retirement plans. Today, the mother of four and grandmother of three has a passion for politics and still reads Rolling Stone and Mother Earth News. Mary Anne said she grew up during a special time after World War II in the late 1940s and early 1950s. It may have been an age of innocence, but she was not always that innocent. Her father, Daniel Sullivan, who served in both World War II and Korea, was among the second class of Delaware State Police troopers in 1924. In those days, they couldn’t afford cars so troopers patrolled on motorcycles. He missed six years of her childhood serving in Europe and then in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He also served another two years following the war on an assignment that was even a secret to the family. Mary Anne said the family thought he was hunting down Nazis in South America. Her mother, Mary Hazel, was a special lady who loved fashion and had some atypical views on the world. Her mother rebelled against Santa Claus, for example, and surmised that every child past the age of 3 had already figured out there was no way he could make all those stops in one night. So at the age of 3, Mary Anne was informed about one of the

greatest mysteries of childhood. She has many memories attending Ursuline Academy in Wilmington as an elementary school student where she was one a of handful of boarding students who lived at the school. She returned home to attend high school in Dover. One of the stories in her book deals with her short-lived exploits as a basketball player for Dover High School, where she graduated in 1953. “All the girls on the team smoked like smokestacks. We thought it looked sexy because the big Hollywood movie stars smoked on screen,” she said. She said they even smoked in the locker room because they knew they intimidated the gym teacher. But when they lit up before an away game at Seaford High School, the bottom fell out. All the girls were kicked off the team, and the girls’ basketball season ended abruptly. She said while most girls were severely punished by their parents, she had an understanding with her mother. “She told me not to tell my father because he didn’t know that she smoked, too,” she said. When she was old enough to drive, she figured out a way to disconnect the odometer wire so she could control the mileage being recorded on her parent’s car. “My mother always checked the mileage,” Mary Anne said. Mary Anne has a love for the printed word. Her first experience with journalism dates back to her school days when she landed a position writing a column under the pen name Teenie in The Dover Index. In her adult life, she would end up a newspaper reporter and editor. A military wife who lived all over the world, she moved from upstate New York back to Delaware in 2004. “I got tired of the cold and having wet feet all the time. I had enough of the snow,” she said. The book contains vintage photographs of Delaware dating back to the 1930s, including a rare photograph taken by her mother of a public whipping in Dover. “I thought it was against the law to photograph the whipping post in use, but mother only abided by the laws she liked,” Mary Anne said. The book is available at local bookshops and at Lower-Slower Inc. on Main Street in Millsboro, Delaware Made and Forney’s Too on Loockerman Street in Dover, and Modern Maturity on Forrest Avenue in Dover.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 40


i.g. Burton Seaford -- Your Used Car Super Store!

102 FAMILY-FRIENDLY YEARS SERVING DELMARVA

SEAFORD SEAFORD 102 FAMILY-FRIENDLY YEARS SERVING DELMARVA We Have What No One Else Has: Your Next Chevrolet! SEAFORD

102 FAMILY-FRIENDLY YEARS SERVING DELMARVA

2010 Chevrolet Avalanche LT 4 WD

NEW

NOW

$29,328

34,305

2 SS Was $39,480.

Was $46,419.

38,151

$

Stk #10-2005

2010 Chev. Express Cargo Vans 2500

NEW

2 Left

Was $28,275.

2010 Chevrolet Impala LT

1 LEFT

NOW

$23,901

NOW $24,721

Was $29,860.

Was $29,875.

NOW

$26,142

NOW

1 LT Was $30,495.

NEW

1 SS Was $35,330. $

$38,776

2010 Chevrolet Malibu 2LT

2010 Chev. Camaro’s

Stk #10-2296

HURRY! IT WON’T LAST LONG! 6 Cyl.

1 LEFT

2010 Chevrolet Silverado’s

ONLY 4 LEFT!

2 EXT CAB 4WD Z71 $ 1 CREW CAB Was 2WD HYBRID $29,935. Starting At 1 CREW CAB Stk #10-2304 $ PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAYA PURPOSES ONLY. NOT BEAUTY! RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE4WD SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL REAL

25,162

302-629-5514 • www.igburton.com

31,818

ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES AND TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.

302-629-5514 302-629-5514 •www.igburton.com www.igburton.com

PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE PICTURES CREDIT ARE FORTHRU DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE TYPOGRAPHICAL DUE TO PUBLICATION SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD ANDAPPLY NOT AVAILABLE. ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCKFOR MODELS ONLY. PRIORERRORS. DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES ANDDATE TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL TO PUBLICATION DATE DEALERS SOME VEHICLES MAY BELENDER. SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON ERRORS. TIER ONEDUE APPROVED CREDIT THRU PREFERRED IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES ANMODELS TAGS EXTRA. RESTRICTIONS SEE TAGS DEALER FORCERTAIN DETAILS.RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK ONLY. CERTAIN PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. APPLY TAXES-AND EXTRA.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 37

Woodbridge field hockey secures winning season with win over CR By Mike McClure

It hasn’t been easy, but the Woodbridge field hockey team finished the regular season with a winning record despite injuries and a small number of substitutes. The Raiders reached the .500 mark with a 3-2 home win over Caesar Rodney on senior day last Thursday in Bridgeville. “They’ve worked hard. We’ve played games with 11 players and no subs. Girls who never played before played whole games,” said Woodbridge head coach Connie Bean. Senior Kelsey Johnson scored with 22:10 left in the first half to give Woodbridge a 1-0 lead. After taking getting seven corners, Caesar Rodney was finally able to score as Carlyn Talerico scored off a feed from Taylor Prillamon to knot the

scored with 1:14 left until half-time. At half-time, the Raiders honored seniors Rachel Doyon, Johnson, Leslie DeRoche, Megan Sirkis, Emily Passwaters, and Brittany Joseph. Then the team went back to work, in search of its first win over Caesar Rodney in recent history. “They’re a good group. They’ve stayed with me for four years. They’ve taken the criticism, they’re tough,” Bean said after the game. Woodbridge goalie Caitlin Blades turned back a shot by the Riders early in the second half. DeRoche put the Blue Raiders on top with a goal on a penalty stroke with 10:07 remaining in the game. The stroke was DeRoche’s second attempt in her varsity career (the first came the Continued on page 41

Seaford’s Udiel Perez-Mendez attempts to put a foot on the ball first against Indian River defense in last week’s final game of the varsity boys’ soccer regular season. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Seaford soccer team gives Indian River a battle in 4-1 home loss

By Lynn Schofer

The fact that Seaford varsity boys’ soccer team graduated 16 seniors in 2009 created an uphill battle for coach Tim Lee and his young team this 2010 season. “In the beginning of the year I said if we have a 500 season, I will be very happy,” said Lee. Coach Lee got his wish and more when the Blue Jays finished 9-6 and may earn a berth in the state tournament. “I am proud of the way they played; the final score is not a justification of how they stayed in the game tonight,” Lee said after Thursday night’s 4-1 loss to Indian River.

In the first half both teams battled for possession of the ball. Quick touches and anticipation of passes proved to be a key component. After an Indian River foul, Ethan Lee’s free kick was perfection except for the fact it skimmed the right goal post and deflected the wrong way; out of bounds. Less than five minutes later Christian Gosnell saved a goal when his height helped to tip the ball over the top of the goal. Each team held the other by limiting shots on goal and minimizing mistakes but at the 14th minute of play Indian River scored to take the 1-0 lead. Continued on page 39

Woodbridge senior Rachel Doyon, left, looks to take a shot as a Caesar Rodney defender moves in on her during last Thursday’s game in Bridgeville. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford Star varsity sports schedules (11/4-10) SEAFORD SENIORS- Last Friday was Senior Day for the Lady Jays hockey team. Seniors playing their last home game are pictured left to right: Elizabeth Ewing (10), Sydnee Pollock (14), Kate Wesselhoff (29), Ania Sypek (8), Molly Cain, goalkeeper, Whitney Wright (24), Amanda Hastings (15), and Beatriz Gomez (10); standing- head coach Alison Venables and assistant coach Bailey Noel. Photo by Gene Bleile

Friday, Nov. 5- Football- Seaford at Indian River. 7:30 p.m., Woodbridge at Polytech, 7:30 p.m., Sussex Tech home vs. Lake Forest, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6- Cross country- Henlopen Conference meet at Killens Pond, 2 p.m.


PAGE 38

  MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Laurel’s Desirae Williams pulls back her stick to hit the ball hard enough to pass Seaford’s defenders and get into scoring distance. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Laurel field hockey team hosts Seaford in final home game By Lynn Schofer

The Laurel varsity field hockey held its final home game of the season on Saturday taking on the Seaford Blue Jays. Seniors Tori Edwards, Gabby Gomez, Desirae Williams, Jevanna Mitchells, and Eileen Thompson were honored on Senior Day. Seaford outplayed and outscored the Bulldogs, 4-1, but Laurel coach Donna Ward said her team learned a lot this season. “Four of the six seniors played field hockey for the first time in their lives this year. Today was not a good day for the girls, they weren’t focused and Seaford totally outplayed us,” said Ward. “The team plans to continue to play together in the off season on a indoor team and I think they will find out how much it will improve their game for next year.” Seaford took the lead on a corner when Bailey Hoch used a reverse stick pass to Maria DeMott for the score at the 4:11 mark. Seaford put a lot of pressure on Laurel who were slow on their feet and were penalized numerous times. Seaford Coach Alison Venables said after the game, “We worked hard the past two weeks on shots and improving hitting

the target.” Seaford would finish with 24 shots on goal. In the second half Seaford had two big scoring opportunities within five minutes; one attempt began when DeMott crossed the ball through the middle of the circle and Julia Tobin deflected it just wide of the goal. At the 8:36 minute Alexis Hawkins put the Blue Jays up 2-0 when Amanda Scudder deflected a sweep shot to Alyssa Hoch who then re centered it to Hawkins for the score. The Blue Jays scored again at 9:31 minute of play on a corner shot when Tyanna Clark slipped in behind the goalie and redirected a pass from Whitney Wright into the goal. Laurel came back and returned the favor scoring a goal on a corner when the ball was put in the net. Seaford would respond at the 22nd minute when a centering pass to Alysza Phares shot put the Blue Jays up 4-1. Coach Venables described a bittersweet season, “The team is really skilled and we can control the ball, I just wish the record would reflect their talent.” “The last two weeks this team played so hard and we coaches witnessed their hearts; I am proud of them,” Venables added.

NEW OFFICERS- Shown (l to r) are the new officers for the Heritage Shores Nine-Hole Golf Association: Dave Levy, vice president; Fred Indoe, president; Alan Greene, vice president. Photo by E.W. Faircloth

Henlopen Conference varsity football scoring leaders (week eight) 1. Quadir Bryant, Lake Forest- 28 touchdowns, one two-point- 170 2. Desmond Sivels, Sussex Tech- 22 touchdowns and one two-point- 134 3. Pierre Foreman, Dover- 17 touchdowns- 102 4. Dante Shells, Caesar Rodney- 12 touchdowns- 72 5. Frank Braham, Delmar- 11 touchdowns- 66 6. Dermaih Gibbs, Caesar Rodney- nine touchdowns, two two-point- 58 7. Samuel Mohr, Cape Henlopen- nine touchdowns- 54 8. Freddie Sample, Woodbridge- eight touchdowns, one two-point- 50 9. De’Vaughn Trader, Delmar- eight touchdowns- 48 Carlton Nash, Smyrna- eight touchdowns- 48 Jerome Johnson, Cape Henlopen- eight touchdowns- 48 12. Chris Jones, Laurel- seven touchdowns- 42 13. Kevin Guthrie, Sussex Central- six touchdowns, two two-point, one extra point- 41

Join the Star sports nation. Over 290 people like the “Laurel Star sports” and “Seaford Star sports” Facebook pages.

POP WARNER PEE WEE- Laurel’s Bragg Davis (23) tackles a Woodbridge receiver during a recent Pop Warner Pee Wee football game. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech field hockey team blanks Polytech, 4-0 The Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team defeated Polytech, 4-0, last Thursday in Georgetown. Maxine Fluharty had two goals and two assists and Abby Atkins and Kelsey Doherty each added a goal for the Ravens. Megan Cannon also recorded four saves in goal for Sussex Tech, which out shot Polytech, 17-4. Sussex Tech field hockey defeats Charter School of WilmingtonThe Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team defeated Charter School of Wilmington, 5-0, last Saturday as Maxine Fluharty netted three goals. Abby Atkins added a goal and an assist, Kayla Krause netted a goal, and Logan Pavlik dished out an assist for the Ravens. Megan Cannon also recorded two saves in goal for Sussex Tech.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Seaford Stars of the Week

PAGE 39

Andre Rosario battles to get to the ball first inside Indian River’s circle during the second half of last week’s game. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Female Athlete of the WeekLeslie DeRoche- Woodbridge Woodbridge’s Leslie DeRoche scored two goals and had two assists in her team’s 10-0 win over Campus Community last Monday. DeRoche also scored a goal in the Raiders’ 3-2 win over Caesar Rodney on Thursday.

Male Athlete of the WeekDustin Venables- Seaford High Seaford’s Dustin Venables netted a pair of goals during his team’s 4-1 win over Delmar last Tuesday. Venables also scored a goal in Thursday’s loss to Indian River.

Honorable mention- Jacques Jules- Seaford; Daisuke Shigaki- Seaford; Christian Gosnell- Seaford; Ethan Lee- Seaford; Andre Rosario- Seaford; Esaie Derolus- Seaford; Kory Brown- Woodbridge; Brent Adams- Woodbridge; Tyler Troyer- Delmarva Christian; Robbie Robles- Sussex Tech; Nathan Jones- Sussex Tech; Josh Walstead- Sussex Tech; Alexis Hawkins- Seaford; Mari Phares- Seaford; Kelsey Johnson- Woodbridge; Taija Maddox- Woodbridge; Veronica Buzzulini- Woodbridge; Tynetta Washington- Seaford; Kelsey Doherty- Sussex Tech; Abby Atkins- Sussex Tech; Maxine Fluharty- Sussex Tech; Mallorie Parsons- Delmarva Christian; Izzy Wharton- Sussex Tech; Emily Ritter- Sussex Tech; Bethany Killmon- Sussex Tech

CONGRATULATES

THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

Seaford soccer continued In the second half and 52nd minute of play Indian River centered the ball in the circle and the offensive line put a head on the ball. Gosnell extended himself but it ricochet off the tips of his fingers and into the corner of net giving a 2-0 lead to IR. Although Indian River was in control of the scoreboard, the game’s pace and competition was intense and both teams put everything onto the field. Indian River added a goal at 56th minute and then took a 4-0 lead at the 67th minute on a corner kick that was redirected on a header to the right corner of the goal. Seaford’s Dustin Venables would put a Blue Jay score on the board at the 76th minute on a penalty kick after he was

taken down inside the circle. Seaford finished the night with five shots on goal to IR’s six. Gosnell made five saves for the Blue Jays. “Indian River is an exciting team to watch, they have great composure and have played together almost their whole lives,” said Lee, who hopes to qualify for another state tournament. “Right now we are on the bubble and will have to wait for a few games to play out, so some prayers may be in order.” “They have grown tremendously since the beginning of the year and are gaining invaluable experience, they played some very good teams and were able to keep pace,” Lee added. “They have matured both individually and as a team; I am very proud of them.”

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

Seaford cross country teams visit Indian River for dual meet The Seaford boys’ and girls’ cross country teams visited Indian River for a dual meet against the Indians and Smyrna last Wednesday. The girls fell to Indian River, 22-33, and lost to Smyrna, 16-33, while the boys defeated Smyrna, 32-33, and lost to Indian River, 23-32. In the girls’ meet, Seaford’s Tynetta Washington finished fifth overall with a time of 24:13, Alex Smith was 12th (27:52), and Verstel Ponder came in 13th (28:35). Jacques Jules paced the boys with a second place finish (19:36), Esaie Derolus placed fifth (21:11), Ryan Craft finished 14th (22:35), and Radames Givens was 15th (22:36).

Woodbridge boys’ cross country team hosts Polytech, Sussex Central The Woodbridge varsity boys’ cross country team hosted Polytech and Sussex Central in a dual meet last Wednesday. The Raiders fell to the Panthers, 15-50, and lost to Sussex Central, 16-43. Woodbridge’s Andrew Solomon led the way, placing 17th overall with a a time of 21:17. Jose Rodriguez came in 19th (19:37), Willie Davis was 21st (21:59), Aidid Watts placed 24th (22:10), and Tyler Mathis finished 32nd (26:56).

Woodbridge varsity football team falls to Lake Forest The Woodbridge varsity football team lost to Lake Forest, 58-30, last Friday night in Bridgeville. Trez’mon Kane returned a fumble seven yards for a touchdown, Freddie Sample ran the ball in from nine yards out, Christian Cole caught a 30-yard touchdown pass from C.J. Pleasants, Pleasants completed an eight-yard pass to George Knight, and Brent Adams booted three extra points and a field goal for the Raiders.

Brentdy Chavez collides with an Indian River player as he goes up to head the ball in last week’s varsity boys’ soccer game in Seaford. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Woodbridge boys’ soccer team nets 2-1 win over Delmar The Woodbridge varsity boys’ soccer team defeated Delmar, 2-1, last Thursday in Bridgeville as Kory Brown had a goal and an assist and Russell Valsquez scored a goal. Thomas Gray netted a goal for the Wildcats, who held a 15-8 advantage in shots and a 7-3 edge in corner kicks. Abraham Leon made 10 saves in goal for the Raiders while Delmar’s Joel Scurti had five saves.

Woodbridge girls’ volleyball team edged by Lake Forest The Woodbridge varsity girls’ volleyball team fell to Lake Forest, 3-2, last Thursday in Harrington. The Spartans won games one (25-17) and three (25-20) while the Raiders took games two (26-24) and four (25-22). Lake Forest won the match with a 15-4 victory in the final game. Veronica Buzzulini had six kills, 12 aces, and six digs; Danielle Briggs added two kills, two aces, and two digs; Jaime Gordon contributed four assists; Joie Polite made four digs; and Kirsten Blake added five digs for the Raiders.

seafordstar.com


PAGE 40

    MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Delmarva Christian girls volleyball team moves to 12-2

By Lynn Schofer The month of October had not been good to the Sussex Tech varsity football team as they entered Friday night’s match up with Caesar Rodney. The Ravens had lost two close games to Dover and Smyrna and looked for redemption but fell short losing to the Riders, 35-17. Early in the first quarter, the Ravens’ Nathan Jones knocked down a pass saving a possible touchdown. On the same CR possession the defensive lineman went vertical to tip away another pass. With 8:44 left in the first quarter and Caesar Rodney on the Raven two yard-line, the Riders scored with a push through the middle and into the end zone. The Ravens’ Beau Warrington received the first kick return and broke through the tackles of CR, taking the ball to the 45 yard line. Sussex Tech, unable to convert a first down, punted the ball away but the defense held the Riders and with five minutes remaining in the quarter, regained possession. Desmond Sivels outstretched his arms to receive a pass and Darrin Beckett finished the drive with a nine-yard run for a Raven touchdown. Tech would have one more possession in the quarter when Damon Ayers pulled down an interception and eventually James Smith put up a 35-yard field goal for a 10-7 lead. In the second quarter, Sussex Tech forced the Riders to make some mistakes, but were outscored 21-7. CR quarterback Seth McFall connected with his receiver for a first down on the 18 yard line. At 7:58 in the second quarter CR’s sweep play to Dermaih Gibbs, who then ran six yards into the end zone, gave Caesar Rodney the 14-10 edge. On the next Rider possession, Sussex Tech took advantage of a quarterback fumble on the hand off and recovered the ball on the 32 yard line. Sivels gave the lead back to the Ravens at 3:28 when he scored a touchdown. Caesar Rodney wasted no time retaking the lead when the Riders scored on a 77 yard pass for the 21-17 lead. Sussex Tech, needing to keep the game close, had to punt the ball with less than a minute to go to half time. McFall threw a strike from the 30 yard line putting his team at first and goal with nine seconds remaining in the half. Gibbs ran to the right side of the end zone and after a successful field goal the Riders took a 28-17 lead into the locker room. In the second half, Caesar Rodney plugged the hole in the middle and stopped the Ravens at the line of scrimmage to force a punt. The Riders lost a 61 yard run on a holding penalty but within a minute Gibbs scored his fourth touchdown of the game. Sussex Tech took possession and Sivels showed the Raven strength when on fourth down he lowered his shoulder and pushed through for the first down. The Ravens faced with another fourth down but Jesse Swanson’s pass to Shane Marvel fell short of the first down. Sussex Tech continued to struggle in the fourth quarter, turning the ball over at midfield on a fumble at 6:53. Later in the quarter the Ravens’ Darrin Beckett moved the chains for the Ravens for a first down at the 41 yard line. However, the chance for a comeback would be lost on a CR interception on the 24 yard line with 1:32 to go. The Riders maintained possession to run the clock out and win the game, 35-17. The Ravens go into the final two games of the season at 4-4 with both games to be played at home.

TIDE CHART 4x12.45 SHARPTOWNWEEK

1 11/4/10 11/05 H-4:43A L-10:51A H-5:15P L-11:43P 11/06 H-5:35A L-11:39A H-6:03P

11/07 11/08 11/09 11/10 11/11

L-12:33A L-12:22A L-1:11A L-2:00A L-2:50A

H-6:24A H-6:12A H-6:59A H-7:46A H-8:36A

L-11:27P L-12:14P L-1:02P L-1:51P L-2:43P

H-5:50P H-6:37P H-7:24P H-8:11P H-9:00P

See more tides at www.saltwatertides.com 100%

The Sussex Tech varsity girls’ cross country team (10-0, 2-0) swept last Wednesday’s home meet against Cape Henlopen and Milford to win the Henlopen Conference regular season title. The Ravens’ boys’ team split the meet, bearing Cape Henlopen and falling to Milford. In the girls’ meet, Izzy Wharton set the pace for Sussex Tech with a first place finish (19:36), Emily Ritter placed fourth overall (20:25), Bethany Killmon was fifth (20:29), and Briana Hall came in 10th (22:10) as the Ravens beat Cape Henlopen, 2431, and Milford, 25-30. The Sussex Tech boys’ team beat Cape Henlopen, 21-34, and lost to Milford, 1935. Robbie Robles came in fifth overall (19:04), Dylan Varrato was seventh (18:36), Sudesh Singh placed eighth (19:40, and Ricky Hernandez was ninth (18:43).

Sussex Tech boys’ soccer tops Caesar Rodney, 2-1 The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ soccer team topped Caesar Rodney, 2-1, last Thursday in Camden. Sam Spellman and Ryan Moore each had a first half goal and Josh Walstead dished out a pair of assists to lead the Ravens. James Smith made eight saves in goal for Sussex Tech, which out shot the Riders, 17-9.

Sussex Tech soccer blanks St. Thomas More, 1-0 The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ soccer team netted a 1-0 win over St. Thomas More last Saturday in Georgetown. Senior Ryan Moore scored a first half goal off a feed from fellow senior Zimri Gomez. Goalie Dylan Lane, also a senior, recorded four saves for the Ravens, who held a 13-6 advantage in shots.

MAKING THE SACK- Laurel’s Benjamin Miller (84) and Eric Wharton (46) tackle Woodbridge’s Shedrick Rayford during last weekend’s Midget football game. Photo by Mike McClure

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Sussex Tech football team falls to Caesar Rodney, 35-17

Sussex Tech girls’ cross country team wins conference title

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Sussex Tech’s Darrin Beckett tucks in the ball and follows offensive lineman Matthew King for a first down in the home game against Caesar Rodney last week. Photo by Lynn Schofer

The Delmarva Christian varsity girls’ volleyball team improved to 12-2 with a 3-1 win over Smyrna last Wednesday. The Royals topped the Eagles, 25-22, in game one and bounced back from a 26-24 loss in game two to win the final two games, 26-24 and 25-17. Mallorie Parsons had 11 kills and 12 blocks; Sierra Parsons added seven kills and four digs; Jessica Hassett added three kills and 16 digs; Madelyn Gilbert contributed five kills, four digs and 15 digs; Kelsey McMunn had four kills and six digs; Lauryl Berger dished out 22 assists, and Jennifer Baker recorded 16 digs for the Royals.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 41

Woodbridge senior Leslie DeRoche scores on a penalty stroke, her second attempt in her high school career, during the Raiders’ 3-2 win over Caesar Rodney. Photo by Mike McClure Seaford’s Whitney Wright plays aggressive defense in the first half against the Vikings. The Vikings beat the Lady Jays 8-2 to remain undefeated. Photo by Gene Bleile

Lady Jays battle Vikings on field hockey team’s senior day By Gene Bleile

The Lady Jays field hockey team hosted the undefeated Cape Henlopen Vikings last Friday at Wilmer-Tull field and lost to the number one ranked team in the state, 8-2. Seaford had hoped to pull off an early Halloween victory and evenly battled the Vikings full field for 21 minutes until Cape’s Jackie Coveleski banged home the first goal of the day. The Vikings’ Hannah Pepper added two more scores with less than three minutes before half to put the game nearly out of reach at 3-0. In the second half, Seaford again played a tough physical game and added two goals of their own, one each by Alisza Phares and Alexis Hawkins, but the Vikings high powered offense added five more tallies to ice the game at 8-2. First year head coach Alison Venables, put the game in perspective, “although the

final score was 8-2, I really think I finally saw a Seaford team play 60 minutes of skilled hockey.” “I am so proud of how we played, especially the seniors. They never backed off, even when we were down in our last home game,” Venables added. Seaford goalie, Molly Cain had another busy day in heavy traffic, recording 11 saves. “Molly did a great job in goal, but Cape’s corner plays were awesome. They had perfect execution and scored most of their goals off those corners,” she added. Seaford had eight shots and four corners against Cape, while the Vikings recorded 19 shots with 13 corners. Venables also singled out the play of Alexis Hawkins and Bailey Hoch as a highlight after the game. “Bailey played the game of her life, starting at centermidi, instead of forward, while Alexis did a great job at forward and scored one of our goals,” she said

Woodbridge field hockey continued previous weekend). Talerico answered with a goal with 3:36 left in the game to tie the game at 2-2. Woodbridge came right back and scored what turned out to be the winning goal less than two minutes later as Johnson scored off a corner (1:39) for her second goal of the game. “That was a complete team effort. When girls were tired they switched out to help each other. They wanted to win today,” Bean said. “Five girls fought to push into the net for the stroke. The passing was there today.” Throughout the season the Woodbridge players had to play different positions because of injuries and Thursday’s game was no different. According to assistant coach Corbin Bean, four players played in positions they had never played before. “This is the best day. This almost beats our wedding day,” said Connie Bean. “Af-

ter that goal (to tie) they came right back and put it in.” “This sends a huge message to everybody else. This win is going to mean more than anything else,” Corbin Bean, Connie’s husband, added. With the win, the Raiders finish the season with an 8-6-1 record which includes key wins over Henlopen North foes Dover, Caesar Rodney, and Smyrna. According to Connie Bean, the team was competitive in all of its games except against Henlopen powers Cape Henlopen and Sussex Tech. The Raiders are hoping a stronger nonconference schedule as well as the team’s efforts in the competitive Henlopen Conference will be enough to earn a berth in the state tournament. “I think they finally stepped up to their potential today. Whether we go to states or not, I couldn’t ask for a better ending,” said Connie Bean.

Above, the Raiders’ Kelsey Johnson, Taija Maddox, and Morgan Rifenburg move the ball downfield during a home contest against Caesar Rodney last week. Woodbridge senior Brittany Joseph, right, battles for the ball in a 3-2 win over Caesar Rodney. Photos by Mike McClure Seaford goalie Molly Cain makes a stick save in heavy traffic late in the second half in the 8-2 loss to Cape Henlopen last Friday. Photo by Gene Bleile


PAGE 42

     MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Laurel/Seaford Star Monday varsity sports scoreboard

Field hockey- Dover 4, Laurel 0- Alyssa Miller recorded 11 saves for the Bulldogs. Boys’ soccer- Campus Community School 2, Woodbridge 1- Elder Alcantara scored on a feed from Richard Alcantara and Raider goalie Abraham Leon made nine saves. Delmar 3, Lake Forest 0- Joe Prochownik, Nick Machado, and James Whaley each scored a goal for the Wildcats in the win. Joel Scurti added five saves in goal for Delmar.

Sussex Tech’s Logan Pavlik controls the ball as Delmar’s Desirae Parkinson and Sussex Tech’s Kelsey Doherty and Maxine Fluharty look on during Tuesday’s varsity field hockey game in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech field hockey team snaps Delmar’s winning streak By Mike McClure

In front of a large crowd and in a playoff atmosphere, the Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team scored two second half goals to defeat Delmar, 4-1, on Tuesday in Delmar. Both teams entered the contest with a nine-game winning streak. Sussex Tech (14-1) scored first as Logan Pavlik scored on a pass from Kelsey Doherty at 5:37 in the first half. Delmar goalie Caila White later turned back a shot by Maxine Fluharty, but Fluharty found Abby Atkins at 20:30 for a 2-0 Raven lead. Less than two minutes later Delmar (12-3) got on the board as Sara “Booter” Ellis scored with Carlee Budd picking up the assist (22:10). Fluharty’s shot on a corner went wide left and the score remained 2-1 going into half-time. Sussex Tech out-shot Delmar, 11-6, in the first half while each team had six corners. White recorded six saves and Sussex Tech goalie Megan Cannon made three stops. The Ravens made it 3-1 when Izzie

Delario scored on a feed from Fluharty 51 seconds into the second half. Later in the game, Delmar’s Caroline Phillips went down with a knee injury following a collision with Fluharty. Fluharty was issued a card on the play. Playing with a man down, Sussex Tech kept Delmar off the board until Fluharty returned. Atkins scored her second goal of the game at 15:45 for a 4-1 Raven advantage. Fluharty later launched a shot off the goal post on a corner. Delmar ended the game with a pair of corners, but Sussex Tech held on for the 4-1 win. The Ravens held a 21-8 advantage in shots while the two teams recorded nine corners. White made 12 saves in goal for the Wildcats and Cannon made four saves. Sussex Tech finished the season in second place in the Henlopen North with the team’s only loss coming in a 4-3 loss to Cape Henlopen on Sept. 23. Delmar also won nine in a row following a loss to the Vikings. The Henlopen South champs’ other loss came in a non-conference contest against Pocomoke early in the season.

Delmar’s Sara “Booter” Ellis carries the ball during her team’s home game against Sussex Tech. Ellis netted her team’s goal in the 4-1 loss. Photo by Mike McClure

SEAFORD CROSS COUNTRY- Shown during the Sussex County cross country meet are Seaford’s Tynetta Washington, coach Art Doakes, and Jacques Jules. Washington placed 10th in the girls’ race with a time of 22:18 and Jules finished 10th in the boys’ race (18:26). No additional information was submitted from this meet. Photo by S.D. Smith

Pop Warner teams advance in conference, regional play The following Pop Warner teams advanced in Eastern Regional and Henlopen Conference play and will compete this weekend: Eastern Regionals- Pee Wee- Laurel vs. Neptune Scarlet Fliers, 11 a.m., Cape Henlopen High School; Midget- Laurel vs. East Baltimore Longhorns, 1 p.m., Cape Henlopen High School Henlopen Conference- Second round- Pee Wee- Lower Sussex at Woodbridge, 1 p.m.; Midget- Milford at Woodbridge, 3 p.m.

WOODBRIDGE DEFENSERaider goalie Caitlin Blades and teammate Megan Sirkis look to defend the goal on a Caesar Rodney corner during last Thursday’s game in Bridgeville. Photo by Mike McClure

The Ravens’ Abby Atkins, left, looks to take the ball away from Delmar defender Chelsea Ralph during Tuesday’s game. Atkins scored two goals to lead Sussex Tech to a 4-1 win over the Wildcats. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 43

Bladen takes Halloween Shootout finale at U.S. 13 Dragway

Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame induction is Nov. 13

By Charlie Brown

By Tommy Young

Bobby Bladen made the trip from his home in Gambrills, Md., worthwhile as he captured the $1,500 by winning the Super Pro final in Sunday’s Halloween Shoot Out at the U.S. 13 Dragway. Glenn Groton of Salisbury earned $1,000 for his final round win in Pro and D.J. Lockwood of Berlin rode to the $250 win in Pro Bike. Other winners on the day included: Dennis Davis of Seaford in Street; Marlon Smith of Lincoln in Bike Trophy; Herby Sullivan of Ridgely, Md. in Jr. Dragster 1 and Rebecca Bireley of Salisbury in Jr. Dragster 2. Bladen in his ’70 Nova faced W.R. Ketterman of Salisbury in his dragster. The two were very close in their reaction times and were very close at the finish line as Bladen took the win with an 8.706/153.32 on an 8.69 dial. Ketterman run a quick 7.524/171.10 on a 7.50 dial. Semi-finalists was Mike Jones of Salisbury who lost to Ketterman. Groton in his Firebird met Roger Ridgeway, Jr. of Dover in his ’78 Mustang in the Pro final. Ridgeway had a red light foul and Groton, who was on his dial with a 10.372/128.00 on a 10.37 dial took the win. Semi-finalists were Charlie Dehaven of Salisbury who lost to Ridgeway and Eddie Baker of Salisbury who lost to Groton. Lockwood rode up against Josh Blank in the Pro Bike final. Lockwood had the advantage at the start and rode to the win with an 8.989/148.71 on an 8.91 dial. Blank broke out with an 11.050/124.18 on an 11.07 dial. Semi-finalists were Travis Waters of Delmar, Md., who lost to Blank and Ron Fensick, II of Bridgeville who lost to Lockwood. In the Street final Davis in his ’71 Camaro was paired against Lindsay Walston of Crisfield in an ’87 Camaro. Walston had a red light foul and Davis drove to the win with an 11.627/116.92 on an 11.68 dial. Smith of Lincoln rode up against William Lurch of Millsboro in the Bike Trophy final. Lurch had a red light foul and Smith rode to the win with a 9.512/144.34. In Jr. Dragster 1 action, Sullivan was matched against Taylor Cox of Mardela Springs. Sullivan had the better reaction and took the win with a 9.151.69.03 on a 9.05 dial. Cox ran a solid 8.945/70.37 on an 8.90 dial. In the Jr. Dragster 2 final it was Bireley taking on Robynn Powell of Salisbury. Bireley had the better start and drove to the win with an 8.553/74.43 on an 8.49 dial. Powell broke out with a 10.109/64.54 on a 10.17 dial. The Halloween Shoot Out closed out the 2010 season at U.S. 13.

On Nov. 13, the Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame will hold its annual dinner and induction of its new members at the Delmar Fire House. The reason I am writing this article is that three of the inductees are from the same town, and it happens to be Delmar. When the emcee introduces the new members, he will only be able to give a brief background of each of them, and it will come mostly from the information that was on the nomination form. However, I have known this group of Delmar High graduates since they picked up their first baseball and thought I would like to tell the folks who never saw them play a little more about what they did to receive this honor. First I’ll start with the only member of this trio who is no longer with us, Wayne Williams. Wayne was born and raised in the village of Melson about two miles east of Delmar, which was famous for three things: its church suppers, a unique general store, and good baseball and softball players. Wayne was no exception; although he was playing baseball at an early age, he was waiting until he was in high school to show off his athletic ability as he became a three sports star. He quarterbacked the Delmar football team, was leading scorer on the basketball team for two years, and pitched and played third base on the baseball team. After graduation, he was offered scholarships to several colleges but chose West Point to further his education. There he only concentrated on baseball pitching and because of his hitting ability played third base when he wasn’t pitching. He led the team in hitting three years, set a record for home runs his senior year and had a winning record on the mound. Naturally, he was contacted by big league baseball scouts but chose the military as his vocations. During his time in the service, he served in Vietnam and married his childhood sweetheart, Ann Jones of Delmar. Then after 20 years service, he retired as a Lt. Colonel. He, Ann, and the two sons bought a house in Smyrna on the golf course as that was the sport he was enjoying at that time. Ann and the boys will be at the dinner. Now Archie Ellis is the youngest member of one of Delmar’s oldest families. He had five brothers and sisters, and while they all didn’t play baseball, they were interested in the game. Archie got into baseball early as he was the bat boy for the 1948 Delmar Railroaders. This peaked his interest in the game, but his ability to play the game never came out until he was in high school where he pitched and played third base. After high school he enrolled at the U of D during the Dallas Green era, and during his two years there he learned a lot but it all came to an end when he had to go in the service as part of the “draft deal.” When he got out of the service, he enrolled at Salisbury Teachers College only to find, due to financial difficulties, the baseball program had been scrapped, but he and a group of baseball players, led by Charlie Muir who were already playing with Hebron in the Central Shore League, got together with Coach Ben Maggs and got the program going again. After graduation he continued to play for Hebron, pitching and playing third base. His record at STC and Hebron as a pitcher was very good, but after the CSL folded, he concentrated n his real profession, teaching. While he was teaching at Seaford High, he married a lady he had met at STC, and they built a home in Delmar where their two children were born. Archie later got into administration and retired as a supervisor. And now the hard luck player of the three, Bobby Nichols who began his baseball career at the age of nine in Delmar’s Little League program. He sailed through the different age groups getting better as a left-handed pitcher every year. Then, when he entered Delmar High School, he became one of the best left-handed pitchers in the Henlopen Conference and gained the notice of major league scouts. After graduation, he talked to several major league scouts, all of whom offered him tryouts in their various camps. He finally decided to sign with the Pittsburgh Pirates because they offered him bonus money. The following spring he reported to the Pirates’ training camp in Blandenburg, Fla., where he impressed everyone with his fast ball and control. After a few weeks, one of the instructors came to him and told him he thought he could go a long way up the baseball ladder but needed to work on a couple more pitches to go along with his fast ball and curve. So, they began to work on a variety of other pitches all the time. They worked so hard and so long on these other pitches that he got not only a sore arm but also a strained ligament in his arm. They were about to end training camp and send the players to different teams in their farm system, but they could not send him anywhere in the shape he was in, so they sent him home. He came home, and a few weeks after he arrived one night while driving home from Laurel on Alternate 13, a car came out of a side road and broadsided him, knocking him and his car into a field where he almost bled to death before the ambulance arrived. Then, he spent the next three months in the hospital healing his broken bones. The most serious break required a rod in the leg, and this caused him to walk with a limp for a long time. Naturally, when the Pirates heard of this accident, they cut him loose. Bobby still loves the game, and every spring when baseball season arrives, you will find him out at the high school helping coach Hearn with the pitching staff and even throwing batting practice. His place of employment in Salisbury handles medical surplus for the hospital and doctors in the area. They arrange his hours in the shipping department so he is able to do this. That’s what you call dedication and love of the game of baseball.

Diamond State Swoop record five shutouts en route to championship

The Diamond State Swoop 14U softball team made the trip north to Mercer County Park in Princeton Junction, N.J. to play in the USSSA sanctioned Glow in the Park World Series Qualifier; and at the end of the tournament, the lone team from Delaware defeated 24 other teams to capture the tournament championship. The Swoop set the tone from the very beginning of pool play as they defeated the Mystics ‘97, 6-0; North Jersey Rocks, 6-1; and New Jersey Thunder, 9-0, respectively.  After outscoring their opponents 21-1, the Swoop were one of three teams to advance to the bracket rounded with an undefeated record. In bracket play, the Swoop continued the domination of their opponents, breezing through the tough competition, which included teams from New Jersey, Pennsylvania and New York. The Swoop displayed their stellar play by shutting out every team they played en route to the championship game, taking down the New Jersey Rocks,12-0l Mystics ‘97, 9-0; and Finch’s Aces 14U Pink, 6-0. To cap off their impressive performance, the Swoop defeated the Chaos, 7-3, to capture their second USSSA tournament championship in a row. In total the Swoop recorded a tournament high 55 runs and only allowed just four runs to some of the best 14U ‘A’ and ‘B’ level teams in the northeast. The 14U Swoop has played in three tournaments this fall and has reached the finals in all three, winning the last two. They are 4-0 against 16U teams, have yet to allow more than 10 total runs in any of the tournaments they’ve entered, and lead the nation in shutouts with 11. The Swoop are managed by Jay Davis and their roster is comprised of Haily Andrews, Emily Cox, Rachel Davis, Regan Green, Kelsie Joseph, Carley Lord, Shelby Murphy, Allison Pusey, Ashton Riddle, Tristin West, Sara Jo Whaley, Jenna Willey and Samantha Wilson.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

TOUCHDOWN RUN- Laurel’s Elijah Snead runs for one of his three touchdowns in the Laurel Pop Warner Midget football team’s 33-0 win over Woodbridge. Photo by Mike McClure

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.


PAGE 44

  MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Seaford Bowling Lanes

Wednesday AM Mixed

Lefty Left 26-6 Seaford Lanes 24-8 Two Plus One 24-8 New Bodies 18-14 ABC of It 17-15 Cougars 13-19 Bee Movie 13-19 Jean and the Guys 11-21 Lucky Strikes 11-21 High games and series George Bramble 309 Rip Penuel 755 Joyce Tull 261, 701

Club 50

Gamblers 21-11 2-1 20-12 Lucky Strikes 19-13 Three Buddies 18-14 Magic Markers 18-14 Cowboys 17-15 The Untouchables 16-16 Pretenders 16-16 Hope 15-17 Deal or No Deals 14-18 3 Wise Men 13-19 Pinbusters 13-19 New Friends 11-9 High games and series Ken Bolt 281 Bill Harding 767 Ruth Warren 284, 721

Tuesday AM Mixed

Fun Bunch 22-10 Pin Drops 18-14 Getter Dun 17-15 Sparetimers 15-17 Trouble 13-19 The Strikers 11-21 High games and series Mike Baker 234, 665

Sharon Bendler

252, 643

Baby Blue Jays

Jays 17-7 New Beginnings 16-8 Strikers 8.5-15.5 Hot Shots 6.5-17.5 High games and series Aidan Russell 156, 299 Kathryn Donati 153, 302

Star

Ten Pins 26-6 Spare Timers 18-14 Pin Destroyers 15-17 Strike Masters 15-17 Dead Eyes 15-17 Strikers 7-25 High games and series J.R. Whitelock 242, 670 Athena Sammons 230, 639

Tuesday Early Mixed

Seaford Moose 23-9 Payne and Two 22-10 Just Chillin 21-11 Half and Half 19-13 Cross Fire 19-13 Trouble 18-14 Laurel Junction 17-15 Vacationers 17-15 Down N Out 15-17 Empty Pockets 13-19 Dreamers 13-19 Bass Awkwards 11-21 B Attitudes 10-22 High games and series James Howell 279 Anthony Policastro 709 Mallory Hagadorn 269 Joyce Tull 686

Mardel ABC

Walking Wounded 54-18 The Wiz 52-20

Fairway Auto Sales 52-20 Buluga’s 48-24 Team Dynasty 44-28 Joey White Horseshoeing 42-30 Henry’s Furniture 40-32 Kernodle Construction 38-34 3 Jokers and a Queen 36-36 Delmarva Consignment 34-38 No Clue 34-38 Sandbaggers 32-40 Stoopid Monkey 24-48 Lewis Racing Stable 20-52 Who is That 16-56 High games and series C.J. Graleski 306 Doug Bailey 839

Friday Trios

Win Lose or Draw 21-11 Puppies at Play 20-12 Wolf Pack 17-15 Norma’s Crew 16.515.5 New Attitude 16-16 7 Up 16-16 12 in a Row 16-16 Strikes and Spares 14-18 Terry’s Tigers 12.519.5 Can’t Touch This 11-21 High games and series Steve Teagle 273 Dale Parker 680 Debbie Hawrylyshyn 228 Deborah Humphreys 641

Seaford City

Easy Pickins 17-11 Ruff Ryders 17-11 Seaford Lanes 16.511.5 Git-R-Done 14-14 Guardian Angels 10.517.5 Phillips Construction 9-19 High games and series Mark Benson 336, 859

Sunday Adult/ Youth

The MVP’s 8-4 Double Trouble 8-4 Pin Destroyers 7-5 Getter Dun 5-7 Double R 5-7 Trouble 3-9 High games and series Gordon Hearn 325, 801 Theresa Richey 258, 734 Ricky Carlisle 271 Justin Marine 762 Taylor Richey 224, 628

Young Adults

Lightening 20-12 Toy Soldiers 20-12 Lucky Charms 19-13 Dust Balls 17-15 Pinbusters 15-17 Strikes and Spares 14-18 Just for Fun 13-19 New Beginnings 10-22 High games and series Robert Bay 259 Justin Marine 673 Jenna Cottet 229, 635

SEAFORD BOWLING LANES Home of Galactic BowlinG

629-9778

302

Nylon Capital Shopping Center Seaford, DE

Seaford Recreation Department Youth Basketball signups are taking place Signups for the City of Seaford Recreation Department’s Youth Basketball League are taking place for the following age groups: boys 8-10, boys 11-13, and girls 8-13. The deadline to register is Dec. 3 at the recreation office. There will be no sign-ups at the gym or on the day of tryouts. Practices will take place in December with the league starting in January. The cost is $25 which includes a shirt that you can keep. Signups for boys and girls ages 6-7- The deadline to register for boys and girls ages six and seven years old is Dec. 31 at the recreation office. The league starts in early February with all game being played at the Frederick Douglass gym on Saturdays. The cost is $25 which includes a free shirt that you can keep. The league must have at least 32 kids in order to play.

Seaford Recreation Department to hold Little Wrestlers program The City of Seaford Recreation Department is holding a Little Wrestlers program for children ages 6-12. The cost of the program, which will begin in mid November and will run through March, is $25 per child. All reegistration will be held at the recreation office. The deadline to register is Nov. 12 Junior Jordan Basketball Clinic to be held in January- The Seaford Recreation Department’s Junior Jordan Basketball Clinic, for boys and girls in grades K-3, will be held on Saturdays in January at the Fred Douglass gym. The cost is $5 per child. Basic fundamentals will be stressed at the clinic. The deadline to register is Dec. 31.

Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club offers co-ed indoor soccer league

The Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club is hosting a co-ed indoor soccer league for the following age groups: Under 6: ages 3, 4, 5; Under 9: ages 6, 7, 8; Under 12: ages 9, 10, 11; Under 15: ages 12, 13, 14; and Under 19: ages 15-18. The registration fee is $25 for club members and $40 for non-club members ($15 covers a one year membership to the club). Register at the club Monday-Friday from 1:30 to 8 p.m. Practices start the week of Nov. 8. For more information, call Alyson Rowe at 6283789. Volunteers are also needed.

STAR TEAM PHOTO OF THE WEEK-- Shown (l to r) is the Seaford 16U AAU girls’ basketball team: top row: Lannica Hilliard, Dej’ah Emory, Monshea Murray, Lashyra Williams; middle row- Tynetta Washington, Keona Hughes, Verstel Ponder, Aljae Cannon; and coaches Katina Hood, Jeff Johnson, and Pat Hughes. Photo by Lynn Schofer Next week: ????? Send photos and captions to sports@mspublications.com.

This week in Star sports history 10 YEARS AGO- The Sussex Tech field hockey team topped Laurel, 4-2, as Allison Anderson and Harper Cornell each had a pair of goals. Casey Ralph and Mia Whitney scored goals for Laurel. FIVE YEARS AGO- The Woodbridge varsity football team handed Seaford a 35-0 win over Seaford in the Raiders’ Homecoming game. Jordan Wescott ran for 135 yards and a touchdown, Ryan Messick had 98 yards passing, and Jermeal Joyner recorded 12 tackles. The Delmar field hockey team moved to 14-1 with a 3-1 win over Laurel as Alison Bloodsworth scored five goals and Charisse Holmes added one goal. Chaniqua Kellam scored for the Bulldogs, who fell to 7-7-1. The Laurel football team defeated Smyrna, 25-7, as Robert Reed ran for 111 yards, Tykie Hill had 151 yards rushing, and Taylor Jones completed three passes to Jeremy Bagwell for 152 yards and a touchdown. ONE YEAR AGO- The Seaford soccer team clinched the Henlopen South title with a 1-0 victory over Indian River. Ethan Lee scored on a header off a pass from Phillip DeMott. The Laurel football team advanced to 4-0 in the conference and 7-1 overall with a 35-7 win over Indian River. Chris Jones ran for 113 yards and two touchdowns, Shawn Miller had two interceptions and a touchdown run, and Kyle West caught three passes for 74 yards and a pair of touchdowns. Desmond Sivels ran for a pair of touchdowns and Jesse Swanson completed a touchdown strike to Andrew Hitchens to lead Sussex Tech to a 21-14 win over Caesar Rodney.

Delmarva Christian volleyball edged by Polytech, 3-2

The Delmarva Christian girls’ volleyball team fell to Polytech, 3-2, last Friday. The Royals won game one, 25-12; lost the second game, 25-23; and took game three, 25-14, before falling in the final two games, 25-23 and 15-12. Mallorie Parsons had 17 kills and 16 blocks, Lauryl Berger added six aces and 35 assists, Kelsey McMunn contributed five kills, seven blocks, and nine digs, and Madelyn Gilbert had five aces and 15 digs for the Royals. Jessica Hassett also had six kills and 14 digs.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 45

Police Journal Father, son die in accident

The Delaware State Police Crash Reconstruction Unit is investigating a three car collision in which two were killed in Felton on Oct. 31. The incident occurred at 8:12 p.m. as Robert Brode, 27, of Harrington, was operating a 1997 Ford Explorer and traveling northbound on U.S. Rt. 13 in the left lane. A 2004 Chevrolet Silverado driven by Benjamin Rieger, 29, of Harrington, approached Brode’s vehicle from behind and then attempted to pass on the left through the median. After traveling through the median, Rieger re-entered the left lane of northbound Rt. 13 where it then struck the driver’s door of the Ford Explorer. Rieger’s vehicle then traveled another 141 feet through the median while rotating in a counter-clockwise direction before entering the southbound lanes of Rt. 13. The Silverado then struck and rolled up onto a 1993 Cadillac Deville which was being operated by Sharon N. Washington, 27, of Seaford. Both vehicles then came to rest on the edge of the southbound lanes. Rieger and his son, Nathaniel W. Hughes, 11, of Frederica, were pronounced dead at the scene. Their bodies were turned over to the Delaware Medical Examiner’s Office where an autopsy will be performed to determine the exact cause of death. Washington was transported to Milford Memorial Hospital where she was treated and released for her injuries. Brode was not injured. The crash is still under investigation. Rieger was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash. It is unknown if Rieger’s son was wearing a seatbelt and if alcohol was a factor in the crash.

Crash sends three to hospital

On Oct. 26, Delaware State Police investigated a personal injury crash on Fawn Road south of Tuckers Road and east of Bridgeville.  The crash occurred at 7:12 p.m. as a 2005 Toyota Tacoma driven by Jeffrey Kitchen, 50, of Greenwood, was southbound on Fawn Road attempting to turn into a private driveway.  The second vehicle, a 1998 Chevrolet pick up truck, was northbound on Fawn Road and a third vehicle, a 1997 Mitsubishi Eclipse, directly behind the pick up truck. The crash occurred when the Toyota turned left into the path of the Chevrolet truck flipping the Toyota on the driver’s side. The Mitsubishi, traveling behind the Chevrolet truck, then struck the Chevy’s right rear side.  Kitchen was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol, first degree vehicular assault and other related charges. As a result of the crash, the 34-year-old male driver of the Chevrolet sustained a leg fracture, the 11-year-old suffered several broken teeth and lacerations, and the 19-year-old (in the Mitsubishi) received minor contusions and abrasions. All victims were transported to Nanticoke Hospital for treatment. 

Police search for shooting suspect  

On Oct. 31, Delaware State Police responded to Nanticoke Hospital to investigate a shooting incident.  Police learned that Michael J. Hurst, 29, of Seaford, was reportedly involved in a domestic altercation with his wife at their residence around 10:09 p.m. At this time, it is not believed that the shooting and the domestic incident are related.    Police were also able to determine that Hurst was picked up by the victim, a 27-year-old Seaford male, and driven away from the domestic scene. State Police is still attempting to gather additional facts pertaining to this shooting, however, believe that after being picked up, Hurst discharged a firearm inside the victim’s car. The circumstances behind the discharging of the firearm are still being investigated.  The victim was shot in his left leg and then driven to Nanticoke Hospital by Hurst. When troopers arrived at the hospital Hurst had already left, however, a truck belonging to the victim was still at the scene.  Delaware State Police obtained arrest warrants for Hurst including first degree assault, possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a person prohibited. Michael J. Hurst is at large and is wanted by the Delaware State Police. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call investigators at 856-5850, ext. 0 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP3333. Update: Michael J. Hurst has turned himself into State Police Troop 4. 

Charged with robbing office 

On Wednesday, Oct. 27 just after 8 p.m., Delaware State Police responded to a burglary in progress complaint.  Delaware State Police 911 Center received a call from an alert citizen who observed a silver vehicle parked in the rear of Dr. Earl Bradley’s Bay Bee Pediatrics office in Lewes. The citizen also heard suspicious noises and observed two suspects traveling back and forth between the silver vehicle and the doctor’s office.  Delaware State Police, assisted by the Lewes Police Department, responded to Bay Bee Pediatrics. The two suspects, Garrett E. Coco, 22, of Harbeson and Justin Oberholtzer, 24, of Lewes were taken into custody.  The investigation revealed that Oberholtzer and Coco entered a garage owned by Bay Bee Pediatrics by removing a screen from a window. The back door to the main office had muddy shoe prints on it from when Oberholtzer and Coco kicked in the door to gain entry.  After searching their vehicle, police located two TV monitors, a stop light, power tools, two heaters, an air nailer and portable air conditioner amounting to approximately $2,000 worth of property.  Delaware State Police detectives took Oberholtzer and Coco into custody without incident and charged them with burglary

to the Bay Bee Pediatrics office and its garage. Oberholtzer and Coco were incarcerated on $2,500 secured bond to the Sussex Correctional Institute.

Charged in lottery theft

On Monday, Oct. 25, Delaware State Police conducted an internal theft investigation at Brownies Package Store on Sussex Highway, Delmar.  Delaware State Police, after being contacted by the business owner, was advised of a large amount of money being lost through State of Delaware Lottery sales. Delaware State Police Financial Crimes detectives learned that Judy E. Cox, 52, of Salisbury, and an employee at Brownies Package Store, was responsible for shift reconciliation sheets during the dates and times of the theft.  Cox is accused of printing out lottery tickets without paying for them and also stealing scratch off tickets totaling approximately $11,500 dollars.  Cox would print out lottery tickets from the business machine without placing money into the cash register.  The owner of the business discovered the discrepancy when comparing the daily sales sheet to what was being deposited into the bank. The business was taking in more income than was being deposited into the bank.  During the months of July, August, September and October, Cox stole $523, $4,892, $4,350 and $1,754. It is believed Cox kept printing out lottery tickets with the hope of “winning it big.”  Cox was arrested on Oct. 27, and charged with three counts of theft $1,500 or greater and theft under $1,500. She was released on $3,500 unsecured bond.

Police investigate assault

On Wednesday, Oct. 27 at 3:20 a.m., Delaware State Police conducted an investigation about a sexual assault which is believed to have occurred somewhere between John J. Williams Highway and Long Neck Road, Millsboro, and County Seat Highway, Laurel.   After speaking with the victim, an 18-year-old Laurel woman, Delaware State Police determined that the victim met the suspect in the parking lot of Happy Harry’s near Long Neck Road east of Millsboro. The victim entered the man’s vehicle to use his phone. The man is alleged to have driven the victim around for an undetermined amount of time, and somewhere between Long Neck Road and the Laurel Flea Market, sexually assaulted the victim.  The victim advised she was able to escape when the suspect slowed down in the area of the Laurel Flea Market. The victim, who fled to her residence and contacted the police, was transported to Nanticoke Hospital where she was treated and released.  The suspect is described as an Hispanic male with short brown hair, brown eyes, clean shaven and a small build. He was driving a red or orange two door car, with dark gray or black interior and a manual shift.

Anyone with information is asked to call investigators at 856-5850, ext. 214 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

Arrested on drug charges 

Delaware State Police were called to a domestic complaint on the shoulder of Old Furnace Road west of Cokesbury Road, Seaford, on Tuesday, Oct. 26 at 2:11 p.m. When Delaware State Police arrived they found Tracey A. Bishop, 19, and her boyfriend Manuel K. Diaz, 21, both of Seaford. Police learned that the argument was over Diaz’s illegal smoking habits. State Police also learned that during the argument a physical altercation occurred between Diaz and Bishop resulting in Diaz being scratched on the neck by Bishop and Bishop being offensively touched by Diaz. Neither required medical treatment.  After the arrest of Diaz and Bishop, Delaware State Police searched their Chevrolet Camaro and seized a marijuana cigarette (1.2 grams), prescription medication not labeled in the defendant’s name and instruments utilized to smoke marijuana.  Bishop and Diaz were both arrested. Bishop was charged with third degree assault, third degree conspiracy, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana and possession of non-controlled prescription drugs. She was released on $5,700 unsecured bond. Diaz was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana, possession of non-controlled prescription drug and offensive touching. He was released on $5,000 unsecured bond.

Shots fired in Laurel

Delaware State Police are investigating an assault that occurred at the Oasis Travel Plaza in Laurel, on Oct. 31 at 1:30 a.m.  The incident occurred as a large crowd of people was inside the Travel Plaza on Sussex Highway. The 49-year-old female clerk asked the crowd to leave the store, and when the request was ignored, a 21-year-old Seaford man, who was a relative of the clerk, then asked the crowd to leave. It was at this point that a suspect described as a black male with a dreadlock hairstyle, told the victim to leave them alone and then invited him to “step outside.” As the victim walked toward the exit doors, he was struck in the face by a second black male suspect described as being short. Both suspects then fled the store and were seen entering a maroon Ford Crown Victoria with large chrome wheels. The short suspect, who was seated in the front passenger seat, then fired numerous rounds from a handgun into the air as the vehicle fled the parking lot. There were no injuries from the gunshots. The 21-year-old victim suffered minor injuries to his face area and refused treatment. Anyone with information is asked to contact Troop 5 at 337-1090 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Seaford referendum passes

A public referendum on the proposed annexation of the Moose Lodge property on alternate U.S. 13 held Monday, Oct. 18, passed by a vote of 22 in favor and one opposed in the city and one in favor, none opposed in the area to be annexed. Members of the lodge requested annexation in order to be able to hook up to the city’s water system. The Moose Lodge is being renovated after part of it collapsed in the winter during a snowstorm and the state fire marshal’s office is requiring that a sprinkler system be installed. Without access to city water, the lodge would have to put up a water tower.

Teen Advisory Board

By Amber Motta Starting its fifth year the Teen Advisory Board has become an invaluable resource to the Seaford Library. The Teen Advisory Board was created by the Teen Librarian Kenda Kile to give the teens a voice in the library family. When the teens have a sense of ownership they are more likely to participate in activities at the library.  The group started out with only three members and has grown to fifteen and many have participated since the beginning of the board. Some of the activities available Teen Advisory Board during the summer were Poetry workshop with Christo Johnson, Live Monopoly, Skater Talk and Speed Texting with author Tony Varrato, and X-treme Photography.  The members of the Teen Advisory Board meet once a month during the school year to assist the Teen Librarian in the selection of books, audio books, magazines, and music and programs that are geared to young adults. If you are a teen or the parent of a teen who might be interested in being apart of the Teen Advisory Board, contact the Teen Librarian Kenda Kile in person at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center for a application form.

FALL FESTIVAL - The 2010 Special Olympics Delaware (SODE) Fall Festival sponsored by JPMorgan Chase took place Oct. 23 at the University of Delaware. David Shanholtz of Seaford, along with teammates Laura Passwaters, Melissa Rust and Kim Smith, won a gold medal in the bocce tournament. Photo by Jon Buzby, SODE

Winners are Jacques Jules, Lindsay James, Tim Parks, Melinda Duryea, Bobby Clagg, Bailey Noel, and Frank Cusmano with Rocky. 40TH ANNIVERSARY - Singletree Stables Riding School in Seaford is celebrating 40 years of success. Mollie, Janet and Neil Esterson have enjoyed sharing their expertise and love of horses with hundreds of students through the years.  An open house was held at the stables with free horse rides, food, games, crafts and riding demonstrations. For more information about Singletree Stables Riding School, call 629-4971. Paid advertisement

Master Gardener Lisa Arney

Runners on the mark at the start.

Library Fitness Day a success

The weather was perfect for the Seaford Library and Cultural Center Fitness Day as young and old (and even one pet) turned out for the event. The Seaford High School Cross Country team and the Key Club set up and manned the race course. Jacques Jules and Lindsay James came in first overall with times of 18:56 and 22:42 respectively. In the over 40 group, Tim Parks and Melinda Duryea came in first with times of 23:06 and 31:53. In the 13-18 group, Bobby Clagg come in at 24:19 and Alex Smith at 27:59. Baily Noel led the 19-29 age group with 19:25, and Frank Cusmano and his pet Rocky led the 50-59 age group with 25:15.  Frank said they could’ve done better, but Rocky insisted on some nature stops along the way.

Mayor Ed Butler reads the Proclamation with Ron MacArthur and Connie Halter, co-chairs of the event.

Frank Cusmano and Melinda Duryea register for the 5K run with Connie Halter.

A special session is being offered at the Ross Mansion on Saturday, Nov. 13, starting at 10:30 a.m. Master Gardener Lisa Arney will guide and instruct each person attending with making a fall centerpiece for the Thanksgiving table. Arney will provide the materials which all are natural and are found growing in this area. It is not necessary to bring a container. Provisions will be made for taking and keeping an arrangement fresh until Thanksgiving. Anyone participating in the class should bring clippers and gloves to use while working with the provided materials. Cost of the class is $25 per person. Attendance will be by reservation only. The first 10 people calling will be accepted. To make a reservation, call Pat Davidson at 629-4619. This is part of the Seaford Historical Society’s 150th anniversary celebration of the opening of the Ross Mansion. For further information call the SHS office at 628-9828.

Cain earns scholarship

Molly Cain, a senior at Seaford High School, has been selected to receive a $20,000 college scholarship through the Samsung-American Legion program. Cain’s selection was based on her class standing, academic and civic achievements and financial need. Ten students earned the scholarship from a finalist group of nearly 100. The selection committee awarded the scholarships on the basis of academic record, involvement in school and community activities and financial need. Eligibility for scholarships requires students to be direct descendants of U.S. wartime veterans. Cain’s grandfather, William Eagle and grandmother, Bernadette Meylor, served in World War II and the Korean War.


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

PAGE 47

School can be dangerous place, even when having ‘fun’ At a time when real issues of school-age self-esteem and emoony indsor tional trauma, like bullying, are being discussed I hope some psychologists gave up on the delusional I am feeling that I cerconcept that the game of “Tag” is tainly have grounds emotionally dangerous. I reported for a negligence lawthis in a column awhile back. Recently, this issue popped up again in suit against Crisfield the form of an online debate at MyHelium.com. The debate included a Elementary #1. survey and according to the results, about 1,200 respondents, 89 percent did not see any problem with the But, I have to say “Tag” was the least game. Research had indicated that “Tag” aggressive of the schoolyard recess games has caused emotional issues with children that we played as kids. Given today’s who had been chased by other students standards, I cringe to consider the other and led in some cases, to school yard armore regular games we played and how guments and fighting. Sounds like pretty they may be viewed by some parents and normal school yard antics to me. school professionals. I vividly recall being tagged “it” and Here is one that comes to mind. Chilthen running like a mentally challenged dren line up against the wall of the school goat after every student body that was and another student hurls a ball at them. within eyesight. And, yes, I will venture The student who gets struck by the ball is to guess that there were a number of these out of the game. We called that “Dodge students who did not particularly care for Ball.” I still have nightmares of that ball me smacking them on the back or other coming vengefully toward my more sensibody areas and shouting “You’re it!” So, I tive body areas. Oh the horror of it! am probably opening up myself to a lawOh, yeah, then there is the game where suit by even admitting this. we throw an unassuming member of

T

W

Amateur radio volunteers service

Members of the Sussex County Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) will be all eyes and ears during two popular area events in the coming days.  The group of amateur radio operators will volunteer their services during Return Day on Nov. 4, and again during Punkin’ Chunkin’ from Nov. 5 to Nov. 7. “Sussex County Emergency Operations Center Director Joe Thomas has asked the county’s RACES unit to offer ‘feet on the ground’ observations directly to the EOC during these events,” RACES Radio Officer John Ferguson said.  “Our members will be tasked to keep an eye toward public safety and to offer up-to-the-minute condition reports as thousands of spectators gather at these popular local events.” Thomas said the additional manpower will give the EOC real-time observations, which helps emergency responders man-

age resources and staff, such as police, medics, and road crews, working the events. “They provide the EOC the right information, at the right time, so we can make the right decisions,” Thomas said. Sussex County RACES is a corps of volunteers assigned to aid the Emergency Operations Center during special events and major disasters, providing a critical communications link when conventional radio, telephones or other forms of communication might be overloaded or down. RACES members have volunteered thousands of hours by contributing amateur radio communications support during the blizzards of 2010, the Sea Colony Make-A-Wish Triathlon and the AppleScrapple Festival. For more information on the RACES program, visit www.sussexcountyraces. com, or contact RACES radio officer John Ferguson at 858-5310 or k3pfw@arrl.net.

The IRS reminds taxpayers to take advantage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 tax breaks that are still available. Tax incentives are still available for making energy efficient improvements to your home and for college expenses paid by parents or students. Residential Energy Property Credit – the Recovery Act increased the energy tax credit for homeowners who make energy efficient improvements to their existing homes. The credit rate is increased to 30 percent of the cost of all qualifying improvements and raises the maximum credit limit to $1,500 for improvements placed in service in 2009 and 2010. The credit applies to improvements such as adding insulation, energy efficient exterior windows and

energy-efficient heating and air conditioning systems. American Opportunity Credit – this credit expanded and renamed the alreadyexisting Hope credit, making it available to a broader range of taxpayers. The credit can be claimed for tuition and certain fees you pay for the first four years of higher education in 2009 and 2010. The income guidelines have been expanded and required course materials are added to the list of qualified expenses. Many taxpayers that are eligible will qualify for the maximum annual credit of $2,500 per student. For more information on the recovery tax provisions, visit www.IRS.gov and access the “Tax Benefits of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009” section.

Recovery tax breaks are available

our school yard colleagues down on the ground and yell, “pile on!” Then from seemingly nowhere hordes of young’uns come running from all points on the playground and drop like a pile of rocks onto the victim. This game we appropriately called, “Pile On.” I was on the bottom of the pile on numerous occasions and every time felt the same: like there were a huge pile of kids on top of me. Ok, now I am feeling that I certainly have grounds for a negligence lawsuit against Crisfield Elementary #1. Oh, my goodness, I almost forgot the most treacherous school yard game we played, “War.” Here is a game worthy of an independent psychological study. The key to this game is to use your school class time just prior to recess to choose up teams. This way once you get to the playground you head to the big open field and the two teams stand at opposite ends. Oh, I almost forgot, we did not refer to ourselves as teammates or to this as a game. It was “War,” and we were warriors. Once both teams of warriors were lined up and ready, the head honcho, who was usually an older heathen and seemed more like a warrior than the rest of us, would shout at the top of his lungs, “Charge!” Now, perhaps my memory is slightly askew, but as I recall the aftermath of the “war lord’s” yelled order, was nothing less than a cross between “Brave Heart” and “They Died with Their Boots On.” Scores of young’uns would haul across the field

Gas Lines

like they were chasing money. Somewhere in the middle of the field we would converge and bodies would be thrown here and there like bags of trash on collection day. When the recess bell rang, the team with the most players still standing, or able to walk, would be declared the winner. Ok, after my few examples of school yard recreation, do I sense a lawyer out there salivating and chomping at the bit to take on my case of mental and physical anguish? Looking back on this I now see just how damaged I am because of the affects of this school yard run amok. Where were the school officials when all of this was taking place right under their noses? I tell you where they were, some were doing recess accompaniment with the younger children and others were preparing class for our studies. My recommendation is to let kids be kids and let’s stop adults from stepping in every five minutes in an effort to find evidence of some kind of emotional abuse. There are real, horrific things happening to our children every day, some even in their own households. This is where our energies should be spent as an effort to protect our young people both mentally and physically. For the most part, I hope we can agree that developing games on the school yard playground has always been a source of creativity and, yes, in some cases, the catalyst for a shoving match or even a bloody nose. But this is part of growing up and learning how to co-exist in this society. crude oil. In its weekly report, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) announced crude oil stocks rose 5 million barrels to 364.9 million barrels, more than forecasted but less than the 6.4 million barrel increase reported by the American Petroleum Institute (API).

Motorists undoubtedly welcomed the gas price retreat in most areas last week.  Prices at the pump had been on the rise in recent weeks, following the trend in crude oil as it ventured into the $80-plus range.  The national average price of regular grade gasoline was $2.81 Friday, down 2 cents from last week. Crude Oil Prices After bursting through the $80 ceiling to start October, crude’s momentum has reached far but has been unable to sustain a price above $84 a barrel, a number that appears to be the top of the current range despite speculation by some analysts that crude oil was poised to reach as high as $87 a barrel.  A weakening U.S. dollar continues to bolster prices for commodities like

 A look ahead “Analysts continue to maintain consumers will not see a sizeable increase in prices at the pumps for the remainder of the year,” said Jana L. Tidwell, AAA Mid-Atlantic spokesperson.  Local pricing On Tuesday gas stations from Delmar to Greenwood were selling regular gasoline in a range from $2.679 to $2.819 a gallon. The low was two cents less than a week ago and the high seven cents less.

Regular Unleaded Gasoline & Crude Oil prices

10/31/10

Nine days ago

Year ago

National

$2.81

$2.82

$2.69

10/29/10

Seven days ago Year ago

$81.43

$81.69

Delaware

Oil Barrel

$2.79

$2.81

$2.63

$79.00


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS*

(For Subscribers - Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch

AUTOMOTIVE 8’ CAP FOR P/U, fiberglass, $200. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28

Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

‘92 ACCORD DX. Runs great, 5 spd, 2 dr, AC, 220K mi. 1 owner. Tagged til 2012. Asking $1900. 7458911. 10/21

Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

HEAVY DUTY BOX, Welded Alum., for small PU, 21” deep, $200 OBO. 6280617. 10/21

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch

629-9788

LEER SM. TRUCK CAP, ladder rack & 2 side boes w/locks, $250 OBO. 2968484. 10/14

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

UPRIGHT PIANO, ivory keys, $150. 629-6730. 10/21

NEWSPAPER RACKS In Good Condition

‘03 MAZDA PROTEGE, 87K miles, great cond., $6200. 410-251-8725. 10/7

1918 CTRY STORE KEROSENE TANK & Pump, exc. cond. & 1-horse plow. 8755164 or 875-7531. 10/21

TYPEWRITER, Electric or Manual, must be in good cond. 875-0747. 11/4

FREE KITTENS (3) white w/ blk. spots on head, 1 tiger colored, 12 wks. old, liter trained. 236-9296. 9/30

COMPUTERS

for tab-size publications. Not interested in coin-operated. Call Karen at 629-9788. DONATIONS OF VEHICLES OR BOATS for nonprofit faith-based charity. Our program produces lifechanging results with troubled young men. Donation is tax deductible (501C-3 org.). Delaware Teen Challenge, 629-2559. CUB SCOUT UNIFORMS, decent new or used. Pack 90 in Laurel would like your uniform donations to help outfit our Pack. 228-2390.

2 TIRES, 16” RIM, call for details, like new, $70. 6281626. 10/14

READY HEATER for SS Coop, good shape, $25. 629-6808.

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES ‘04 ARTIC CAT ATV, 650 LE 4x4, 700 mi., like new, w/wench & grill guards, $3700. 410-251-8725. 10/7 HD MOTORCYCLE JAKLIFT, model 1800 (1200# cap.), used little. New $380, asking $125. 629-8077. 10/7

Real Estate Auction

Nominal Opening Bids Start at $10,000

YARD SALE GARAGE SALE, Sat., 11/6, 8 am - 4 pm, rain or shine! 34446 St. George Rd. Laurel. Furniture, lienes, hshld, clothing. Everything goes! Last sale of season. 11/4

Enjoy the Star? Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788

OUTBOARD MOTOR, 15 hp, negotiable. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28

BULLET HEATER, Kerosene, 35K BTU, good cond., $75 OBO. 349-4241. 10/28

WEIGHT-LIFTING BARBELLS. 875-1047. 10/21

SIAMESE CAT, Seal Point, male, “Scrappy” missing since 10/28 from Phillips Landing Rd., Laurel. Reward. 8751165. 11/4

GIVE-AWAY

BOATS

‘92 RS CAMARO, $900 OBO. 245-6856 or 8754159. 10/14

WANTED

SM. FEMALE DOG found in West Seaford area. Call with description to claim. 629-3642. 10/21

‘95 WINNEBAGO RIALTO,, Low mi., fully equipped, perfect cond. Best offer over $9000. 875-3656.

1 Dock Street, Crisfield, MD 3BR 3BA 1,497sf+/- condo. 11418 Beckford Ave, Princess Anne, MD 3BR 2BA 1,154sf+/102 Carvel Ave, Laurel, DE 3BR 1BA 1,562sf+/14363 Mears Circle, Harborton, VA 3BR 2BA 1,661sf+/13337 Nandua Rd, Painter, VA 4BR 2BA 2,891sf+/All properties sell: 12:00PM Sun., Nov. 7 at 1 Dock Street, Crisfield, MD

Open to the Public this Weekend Please go to williamsauction.com or call 800-801-8003 for details.

Many properties now available for online bidding! A Buyer’s Premium may apply. Williams & Williams MD RE LIC#639143 DANIEL NELSON BROKER, AUC LIC#368 LARRY MAKOWSKI AUCTIONEER

BLACKSMITH SHOP Equip., Forge, anvil, etc. 8875-5164 or 875-7531. 10/21 CAST IRON CAULDRON, 3 legs, great shape. Used during old hog-killing days, $150. 846-9788. 10/21

Smell Great Feel Good!

SM. KIT. TABLE, 36”x36”, white, 2 matching chairs w/ rose colored cushions, $35. Bookcase, 6 shelves, dk. cherry, good cond., $25. 629-6504. 11/4

16’ ROWING SCULL, carbon fiber oars, transport dolly, dry storage port in cockpit. New $4200, Will sell for $2100 OBO. 3494107. 9/30

LOST

FOUND

AIR SCOOP for trailer, $200. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28

EARLY AMERICAN SOFA, 3 cushions, very good cond., $50 OBO. (need the space). 629-6504. 11/4

BIKE CARRIER for 2 bikes, for bumper hitch or 2” receiver. $80. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28 CHINA HUTCH, solid wood, pine. 7 drawer lower chest, lit upper glass display, $300 OBO. 519-0441. 10/21

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com

CALICO CAT, ‘Katie.’ I’ve had her 20 years & want her back, please! 301 Fifth St., Seaford, 629-4307. 10/14

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS

FIREWOOD: Seasoned hardwood, $130/cord; $70 for 1/2 cord. Call John, 6299657. 10/21 DISHWASHER, built-in, Frigidaire, never used, exc. cond., best offer. 875-8134. 10/21 3 CAST IRON FRY PANS, 6.5”, 8” & 10.5”, good shape, $25. 846-9788. 10/21

The Bath & Body Shop At

Two Cats in the Yard 628-1601

S. Conwell St., Seaford Wed., Thus., Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

VHS MOVIES: James Bond, Titanic, many more, 50¢ ea. 628-1880. 10/7 CHANDELIER & MATCHING 44” Ceiling fan w/light, brass; 5 white glass shades on ea., w/all parts needed for hanging, exc. cond., $100 for both. 410-8832541. 10/7 JVC DVD PLAYER, new, never out of box, $40. 6294482. 10/7

ANT. ROCKING CHAIR, 100 yr. old, great cond., $110 OBO. 519-0441. 10/21

3 RODS & REELS, 2 lg. & 1 sm. tackle boxes with fishing supplies, $50 OBO. 628-0617. 10/21

FOR SALE

DR LEAF VACUUM/Mulcher, 5 hp BNS eng., 2500 gal. leaf capacity, hardly used. $650. 629-5354. 10/14

DEWALT WORK STATION RadIo w/built-in charger & auxiliary port, $100. 6294482. 10/7

RECLINER. Green, like new, $100. 628-3362. 10/14

GAS HEDGE TRIMMER, 22”, used 1 time, $70. 8755889. 10/7

ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER, Smith-Corona Devilli 700 w/ Spell Right dictionery, exc. cond., used w/TLC, 2 new ribbon cassettes, 1 correcting cass., 2 exra print whls & owners manual. $60. Typewriter/laptop table on wheels & pull-out shelf, $25. Orig. owner.875-5086. 11/4 Help support a benefit for

Mike Cherrix, who is

recovering from cancer treatment/orthopaedic surgery and enjoy entertainment by the

BO DICKERSON BAND

Sun., Nov. 21 1-5 pm Station Seven at Laurel Junction (formerly Bargain Bill’s) Cost $10 in advance or at door Cash bar and full menu available.

Live & Silent Auctions for tickets or info call 236-7642 - 875-7460 - 875-8505

2 EXT. DOORS, 1 storm, 1 reg.. Med. size FP insert, good for garage, etc. 3 Michelin tires, 245 65 17”, best offer. 628-9352. 10/14 7.5’ NORWAY SPRUCE Christmas Tree, $50. 6294768. No Sunday calls. 10/14 10” TABLE SAW, table top, new, $50. New coveralls w/ hood, 58 reg., $50. 6294768. No Sunday calls. 10/14 ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD, like new, hardly used, $290. 875-7495. 10/14 DRY SINK, $150. 6 sets of Betty Boop salt & pepper shakers, $50 for all. 8759283. 10/14

YARDMAN WEED WACKER, gas motor, $40. 6294482. 10/7

BETA VIDEO PLAYER (not VHS) & 3 boxes of movies, all G-rated. $35. 628-1385. 250 GAL. OIL TANK, $100, exc. cond. 628-9245. 9/30 CHERRY WOOD, seasoned, $75 for 1/2 cord. 381-4656. 9/30 BOW-FLEX Extreme, $350 cash only. 629-7578. 9/30 BATH TUB ASST. BAR, $50. 875-2938. 9/30

ANIMALS, ETC. BORDER COLLIE, Female, 6 mos. old, registered, all shots, $450. 875-5164. 10/21


ATTORNEYS

Fuqua, Yori and Willard, PA

Auto Accident Injuries Real Estate Settlements • Divorce Wills & Estates • Criminal Defense Traffic Tickets - DUIs

CALL 302-856-7777 www.fywlaw.com

28 The Circle,Georgetown, DE

CONCRETE

• DRIVEWAYS • GARAGES • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS

MR. CONCRETE 410-742-0134

Mark Donophan

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

EMPLOYMENT

BUSINESS & SERVICE BUS DIRECTORY PAGE DIRECTORY

BARBER/BEAUTY

Healthy Hair Clinique

Healthy Hair with a Healthy Glow Men - Women - Children

Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

302-629-4281 Seaford, Delaware

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales

Donna Brown Call for an appointment!

239 E. Market Street Laurel, DE 19956

CONTRACTORS: DRYWALL FOR SALE

628-6980/6982 fax Cell 302-462-1528

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Your ad could be here!

Call The Star To ADVERTISE!

629-9788

LANDSCAPING

LAWN CARE

MOTEL

Superior Service at Reasonable Rates Owner Operated • 15 Years Experience

Landscape Design & Installation Landscape Maintenance • Irrigation Paver Patios, Walkways & Fire Pits

302-337-8202

Lawn Mowing, Pruning, Spring & Fall Clean Up, Bed Renovations, Garden Rototilling

SUNRISE MOTEL 22512 SUSSEX HWY. SEAFORD, DE 19973.

LOW WEEKLY RATE, START FROM $ 199.99 & UP. DAILY ROOM RATE START FROM $ 39.99 & UP.

Licensed & Insured

302-260-2679

302-628-0155 302-629-5511

SEAFOOD

TAX SERVICE

WATER TREATMENT

20478 Atlanta Rd., Bridgeville, DE

302-629-4548

302

629-0444

800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Fax: 302-628-0798 - www.jacksonhewitt.com

Independently Owned & Operated 320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2 31A Creamery Lane Millsboro, DE 19966 Easton, MD 21601

302-934-9450

410-819-6990

Delmarva’s #1 Water Treatment Dealer

Also Offering Premium Spring Water

410.742.3333 800.439.3853 sharpwater.com

Mid Shore Boat Sales “A BOAT FOR EVERY BUDGET”

New Owners: Jerry Banks & Chad Miller

Authorized G-3, Suzuki & Yamaha Dealer Full Service Sales & Parts Departments Custom Shrink Wrap, Winterization, Bottom Paint & Boat Storage

875-8099

Mon.-Fri. 8-5; Sat. 8-noon

Owned & Operated with 27 Years Experience

337-8186

IRRIGATION

Remind People You Are Here For Them!

U.S. 13 N., Seaford 302-629-9645 • 800-564-5050

OWNER OPERATED ~ LAUREL, DEL.

12567 Whitesville Rd. Laurel, DE 19956

Brian Papp

BOAT SALES

www.midshoreboatsales.com 11430 Trussum Pond Road, Laurel

Custom Homes • Additions Sheds • Roofing & Siding Garages • Porches • Decks & More

22367 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973

Millstone River Lawn Care LLC

875-7453

Approved

302-934-9450

320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2, Millsboro, DE 19966

Make Your Appt. Today with Victoria or Whitney at

Construction, Inc.

Specialty Products & Insulation Co.

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

Victoria’s Hair Classics

K&B

CALL CHRIS

FARM & HOME

BEAUTY/BARBER

CONSTRUCTION

1/2” 4’x8’ - $5.44 ea. 5/8” 4’x8’ - $6.08 ea.

M-F 7:30-6; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

302-628-0767

BEAUTY/BARBER

ELECTRICIAN

Ken’s Electrical Service All Residential Wiring

No Job Too Small! 20 Years Experience

629-3795

Cell 228-5435

Leave a Message!

LANDSCAPING Serving Delmarva since 1990

R & L Irrigation Services Finish Site Work Complete Irrigation Systems Sod Laying & Seeding Exterior Lighting Ponds, Mulching, Concrete Pavers

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS

302-530-3376

All State Land Design & Maintenance

• Landscaping • Fall Cleanup • Mulch, Sod • Tree Removal • Plant & Tree Installs

POWERWASHING

Chip Cubbage, Owner

PEST CONTROL

Don’t Get Bugged, call Ladybug (302)

302-827-2607 (office) 302-344-6774 (cell)

PRINTING/PROMOS

846-2295

Frank & Sandy Honess • Delmar, DE

www.ladybugpm.com Pests, Termites, Bed Bugs, Dry Zone Systems

WEDDINGS

Getting Married?

Stop By The Star Office Pick Up A FREE copy of the Stars’

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford

6299788

B RIDAL P LANNER

To Advertise In This Directory Call

302-629-9788

Only $10.00 Per Week (3 Month Minimum)

WEIGHT LOSS

Are you ready to commit to a Lifestyle change?

Why Weight?

Make the Transitions Today! You owe it to yourself to check out this program! Call 302-875-3099 for Info HealthierYou.TransitionsLifestyle.com


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR

LEGALS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ­ADJUSTMENT HEARING

Nanticoke Hundred Case No. 10738 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article VI, Subsection 115-42, Item B of said ordinance of ALFRED H. JOHNSON who is seeking a variance from the front yard setback requirement, to be located northwest of Route 13A, north of Garden Lane, being Lot 55 within Green Acres developmen. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Del­aw ­ are, on Monday evening, DECEM-

BER 6, 2010, at 7:00 P.M. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/4/1tc

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

Commonwealth of Virginia Code § 8.01-316 Charlottesville J&DR Juvenile Division Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court in re Mariah Nicole Jenkins v. Serita N. Jenkins. The object of this suit is to terminate the residual parental rights of Sarita N. Jenkins to the female child born August 22, 1994.

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

It is ordered that the defendant Sarita N. Jenkins appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before 12/22/2010, 9:30 a.m. Dated: 10/27/2010 Signed: Edward D. Berry, Judge 11/4/4tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING C/U #1875

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, DECEMBER 9, 2010, in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, George­town, Dela­ware, on the application of FREDERICK J. TAYLOR, JR. to consider the Conditional Use of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District for an

automotive sales lot to be located on a certain parcel of land lying and being in Little Creek Hundred Sussex County, containing 2.73 acres, more or less, lying at the southeast corner of Route 24 and Road 461 (Old State Road). Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this proposal may be examined by interested parties in the Planning and Zoning Of­fice, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Dela­ware, between 8:30 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/4/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Seaford School District Board of Education will hold a public meeting for the purpose of consideration of a waiver to the provisions of 14 Delaware Code §1705(A)(a) requiring any kindergarten or grades 1-3 public school classes to have no higher ratio of teacher to students than 1:22 by the last school day in October of the current school year. This ratio is only to apply to a class where students are instructed in core academic subjects of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. A local school board may waive this subsection after voting to waive it at a public meeting noticed for that purpose. Any local school board seeking such a waiver shall do so on or before December 1st of each year.

The meeting will be held on Monday, 8 November 2010 at 7:00 p.m. in the Ashok Champaneria Board Room, 390 North Market Street Extended, Seaford, DE 19973. Citizens may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education. Procedures related to the public forum portion of this meeting include: 1) Citizens who wish to address the Board shall complete the “Public Participation Form for School Board Meetings” (available at the Seaford School District Office at 39 0 North Market Street Extended during regular business hours or at the time of the meeting) and present it to the presiding officer prior to the start of the meeting; 2) Citizens may address the Board of Education by seeking recognition from the presiding officer. When recognized, citizens shall first state their names and the topic upon which they would like to speak; 3) The presiding officer may limit the time for comments. WHAT: WHEN: WHERE: WHY:

A public meeting of the Seaford Board of Education 7:00 p.m. on Monday, 8 November 2010 Ashok Champaneria Board Room, 390 N. Market Street Extended Consideration of a waiver of the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, §1705(A)(a) for West Seaford Elementary School, Blades Elementary School, Frederick Douglass Elementary School, and Central Elementary School

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The Seaford School District Board of Education will hold a public meeting for the purpose of consideration of a waiver to the provisions of 14 Delaware Code §1704(3). This subsection of the law requires all public school buildings to have allocated to them 98% of the Division 1 units generated by the actual unit count in that building by the last school day of October of the current school year. A local school board may waive this subsection after voting to waive it at a public meeting noticed for that purpose. Any local school board seeking such a waiver shall do so on or before December 1st of each year.

The meeting will be held on Monday, 8 November 2010 at 7:15 p.m. in the Ashok Champaneria Board Room, 390 North Market Street Extended, Seaford, DE 19973. Citizens may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education. Procedures related to the publ ic forum portion of this meeting include: 1) Citizens who wish to address the Board should complete the “Public Participation Form for School Board Meetings” (available at the Seaford School District Office at 390 North Market Street Extended during regular business hours or at the time of the meeting) and present it to the presiding officer prior to the start of the meeting; 2) Citizens may address the Board of Education by seeking recognition from the presiding officer. When recognized, citizens shall first state their names and the topic upon which they would like to speak; 3) The presiding officer may limit th e time for comments. WHAT: WHEN: WHERE: WHY:

A public meeting of the Seaford Board of Education 7:15 p.m. on Monday, 8 November 2010 Ashok Champaneria Board Room, 390 N. Market Street Extended Consideration of a waiver of the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, §1704(3) for Frederick Douglass Elementary School and Seaford Senior High School

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING C/U #1879

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, DECEMBER 9, 2010, in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, George­town, Dela­ware, on the application of LAUREL FIRE DEPARTMENT, INC. to consider the Conditional Use of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District for a fire department substation to be located on a certain parcel of land lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, containing 4.9652 acres, more or less, lying west of Fire Tower Road (Road 479) 550 feet north of Sycamore Road (Road 466). Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this proposal may be examined by interested parties in the Planning and Zoning Of­fice, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Dela­ware, between 8:30 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/4/1tc

Enjoy the Star? Subscribe Today!

629-9788

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The following ordinance has been proposed at the regular meeting of the Sussex County Council on October 5, 2010: AN ORDINANCE TO GRANT A CONDITIONAL USE OF LAND IN AN AR-1 AGRICULTURAL RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT FOR AN AUTOMOBILE SALES LOT TO BE LOCATED ON A CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN LITTLE CREEK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY, CONTAINING 2.73 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, (land lying at the southeast corner of Route 24 and Road 461 (Old Stage Road); application filed on behalf of FREDERICK J. TAYLOR, JR.; C/U #1875). Copies of the above Ordinance are available in the Office of the Clerk of the Sussex County Council, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware. Public Hearings thereon will be held in the Chamber of the Sussex County Council, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on JANUARY 4, 2011, at 1:30 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. At that time and place, all persons interested shall have a reasonable opportunity to be heard. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/4/1tc See LEGALS—page 51

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Woodbridge School District Board of Education as a part of its regular November public meeting will consider a waiver to the provisions of 14 Delaware Code § 1704(3) and § 1705(A)(a). Subsection 1704(3) of the law requires all public school buildings to have allocated to them 98% of the Division 1 units generated by the actual unit count in that building by the last school day of October of the current school year. Subsection 1705(A)(a) requires any kindergarten or grades 1-3 public school classes to have no higher ratio of teacher to students than 1:22 by the last school day in October of the current school year. This ratio is only to apply to a class where students are instructed in core academic subjects of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. The meeting will be held in the library of the Phillis Wheatley Middle School. Citizens may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education, under the public commentary portion of the meeting. WHAT: A public meeting of the Woodbridge Board of Education WHEN: Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. WHERE: Phillis Wheatley Middle School Library WHY: Consideration of a waiver of the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, § 1704(3) and § 1705(A)(a) 11/4/2tc


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 50

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The following ordinance has been proposed at the regular meeting of the Sussex County Council on October 12, 2010: AN ORDINANCE TO GRANT A CONDITIONAL USE OF LAND IN AN AR-1 AGRICULTURAL RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT FOR A FIRE DEPARTMENT SUBSTATION TO BE LOCATED ON A CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN BROAD CREEK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY, CONTAINING 4.9652 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, (land lying west of Fire Tower Road (Road 479) 550 feet north fo Sycamore Road (Road 466); application filed on behalf of LAUREL FIRE DEPARTMENT; C/U #1879). Copies of the above Ordinance are available in the Office of the Clerk of the Sussex County Council, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware. Public Hearings thereon will be held in the Chamber of the Sussex County Council, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on JANUARY 4, 2011, at 1:30 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. At that time and place, all persons interested shall have a reasonable opportunity to be heard. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/4/1tc

NOTICE

Estate of Thelma L. Ball, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Thelma L. Ball who departed this life on the 10th day of October, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Judy A. Thomas on the 25th day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 10th day of June, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Judy A. Thomas 26044 Butler Branch Road

Seaford DE 19973 Attorney: James D. Griffin, Esq. Griffin & Hackett P.O. Box 612 Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 11/4/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Maureen Gorman Keck, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Maureen Gorman Keck who departed this life on the 7th day of September, A.D. 2010 late of Lewes, DE were duly granted unto Courtney B. Peksens on the 21st day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 7th day of May, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Courtney B. Peksens 8329 Wesleyan St. Vienna, VA 22180 Attorney: Michele Procino Wells, Esq. Procino-Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 11/4/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of David Webster Lovelace, II, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of David Webster Lovelace, II, who departed this life on the 10th day of October, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Shannon M. Lovelace on the 22nd day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 10th day of June, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Shannon M. Lovelace 537 McKean St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 11/4/3tc

Subscribe Today!

629-9788

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

NOTICE

Estate of Pauline B. Carey, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Pauline B. Carey who departed this life on the 6th day of September, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Asher B. Carey, III, on the 5th day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 6th day of May, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Asher B. Carey, III 1371 State St. Dover, DE 19904 Attorney: Richard J. A. Popper, Esq. Young Conaway Stargatt & Taylor, LLP P.O. Box 391 Wilmington, DE 19899-0391 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 10/21/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of John A. Fredricks (Sr.), Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of John A. Fredricks (Sr.) who departed this life on the 25th day of September, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto John A. Fredricks, Jr. on the 12th day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 25th day of May, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: John A. Fredricks, Jr. 6922 Atlanta Circle Seaofrd, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 10/21/3tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hun-

dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot piece and parcel of land situate lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County State of Delaware being known and designated at Lot #2 of the Subdivision of lands of peter A. and Marjorie A. Eckert, as will more fully and larely appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Mann Associates Surveying Inc., dated January 25, 2002 and filed in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plot Book 76 Page 259. BEING the same lands and premises which Ricky L. Vickers and Marla Vickers did by deed dated May 19,2006 and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds, aforesaid in Deed Book 3323 Page 12 did grant and convey unto Mark Cox and Maria Cox. Tax Parcel: 4-30-16.0029.14 Property Address: 11903 ECKERT ACRES ROAD, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARK & MARLA COX

PAGE 51 and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that piece and parcel of land being known as Lot 18 of “John N. Wright’s Second Addition to Seaford - 1878” (Deed book 85-page 511 ) and situated in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and as shown on a survey by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated April 17, 2006 and more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at a rebar found on the easterly side of Pine Street and being a corner for this Lot and Lot 17; thence with Pine Street North 33°-59’-48” West a distance of 51.44 feet to a rebar found; thence with Lot 19 North 69°-12’-39” East a distance of 162.06 feet to a mbar found; thence with Lot 16 South 21 °-26’-46” East a distance of 49.52 feet to a rebar found; thence South 68°-59’-47” West a distance of 150.88 feel home to the point and place of beginning and containing 7.793 sq. ft., more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which Roger a. Shank and Melody Shank by Deed dated April 18, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3303, Page 219, did grant and convey unto Dana K. Parsons. Tax Parcel: 4-31-4.0065.00 Property Address: 405 PINE STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale

subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DANA K. PARSONS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land, situate in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, containing a total of 4.992 acre of land, more or less, and being further identified of “Residual” (1.7940 acres) and “Parcel A” (3.1980 acres) as shown on a plot entitled “Revised Minor Subdivision, Lands of Diana L,. Jewell and Kimberly M. Absher” prepared by Simpler Surveying & Associates, Inc., as filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 108, Page 185. Subject to a 50’ wide Perpetual Cross-Access Easement for Ingress and Egress as shown on the plot filed for record in the Office aforesaid in Plot Book 108, Page 185, and subject to any other rights of way, easements and or restrictions of record. AND BEING the same See LEGALS—page 52


PAGE 52 LEGALS - from Page 51

lands and premises which Diana L. Jewell and Kimberly M. Absher by deed dated October 20, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3376, Page 255 did grant and convey unto PHILIP E. ROBERTS, III and DORIS A. ROBERTS. Tax Parcel: 2-32-5.002.01 & 2-32-5.00-2.02 Property Address: 29299 HEARN LANE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PHILIP E. ROBERTS, III & DORIS A. ROBERTS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Dela-

MORNING STAR ware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece parcel and Ito of land lying and being situate in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, known as Lot No. l1 on a subdivision land of HEATHER GLEN, prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc., Registered Surveyors, dated April 28, 1995, revised May 2, 1995, and filed for record in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plat Book 54, page 142. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Pat Arost by deed dated May 29, 2002 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2771, Page 349 did grant and convey unto LEERONS SABB, JR. AND TASHANA Y. ROBERTS. Tax Parcel: 5-30-9.0032.10 Property Address: 12613 WOODBRIDGE ROAD, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

execution the property of LEERONS SABB, JR. & TASHANA Y. SABB F/K/A TASHANA Y. ROBERTS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings thereon erected, known as Lot Number Fifteen (15) and part of Lot Number Fifty-One (51) with improvements, on the Plot of Longfellow Park, which is of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 310, Page 590 &c., and according to a survey made by Harold L. Cook, Registered Surveyor, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob located in the sidewalk on the Southerly side of Pennsylvania Avenue, a comer for this lot and lands of Howard F. Callaway; thence turning and running South 13 degrees 01 minutes 00 seconds East 123.07 feet to an iron stob, a comer for this lot and located in the line of lands of Howard F. Callaway; thence turning and running with the line of lands of Howard F. Callaway, South 77 degrees 28 minutes 48 seconds West 91.41 feet to a pipe, said pipe being located on the Easterly side of Phillips Street; thence turning and running along and with the right-ofway line of Phillips Street, North 12 degrees 06 minutes 45 seconds West 123.62 feet to an iron stob located in sidewalk; thence turning a and running along and with the right-of-way line of Pennsylvania Avenue, North 77 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds East 89.47 feet to the point and place of beginning. Be the contents thereof what they may. BEING the same lands and premises which Donna Mitchell Stolzenbach, formerly known as Donna B. Mitchell, by Deed dated July 31, 1987, and recorded in the Office for the Recording of Deeds, in and for

Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 1510, Page 175, did grant and convey unto David J. Miller and Kathy S. Miller, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.10125.00 Property Address: 521 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DAVID J. & KATHY S. MILLER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little

Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the southerly right-of-way line of County Road No. 515 (40’ t/w), and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument (found), said concrete monument being located on the aforesaid southerly right-of-way line of County Road No. 515 at a comer for these lands and lands of Freddy T. Pusey; said concrete monument also being located 342 feet, ±, from the center line of the Penn Central Railroad; thence from said beginning point, by and with the common boundary line of these lands and lands of Freddy T. Pusey, South 06° 35’ 00” West a total distance of 183.58 feet, passing over a concrete monument (found), to a point located in the center line of a 10 foot, ±, wide ditch, a comer for these lands and lands of Philip Pinckney; thence turning and running by and with the center line of said ditch and lands of Philip Pinckney, the following two (2) courses and distances: (1) North 73° 509’ 15” West a distance of 106.88 feet to a point; and (2) North 54° 43’ 09” West a distance of 58.04 feet to a %” pipe (found); thence turning and running by and with the common boundary line of these lands and lands of R & B Investments, North 07° 05’ 40” East a distance of 129.96 feet to a %” pipe (found); thence by and with the southerly right-of-way line of County Road No. 515, South 86° 21” 23” East a distance of 155.34 feet to the point and place of beginning, and said to contain 25,438 square feet of land, ±, together with all improvements thereon, as surveyed by Simpler Surveying & Associate, Registered Surveyors, on February 13,2004, attached hereto and made a part hereof. BEING the same land and premises that Samuel C. Prettyman and Shirley D. Prettyman by Deed dated February 25,2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 2947, Page 209, did grant and convey unto Lisa Ann Peters and Raymond Clayton Peters III, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-6.0027.00 Property Address: 10110 BACONS ROAD, DELMAR Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of

the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LISA PETERS & RAYMOND CLAYTON PETERS, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, with the improvements thereon erected, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point marked by a monument set along the easterly edge of the 200 foot right of way of U.S. Route 13 and located 1366 feet more or less from the edge of the right of way of County Road 534, said point being a comer for these lands and lands nor or formerly of Arthur W. Crisfield, et ux.; thence along See LEGALS—page 53


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 52 the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Arthur W. Crisfield, et ux., South 71 degrees 42 minutes 20 seconds East for a distance of 578.80 feet to a monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Arthur W. Crisfield said point also being located along the lines of lands of Hubert B. Tharp; thence along the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Hubert B. Tharp South 35 degrees 33 minutes 28 seconds West for a distance of 200.53 feet to a monument, said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard; thence by and with a division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard; North 54 degrees 40 minutes 00 seconds West for a distance of 252.10 feet to a monument; thence by and with a division line now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard North 88 degrees 48 minutes 31 seconds West for a distance of 278.93 feet to a monument said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard and being located along the easterly edge of the 200 foot wide right of way of U.S. Route 13; thence by and with the easterly edge of said right of way the following two courses and distances: (1) North 14 degrees 31 minutes 00 seconds East 109.90 feet to a point; and (2) North 15 degrees 32 minutes 30 seconds East for a distance of 90.1 0 feet home to the point and place of beginning, containing 1.98 acres more or less, as surveyed by Gene R. Littleton, Registered Surveyors, dated September 1983. The above property is described more particularly in accordance with a Boundary Survey Plan prepared by Ramesh C. Batta Associates, P.A. dated May 9, 2007, as revised May 23,2007, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point marked by a monument set along the easterly edge of the 200 foot right of way of U.S. Route 13, said point being the following two courses from the northeasterly end of the comer cutoff connecting U.S. Route 13 with Tharp Road (County Road 534): (I) South 72 degrees 46 minutes 46 seconds West 36.48 feet to a point on the easterly rightof-way of V.S. Route 13 and (2) South 15 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds West 1335.63 feet to the point of Beginning, said point being

a comer for these lands and lands nor or formerly of Milford HHMO Center, LLC; thence along the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Milford HHMO Center, LLC, South 71 degrees 42 minutes 00 seconds East for a distance of 578.10 feet to a monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Milford HHMO Center, LLC, said point also being located along the lines of lands now of formerly of Tharp Road Acquisition Company, LLC; thence along the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Tharp Road Acquisition Company, LLC South 35 degrees 32 minutes 00 seconds West for a distance of 200.00 feet to a monument, said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Sussex Ventures Inc.; thence by and with a division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Sussex Ventures Inc. North 54 degrees 40 minutes 00 seconds West for a distance of25 1.50 feet to a point; thence by and with a division line now or formerly of James A. Davenport and Jeffrey M. Davenport North 88 degrees 51 minutes 19 seconds West for a distance of 279.01 feet to a monument, said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of James A. Davenport and Jeffrey M. Davenport and being located along the easterly edge of the 200 foot wide right of way of U.S. Route 13; thence by and with the easterly edge of said right of way the following two courses and distances: (1) North 14 degrees 31 minutes 00 seconds East 109.90 feet to a point; and (2) North 15 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds East for a distance of 90.10 feet home to the point and place of beginning, containing 1.98 acres, more or less. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.009.02 Property Address: NOT AVAILABLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BUFFET REALTY OF SEAFORD, LLC; FRANK C. ALARIO; NANCY ALARIO; CHARLES P. ALARIO; JANET T. ALARIO and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and being known and designated as Lots 23 and 24 on Plot 1 of George R. Hutson, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a nail set 12 feet from the face of the curb at the intersection of the Southerly side of Spruce Street (36’ flf) with the Easterly side of Hall Street (35.8’ fit); thence with a line located 12 feet from the face of the curb on the Southerly side of Spruce Street, North 79 degrees 49 minutes 49 seconds East 150.00 feet to a pipe set in the line located 12 feet from the face of said curb; thence turning and running along Cypress Street, South 10 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds

East 153.62 feet to a point located 6.23 feet from a reference concrete monument found at a corner for lands now or formerly of Franklin L. and Betty I. Phillips; thence with the line of lands of said Phillips, South 79 degrees 10 minutes 13 seconds West 150.00 feet to a concrete monumf3nt found 12 feet from the face of the curb on the Easterly side of Hall Street at a corner for lands of said Phillips; thence by and with Hall Containing 23,172 square feet of land, more or less, together with the improvements located thereon, as shown on a survey prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc., dated February 4, 1999. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed to Felix Castrejon by Deed from Barry E. Parson and Cheri W. Parsons, his wife, dated December 28, 2006, and recorded on January 26, 2007, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3410, Page 39. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.06170.00 Property Address: 327 NORTH HALL STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff

PAGE 53 of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of FELIX CASTREJON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain parcel of land situated in the Nanticoke Hundred, County of Sussex, State of Delaware, being known and designated as follows: Lot 2 of R.B.K., Inc. Subdivision, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a found concrete monument located in the Southwesterly right of way line of Route 18, said point being 445 feet from Route 528; thence along Lot 1 South 06 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds West 1055.52 feet to a found iron pipe; thence along lands now or formerly of John M. Sharp, South 62 degrees 30 minutes 36 seconds West 259.47 feet to a found steel post; thence along Lot 3 North 07 degrees 37 minutes 52 seconds East 1132.46 feet to a found concrete marker situate in the Southwesterly right of way of Route 18; thence along the Southwesterly right of way of Route 18, North 77 degrees 01 minutes 39 seconds East 205.00 feet to the point and place of beginning, containing 5.10 acres, more or less, as surveyed by McCann, Inc. by survey dated September 24, 2002. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Felix A. Medina and Martha Lima, by Special Warranty deed of Martha Lima dated October 19, 2007, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, on November 1, 2007, in Deed Book 3516, page 128. Tax Parcel: 2-317.00-30.00 Property Address: 16500 SEASHORE HIGHWAY, GEORGETOWN Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driv-

er’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARTHA LIMA & FELIX MEDINA, INDIVIDUALLY & D/B/A MEDLI FRAMING CONTRACTORS, INC. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land, being known as tax map #2-32 3.00 4 said to contain 96.46 acres more or less. BEING all or part of the lands conveyed unto Alden B. James, Trustee under Revocable Trust Agreement of Alden B. James dated April 28, 2004 as to an undivided one-half interest, of 27682 James Road, Laurel, Delaware 19956, and Nanette C. James, Trustee under Revocable See LEGALS—page 54


PAGE 54 LEGALS - from Page 53 Trust Agreement of Nanette C. James dated April 28, 2004, as to an undivided one-half interest, of 27682 James Road, Laurel, Delaware 19956 by deed of Alden B. James and Nanette C. James, dated April 28, 2004, and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2971, Page 271. Tax Parcel: 2-32-3.004.01 Property Address: RT 20, HARDSCRABBLE ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ALDEN B. JAMES, TRUSTEE OF THE REVOCABLE TRUST OF ALDEN B. JAMES U/A DATED 4/28/04; NANETTE C. JAMES, TRUSTEE OF THE REVOCABLE TRUST OF NANETTE C. JAMES U/A DATED 4/28/04; ROBIN T. JAMES & PAMELA S. JAMES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Le-

MORNING STAR vari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Al1 that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more parlicu13rly described as follows to wit: Beginning at a concrete marker 400 feet along the east side of Jewell Street, North of the intersection with the centerline or Delaware Route No, 524: thence continuing North 18 degrees 32’ West 100 feet 10 a concrete marker: thence North 71 degrees 28’ East 123.65 feet to a concrete marker: thence South 18° 45’ East 100 feet to a concrete marker; thence South 71 degrees 28’ West 123.92 feet to the place of Beginning, containing 12.400 square feet of land be the same more or less and being known as Lot NO, 54, as plotted by T. B. Simpler on a revised plot of “LAKEWOOD DEVELOPMENT” of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in Plot Book 8, page 349. BEING the same lands conveyed to Abbott & Abbott Construction, Inc. by deed or O. Evans Denney, United States Marshal for the District of Delaware, dated January 22, 1993 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 1909, Page 267. BEING the same premises which Abbott & Abbott Construction, Inc by Deed dated June 4, 1993, and recorded June 7, 1993 in the Office for the Recorder of Deeds in and for the County of Sussex and State of Delaware in Deed Book Volume 1915 Page 320 granted and conveyed unto Doralene Davis grantor/mortgagor herein. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.00122.00 Property Address: 24741 JEWELL STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash,

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DORALENE DAVIS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known and designated as Parcel “A” as shown on a plot of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 69, Page 152, and as more particularly described in that certain May 13, 2002 survey prepared by R.B. Kemp, Ill, P.L.S., as follows, to wit: . BEGINNING at an iron bar found in the easterly right of way line of County Road 484 (at 50 feet wide), marking a corner for this lot and Parcel “B”; thence turning and running by and with the line of Parcel “B”, South 69 degrees 00 minutes II seconds East 534.59 feet to an iron bar found in the line of lands now or formerly of ABC Woodlands, LLC; thence turning

and running by and with the line of lands now or formerly of ABA Woodlands, LLC, South 27 degrees 14 minutes 42 seconds West 199.41 feet to an iron pipe found in the northeasterly edge of a ditch; thence continuing South 32 degrees 54 minutes 44 seconds West 13.59 feet to a point in the center of ditch, marking a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Ralph A. Drumbore; thence turning and running by and with the line of lands now or formerly of Ralph A. Drumbore the following three (3) courses and distances: (1) North 65 degrees 40 minutes 04 seconds West 11.06 feet to an iron pipe found in the southwesterly edge of ditch; (2) thence North 65 degrees 40 minutes 04 seconds West 106.51 feet to a concrete monument found; and (3) thence North 65 degrees 40 minutes 04 seconds West 326.72 feet to an iron bar found in the southeasterly right of way line of County Road 484, marking a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Ralph A. Drumbore; thence turning and running by and with the southeasterly right of way line of County Road 484, along a curve to the left, having a radius of337.48 feet, a chord bearing North 01 degrees 16 minutes 44 seconds East 197.24 feet to an iron bar found, being the point and place of beginning, said to contain 2.182 acres of land, more or less, together with any and all improvements located thereon. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING a part of the same land conveyed unto P.A.F., LLC, by Deed of Lloyd E. Sammons, Jr. & Patricia J. Sammons, dated February 27, 1999 and recorded March 5, 1999, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2269, Page 302. AND BEING a part of the same lands conveyed unto P.A.F., LLC by Deed of Ralph A. Dumbore dated May 19, 1999 and Recorded May 24. 1999, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2390, Page 146. BEING the same premises which P.A.F., LLC, by Deed dated May 20, 2002, and recorded May 22, 2002 in the Office for the Recorder of Deeds in and for the County of Sussex, and State of Delaware in Deed Book Volume 2709, Page 221, granted and conveyed

unto Steven C. Graebner and Lisa B. Franklin grantor/ mortgagor herein. Tax Parcel: 2-31-14.008.09 Property Address: 23007 RUM BRIDGE ROAD, GEORGETOWN Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LISA B. FRANKLIN & STEVEN C. GRAEBNER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All those certain lots and parcel of land located in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, knoVvi1 as Lots 42.43,44.45 and 46 al1d more fully described in Deed Book 363, page 85. THIS CONVEYANCE is

subject to restriction as follows: 1. Only one (1) detached dwelling may be placed or erected on the property. A mobile home dwelling may not be placed on the subject property. 2. Any dwelling unit or conventional construction shall have a minimum of 1,200 square feet of living area. 3. No commercial chicken house shall be permitted on the property. 4. The property shall be maintained in an attractive condition and no trash, garbage or refuse shall be permitted on any portion of the property. 5. No unregistered vehicles or wholly or partially dismantled vehicles shall be permitted on the property unless housed in a garage or similar structure. Being the same lands conveyed unto K. Barry Kennedy and Beverly A. Kennedy by deed 0 Sarah Oliphant Phillips dated January 12. 1990 and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 1696, page 53. BEING the same lands conveyed unto K. Barry Kennedy by deed of K. Barry Kennedy and Beverly A. Kennedy dates May 11, 1995 and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2053, page 353 Tax Parcel: 3-322.00-65.03 Property Address: 31704 OLD STAGE ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will See LEGALS—page 55


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 54 be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of K. BARRY & DEBRA KENNEDY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, on the North side of County Route No. 66, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a concrete monument set on the Northerly right of way line of County Route No. 66, the said monument being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Robert Clark; thence North 45 degrees 58 minutes 20 seconds West 287.96 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 46 degrees 10 minutes 36 seconds West 160.0 feet to an iron pipe; thence by and with the centerline of a ditch, South 46 degrees 41 minutes 49 seconds East 265.43 feet to a concrete monument located in the Northerly right of way line of County Route No. 66; thence by and with the arc of a curve, a chord distance of 159.11 feet along a bearing South 54 degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds West to a concrete monument, the point and place of beginning, said to contain one (1) acre of land, more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Assoc., as recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 779 page 318. Together as an improvement to the land that certain mobile home a used 2000

Norris Homes, 68 X 27, Serial# N02012756TNA and N02012756TNB, Model# WM WM2866SC permanently affixed to the above described property. Being the same lands and premises which Teresa Aydelotte, did grant and convey unto Allen B. Aydelotte, by deed dated June 21, 2007 and recorded on July 3, 2007 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3469 at Page161. Tax Parcel: 5-32-15.0011.09 Property Address: 15091 PEPPERBOX ROAD, DELMAR Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ALLEN B. AYDELOTTE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com-

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

plex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being designated as Lot No. 301, in Woodside Manor, and being more particularly described, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the Southerly right-of-way line of Tulip and being a corner for this lot and Lot No. 713; thence with Tulip Place along a curve to the left having a radius of 595.99 feet, Delta 07 degrees 14 minutes 52 seconds, an arc distance of 75.27 feet, a chord of 75.22 feet and a bearing of South 59 degrees 36 minutes 58 seconds East to a concrete monument found; thence with Lot No. 303, South 23 degrees 26 minutes 21 seconds West a distance of 144.19 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and with Baynum lands, North 86 degrees 06 minutes 50 seconds West a distance of 84.20 feet to a concrete monument found; thence with Lot No. 713, North 24 degrees 55 Minutes 00 seconds East distance of 181.53 feet home to the point and place of beginning, said To contain 12,456 square feet on and, be the same, more or less, together with all improvements thereon, as shown on a plat by Temple-Sellers, Inc., dated February 23,2004. Being the same lands and premises which Ethel B. Engle and Gloria J. Thomas, did grant and convey unto James C. Bell, Sr., by deed dated February 26, 2004 and recorded on February 27, 2004 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2947 at Page 141. Tax Parcel: 5-31-10.18117.00 Property Address: 305 TULIP PLACE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before

December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMES C. BELL, SR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known as Lot No. 96 in “Morning Side Village II” subdivision, together with all improvements thereon, and being described more particularly as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe (set) on the Northerly right-of-way line of Greg Avenue (50’ R/W); said pipe being situate on the Northwesterly corner of Greg Avenue and Passwaters Drive (50’ R/W); thence with the right-of-way line of Greg Avenue, North 66 degrees 15 minutes 05 seconds West a distance of 151.49 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with Lot No. 97, North 23 degrees 44 minutes 55 seconds East a distance of 119.76 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence with Lots No. 63 and 64, South 69 degrees 47 min-

PAGE 55 utes 26 seconds East a distance of 174.49 feet to a point; thence with the rightof-way line of Passwaters Drive and along a curve to the right having a radius of 550.00 feet, the central angle being 05 degrees 13 minutes 28 seconds, the arc length being 50.61 feet, the chord bearing South 21 degrees 06 minutes 45 seconds West a distance of 50.59 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence continuing with the said right-of-way line, South 23 degrees 44 minutes 55 seconds West a distance of 55.00 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence continuing with the said right-of-way line and along a curve to the right having a radius of 25.00 feet, the central angle being 89 degrees 58 minutes 29 seconds, the arc length being 39.26 feet, the chord bearing South 68 degrees 44 minutes 51 seconds West a distance of 35.36 feet home to the point and place of beginning, said to contain 21,927 square feet of land, be the same, more or less Being the same lands and premises which Amos L. Bratten, Jr. and Lynn M. Werner did grant and convey unto Amos L. Bratten, Jr., by deed dated January 22, 2007 and recorded on January 30, 2007 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3411 at Page 39. Tax Parcel: 4-30-19.00279.00 Property Address: 11295 GREG AVENUE, BRIDGE­ VILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the

deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of AMOS L. BRATTEN, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate and lying in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, More particularly described as follows, to wit: Commencing at a post on the North side of Highway Route No. 46 leading from Middleford to Georgetown on the division line between these and lands of Edward Hearn; thence North 5 degrees 15 minutes East with line of land of Edward Hearn a distance of 150 feet to a point; thence North 83 degrees 10 minutes West a distance of 60 feet to a point; thence South 5 degrees 15 minutes West a distance of 150 feet to a point on the north right-ofway line South 83 degrees 10 minutes West a distance of 60 feet to a post, the place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. Being the same lands and premises which Rajun Cajun Homes, LLC, did grant and convey unto Russell Collins, by deed dated July 26,2005 and recorded on August 1, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03178 at Page 049. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.0047.00 Property Address: 12455 OLD FURNANCE ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of SusSee LEGALS—page 56


PAGE 56 LEGALS - from Page 55

sex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RUSSELL COLLINS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the development known as “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known and designated as LOT NUMBER 40 , as shown on a certain Plot of lots entitled “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, Baltimore Hundred Sussex County and State of Delaware, dated July 30, 1981, prepared by Peter E.

MORNING STAR Loewenstein & Associates, Inc., Professional Land Surveyors, which said Plot was filed for Record in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, on October 6,1981, in Plot Book 24, Page 135, and was revised by a revised Plot of “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, which said revised Plot was filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, aforesaid, on April 7, 1982, in Plot Book 26, page 39, which said plots are now superseded by a revised Plot of “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, which said revised Plot was filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, aforesaid on October 8, 1982, in Plot Book 27, Page 1, reference thereunto being had, will more fully and at large appear. TOGETHER with the right to use the common areas and roads in common with all present and future owners in Quillen’s Point Subdivision, pursuant to the “Declaration of covenants, Conditions and Restrictions”. THE ABOVE LOT is subject to the drainage and/or utility easement as required by Article 7, Section 6, of the Sussex County Subdivision Ordinance. THE ABOVE LOT OF LAND is subject to the “Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions”, dated November 30, 1981, as filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1094, Page 4, and are made a part hereof by express reference thereto, as fully and as effectually as though incorporated herein. Being the same lands and premises which John Y. Beck and Jean M. Beck, did grant and convey unto Joseph R. Foust and Lilia Foust, by deed dated December 29, 2006 and recorded on January 8, 2007 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3403 at Page 34. Tax Parcel: 1-34-5.00349.00 Property Address: 38874 COVE COURT, OCEAN VIEW Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bid-

• NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2010

der Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOSEPH R. FOUST, LILIA FOUST & PARASKEVA SOTIROVA and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: COMMENCING at a pipe met in the north side of Delaware Road No. 24, said beginning point being easterly 217.5 feet from the intersection of Boyce Avenue with the aforesaid Delaware Road No. 24, thence with the north side of said Delaware Road No. 24 South 71 degrees East a distance of 100 feet to a pipe; thence North 19 degrees East a distance of 135 feet to a pipe; thence North 71 degrees West a distance of 100 feet to an iron stake;

thence South 19 degrees West a distance of 135 feet to the place of beginning, together with the improvements thereon, containing 13,500 square feet of land be the same more or less, and being known and designated as Lots 10 and 11 and shown upon the plot of lots of Sussex County Development Co. as the same appears of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 310, Page 588. Being the same lands and premises which William R. Marshall and Julia Marshall did grant and convey unto Elmer A. Fuentes by deed dated December 28, 2004 and recorded on January 5,2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03084 Page 006. Tax Parcel: 3-32-2.0040.00 Property Address: 11333 LAUREL ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ELMER A. FUENTES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with the improvements erected thereon, situated in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, lying on the Southeast side of Meadow Drive, a short distance Southwest of Gum Branch Court; being bounded on the Northwest by Meadow Drive; on the Northeast by Lot No. 12; on the Southeast by lands now or formerly Morris L. and Denise L. Tatman; on the Southwest by Lot NO.1 0, and being designated as Lot No. 11 of the “Bridgeville Chase” Subdivision, as shown on the Record Plot Plan for the same as recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 48, page 136, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a found iron pipe in the Southeast right-of-way line of Meadow Drive, at a comer for this lot and Lot No. 12, said point of beginning commencing from the South end of a 25.00 foot radius junction curve Southwest right-ofway line of Gum Branch Court with the Southeast right-of-way line of Meadow Drive on the following two courses: (1) running in a Southwesterly direction with a 725.00 foot radius curve to the right an arc distance of 521.48 feet having a chord bearing South 24 degrees 58 minutes 55 seconds West 510.31 feet to a point; thence (2) South 45 degrees 35 minutes 00 seconds West 354.57 feet to a point; thence (3) running in a Southeasterly direction with a 2001.30 foot radius curve to the left, an arc distance of 123.46 feet, having a Chord bearing South 43 degrees 48 minutes 58 seconds East 123.44 feet to the point of Beginning; thence running from said point of beginning with Lot No. 12, South 44 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds East 406.20 feet to a set pipe at a comer for this lot and Lot No. 12, in line of lands now or formerly of Morris L. & Denise L. Tatman; thence running with lands now or late of said Tatman, South 45 de-

grees 35 minutes 00 seconds West 150.00 feet to a set pipe in line of lands now or formerly of said Tatman, at a corner for this lot and Lot NO.1 0; thence running with Lot NO.1 0, North 44 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds West 391.24 feet to a set pipe at a comer for this lot and Lot NO.1 0 in the Southeast right-of-way line of Meadow Drive; thence running with the Southeast line of Meadow Drive running in a Northeasterly direction with a 2,001.30 foot radius curve to the right, an arc distance of 150.78 feet, having a chord bearing of North 39 degrees 53 minutes 26 seconds East 150.74 feet to the point and place of beginning. Said to contain 1.3763 acres of land, be the same more or less, as surveyed by Earl D. Smith, Inc., Registered Surveyor, January 15, 2007. Being the same lands and premises which S & L CONTRACTORS Inc., a/k/a S & L CONTRACTORS, Inc., did grant and convey unto Larry T. Karnes and Tammy A. Karnes, by deed dated February 20, 2007and recorded on February 22, 2007 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3418 at Page 75. Tax Parcel: 4-30-16.0064.00 Property Address: 17891 MEADOW DRIVE, BRIDGE­VILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presentSee LEGALS—page 57


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010 LEGALS - from Page 56 ed to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LARRY T. & TAMMY A. KARNES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron rod found on the north side of Sussex County Road #480 in a shallow ditch, a corner for the lot of the grantee and the lot of Ricky Lee Eskridge; thence running North 73 degrees 30’00” West 199.27’ along the north side of said Route #480 to a found concrete post, a corner for the grantee and for the lot of Amy M. Littleton; thence leaving Route #480 and running along the Littleton line N 27 degrees 01’20” E. 200.19’ to an iron pipe found; thence continuing along the Littleton line N 32 degrees 07’ 45” E, 164.37’ to a point in the middle ora ditch; thence along the middle of said ditch S 47 degrees 59’07” E 211,97’ to a ditch intersection. a corner for the grantee and the lot of the aforementioned Ricky Lee Eskridge S 31 degrees 56’ 27” W 165.69’ to a shallower ditch, thence along the same bearing S 31 56 ‘27” W, 108.00’ making a total of 273.69’ along the Eskridge line to the place of beginning, containing 1.501 acres more or less. Bearings magnetic for the year of October, 2005, Subject to the restrictions, easements, rights of ways and agreements presently of record or that may be added and amended from time to time.

Being the same lands and premises which Jay R. Luff (by a Specific Power of Attorney to Mary Harding being of record in Book 877, Page 350), and Tracy L Luff did grant and convey unto Michael A. Stoe by deed dated October 21, 2005 and recorded on November 3, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3226 Page 105. Tax Parcel: 1-32-12.00140.00 Property Address: 10587 WALLER ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICAHEL A. STOE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hun-

dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known as Lot 16 of Saddlebrook Subdivision as recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 72, at Page 202, be the contents what they. BEING the same land conveyed unto Eric L. Willey and Julie M. Willey by deed of D & N Properties, LLC and Timothy Ramey Construction, Inc. dated August 12, 2005, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3186 at Page 99. Tax Parcel: 3-31-4.00214.00 Property Address: 21908 ANDALUSIAN LANE, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ERIC L. & JULIE M. WILLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

PAGE 57

FREE CLASSIFIEDS

Personal Items for Sale. Seaford High School students No Vendors Please.

Jacqueline Torkelson, Matt Taylor, Lamar Meekins and Jessica Harris recently participated in the National Technology Student Association (TSA) Call 629-9788, competition in Baltimore.

or send to P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973.

Students attend TSA competition

Seaford High School students returned from the National Technology Student Association (TSA) competition with honors and awards. The conference was held in Baltimore and hosted by Delaware TSA. TSA is the only student organization devoted exclusively to the needs of students interested in Sale. technology, and is Personal Items for supported by educators, parents and busiNo Vendors Please. ness leaders who believe in the need for a Call 629-9788, technologically literate society. or send to P.O. Box 1000,  TSA members learn through competiSeaford, DE 19973. tive events and leadership opportunities. Students compete in a variety of problem solving activities such as designing dragsters, structural engineering designs, communication systems and career exploration. This year’s team consisted of Jacqueline Torkelson, Matt Taylor, Lamar Meekins and Jessica Harris. Torkelson, a senior, and Taylor, a soph-

FREE CLASSIFIEDS

omore, participated in video production competitions. One of their tasks, “On Demand Video,” was to write, film and edit a 60 second video at the conference. Lamar Meekins, senior, and a top ten finalist in 2009, redesigned his 2010 state championship CO2 “Dragster design” challenge car. Lamar, competing against 132 of the nation’s fastest dragsters, held the number four spot until his front axle became loose causing him to finish in ninth position.  Jessica Harris, freshman, tried a “myth buster” aerodynamic “hump” design for her Dragster design challenge vehicle. Harris, making it the final field of 16 cars, was able to finish 11th missing the top 10 by two thousands of a second. She also brought home a third place trophy in the “transportation modeling” challenge. This year’s theme was “movie vehicles” and Harris built Evel Knievel’s rocket bike.

NEW MEMBERS - The Seaford Lions Club inducted four new members during a recent meeting at PK Restaurant. Membership Chairman, Tom Spires, was presented a Certificate of Excellence for his ongoing service to the club and the community by District Governor, Karl Gude, who was there on his annual visit. Lion Tom presented the following for membership: (from left) Merl Cordray, manager of Lowes; Steve Rose, president of Nanticoke Hospital; Don Tricarico Jr., vice-president of Clinical Operations at Nanticoke Hospital; and Jimmy Hoppa, Morning News anchor at WBOC TV. The new members were sworn in by Gude and then warmly greeted by the Lions’ members and Gude’s staff. See LEGALS—page 59


PAGE 58

MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

Letters to the Editor

What happened to the lights?

Has anyone else in the area noticed a significant rotation change in the stoplights along West Stein Highway in Seaford? While I’m not usually one to complain about community improvement projects, this particular issue has irritated me lately, and so I thought I would merely express my opinion to see if anyone else has been frustrated by the “red light problem” along Rt. 20. I’d like to begin by pointing out that the scheduled length of the red lights at key intersections along Stein Highway has already proven to be a mess for commuters, especially on top of the already prolonged construction projects scattered throughout town. For instance, time and time again I have witnessed repeated traffic delays and long lines of vehicles stretching from light to light due to the green lights lacking a longenough cycle time to allow motorists to pass through during the morning and afterwork hours. Although I am not arguing the subject of construction projects here, I am simply frustrated with the idea of having a barely needed turn signal that is scheduled for 15 seconds in length while the green light is only 30 seconds long with each passing cycle. Just the other day, I was traveling to Walmart to pick up a few things, and, beginning at the first red light at Rt. 20 and Sussex Avenue and ending at the Tharp Road light, it took me 15 minutes just to get to the north side of town! Stoplights are certainly assets toward enforcing traffic regulations. They ensure safe passageway for motorists along highways, roads, and streets and continually serve to protect the public from dangerous intersections. However, I went to college in suburban Philadelphia where traffic congestion has completely surpassed its maximum efficiency level and where stoplights are continually being installed at street corners at an alarming rate. Seaford is not Philly, nor does it simply have that kind of traffic (at least not on West Stein Highway). I am proud of my hometown and the small town heritage that I have grown up with and continue to love to this day. I also believe the mayor and city council have done a superb job of handling residential complaints and ensuring smart growth practices for the town as well. However, there comes a time where

traveling through Seaford becomes more of a headache every day due to unnecessary long red light rotations and unsynchronized stoplights at the intersections of Stein Hwy/Sussex Ave, Stein Hwy/Nylon Blvd, and Stein Hwy/Shipley Street. For these particular intersections, the length of the thru-green light has been reduced while the turn lane light shines brighter and longer than ever for cars that are not even waiting to turn. Now I am by no means a civil engineer, but don’t stoplights now come with motion sensor devices or longer light timers? There has to be something that can help ease the burden of traffic congestion in our city. I’m not sure about other residents, but getting to the north side of town by means of Atlanta Road, Ross Station Road, and Herring Run Road has certainly alleviated my frustration with the new red light rotation. I have personally talked to other commuters in Seaford, and they have noticed a sharp increase in the length of time it takes to get from one side of town to the other as well. While I’m not sure if it’s worthy of their attention, I certainly do hope that the City of Seaford and DelDOT can work to remedy the situation at hand and give motorists a break with the lights. They seemed to work great in the past! Let’s keep them that way. Jason Bradley

Resident of West Seaford

Hypocrisy is disgusting

I’m home under the weather, but need to get at least this little bit off of my chest.  I’ve just finished reading last week’s Star and again am disgusted with the hypocrisy in the letters section and the Republican party, in general.  As you well know, I am an agnostic.  At one point in time I was a member of Grace Baptist Church. I read the Gospels and got to know them pretty well, at least their espoused philosophy, or, what I should say, the philosophy of Jesus.  There is not one iota of doubt in my mind that, if Jesus were alive today, he would be called a socialist. “We are our brother’s keeper.”  “What one does to the least of these he does to me,” or words close to that effect.  “He who is without sin cast the first stone.” Sharing was endemic in Jesus’ teachings. So, it is that I am appalled at the crassness I see being espoused by the religious right, even an assistant pastor, who certainly should know better.  President Obama, with the help of

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 • 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com Serving the Delmarva Peninsula since 1996

Subscriptions - $21 a year in Sussex County $26 in Kent and New Castle Counties, Del., and Federalsburg, Sharptown and Delmar, Md.; $31 elsewhere.

Congressional Democrats, was able to get health care reform passed, which included adding 31 million people who had no health care coverage. That would perfectly fit Jesus’ teachings.  Jesus wanted to throw the money changers out of the Temple and Obama passed Wall Street reform. Now the Republicans want to undo that reform. I can’t believe my ears. Are we really that stupid to buy into this, to let the wolves back into the hen house? The Republican mantra is smaller government: cut, cut, cut.  But, most of the Federal budget covers the military, Social Security, and Medicare. Neither party, in reality, will touch any of those third rails.  Both parties agree that the Bush tax cuts on those earning under $250,000 should be maintained, at least for now.  The difference, of course, is that the Republicans want the super rich to have their tax cuts extended, too.  If one puts this a bit in perspective, at one time the super rich top tier was paying a 93% incremental income tax rate.  Now they squeal because they might have to pay 4% more tax than currently.  We still haven’t figured out a way to stop top industry executives from receiving outrageous compensation. The bald faced audacity of the Republican leadership and the seeming willingness of the American electorate to fail to see through all this amazes me.  David Stockman, Reagan’s man in charge of Reagan’s massive tax cut in the 80s, was on 60 Minutes last night. He believed that taxation has gotten a bad rap.  We want something for nothing, although the latter isn’t the case, as witness the growing national debt.  Reagan’s tax cuts took us from $1 trillion to $4 trillion in national debt. Now we’re at $13 trillion in debt. If you can’t cut, then you have to increase taxes, as Stockman pointed out. And, he thinks those under $250,000 ought to have their tax cuts expire, too.  The one area in which I agree with the Republicans is the estate tax. It is unearned income to the Federal government. At the least, the starting level needs to be massively increased and the incremental tax rates lessened.   Richard Eger

Seaford    

 

I’m simply fed up!

I’m simply fed up. The political ads this time around are sickening. This candidate does this, this candidate does that. Very few of the ads, and I will say the best of the bunch, are actually by the candidates themselves, speaking about themselves. The vast majority of all political ads are

by one of the parties or the other about the candidate from the opposite party. If the Coons/O’Donnell race is typical, the Democratic party is spending millions in advertising to discredit the candidate from the opposing party (Ms. O’Donnell). If the Republican Party had half a brain they could use the Democratic ads against the current Democratic majority Congress. Think about it, “She’ll fit right in in Washington spending our money.” Well who’s doing that now? But the Republican Party seems satisfied to let “their” candidate fend for herself, almost certainly guaranteeing defeat. Maybe this is what they want because their longtime candidate was defeated in the primary, embarrassing the party elite. I’m simply fed up. The political parties are only interested in their specific agendas. That would seem logical except for the extremes that the party insiders (the elite) take it to. Both parties grow government. This is what gives them their power. Both parties follow the Saul Alinsky model of social reform – say what you need to say to get into power and then do what you want because you are in power. The American public should be able to hold candidates and parties to what they say (contract law) and if they don’t follow through, they should be held financially culpable. I’m simply fed up. Every citizen in America has to follow a budget for their spending. We can’t go to our employers and say, “Oh, gee, I want to spend $1,000 more than I will make this year, so give it to me.” The American government has done this for ages and continues to do it. Congress is not held fiscally responsible. They do not guide themselves within the confines of any budget. If they need more money, they go to those in the country that pay taxes and say “we need more.” Congress, you are at the point where we do not have more to give regardless of the guilt trip you want to put working Americans on. I’m simply fed up. Congress, if you pass a law, then you, too, should live by that law. Who’s the elite here? I’m simply fed up. I will admit that when President Obama was elected, I had high hopes that he would be the one to break the political mold. I am saddened that he has let me down on the vision he gave me for those changes (the main one being both parties working together to build a stronger United States). All I can see is the number of bureaucratic elite has grown considerably and that true health care reform (i.e. lower cost and universally available) is nowhere near. I’m simply fed up! Paul Bradham

Seaford

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Composition Cassie Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Circulation Karen Cherrix

Secretary Tina Reaser Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Carol Kinsley Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg

Sales Rick Cullen Sutton Joseph Melissa Perdue

MSP Mission Statement

To create a business atmosphere where the ideas and efforts of creative people are encouraged and rewarded. To benefit our advertisers, readers and communities by producing quality publications. To work with others to help improve the quality of life for everyone.

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • november 4 - 10, 2010

New and shocking news about bigotry

I found out something new and shocking about myself from reading Pastor Kim Birowski’s Letter to the editor in last week’s Star. Apparently, I am a bigot against Christianity because I support the separation of church and state. Not only am I a bigot, but Rick Warren, author of The Purpose Driven Life; Alvin Plantinga, one of the most prominent Christian philosophers who is famous for his free will defense against the problem of evil; evangelical social critic Os Guinness; and noted evangelical Christian apologist and Philosopher J. P. Moreland are also bigots against the very faith that they have spent their lives and careers defending. Personally, I feel that the principle of the separation of church and state is what fosters the religious freedom that we have in this country. Of course, I know the phrase does not appear in the Bill of Rights, but I do think it is mandated by the language of the First Amendment. But even if you disagree that it is, I think the more important question is: “Should we have a separation of church and state?” The philosopher John Rawls came up with a brilliant method for aiding us in determining the right moral action on certain issues. Rawls said that we should reason from behind a “veil of ignorance.” In other words, when deciding issues of justice, we should pretend we do not know how the outcome will affect us or the group we belong to. For example, when deciding whether slavery is just, we should pretend that we do not know whether we will be the slaveholder or the slave. If we apply this to the separation of church or state, we should pretend that we do not know whether we will be a member of the majority religion or not. Right now, Christians are the clear majority in America, but what if instead Muslims held the majority? Christians should ask themselves, would they be fine living under Sharia law as they do in Saudi Arabia? Would they think it right to have mutaween roaming the streets, making sure that women were fully veiled and never associated with unrelated males? Does a separation of church state mean

Send us your Final Words

We encourage readers to submit items for the Final Word. If you have a pet peeve or word of encouragement you can express in a few words, email the item to us at editor@mspublications.com or mail it to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Include your name, hometown and a daytime phone number.

PAGE 59

Final Word that Christians should not vote their conscience? Absolutely not, but it does mean that the government should, in no way, promote or give privilege to any particular religion or sect. It also means that “the Bible says so” is never good grounds for passing legislation, just as we would not base legislation on the fact that “the Qur’an says so.” Even if there is disagreement over the principle of separation of church and state, I hope the disagreement can at least be respectful. Neither side of the argument should be dismissed as being bigoted. This sort of baseless name calling is just a tactic to squash serious debate (the same goes for referring to liberals as “marxists” or conservatives as “fascists”). I am of the opinion that a term like bigot should be reserved for, I don’t know, cases of actually bigotry perhaps. Daniel Richardson Editor

Vital Stats

Federal Debt as of November 3, 2010 at 9:55 a.m. $13,719,833,943,359 Population of United States 309,411,700 Each citizen’s share of debt $44,342 The average citizen’s share of debt decreased $134 the past seven days.

The debt increased by more than $43 billion and the population increased by 41,367. Source: brillig.com/debt_clock Note: Last week’s Federal Debt report had the wrong date. The date should have been October 27, 2010, not October 20.

Bryant Richardson

Historic perspective

The following is a reprint from April 3, 2008 edition of the Star: At the time this column was written on Tuesday evening, the national debt stood at $9,439,291,885,927. That’s nine trillionplus dollars as of April 1, 2008, and sadly, that’s not an April Fool’s joke. On February 27, 2008, the national debt was $9,323,631,424,048. I won’t even calculate the difference in overall dollars, but bring it down to a more understandable level. With the estimated population of the United States on April 1 standing at 303,730,989, the average amount of debt per person stood at $31,078. On February 27 the average debt per person stood at $30,622. That’s an increase of $456 in 34 days. Some Americans are not in a position to help pay down the debt. They are dependent on the government for help. That leaves those who may be able to share in the burden of repaying the debt with an even greater burden.

Sean Steward REALTOR®, GREEN

Residential • Commercial

We need to insist that the government act to reduce the federal debt. We can’t continue to worry about solving the world’s problems when we can’t even balance our own national checkbook. Reason must prevail. We must insist that our leadership take steps now to help improve our financial future. Publisher

November temperature records High 88 in 1950 Low 8 in 1938

Quoteworthy

“With hurricanes, tornados, fires out of control, mud slides, flooding, severe thunderstorms tearing up the country from one end to the other, and with the threat of swine flu and terrorist attacks, are we sure this is a good time to take God out of the Pledge of Allegiance?” Comedian Jay Leno

Last Laugh Mind of an engineer  To the optimist, the glass is half-full.  To the pessimist, the glass is halfempty.  To the engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

Bobby Nibblett REALTOR®/Broker

Cell: 302-381-1085 Cell: 302-236-2164 www.seansteward.com www.bobby@4htr.com

RIDGEWOOD CROSSING

Are you ready for winter? We Can Help, Call Today!

REDUCED PRICE...

Owner said bring offers. Home shows owners pride this 3 BR 2 bath home is located on a horseshoe drive. It has a family and living room, island kitchen, open floor plan, secluded back yard and new carpet. Need I say more this is a must see. Call Sean Today!

Brand new construction near cul-de-sac in Seaford’s newest community, Ridgewood Crossing. Home features 1400 sq ft of quality construction by JBS , situated on partially wooded 3/4 acre. Hurry, still time to pick colors!

NEW LISTING

We Service All Models

Sales • Service • Installation www.yoderdoors.com

302-875-0663

Route 13, Laurel, DE

Looking to become a homeowner this is your

www.4HTR.com

chance. What was once a model home can now be your first home. Great open floor plan with large kitchen and 3 bedrooms.

959 Norman Eskridge Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973

COUNTRy RETREaT!

Drive down your own tree lined driveway and relax on this 1.5 ac parcel. Single wide with a detached 2 car garage with plenty of room to grow. Call Sean today.

LOT

Remodeled and soon to be ready to

302.629-7711 move in. Still time to choose counter 800.447-7711

Approved for standard cap and fill septic. $45,000

tops. New cabinets, kitchen bathrooms and in ground pool are just a few of the features of this home. Situated in convenient location to everything that Seaford, DE has to offer. Call Bobby Today!

NEW LISTING

Bring all of your toys & animals, plenty of room. 3 BR, 1 bath home with hardwood floors, new roof, 30x50 detached 3 bay garage and paved driveway.


A Little Bit of Italy in Your Own Backyard 411 N. Central Ave., Laurel

Winter Hrs: Sun. - Thurs. 11-9:30, Fri. & Sat. 11-10:30

y e tr

Com

our

p m u L

bo-

302

Carry Out Available

Jum rab Cak

e”

he

T s on

r Sho

877-0660

Mouth-Watering Pizza, Pasta Dishes Homemade Soups and Desserts

e

tC

s “Be

Rice Pudding, Tiramisu, Baklava, Cheesecake, Napoleon, Canolis

laurelpizzeria.com

r e t a C We

Whether you’re hosting Christmas dinner or a holiday party, we have the catering menu and services to make your event an affair to remember. We offer a variety of catering options to meet your needs.

Catering Menu

Trays: Half Serves 8-10

Salad Trays

Buffalo Wings (50) 26.99 (100) 52.99

Mild, Hot, Extra Hot or BBQ half

whole

SPECIAL COMBO 34.99 67.99 Broccoli Bites - Mozzarella Sticks Chicken Nuggets - Onion Rings Jalapeno Poppers - Fried Mushrooms Chicken Tenders Meatballs

half

34.99 19.99

whole

67.99 37.99

Sub Trays

Served with lettuce, tomatoes, cheese, oil & vinegar half

whole

Mix or Match 29.99 59.99 Turkey, Ham & Cheese, Roast Beef, Chicken Salad, Tuna Salad, Italian, Veggie

Club Sandwich Trays

Served with lettuce, tomatoes, mayo, bacon & Provolone cheese half

whole

Mix or Match 34.99 64.99 Turkey, Ham & Cheese, Roast Beef, Chicken Salad, Tuna Salad, Laurel

GARDEN SALAD GREEK SALAD CHEF SALAD GRILLED CHICKEN SALAD GRILLED CHICKEN CAESAR SALAD ANTIPASTO SALAD

half

19.99 28.99 28.99

Oven Baked Trays whole

38.99 49.99 49.99

LASAGNA STUFFED SHELLS MANICOTTI RAVIOLI 29.99 54.99 BAKED ZITI BAKED ZITI 32.99 59.99 QUATTRO FORMAGGIO 29.99 54.99 BAKED ZITI W/SAUSAGE Dressings: Ranch, Blue Cheese, Thousand Island, Caesar, OR MEAT SAUCE Pepper Parmesan, Honey Mustard, Greek, Light Italian, Balsamic Vinaigrette, French

Pasta Trays

CHICKEN ALFREDO CHICKEN PICCATTA CHICKEN MARSALA CHICKEN PARMESAN VEAL PARMESAN HOMEMADE JUMBO LUMP CRAB CAKES CRAB BALLS Some items may require a 48 hour notice.

Your Choice of Pasta: Penne, Angel Hair, Spaghetti, Linguini, Fettuccine MARINARA MEAT SAUCE OR MEATBALLS ALFREDO SAUCE

19.99

half

whole

24.99 24.99

44.99 42.99

37.99

Whole Desserts

DELUXE CHOCOLATE CAKE 42.00 HOMEMADE TIRAMISU 35.00 HOMEMADE CHEESECAKE 35.00 CHERRY OR BLUEBERRY CHEESE CAKE 39.00

34.99 34.99 34.99 34.99 25.99

half

whole

34.99

64.99

34.99

64.99

64.99 64.99 64.99 64.99 49.99

Chicken, Veal & Seafood Trays

Central Ave.

Appetizer Trays

Whole Serves 15-18

Broad Creek

half

37.99 37.99 37.99 34.99 39.99

whole

67.99 67.99 67.99 64.99 69.99

84.99 169.99 84.99 169.99

s e t a c rtifi

e able C t f Gi Avail


November 4 2010 S