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VOL. 13 NO. 16

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2008

50 cents

NEWS HEADLINES BUSINESS PERSON OF THE YEAR - Laurel native feels blessed to be able to help his community. Page 3 BOAT RAMP COMING - Town council set to vote on agreement with state. Page 4 HOSPITAL CEO - Nanticoke Memorial names new administrator. Page 9

CELEBRATING VETERANS DAY - Above, participating in the the Delmar VFW Post 8276 service are, from left, Air Force Master Sgt. Tom Cherrix, Marine Corps Master Sgt. Jerome Will and Army Sgt. Dean Elliott. The post held a special ceremony to honor American prisoners of war. Below, Chaplain Richard Roller of American Legion Post 19 in Laurel addresses the audience Tuesday, Nov. 11. To his right is speaker Sgt. Gary Banks, Laurel Mayor John Shwed, Sen. Robert Venables, state Rep. ‘Biff’ Lee and Sussex County councilman Dale Dukes. Photos by Pat Murphy WE DID IT! Members of the Delmar varsity field hockey team celebrate a 3-2 overtime win over Middletown in the state quarterfinals. See story on page 41. Photo by Mike McClure STARS OF THE WEEK - A Laurel football player, a Delmar football player, and two Delmar field hockey players are this week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 43

INSIDE THE STAR BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS ENTERTAINMENT FINAL WORD FRANK CALIO GASLINES GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS LYNN PARKS MIKE BARTON MOVIES

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17 22 32 28 55 50 50 29 26 54 40 53 7

OBITUARIES OPINION PAT MURPHY PEOPLE POLICE JOURNAL PUZZLES SNAPSHOTS SOCIALS SPORTS TIDES TODD CROFFORD TOMMY YOUNG TONY WINDSOR

23 54 21 49 30 20 52 53 41 7 51 45 50

Election of Barack Obama inspires hope, optimism By Lynn R. Parks When Rose Poole was a young girl in Brunswick, Ga., she was forbidden by law to drink from water fountains that were marked for “whites only.” “We had to drink from the fountain for the colored,” said Poole, who lives

in Seaford and who turned 70 Tuesday. One day, when no one was watching, the young girl mustered her courage and drank from the white folks’ fountain in the town’s 5 and 10 cent store. She didn’t get caught, she said. And she found out that the water didn’t taste any different.

“Coming from Georgia, I’ve lived through a lot of the things that people talk about,” she said. That included segregated schools and struggles for racial equality. But she and her siblings were fortunate, she added. Continued on page eleven


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564240 $549,000 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY , 11/16, FROM 2:00 TO 4:00. 4954 Woodpecker Rd., Seaford. Host: Kevin Thawley Cell 302-258-6455 DIRECTIONS: West on Rt 20 (Stein Hwy) to West on Woodpecker Rd. Home is on the left.

555382 $245,000 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY , 11/16, FROM 2:00 TO 4:00. 131 Oak Lane Dr, Laurel. Hostess: Barbara Smith Cell 302-745-6489 DIRECTIONS: From Rt 13 in Laurel, turn West on Trussum Pond Rd, then left on Gordy Rd. Turn right on Oak Lane Dr. Property on the right.

562496 $235,000 3 BR, 2 BA Spacious colonial in country setting outside Laurel has irrigation, 3-season room, attached & detached garages w/ elec. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

558022 $135,000 2 BR, 1 BA Bungalow outside Seaford has many updates including new siding, roof & rear deck. Great home in a shaded location. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-7456489.

553349 4 BR, 1 1/2 BA Grand colonial in Laurel has wraparound front porch, rear deck, new furnace in ‘07, fresh paint, kitchen update w/porcelain & hardwood floors & new stainless appliances. Seller is a licensed realtor. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

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REAL ESTATE AGENTS 555116 $215,900 3 BR, 2 BA Like new Rancher on corner lot w/fenced rear yard outside Laurel has deck & separate 1-car garage. All appliances included. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302745-6489.

547494 $162,000 4 BR, 2 BA new contemporary in Laurel has 1st floor BR, architectural shingles, landscaping & open floor plan. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

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548712 $229,900 3 BR, 3 BA Townhome on Records Pond has 3-season porch, MBR & LR w/ waterfront views & new HVAC. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-5592333.

557523 $151,000 3 BR, 2 BA New Colonial in Laurel is close to shopping. Open floor plan with lots of old town charm. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

556973 $250,000 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA Rancher on corner lot outside Georgetown has 2-car attached & 3-car detached heated workshop.

564314 $189,900 3 BR, 1 BA Updated Rancher is close to everything on 1.01 acres in Harmony, MD & has 16x16 workshop w/elec. Call Patti

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562122 $63,000 Three one acre lots in Delmar School District with site evaluations completed. Build your new home here! Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

564230 $69,000 2 BR, 1 BA Bungalow in Blades on extra large lot. Great rental income with all city conveniences. Call

562346 $95,000 3 BR, 2 BA energy efficient Doublewide w/ beautiful floor plan in nice park outside Bridgeville on rented 1/2 acre lot. Call Dianne Reece’s

562324 $239,900 3 BR, 2 BA Class C in Delmar School District on large landscaped lot. Screened porch, new carpet, formal dining room. Call Dianne

cell 302-745-1151.

560550 $200,000 3 BR, 1 BA Rancher on 1.6 waterfront acres at Trussum Pond. Great vacation or year round home. Call Wanda

Wanda Rash’s cell 302-5428024. Rash’s cell 302-542-8024.

Reece’s cell 302-745-1151.

562178 $250,000 5 BR, 2 BA Great family home on 2 acres in MD has deck & patio and large family room, dining room and formal living room. Call Dianne

Reece’s cell 302-745-1151.

Call Wanda Rash’s cell 302-5428024. Haney’s cell 302-462-0710.

561156 $269,900 3 BR, 3 BA Split level in Atlanta Est on nicely landscaped double corner lot with inground pool. No town taxes!

558544 $89,900 Shaded lot in Greenwood with 2 BR, 1 BA Mobile w/deck & 2-car detached garage. Partially fenced lot. Call

Call Dianne Reece’s cell 302- Dianne Reece’s cell 302-745745-1151. 1151.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 3

Business person of the year has deep roots in Laurel By Lynn R. Parks The Laurel Chamber of Commerce has selected a fifth-generation Laurelite as its 2008 business person of the year. Greg Johnson will accept the award at a dinner Nov. 19 at the Georgia House. “This is an honor and is very humbling,” Johnson said. “Some fairly significant people have received this award and it is nice to be included in their company.” Previous winners of the award include John and Mary Janosik and the Carey family of Carey’s Sunoco Station. Johnson, 52, is owner with Ed Wilgus, Salisbury, of CAP Management, which has under its umbrella seven companies, including The Car Store, used car lots in Laurel and Salisbury. The largest of the seven companies, The Car Store employs 50 people. Cap Management in its entirety employs a little more than 100 people. Other businesses owned by CAP Management are Delmarva Motors Acceptance Corporation, Atlantic Financial Credit Services, Cash Advance Plus, Premier Reinsurance Company, Wye River Foods and Affordable Used Cars. Johnson has been active in the Nanticoke Rotary since its start in 1990. He organizes its charitable golf tournament every year, to raise money for area causes. Last year, the tournament brought in $45,000 for the new Pegeen and Samantha Brown Pediatric Area at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford. This year, the tour-

School in 1974. He attended the University of Delaware for two and a half years, studying criminal justice, then went to work for Conrail as part of the building and bridges gang, working on stations and railroad bridges throughout the Delmarva Peninsula. He left Conrail after two years to go into the insurance business and ended up as a partner in Fowler Williams Insurance Market. He sold his share of the company to the other partners about 10 years ago and joined Wilgus in CAP Management, of which he serves as president. Johnson and his wife, Carla, have four ney raised money for the Rotary Houses, adult children, Lindsey Smith, Laurel, emergency shelters in Seaford. In return, Nicole Condon, Laurel, Kyle Whaley, the Rotary members dedicated one of the Seaford, and Kimberly Whaley, Delmar. four units of Rotary House to Johnson. Johnson has also served on the board of They also have four grandchildren, Taylor the Good Samaritan organization in Laurel Smith, 5, Madison Smith, 1 and 1/2, Nathan Gregory Condon, 1 and 1/2 and the board of the Laurel Chamber of months, and Kamden Whaley, 4. Commerce. He is on Taylor, Madison the board of directors and Nathan Gregory of Nanticoke Memori- ‘I’ve traveled all over the counall live in Laurel and al Hospital and on the represent the seventh try, but I would always come board of Delaware generation of the National Bank. home. Laurel is where my family Johnson family in “I believe that I’ve town. Johnson’s brothbeen blessed and that is and it’s home.’ er, Wade, also lives in there’s a responsibiliLaurel. ty to give back to the “I am well-groundcommunity,” he said. Greg Johnson ed in the community,” The son of Norval Laurel’s business person of the year Johnson said. and Shelby Johnson, Johnson said that in Johnson grew up in the course of his insurance career, he Laurel and graduated from Laurel High worked in New York City and in Chicago. For your information: A dinner to recognize Greg Johnson, this year’s Laurel business person of the year, will be Wednesday, Nov. 19, at the Georgia House restaurant on Delaware Avenue in Laurel. Social hour is from 6 to 6:30 p.m. with a cash bar serving wine and beer. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 per person. Tickets will be sold through Friday, Nov. 14. To purchase tickets, call Joyce at the chamber office, 875-9319. No tickets will be sold at the door.

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But he always came home to Laurel. “I literally commuted to Chicago, leaving here on Sunday nights and flying back for the weekend,” he said. “I’ve traveled all over the country, but I would always come home. Laurel is where my family is and it’s home.”

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

VFW Veterans Day ceremony includes memorial to POWs, MIAs By Pat Murphy “Tonight is not really any different than any other night to many of us in this room, because all of us know what a veteran is and what they have done over the years, to see that our country remains the land of freedom. Now it is our jobs to pass this on to others.

“Nov. 11 was the date established as the day to honor all veterans. Tonight, we have all joined together in the celebration to honor ours in a very special way. Some of those veterans who celebrated with us over the many years have now gone to their heavenly home and they are the ones this memorial service is dedicated to.” These were the words of Post 8276

Council set to OK boat ramp agreement By Tony E. Windsor The town of Laurel was set to move forward with adopting an agreement with the state regarding the proposed boat ramp in west Laurel. However, the council meeting at which the agreement was to be adopted was cancelled. The issue is now set to be heard during the next council meeting Monday. Nov. 17. The boat ramp project has been a point of discussion between the town and the state since 2002. However, a variety of challenges have plagued the project, including an issue about whether a parcel of land offered by the town as a required match for the estimated $250,000 project was valued at the necessary price. Now, seven years later and with a price tag that is now estimated at $400,000, the town of Laurel has been told that the Division of Fish and Wildlife is ready to move forward on the project and will use special sports fishing and wildlife user license fees to pay for any necessary federal match for the boat ramp construction. The boat ramp will include a floating dock and a fishing platform. It will be located at the entrance to the Laurel River Park off West 6th Street and will include a parking lot large enough to hold 10 vehicles with boat trailers and 10 single vehicles. According to federal requirements, the boat ramp must be opened 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and involve no user fees. Also, due to the temporary loss of one of its certified project monitors, DNREC is asking the town to provide the necessary qualified project monitor to help oversee the boat ramp’s construction. During an October council meeting, Lynn Herman, a representative of Fish and Wildlife, which is under the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, said it would be necessary to develop a memorandum of

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understanding that would nullify any previous agreements and set the parameters of maintenance and oversight of the new boat ramp. The memorandum is necessary before the state will move forward with the project. It is hoped that during the Nov. 17 meeting, an agreement that has been drafted by the town will be approved. The memorandum stipulates that the state will take care of all costs associated with constructing the boat ramp, including the designs and environmental permits. The state will provide for “major maintenance repairs or replacement of boat ramp, parking lot, shoreline stabilization, storm water management system, courtesy docks and boarding docks to insure safe and efficient public use” and will erect a sign to identify the boat ramp facility as a partnership between the town of Laurel and the State Division of Wildlife and to say that it was built with Federal Aid and Sport Fish Restoration Act funds. The town will pay for operational expenses and services including utilities, repairs and replacement of all lighting, security, grass cutting and trash removal. The town will also monitor the construction, a job that will most likely be done by engineers at George, Miles & Buhr Inc. Full liability insurance coverage of the boat ramp property will also be assumed by the town. The proposed memorandum also stipulates that the boat ramp will be used as a public facility for at least 25 years. If the town decides to use the property for anything other than a boat ramp within the 25 years, it will have to reimburse the Division of Fish and Wildlife Services the remaining, pro-rated value of the facility based on the original construction costs. Pending approval of new memorandum, the boat ramp project could start construction within the next six months and be completed in 120 to 180 days.

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

Delmar VFW master of ceremonies and auxiliary president, Brenda Foskey, in greeting the approximately 100 members and guests at the opening of the Veterans Day service, Saturday, Nov. 8, at the VFW Percy Elliott Banquet Hall in Delmar. Foskey introduced guests Doug Niblett, mayor of Delmar, and his wife, Sue; John McDonnell, city manager of Fruitland, Md.; department 16 commander Calvin Mitchell and guest Toni Smiley; Jack Lewis, department service; Lee Lewis with the department guard; Tom Rippon, Post 8276 commander, and his wife, Meriam; Irma Sofinowski, department service; Perry Elliott, past post commander, and his wife, Marcia; commander Brian Sturgis; Debbie Sturgis, senior vice commander of District 4; and PSC Tom Kimball and his wife, Jackie. The service was opened by the presentation of the colors by senior cadets of Delmar Boy Scout troops 81 and 246. A wreath and candles were lain on a table by Tom and Meriam Rippon in honor of all post commanders, living and deceased. The wreath is a symbol of eternity and the red flower is for courage, the white for purity and the blue for tranquility. Representing the branches of service were Army Sgt. 1st Class Dean Elliott and his wife, Windy; Navy D4 Commander Brian Sturgis; Air Force Master Sgt. Tom Cherrix and his mother, Joyce Matthews; Marine Corps Sgt. Jerome Will and his wife, Jen; and Tommy Bowden and Beth Scott, members of the U.S. Coast Guard. Foskey told the audience during a cere-

mony to honor the nation’s prisoners of war and soldiers and Marines who are missing in action that there were 1,000 unaccounted for from Vietnam War, 8,000 from the Korean War, 78,000 from World War II and one from the first Gulf War. In addition, more than 100 soldiers and Marines who served during the 46-year Cold War are missing in action. In a solemn ceremony, the members of the auxiliary placed items on a table that are a reminder of the lives of the missing and the loved ones who keep faith waiting for answers. A red bow shows continued determination to account for the missing, a slice of lemon is a reminder of the bitter fate of those captured and missing in a foreign land, the Bible represents the strength gained through faith, an inverted glass symbolizes their inability to share in the days toast, a lit candle represents the upward reach of their unconquerable spirit, and an empty chair expresses their absence. Representatives from the branches of service placed hats on the table and saluted during the playing of taps. Recognized for their dedication to the VFW and auxiliary were Doris Adylotte, 48 years, and Betty and Carl Wilkens of Laurel, formerly from Delmar. Wilkens came home from the service in 1946 and has been a member since. Also honored was Sgt. Susie Calhoun, who returned from a year’s duty in Iraq with the Maryland National Guard Unit. Calhoun was responsible for seeing that 149 Care packages were given to soldiers in Iraq.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 5 LHS CLASS REUNION - Members of the Laurel High School Class of 1978 recently celebrated their 30-year class reunion. Class members who attended the reunion are, front, from left: Sue Ellis Pressley, Jan Conaway Allen, Kathy Foskey Givens, Debra Bailey Kennedy, Bart Phillips, Mozette Stancell, Gale Hall Daugherty and Jinya Short Bennett. In the second row are Laura Higgins, Mr. Bishop (class advisor), Brad Whaley, Brett Givens, Mike Horsey, Mike McCrea, Joe Hudson and Christi Banks. In the third row are Mike Walls, Steven Culver, Tambra Myers Wharton, Melody Givens Atkins and Chris Pressley.

Waste water treatment plant is half in, half out of town limits By Tony E. Windsor It appears that the Laurel wastewater treatment plant is sitting on land that is not part of the town. According to town manager Bill Fasano, employees who were reviewing Sussex County parcel maps found that a small portion of land that is occupied by the wastewater plant is not in Laurel corporate limits. The state requires that the town pass an

ordinance annexing the property into the town. The State Office of Planning, a division of the Delaware Office of Management and Budget, has told the town that this action need only be approved by the town council. The standard annexation process is being waived by the state. Constance Holland of the Office of Planning informed the town about the need for the annexation ordinance. “After

review of the materials provided and several phone conversations, it is my understanding that this is a mapping error and therefore in my opinion will not require a Plan of Services review by this office,” she said. Holland said once the town completes the process of approving an ordinance to annex the property the mapping error will be corrected. She said any future annexation would need to follow the standard

process of providing her office with a Plan of Services. The Plan of Services is part of the annexation process and includes a review of annexation requests done by the town’s Annexation Committee prior to entertaining a decision by the full council. The town council approved a first reading of the ordinance to annex the property during its Oct. 20. meeting. A second and final reading is scheduled for the Nov. 17 meeting.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • NOV. 13 -19, 2008

Business Workshop on organic farming to be held

Stephen Huston joins CFM

Kathy Farnell, vice president and broker of Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc., announces that Stephen R. Huston has joined the firm. In addition to his position as a realtor, Huston is also a state certified residential real estate appraiser in both Delaware and Maryland with Huston Appraisal Company in Seaford. Over the past 17 years, Huston has had significant experience in both appraising and selling all types of residential properties throughout Sussex County, including high value resort homes and homes with historic appeal. He is a member of the National Association of Realtors and an associate member of the Delaware Chapter of the Appraisal Institute. In 2005 he was appointed by Governor Ruth Ann Minner to serve on the Delaware Council of Real Estate Appraisers and was elected chair in January. Huston is a 1991 graduate of East Carolina University and resides in Seaford with his wife Donna. He can be reached at 302-629-4514 or 302-745-2603.

Scott elected to board of directors

Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc., (CFM) announces that Terry Scott was recently elected to its board of directors. To qualify for nomination to the board, Scott had to achieve specific sales goals and demonstrate qualities considered essential to being an exemplary realtor. “Terry has been an asset to our firm’s continued Scott growth and to the real estate industry since she began her career in 2004,” said Broker Dee Cross. Terry joins board members Broker Dee Cross, Trina Ruark, Karen Hamilton, Randy Hill, Fran Ruark, Bev Blades, Broker Kathy Farnell and President George Farnell.

RIBBON CUTTING - Whimsey Cottage recently held a ribbon cutting to celebrate their grand opening. Pictured from left is Jane Sheilds, manager and Linda White, owner. Also in attendance were representatives of the Laurel Chamber of Commerce, Don Dykes, Ellen Hudson, AL Turchan and Connie Lewis Young.

The Delaware Organic Food and Farming Association (DOFFA), in partnership with the University of Delaware and DSU Cooperative Extension, is presenting a workshop and question & answer session on “Getting Started in Organic Farming” on Thursday, Nov. 20 at 6 p.m. at the University of Delaware Carvel Research & Education Center on Route 9 in Georgetown. This will be a valuable session for anyone who is interested in transitioning to the organic market. University Extension agents, a Delaware based inspector who works with USDA accredited organic certifiers, local USDA Certified organic producers, DE Department of Agriculture personnel and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service representatives will be available to answer questions. For more information, contact Gordon Johnson at 302-730-4000 or Lynne Betts, DOFFA at 302-629-3949 or 302-2655602. Register in advance by calling 302730-4000.

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CFM announces top producers

Kathy Farnell, vice president of Callaway, Farnell and Moore Real Estate, announces the firm’s top producers for October. Bev Blades was the top selling agent and Terry Scott was the top listing agent for the month.

Plaque honors Callaway

Sussex County Council dedicated a plaque to honor Paramedic Stephanie Callaway. The plaque will hang in the council chambers to honor Paramedic Callaway, who was killed in the line of duty on June 17. Sussex County E.M.S. Director Glenn Luedtke read the inscription:“This plaque is placed in loving memory of Sussex County EMS Paramedic Stephanie Callaway, who was tragically killed in the line of duty on June 17. She will always live in the hearts of those who were fortunate enough to know her, and the patients she cared for.”

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 11/14 & SATURDAY 11/15 FRIDAY Check The Madagascar II: Escape To Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . .7:00 Star to see if High School Muscial III Senior Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . .9:00 shows are SATURDAY Madagascar II: Escape To Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . .5:30 continued by High School Muscial III Senior Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . .7:30 one week. Beverly Hills Chihuahua . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . .9:00

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 11/14 THRU THURSDAY, 11/20 Quantum of Solace . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 1:40, 3:50, 4:50, 6:45, 7:15, Madagascar: Escape To Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:00, 5:00, Secret Life of Bees . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:05, Beverly Hills Chihuahua . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 3:50, High School Musical 3: Senior Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:00, Saw V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:45, Soul Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:00, Nights in Rodanthe . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 4:10, The Haunting of Molly Hartley . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:15, Zack and Miri Make A Porno . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:40, Body of Lies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:00, Role Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:35, The Changeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:35, all shows subject to change and availability

9:10, 9:35 7:00, 9:00 7:00, 9:20 6:30, 8:50 6:35, 9:00 7:20, 9:40 6:35, 9:00 6:45, 9:15 6:50, 9:05 7:25, 9:45 6:40, 9:20 7:05, 9:30 7:05, 9:30

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 11/14 THRU THURSDAY 11/20 CLOSED MON. & TUES. Nights in Rodanthe . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nightly 7:30 Sunday 2:30, 7:30

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Seaford native cuts down tree for Capitol By Carol Kinsley The citizens of Montana have a gift for the nation, a magnificent, 60-foot fir which will stand as “the People’s Tree” in front of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. this Christmas. Each year a different National Forest and the state in which that forest is located are asked to provide the Capitol Christmas Tree and all the trimmings. This year the honor belongs to the Bitterroot National Forest in western Montana — and the honor of climbing the tree one final time to rig it for cutting and transport fell to Don Booth Jr., a native of Seaford. Booth, whose father and newlywed daughter, city employee Tricia Newcomer, still live in Seaford, moved to Montana in the early 1990s. He is a forestry tech in the Darby Ranger District, working in silviculture and reforestation. Because he's a certified climber, he does a lot of tree climbing. For example, he climbs white bark pine trees that are resistant to blister rust to install cages to collect the pine cones for planting seed in an experimental nursery, and he collects scions (the tips of branches) to graft onto other trees. On Nov. 1, Booth headed into the Sapphire Mountains of Bitterroot National Forest before dawn, hiking to an elevation of 5,500 feet near Skalkaho Creek. He was accompanied by a second climber as required by the Forest Service in case a rescue is necessary. At the foot of a subalpine fir, they strapped on their gear as a huge 100-ton crane was moved into place. The tree towered 97 feet high, according to the laser measurements. Its girth was so big Booth could just barely wrap his arms around it when hooking the climbing ropes. They climbed the thick branches almost to the top. A nylon strap weighing 20 to 30 pounds was lifted by the crane and maneuvered toward Booth using relayed radio instructions since the crane operator could not see him. He wrapped the strap around the tree, then hooked it onto the ball of the crane. “Then we climbed down,” he said. Meanwhile, a crowd of 600 on-lookers began to gather nearby for a ceremony. They were shuttled two miles into the forest to a trailhead from which they had to hike another quarter mile. Some sipped coffee or hot cocoa and warmed themselves by a toasty fire while waiting for the cutting of the tree. “The tricky part,” Booth said of his job, “was that there were two balls (hooks) on

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the crane.” The first held the tree almost perpendicular, the crane operator balancing 6,000 pounds when the tree was first cut. The second ball would pick up the stump end to lay the tree down horizontally. It had to be connected so the tree could spin on the cable without going through any branches and so the straps would not slip and peel any branches off, Booth said. A knee-high stump was left. In order to fit the tree onto the special trailer which had been lengthened to 80 feet, 4-foot sections were lopped off until the tree measured 79 feet. It then weighed 3,800 pounds. “The crane operator set it down close to the road so as not to let the weight break any branches,” Booth continued. “We let the public touch it and ‘ooh’ and ‘ahh’ over it, then moved the crowd back and put it in a cradle on the trailer. There was a big sigh of relief for all involved to see it loaded on the truck,” he said. The process began two years ago, he explained, when anyone, including park visitors, who found a good candidate for the national tree was asked to recommend it to rangers and foresters to look at. Alternate trees are always chosen in case the top breaks off or something else happens. Once the selection was made, it was kept a big secret. “We even had law enforcement camped out,” Booth said, to protect the tree in the final days from “tree huggers” or someone who might try to climb the tree to keep it from being cut. After a blessing by the Salish tribe, special music and speeches, branches from two adjacent “donor” trees were loaded, along with branches that had to be cut from the tree itself, onto the trailer. These will be anchored onto the tree, once it is set into place on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, to make it look fuller. The whole load was covered and the convoy — including a forestry supervisor and public affairs officer — set off on a six-week journey through Montana and on to Washington. There will be ceremonies in “a mess of towns” on the Montana end of the 3,730-mile journey and at a few other stops along the way, Booth said. The journey can be tracked via a link found at www.capitolchristmastree2008.org. Also part of the gift from Montana are more than 70 smaller trees which will decorate congressional offices, agency and organization headquarters throughout Washington, and more than 5,000 handmade outdoor ornaments from 73 different towns and cities. Among them are laminated pa-

per ornaments made by the Hidden Lake Hutterite Colony in Cut Bank, Mont., where the school consists of six students and one teacher. About 65 percent of the ornaments came from 4-H groups. The tree is due to arrive in Washington on Nov. 21. At 5 p.m. on Dec. 2, a flip of a switch will illuminate 10,000 lights on the tree. Don Booth won't be there. The towering trees he'll be admiring are illuminated only by twinkling stars in the Montana sky.

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Marilyn Wildey, forest hydrologist tech and coordinator of the Capital Christmas Tree Project, checks out the 97-foot subalpine fir which is now on its way to the Capital Building in Washington, D.C. Photo courtesy Bitterroot National Forest Community Affairs

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 9

Nanticoke Health has new senior management team Robert Boyd, chairman of the Board for Nanticoke Health Services, announces that a new senior management team is in place. Steven A. Rose, RN, MN, has been appointed as president and Chief Executive Officer. Rose was previously Nanticoke’s Chief Operating Officer and Chief Nurse. Rose brings to the role extensive experience in health care senior leadership and has over 34 years experience in the health care field. His experience includes nursing, hospital administration, and serving as Pennsylvania’s Medical State Area Command Executive Officer of the Army National Guard. Rose holds a Master’s Degree in Nursing from Pennsylvania State University and acquired a Post-Master’s Certificate in Hospital Administration from Villanova University. Rose, along with his wife, Rosie, resides in Bridgeville. “Steve is supported by a senior management team that brings a combination of extensive experience in operations, finance, nursing, and human resources,” said Robert Boyd, chairman of the Board for Nanticoke Health Services. “Steve’s ability to positively guide the team to provide the highest levels of quality care and patient satisfaction, gives me the utmost confidence in the viability of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital.” Leadership changes also include the promotion of Thomas E. Brown, who has been serving as Vice President, Corporate Development for the past seven years. Brown will serve as Nanticoke’s Senior Vice President. Brown holds a Master’s degree in Finance and has over 22 years of experience in Marketing and Development. He is active in the community by serving on numerous boards and associations, including serving as president of

Dairy Queen burglarized

Seaford Police report that on Saturday, Nov. 8, at 7:20 a.m. officers responded to the Dairy Queen in reference to a burglary. The thieves forced entry into the business and removed an undisclosed amount of cash. The Seaford Police Departments Criminal Investigations Division responded and processed the scene. The Seaford Police Department is asking anyone with information about this crime to call 629-6644 or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP3333 or online www.tipsubmit.com. Delaware Crime Stoppers is offering a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those involved.

ronments. Hall is a Certified Public Accountant and has a B.A. in Business Administration from the University of Tennessee. “We’ve promoted leadership from within Nanticoke’s ranks,” said Steven A. Rose, RN, MN, Nanticoke’s newly appointed President and Chief Executive Officer, “and I am positive senior management will utilize their ex-

tensive knowledge of the organization to help further cement the foundation of our hospital here in our community.” About Nanticoke Nanticoke Health Services features a full-service community hospital, an award-winning, longterm care facility, emergency services ranked #1 in Delaware

for heart emergencies, a cancer center with the most advanced radiation oncology technology on Delmarva, the only Delaware health care facility to have an Outpatient Pulmonary Rehabilitation program certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and physicians in more than 35 different specialties.

Steven A. Rose, RN, MN, is Nanticoke Health Service’s new president and Chief Operating Officer.

the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce. He is also a past president of the Nanticoke Rotary and served on the Board of Directors for the Seaford Golf and Country Club. Penny L. Short, RN, BSN has been promoted to Chief Nursing Officer. Short will be responsible for providing a vision and strategic focus for nurses throughout the organization. A native of Delaware, Short has a Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing, is a registered nurse, and has over 24 years experience in the nursing field. In addition to delivering hands-on nursing service to many of Nanticoke’s patients, she’s held various roles within the organization, including Joint Commission Coordinator, Critical Care Services Director, and Acute Care Clinical Process Coordinator. In addition, members of Senior Management will assume additional responsibilities. Theresa Drye, PHR, MBA will assume more administrative duties in addition to her current responsibility for Human Resources. Drye joined Nanticoke Health Services in 2006 and has more than 18 years of human resource, finance and operational experience. As Chief Administrative Officer, Drye will oversee Food Services, Occupational Health, Laboratory, Therapy Services, and other departments. Drye has a Master’s Degree in Business Administration and a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology and Business. Darr Hall, CPA, responsible for Nanticoke Health Services financial operations management, will continue to hold the position of Chief Financial Officer. Hall has more than 30 years of experience in health systems. He has worked in all aspects of hospital financial operations and diversified health care envi-

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MLS# 563769 $225,000. 5077 Old Sharptown Rd., Laurel. This 3 bdrm, 2 ba home is ready to move in. Home offers 30x60 pole barn/garage w/water & electric, mstrbdrm w/ full ba, lg LR and backyard deck. Directions Rt 24 W, R on Airport Rd., L onto Old Sharptown Rd., home is approx 1 mi on R, up on a hill, look for sign. Hostess - Keri Simpler, 302236-5257 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 563879 $399,900. 10368 Fox Glen Drive, Bridgeville. Wonderful 4 bdrm, 3 1/2 ba ready to move in home. This home offers a 2 car detached garage and a 2 car attached garage, private lot with a sunroom in the back. View of the wild life. Directions - North on 13, turn R on Camp Road, go to Eskridge Rd., turn R follow to Fox Glen, turn R, house is at the end, look for sign. Hostess - Carol Crouse, 302-236-4648 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 558427 $159,900. 11781 Glen Circle, Bridgeville. Spacious 3 bdrm, 2 ba rach style doublewide - features built-in entertainment Center & surround sound speakers. Owners suite w/large soaking tub, separate shower and walk-in closets. Directions - From Seaford: 18/404 E, left on Oak Rd at the Country Store, continue on Oak, left on Glen Circle - look for sign. Hostess - Trina Joyner, 302-745-3840 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

Just reduced over $12,000! Brand new for you! Pick your carpet colors. Very nice new home in a great country location yet close to town amenities! Oversized 2 car garage with large Bonus/Storage room above with walk in stairs. Formal foyer, lg. fam./living room, King Size Master Suite with soaking tub and walk in closets. This home has too much to mention. Another—must see! $2,500 SELLERS ASSISTANCE! $257,900 (MLS# 557309) Directions: Heading South from Seaford/ Blades on Alt.13 past Mernies Produce. Turn Right on Johnson Rd. (488). Cross railroad tracks. Home on Right. Your Host: The Builder!

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MLS# 561062 $164,900. 11810 Sandy Ridge Dr., Laurel. Freshly painted 3 BR, 2 BA home in excellent condition. Lg kitchen with ctr island, MSTRBDRM features 2 walkin closets and remodeled ba. Lg LR w/gas fireplace & oragmi ceiling, sunroom too!. Shed w/elec & cable. Directions - From Rt 13 head E on Rt 24 about 1/2 mile, R onto Old Stage Rd, L into entrance to Sandy Ridge, home is on the R. Host - Rick Bennett, 302-228-1760 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 564233 $315,000. 103 Emily’s Pintail Drive, Bridgeville. This 3 bdrm, 3 ba home located in Heritage Shores is ready to move in at a great price. Beautiful Mastersuite, 2 car garage, 3 zone gas hot water heat. Guest rm w/sitting area on 2nd floor, full bath on second floor. Bonus rm/extra bdrm 2nd floor. Directions - Heritage Shores entrance is on southbound Rt 13 in Bridgeville, go around 1st and 2nd circle go to 1st street on R Emily’s Pintail, 1st fork bear L, look for sign, home is on the right. Hostess Carol Crouse, 302-236-4648

MLS# 559644 $349,900. 6 Amanda’s Teal Drive, Bridgeville. Spectacular house with views of pond, golfers & clubhouse. Home offers a 3 season porch, 1st flr mstrbdrm w/full bath & walk in shower, guest bdrm/den & full bath. Second flr has a 3rd full bath/private guest bdrm suite with sitting room, plus bonus bdrm, 3 zone gas hot water heat. Directions - Heritage Shores entrance, southbound Rt. 13, just south of Rt 404, turn into community, pass clubhouse & sales office, left on Willis Island next left go to end. Hostess - Holly Cooper, 302-236-3352

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MLS# 563595 $449,900. 107 Rivers End Drive, Seaford. New 4 bdrm, 3 1/2 ba home in the gorgeous waterfront community of Rivers End. Home features 9’ ceilings on 1st flr, hardwood floors, ceramic tile, granite countertops, whirlpool tub in MB, gas fireplace, upgraded appliances and paved drive all situated on 3/4 acre. Directions - E on Middleford Rd, turn R onto Old Furnace Road, turn R onto Old Meadow Rd., left into Rivers End, left at first Y, home on left. Host Bobby Nibblett, 302-236-2164

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MLS# 563724 $399,900. 16042 Hardscrabble Road, Seaford. Spacious 5 bdrm, 2.5 ba rancher - home features oversized garage, inground pool, sunroom, large composite deck, exquisite master suite with sitting rm, LR w/fireplace on 1.62 partially wooded acres. Close to Georgetown and Millsboro. Directions - From Rt 13S in Seaford, turn left onto Concord, follow for approx 7.2 miles, home is on the right - look for sign. Host Frank Parks, 302-745-7653 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 559975 $259,900. 9669 North Shore Drive, Seaford. Tastefully maintained 4 bdrm, 2 1/2 ba home - new custom kitchen, beautiful refinished wood floors all located in a peaceful and quiet neighborhood. Directions - Rt 13S, turn L onto Middleford Rd. - go 1.5 miles turn R onto North Shore Dr., around the bend, house is on L. Host - Mike Procino, 302-542-9726 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 564348 $149,900. 10061 Fay Avenue, Seaford. Cute 2 bdrm, 1 ba home close to shopping and retaurants. Roof and siding 3-4 years old, very well taken care of. Home features nice back deck and shed. Directions From Middleford Rd., turn into Kenmore Park and then on to Fave Avenue, look for signs. Hosts - Ryan and Jenn Horne, 302-381-8438 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 562353 $214,900. 8039 Armiger Drive N, Seaford. Ready to move in! This 3 bdrm, 2 ba home sits on a large wooded lot, offers master suite and kitchen appliances included. Host - Adam Gaull, 443-359-1343 Directions: Take 13A south, turn R on River Rd., take L into Hill-n-Dale, take L onto Grace Circle, follow to back of development, home on the left. HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

SEAFORD-Add your touches and move right in! This quaint, 3 BR,1 BA rancher is located in a convenient, quiet area just east of Seaford. Enjoy your well landscaped yard with a swimming pool and all this home has to offer. $2,500 Seller’s Help Available. $174,900. (MLS#561892) Directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, take Rt. 20 East. River Vista is on the Left about 2 tenths of a mile. Home on the corner. See Signs Your Host: John Allen COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

Adorable 2 BR, 1 BA, cottage on .75 Ac lot just outside Town of Millsboro. Home was used as a summer get-away for years and has many updates. Sits on 2 separately deeded parcels. Only $150,000 (MLS#563875) Directions: Take Rt. 20 East to Millsboro. Go straight on Betts Pond Rd. Follow pond and cross railroad tracks. Home is on the immediate left. See sign. Your Hostess: Mary Harding COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

25 CROSSGATE DR., Seaford - 2 BR, 2 bath Townhouse, end unit, with 4 season 11x10 sunroom. Freshly painted, new carpet & vinyl. $179,000. Directions: From Atlanta Rd., turn into Crossgate Drive. Home is on left. GLENN SIZEMORE REALTORS • 629-3066

106 WILLOW BROOKE CT., Seaford Quality workmanship abounds in this 3 BR, 2 BA home. Many custom features including custom tile in master bath. Kit. includes range, microwave, & dishwasher. Ready for occupancy soon. $224,900. Directions: Enter Clearbrooke at 2nd entrance from Rt. 18. Take next right & home is on right on Willow Brooke. GLENN SIZEMORE REALTORS • 629-3066


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 11

‘Obama is a young black man, able and brave’ Continued from front page

“Our father was well-grounded and a very wise man,” she said. “We were always taught that we were no better than the next person, and the next person was no better than we were.” Poole believes that the election of Barack Obama as the first AfricanAmerican president of the United States will do for today’s children what her father’s lessons were able to do for her. “I think that this has already done wonders for America’s children,” she said. “It puts away the idea that there is an excuse for why you can’t do something because of the color of your skin. It shows us that the color of your skin has nothing to do with who you become.” Poole is a member of Macedonia AME Church in Seaford. She said that on Sunday, the first day of worship after the Nov. 4 election, everyone in the congregation was excited by the prospect of having a black man in the White House. “We had a church member, Martha Dorman, who was 94 and who died in June,” Poole said. “Before she died, she said that if Obama was elected, she was going to do a dance in the streets. After the service, about 40 or 50 of us walked to her house and anybody who wanted to did a little jig.” Teresa Stevenson, Seaford, is a paraprofessional at Paul Laurence Dunbar School, Laurel, and like Poole, a member of Macedonia Church. She is also the founder of African-American Reflections, which gives presentations on black history in America. She said that she joins the rest of the

Macedonia congregation in being excited about Obama’s election. “We have waited over 400 years for a day that we can acknowledge and celebrate who we are,” she said. “This is fulfilling a part of Martin Luther King’s dream,” said Cora Norwood Selby, a retired teacher from Laurel. “Obama is a young black man, able and brave, and I pray that he is able to do the job and unify the country.” Dr. Booker T. Outland, a veterinarian who moved to Sussex County in 1963 and set up his practice, Bridgeville Animal Hospital, four years later, said that Barack Obama is the “kind of leader who comes along once in a lifetime.” He points to Sunday’s statement by Carla BruniSarkozy, the wife of French president Nicolas Sarkozy, urging her country to overcome prejudice, as an example of the influence Obama can have throughout the world. In her statement, Bruni-Sarkozy cited the “Obama effect.” “Prior to the election, the world was united in its desire to see Obama become the leader of the free world,” Outland said. “After the election, the world celebrated.” Outland sees the Obama presidency as the culmination of years of struggle in the black community. “Events happened in our lifetime that made this possible,” he said. Those events include World War II, during which black soldiers served with honor, school desegregation and the successful battle for equal voting rights. Pat Jones, the first African-American woman to serve on the Seaford City Council, said that she was moved to tears by the election results and Obama’s

Tuesday-night speech to the nation. “I never thought in my lifetime that an African-American would hold the highest office in this country,” she added. “I was totally overwhelmed. It was an awesome moment in history.” Jones predicted that Obama’s election will mean the end of racial prejudice in this country. “He is not just for our people,” she said. “I believe he will do a great job for everybody in our country. And I believe we’re not ever going to look at color again. We are going to come together and make a difference. Color barriers are a thing of the past.” “People are going to start living and working together for the common good,” Outland predicted. Like Obama, “we will learn to emphasize what we have in common rather than emphasize our differences.” Like Jones, NaTasha Mullen found the election results to be very moving. A psychotherapist with Delaware Guidance Services for Children and Youth and founder, with her husband, Julius, of ManUp, a program designed to help boost state test scores for African-American males, Mullen said that Election Day turned into a “family historical event.” About 20 friends and family members converged on the Mullen home in Seaford to watch the returns and finally, at midnight, Obama’s acceptance speech. Mullen said that Obama’s election will encourage children to “reach for the stars.” But beyond that, she said, it will remind adults that they have a responsibility to help children.

“Obama made it, but he didn’t do it alone,” she said. “He had supportive adults who helped him get there. We all need to really help our kids succeed.” Outland also sees Obama as an inspiration for parents. “Now, kids are out on the streets. Parents aren’t making the sacrifices our parents made to make sure that we got a good education,” he said. “Obama will be a day-to-day example of the value of a good education. He will serve as an inspiration for people to pull themselves up.” Poole said that Obama can use his inspirational skills to encourage people to join him in tackling the country’s problems. “If change is coming, all of us have to be a part of it,” she said. “It will not be Barack alone. He needs all of us doing our part.” “People will be inspired to do the hard work that is needed,” Outland said. Clarence Davis, the first AfricanAmerican principal at Seaford High School, said that all that matters in an election is that the best person wins, regardless of race. But he added that the election and Obama’s candidacy created a “heightened awareness” among people, “young and old and of all ethnic backgrounds.” He said that, after 43 administrations headed by white men, it was time to give a person of color or a woman a shot. “It is nice to give other people a chance,” he said. “If America is the land of opportunity, we have to give other people a chance.”

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7790 HOLLY BRANCH DR, LAUREL - Large ranch on a wooded acre-plus lot in Broadcreek Estates. Over 2,700 sq. ft. include 4 BRs, 2.5 BAs, LR and FR, DR, & kit. w/ appliances. Features HW floors, deck overlooking an in-ground pool, 2 aquatic gardens, & portico, home warranty & more for $365,000 (MLS 563289) HOSTESS: Fran Ruark DIRECTIONS: Go S thru Bethel & over bridge, turn L on Shell Bridge Rd, turn L on Holly Branch Dr, 2nd house on R CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

12 E EIGHTH ST, BLADES - Need 4 BRs? Then this is the home for you. Offers 2 BAs, FR, appliances, one-year warranty, 2 stg sheds & 14’x16’ deck. Additional lot next door may be purchased separately. $175,000 MLS #550945 HOSTESS: Eileen Craft CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

1 BROOK HAVEN DR, SEAFORD Rancher w/ 4 BR, 2.5 BA, sunroom, & 2car garage on a spacious corner lot in Clearbrooke Estates. Recent improvements include new carpeting & porcelain floors. $249,900 MLS #547135 HOSTESS: Susie Mordes CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

22 CROSSGATE DR, SEAFORD - Lovely 2BR Condo in Crossgate Vlg. Give up yard work! Sit on the patio & watch the seasons change. Enjoy the cathedral ceilinged living area & balcony w/enough space for an office. Extras included for just $149,900. (MLS#560313) HOSTESS: Phyllis Parker CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

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202 ARBUTUS AVE., SEAFORD - This well-planned rancher has been loved, and it really shows! Besides 3 BRs & 2 BAs, there’s an office & large sunporch. Appliances, rear patio, and double att. garage are just some of the extras in this Woodside Manor home! $210,000 (MLS 560760) HOSTESS: Trina Ruark CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

742 ROSETREE LN., SEAFORD - Wellmaintained home in Woodside Manor offers 3 BRs, LR & FR, kit, separate utility, carport, central air, rear patio & extras for only $167,500 (MLS 562854) HOST: Ron Ruark CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

21006 Wesley Church Rd., Seaford - Outstanding & Unique 3 BR, 3 bath histoical home known as “Jacob’s Choice.” Many recent improvements incl: new roof, new heating/AC sys., new S/S appl’s, countertops & flooring in kit., updated game rm w/woodstove, formal LR w/FP, DR, den, study, 3 car garage, scr. house w/new hot tub, inground pool, fish pond, manicured grounds w/new irrig. sys., sec. sys. $575,000. (564138) Directions: Take Atlanta Rd. North, turn right onto Wesley Church Road, house on left. Your Hostess: Gerry Thomas ROBINSON REAL ESTATE • 629-4574


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Department dedicates memorials to past members

Volunteers pick up 20,000 pounds of trash

By Pat Murphy

Approximately 1,700 volunteers collected more than 20,000 pounds of trash from Delaware shorelines and tributaries at this year’s Delaware Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 20. Volunteers from civic groups to businesses to families cleaned up 38 sites throughout Delaware from Wilmington to Fenwick Island. Topping the list of unusual items that volunteers found this year are a bowling ball, tennis racket, shopping cart, truck bed, car engine, car windshield, water cooler, television, dresser, grill, a New Jersey police officer cap and washed up political signs. The types and quantities of trash collected in the various locations are recorded on data cards and forwarded to the Center for Marine Conservation, which compiles the information for all of the cleanups held in the country and around the world. The information helps identify the source of the debris and focus efforts on eliminating or reducing it. The Delaware cleanup is one part of the International Coastal Cleanup sponsored by The Ocean Conservancy. Other sponsors include Delmarva Power and Energizer Family Products. DNREC is responsible for organizing the event, recruiting volunteers, distributing supplies, ensuring trash removal and tabulating all the data collected. Many municipalities help with the trash pick-up. The International Coastal Cleanup is the Ocean Conservancy’s flagship program dealing with marine debris and data collection. Delaware’s next Coastal Cleanup is set for Saturday, Sept. 19, 2009. Interested volunteers can check out DNREC’s Web site at www.delaware.dnrec.gov next summer for registration information. For more information on The Ocean Conservancy or the International Conservancy, visit the Web site www.oceanconservancy.org.

On Sunday, Nov. 9, the Laurel Fire Department formally dedicated its new monument for deceased members of the ladies auxiliary and the fire department. The memorial has been standing in the front of the building for several years. Approximately 100 people attended the ceremony. The auxiliary stone reads, “Dedicated to the women that helped to lay the Foundation of the Laurel Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary. These are the women that we strive to model in our duty to the Fire Service and our community. This monument is in memory of Eleanor Elliott and Minnie Kittle, in addition to the generous donations by the family of Mr. and Mrs. Linwood O’Neal and the Laurel Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary, 2005. Volunteer firefighter Mike Lowe gave the opening remarks at the ceremony. The invocation was given by the Rev. Wayne Grier, Department Chaplain. Remarks were made by William Hearn, president of the fire department; Jeff Hill, department chief; Dixie Northam from the ladies auxiliary; state Rep. “Biff” Lee; Joe Morris from the Sussex County Fire Chiefs Association; Bill Tobin from the Delaware Fire Chiefs Association; and Karen Workman, president of the county auxiliary association. Speeches were given by Lawrence Elliott, husband of Eleanor Elliott, and their son, Craig Elliott. Excerpts from Craig Elliott’s speech follow. “This is truly an honor and I know that my mother, Eleanor Elliott, is looking down with approval. This memorial for

Effort is part of Ocean Conservancy program

Pat Walker, president of the Laurel Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary and Dick Russell, chief engineer of the Department unveil the memorials at the Sunday dedication. Photo by Pat Murphy.

the honor of service to this community will now forever be a part of this town’s history and that means so much to our family. “As I look at the names contained on these monuments — you have to understand, these names represent so much more to me than just a beautiful piece of stone containing my mother’s name, but to me this represents a walk down memory lane. “Many names contained on these stones are names of those that, as a child, I remember growing up with: Miss Minnie, Miss Hilda Libby, Miss Evelyn, Mr. Harry Ryall, Uncle Scotty, Uncle Clifford, Lenny, Mr. Tom. “These names honored on these monuments were members of a large family and even though there were those who did in fact contain true family blood, it really never made a difference. They were all brothers and sisters of the Laurel Fire De-

partment, be it the ladies auxiliary or members of the active duty fire fighters. Their volunteer service accounted for many hours, but to these great ladies and gentlemen honored here today, they all did it because it was their true honor to serve. “I would like to say that my father, Lawrence Elliott, of whom I am very proud to say, is with us today, for those that may not have known is responsible in great part for seeing this monument project to this completion. “Ladies and gentlemen, as we come together today to dedicate these monuments, these monuments should be dedicated in true honor of all those names inscribed, but yet we must also step back and honor those that are with us and truly recognize the sacrifices made by all members of the Laurel Fire Department.” The Fire Department announced the department’s essay contest winners at the conclusion of the dedication.

Completion of handicapped pier delayed until Nov. 14 Due to unforeseen complications in the repairs and inclement weather, the handicapped pier at Records Pond and the adjoining parking lot at the corner of Front and Willow Street in Laurel will remain

closed until Friday, Nov. 14. Workers with the Division of Fish and Wildlife began repairs on the pier on Monday, Oct. 27. Work includes replacing decking, 800 S. Market St., Blades, Del.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 13

It all started when the Beatles came to town Comedy is first of the school year for Delmar students By Donna Dukes-Huston On Oct. 23 and 25, the Delmar Drama Club performed the comedy "The Beatles Slept Here," the group’s first production this school year. Although the play is set in present time, the actual events begin in 1964. The story revolves around Sgt. Paprika, owner of the Penny Lane Hotel where the Beatles once stayed. Forty years ago, the group’s touring bus had broken down and John, Paul, George and Ringo were forced to seek lodging there. During their stay, Paprika’s girlfriend fell in love with the Beatles and she never spoke to him again. As a result, Paprika has tried to keep the fact that the Fab Four spent a night in his hotel a secret for all these years. Now, Sgt. Paprika owns 51 percent of the hotel. His evil sister Clarabell owns the other 49 percent and she wants to sell it. A group of high school students, knowledgeable about the hotel’s past, exposes the fact that the Beatles slept there when they raffle off a night in the very room where the rock band slept. A Beatles fan club arrives with their memorabilia, which is promptly stolen by Miss Mustard and her gang of art thieves. Detective Johnny B. Goode is called in to solve the crime and quickly zeros in on Sgt. Paprika as his prime suspect. Meanwhile, Clarabell is trying to have

Sgt. Paprika committed to an insane asylum. In the end, the memorabilia is recovered, the hotel is saved, and Sgt. Paprika finally finds true love with the hotel manager, Eleanor Digby. This is band director Dave Smith’s first year as drama advisor. He has helped with vocals for the middle school musicals for the past few years, but said he was not prepared for the magnitude of supervising all aspects of a production. “I could not believe the last two weeks especially,” Smith said. “I spent a lot of time running to Lowe’s and thrift shops, anywhere to find things for the set and costumes.” Smith’s decision to become the drama advisor was prompted by his son’s desire to pursue a career in musical theater. Smith said that two other students in the club would also like to spend their future onstage in various roles. Smith noted a few challenges he discovered with his first play. “Many of the kids are involved in other extra-curricular activities as well,” he said. “This provided a challenge with practices needing to be scheduled around other events and practices.” Smith said that finding the right costume for each role can also be challenging despite the fact that the play was set primarily in modern day. With the challenges also come rewards.

The Delmar Drama Club recently performed its first production of the year, ‘The Beatles Slept Here.’

“Being a band director, it’s sometimes harder to identify individual achievements, but with a play it’s easier for me and for the other kids to recognize when someone is very talented or when something needs to be improved.” Smith is also encouraged by the new members who have joined the club this year, many of whom began performing in

middle school plays and are now in high school. The club’s next play will be a musical called "Back to the 80s.” The setting is the year 2000, and the main character is a 30-something guy who is reminiscing about his days in high school in the ’80s. This musical is scheduled to be performed later this school year.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Biden promises Return Day crowd that he’s not leaving Delaware By Lynn R. Parks There were rumors that the presidentelect himself might appear. People standing in long lines before Secret Service checkpoints were talking about it, people waiting for the parade to start were talking about it. “Crazier things have happened,” said Ronna Cobb, Roxana. “It would certainly be an honor for Sussex County if he showed up.” In the end, President-Elect Barack Obama did not make an appearance at Return Day, a Sussex County two-days-after-Election-Day tradition. But his running mate, Vice President-Elect and Delaware Sen. Joseph Biden, was there. And that, for the tens of thousands of people who were anxious for a chance to see him, was enough. “It is an honor to have Sen. Joe Biden from Delaware here,” said Cobb, who stood in a steady drizzle for nearly two hours, waiting for the start of the Return Day parade. “I have a lot of admiration for him.” Biden led off the traditional parade, which got underway more than an hour later than its scheduled time. He and his wife, Jill, rode the parade route in an elegant white carriage that was pulled by two gray ponies. For most of the way, he hung out the carriage door, standing on the running board, one hand holding onto the carriage roof and the other waving at the crowd. People cheered and yelled out “Joe, Joe!” as he went by. After his parade ride, he took a seat in the parade reviewing stand set up on the Circle. Sitting in the stand with him were Congressman Mike Castle and Sen. Tom Carper, both of whom had walked in the parade, Gov. Ruth Ann Minner and Governor-Elect Jack Markell, as well as state and local officials. After the parade was over, at the start of the Return Day ceremony, Biden spoke to the crowd from a podium on the parade reviewing stand. “It is good to be home in Delaware,” he said. “No matter what office I hold, I’m still a Delawarean.” Making a reference to the man from Ohio who became a symbol for the McCain campaign and its claim that Obama will raise taxes, he added, “You’ve heard of Joe the Plumber? I’m Joe from Delaware.” AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

Across the Circle from the reviewing stand, on a three-story Colonial blue house, hung a large sign that read “Joe The Biden.” Biden, who lives in Greenville, told the cheering crowd that he has no plans to leave the state for which he has served as senator for 34 years. “Jill and I aren’t leaving,” he said. “We will be home every weekend, so you know where we live.” And he added that being elected vice president is not the accomplishment of which he is most proud. “The proudest title I’ve ever held is representing the state of Delaware,” he said. “I love you all.”

A different Return Day

For the first time in anyone’s memory, a holder of national office attended Return Day. Because Vice President-Elect Biden was there, this was a very different celebration from the many that have preceded it. The event is believed to have started in the 1790s, when voters returned to the county seat to hear election results. Gone were peddlers selling cotton candy and oversized balloons. No one threw candy to the crowd from passing floats, no one dashed from the sidewalk to embrace a candidate. And no candidate, after finishing the parade, walked the route a second time, greeting and talking with constituents. People who wanted to stand along much of the parade route had to go through metal detectors manned by the Secret Service. Lines were long, with waits of more than a half hour. Food vendors were banned to several blocks away from the Circle, meaning that a person who was on the Circle and who was struck with a sudden desire for a hot dog had to go through the metal detectors again to get back to the Circle. From the roofs of the county building, Georgetown Town Hall and the Family Court building, men dressed in military uniforms used large binoculars to scan the crowd. At least one of them stood at attention while Cassandra Abbott sang the StarSpangled Banner. Despite the changes, several Return Day traditions remained. The ox roast went on behind the courthouse. Town crier W. Layton Johnson read aloud the results from Sussex County polling stations, telling the crowd, as he does every year, that votes from Sussex County are the only ones that really count. And represen-

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Governor-Elect Jack Markell talks with the Return Day crowd. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

tatives of four political parties, the Republican, Democrat, Libertarian and Independent, buried the symbolic ax in a box of sand. “Today, we bury the hatchet not in each other’s backs, but in the warm sand from Delaware beaches,” Georgetown Mayor

Eddie Lambden said. Lambden also had warm praise for Biden, whom he said he first met when he was in the fifth grade. “I love you both,” he told Joe and Jill Biden. “Thank you so much for what you have done.”

My Thanks To The Citizens Of The 39th District I appreciate the support of the citizens in the 39th District, the number of votes I received was very encouraging and means that my message did resonate with many. Your votes affirm that change is necessary, and vital to the economical, social, and educational progress of the 39th District. I addressed issues and concerns which impact all of us. The lack of jobs, a living wage, affordable health care, resources for young people, rising crime, and how our senior citizens are thought about and cared for, including the control of home and lot rents, these are issues that are still un-resolved. What happens now should be of great interest to all of us, here in the 39th District, and I hope that all who did not vote for my candidacy, will pay close attention these next two years. I would like to express my gratitude to the local union members for their support, to those in the Seaford school district, with special thanks to Michael. I wish to also thank The Cool Branch Citizens For Semper, for the financial and volunteer support, with the following being deserving of special recognition: Jack, Dot, Joe, Gerri, Gary, Pat, Joe, Estelle, Don M, Frank, Jeannie, Eleanore, Christine, Don, Miriam, Eddy, Harry, Eileen, Phil, Jane, Chuck, Bill, Dreama, Bob and Sharon. The dream team that helped to make my vision a reality. I would be remiss if I didn’t thank my wife, Rosalyn and Teresa my campaign manager for great dedication and support. I must also note the personal and financial support of my friends in the political arena, Governor elect Markell, Lt. Governor elect Denn, senators Adams and Venables, Pete Schwartzkopf, Richard Korn, and the Candidates of the Democratic Party. Thanks for your support, we did pretty well; in the future we will do better. Jerry “Doc” Semper


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 15

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

WAVING TO THE CROWD - Rep. Danny Short, 39th District, waves to the crowd during the Return Day parade. Short, getting his second term, was one of the few Republicans to win during a Democratic sweep of the state House on election day. Photo by Ron MacArthur

HATCHET TOSS - Joe Conaway is pictured winning the ceremonial hatchet toss. Only a few mayors took part because of the rain. He has now won the watermelon seed spitting contest and scrapple toss as well. Photos by Ron MacArthur

Laurel mayor John Shwed participated in the hatchet toss as well.

JOE THE BIDEN - A sign hanging on the circle in Georgetown welcomes “Joe the Biden.” Photo by Lynn Parks

STANDING AT ATTENTION - A secret service agent is pictured standing at attention on the roof of the county building during the singing of the national anthem. Photo by Lynn Parks

BIDEN - Vice president-elect Joe Biden waves to parade watchers from a white horse drawn carriage. Photo by Susan L. Gregg


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 17

Community Bulletin Board senior Banquet. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the door. Come out and enjoy some great food and fellowship. Call 6297161, ext. 130, for further information.

Bake sale and bazaar Nanticoke Senior Center will hold a bake sale and bazaar on Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Handmade quilts, yard sale items and baked goods available. Tables for rent: $5 for members and $10 for non-members. For sign-ups call 629-4939.

Leaf removal Leftover leaves littering your lawn or lot? Seaford Lions will rake your Seaford City limits location of leaves (for a donation), so you can live leaf free. Call Lion Keller at 629-4179, or Lion George at 629-7982, to set up an appointment. Regional Builders, Inc. has begun its annual toy collection drive for the Toys for Tots program. This program, conducted by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, collects and distributes toys to needy children in the community. To participate, you may drop off new, unwrapped toys at Regional Builders, Inc., 300 High St., Seaford. Donations will be accepted on weekdays between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. through Dec. 12. You may also make a tax-deductible donation to Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, PO Box 1947, Marine Corps Base, Quantico, VA 22134.

SHS Class of 1998 seeks alumni The Seaford High School Class of 1998 is looking for alumni. We are planning a 10-year reunion for early 2009 and need your contact information. Please email: seaford98@gmail.com; or USPS: Andrea Jones, P.O. Box 336, Newtown, PA 18940.

DuPont Golden Girls luncheon 31st DuPont Golden Girls luncheon, Thursday, Dec. 4, at 11 a.m., at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. The cost is $15, for more info call Jackie 875-7625.

Pancake Breakfast All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast on Saturday, Nov. 15, 7:30-10:30 a.m. in the Seaford Christian Academy Gym at 110 Holly St., Seaford. This is a Class of 2011 fundraiser to raise money for the junior/

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The Seaford Class of 1983 will hold its 25-year reunion on Saturday, Nov. 29, at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club, Blades, from 7:30-11:30 p.m. Visit classmates.com to RSVP. Formal invitations will also be mailed out. If you do not receive one, contact Dawn Collins (Dukes) at 302-8415682 or Suzanah Smoot (Montague) at 302-745-1974.

Santa Claus visit

Historical Society raffle

On Saturday, Dec. 20, Seaford will welcome Santa Claus - The Shoppes of Historic High Street invite you to join them in welcoming Santa Claus. Retailers will be providing special treats, hot and cold beverages, and finger foods for last minute shoppers. Join us for a day filled with Christmas spirit, special sales, free drawings and pictures with Santa Claus.

The Seaford Historical Society raffle offers a luxurious condo in either Williamsburg or Myrtle Beach for a week in 2009 as the prize. Raffle tickets are $5 each or five tickets for $20 and may be purchased at either the Ross Mansion on Saturday or Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. or at

Carols for Christmas The Southern Delaware Choral Society Christmas concert, “A Newborn Child: Cantatas and Carols for Christmas,” will be presented Saturday, Dec. 13, at 7 p.m. at the Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church in Seaford, and on Sunday, Dec. 14, at 3 p.m. at St. Edmund’s Roman Catholic Church in Rehoboth Beach. The cost for tickets will be $15 for adults and $10 for students. Tickets are available by calling 226-5231 or at www.brownpapertickets.com

SHS alumni social The Seaford High School Alumni Association is sponsoring its annual fall social

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Class of ‘88 reunion The Seaford High School class of ‘88 20-year reunion will be Saturday, Nov. 29, at the banquet center next to Jimmy’s Grill Restaurant in Bridgeville. The reunion will be from 6 - 10 p.m. with a cocktail hour from 6 - 7 p.m., and dinner at 7. The cost is $75 a couple and $37.50 for a single. This includes dinner and entertainment. Contact Cathy Hastings (Maas) at dcat5186@hotmail.-com, Lexie Ketterman (Kingree) at lexketterman@gmail.com or Angie Zebley (Mitchell) at angie@tullramey.com with contact information.

Seaford Class of ‘83 reunion

Seaford Toys for Tots

at the Seaford Golf & Country Club on Friday, Nov. 28, from 6-9 p.m. The executive board invites you to spend time with classmates and fellow alumni to revel in fond memories of times spent at SHS. Snacks and a cash bar will be available. Call Donna Hastings Angell at 629-8077 with any questions.

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the Seaford Museum on Thursday through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. The drawing will take place on the last day of the 2008 Victorian Christmas, which is Sunday, Dec. 14.

Victorian Christmas The annual Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion, Dec. 12, 13 and 14, will once again feature a Christmas Boutique. Each member of the Seaford Historical Society is asked to contribute one item. Handmade gifts in the price range of $10 to $20 are especially popular. Items may be left in the gray box on the front porch of the Ross Mansion at any time. For questions call Diane Thomas at 629-2085 or Shirley Skinner at 629-9378.

Breakfast cafe VFW 4961 breakfast cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

Seaford class of ‘73 The Seaford class of 1973 reunion will be held on Saturday, Nov. 29, at 6 p.m. For more information and reservations call or email Mike Wheatley, 629-2498 or wheatley5@comcast.net.


PAGE 18

LHS class of ‘98 Laurel High School class of ‘98 is planning a class reunion. Contact Megan Jones at megj22@comcast.net or phone 8415835 with contact information.

Laurel Chamber events Nov. 18 – Board meeting, 5:30 p.m., Chamber office Nov. 18 – General meeting, How To Invest by John Downes of Insurance Market, 6:30 p.m. Nov. 19 – Business Person of the Year Dinner, 6 p.m., Georgia House Dec. 5 – Christmas parade, 7 p.m. Dec. 9 – Open house/ribbon cutting, Members Christmas Party, Laurel chamber office 4-7:30 p.m.

Laurel Public Library events Thursday, Nov. 20 at 4:15 p.m. - The Nanticoke Indian Museum comes to the Laurel Public Library. Children in grades K-6 are invited to be part of this hands-on opportunity to learn about the Nanticoke Indians, both today and back in the ‘olden days. Pre-registration is required. Both programs are free and open to the public. For more information, or to pre-register for either of these programs please drop by the Laurel Public Library at 101 East 4th St., or call us at 875-3184. You can also email Becky Norton, Youth Services Librarian at rebecca.norton@lib.de.us.

Class of 1956 luncheon The Laurel High School graduating class of 1956 will hold their quarterly luncheon Friday, Nov. 14, at 11:30 at the Georgia House, Delaware Avenue, Laurel. Call Frank Calio at 875-3770 if you are planning to attend.

Free community luncheon Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community-wide luncheon (turkey) on Saturday, Nov. 15, noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, west side of 13 A, approximately two miles south of town. Any questions, call Shirley at 875-2314.

Holiday food drive SunKissed Tanning wants to donate a holiday dinner to four Laurel families who need a helping hand during this holiday season. Our goal is 250 non-perishable food items to be donated by Nov. 24. Help us meet this goal. In return for your generosity, every three non-perishable items you donate, you receive one free tan. You can earn up to ten free tans. Our donations will continue for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday. Deadline for Christmas donations is Dec. 22.

Miss Delaware dinner Join Miss Delaware 2008, Galen Giaccone, for dinner on Monday, Nov. 24, from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Georgia House, located

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008 on 300 Delaware Ave., in Laurel. The event will feature piano performances by Miss Delaware and a buffet-style dinner. The proceeds will benefit the Children’s Miracle Network, the National Platform of the Miss America Organization. Galen, a native of Wyoming, Del., will compete for the title of Miss America 2009 in January in Las Vegas. Tickets are $16.99 and may be obtained by calling Linda Pusey at 302947-9065.

Toy and canned goods drive A toy/canned goods drive will be held during an upcoming event at the Dodge City Mud Hole, according to owner Joe Hearn. Visitors to the Sunday, Nov. 16, mud hop event are asked to bring a new child’s toy or canned good to be presented at the gate for admission. Hearn said all gate admission donations will be given to local charities. Gates open at 8 a.m. for the Nov. 16 mud hop with the truck action starting at 11 a.m. The Dodge City Mud Hole is located at 27207 Dillards Road, Laurel.

Upward Basketball It’s time to sign up for Upward basketball for boys and girls ages 6 and now up to age 13. Upward is more than a game. Every child is a winner. Registration forms are available at Laurel Wesleyan Church on Rt.13A in Laurel or the Boys and Girls Club in Seaford and Laurel. Registration is $50, scholarships & multi child discounts available. Sign up by Nov. 25. For more information contact the church at 8755380.

Safe driving course Laurel Senior Center will hold an AARP Driving Course on Nov. 17 and 18, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $10. To register for the course call 875-2536.

Senior Center fall festival Laurel Senior Center Fall Festival, at 113 N. Central Ave., Laurel, will be held Friday, Nov. 14, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Luncheon, served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., will include homemade chicken salad, soup and desserts. There will be crafts, baked goods, quilt chances, and a white elephant table. Call 875-2536 for more information.

Mentors needed The Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program is seeking dedicated adults to spend one hour per week with a fifth, sixth, or seventh grader. Mentors and students meet at the Laurel Library. Contact Kim Trivits or Lynne Betts at 629-7790 for details.

Post Office cancellation The Bridgeville Post Office will have a special cancellation to commemorate the 2008 Apple Scrapple Festival. Requests

can be mailed in over the next 30 days to obtain the 2008 cancellation.

Christmas in Bridgeville The Bridgeville Historical Society will host its 33rd Annual Christmas in Bridgeville Craft Show on Saturday, Dec. 6, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Woodbridge High School, Laws Street, Bridgeville. The craft show will include more than 60 vendors, selling a large assortment of holiday gift items. The show will include raffles for a 50-50 and antique furniture item. More than 40 door prizes will be given away. Admission is free and all proceeds benefit the non-profit Bridgeville Historical Society.

Veterans Day program The Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 on 2 Governors Ave. in Greenwood is sponsoring a pet food and pet toys drive during the month of November to benefit the SPCA in Georgetown. Items needed include: clean large towels, thin blankets with no filler, cat toys, dog toys, dog treats, cat treats, Beaverdam Hi-Pro Dog food (only dry dog food used), any brand dry cat food, clay cat litter (nonclumping), plastic colanders, leashes & collars (sm., med. & lg.), and baby gates. Contact Michaele Russell, president, for more information at 302-349-4220.

Chili & Cheese Event Sample a variety of tasty chilies from wild game to vegetarian on Saturday, Nov. 15 at Greenwood Fire Hall. Along with the chilies, a selection of cheeses will be offered along with rice, tortilla chips and other snack foods. Dessert, beer and wine will round out the menu. The evening of fun will also feature music for listening and dancing and a 50/50 drawing. The event, sponsored by the HUB Club Rotary of Harrington, Greenwood and Felton, will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. in the fire hall located at the intersection of Routes 13 and 16, Greenwood. Tickets are $15. All proceeds benefit the service projects of the Harrington-Greenwood-Felton Rotary. The club’s community outreach is a continuing effort that includes support of activities in all three towns and both Lake Forest and Woodbridge School districts. The club purchased basic medical supplies for victims of Hurricane Katrina and has taken on an international project by sponsoring a polio camp in Anand, India. Proceeds from the Cheese & Chili will be contributed to the Food Bank of Delaware, Milford location, and toward Rotary’s mission to eradicate polio worldwide. For more information about the Chili & Cheese event or to reserve tickets, call Franklin Hendricks at 302-398-3232 (day) or 302-398-4619 (after 5 p.m.).

Father-daughter dance Daddy’s Night Out - Father-Daughter Dance is open to fathers or father figures and their daughters. All ages are welcome, Saturday, Nov. 15, 7-9 p.m. It will be held at Woodbridge Elementary School Cafeteria, Greenwood. Dance tickets are $5 each. Call Jennifer at 249-0292. Music will be provided by The Jumping Jukebox. Portraits will be available for $5.

‘A Celebration of Quilts’ On Saturday, Nov. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Greenwood Public Library will be hosting “A Celebration of Quilts” at the VFW Hall in Greenwood. Quilts made and/or owned by local residents will be on display. In addition, members of the Helping Hands Quilt Guild of Dover will be making presentations on various aspects of quilting. At 10:30 a.m. there will be a presentation on how to start quilting, including the three basic types of quilts, choosing your fabric and batting, tools, and how to make an easy block. The demonstrations for the afternoon include: 1 p.m. - quilt-as-you-go strip quilting; 2 p.m. – paper piecing; 2:30 p.m. – yo-yo quilting; and 3 p.m. – hand appliqué. If you are curious about how to start quilting or would like to learn other quilting techniques, this is the place for you. The VFW Hall is located on the corner of Mill Street and Governors Avenue in Greenwood.

CHEER program Many adults face the challenge of managing one - and often several - chronic medical conditions, such as, high blood pressure, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, hearing problems, and depression. All of which can be costly and debilitating. The Chronic Disease Self Management Program (CDSMP), developed at Stanford University, has proven extremely effective at enabling people to take more control of their own health. This program can give adults a sense of control over their lives, improve their day-to-day functioning, and help save on medical bills. CHEER begins this program at the new CHEER Greenwood Activity Center. The program consists of six 2-1/2-hour workshops. The first class begins Monday, Nov. 3 at 1:30 p.m. and the workshop series ends on Monday, Dec. 8 at 1:30 p.m. This class is free but registration is required. Call Cindy Mitchell at 856-5187 to register or for more information.

Longaberger sale The Delmar Lions Club is holding a Longaberger basket sale with all proceeds going to the community and the visually impaired. Baskets, with blue and orange trim and Wildcat paws, cost $49 each.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008 The price of the lid, with a Delmar and Wildcat logo, is $30. Liners and dividers are available upon request. For more information or to order a basket contact Mildred Riley at 846-3846 or kragera@verizon.net

Delmar Chorus Booster Dinner The Delmar Chorus Boosters will hold an all-you-can-eat beef and dumpling dinner on Sunday, Nov. 16, from 1-4 p.m., at the Delmar VFW. Tickets are $10 and are available from any chorus member or by calling the school at 302-846-9544. A limited number of tickets will be available at the door. Dinners are eat-in or carryout. The VFW is located on West State Street and Memorial Drive in Delmar, Md. All proceeds from the dinner will support the programs and events of the middle and high school choruses and support the high school chorus in their participation in The Music in the Park competition in Hershey, Pennsylvania, in May 2009.

Longaberger Basket Bingo A “Christmas” Longaberger Basket Bingo, benefiting the Miss Delaware’s Outstanding Teen Organization, will be held Tuesday, Nov. 25, at the Millsboro Fire Company Banquet Hall, Millsboro. The event will include 20 bingo games with Longaberger Baskets as prizes. Doors open at 6 p.m. and games begin and 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. For advance tickets and additional information call Georgeann White at 302-934-9797 or email ghwhite70@aol.com. The Millsboro Fire Company is located on 109 State St., Millsboro. For more information visit www.MDOTeen.org

having “Macy’s Style” balloons in the parade in 2006. This year, nine balloons, even more than before, are planned. The Chamber is seeking sponsors for the balloons to help offset the cost of the balloons and the gas to fill them. Sponsors can choose a balloon and level of sponsorship, will be able to have their sign or banner carried in front of the balloon, will be announced as the sponsor of that balloon by the parade MC’s David Marvel and WBOC’s Dennis Ketterer. Sponsors will also receive recognition in the program/coloring book, the chamber newsletter and an ad on the chamber website for three months. Applications are now being accepted for entries in the parade. There is no charge to enter the parade. The theme for 2008 is Rudolph’s Christmas Parade. For more information on both sponsoring and entering the parade, go to www.georgetowncoc.com and click the Reindeer link, email info@georgetowncoc.com or phone 302-856-1544.

Annual Memorial Service Farmington Fire Company and Ladies Auxiliary to hold annual memorial service. This event will be held on Nov. 23, at 6:30 p.m. at the Farmington Fire House. The event is held to honor our past service members for both the fire service and the auxiliary. Entertainment will be provided by Two Mile Road. The event is open to the public and refreshments will be served. For more information, call the Farmington Fire House at 398-4445.

Native American Heritage Month The Nanticoke Indian Association, Inc. will be celebrating Native American Heritage Month during the month of November. To celebrate this month, on Nov. 28, the association will offer free admission to their museum from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Come and join us for a day of dancing, food, and celebration of our heritage. For further information, call our center at 302945-3400 or our museum at 302-9457022.

Free Thanksgiving dinner A free Thanksgiving dinner will be held on Nov. 27, beginning promptly at noon and ending at 1:30 p.m. It will be provided by Bethel United Methodist Church and served in the Bethel Community House. Directions: west of Seaford at north end of Oak Grove Road.

Ruritan’s Ham and Turkey Shoot The Ellendale Ruritan Club ham and turkey shoot, Saturday, Nov. 22, (rain date Nov. 29) at 11:30 a.m., at Ellendale VFW, on V.F.W. Road. Directions: 1/2 mile south of U.S. 113 and 16 intersection). Refreshments will be available for sale. (If rain dates are cancelled, we will go to next shoot.) For possible cancellations call 302-422-2948 or cell 302-249-7025.

Georgetown Christmas Parade The Georgetown Christmas “Balloon” Parade is set for Thursday, Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. The parade was renamed the “Balloon” parade when the chamber began

Seaford AARP Money has to be paid in time to make reservations for all trips. • Nov. 19 - Rainbow Dinner Theater in Pennsylvania to see the comedy, “Deck The Halls And Clean The Kitchen.” Cost is $65. Bus leaves Seaford Peebles parking lot at 7:30 a.m. • Dec. 5 - The American Music Theater to see “Christmas Show.” Cost is $65. Enjoy holiday songs and comedy sketches. Also an appearance of Santa. There will be time to Christmas shop at the Rockvale Outlets and have lunch on your own before going to the theater. • Mar. 9-11 - Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun Casinos, three days, $240. Deluxe ac-

commodations at the Great Cedar Hotel. Visit the new MGM Grand Hotel casino (all connected). Breakfast and dinner buffets included, plus more. Bus leaves Peebles parking lot in Seaford. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180 for details.

PAGE 19 trations. Cost is $145 and seats are in orchestra section. There will be a few hours after the show to tour New York City. Call 629-6809.

‘Narnia’ exhibit Nanticoke Senior Center’s trip to Franklin Institute ‘Narnia’ Exhibit will be on Thursday, Jan. 15 at 8 a.m. Trip includes: motor coach transportation, admission to Franklin Institute, lunch at Old Country Buffet, all tips and gratuities. Cost is $60 for members and $65 for non-members.

Sight & Sound Laurel Senior Center Trip to Sight & Sound, “Miracle of Christmas,” on Dec. 9. Cost is $90 and includes transportation, show & dinner at Shady Maple Smorgasbord.

Englishtown Bus trip to Englishtown Flea Market in New Jersey on Saturday, Nov. 29, at 5 a.m. Cost is $35 for adults, children, nine-years old and under is $17.50. Money is due by Saturday, Nov. 15. Bus leaves from Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 108 First St., Bridgeville. Deacon James Stewart at 3377003.

Radio City Seaford Recreation’s 17th annual Radio City Christmas Spectacular is set for Sunday, Dec. 7, and is now taking regis-

Embroiders’ Guild The Sussex Chapter of Embroiders’ Guild meets on the second Monday of the month at the CHEER Center in Georgetown. All levels of stitchers from beginner to advanced are welcome to attend. For details call 302-539-9717.

Coast Guard Auxiliary Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 for details.

Acorn Club The G.F.W.C.-Seaford Acorn Club is having a meeting at the Seaford District Library on Nov. 13, at 7:30 p.m. The hostesses are Kitty Medford and Mabel Gassaway and their committee.

AARP membership AARP Seaford Chapter 1084 of western Sussex County will meet Thursday,

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Ser ving Breakfast 6 to 10 a.m., Mon. thru Sat. at “The Round Table”


PAGE 20 Nov. 13, at Methodist Manor House, Fellowship Hall, in Seaford, at 1:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be from the Seaford Library. Guests, 50 years or older, are welcome and invited to join in refreshments and conversation after the meeting. For more information regarding membership to this state chapter, call Helen at 875-5086.

S.C. Genealogical Society The Sussex County Genealogical Society (SCGS) will meet at 10:30 a.m., Nov. 15, in the upstairs meeting room of the Rehoboth Beach Public Library. Anyone interested in learning about his or her family’s history is welcome to attend this free monthly meeting. Each month features a program on some aspect of the genealogy hobby. At this meeting, our web master, Dick Cleveland, will give an overview of the design and development of websites. Dick served two years as president of the ROOTS Users Group of Arlington, Va., which had over 600 members worldwide. In later years he worked as a volunteer for the Arlington Commission on Aging and other nonprofit organizations designing and implementing data management systems. He’s currently responsible for four other websites including the town of Dewey Beach. His program should give a great insight in how SCGS’ website functions to keep its membership informed and help you with ideas on establishing a web site of your own. For further information call 875-5418 or visit our website at www.scgsdelaware.org.

S.C. Advisory committee The Sussex County Advisory Committee for the Aging and Adults with Physical Disabilities will meet at the Sussex County West Administrative Complex, North DuPont Highway, Georgetown, at 10 a.m. Agendas and minutes can be viewed on the county’s website at www.sussexcountyde.gov. All meetings are open to the public For more information, call Raymond Moore, Chair, at 4368132.

Republican Women’s lunch The November meeting of the Republican Women’s Club will be held early this month because of the Thanksgiving holiday. The luncheon meeting will be held on Nov. 19, at the Sussex

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008 Pines Country Club at 10:45 a.m. The cost of the lunch is $15. The subject of this month’s meeting is “A Salute to Our Military” with special guest speaker Brig. Gen. Reid Beveridge, Ret. He will speak on the subject of “How Great We Really Are, Despite the Media.” Members and guests who have family members in the services are asked to bring him/her along. Those who are members of the services are asked to wear their uniform or just the hat so we can identify the various branches represented. Members and guests are asked to make reservations by calling Kathy Vengazo at 302539-4757. For more information about this meeting, the club, or club activities see the club web site at: www.scrwc.net.

H.A.P.P.E.N. The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearn’s Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization will meet on Thursday, Nov. 13, at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Museum. Among the topics to be discussed are traffic, the Hearn’s Pond Dam and annexation. As always, H.A.P.P.E.N. members welcome any group or individual who is interested in attending the meeting.

AARP membership AARP Seaford Chapter 1084 of Western Sussex County will meet Thursday, Nov. 13, at the Methodist Manor House Fellowship Hall in Seaford, at 1:30 p.m. Guest speaker, Mary Ellen Farquhar, of Seaford Public Library. Persons, 50 years or older, who would like information regarding this chapter are welcome and invited to join in refreshments and conversation after the meeting. Members are reminded to turn in their 2008 volunteer ours to Helen Skjoldager, 8755086.

SCWDC meeting The Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club will hold its regular monthly meeting at 11:30 a.m. on Nov. 20, at Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown. A business meeting is scheduled with a Thanksgiving luncheon. Members are asked to bring a friend and newcomers are always welcome. Dinner will cost $13 per person. For details and reservations, call Catherine King 628-4812 or e-mail Ladycdk@comcast.net.

day, Nov. 18, at 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral. The planned guest speaker will be James Littleton of the Laurel Lions Club. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Georgetown NAARF The Georgetown Chapter (1992) of the National Association of Active Retired Federal Employees will hold their next meeting on Monday, Nov. 17, at noon, with lunch at the Pizza King Restaurant on Stein Highway in Seaford. The program is a lecture about Patty Cannon. Joan Anderson is the speaker. She has done extensive research on the subject and is an adjunct professor at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, Md. She is also librarian for the Kent County Historical Society Museum in Md. and takes part in a national program, “Character Counts.” If you have any questions about the lecture or NARFE Meetings, please call Charles Singman at 337-0337.

Seaford Republican Club The next meeting of the Seaford Republican Women’s Club will be held on Nov. 20 at 10:30 a.m. in the Seaford museum. This is a departure from the usual fourth Thursday because of the Thanksgiving holiday. The change of location is needed because of the program. Jim Blackwell will demonstrate the use of a touch-screen presentation he has developed featuring individuals from this area who have serve in the Delaware legislature. Blackwell spent more than 1,000 hours on the project including the research, organization of information, computer input, and photograph enhancement. Mary Ellen Farquhar will be present to talk about plans for the new Seaford Library and Cultural Center. Chicken salad box lunches from Seaford Golf & Country Club will be available for $8 each. Reservations are required and may be made by calling Anne Nesbitt at 628-7788 before Monday, Nov. 17. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning

Widowed Persons Service

Star Publications - PO Box 1000,

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tues-

Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Answers on page 47


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 21

Percy one of many Elliotts who make a difference in community I’m going on my 13th year now with the Star and one of the early AT URPHY Delmar folks I got to know had to be Percy Elliott. He and Ron When he stepped down in McGinnis are forever at the VFW doing things that keep that commu- June, so to speak, several nity hub functioning. awards were given to PerSo it came as a shock to me Sat- cy, both from the town urday when I learned that way community and his VFW, back in June, Percy had given up including naming the banhis position as commander of Post 8276. Percy had that position for quet hall after him. 16 years in which the VFW has prospered, and modernization and cause he wanted to put something back addition have come to pass under his cominto the community. “I would have gone mand. crazy doing nothing,” said Percy. Don’t get me wrong. Even though Tom Percy has been district commander Rippon has taken over as new commander, three times and is presently the convention Percy still sees to the day-to-day operation chairman. On Saturday night at the hall of the place. during the Veterans Day banquet, he made Percy was born and raised in Town several trips to the kitchen to see that End, Va., and once a month for a weekend, things were right. he and wife Marcia go there for a retreat. When he stepped down in June, so to Sometimes some of their seven grandchilspeak, several awards were given to Percy, dren go with them, but you can be sure to both from the town community and his see Percy early in the mornings seeing at VFW, including naming the banquet hall least one off to school, a chore he relishes. after him. Percy was in the Army with the Green Wouldn’t you say that Percy Elliott is a Berets Special Forces as a paratrooper. name in a long line of Delmar folks who Percy served duty in Vietnam twice and do make a difference in the lives of othfinished with the rank of Sergeant First ers? Class, after 12 years. This was from 1958 until 1972, when he left the service with a If I have read it correctly, both the Laudisability from his eyes. rel Business Person of the Year Banquet He ended up in Delmar, where he and the Delmar Citizen of the Year will be worked for the railroad for five years. held on Nov. 19. Laurel’s event honoring Percy said he got into Post 8276 be-

P

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Greg Johnson is at the Georgia House, call 875-9319 for tickets, and the Delmar Citizen of the Year honoring Donna Wilkosz is at the Delmar VFW. For tickets, call 1410-742-9401. I was in Paul Lawrence Dunbar School Friday, when one of the teachers said to me, “Do you know what one of my students just asked me? ‘Is that John McCain?’” Ah, fame is but a fleeting thing. I haven’t said much about Laurel’s Business Person of the Year, Greg Johnson. For several years Greg and I and several others got together for morning coffee, but no more, as Greg finds himself busier and busier. Beside the Car Store, Greg has many other ventures he is into. You might say he is an entrepreneur. No, I did not say full of manure, that’s me. Whatever Greg tries he is successful at and has been a good athlete all his life. Currently, golf is his passion and I have been told that he can drive it into the next county. The Car Store has been very successful and the monkeys in his commercials, whether they were Greg’s idea or Rob Brown’s, have brought the store instant recognition. I think it was about time for Greg to be chosen, a deserving honor in a tough-market time for us all. Now, if we can just get him to put the cell phone down and sit still so they can recognize him. Congrats Greg.

Got a lot of response to the Reid Williamson piece of my column. Emily Abbott was Laurel department head for English, speech and theatre back then, and she said that the question Reid missed after many weeks of success was not about Shakespeare, but about an American poet. Something else that Ken Brown passed on to me was that Reid, as a freshman at William and Mary, was a member of the debating team. Quite an accomplishment. Sunday I had the honor of attending the Laurel Fire Department monument dedication ceremony. The monuments are a beautiful reminder of those deceased members of both the fire company and auxiliary who gave their time to the department. Lawrence Elliott, in memory of his wife, Eleanor, played a large part in the completion of the project. In the past nine or 10 days, I have talked to three people who were very much in the need of employment. We’re in a different time and situation now, one that most of us have never seen in our lifetimes. High prices and low-paying or no jobs are becoming routine and the whole world is changing. Let’s hope that it starts changing for the better — morality, crime, and the economic fate of the American worker, as well as health care are among the things we should be praying for. I could say much more, but this will suffice. Have a great week, everyone!

Pageants looking for contestants The Miss Delaware and Miss Delaware’s Outstanding Teen Organizations, affiliates of the Miss America and Miss America Outstanding Teen Organizations, are seeking contestants. To be eligible to compete in the 2009 Miss Delaware Pageant, a young woman must be between the ages of 17 (and a high school senior) and 24; a citizen of the United States; never been married; and meet residency requirements for the state of Delaware, or be a full-time student in a Delaware college or university, or have full-time employment in the state. Contestants are also required to compete in an official local preliminary. The winners of each local title will then compete for the title of Miss Delaware 2009 in the pageant June 11, 12 and 13 at Dover Downs Hotel & Casino, Dover. The winner will represent Delaware at the 2010 Miss America Pageant. Information on local pageants throughout the state is available at www.MissDelaware.org. Women who are interested in becoming a Miss Delaware contestant may contact Dulcena Kemmerlin at Kemmer32@hotmail.com, 302-424-1960, or visit the Web site www.MissDelaware.org. To be eligible to compete in the 2009 Miss Delaware’s Outstanding Teen Pageant, girls must be 13 by March 29, 2009, and not 18 on or before July 31, 2009; have resided in Delaware for six months prior to March 29, 2009; be enrolled in and attending classes at an accredited public, private, or home schooling program; never have been married;

and be a US citizen. Contestants are not required to compete in a local preliminary competition. However, there are several upcoming official local teen pageants available for girls who would like to have the pageant experience. The 2009 Miss Delaware’s Outstanding Teen Pageant will be Sunday, March 29, at Sussex Central High School, Georgetown. The winner will represent Delaware at the 2010 Miss America’s Outstanding Teen Pageant in August, 2009 in Orlando, Fla. The application package and information on entrance fees may be obtained by contacting Jean Toman at Jean411@ msn.com or 302-235-1872. For more information visit www.MDOTeen.org.

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PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Church Bulletins Mt. Olivet Preschool has added another three-year-old class to its program. There are limited openings in the three and fouryear-old classes. Call Linda Stephenson at 629-2786 for details.

finally achieve financial freedom. The doors of The Lighthouse Church will be open during certain hours of the day and evening so that anyone can come and pray. For more information, call 8757814, or visit the church at 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel.

Fall Fundraiser begins

Christmas extravaganza

Mt. Olivet Preschool openings

Christ the Cornerstone Community Church is starting its fall fundraiser. A selection of crafts, gifts, and decorations available until Dec. 15. To view these items, stop by the church, or call 875-8150 for time availability. Church is located at the corner of Seaford Road and Bethel Road, Laurel.

‘God Thing’ Our country should not be surprised at the recent downturn of the nation’s economy, according to Pastor Timothy Jones of the Lighthouse Church of Laurel. According to Second Chronicles, God promises to heal a nation if we humble ourselves, pray and turn from what we as a nation have been doing. Pastor Jones is calling upon Delmarva’s churches to participate in 40 days of prayer and supplication ending Nov. 23, to ask for God’s Divine Intervention, God’s wisdom and as a call for repentance. Pastor Jones is preparing to present a program designed to help people get out of debt, to help people achieve practical methods of living within one’s means, and

Trinity United Methodist Church will have a Christmas shopping extravaganza on Saturday, Nov. 15, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Rev. Lee Elliott building. Home-based vendors such as Pampered Chef, Avon, Longaberger Baskets, Home Interiors, Discovery Toys, Premier Design Jewelry and others will be there for one day of shopping. Orders taken from the catalogues will be there in time for Christmas. Lunch will be available for purchase and there will be free activities for children. Free give-aways too. Call 875-4741 for more information.

Gospel Concert The Delmar Wesleyan Church is having a Gospel Concert featuring the Kings Ambassadors on Saturday Nov. 15, at 6 p.m. The Church is located on 800 E. East St., Delmar, Md. Everyone is welcome.

Free community luncheon Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a Free Community-wide Luncheon (Turkey) on Saturday, Nov. 15, noon to 2 p.m.

The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, west side of 13A, approximately two miles south of town. Any questions, call Shirley at 8752314.

Gospel Café Gospel Café of Centenary United Methodist Church, corner of Poplar and Market streets, Laurel meets every Saturday night from 6 to 9 p.m., featuring Bruce and Nancy Willey Music Ministry. Live Christian Music – Fellowship – Refreshments. Guest singers: Nov. 15 – Ray & Trevor Marine, Bill Primrose, Frank Silva and Mary Ann Riggi. Nov. 22 – Cassandra Abbott, Kaila Clucas, Don White and Dan Welch. Nov. 29 – Good News Tour (Singing from their new CD) Sam Hearn, Frank Silva, Mary Ann Riggi and Amanda Jones. For more information contact Bruce & Nancy Willey at 875-5539 or 875-7339.

Christmas Yard Sale An indoor Christmas Yard Sale will be held at Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, on Saturday, Nov. 15, beginning at 7 a.m. Come and enjoy scrapple sandwiches for breakfast, and hot dogs and chilli for lunch, while scooping up bargains on Christmas items, decorations, and gifts. Call 875-4233 for more information.

Trinity Dublin Hill Trinity Dublin Hill is having its 164th anniversary of the church and the 141st anniversary of the building, homecoming on Nov. 16, at 2 p.m. The regular service will be at 9 a.m. on Sunday morning, followed by a luncheon at noon. The homecoming service will be at 2 p.m., following the luncheon. This will be followed by a time of fellowship.

Latin Mass A Latin mass according to the Missal of 1962 is celebrated on the third Sunday of every month at 3 p.m. at Holy Cross Church in Dover. The mass will be celebrated on Nov. 16. The mass is always a Missa Cantata using traditional Gregorian chant. For further information, call 302674-5781.

Woodland UMC Homecoming The Wodland United Methodist Church will hold its annual homecoming service on Sunday, Nov. 16, at 2:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Dave Bailey, founder and director of Ranch Hope in Alloway, N.J. Ranch Hope is a home and school for troubled youth. The Good News Quartet and the former pastor of Woodland, Bob Robinson, will provide special music. A covered dish dinner will follow in the Fellowship Hall. There will be no morning worship service.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, D el. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church

Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary) Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S .C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker WorshipS ervices: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Pastor www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956

Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road6 8, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Delmar Wesleyan Church 800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: BibleS tudy 7P M


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Zion Church Homecoming St. John AME Zion Church (Ross Point) will celebrate homecoming on Sunday, Nov. 16, at 3:30 p.m. Minister Anthony Lovett from Union Baptist Church, Easton, Md. will be the preacher. Dinner will be served prior to the afternoon service. For more information call 841-0203 or 245-2250; or visit our website for directions www.stjohnrosspoint.com. Host Pastor is the Rev. Shirley M. Caldwell.

Women’s service Join us this Sunday evening, Nov. 16, at 6:30 p.m. at Greenwood United Methodist Church as we join together to focus on women - our caring and our faith. The evening includes praise music, a solo performance by Joanne Jones, and a message given by the Rev. Phyllis Walton from Avenue UMC. Light refreshments will be served following the service. If you have any questions, call 302-3494222. All are welcome.

Upward basketball It’s time to sign up for Upward basketball for boys and girls ages 6 and now up to age 13. Upward is more than a game. Every child is a winner. Registration forms are available at Laurel Wesleyan Church on Rt. 13A in Laurel or the Boys and Girls Club in Seaford and Laurel.

Obituaries Elizabeth Ann Figgs, 61 Elizabeth Ann Figgs of Delmar, died peacefully at her home on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008, surrounded by her loving family. She was born Sept. 1, 1947 in Salisbury, a daughter of Roland and Mary Jenkins Smart, who preceded her in death. She worked as a rural postal carrier for the USPS in Salisbury for more than 15 years, and prior to that worked as a school bus driver. She was an active Elizabeth Figgs member of Bay Shore Community Church in Gumboro where her ministry at the church was an important part of her life. Time spent with her six grandchildren was one of her greatest joys. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by two brothers, Milton Smart and Roland Smart, Jr. She is survived by her husband of more than 40 years, Phillip A. Figgs; a daughter, Kimberly Ann Johnson and her husband, Cale of Delmar; their children, Kenzie, Kelsey and Kaylin Johnson; a son, Lonnie R. Figgs and his wife Talli Renee of Delmar; their children, Seth Phillip, Luke Milton, Cassie Renee Figgs and a granddaughter, Elizabeth Ann, expected to be born in January; three sis-

PAGE 23

Registration is $50, scholarships & Multi child discounts available. Sign up by Nov. 25. For more information contact the church at 875-5380.

Free clothing giveaway Cannon Mennonite Church will be hosting a free clothing giveaway of gently used clothing of all sizes, for the benefit of those in need. Event will take place Nov. 25, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at Cannon Mennonite Church, located 8011 Cannon Road, Bridgeville. On Rt. 18, one mile east of Rt 13. For further information, call 629-4487.

Christmas dinner The Ninety & Nine extends an invitation to all women and men to join them for their annual Christmas dinner/meeting at The Cannon Mennonite Church in Bridgeville, on Monday evening, Dec. 1, at 6:30 p.m. The Ninety & Nine is a ministry, which was formed in 1984 by a group of women who care about the needs of others. Jerry and Jeannie Jones will be ministering in song and testimony for this special Christmas occasion. Jerry sings some contemporary music, popular gospel music, songs that he has written, as well as an occasional old hymn. Reservations are necessary. Deadline is Nov. 25. For details or more information call Joyce Thomas at 629-2248.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Pauline H. Chaffinch of Bridgeville passed away peacefully on Monday, Nov. 3, 2008, at Lofland LifeCare in Seaford. She was born on Feb. 11, 1921 in Greenwood, a daughter of George Henry and Madeline C. Willey Harris. Mrs. Chaffinch was a member of St. Johnstown United Methodist Church in Greenwood and a former member of the Epworth United Methodist Church on Blanchard Road, Greenwood. She was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. She was preceded in death by her husband of 65 years, Leonard Chaffinch,

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Church School -All Ages - 9:15 a.m. Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Rev. Rick Elzey Wings of Prayer - Tues. 7:00 p.m. Come Join Our Family

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

Pauline H. Chaffinch, 87

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

ters, Pat Messick of Delmar, Thelma Johnson of Delmar and Pauline Pulley of Pittsville; and four brothers, Melvin Smart of Delmar, Donald Smart of Salisbury, Russell Smart of Delmar and Frankie Smart of Mardela Springs. She is also survived by many nieces and nephews. A funeral service was held on Saturday, Nov. 8, at Bay Shore Community Church, Millsboro, with Pastors Danny Tice and Jeff Hudson officiating. Interment followed the services at Melson’s Cemetery in Delmar. Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to: Bay Shore Community Church, 36759 Millsboro Highway, Millsboro, DE 19966. Arrangements were handled by Short Funeral Home of Delmar. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302- 875-4646

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

Messiah’sV ineyard Church

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755 Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:30 AM • Sunday School 9:30 AM • Traditional Worship 11 AM

ROCK CHURCH

Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids-Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12), DivorceCare 7:00 Prayer Meeting, Men’s Group, KidStuf 103 (K-6 Kids & their parents, 1 & 3rd Wed.)

30320 Seaford Road, Laurel, Del. Ph: 875-7275 • Pastor Bill Konkel Sunday School: 9a .m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. & 1st & 3rd Sunday Evening: 5 p.m. Thurs Evening Prayer: 7p .m.

COKESBURY CHURCH

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’sP astor:M arilyn Searcey

629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


PAGE 24 who died in 2007. She is survived by two daughters, Sharon Mae Chaffinch of Bridgeville, and Portia M. Brandt of Muncy, Pa.; two sons, Darl V. Chaffinch of Apache Junction, Ariz., and Col. L. Aaron Chaffinch, DSP Ret. and his wife, Karen of Greenwood; five grandchildren; and her sisterin-law, Helen Calder of Middletown. Funeral services were held Friday, Nov. 7, at St. Johnstown United Methodist Church, Greenwood, where friends called. Interment was in the adjoining churchyard cemetery. The Rev. Dr. Everett C. Isaacs and the Rev. Denise Founds co-officiated. Arrangements were handled by Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel, Bridgeville, DE. The family suggests memorial contributions be made to St. Johnstown United Methodist Church, c/o Brenda Prettyman, 14569 Sussex Highway, Bridgeville, DE 19933. Send online condolences to: condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com

Dolores E. Culver, 71 Dolores E. Culver of Laurel passed away Monday, Nov. 3, 2008, at her home very unexpectedly. She was born in Seaford on Oct. 25, 1937, a daughter of Carlos W. and Helen Dickerson Elliott, who predeceased her. Dolores graduated from Delmar High School class of 1955 as the Dolores Culver valedictorian. Growing up, Delores was raised on the family farm. She and her husband continued the farming tradition passed on from her parents. They retired in 2000 from farming, but they continued to raise chickens for Mountaire Farms, which they had done for more than 50 years. She had worked at the Laurel Auction Block for over 35 years, most recently as head cashier. She had been a substitute teacher for Laurel and Delmar schools, and delivered flowers for Flowers by Hearn during the holiday season. She was a member of the Delmar Alumni Association. Dolores was a member of St. George’s United Methodist Church, where she was the organist and a Sunday school teacher for many years. She enjoyed bus trips to Sight and Sound, dinner theaters, and Gaither concerts. Most importantly she was a devoted daughter, mother and grandmother. Her seven grandchildren were her pride and joy, she enjoyed attending their sporting events and school concerts. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband of 51 years, Richard L. “Dickie” Culver, Sr. who passed away on Dec. 16, 2007. She is survived by three sons, Rick Culver and his wife Felicia of Laurel, Randy Culver and his wife Becky of Colorado Springs, and Ron Culver and his wife Melissa of Dagsboro; grandchildren, Kristin, Sarah, Kelly, Aaron, Kevin, Tyler and Veronica Culver. She is also survived by a sister, Janet Kelley and her husband Paul, of Wilmington; several

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008 close cousins, and many nieces and nephews. A funeral service was held on Sunday, Nov. 9, at the Short Funeral Home, in Delmar, where family and friends called. The Rev. Dale Evans officiated. Interment followed the service at Odd Fellows Cemetery in Laurel. In memory of Mrs. Culver, memorial contributions may be made in her memory to St. George’s United Methodist Church, c/o Mr. Rick Culver, 28996 Discountland Road, Laurel, DE 19956. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Victoria M. Hogé, 90 Victoria M. Hogé of Seaford passed away on Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2008, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. She was born Dec. 11, 1917 in Fishing Creek, Md., a daughter of Alfred Meekins and Octavia Parks Meekins. She was also preceded in death by her husbands, Clarence “Ducky” Spear and Vernon Otto Hogé. She was a homemaker. She enjoyed cooking, sewing, and her flower gardens. She enjoyed her daily activities including ceramics at LifeCare at Lofland Park in Seaford. She was preceded in death by five siblings, Clarence Parks, Barrett Parks, Mary Jackson, Gertrude Hopkins, and Willie Meekins, and a grandson, Eric Spear. She is survived by four children, Vernon Spear and his wife, Lea of Cambridge, Nancy Robbins and her husband, Grayson of Linkwood, Terry M. Hogé and his wife, Kaye of Greenwood, Bonnie Galowin and her husband, Harvey of Huntington, 11 grandchildren, and several great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Services were held on Friday, Nov. 7, at Maryland Eastern Veterans’ Cemetery in Hurlock with the Rev. Denzil Cheek officiating. Friends called at the Framptom Funeral Home in Federalsburg. For more information visit www.framptom.com

Alfonzo James Sample, 41 Alfonzo “Al” James Sample was born on May 18, 1967 and was raised in Millsboro. He was a son of Doris Sample Showell and James Benjamin Finney. He attended Sussex Central High School in the Indian River School District where he graduated in 1985. He worked at Vlassic Foods, now called Pinnacle Inc., for 16 years. Mountaire Farms currently employed him. He is survived by his wife Christine Sample and daughters Jazmine Sample, Alana and Alayla Sample; step-daughter, Kayla Townsend and Aliyah Sample of Ellendale. He is also survived by his sisters, Amy Kellam of Millsboro, April Thacker of Seaford, Rose and Roshelle Sample, both of New Jersey; brother, Bobbie Sample of Ellendal. His aunts: Jeanette Finney and Loise Sample of Millsboro, Catherine Sample and Eyvonne Sample, both of Georgetown. Sara Ames of Bridgeville, Josephine Tharp of Massachusetts, Mary Nelson of Parsonsburg, Md.; Uncles, Gary Horsey of Virginia, Raymond Sample of Har-

rington, Ralph Sample, Joseph Aducci and John Hargett of Millsboro and a host of nieces and nephews and cousins. Alfonzo was very well known in the area, and had a smile and laugh you could never forget. All will miss him. Services were held on Friday, Nov. 7, at Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro. Arrangements were by Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro. Letters of condolence may be emailed to: Watson Funeral Home, Delmarvaobits.com or Watsonfh.com

Mary L. Wiley, 91 Mary L. Wiley of West Chester, died Sunday, Nov. 2, 2008 at Park Lane at Bellingham. She was the wife of the late Virgil Wiley. Born in Leetsdale, Pa., she was the daughter of Frank Snyder and Josephine Schlegel Snyder. Mary received her MA in Education from Columbia University and was an elementary teacher and principal for more than 50 years for the Seaford School District. She was a member of Mt. Olivet Methodist Church in Seaford. Mary was the beloved sister of Helen Daiuta, wife of Leo of Kennett Square, Pa., and the beloved aunt of many nieces, nephews, great nieces and great nephews. Relatives and friends were invited to her funeral Service, Saturday, Nov. 8, at the DellaVecchia, Reilly, Smith & Boyd Funeral Home Inc., West Chester. Visitation was held, Saturday morning at the funeral home. Interment was private. Contributions may be made to Compassionate Care Hospice, Attn: Carolyn Cushner, 3333 Street Road, Suite 235, Bensalem, PA 19020

E. Madelyn Hearn, 86 E. Madelyn Hearn of Laurel died on Nov. 4, 2008, at LifeCare at Lofland Park in Seaford.

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 HandicapF riendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

Madelyn was born in Laurel, a daughter of Wm. Raymond Hearn and Leila E. Hearn. Mrs. Hearn was a graduate of Laurel High School’s class of 1940. She was also a graduate of Goldey Business College. Madelyn retired as a supervisor for Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in Salisbury. After retirement she worked for several businesses, with the last being Nanticoke Cardiology in Seaford. She attended Messiah’s Vineyard Church in Laurel. In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her siblings Pearl Reynolds, and Wm. Harold Hearn. She is survived by her sister, Ruth H. Lewis of Laurel; her brothers, Martin T. Hearn and his wife Mary Catherine Hearn of Laurel, and E. Ross Hearn of Stratford, N.J.; a sister-in-law, Edna M. Hearn, and a brother-in-law, Linford Reynolds. Several nieces and nephews also survive her. A funeral service was held at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel, on Saturday, Nov. 8, where a viewing was held. The Rev. Dr. Carl Vincent officiated.Interment followed in Laurel Hill Cemetery. Memorial Contributions may be made in her memory to Messiah’s Vineyard Church, PO Box 60, Laurel, DE 19956; or Vistas Hospice 100 Commerce Drive, Suite 302, Newark, DE. 19713.

Edna King Ellis Hearn, 81 Edna King Ellis Hearn of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Bridgeville, passed away on Monday, Nov. 3, 2008, at her daughter’s home in Bridgeville. She was born March 18, 1927 in Georgetown, a daughter of Burton and Hester Figgs King. Mrs. Hearn moved from Bridgeville to Vero Beach, Fla., in 1986. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her daughter Carolyn Jefferson in 2004.

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701B ridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008 She is survived by two daughters, Gail Wheatley of Bridgeville and Constance Clifton of Leesburg, Fla.; a son, Dennis Ellis of Vero Beach, Fla.; eight grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; a sister Bonnie Maulden of Wasilla, Alaska; and a brother Burton Lee King of Seaford. Graveside services were held on Friday, Nov. 7, at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel, with the Rev. Dale L. Brown officiating. Friends called at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Bridgeville. Send online condolences to: condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com

Jeanne Elizabeth Ewell Johnson, 83 Jeanne Elizabeth Ewell Johnson passed away at her home in Blades on Nov. 7, 2008. Born in Greenport, Long Island, N.Y., on May 24, 1925, she was a daughter of Edna May Truex and Edward Leroy Ewell. She was a homemaker and a former member of the Seaford Moose Lodge and the Ladies Auxiliary of Virgil Wilson VFW Post 4961. In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her husband, Floyd “Scappy” Johnson, Jr.; a son, Floyd “Marty” Johnson, III; a daughter, Faith Ann Johnson Whaley; a granddaughter, Kelly Whaley Dunning; a brother, Eddie Ewell, and a sister, Isabel Griffith. She is survived by her daughter, Mary Lee Johnson Adkins of Greenwood; a son and daughter-in-law, Gregory and Sara Johnson of Blades; her grandchildren, Laurie Adkins Bireley of Delmar, Md., Marty Johnson, IV, of Salisbury, Md.; Bethany Adkins Larmore of Laurel, and Michelle Johnson of Seaford; greatgrandchildren, John “Trey” Dunning, III of Blades, Michael Bireley and Christopher Bireley of Delmar, Md., Christopher Johnson and Emily Johnson of W.Va.; Noah Waldrige of Seaford; Kai Terry of Seaford; Katelynn Johnson of Salisbury; Siene Terry of Seaford; and John Dunning IV of Seaford; and several nieces and nephews. Services were held Tuesday, Nov. 11, in Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial followed in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford.

Col. William N. Martasin, 92 Col. William N. Martasin “Bill”, US Army Retired, passed away in Seaford, on Oct. 21, 2008. He was born in New York City in 1916. He graduated from the University of Hawaii, and received his MBA from Ohio State University. He was a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Beta Gamma Sigma, honorary scholastic fraternities. Prior to joining the army, Col. Martasin served as a safety engineer with Liberty Mutual Insurance Company in New York and California until August 1941. He then joined the Contractors, Pacific Naval Air Bases, and was on Midway Island on Dec. 7, 1941. He returned to Hawaii in December 1941, and became personnel manager for the Contractors at Kaneohe Naval Air Base. He later served as deputy to the chairman of the War Manpower Commission

in what was then the territory of Hawaii. He married Susan Rabe of Topeka, Kan. in 1944 on the same day that he received his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant, Infantry at Ft. Benning, Ga. His combat service during World War II was as an armored infantry platoon leader and company commander in the 10th Armored Infantry Battalion, 4th Armored Division in General Patton’s 3rd Army in France, Luxembourg, Germany and Czechoslovakia. He was awarder the Bronze Star medal for valor. Integrated into the regular army in 1947. From 1950 to 1953, his assignments included service on the staff and faculty of the Command and General Staff College at Ft. Levenworth, Kan., of which he was a graduate. He also graduated from the US Army Management School and the Army War College. Col. Martasin also served as Deputy Adjutant General of the US Army, Pacific and as Adjutant General of I Corps, Uijongbu, Korea. In 1957, Martasin was assigned to Geneva, Switzerland as Executive Officer to the Joint Chiefs of Staff representative to the ten power “Surprise Attack” conference. He also helped establish the “Arms Control” office in the office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. At the time of his retirement he was Deputy Commander of the US Army Data Support Command in the Pentagon. Upon retirement, he was employed by EBS Management Consultants, Computer Science Division in Washington, DC. In

1969 he became the Director of Administrative Services for the University of Georgia in Athens. Martasin entered the real estate business in Falls Church, Va. in 1972, and in 1976 became manager of Century 21, Tideland Properties in Easton, Md. He was an adjunct instructor in real estate subjects at Chesapeake College from 1981 to 1984. Martasin was a member of Royal Oak Community United Methodist Church and served two terms as chairman of the administrative board. He was also president of the “Eastern Shoremen” Barbershoppers Chorus; a member of the Board of Directors of the Talbot County Mental Health Association; president of the Talbot County Board of Realtors; chairman and member of Board of Trustees, Upper Shore Mental Health Center; member of the Talbot County Mental Health Advisory Committee; president of the Mid-Shore Alliance for the Mentally Ill. In 1994, the Martasin’s left Easton after 20 years residence in Arcadia Shores, and moved to the Methodist Manor House, a continuing care community in Seaford. Col. Martasin taught the 55-Alive Safety Driving Course for AARP, served on the Resident Council of the Manor House and served as an AARP tax counselor for the elderly. Colonel Martasin’s wife Susan preceded him in death in 1997. He is survived by a son James Martasin, a daughter Susan Martasin, and a

PAGE 25 very dear friend, Josephine Herron of Easton, MD. A memorial service was held for Col. Martasin at the Manor House on Nov. 12. Donations may be made to the Benevolance Fund, Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973.

Margaret V. Bushey, 74 Margaret “Peggy” V. Bushey of Delmar died Friday, Nov. 7, 2008 at Atlantic Shores Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Millsboro, after a courageous battle with cancer. She was born in Baltimore, July 28, 1934, a daughter of Raymond and Viola Downes Kenney. In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her husband, Cloyd F. Bushey, who passed in 2000. She is survived by her devoted son, with whom she lived, Clayton Bushey; a daughter, Megan Stoner and her husband Eric; two granddaughters, Vivian and Hannah; a brother, Walter Kenney; a sister, Nancy Thompson and her husband Bob, and their daughter, Linda; a sister, Ellen Claggett; a devoted sister-in-law, Wilmette Stevens; a brother-in-law, David Bushey and his wife Sally; and a brother-in-law, Milton Bushey and his wife Barbara. Funeral services were private at the request of the family. Private interment will be held at Henlopen Memorial Park in Milton. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.


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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Health briefs Nanticoke raffles game system

The Look-In Glass Shoppe at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will raffle a Wii gaming system console that includes a CD with five sports games, two nunchucks and two remotes (retail value $350). Tickets are on sale at The Look-In Glass Shoppe (located within Nanticoke Memorial Hospital) from Nov. 14 until Dec. 15 at noon. Tickets cost $5 each or five for $20. The drawing will be held at noon on Dec. 15. All proceeds from The Look-In Glass Shoppe benefit Nanticoke Health Services. For more information about the raffle, call 302-629-6611, ext. 4955.

Hospice needs volunteers

Hospice patients and their families need volunteers to read to patients, run errands, offer companionship and/or provide relief for caregivers. Training is provided by Compassionate Care Hospice. An information session will be held at Seaford Presbyterian Church located at 701 Bridgeville Road on Tuesday, Nov. 11 from 10 a.m. to noon. A Compassionate Care Hospice representative will be available to answer questions. The session will be held in the lower level of the church. For more information, contact Volunteer Coordinator Susan Graves at 302-934-5900.

Stroke and Osteoporosis Screening

Life-Line Screening will be at the Nanticoke Senior Center on Dec. 10. The site is located at 310 Virginia Ave. in Seaford. Appointments will begin at 10 a.m. Screenings are non-invasive. They help identify potential health problems such as blocked arteries and irregular heart rhythm, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and hardening of the arteries in the legs, which is a strong predictor of heart disease. A bone density screening to assess osteoporosis risk is also offered and is appropriate for men and women. Register for a Wellness Package with Heart Rhythm for $149. All five screenings take 60 to 90 minutes to complete. For more information regarding the screenings or to schedule an appointment, call 1-877-237-1287 or visit us on the web at lifelinescreening.com. Pre-registration is required.

Prostate Cancer Screenings

If you’re a male over 50, you’re at risk for prostate cancer, the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. And if you’re African-American, your prostate cancer mortality rate just doubled: you should get screened beginning at age 40. Bayhealth Medical Center will offer free prostate cancer screenings on Saturday, Nov. 15 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the

Kent General Endoscopy Suite. Bayhealth’s free two-part screening includes a blood test for prostate specific antigen (PSA) and a digital rectal exam (DRE) performed by a urologist. Attendees must pre-register and qualify to participate in the screening. To register, call 302-7447135, or (toll-free) 1-877-453-7107.

Gold Coast sale

Shop early for the holidays in the lobby at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital on Monday, November 17, 7:00 am to 4:00 pm and Tuesday, November 18, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Look-In Glass Gift Shoppe at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital is hosting a "Gold Coast" sale featuring rings, earrings, watches, pendants, and bracelets with diamonds and in gold and silver. All proceeds from The Look-In Glass Gift Shoppe benefit Nanticoke Health Services.

Cardiovascular Disease Screenings

According to the American Heart Association, there are an estimated 80 million people in the United States with one or more forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD). To give patients easier access to care, Bayhealth is offering low-cost CVD screenings at several local physician offices. Screenings will include checking blood pressure, cholesterol (total lipid profile and ratio) as well as a glucose evaluation. Fasting is not required.

Screenings will be available at the following locations: November 13, from 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. at the office of Dr. Morris and Dr. Gupta, located at 305 Jefferson Ave., in Milford. November 14, from 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. at Bayhealth Women’s Care Associates located at 517 S. Dupont Hwy., in Milford. November 14, from 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the office of Dr. Sargent located at 25 Bridgeville Rd., in Georgetown. For more information, contact Donna Goldsborough at 302-744-6144.

DPH offers free flu shots

The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) will offer free flu shots to everyone six months of age or older at a flu clinic in Dover on Wednesday, Nov. 19 from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Modern Maturity Center. DPH will provide 2,500 flu shots. Staff will provide car side service to clients who cannot walk into the center. The Kent County flu clinic is organized as a preparedness exercise so DPH can test its mass vaccination capabilities needed in an influenza pandemic. This event mirrors a successful flu shot exercise held last November at the Delaware Technical Community College in Stanton, where the triaged public received 2,544 flu and 84 pneumococcal vaccinations in 9 hours.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 27

Health Some seek medical care more often than needed By Anthony Policastro, M.D Military personnel and their dependents do not have to pay for outpatient care at military facilities. Whether they have an office appointment or an ER visit, there is no charge. The people who worked in my ER’s often complained to me that patients overused the ER because of that. For that reason, I offered them a challenge. I asked them to find for me someone that they thought was overusing the ER. If they could, I would address it with the patient directly. Two things happened as a result of that challenge. The first was that they did not often come to me with any names. They did indeed see some people more frequently than others. However, when they looked at the reasons for the patients being there, they found that most of the reasons were legitimate. Therefore, those patients used the ER more often because they were actually sick more often. The second was related to the review I did when they did identify a patient to me. Since both ER and outpatient visits were all part of the same system, they were recorded in the same computer system. When I got the name of a patient, I looked up the name in the computer. I found the same thing in every instance. Every patient that used the ER frequently had a large number of office visits as well. They were not just using the ER. They were utilizing medical care in all areas. In most cases these patients were not a lot sicker than other patients. They just had

a low threshold for seeking medical care. There is usually not one reason for this kind of behavior. In some cases, patients see the physician a lot because they do not have a lot of medical knowledge. They think they need to be seen when that is not actually the case. This has nothing to do with intelligence. Some people worry more about their health than others. They want to be reassured that everything is OK. Some people worry about their children and think that they need to be seen for every minor childhood illness. In either case, it is important for the physician to help educate them. For example, I have a standard talk that I give to mothers at the four-month check up. I tell them that their child is losing the immunity that he/she got across the placenta before birth. That means that the child will start coming down with infections every two weeks or so until they hit two years of age. A majority of them will be minor. Some will have very few symptoms. Most will last 72 hours and then go away. For that reason, childhood illnesses with minor symptoms like fever should be treated for 72 hours for those symptoms. If the child gets better, then the infection has run its course. If the child does not get better, then an office visit is usually warranted to see what is the cause of the prolonged illness. Patients would then have a little more patience treating their children when they got sick. Another reason for frequent visits for medical care is the mistaken belief that

every illness needs medication. I still receive phone calls from parents asking me to call in an antibiotic because their child is ill. Most illnesses do not require an antibiotic. Before the time of antibiotics most illnesses resolved on their own. This kind of belief by patients also requires education by the physician. If a patient does get better without medication, it will help them understand that drugs are not the answer to every illness. Some heavy users of medical care do so because they read about their symptoms and always think the worst. Therefore, they want to be reassured that they do not have a serious illness. They will go to the doctor to be checked for that serious illness. Unfortunately, they do not tell the doctor what they are

worried about. Therefore, the doctor does not mention that particular disease. They leave thinking the physician has missed something. So back they go to make sure they do not have that serious illness. It is important for patients to tell physicians if they are worried about having a particular illness. Physicians will not always be able to guess at what the patients are thinking. The question needs to be asked specifically. These are just some of the reasons that patients seek a lot of medical care. In most instances improved communication between the physician and the patient will help decrease the high number of visits. The responsibility for that communication falls on both individuals. It needs to involve more than just the reason for that particular visit.

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Hospice receives unique gift Ken Conner of Seaford owns Dog Guard of Delmarva, LLC and provides out of sight fencing for dog owners. Delaware Hospice planned to approach Canine Partners for Life to provide a companion dog for the Center. Unfortunately, Hospice wasn't sure how to keep the dog safe on the property and maintain the integrity of the landscaped grounds. Chuck Palmer, Delaware Hospice Center’s facilities manager, invited Ken Conner to look at the project and give an estimate for an out-of-sight fence. Ken toured the Center and then returned to his office and contacted Sunward Electronics, the manufacturer of Dog Guard equipment, about sponsoring this project. The following day, Ken informed

Delaware Hospice that Sunward would be donating all electronics, and that Dog Guard of Delmarva would be donating all other materials, including the labor. A few weeks later, Ken and his brother, Jack Conner, returned to the Center to dig the trench around the large property and install the out of sight fence. Ken said, “As a cancer survivor myself, I felt particularly inspired by this Center and I’m so pleased to support the cause.” Delaware Hospice’s President and CEO, Susan Lloyd, expressed her appreciation on behalf of the organization, “ We are so grateful for this contribution of materials and labor that will keep the dog safe and ultimately make such a difference in the lives of our patients and families who stay with us at the Center.”

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PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Entertainment Choral concerts feature organist Rebecca McDaniel of Milford will be the guest organist during the Southern Delaware Choral Society Christmas concert, “A Newborn Child: Cantatas and Carols for Christmas,” under the direction of John McDaniel Ranney. Concerts will be held on Saturday, Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. at Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church in Seaford and on Sunday, Dec. 14 at 3 p.m. at St. Edmund’s Roman Catholic Church, Rehoboth Beach. The cantatas are German pieces written during the Baroque era and will be sung in German. While Ms. McDaniel performs the continuo bass accompaniment on the organ, a professional string ensemble will join her playing the melody. McDaniel is a graduate of James Madison University where she also worked as

an accompanist for shows, recitals and voice lessons. Since moving to Milford she has been employed as a piano accompanist, pianist, organist and section leader for the SDCS and Delaware State University. She is also organist and choir director at Milford Christ Episcopal Church and teaches voice and piano at Wilmington Delaware Music School in Milford. Founded in 1985, the SDCS presents concerts at Christmas and spring in different venues in Sussex County. Each year the Christmas concerts are usually sold out by the performance date. The choral society of more than 80 singers is well known for bringing in guest performers from all over the east coast. Tickets are $20 for adults and $8 students and are available by contacting Dot Barlow at 302-645-2013 or online at www.brownpapertickets.

From left are Kaila Clucas, Bridgeville; Rick Trice, Seaford; Sadie Davis, Milton and Leslie Boslet of Milford rehearse a scene from Possum Point Players upcoming Christmas Show, Alan Menken’s Broadway version of “A Christmas Carol.”

Players presents ‘A Christmas Carol’ Possum Point Players brings the famous Alan Menken-Lynn Ahrens-Mike Okrent version of “A Christmas Carol: The Musical” to their stage. The holiday classic opens on Friday, Dec. 5 at 8 p.m. Nina Galerstein of Millsboro returns to the director’s seat for this production. Auditions were held in the summer so that period costumes could be created in time. Rick Trice of Seaford plays Ebenezer Scrooge. The Broadway production had a cast of 77 while the Possum production will have 39. “We have a

cast of 29 adults and 10 kids. There’s no chorus, per se, because everyone has at least one part. Most have several. That also means that they have several costumes, and some have more than one type of English accent to learn,” said Galerstein. The production is expected to play to sell-out crowds. Performances are Dec. 5, 6, 12, 13 at 8 p.m. and on Dec. 7 and 14 at 2 p.m. Tickets are available for $18 ($17 for seniors or students) by calling the Possum Ticketline at 302-856-4560.

Ballet Theater presents Nutcracker

Nukri Mamistvalov and Angela Marie Zintchenko. Ticket prices are $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Tickets are available at all Bank of Delmarva locations, the Salisbury Wicomico Arts Council, the Salisbury Studio of Dance in Fruitland and Dance Wear, Etc. in the Court Plaza shopping center. For more information, call Nicole at 410-546-5642 or Betty at 410-742-2858

The Eastern Shore Ballet Theater will present the “Nutcracker” on Saturday, Dec. 6 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 7 at 2 p.m. in the Wicomico High School Auditorium. Artistic Director Elena ManakhovaAmy is a graduate of the Kirov Ballet School and the Vaganova Academy in Russia. Guest dancers are Alexander Bojko,

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Laurel Senior Center will be holding their Annual Fall Festival on Friday, Nov. 14, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the center. The planning committee is Millie Price, Adele Morris, Marie Derrickson, Golda Williamson, Harriett Joyce, Penny Duncan, and Carolyn Horsey. Mountaire Farms is supporting the event by donating chicken for the luncheon that features chicken salad sandwiches, soup and more. Photo by Pat Murphy.

‘Every Day’s a Holiday!’ The holiday season is fast approaching and to help you get in the mood, Delaware Technical & Community College is pleased to host “Every Day’s a Holiday!” by the Clear Space Chorus on Thursday, Nov. 20 at 7 p.m. in the theater of the Arts & Science Center. Under the direction of Doug Yetter, the incredible musical journey will focus on

Br idal Tuxedos & Prom

holidays throughout the year: Valentine’s Day, Father’s Day, Christmas, Fourth of July, and even National Hunting Day. The 60-voice chorus will include solo performances by Lorraine Steinhoff, Ken Skrzesz, David Button, Don McCabe, and Dana Peragallo. Accompanying the orchestra will be Melanie Bradley. To reserve tickets, please call the Clear Space box office at 302-644-3810 or order online at www.ClearSpaceProductions.org.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 29

This Thanksgiving, branch out beyond the traditional According to Thanksgiving guru Rick Rodgers, my personal seasonORETTA NORR al Svengali, I’m already seriously behind on my turkey day preparations. According to Rick, by now I should have: invited guests, prepared a menu, ordered the turkey, prepared a shopping list, cleaned out my cupboards, purchased all non perishables and cleaned out the freezer. Having done none of this, tip # 8, “Relax”, seems a bit out of to try something new but still have their reach. favorites to fall back on. I’ll never be as organized as Rick He loves his scalloped yams but says Rodgers but one thing we do have in common is a lesson learned the hard way it’s no big deal to put some canned yams with syrup and marshmallows on top in — serve plenty of nostalgia on Thanksthe oven to forestall insurrections. giving Day. Like all of us who love to I do this on a limited basis. I can’t give cook, Rick and I have tried over the years to offer modern twists on tradition- up my cranberry/shallot chutney but I still slide out a glob from the can so certain al recipes which resulted in open revolt family members won’t run out to the store at the dinner table. His solution is to ofin search of it. fer two versions of some recipes so that If your family loves the yams with traditionalists will have the opportunity

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

Horsey Family Youth Foundation president David G. Horsey (center) accepts a check for $2,500 from Bargain Bill’s owners Bill and Christy Brown (right). Proceeds were from a benefit held by the Browns to benefit the foundation. On the left are Mike Payne Horsey, event coordinator, and Pat Horsey, treasurer of the foundation. Photo by Frank B. Calio

Raffle brings in money for sports teams By Frank B. Calio A generous donation by owners of Bargain Bill’s in Laurel helped the Horsey Family Youth Foundation to top $150,000 in proceeds raised this year from selling chances on the 2008 Mustang Shelby Cobra. Earlier in the year the Horsey Foundation displayed the Mustang on the Bargain Bill property and sold chances. The Browns donated the $2,500 in cover charges they collected that evening.

Horsey Foundation president David Horsey said that 8,000 tickets were sold this year, enabling his organization to donate more than $100,000 to sports teams in Delaware which includes the three counties, 13 leagues, Del Tech and Sussex Tech. The winner of the Mustang was from Salem, N.J.; four $2,500 winners were from Salisbury, New Castle, Georgetown and Milton.

Hospital shop is all ready for Christmas Just in time for the start of holiday shopping, the Look-In Glass gift shop in Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford, is hosting a Gold Coast sale featuring rings, earrings, watches, pendants, and bracelets with diamonds and in gold and silver.

The sale will be Monday, Nov. 17, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Tuesday, Nov. 18, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. All proceeds from the gift shop benefit Nanticoke Health Services.

Sale of Peebles coupons will benefit charities Peebles Department Store will host a Charity Day Event Sunday, Nov. 16. Peebles will donate a quantity of coupon booklets to charities. The charity will then sell them for $5. All money will go to the charity.

The booklet features coupons for all Peebles departments with discounts up to 50 percent off. Participating charities will start offering the coupon booklets prior to Charity Day on Nov. 16.

marshmallow casserole, go ahead and fix it. But give them a taste of Rick’s favorite — you might make a few converts. Scalloped Yams with Praline Topping Makes 8 to 12 servings Rick says: “This is one of my favorite dishes to demonstrate how yams don’t have to be cloying sweet to be good. Whenever I make it, it never fails that someone remarks (or words to this effect), ‘I don’t even like yams, but I could eat a whole dish of these!’” 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/3 cup (about 2 ounces) finely chopped pecans 6 medium yams, peeled and cut into 1/2inch thick rounds (about 3 pounds) 1 and 1/2 cups heavy cream, heated In a small bowl, using your fingers,

work the brown sugar, butter and flour together until well combined, then work in the pecans. Set aside. (The praline topping can be prepared up to 8 hours ahead, stored at room temperature.) Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the yams and cook just until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Do not overcook. They should be able to hold their shape when drained. Drain and rinse under cold running water. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly butter a 9- by 13-inch baking dish. Overlapping in vertical rows, place the yams in the prepared dish. (The yams can be parboiled and placed in their baking dish up to 8 hours before baking, covered tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerated.) Pour the cream over the yams. Bake for 20 minutes. Crumble the pecan mixture over the yams and continue baking until the yams are tender and the topping is browned, 20 to 30 more minutes. Serve hot.


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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Police Journal Mother, son die in Georgetown crash

A mother and her 1-year-old son were killed in a Nov. 5 accident on Truck Route 9, east of South Bedford Street, Georgetown. Police said that Kirstie DavidsonMatt, 40, of Lewes, lost control of her vehicle and crashed, killing herself and her son. According to police, Davidson-Matt was driving a 2000 Ford Explorer west on Truck Route 9. She crossed the railroad tracks and lost control of her vehicle, then crossed into the eastbound lane and crashed head-on into a 2005 Chevrolet Silverado pick-up driven by Justin Lee Collins, 19, of Georgetown. Collins sustained multiple fractures of the lower extremities and was transported to Beebe Medical Center and admitted. He was listed in stable but guarded condition.

Teen accused of attempted murder

Delaware State Police have arrested a 14-year-old Millsboro girl and charged her with first-degree attempted murder. Police said that the assault occurred on Nov. 1 at 1:10 p.m., on the 28000 block of Layton Davis Road, Millsboro. According to police, the 78-year-old male victim was approached by the teen as he was attempting to leave his residence. The teen asked the victim for a ride and when he refused, she reportedly became angry. The victim advised her he was calling the police. She allegedly grabbed the victim’s cellular phone and damaged it beyond use, then sprayed the victim in the eyes with a bleach substance. The police said that the teen then jumped onto the victim as he was seated in his car and began to punch him. The victim was able to push her away long enough to attempt an escape. But she allegedly pursued the victim and stabbed him in the back and in the chest with a knife. Detectives said that she attempted to stab the victim a third time, but the victim was able to grab the knife and remove it from her possession. The teen then fled the

area, police said. The victim was taken to the hospital and has been released from the hospital pending surgery at a later date. On Nov. 4, troopers arrested the teen at her residence without incident. In addition to attempted murder, she has been charged with possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony, second-degree assault, criminal mischief under $1,000 and third-degree criminal trespassing. She was remanded to the Stevenson House in lieu of $75,500 secured bond.

Man asked girls for photos, police say

Following a month long investigation, Delaware State Police have arrested Robert E. Bench, 41, of the 100 block of Geldon Road, Felton, on various child pornography and sexual solicitation charges. On Sept. 22, state police detectives learned from a 14-year-old victim that she had been solicited to take inappropriate pictures. The alleged offense occurred on Sept. 8 at Bench’s residence. Police said that Bench offered the victim money in exchange for these photos. According to police, Bench solicited and fondled three others victims, Bench age 12, 16 and 17. Troopers confiscated various computer equipment, discs and cell phones during a search of Bench’s residence and turned the items over to the Delaware State Police High Tech Crimes Unit for forensic analysis. The High Tech Crime Unit discovered 13 images depicting a child engaging in a prohibited sexual act, police said. Bench was charged with two counts of sexual solicitation of a child under 16; five counts of first degree unlawful sexual contact; 15 counts of possession of child pornography; and one count of reckless endangering.

New Gospel CD: ‘Beside the Still Waters’

He was remanded to the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center in lieu of $167,500 cash bail.

Man linked to two robberies

On Tuesday, Nov. 4, state troopers received a 911 call from a Milton couple who said they were robbed at gun point. The Milton couple was traveling along U.S. 9 east of Georgetown at 1:16 a.m. when they came across what they believed to be a disabled vehicle. The operator of the vehicle, Darius L. Bradley, 23, of the 28000 block of Carpenter Road, Milton flashed his vehicle lights at the Milton couple. When the coupled stopped to ask if Bradley needed assistance, he asked them for a vehicle jack, police said. As the victim walked to the rear of his vehicle to obtain the jack, Bradley allegedly displayed what appeared to be a gun and pointed it at the victim. Bradley then demanded money, police said, and upon obtaining an undisclosed amount of cash, fled the area in his vehicle. The victims dialed 911 and followed Bradley, providing 911 with Bradley’s location information. At one point, police said, Bradley stopped his vehicle, charged the victim’s vehicle and again pointed what appeared to be a gun at the victims. The victim backed his vehicle up as several troopers and a canine unit arrived on scene. State police apprehended Bradley with the use of the dog without further incident. Police said that Bradley was also involved in a similar incident on Aug. 1. Two male victims were traveling along Delaware 5 when Bradley pulled next to them in a Chrysler 300. Once beside the victims, police said, Bradley told them he needed assistance with a tire on his vehicle. Shortly after Bradley and the victims pulled onto the shoulder of the roadway and exited their vehicles, Bradley allegedly displayed a handgun, pointed it at the victims and demanded cash. Upon obtaining an undisclosed amount of money, Bradley reentered his vehicle and fled the

area. The victims were able to provide vehicle registration and vehicle description which helped troopers link Bradley to the Aug. 1 robbery. Bradley was charged with two counts of first-degree robbery; one count of attempted first-degree robbery; two counts of possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony; four counts of aggravated menacing; and two counts of terroristic threatening. He was remanded to Sussex Correctional Institute in lieu of $104,000 secured bond.

Police investigate home robbery

Delaware State Police detectives are investigating a robbery which occurred Thursday, Nov. 6, at 10 p.m. in the 28000 block of Blueberry Lane, Frankford. Troopers responded to a shots fired complaint on Blueberry Lane. The investigation revealed the victims were inside a shed located outside one of their residences playing cards. There were a total of nine victims, including an 8-year-old child. One of the victims was also outside sitting in a vehicle when the suspects approached him. The victim sitting in the vehicle had a handgun pointed at him and the suspect demanded money. As this was occurring, three other unknown suspects entered the shed and confronted the other victims. The suspects also had handguns and demanded money. A single shot was fired into the ceiling of the shed prior to the suspects fleeing. After fleeing the shed, the suspects then entered the residence next to the shed by kicking in the door. When the suspects determined there was no one inside the residence, they fled the area with an undetermined amount of money. The suspects were described as four black males. Delaware State Police are continuing their investigation. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call 302-856-5850, ext. 0. Tips may also be provided through Crime Stoppers at 800-TIP-3333.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 31

Group remembers innocents who died in wars during past 50 years In remembrance of the estimated more than 44 million non-combatant innocents who died in armed conflicts around the world in the last 50 years, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, located a block off The Circle in Georgetown, conducted a special worship. “Although it is not possible to determine with absolute precision the many costs of war, economic, human, or environmental, we have adopted this ‘working estimate’ from available recent research,” explains the Reverend Earl Beshears, rector of St. Paul’s. Sponsored by the Delaware Chapter of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship (EPF), the worship, called Witness for the Innocents, included participants lighting 44 candles, one for each million killed since World War II. One of the participants, Joe Holler spoke about the innocent victims of war who died on the sidelines, the wounded, the orphaned, the widows, the children and the countless families of different faiths

and nations whose lives were forever changed and his experience traveling to Vietnam to visit the site where his best friend and brother-in-law was killed in an ambush 40 years ago. “What I experienced in Vietnam was beautiful, compelling, transforming and enriching. It affirmed my optimistic view that the world is good because its people are good and that the problems of the world are the difficult pieces in a large puzzle,” Holler said. “I believe that the Human Spirit, expressed through our great wisdom traditions, is, fundamentally, an expression of what is or can be good,” explained Holler, as he recalled the spirit of the Vietnamese people, their hospitality and their continued suffering from munitions the United States left behind. As a tangible reminder of the costs of war, church members began collecting 44 million pennies that eventually will be donated to agencies specializing in relieving civilian war suffering.

The Delaware Chapter of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship is one of 71 chapters across the United States connecting all who seek a deliberate response to local and global injustices and strive to be peacemakers. Chapters sponsor prayer and public witness events, and organize and implement service projects to raise awareness, and take action for peace and justice. Although the principles of the Delaware chapter are based on the Christian faith, the chapter welcomes participation from people of all faiths. The Delaware chapter, which includes members from Maryland, meets the first Saturday of the month at 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Several activities are planned for the next few months. For more information, call the church at 302-856-2894 or visit www.stpaulsgeorgetown.org. For more information about the national organization, call 312-922-8628 or visit www.epfnatioal.org.

Ginny Wright adds pennies as a tangible reminder of noncombatants killed in armed global conflicts in the last 50 years.

State seeks 1933 petition signers

NEW HABITAT HOMEOWNER - On Saturday, Nov. 1, Carleen Cannon and her family became Sussex County Habitat's 37th homeowner. Habitat held a home dedication ceremony at Cannon's new home in Concord Village in Seaford. At the ceremony, Cannon received the key to her home along with good wishes from volunteers, family and friends. The blessing of the home was led by Cannon's pastor YoVanda Jenkins from Oasis Living Word Ministries.

The Department of State is searching for living signers of the original petitions that officially established Delaware Day in 1933. As part of this year’s Dec. 7 festivities, Secretary of State Harriet Smith Windsor is inviting those signers to join her in a special celebration to mark the 75th anniversary of the establishment of Delaware Day. Ever since Delaware became the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution on Dec. 7, 1787, that date has been significant to Delawareans. However, it would be nearly 150 years before Dec. 7 would be officially recognized as Delaware Day. In that year, Mr. E. Paul Burkholder, a Delaware educator and legislator, forwarded a letter to Governor C. Douglass Buck requesting his consideration of a petition “regarding the proper observance of December seventh on account of its significance in the history of Delaware.” He provided Governor Buck with copies of the petition signed by over 6,000 citizens, a list of statewide organizations that endorsed this movement with letters affirming their action, and a list of various community organizations that cooperated in circulating the petition. Thanks to the efforts of Mr. Burkholder and many others, the first Delaware Day celebration was held Dec. 7, 1933 by proclamation of

Governor C. Douglass Buck. Since a significant percentage of the signers were school age children, it is likely that many are still living. Secretary Windsor is inviting them to join her in Dover on Dec. 7 to honor their contribution to Delaware Day. The complete list of signers can be found at public libraries across the state and by visiting http://delawareday.delaware.gov/information/petition.shtml. If you are a signer and are interested in attending the Dec. 7 event, contact Suzan Voshell at 302-744-5050.

Youth conference planned

More than 3,000 middle school students and youth leaders will experience a weekend of challenge and adventure at Alive 2008: Quest Youth Conference from Friday, Nov. 21 through Sunday, Nov. 23, at the Ocean City Convention Center. Bands pureNRG and Leeland, youth speakers Runks and Joel Sonnenberg, performing artists Onetimeblind and Fitz Family Jugglers, leadership trainers Leonard Sweet, Dr. Doris Morgan and others will offer insight on issues faced by middle school students. Alive 2008 is $80 per person and hotel rates are additional. Call 877-896-3802 or visit www.mmyfc.org.

Secondhand smoke exposure causes heart disease and lung cancer in nonsmoking adults. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR

• NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com LOST FREE KITTENS, litter box trained, 10 wks. old. 8752003. 11/6

FOUND MIXED BLACK LAB MALE found, 3-5 yrs. old, very well behaved. Need vet bill. 629-8949. 11/6

GIVE-AWAY 17 OFFICE PARTITIONS, FREE. 629-9788. 11/13 FREE KITTENS - 2 female calico kittens & 1 male orange tabby kitten to good homes only. 10 weeks old, very lovable. Momma cat adopted us, but we need to find homes for her kittens! 875-7179. 11/13/2t SHEPHERD/CORGI Mix female, 2 yrs. old, free to Approved Home. Obedient, spayed, good w/kids, loving house pet. Call Robin, 8460847. 10/23 6 PUPPIES, mixed, mostly black lab, about 8 wks. old & looking for goodhome. 629-4930. 10/16 FREE HORSE MANURE, mixed w/shavings. You load, great for flower beds or gardens. 337-7200. 10/16

HELP WANTED ADVERTISING SALES Metropolitan Magazine has an opening for Ad Executive for the Southern Del. and Lower Shore areas. Proven sales record preferred. Join our growing team & enjoy your own private office! E-mail resume & cover letter to carol@metromag.net or call 410-546-6388 and ask for Carol Naarup. 11/6/2tc

LIBRARY ASSISTANT The Delmar Public Library is seeking a part-time Library Assistant. Essential functions include working with community and staff, handling circulation duties, general computer skills and technical library tasks. Library experience, knowledge of QuickBooks Pro and/or education in library science is preferred. Deadline for applications is Monday, December 1, 2008. Applications can be submitted to the Delmar Public Library (www.delmarlibrary. org) 11/13/2tc CHANCEL CHOIR DIRECTOR: Union United Methodist Church, Bridgeville, desires to hire a Chancel Choir Director as soon as possible. Salary paid for 40 weeks, Sept. - 1st week of June. Qualifications incl. background in piano & organ; strong background w/directing & voice, college degree in music preferred, but not required, and must have good communication skills. For add’l info & to request job description & application, contact church office at 337-7409 or 3377070. 10/30/3tnc

SERVICES JAMES LAWN CARE, ‘A Cut Above The Rest.’ Family owned & operated. For free estimates, leave message at 875-0402.

NOTICE CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that really works! Seating Limited. Call today for free intro session! 302-875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

UPCOMING AUCTION: RALPH CUPBOARD built in Bethel, DE, in 1800s - a rare piece of Delaware history! Valuable antique at auction Nov. 15. Contact owner for details & history at 610-909-6061 or email nkay@ nkay.com. Pictures at cleanfittings.com/ralph. The Ralph brothers were master carpenters & ship builders of the unique and highly specialized sailing schooner, the "ram," built only in Bethel. In the winter, they built cupboards of the same wide pine boards harvested from the local area to build ships.

YARD SALE MOVING SALE 11/15 & 11/16 8-2. 505 S. Central Ave., Laurel. Huge! Furniture, household goods, tools, garden & patio items. Sewing, craft & scrapbook supplies. Lg. # of gift items from closed shop. 11/13

WANTED POWERWHEEL BARBIE JEEP, in exc. cond., for a Christmas gift. Can pay up to $75. Call Sherri, 410430-5764. 10/9

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES VINTAGE SPORTS MEMORABILIA makes memoriable Christmas gifts. Yearbooks, books, programs, pennants, vintage photos, more. 875-5749. 11/13

SOFA & CHAIR w/Ottoman, 3 pcs., 2 yrs. old. 629-4796. SOFA, 7’, floral print, $100. 2 Barrel Chairs compliment sofa, exc. cond., $100. Table & chairs, oval w/leaf, 2 oak chairs, very good cond., $100. 629-6526.

‘71 LAUREL H.S. YEARBOOK exc. cond., $75 firm. 2-Man Crosscut Saw, orig. wooden handles, exc. cond., $65 firm. 841-9274. 11/13

5 WICKER PCS., 2 rockers, 2 plant stands, 1 peacock chair, very gd cond., $100. Sleep Sofa, 6’ w/queen mattress, neutral clr, good cond., $50. Storage/entertainment cabinet, dark pine, very gd cond., $75. 629-6526.

PIANO - 1908 ant. upright Schomacker, solid walnut, exc. cond., $800. 6296526. 11/13

ELECTROLUX VACUUM with power sweeper, $75 firm. 629-4348. 11/6

ANT. DR SET, 1940’s, table w/leaves, 6 chairs, china cabinet, all mahogany in good cond., $800. 6296526. 11/13 FENTON SET OF 4 COMMEMORATIVE Plates, lg. Fire King bowl, sm. old crock, oil lamp wall hanger, other items. Call 629-8745, COLLECTOR ‘58 EDSEL hard top 2-dr. car, $35. Collector ‘342 Chevy Truck, $10. 629-5192. 10/16

GE SIDE-BY-SIDE Refrig., like new, 4 yrs. old, $350 OBO. 875-8677. 11/6 TV STAND, $25. Apt. size tall refrig., $100. Small Microwave, $20. Entertainment center, $50. 5-Drawer Dresser, $50. All good cond. Cell: 841-7275. 11/6 CRAFTSMAN 10” RADIAL SAW, good cond., $100. Stanley 3/4” High Torque Drill, used, good cond., $75. 934-6995. 11/6

AUTOMOTIVE

WASHER $120; DRYER $120. 628-1320. 11/29/tnc

2 PEAVY FLR. MONITORS w/new source speakers & tweeters, will trade for 1 EV 300 speaker monitor. 2 SP3 Peavy Main Speakers, $200. 934-6995. 11/6

‘04 NISSAN MAXIMA, 12k mi., Call for details, 6294195. 11/13

LIONEL TRAIN SET, boxed, $85. 410-883-3734.

275 GAL. VERTICAL OIL DRUM, $100. 934-6995.

9’ XMAS TREE, pre-lit w/1500 clear GE lights. Used 2 seasons, xc. cond., asking $150 incl. storage bag. 337-3239. 11/13

12-PC. PLACE SETTING, Sango Calligraph Pattern, $150. 934-6995. 11/6

REAR BUMPER for ‘02 or newer Dodge Ram PU. Exc. cond., $65. 841-9274. 11/13 LUGGAGE RACK, fits ‘04 VW Passat, & similar sizes, $110. Voyager LX Clamn Shell carrier, $65, or both for $150. 337-0359. 10/30 1 MICHELLIN RADIAL Tire 215/60/R15. 629-8745. 10/16 JUMP START with air compressor, $40. 629-5192. 10/16 3 CARS: 2 - ‘63 Fords, 1‘68 Mustang. All for parts, $1000 for all. 542-0695.

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS 5x10 INT’L. TRAILER, wood flr & ramp gate, gross 3,000 lbs. $900. 258-6553. 10/30

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FOR SALE

COMPAQ PRESARIO CQ50 Notebook PC. new in orig. box, Windows Vista, 160 GB HD. Never used, $400. 236-9075. 11/13 STONEWARE DISHES, new, 7 of ea.m, pd. $60, asking $20. Red rooster Canister set, paid $40, asking $20. 629-4649. 11/13 SINK SHELF, Over-TheCounter, 36” L, 7” W, new, light wood, apples on side, $10. Heater Fan, swivel base, good for bathroom, good cond., $10. 629-4649. QUEEN SLEEP SOFA, exc. cond., $60. 629-8928. 2 VENETIAN BLINDS, custom made, Hunter Douglas, white, 1” vinyl slats, 52” l, 41” w, like new, $30. 8755086. 11/13 3 AREA RUGS, 1 oriental blue & white 7x10, $100. 1 rose-colored floral 11x12, $50. 1 white wool shag 4x6, $50. 629-6526. 11/13

ELVIS LP Photo book, $30. Elec. steam cleaner, extra pads, pd. $119, asking $35. 875-1025. 10/30 1000+ VHS Tapes, will sell part or all. Best offer. 6297710. 10/30 3 LIFE-SIZE LIGHTED DEER for outdoor display, work perfectly. Incl. ext. cord on stake & timer, $75 OBO. 236-9075. 10/30 18” AMER. GIRL home made doll clothes. 8770340. 10/30 COLEMAN NAT’L GAS Furnace, 75,000 BTU, used 2 seasons, like new, $650 OBO. 245-2278. 10/30 2 CEMETARY PLOTS in Blades, $700 for both. 8753463. 10/30 COMPLETE LR: Bamboo glass top table, blue leather sofa & 2 lounge chairs, 1 white, 1 blue leather, curio cabinet, small rug, all used very little, $980. 875-2460.

CHILD’S WOODEN ROCKER, 3 Christmas outdoor raindeers, brass DR light fixture, other items. 6298745. 10/30 WOOD STOVE, Dutchwest glass front dr., side loading door, brass detail, extra glass for door, new fan motor, Pd $1350 (new); $500 Ready to use. 8751246. 10/23 35’ RCA TV, analog, needs converter box. Entertainment Center, solid oak, holds 35” TV, glass drs. w/shelves for DVD/VHS, cable or satellite box. $300 both. Will separate. 6289950. 10/23 THERMO SPA HOT TUB, 4 person, brand new cond., 3 yrs old. Fully automated & self-contained. 2 yrs. of chemicals & all accessories incl. Heavy duty insulated cvr w/hinged lift, $3200 neg. 628-9950. 10/23 ROUTER, 1 1/2 HP, used 1 time, $60. 258-6553. 10/23 12” METAL LATHE, Craftsman, $200. Sears 4” Wood Jointer, $75. 629-6730. ACOUSTIC GUITAR, Jasmine by Cakamine, $75. 875-3744 or 856-4031. CORD OF WOOD, cut May 08, $110. 875-3744 or 8564031. 10/23 COMPRESSION SEQUENTIAL CIRCULATOR for removing fluid from legs, $500. 337-7140. 10/16 COLEMAN GENERATOR, 5000 Watt, 10 hp, on wheels. Used very little. $450. 629-7834.10/16

ANIMALS, ETC. SHIH-POO PUPPIES, non shedding, hypoallergenic, 10-15 lbs. max. 381-7462. 11/13 MINIATURE SCHNAUZER pups for sale, AKC. 8 wks old, 1 blk., 2 salt/pepper. Wormed & first shot. Health guarantee, $450 ea. 2585710. 10/16

MOBILE HOME FOR SALE ‘88 MOBILE HOME, 3 BR, 2 full baths, nice, $10,500. 628-8925, lv. msg. 10/23

ROOMMATE LOOKING FOR A ROOMMATE, 2 BR apt. 875-4181.


MORNING STAR

• NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

SPECIAL REGIONAL ADS Apartments For Rent 5 bd. 3 ba. HUD Home $205/mo! More 1-5 bd. Foreclosures fr $199/mo! Never Rent Again! For Listings 800-585-3617 x T297 Auctions ESTATE AUCTION - SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2008, 10AM - 4409 HIGHBORO COURT, MT. AIRY, MD 21771.For photos & details: www.weschlers.com www.gregorysauction.com Weschler’s Auctioneer, 202628-1281. Automobile Donation DONATE VEHICLE: Receive $1000 GROCERY COUPONS, Your Choice. NOAH’S ARC, NO KILL Animal Shelters, Advance Veterinary Treatments, Free Towing, IRS TAX DEDUCTION. Non-runners, 1-866912-GIVE

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Job Listing

AND SCOOTERS. IMMEDIATE DELIVERY - CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-9984111 TO QUALIFY. Help Wanted Truck Driver Driver - $5K SIGN-ON BONUS for Experienced Teams with HazMat: Dry Van & Temp Control available. O/Os welcome. Covenant 866-684-2519. EOE. WANTED Owner-Operator OTR. CDL-A. Good MVR. 1yr Minimum Experience Required. Good Miles. Fuel Surcharge. Quarterly Fuel Taxes Paid. Call Chris or Rob 732-750-9000 x281/282.

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DISCLAIMER: be aware that Morning Star Publications has no control over the Regional ads. Some employment ads and business opportunity ads may not be what they seem to be.

Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer. Heavy Equipment Training. National Certification. Financial & Placement Assistance. Georgia School of Construction. www.Heavy5.com Use code “PACNH� 1866-4297932 Lots & Acreage Absolute Steal! 4.9 AC$74,900 ACCESS TO JAMES RIVER Gorgeous estate- size building site w/private access to historic James River. Abuts almost 200 acres of green space! Paved rds, water, sewer, more. Must see! Call now 866-764-5238, x1928

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LEGALS NOTICE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that Kirk R. Messick of Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 11/13/1tp

NOTICE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that David L. Johnson of Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 11/13/1tp

PUBLIC NOTICE You are hereby notified the below applications will be before: The City of Seaford Board of Adjustment and Appeals for their determination on Wednesday, December 3, 2008 at 12:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: Case No. V-20-08: Thomas Rafail, property owner of 455 North Street, Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.19 114, is seeking a special exception as required by the Zoning Ordinance, Sec. 15-20(1)/Sec. 1514(2) Uses by Special Exception, on behalf of Tanya Ricketts. Ms. Ricketts would like to operate a large family day care at this location. Case No. V-21-08: Growmark FS, LLC, property owner of Tax Map and Parcel 531 13.00 29.00, on Nanticoke Ave. (riverfront) is seeking relief from the Zoning Ordinance, Sec. 1580A Temporary Structures. The old office/shop was torn down to make way for a new structure; however, a temporary building is needed to house the business operations until a new building can be built. The temporary building will be removed upon completion of the new structure. If any of these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 13th day of November 2008 pursuant See LEGALS—page 34


PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

LEGALS - from Page 33 to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 11/13/1tc

and a variance from the maximum allowed cul-desac length of 1,000 feet, located north of Road 592, 0.97 mile southwest of Road 565. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/13/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE You are hereby notified the below matters will be before: The City of Seaford Planning and Zoning Commission for their review and recommendation on Thursday, December 4, 2008 at 7:00 P.M., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware; and, The City of Seaford Mayor and Council for their determination on Tuesday, December 9, 2008 at 7:05 P.M., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: 1) S&L Contractors, Inc. are seeking a final plan approval for Governor’s Grant R-3, which consists of 104 condominium units. The property is located adjacent to Governor’s Grant R-1 on Atlanta Road. The property is identified as Tax Map and Parcel 331 10.00 379. 2) Growmark FS, Inc. property owners of Tax Map and Parcel 531 13.00 19, Nanticoke Avenue, are seeking sketch plan approval for the construction of a 720 square foot office with a detached 576 square foot shop to replace the former 4,000 square foot structure. If these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 13th day of November 2008 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 11/13/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NANTICOKE HUNDRED Subd. #2007-25 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, DECEMBER 18, 2008, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of JOSE G. AND MARY E. GUTIERREZ to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 15.203 acres into 3 lots,

• NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BROAD CREEK HUNDRED Subd. #2007-26 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, DECEMBER 18, 2008, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of D. M. PROPERTIES OF BETHEL, INC. to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 260.69 acres into 390 lots, (Cluster Development), and a variance from the maximum allowed cul-de-sac length of 1,000 feet, located north and south of Road 472, west of Road 434 and west of Road 438. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/13/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BROAD CREEK HUNDRED Subd. #2007-27 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a

public hearing on Thursday evening, DECEMBER 18, 2008, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of JESTICE FARMS, LLC to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 381.23 acres into 571 lots, located east of Road 463, 1,400 feet north of Route 24 and 2,100 feet east of Road 463. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/13/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NORTHWEST FORK HUNDRED Subd. #2007-23 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, DECEMBER 18, 2008, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of EVERETT AND CATHERINE WARRINGTON to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 27.98 acres into 9 lots, located at the northeast corner of the intersection of Road 563 and Road 562. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/13/1tc See LEGALS—page 36

5 Personal Property Auctions by Marshall Auctions LARGE PUBLIC MULTI-ESTATE AUCTION Selling from several well known local Estates including the Estate of John David Vaughn of Salisbury, MD, the Estate of Walter Adshead of Sharptown, MD and several others.

ALL ITEMS SOLD ABSOLUTE WITH NO MINIMUM AND NO RESERVE!!

Friday evening, November 21st, 2008 at 5 PM 8000 Esham Rd., Parsonsburg, MD John Deere 5420 Tractor, John Deere 6x4 Gator, 18ft Land Pride Batwing Mower, McCormick Farmall Model A, Ford F250XL, Sterling Silver, Fostoria, Oriental Rugs, Antique Furniture, Several Curio Cabinets, Decoys, Nice Selection of Duck Stamp Prints, Tools Directions: At the intersection of Rt. 50 & Forest Grove Rd., in Parsonsburg, turn North onto Forest Grove Rd. and follow for 0.5 miles to Old Ocean City Rd. Right onto Old O.C. Rd. and follow for 1.2 miles to Esham Rd. Left onto Esham Rd. and follow for 1.2 miles to burgundy/tan bldg. on left. Signs Posted. Boxlots (5pm): Several concrete pillars and yard ornaments, stainless BBQ grill, Kenmore upright freezer, Kenmore super capacity washing machine, Everstar portable air conditioner, handmade oar, several 19” TV’s, stereo equipment, whatnot shelf, beveled glass mirror, several lamps, wicker trunk, inlaid jewelry box, large fountain, biscuit box, toastmaster oven & much more! Truck (5:45pm): 1997 Ford F250 XL long bed 2wd, V8 460 with 49,000k miles. John Deere Tractor/Equipment (6pm): John Deere 5420 65HP Tractor with 542 front end loader & 73” bucket, 3 rev synchro transmission, air conditioned cab, radio, only 945hrs!!, Land Pride 18ft pull behind batwing mower, JD 6x4 gas powered gator 600 hrs, McCormick Farmall Model A Cultivision, Massey Ferguson Model 35 w/ 2,417hrs, Crenshaw spray rig, 7ft scrape blade, Lowes 14hp 42” cut lawn tractor, Leinbach 3pt auger, Eagle Line 6ft rake, Howse 8pt disc, Howse 4ft bush hog, Central Tractor 7ft scrape blade, New Holland 785 tracks, 8ft box scrape, wench, garden seeder, table saw, pull behind seeder, gas powered auger, 18’ Morgan Refrigerator Body with Thermo King 3Phase/Diesel Unit (This unit is currently in use in Salisbury and can be shown any time.) Silver (6:30pm): 129 pcs. Towle Lady Constance, 90 pcs. Lunt William & Mary, 95 pcs. Stieff Homewood, 105 pcs. Wallace Grand Victorian, 132 pcs. Towle Layafette, 98 pcs. Continental 900 Rostfrei, 82 pcs. Continental Arts & Crafts style, 81 pcs. Weidlick Virginia, 64 pcs. Stieff Betsy Patterson, 79 pcs. Whiting King Albert, 54 pcs. Alvin Maryland, 53 pcs. Dominick & Haff Acanthus, 41 pcs. Whiting Louis XV and many odd serving pieces of different makers. Glass/China/Collectables (6:30pm): Nice selection of American Fostoria, Heisey glass to include: moon glow stems, berry set, candlesticks and compotes-, nice selection turn of the century Thanksgiving post cards, local books to include: E.S. Maryland & Virginia 2 vol. set, Worcester Co. Maryland’s Arcadia, Maryland Time Exposures 1840-1940 and more-, early Sharptown shipyard photo, teardrop mantle clock, Gilbert banjo clock, blue and grey stoneware crock, fireplace tiles “pastoral scene”, Singer Feather-lite sewing machine, Shoe Shine and Hat Cleaning Phone 824 Salisbury advertising, Waterbury mantle clock, pr of brass duplex column lamps, elk head bellows, Lamberton Ivory Natalie pattern 74pc china set, Henry Troemner #2 candy scale, (5) John Moll prints, Don Swann prints, (2) peanut pattern oil lamps, pr of Hull vases, B+H lamp, Copenhagen plates, jardinières, antique brass coal scuttle, antique bellows, antique block planes, Franklin Roosevelt Clock, washbowl and pitcher set, German steins, approx. 30 pc Lariat pattern china set, nice selection of Guardian ware, signed cut glass bowl, Hess trucks, costume jewelry and more!! Decoys/Duck Stamp Prints: Pr of mallards by Gilmore Wagoner Harve de Grace, MD, 1952 miniature pintail drake by Howard Freeman, chickadees by Howard Freeman, Garton wood duck decoy, merganser, Bill Murray Chincoteague carved shorebird, carved Larimore by Butch Carol, Chincoteague carved shorebird, and others- Framed Duck Stamp Prints to include: 1990 Tundra Swans gold stamp print, 1992 Nancy Howe Snow Goose gold stamp print, 1991 Pinitail print, 1989 Tom Hirata canvasbacks, John Taylor Old Squalls, 1986 Burton E. Moore Gold Medallion Edition Fulvous Whistling Duck, Gilbert 1997 wood duck print, apprx 50 unframed Duck Stamp prints to include: Special Edition Maryland Mirgatory Stamp print by Roger E. Lent, 1993Maryland duck stamp print signed Louis Frisino, “Resting Hooded Mergansers” by Louis Frisino Maryland print, David Turnbaugh “Almost Spring” Maryland migratory print, “Early Spring Ruddies” by Christopher White Maryland Duck Stamp print, Bruce Miller Virginia black ducks, First of Canada 1985 mallards, Tom Hirata Connecticut and Maine prints, and many others, Wild Wings Chocolate lab sculptures & more!! Furniture/Rugs(7:45pm): Oak hall seat w/ beveled mirror and hat hooks, Seth Thomas grandmother clock, large oak beveled glass mantle w/ pillars, 9pc Basset fruitwood dining room suite, 4pc Pennsylvania House maple bedroom suite, (2) ball in claw foot piano stools, cherry two door lighted curio, cherry dome top lighted curio, pine 4 shelf lighted curio, oak beveled glass single door whatnot, oak table w/ leaf, Victorian marble top lamp table, Empire round oak dining table, set of 4 oak pressed back chairs, 9x12 hand woven Persian area rug, Afghan Bukara, Anatolian Turkish rug, several Hamadan’s, RCA Radiola 18 (mint), spoon carved mantle, softwood Victorian mantle, Lane cedar chest, pump organ, metal art nouveau desk, mahogany Duncan Phyfe table, Mahogany server, pair of twin brass beds, pair of marble top end tables, Zenith 25” TV, Sanyo 25”TV, four wicker bar stools, Waterfall vanity and dresser, white iron bed, and much more!! Terms Personal Property: Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 8% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold "As Is" with no warranties of any kind. Auction conducted inside & outside of 9,000 Sq. Ft. facility. Two Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Food served by Station 7 Restaurant of Pittsville

Additional Upcoming Auction Dates at the Marshall Auction Facility will include December 12th, January 9th & 30th. These auctions will include a nice selection of Estate Glass, China, Collectibles, Antiques, Furniture & More!

Important Notice!! Marshall Auction’s 3rd Annual Firearm & Men’s Night Out Auction is scheduled for Friday evening, February 6th, 2009 We are now taking quality consignments for this auction sale but SPACE IS LIMITED!! Our past firearm auctions yielded over 1,600 buyers from all over the country! WE HAVE 150+ FIREARMS, a 16ft LOWE BIG JON BOAT, SUZUKI FOUR WHEELER, MUD BUDDY, OUTBOARD MOTORS, BROWNING GUN SAFE AND MORE SCHEDULED FOR THE AUCTION -- SO DON’T MISS OUT ON YOUR CHANCE TO SELL IN A HIGH QUALITY, PROFESSIONALLY RUN, MARSHALL AUCTION!! For more info on how to receive a reduced commission rate please contact Dave Allen or Jeff Smith at 410-835-0383 or email dave@marshallauctions.com no later than Jan. 1st, 2009.

View Website for Additional Information & Pictures!

Five Generations of Combined Auction Experience Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers 410-835-0384 www.marshallauctions.com


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PAGE 36 LEGALS - from Page 34

BID NOTICE The Town of Blades will be accepting bids on the following surplus vehicle: 1996 Chevrolet Caprice. All bids are due to the Town Administrator by December 22nd, 2008. The vehicle is located at Town Hall and can be inspected between 8:30am and 4:30pm, MONFRI. Payment must be made in cash or certified/ cashiers check. The bids will be sealed until opened by the Town Council at the Jan 12th, 2009 Council Meeting. The terms of the sale shall be designated final when the bid has been awarded and the vehicle is sold “AS IS”. The Town Council has the right to refuse any bids and has final say. The successful bidder has seven (7) business days from the date of notification of award to pay for and pick up vehicle. Any questions please call 302629-7366. 10/30/4tc

NOTICE Estate of June M. Dorrell, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of June M. Dorrell who departed this life on the 29th day of September, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Clint A. Anderson on the 29th day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 29th day of May, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Clint A. Anderson 28834 O’Neals Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/13/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Melvin R. Milligan, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Melvin R. Milligan, Jr. who departed this life on the 24th day of October, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Michael R. Milligan on the 3rd day of November, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the de-

MORNING STAR ceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 24th day of June, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Michael R. Milligan 31531 Justice Farm Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/13/3tc

NOTICE Estate of James E. Hurst, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of James E. Hurst who departed this life on the 26th day of September, A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Brittany Hurst, Steven Hurst on the 29th day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Administrators without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Administrators on or before the 26th day of May, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Administrators: Brittany Hurst 33310 Horsey Church Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Steven Hurst 7801 Chesapeake Rd. Pasadina, MD 21122 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/13/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Alan B. Carey, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Alan B. Carey who departed this life on the 6th day of September, A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Aaron B. Carey, Reese A. Carey on the 24th day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 6th day of May, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Aaron B. Carey 10961 4th Street Laurel, DE 19956 Reese A. Carey 22575 Bethel Road Millsboro, DE 19966 Attorney: Lawrence B. Steele III P.O. Box 799

• NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Georgetown, DE 19947-0799 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 11/6/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Doris Frankie Elmer, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Doris Frankie Elmer who departed this life on the 24th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Sonja L. McClurkin on the 21st day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 24th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Sonja L. McClurkin 394 Graham Branch Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/30/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Josephine Santerre, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Josephine Santerre who departed this life on the 5th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Bridgeville, DE were duly granted unto Angela Francisco on the 16th day of October, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without

delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 5th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Angela Francisco 7411 Gambinos Way Bridgeville, DE 19933 Attorney: Shannon R. Owens, Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 10/30/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and lying on the South side of a dirt road extending from U.S. Route # 13 to the road leading from Laurel to Hearns Cross Roads, and more particularly bounded as follows: BEGINNING at a stone in the center of said dirt road and at the Northeast corner of the Lot hereby conveyed, and running thence with the center of said road Northwest 80 degrees 35 minutes 128 feet

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Woodbridge School District Board of Education as a part of its regular November public meeting will consider a waiver to the provisions of 14 Delaware Code § 1704(3) and § 1705(A)(a). Subsection 1704(3) of the law requires all public school buildings to have allocated to them 98% of the Division 1 units generated by the actual unit count in that building by the last school day of October of the current school year. Subsection 1705(A)(a) requires any kindergarten or grades 1-3 public school classes to have no higher ratio of teacher to students than 1:22 by the last school day in October of the current school year. This ratio is only to apply to a class where students are instructed in core academic subjects of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. The meeting will be held in the library of the Phillis Wheatley Middle School. Citizens may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education, under the public commentary portion of the meeting. WHAT: A public meeting of the Woodbridge Board of Education WHEN: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 at 7:00 p.m. WHERE: Phillis Wheatley Middle School Library WHY: Consideration of a waiver of the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, § 1704(3) and § 1705(A)(a) 11/6/2tc

to a stake, thence Southwest 7 degrees 170 feet to a pipe in the center of a lane leading to the home of Virginia Oliphant, thence with the center of said land Southeast 86 1/2 degrees 124 feet to the center of another dirt road, thence Northeast 8 degrees 20 minutes 157 feet to a stone, and the place of beginning. BEING the same lands and premises which Patricia Ann Alexander and John C. Alexander, her husband, by Deed dated December 2, 1994 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and-for SussexCounty-and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2022, Page 266, did grant and convey unto Pamela L. King and Peter N. King, Jr. Tax Parcel: 3-32-3.00112.00 Property Address: 11318 Scarborough Lane, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 per-

cent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PAMELA L. & PETER N. KING, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little See LEGALS—page 37

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Laurel School District Board of Education will consider the request for a waiver to the requirements per 14 Delaware Code §1705 (A) (a) requiring the ratio of students to instructors in any class in kindergarten or grades 1-3 in a Delaware public school shall not exceed 22 students as of the last school day of October. This student-to-instructor ratio shall only apply to a class within which students are instructed in the core academic subjects of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science and social studies. A local school board may waive subsection (a) of this section after voting to waive such subsection at a public meeting noticed for that purpose. Any local school board vote on such a waiver shall occur on or before December 1 of each year. This public meeting will be held on Wednesday, November 19 th at 7:00 PM in the Laurel School District Office Board Room, 1160 South Central Avenue, Laurel, DE 19956. The general public may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education. Procedures for presenting such written or oral comments include the following: 1.) Citizens who wish to address the Board must first seek recognition from the presiding officer of the meeting. 2.) Citizens, once recognized by the presiding officer, must state their names and the topic upon which they would like to speak. 3.) The presiding officer may limit the time that each citizen is permitted to speak. WHAT: Public Meeting of the Laurel Board of Education WHEN: Wednesday, November 19, 2008 at 7:00 PM WHERE: Laurel School District Board Room 1160 South Central Avenue, Laurel, DE 19956 PURPOSE: Consideration of a waiver of the requirements per 14 Delaware Code, §1705 (A) (a) for Paul L. Dunbar Elementary School and North Laurel Elementary School 11/6/2tc


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36 Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, on the southern side of Fifth Street in the Town of Laurel, adjoining other lands of Norris L. Niblett and more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a stake in the center of a mutual drive on the southern side of Fifth Street, being a corner for the lands herein conveyed and other lands now or formerly of Norris L Niblett; thence with the center of said mutual drive and said Niblett lands southwest 26.5 degrees 83.1 feet to a stake; thence continuing with said Niblett lands northwest 56.75 degrees 32.00 feet to a stake; thence northeast 27 degrees 10 minutes 80.10 feet to a bolt on the southern side of Fifth Street; thence with the southern side of Fifth Street southeast 62 degrees 50 minutes 31 feet to the stake and place of BEGINNING, said to contain 2,569 square feet of land, more or less, as surveyed by Harold L. Cook in December 1964. BEING the same lands and premises which Jubilee Builders, Inc., a Delaware corporation, by Deed dated November 27, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3387, Page 200 did grant and convey ¬unto Gregory J. Arsenault and Barbara A. Arsenault, in fee. Tax Parcel: 3-32-1.0763.00 Property Address: 315 Fifth Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the

deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of GREGORY J. & BARBARA A. ARSENAULT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot piece or parcel of land situate lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known and designated as Lot No. 72, "Crestfield II" a subdivision as shown on a plot prepared by Theodore B. Simpler, Land Surveyor, said plot dated April 30, 1997, and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plot Book 2340 Page 108. AND BEING the same lands and premises which William J. Gray, Alan S. Collins and Angie M. Collins did by deed dated November 20, 1998 and recorded in the office aforesaid in Deed Book 2340 page 108 did grant and convey unto Alan S. Collins and Angie M. Collins. Tax Parcel: 5-31-8.0070.00 Property Address: 145 S. Paula Lynne Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008.

• NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ALAN S. & ANGIE M. COLLINS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a pipe located on the southerly right of way line of Linden Avenue, said pipe being 24 feet from the centerline of Linden Avenue with its intersection of School Lane; thence by and with the right of way line of School Lane South 09 degrees 37 minutes East 102 feet to a pipe, a corner for this lot and Lot 27; thence along Lots 27 and 28 North 80 degrees 34 minutes East 100 feet to a concrete monument; thence turning and running along Lot 22 North 09 degrees 37 minutes West 102 feet to a pipe along the southern right of way line of Linden Avenue; thence along Linden Avenue, South 80 degrees 34 minutes West 100 feet back to the place of beginning and being all of Lot 21 and westerly 20 feet of

Lot 22 in Wil-Mar Village, as surveyed by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. on September 22, 1973. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Craig A. Dickerson and Marc P. Dickerson by deed dated April 17, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3297, Page 156 did grant and convey unto WINSOME C. WASHINGTON AND CHARLES LYNN LEEBRlCK, her husband, in fee. Tax Parcel: 3-31-5.1932.01 Property Address: 501 Linden Avenue, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of WINSOME C. WASHINGTON & CHARLES LYNN LEEBRICK and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

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PAGE 37 SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Fieri Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece or parcel of land situate lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County State of Delaware, on the East side of the Public Road leading from Coverdale Crossroads to Fishers Old Mill, Beginning for the meets and bounds thereof at South West corner of the lands of these Grantors, at a post on the East edge of the road, also a corner for the lands of Heirs of Harry N. Graham, thence with the Graham land South 50 Deg. East 505 feet to post at the Messick line with same North 50 Deg. East 86.5 feet to post thence through the Dexton Lands North 50 Deg. West 505 feet to post on East edge of the Public Road, thence South 50 Deg. West 86.5 feet to the place of Beginning, containing One Acre of land be it the same more or less. BEING the same lands conveyed to James Mathis and Daisey May Mathis, his wife, by Walter Thomas Lexton and Mary Lexton, his wife, by Deed dated October 1957, and recorded at the Offices of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, on September II, 1958, in Deed Book 494, Page 265. Tax Parcel: 4-30-23.0081.00 Property Address: 20749 Coverdale Road, Bridgeville (SH Messick Hrs. Sub Lot 1) Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Pur-

chaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of HELEN WRIGHT, AS GUARDIAN FOR DAISEY MAE MATHIS, AN ALLEGED INFIRM PERSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate lying and being in CRAWFORD ADDITION to Greenwood, Sussex County, Delaware, and more fully described as follows, to wit: Plotted as Lot No. 5 in Block G, fronting 50 feet on the County Road, which leads from Greenwood to farm of J. Roy Barsick, and running back 120 fees to Lot No. 7, also bounded on the North by Lot No. 6 which same Lot No .6 has a frontage on the County Road of 83 feet to Cart Branch Ditch, this last measurement of Lot No.6 is for the purpose of establishing a corner for the lands herein conveyed. This Lot No. 5 being part of the same lands and premises which BETTY BROWN, a single woman, did convey unto MAGGIE BENSON and ERNESTINE McMILLON on May 3, 1965, and recorded at the Offices of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, on May 5, 1965, in Deed Book 588, Page 24. Tax Parcel: ONE HALF (1/2) INTEREST IN: 5-3010.09-2.00 Unit 844 Property Address: 12731 See LEGALS—page 38


PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37 North 1st Street, Unit 844, Greenwood PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE SELLING ONE HALF (1/2) INTEREST ONLY IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ERNESTINE McMILLON THOMPSON (1/2 INTEREST ONLY) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred Sussex County, State of Delaware, being more particularly bounded and described according to a survey and plot prepared by Gene R, Little-

MORNING STAR ton & Associates, Registered Surveyors, dated May 2000, and now of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot book 69, Page 84, being designated as Parcel C on said Survey, BEING a part of the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Darlene K. Johnson by deed of Kimberly Parker and Larry A Whaley, dated August 28, 2003 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2879, Page 212. Tax Parcel: 4 - 3 2 7.00-28.00 Property Address: 7081 Airport Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DARLENE K. JOHNSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

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• NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Fieri Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel, lot, or tract of land lying on the northerly side of Delaware State Route 54, sited 250 feet, more or less, westerly of U.S. Route 13, designated District Map Parcel No. 5-32-20.00-91.01, situated in the town of Delmar, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, the State of Delaware, and being more particularly located and ascertained in the following metes and bounds description, by the P.E.L.S.A. Company, Inc., Land Consultants and Surveyors, in accordance with a survey and plan prepared by said P.E.L.S.A. Company, Inc., dated August 22, 2006, referenced and filed M0061172, thus, bounded and described, to wit: BEGINNING at a point and place situate in the northerly side of Delaware State Route 54 (60.00 feet wide) located at a common corner in the division line for said lands herein being described and lands lying northerly and easterly, respectively, now or formerly State Line Plaza Associates, said point being North 77 degrees 47 minutes 27 seconds West 30.01 feet measured from a concrete monument set at the point of intersection of the said northerly side of Delaware State Route 54 with the westerly line of lands now or formerly Sussex Trust Company, to the point and place of beginning; thence, commencing from the said point of beginning and running along the said northerly side of Delaware State Route 54, intersecting the easterly side of a "water and sewer easement" (per deed book 1979 page 346) crossing the end of the same, North 77 degrees 47 minutes 27 seconds West 229.93 feet to a point; thence, along the division line for lands lying westerly and southerly, respectively, now or formerly Delmarva Health Center, Inc., North 12 degrees 10 minutes 09 seconds East 210.20 feet to a point; thence, in like bounds of the previous course, North 77 degrees 59 minutes 51 seconds West 100.10 feet to a point; thence, along the division line for lands lying westerly and northerly, respec-

tively, now or formerly Saint Stephen's Methodist Church North 12 degrees 09 minutes 17 seconds East 140.00 feet to a point; thence, in like bounds of the previous course, South 77 degrees 52 minutes 41 seconds East 135.96 feet to a point lying in a strip of "ingress and egress easement" (per deed book 1979 page 346); thence, along the division line for the aforesaid lands now or formerly State Line Plaza Associates, running through the said "ingress and egress easement" 9.00 feet opposite its southerly side and parallel thereto, South 79 degrees 09 minutes 31 seconds East 186.87 feet to a point; thence, in like bounds of the previous course, running in part through said "ingress and egress easement," continuing along the westerly side of said strip of easement at 30.01 feet wide, South 11 degrees 04 minutes 51 seconds West 174.12 feet to the aforesaid northerly side of Delaware State Route 54 and the first mentioned point and place of beginning. BEING the same land and premises that Delmar Family Restaurant, Inc. by Deed dated November 4, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3381, Page 263, did grant and convey unto YCL Delmar Restaurant, LLC, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.0091.01 Property Address: 10975 State Street, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of

sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of YCL DELMAR RESTAURANT, LLC and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a rebar found on the Northwesterly side of a 20 foot mutual access road leading from County Road 62 (Whaley's Road) to lands now or formerly of Paul and Mary Kathleen DeFelice, said rebar located South 28 degrees 27 minutes 42 seconds West, 101.91 feet from a rebar located at a corner for lands now or formerly of these Grantees and lands now or formerly of the Grantor on the Westerly right of way line of County Road No. 62 (Whaley's Road), said point of beginning being at a corner for this parcel, other lands now or formerly of these Grantees, and lands now or formerly of this Grantor; thence proceeding with said the northwesterly side of said 20 foot mutual access road, South 28 degrees 41 minutes 42 seconds West, a distance of 190.32 feet to a point located at a corner for this parcel and Lot 2 as shown on the below mentioned survey; thence turning and running with the boundary line of Lot 2 and centerline of a ditch, North 40 degrees 19 minutes 25 seconds West, a distance of933.64 feet to a point, said point being a corner for this parcel and Lot 2; thence turning and running North 48 degrees 52 minutes 22 seconds East, a distance of 275.00 feet to a point, said

point being a corner for this parcel and lands now or formerly of John W. Calloway; thence turning and running with said Calloway lands, South 36 degrees 25 minutes 13 seconds East, a distance of 277 .64 feet to a point; thence South 41 degrees 10 minutes 23 seconds East, 60.18 feet to a point; thence South 52 degrees 17 minutes 18 seconds East, a distance of 74.13 feet to a point; thence turning and running with other lands now or formerly of these Grantees, South 28 degrees 41 minutes 28 seconds East, a distance of 469.30 feet to a rebar found, said rebar being the point and place of beginning, containing 4.9832 acres of land, more or less, and designated as Parcel "B", on a plot prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc., dated June 5, 2006, said plot being filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 109, Page 29. BEING the same land and premises that Roslyn M. Hensley by Deed dated January 18, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3406, Page 345, did grant and convey unto Charles R. Hensley and Bonnie F. Hensley, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-16.007.03 Property Address: 36350 Whaley’s Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHARLES R. & BONNIE F. HENSLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred Sussex County, Delaware, being designated as Lot No.7, of the development known as Greenwood Meadows, a plot of which is of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, State of Delaware, in Plot Book 78, Page 48. This property being conveyed is subject to the restrictions of Greenwood Meadows Deed Restrictions for Lots 4-7 attached hereto which shall be deemed to "run with the land" and bind the parties of the second part and their heirs and assigns. BEING the same land and premises that Marie Lister, Sr. and A. Pauline Lister by deed dated October 11, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3375, Page 113, did grant and convey unto Guinell Jacques, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-30-3.0019.10 Property Address: 12001 Blanchard Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited

to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of GUINELL JACQUES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, located in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and more fully described as follows: Being Lot No. 2IA of the revised subdivision of Florence E. Johnson. according to a plot made by Harold L. Cook in 1947 which is recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, at Georgetown, Delaware in Volume 310 at pages 526 and 527: lying on the West side of the state highway from Laurel 10 Seaford, bounded on the South by Rosevelt Street on the North by Lot No. 20A on the East by Route 13A and on the West by Lot No. 2IB and containing l1,820 square feel of hind be the same more or less. The improvements thereon being commonly known as N725 Rosevelt Street Seaford, Delaware

• NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Being the same lands and premises which Howard Samuel Davis and Brenda K. West did grant and convey unto Brenda K. West and Howard J. West by deed dated 10/29/1999 and recorded 11/19/1999 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02440PGO 17. Tax Parcel: 1-32-6.00123.00 Property Address: 8725 Rosevelt Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of HOWARD J. & BRENDA K. WEST and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following

described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument set along the Westerly side of Vine Street in the City of Seaford, at a point 121.35 feet southerly from the intersection of Vine Street with Poplar Street, and corner for lands now or formerly of E. S. Adkins and Company, thence with the westerly side of Vine Street South 17-48' 20" East 60.00 feet to a pipe and corner for lands now or formerly of Ronald H. Marvel, thence by and with lands of Ronald H. Marvel and also with lands of Tommy C. Wilkins, South 72-45' 30" West 138.36 feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly right of way line for Cedar Avenue, thence with said Cedar Avenue, North 11-49' 00" West 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence by and with lands now or formerly of E. S. Adkins and Company, North 72-39' 15" East 132.20 feet to a point and place of beginning, containing 8,093 square feet of land, more or less, and being known as Lot #2 in a subdivision of lands of E. S. Adkins and Company, according to a survey by Gene R. Littleton and Associates in September of 1978. Being the same lands and premises which Franklin E. Baker did grant and convey unto Franklin W. Baker and Brenda E. Baker by deed dated 9/5/1997 and recorded 9/25/1997 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for New Castle County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02233PG268. Tax Parcel: 4-31-4.00104.02 Property Address: 203 Cedar Avenue, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 per-

PAGE 39 cent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BRENDA E. BAKER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land being situate in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware described more particularly in accordance with a survey by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated July 18, 2005 as follows to wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the southerly rightof-way line of Sussex County Road #552 (50' RJW) said point also being a common corner for this parcel and lands now or formerly of Salvatore S., Jr. & Robin L. Guinta said point also being 520' +/- from Co. Rd. 552; thence with said Guinta lands South 05 deg. 36' 26" West a distance of 267.91 feet to a pipe found in the line of lands now or formerly of Sally M. Mckeever a common corner for this parcel and said Guinta; thence turning and with said Mckeever a common corner for this parcel and said Guinta lands; thence turning and with said line of Mckeever a common corner for this parcel and lands now or formerly of Dennis S. Kinnel; thence turning with said Kinnel lands North 02 deg. 20' 42" East a distance of 237.20 feet to a pipe found on said right-¬of-way line of 552 at a common corner for

this parcel and said Kinnel lands; thence turning and with said right-of-way line North 77 deg. 29' 29" East a distance of 150.00 feet home to the point and place of Beginning said to contain 34,485 square feet of land be the same more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Viet Hoang Nguyen did grant and convey unto Christopher Williams by deed dated 8/1/2005 and recorded 8/15/2005 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03814PG330. Tax Parcel: 5-31-9.00134.00 Property Address: 4226 Horseshoe Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 1, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BARBARA MILLERWILIAMS (HEIR), CLAUDIA WILLIAMS, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS AND DARIEN HOPE ADKINS (MINOR HEIR) C/O HOLLY ADKINS (MOTHER & GUARDIAN) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/6/2tc


PAGE 40

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Behind one old wall, there was a surprise It has been slightly more YNN ARKS than a month since I wrote That piece of fiberabout our ongoing back porch glass looks like it has project. A long month during which, I’m sure, legs, I thought. How inanxious readers have lain awake at night, wonder- teresting. ing what was goI can’t say that it hasn’t been ing on at the Parks household. slow going. We took our first Well, sleep easy, fans. We are steps toward a new back porch in making good progress, so much June, and had hoped to be subso that my husband and I can sit stantially finished in mid-Octoin the new room, drinking our ber, when our daughter and sonevening beer and planning what in-law visited. We missed that steps come next. goal and I fear that our second The project was necessitated by a deteriorating back porch that goal, completion by Christmas and a planned visit by our son was slowly falling off the rest of and daughter-in-law, will also go the house. We have torn it off, unmet. board by board in order to save But my husband is still hopeas much wood as possible, and ful. The exterior walls and floor are replacing it. are complete. Roofing and siding The new model, with large, are on order and, once received, triple-glass windows and a concrete floor, is designed to capture can be hammered on. The plumbing is nearly done, electric work and store the sun’s heat and, is next on the list, then interior through a series of vents, allow walls can go up. that heat to drift through the rest This weekend, I worked upof the house.

L

P

Traffic pattern to change at 13/404 A new traffic pattern will be put in place on the Route 13/404 improvement project in Bridgeville during the week of Nov. 10. Due to construction on Business Route 404 eastbound, traffic is currently being detoured off Business Route 404 East onto Rifle Range Road and then onto Route 13 southbound. Once the traffic pattern has been changed, the detour route will no longer be needed. Business Route 404 traffic will be permitted to use the new Business Route 404 alignment, which has been built to bring traffic perpendicular to Route 13 at the signalized intersection. This improvement provides better visibility and safety for all motorists at the intersection. In addition, the east service road off of Business Route 404 west has been built, and westbound traffic wishing to access the Royal Farms may begin using this road to access the back of the Royal Farms property. Message boards will be posted in the area alerting motorists to the new traffic pattern in both areas. The change in traffic pattern is weather dependent, as there is minor work that must be done before the traffic pattern actually occurs. Traffic alerts and traveler information are available at www.deldot.gov or tune to WTMC-AM 1380. The proposed service roads are necessary to accommodate

additional traffic generated by developments along US 13. This location was listed in 1998 and 2001 Highway Safety Improvement Program as a site having a high rate of accidents. Many of these accidents were attributed to the skew angles where the existing DE 404 intersects US 13. As part of the proposed improvements of this project, DE 404 will be realigned to intersect US 13 at a perpendicular angle. The proposed improvements will also include additional lanes through the intersection, turn lanes and will improve both traffic flow and safety. The project began in June 2007 and will be completed next spring. The contractor is Mumford and Miller Concrete Inc. and the contract price was $15,860,387.10. The project extends from the intersection of US 13 and U.S. 404, 3,000 feet west along 404 to 3,200 feet east for a total of 1.2 miles of new roadway. The project will also add a western service road, Passwaters Farm Road, and the East Service Road. Passwaters Farm Road will extend from relocated 404 to the south 1,500 feet of the existing intersection of 13 and 404 and will have a total length of 3,600 feet. The East Service Road will also extend from the relocated 404 to Rifle Range Road, 660 feet east of the intersection of US 13 and Rifle Range Road, and will have a length of 3,800 feet.

stairs in our son’s bedroom, tearing out what remained of the back interior wall. We set a new window in that wall as part of the project and my husband wanted all the old drywall torn out so that we could replace the old, largely ineffectual insulation with new. As I ripped out drywall and old, dusty fiberglass, I threw the debris out the new window, onto the new back porch roof. Midway through the job, my brother called. While I talked with him, sitting on the double bed in the room, I stared out the window at the pile of trash. Eventually, my eyes focused on a small brown lump lying next to a heap of drywall and plaster dust. That piece of fiberglass looks like it has legs, I thought. How interesting. Then, a few minutes later —

that piece of fiberglass looks like it has a tail. Even more interesting. Finally — that piece of fiberglass looks like it has teeth. Hmm, legs, tail and teeth — that piece of fiberglass is a mouse! After living in this old farmhouse for more than 20 years, I have grown used to seeing and hearing the occasional mouse. But pulling a dead rodent out of the wall is a bit much. If, before I threw it out the window, I had looked down and seen that I was holding a deceased mouse in my ungloved hand, I might well have left my husband to the rest of the project and taken a room in a nearby hotel for the duration. Earlier in the project, my husband came across a 6-foot snakeskin that was curled around the old floor joists. What if the snake that left that behind, attracted by

the scurrying of the mouse, had crawled up through the wall to the second story and, encountering the same phenomenon that ended the mouse’s life, died right there in the bedroom wall? And what if I had reached in to pull out fiberglass insulation and had grabbed a handful of snake? I had hoped that readers, reassured by my confidence in our progress, might be able to sleep better tonight than they have been. But in my attempt to calm, I have painted a picture far worse than that of an unfinished back porch. I may even, having realized what could have happened, join the ranks of the sleepless. To anyone out there who feels sleep eluding them, care to join me on a nearly-complete back porch? I’m sure that we have some beer left.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 41

Local teams advance to state semifinals

Laurel’s Jordan Brown holds on to Seaford’s Mykeal Purnell for the tackle Friday night in Laurel. Laurel finished the season with a 37-0 win over Seaford. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Laurel blanks Seaford, 37-0, earns second seed in state tournament By Lynn Schofer Last Friday night’s final high school football game of the regular season ended with the annual rival game between Seaford and Laurel. Laurel defeated Seaford, 37-0, to finish the regular season with an 8-2 mark. Friday’s game played at Robert T. Ruston Stadium in Laurel was also senior night for the Bulldogs. The win kept the Lions Clubs of Seaford and Laurel trophy on the shelf at Laurel High School for the fifth straight year. Seaford was never able to gain enough ground or make enough tackles to stop the strength of the Bulldogs. Seaford Coach Darnell Savage said “Laurel is a great football team but we gave it our best shot.” Laurel gained yardage on several long runs by Chris Jones and Tyler West. On defense, Seaford’s linebacker Ross Miller, had to sit out the game due to a concussion suffered in practice prior to the game. The Bulldogs took advantage and with 7:08 remaining in the first quarter,

Laurel put seven on the board on a sevenyard touchdown run by Jones and an extra point by Kyle Brown. Less than five minutes later Jones and the Bulldogs added another touchdown making it 14-0. Laurel’s David Albert attempted to add seven more on a 60 yard punt return to the end zone, but was called back on a penalty. Seaford was able to hold Laurel’s offense and end the first quarter. In the second, Laurel didn’t waste any time when Brown kicked a 24-yard field goal to make it 17-0. Spencer Coulbourn threw an interception to Laurel’s Billy Yossick and at 2:19 in the second quarter Laurel pushed the lead to 23-0 on a nineyard run by Jones. The game didn’t improve for Seaford in the second half especially when Laurel quickly attacked and at 10:13 in the third quarter Jones scored for the fourth time making it 30-0. Seaford’s one opportunity to score from the 12 yard line was foiled by Laurel’s defense. The ball was turned over on Continued on page 44 Laurel’s Derek Babinski makes a block on Seaford’s Robbie Payne that opens the lane for Chris Jones for a Bulldog first down. Jones scored all five touchdowns for the Bulldogs. Photo by Lynn Schofer

The Delmar varsity field hockey team celebrates after topping Middletown, 3-2 in overtime, in the state quarterfinals last Saturday in Milford. The 14th ranked Wildcats were scheduled to play in the semifinals earlier this week. Photo by Mike McClure

Wildcats win a thriller in Milford to advance to state semifinals Delmar field hockey team tops Cape, Middletown in OT By Mike McClure The Delmar varsity field hockey team gave their fans their money’s worth, winning a pair of games in overtime to advance to the state semifinals. The Wildcats, with just two seniors, defeated Cape Henlopen, 2-1, before edging Middletown, 3-2, on penalty strokes. “It’s (reaching the semifinals a dream come true. I never thought I’d make it this far playing hockey,” said Delmar senior goalie Shannon Wilson. “Everything’s a team when we come together.” On Saturday, Middletown took a 1-0 lead on goal in a game played on a soggy field in Milford in the state quarterfinals. Mia Paltrineri’s goal at 7:23 put the Cavaliers on top. The 14th seeded Wildcats knotted the score on a goal by Lindsay Lloyd, who scored at 13:33 on a feed from Carlee Budd. Delmar’s Lauren Ruark made it 21 with a goal at 24:09. The Wildcats, who outshot the Cavs 10-3 and held a 5-0 advantage in corners, took that lead into half-time. Middletown put Delmar on the defensive in the second half, quickly tying the score at 2-2 on a goal by Danielle Tearl (37:04). The Wildcats’ defense made a number

Delmar’s Lindsay Lloyd carries the ball on a break during the Wildcats’ 3-2 win over Middletown last weekend. Lloyd had a goal and a penalty stroke to help lead her team to the state semifinals. Photo by Mike McClure

of stops including a defensive save by Alyssa Martin and several kick saves by Wilson, including one with around two minutes left in regulations. Lloyd’s shot Continued on page 45


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

GOING TO SETON HALL- Sussex Tech senior softball player Brooke Tull, center, prepares to sign a letter of intent to attend Seton Hall University during a press conference on Monday. Shown (l to r) are her sister, Ashley; her father, Rob; and her mother, Kathy. See story on page 46. Photo by Mike McClure WILDCATS AND RAIDERS- The Delmar defense stops Woodbridge running back Dashawn Collins during last week’s game in Bridgeville. Delmar won the game, 47-14, to improve to 8-2. Photo by Mike McClure

Raven Roundup- Tech soccer, hockey teams fall in states The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ soccer and field hockey team each fell in state tournament play last week. The Lady Ravens lost to Wilmington Friends, 2-0, last week in Wilmington. The soccer team beat Friends, 2-1, in overtime on Wednesday. Evan Lee netted a goal and Ariel Espinoza, Aris Reynoso, Nathan Zanks, and Christian Espinoza (gamewinner) scored on penalty kicks in the win. The Ravens fell to Middletown, 3-0, in the state quarterfinals last Saturday in Dover. Football team ends season with win- The Sussex Tech varsity football team defeated Polytech, 41-14, as Desmond Sivels ran for 195 yards and four touchdowns and Zach Adkins completed a touchdown pass.

Laurel Pee Wee team tops Sussex Central, falls in regionals The Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee football team won a shootout with the Sussex Central, 7-6, last Wednesday to advance to the first round of the Eastern Regionals. The Bulldogs lost to the FBR Tarheels of the DC Metro League, 20-0, on Sunday. Laurel finished the season with a 9-1 record and its fourth straight Henlopen Conference title. On Wednesday, Christian Ellsworth scored on a four-yard run and also ran in the extra point. Sussex Central scored a touchdown on a two-yard run but the Laurel defense denied the extra point. On Sunday, Ellsworth had 13 carries for 57 yards, Tarez White added eight carries for 22 yards, and Elijah Snead carried the ball six times for 17 yards. Ellsworth led the Bulldogs with 10 tackles, White recorded eight tackles, Justin Taylor had five tackles, and Snead added four tackles. Travon Milton and Johnny McGinnis also made three stops, Ethan Cahall had two tackles, and Zach Baynum and Leon West added one tackle each.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 43

Laurel Stars of the Week

Male Co-Athlete of the WeekJosh Kosiorowski- Laurel Laurel senior Josh Kosiorowski hauled in three receptions for 66 yards in his team’s win over Seaford last Friday. Kosiorowski also recorded five tackles for the Bulldogs, who moved to 8-2 with the win.

Male Co-Athlete of the WeekTyler Cornish- Delmar High Delmar’s Tyler Cornish made an impact offensively and defensively in his team’s season-ending win over Woodbridge last week. Cornish had an interception return for a touchdown and a fumble recovery on defense and added six carries for 31 yards and two touchdowns.

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SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

Female Co-Athlete of the Female Co-Athlete of the Week- Lindsay Lloyd- Delmar Week- Shannon Wilson- Delmar Delmar goalie Shannon Wilson, the Delmar senior Lindsay Lloyd netted a team’s other senior recorded 16 saves and pair of goals in her team’s 2-1 win over Cape in the first round of the state tourna- allowed one goal in her team’s 2-1 win ment last Thursday. Lloyd also had a goal over Cape last Thursday. Wilson allowed and a penalty stroke in the Wildcats’ win two goals and one penalty stroke while over Middletown in the state quarterfinals recording 18 saves in the win over Middletown. on Saturday. Honorable mention- Chris Jones- Laurel; Billy Yossick- Laurel; Tyler West- Laurel; Brandon Hearne- Laurel; Chris Cutsail- Laurel; Nick Munoz- Laurel; Kyle Brown- Laurel; Bryan Daniels- Delmar; David Bradshaw- Delmar; Keondre WhaleyDelmar; Frank Braham- Delmar; Delmar offensive line; Cody Webster- Delmar; Andrew Townsend- Sussex Tech; Zach Adkins- Sussex Tech; Desmond Sivels- Sussex Tech; Christian Espinoza- Sussex Tech; Evan Lee- Sussex Tech; Ariel Espinoza- Sussex Tech; Nathan Zanks- Sussex Tech; Aris Reynoso- Sussex Tech; Lauren RuarkDelmar; Amanda Campbell- Delmar; Chelsea Ralph- Delmar; Alyssa Martin- Delmar; Lauren Massey- Delmar; Emily Ritter- Sussex Tech

Delmar football team ends season with 47-14 win over Woodbridge By Mike McClure The Delmar varsity football team came away with a 47-14 win over Woodbridge last Friday night in the final game of the regular season. The Wildcats improved to 8-2 with the win over the home standing Raiders in the annual Harvest Bowl game, but it wasn’t enough to secure the Wildcats a place in the state tournament. Woodbridge started the game with the ball on its own 22. Senior back Jorge Young had a 22-yard run on third and 11 to sustain the drive before the Wildcat defense forced a punt. Delmar moved the ball into Woodbridge territory as Bryan Daniels had two carries for 12 yards. A sack by the Raiders’ Silvestre Villalobos forced the Wildcats to punt, but they got the ball back on a fumble recovery. Delmar took advantage of the turnover with Tyler Cornish carrying the ball three times for 20 yards including a one-yard touchdown run. Casey Bellamy’s extra points gave the Wildcats a 7-0 lead with 40 seconds left in the first quarter. Following a Woodbridge punt, Delmar scored again thanks to the running of Daronte DeShields. DeShields was brought down after a five-yard gain by Woodbridge Freddie Sample before adding a 22-yard run and a 35-yard run for a touchdown. Bellamy made it 14-0 with 7:43 left in the half.

Woodbridge started its next possession on the 35 before Young pushed the ball into Delmar territory on a 17-yard run. The Raiders’ Trevor Wescott took a toss from quarterback Austin Perry on fourth and seven from the Delmar 38 and looked downfield to Young, but the pass was incomplete and the Wildcats took over on downs. Daniels scored on the first play of Delmar’s possession, a 58-yard touchdown run to up the Wildcats lead to 21-0 following the PAT (3:15). Cornish’s fumble recovery set up Cornish’s six-yard touchdown run. Woodbridge blocked the extra point to keep the score at 27-0 with 1:06 left in the first half. Woodbridge put together a drive late in the half, starting at the Delmar 29 following a kick return by Wescott. Young had an eight-yard run, Perry completed a seven-yard pass to Wescott, and a Delmar penalty set up first and goal from the Delmar seven. Young scored on a seven-yard run with no time remaining in the half and Micah Idler made it 27-7. Delmar opened the third quarter with the ball and moved it downfield with a 21-yard run by Bryan Daniels on third and 10 from the 49. Cameron Mattox followed up a 23-yard run with a three-yard touchdown run and Bellamy booted the extra point for a 34-7 Delmar lead (8:33). Continued on page 44

Delmar’s Doug Causey (9) and David Bradshaw look to bring down Woodbridge fullback Jorge Young during last week’s game in Bridgeville. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar boys’ soccer season ends with 2-1 loss to Caravel The Delmar boys’ soccer team fell to Caravel, 2-1, in the first round of the state tournament last Wednesday. Cody Webster gave the Wildcats a 1-0 lead, but the Bucs tallied a pair of second half goals for the win. The game was played under rainy and windy conditions at Dover High School.


PAGE 44 Delmar football continued Delmar senior David Bradshaw forced and recovered a fumble to set up the Wildcats’ next score. Daniels found the end zone on a 31-yard touchdown run, but Bellamy’s extra point was blocked by Sample (40-7, 6:27). Woodbridge faced fourth and nine from the 42 on its next possession and tried some trickery. Senior Rashawn Felder faked a punt and ran for a first down. Delmar’s defense answered with a 44-yard interception return for a touchdown by Cornish. Bellamy gave the Wildcats a 47-7 advantage with under three minutes left in the quarter. The Raiders scored their final touchdown following a 66-yard drive. Young had an 11-yard run, DaShawn Collins

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008 added a nine-yard run, and Doug CopLaurel football continued pock scored from 33 yards out. Idler’s downs and Laurel’s Jones took the ball kick made the score 47-14 with no time from the eight-yard line to the opposite remaining in the third quarter and that’s end for another score (91 yards). the way the game ended. The final score of 37-0 ended the seaDaniels paced Delmar with 14 carries son for the Blue Jays at 2-8 overall who for 183 yards and two touchdowns, will go home and make plans to build a DeShields carried the ball five times for stronger team for 2009. 84 yards and a touchdown, and Cornish “We will rebuild and emphasize body added 31 yards and two touchdowns. Corconditioning and strength for the team in nish also recovered a fumble and interthe off season,” Coach Savage said. cepted a pass, Frank Braham had an interThe Bulldogs go on to the Division II ception, and Bradshaw recovered a fumstate tournament which begins Friday. ble he forced. Second seated Laurel has a bye the first Young ended his stellar senior season round of play and will host the semifinals with 15 carries for 112 yards and 1,535 on Saturday, Nov. 22 (see next week’s yards rushing for the season. Wescott Star). recorded seven tackles and an assist and Laurel quarterback Brandon Hearne Felder had a sack and an assist.

completed four of five passes for 80 yards; Tyler West had nine carries for 109 yards; and freshman Chris Jones added 21 carries for 246 yards with five touchdowns. Josh Kosiorowski caught three passes for 66 yards and had Treyon Parker five tackles; Chris Cutsail recorded seven tackles; Billy Yossick had five tackles and an interception; Nick Munoz added five tackles and a sack; and Treyon Parker chipped in with two tackles and an interception.

Delmar’s Casey Bellamy boots an extra point as the Woodbridge defense looks to block the kick during the second half of last week’s game in the fog. The kick was good and the Wildcats went on to win, 47-14. Photo by Mike McClure

Aaron Givens named to Henlopen all-conference soccer team Laurel senior goalie Aaron Givens was selected Henlopen all-conference honorable mention for his play in goal this season. The list submitted by the conference mistakenly had Eber Maldanado as Laurel’s honorable mention selection instead of Givens.

Delmar Youth Basketball League to hold signups in November Signups for the 2008-09 Delmar Youth Basketball League for boys and girls ages 712 will be held on Saturday, November 15. Registration will take place 10 a.m. to noon at the north entrance of Delmar High School (by the gym) at a cost of $25 per child or $40 for a family. Children must be residents of the Delmar School District. Please call Odell Jones, Jr., president of Delmar Youth Basketball League, at 410251-6570 (cell) or 302-846-9544 ext. 141 (work) with any questions.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Subscribe to the Laurel Star for the best local sports coverage.

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STATE QUARTERFINALS- Delmar’s Chelsea Ralph has the ball during her team’s state tournament game against Middletown last weekend. Ralph netted the game-winning penalty stroke to help move the Wildcats on to the semifinals. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008 Delmar hockey continued was stopped by Middletown goalie Jess Shepps and Amanda Campbell’s shot went wide as the Wildcats headed to overtime for the second straight game. By Tommy Young In the first 10 minute overtime, Wilson recorded three saves, Lauren Massey The Delmar High School football team ball program because the JVs just completed made a defensive save, and Middletown completed its regular season last Friday night another winning season finishing up with a up at Bridgeville by defeating the winless 7-2 record. Their only losses were to Lake had three corners. In the second overtime, Woodbridge team 47-13. As the score indiForest and Milford, both by single touchWilson made several saves and a Middlecates, there was not much to it as Wooddowns, and they wound up their season by town goal was waved off by the officials. bridge is having their worst season in a long defeating Laurel 42-0. The team has been Delmar went on the offensive in the time. coached by Jonathan Layton for the past few third overtime as Lloyd passed the ball to Here is how the scoring went to give Delyears with assistance from Tom Elliott, Ed Taylor Elliott who passed to Lauren Rumar a 27-7 lead at half time. Bryan Daniels Vickers, and Mark Quillen whenever their scored twice, one set up by a Keandre Whaduties from the varsity coaching staff will alark, but Ruark’s shot glanced off Shepps ley fumble recovery, and then Tyler Cornish low it. and into the air. Massey had another deand Daronte Deshields each ran one in, and As much as I hate to end the column on a fensive save and Wilson recorded a pair Casey Bellamy kicked three extra points. sad note, I have no choice as an old friend of saves as the conclusion of the third Although Coach Hearn had been substiand former teammate on the Delmar Railovertime period brought on penalty tuting frequently in the first half, after Tyler roaders passed away last week, Joe Long. I strokes. Cornish had scored twice, one on an interknow the daily papers have been full of good cepted pass and Cameron Mattox scored his things he had done not only for local people Paltrineri’s shot was stopped by Wilfirst touchdown of the season, Hearn emptied but also for the county, state and his home son, then Lloyd found the net. After anthe bench, and for a quarter and a half, the town of Salisbury, but little was said about other stop by Wilson, Campbell gave Del“subs” had the most fun they have had all his involvement with baseball on the Lower mar a 2-0 advantage. Middletown’s Ali year. Shore. Kern made it 2-1, Shepps stopped ChristiThis gives the Wildcats an 8-2 record for Joe was born and raised in Delmar until na Parsons’ shot, and Wilson made a kick the season. They will have to wait until Mon- he was 12 years old when his family moved day, November 10, to find out if they made to Salisbury. He played baseball for Wicomisave to keep it at 2-1. the playoffs as that is being decided today co High School, and then after graduation With just one more Middletown player too late to get in this column. Regardless of and going in the service in World War II, he left to take a penalty stroke, Delmar’s the outcome of the selection committee, returned to Salisbury and began playing Chelsea Ralph knocked in the winning Coach Hearn and his staff should be congratbaseball for various town teams. Then the shot to advance the Wildcats to the state ulated on the great job they have done after town teams began to organize leagues, namesemifinals. losing so many key players from last year’s ly the Marva, Central Shore, and the Mar-Del team. leagues. At one time or another, Joe played in “I love (penalty) strokes, they’re my Meanwhile, the boys’ soccer team’s seaall of them. favorites. I love coming down to just me son came to an end last week as they were I got to really know Joe when he came to and another player,” Wilson said. defeated 2-1 in a hard fought game with Carplay with the Railroaders in the 1950s. He “They just battled so hard throughout avel as Seth Benson scored the only goal for even managed them one year when Eppie the season to get to the position they are the Wildcats. Again, congratulations to Culver retired and before Jobey Hearn took in today,” Delmar head coach Susan ElCoach Greg Cathell and his team on a good over the team. These were the times that I season. think he had the most fun even thought he liott said. “Shannon just steps up big in And how about the Delmar field hockey was in the twilight of his career; there was big games. She’s the best in the state. She team- ranked 14th in the state and upsetting never a dull moment in the dugout whether brings her best in the big games.” the third ranked team 2-1 on Thursday as we were winning or losing, it was fun being Wilson recorded 18 saves in the win as Lindsay Lloyd scored both Delmar goals and around him.

PAGE 45

Delmar Sports Scene

Shannon Wilson made 16 saves in the goal. Then on Saturday they came right back to defeat Middletown 3-2 in a game decided by penalty strokes in three overtimes. Again Lindsay Lloyd and Lauren Ruark scored the goals for Delmar, but the real hero was Shannon Wilson as she made 18 saves in goal. Now they move on to the semi-finals this week. Their opponent is second ranked Brandywine, but where they are playing had not been determined. ASSISTS AND ERRORSThere is good news for the Delmar foot-

Joe later was instrumental in the promotion of Little League Baseball in Salisbury, and his popularity gained in the position of State Senator. Then everybody got to know him and find out what kind of person he really was, a good, old down-home boy who told it like it was and was a real asset to anything he was involved in, like the Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame Foundation. Despite his health issues, he always had time to give us advice on any problems that arose concerning the Foundation. There was only one Joe Long.

Delmar’s Amanda Campbell follows through on a penalty stroke during last Saturday’s game in Milford. Photo by Mike McClure

Middletown held a 30-11 advantage in shots. Delmar had a 6-5 edge in corners. With the win the Wildcats advance to the semifinals where they will face second ranked Brandywine on Wednesday, Nov. 12 in Dover (see next week’s Star). The Delmar field hockey team has shown great poise despite its youth. “Agewise we’re relatively young but most of the girls have been playing together through middle school,” said Elliott. Elliott said her team worked on passing, playing the little game, talking, and being there for each other in preparation for the state tournament. On Thursday, Delmar and Cape Henlopen battled in the first round of the state tournament. After a scoreless first half, Lloyd scored on a pass from Ruark on a corner (16:21) and Cape’s Carolyn Judge tied it at 1-1 on a corner at 8:20. Lloyd’s overtime goal on a penalty stroke (1:21) gave Delmar the win over the homestanding Vikings. Wilson recorded 16 saves in

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DELMAR GOAL- The Wildcats’ Lauren Ruark, right, knocks in the go ahead goal in her team’s win over Middletown in the state field hockey quarterfinals last Saturday in Milford. Photo by Mike McClure

• Upward Basketball T-shirt • Upward Basketball Jersey • End of season awards & celebration • 1 year membership to Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club • Every child gets equal playing time every game

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Laurel Pop Warner teams continue post-season play

Partial scholarships & multi child discounts available

The Laurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee football team hosts Woodbridge on Saturday at noon in the semifinals of the conference tournament. The Mitey Mite team will host Delmar in a bowl game prior to the Junior Pee Wee game (10 a.m.). The Midget team goes to Cardinal Gibbons High School on Sunday at 5 p.m. for the second round of the Eastern Regionals. No information was submitted from the first round game prior to the Star’s deadline.

Forms can be picked up at Laurel Wesleyan Church Office 875-5380 Monday-Thursday 10:00am-4:00pm & Sunday mornings

Forms also available at the Boys & Girls Clubs in Seaford & Laurel

Register by November 25th


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Brooke Tull signs letter of intent to play softball at Seton Hall University By Mike McClure Sussex Tech senior pitcher Brooke Tull recently signed a letter of intent to go to Seton Hall University where she will play Division I softball and attend school. Tull, who is from Greenwood, will join a number of former Ravens as a college softball player following graduation next spring. Last spring nine former Sussex Tech players were playing college ball. “We’re happy to see another person going on to play the game. That obviously shows that they love the game,” said Sussex Tech head softball coach John Marvel. “She’s matured mentally, she’s gotten stronger. Brooke is blessed with athletecism but she has learned how to use that and direct it in the right way.” “It feels great,” Tull said. “Without my dad I definitely wouldn’t be where I am today.” Brooke credited her father, Rob, for working with her on her pitching as well as her mother, Kathy, for being there to help her with everything else in her life. Also on hand at Monday’s press conference at Sussex Tech were Tull’s sister, Ashley, her travel softball coach Bill Dryden, and Sussex Tech administrators Patrick Savini and Allen Lathbury Tull said she chose Seton Hall because of the campus and the coaches. “They (coaches) just had so much knowledge and I loved the campus when I went up there,” said Tull. “It’s awesome because it’s Division I and that’s what I’ve always dreamed of. I’ve had to work hard. I’m looking forward to going up there.” “It’s a really nice school. It’s in a good area,” added Rob Tull. “We really like the coaches. They act like they really care about the kids.” Marvel praised the Seton Hall softball team for its competitve play as well as its team grade point average which is among the best in the country. “They play competitive softball. I can only see good things. It’s a good, safe environment,” Marvel said. “We feel good

CLOSE CALL- Delmar goalie Shannon Wilson makes a stop as teammate Lauren Massey backs her up during the Wildcats’ 3-2 win over Middletown in the state quarterfinals. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech pitcher Brooke Tull winds and delivers a pitch during a game last season. Tull, a senior, recently signed a letter of intent to play softball at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. She has been with the Ravens since her freshman year. Star File Photo

about her going to Seton Hall.” Tull praised Marvel, her coach since her freshman year at Sussex Tech. “He’s just an awesome coach and he can teach you so much,” said Tull. “I’ve come so far since freshman year.” Tull played with the varsity team as a freshman, but she had to compete for playing time with veteran pitchers Kim Owens and Brittany Joseph (both of Laurel) ahead of her at the start of the year. Marvel believes that experience will help her when she looks to compete for a starting position at Seton Hall. “When she gets to Seton Hall she won’t be the only one who can pitch. She’s not used to having it handed to her,” Marvel said. Brooke started all four tournament

games as sophomore in 2006 when the Ravens won the state championship. She also pitched in the semifinals against Caravel as a freshman. “It’s been a good learning experience (playing at Sussex Tech),” said Rob Tull. “Two years ago when they won the state championship that was a big moment for her.” “I just can’t wait ‘til softball season

JUNIOR PEE WEELaurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee player Alyziah Kellam makes a tackle in the backfield during a game earlier this season. The Bulldogs host Woodbridge in the semifinals of the conference tournament on Saturday at noon. Photo by Mike McClure

We’re EXCITED!

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TAX REFUND LOAN • Are you getting a BIG REFUND next year, but need money now? • Find out how you can get your money now & pay it off when you’re tax refund comes in! • Got questions, we got answers! Sussex Tech’s Brooke Tull is shown delivering a pitch during a game last season. The Greenwood native is looking forward to helping the Ravens compete for a state title in her senior season. She was a member of the 2006 Sussex Tech softball team which won the championship. Star File Photo

starts because I want to end on a good note,” Brooke added. “I’d love to end my senior year like that (sophomore season).” Tull enters the season as a two-time all-state pitcher. Marvels believes the best is yet to come and that she is in better shape, is stronger, and is more motivated. “I think this will be her best year,” said Marvel.

Call Today! Seaford 302-629-6266


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 47

Seaford Bowling Lanes Nite Owl

High games and series Lou Dobson 276 Myron Hayes 768 Kim Marine 687 Diane Patchett 247, 687

High games and series Erik Mulford 288 Brian Hill 288 Jim Nelson 758

Club 50

Tuesday AM Mixed High games and series Clem Warrener 242, 636 Theda Brittingham 227 Ruth McBride 609

Mardel ABC High games and series Gary Holodick 276, 748

Wed. AM Mixed

High games and series Randy Heath 276, 736 Ireme Foxwell 269 Shirley Ellis 720

Eastern Shore Men High games and series Todd James 309 Zachary Merrill 764

Star High games and series C.J. Ellis 225 Zach Carey 639 Ann Childress 266, 627

Baby Blue Jays High games and series Nate Trammell 191, 355 Dallas Slavin 196

STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK- Shown (l to r) are members of the Diamond State Swoop 12U fast pitch softball team which won the Season Finale Fall Championships recently: sitting- Shelby Murphy and Carley Lord; kneeling- Lauren Balas, Reagan Green, Samantha Wilson, Rachel Davis, Emily Cox; standing: Ashton Riddle, Alison Pusey, Coach Jay Davis, Courtney Tate, Hailey Andrews, Kristen Ball, Kelsea Joseph, Sara Jo Whaley, and Coach Jodi Green. Not pictured are Lauren Genshaw and Kyra Webb.

Diamond State Swoop places first in Virginia tourney The Diamond State Swoop 12u fast pitch team placed first in the Season Finale Fall Championships held in Newport News, Va., the weekend of Oct. 26. They went undefeated in six games in the 12u bracket which hosted 12 teams from Virginia, Delaware and New Jersey.

Send your photos to the Star to be a Star team of the week.

Michelle Talley

343

Friday Trios High games and series Michael Swartz 264 Barry Robbins 692 Brenda Layton 256, 658

Christan Fellowship High games and series Kevin Brightwell 247. 674 Joyce Tull 244, 677

Tuesday Early Mixed High games and series J. Stanley Howell 281, 696 Selena Bay 262 Diane Patchett 683

Seaford City High games and series Jeffrey Nelson 293 Jeffrey Shockley 781

Senior Express

Randy Heath Ruth Hesterberg June Long

342, 821 289 784

Thurs. Nite Mixed High games and series Dale Burgess 270, 761 Marian Kellam 256, 673

Sunday Nite Mixed High games and series Grayson Barthlow 286, 769 K. Nikki James 272, 757

Young Adults High games and series Keith Parlier 252, 679 Krystyn Parlier 238, 614

Sunday Adult/Youth High games and series Doug Avery 253, 714 Nancy Herrmann 290, 799 Ben Hearn 282, 820 Brittany Hastings 271, 757

High games and series

Seaford/Laurel Star high school football leading scorers 1. Desmond Sivels, Sussex Tech- 25 touchdowns and four two-point conversions- 158 2. Tevin Jackson, Delmar- 21 touchdowns and one twopoint conversion- 128 3. Tyler West, Laurel- 17 touchdowns- 102 4. Chris Jones, Laurel- 16 touchdowns- 96 5. MyKeal Purnell, Seaford- 10 touchdowns and two twopoint conversions- 64 6. Jorge Young, Woodbridge- 10 touchdowns and one twopoint conversion- 62 7. Daronte DeShields, Delmar- 10 touchdowns- 60 8. Kyle Brown, Laurel- 39 extra points and five field goals- 54 9. Casey Bellamy, Delmar- 36 extra points, two field goals- 42 Tyler Cornish, Delmar- seven touchdowns- 42

Tyler West

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WILDCATS- Delmar freshman Carlee Budd moves the ball upfield during last Saturday’s state tournament game in Milford. Photo by Mike McClure

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PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Young Wildcats continue quest for state title

Casie Brinck

Carlee Budd

Amanda Campbell

Hunter Causey

Taylor Elliott

Alyssa Martin

MacKenzie Martin

Lauren Massey

Christina Parsons

Caroline Phillips

Chelsea Ralph

Lauren Ruark

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GET A FREE INFORMATION KIT Delmar’s Lauren Massey, shown going to the ball, and the Wildcat defense looks to clear the ball during last weekend’s overtime thriller in Milford. Shown (l to r) are: Hunter Causey, Caroline Phillips, Shannon Wilson, Massey, and Casie Brink. Photo by Mike McClure

Local athletes named to all-conference cross country team

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The following local athletes were named to the Henlopen Conference cross country all-conference teams: First team- Emily Ritter, Sussex Tech; Andrew Townsend- Sussex Tech; Chad McMaster, Sussex Tech Second team- Brian Singh, Sussex Tech; Kirk Neal, Seaford Honorable mention- Lee Mayer, Seaford; Megan Jones, Seaford See next week’s Star for the football all-conference list and photos of all of the local athletes named first team all-conference this Fall.

Congratulations to Sylvia Milburn, the Star’s predictions winner for week 10.

Timber Production


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

PAGE 49

People Crew leaders wanted for Women Build

WELCOME HOME - Long-time Joe Biden supporters Carolyn Calio and Frank Calio celebrate a happy moment at the Return Day luncheon at Delaware Technical and Community College with the vice president elect and his wife, Jill. Photo by Natalia Alvarez

Gaull family welcomes daughter Adam and Melissa Gaull of Laurel announce the birth of their daughter, Addison Michelle Gaull. She was born on Friday, Sept. 19, 2008, at 6:05 p.m., at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. Addison weighed 6 pounds, 15.9 ounces and was 20 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Bart and Susan Phillips of Laurel and her paternal grandparents are William and Jessica Gaull, also of Laurel. Addison’s maternal great-grandparents are Fred Phillips and Barbara Oliphant of Laurel. Her paternal great-grandparents

LITTLE MISS PUNKIN CHUNKIN - The first annual Little Miss Punkin Chunkin Pageant was held on Nov. 2. Hailey Passwaters, 7, of Seaford, was the winner. She attends Frederick DouglasS Elementary School, Seaford. Her parents are Shawn and Nicole Passwaters.

Sussex County Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build 2009 is looking for crew leaders for the project set to break ground in January 2009. Crew leaders are responsible for leading a group of four to five construction volunteers on-site. They don't need to know how to build a house from the foundation up, but should be comfortable with tools, willing to learn and able to teach and include others. Women can volunteer for just one work day or every week. This will be Sussex County’s second whole-house women built project. Completion is scheduled for mid-June. The house, in the Concord Village development in Seaford, is one of eight houses planned by Sussex County Habitat for 2009. Women Build takes women from all walks of life and teaches them basic construction skills. For more information or to volunteer, call 302-855-1153 or email womenbuild@sussexcountyhabitat.org.

DANNY SHORT Addison Michelle Gaull

are Irvin and Rose Hastings, Fred and Shirley Prettyman, and Margaret Sink, all of Laurel.

S TATE R EPRESENTATIVE A VeryS pecial

‘THANK YOU’ To the voters of the 39th District For Your ContinuedS upport. I will continue to work diligently, with energy and enthusiasm on your behalf.

HONOR SOCIETY INDUCTEES - New inductees to the Charles R. Jenkins Chapter of the National Honor Society at Worcester Country School, Berlin, Md., are: first row, from left: Mike Guerrieri, Ocean City, Md.; Christina Vosters, Bethany Beach; Lauren Price, Seaford; Katie Marshall, Salisbury, Md.; Zoe Kulina, Lewes; Paige Spangler, Berlin, Md.; and Manali Patel, Berlin. Row two: Molly Dickerson, Ocean City; Victoria Purnell, Lewes; Elizabeth Twilley, Salisbury; Betsy Desmarais, Salisbury; Laura Breslau, Salisbury; Polly Macnab, Bethany Beach; Mary Hudson, Berlin; Bethany Frick, Bishopville, Md.; Caitlin Miller, Ocean View; Austin Coates, Berlin; and Kelly Meiser, Salisbury. Row three: Brandon Thaler, Ocean City; Brad Harris, Rehoboth Beach; Tom Barranger, Dagsboro; Julian Greer, Bishopville; Marisa Grimes, Ocean View; Maura Burton, Ocean Pines, Md.; Chelsea Thaler, Ocean City; Megan Rosales, Seaford; and Gabby Castaneda, Ocean Pines. Row four: Zack Schmidt, Bethany Beach; Peter Buas, Ocean City; Michael Dowling, Ocean City; Austin Cook, Ocean City; Adam Albright, Ocean City; Martin Sanchez, Salisbury; Connor Douglass, Rehoboth Beach; Max Perim, Salisbury; Justin Butler, Bishopville; Taylor Kern, Dagsboro; and Laureen Rosa, Lewes.


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Tsunami sweeps over the political scene A record voter turnout caused a tsunami wave over the political scene RANK ALIO of Delaware politics that turned the political climate we knew upside According to a local down. Delaware Democrats expected to elect a governor and maybe pick up a radio station Republican couple House seats to gain control of Bill Lee conceded to the House. Instead they won five Jack Markell before the House seats, including knocking off the longest serving speaker of a state first vote rolled in. house in the nation and picked up two additional Senate seats. 35th District: When I wrote of with 59% of the vote. Barb says she will be this race it was a toss up, but heavy advertis- back in two years. But Biff loses his leadering linking Aaron Chaffinch with lawsuits ship role as Majority Whip and office space, while he was colonel of the Delaware State as the Republicans head to the basement ofPolice and a local issue the last week did fices for the first time in more than a decade. him in as Dave Wilson swept all voting dis41st District: I successfully predicted an tricts in a 61% win. Governor Minner will upset here if Republicans still supported forappoint his replacement as Sussex County mer Representative John Atkins, now a DeRegister of Wills. mocrat. They did and he upended incumbent 39th District: As expected Danny Short Greg Hastings with 53% of the vote despite captured 69% of the vote in his first re-elecefforts by the Republican Party to remind tion bid, but this rising star in Dover is voters of Atkins’ past run-in with the law. A slowed as his party becomes the minority double winner, Atkins moves upstairs to the party unless he is named to a leadership pooffices with his new Democrat Party and can sition. have his legislation passed with both Houses 40th District: Biff Lee overcame his first being Democrat controlled. contest in 12 years over a feisty challenger in District 2 Council: I predicted Sam WilBarb Hudson. She did well, but Biff overson who won by 56% over former Georgecame a strong Democrat landslide statewide town Mayor Mike Wyatt. Sam’s district is ul-

F

C

tra-conservative, and Sam fits the mold. District 3 Council: My only wrong prediction was Joan Weaver with 51% of the vote upsetting Mark Baker. The one-issue Deaver (an anti-development advocate) switched gears in the last few weeks, reformatted her campaign and got off the land issue, raised some money and diversified her issues to gain her win. If she reverts to her land use issues, she will find an ally in George Cole, but with realtor and land developer Vance Phillips holding the gavel as council president, her voice will be silenced. Clerk of Peace: Incumbent George Parish wins over newcomer Greg Fuller 59-41%. Insurance Commissioner: I said John Brady would win Sussex. He did by almost 13,000 votes. I said he would win Kent, but he lost by 2,200. I said he would be overcome by Karen Stewart in New Castle and he was, losing statewide. Lt. Governor: Matt Denn wins big as I predicted by a comfortable 61% despite a negative campaign by opponent Charles Copeland. Governor: According to a local radio station Republican Bill Lee conceded to Jack Markell before the first vote rolled in. Markell won by the largest percentage, 68% since Pete Dupont won by 70%. Congress: A typo by me had Mike Castle getting another win by 80%. My notes said

60%. He won over Karen Hartley-Nagle by 61%. Majorities for statewide offices are narrowing because of the large increases in Democrat registrations in New Castle. U.S. Senate: A double win for Joe Biden, who regained his Senate seat and was elected vice-president of the United States. This despite criticism he should have resigned his Senate seat by opponent Christine O’Donnell. Joe Lieberman, John Kerry, John Kennedy, and John McCain didn’t resign their Senate seats to run for higher office and Dave Wilson didn’t resign his county position. Besides, the State Constitution allows for double office runs. It was Biden by a whopping 65%. He will resign his Senate seat before being sworn in as vice president to give his replacement seniority over other newly elected U.S. Senators. Minner will name his replacement. U.S. President: I said it wouldn’t be close. It wasn’t. Barack Obama won 364 electoral votes to 163 for McCain, more than a 2-1 majority. He won by more than 4 million votes (51-42%). As a people, we have been divided by red and blue, patriots and non patriots for the past eight years. Hopefully the new regime will bring us all together as Americans. Next: What I think the next four years will bring in the county, state and nationally.

When there was little to do for fun, you just had to improvise I wonder what it was that made me as a child so obsessed by an opONY INDSOR portunity to be where I was not suppose to be? No matter how ...my friends and I would much I was warned about certain things, I was drawn to mischief dance around like as like a buzzard to a deer carcass. I was continuously warned by many brain-damaged my mother to “stay away from the gorillas. road.” This would seem like fairly reasonable advice considering our house was only several inches from the busiest street in Crisfield. Richardson Avenue stood literalThere was the one time I also got my head ly less than a foot away from our front stuck in a sewer grate, but that is another porch. There were two main thoroughfares story. in and out of Crisfield: Richardson and Bottom line, there was no danger great Maryland avenues. They called it “The enough to keep me from crossing two Circuit,” because teenagers could be found highways to get to Archie’s and Ruby driving around the circle that took you in Dize’s stores on the other side. and out of the town. Then there was the awesome lure of Living so close to Richardson Avenue discarded coal dust that attracted me like was no less dangerous if our house had set pigs to a slop bucket. My best grandmothin the middle of the runway at BWI airer lived behind us and she had a coal port. On no less than three occasions stove. Every once in a while I would see someone veered off the normal path and her come to the door with that a big buckcrashed into my father’s car, which would et filled with coal ashes. I would break be parked in front of our house. away and try to get to the old brick cistern As kids we traditionally played in the located just to the left of her back door. back yard of our property, but we still She would give that bucket a throw and faced the temptation of Archie Tyler’s when that white coal ash hit the ground it store across the street. Archie’s store was would throw a plume of white dust that rethe precursor to Shore Stop and Royal sembled the bomb blast at Hiroshima. Farms convenience stores. When the dust cleared you would see what Getting to Mr. Archie’s store was douwas previously hidden by the cloud of ash ble the danger because we had to cross not – me dancing around inside like one of Saonly Richardson Avenue, but Maryland tan’s imps. Avenue and a wide ditch that ran along the This was no different than the evenings railroad tracks in between the two roadwe would lie in wait for the mosquito ways. spray truck. I could look down the highI think it is possible that the video way towards town and in the distance see game, “Frogger” may very well have been the heavy white cloud of spray sifting based on our saga of crossing the dual through the air. It was beautiful. I could highway in front of our Crisfield home. then get outside and hide behind the hedge I can only remember once that I was al- bush along the roadway and wait for it to most struck by a car, but that good fortune get to our house. must be attributed to the grace of God. We had to hide because if the mosquito

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spray man saw us he would avoid shooting off the spray. We had a field next to our house so it was a sure thing that as long as I stayed out of sight he would let loose with the cloud of insecticide. Sure enough that spray would come out from the tank in the back of the truck and my friends and I would dance around like

Gas Lines Gas prices under $2

During the week ending Sunday, Nov. 9, more gas stations posted prices below $2 a gallon, including many pumps in the Mid-Atlantic region. The NorfolkVirginia Beach area saw more than 50 gas stations with prices below $2 gallon including prices as low as $1.85. The last time gas was under $2 a gallon was in 2005. In Delaware the price on March 1, 2005 was $1.99 for regular. The price of crude oil fluctuated this week, closing out Friday at $61.04 a barrel. Crude continues to be at its lowest levels in more than a year - and less than half the price per barrel we saw in July. Gasoline demand in the U.S. is inching a bit higher, although slowly. Demand for oil is falling around the globe as weak economic data curbs demand for fuel. China is also experienc-

as many brain-damaged gorillas. That was insecticide and back in the mid-1960s I am confident that there was no Environmental Protection Agency overseeing the chemicals that made up that concoction. It is still a wonder to me that our children weren’t born with three heads and a dozen arms. Oh well, such is the innocent antics of youth! ing an economic slowdown and expects to see near zero oil demand growth in 2009. “AAA believes that lower gas prices are still in the offing and $2 a gallon as a national average is still possible before the end of the year.” said Catherine L. Rossi, manager, Public and Government Affairs, AAA Mid-Atlantic. “Much will depend on whether motorists remain conservative and drive less than they did last year and also whether oil and gas producers try to balance supply and demand by cutting production.” OPEC has said it will trim production starting this month and further cuts are possible. At least one major grocery retailer said that it is lowering hundreds of prices, partly in response to lower fuel costs. AAA said last week that it believes that lower gas prices should translate to other consumables which have a high transportation cost component attached to them.

Price comparison average for Regular Unleaded Gasoline 11/9/08

Week Ago

Year Ago

National

$2.26

$2.44

$3.09

Delaware

$2.15

$2.30

$2.97


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Reasons for rejoicing but not for the media With the election now past us, many are breathing a sigh of relief ROFFORD EV ODD that it is finally over. Before I move on to holiday thoughts in the ...they have every weeks to come, I thought I might share some final impressions of right to feel a sense this historic election. First, I am convinced that as a of catharsis and joy white man I really can’t understand all this election meant to over the election of African-Americans in this country. I have watched the elation and I Senator Obama. feel they have every right to feel a sense of catharsis and joy over the election of Senator Obama. ing the election cycle as Obama. There are The election of our first ever African no words for the disgusting, horrific treatAmerican president is compelling eviment of Governor Palin during the elecdence that the American Dream of a nation process. I have to confess it is tough tion truly free to chart our individual desto feel any pride in a free press when you tinies is alive and well. struggle to find any mainstream media To paraphrase commentator Dennis that offers balance in their reporting. Miller, “The thought that any little boy or As an aside, Fox News, which is acgirl can really grow up to be president is cused of being lopsided for Republicans, now a thought that every little black boy was reviewed by the same independent or girl can participate in.” For that, every media watch-group and found Fox had exAmerican can rejoice over last Tuesday. actly the same percentage of negative reWith that in perspective, let us also reports about the Democratic candidate as alize that there are many like myself who the Republican. This study appears to bear are very concerned about the direction out Fox’s claim to be fair and balanced President Obama will lead us. Millions of (despite liberals complaining) as a legitiAmericans voted for John McCain for rea- mate claim. sons that were not racist at all. If the taThird, I am interested in watching the bles had been turned and the candidate behavior of our new President as it relates who held my values was African-Amerito the geo-political world. I fear we are can and the one who opposed my values headed for 4 (8?) years of greater concern was white, I would have had no problem of our standing in the United Nations than voting my values with skin color as no isour own sovereign interests. sue at all. (In a fictitious election between I hope I am wrong, but I fear that the Condoleezza Rice and John Edwards, candidate who said he would meet with you’d have found a Rice ‘08 bumperIran without preconditions is setting us up sticker on my car from Day 1!) for a foreign policy that is dangerously Second, this election has signaled the naive. end of reasonable mainstream journalism. Finally, as I have with the past PresiPerhaps my fears of the fawning and lack dents of my adulthood, I am committed to of journalistic integrity comes from exam- praying for President Obama. I am very ples like MSNBC Hardball moderator specifically instructed by scripture to pray Chris Matthews, who recently said, “I for the leaders that God places over me. want to do everything I can to make this With the hardships we face as a nation thing work, this new presidency work.” right now, we certainly need God to grant I can imagine President Bush would him wisdom. give his right arm to have ever found such The world we leave for our children advocacy in the press. will be molded and influenced in a large Recent research by an independent degree by his decisions. foundation found McCain had twice as May God bless President Obama and many negative stories leveled at him durGod bless America.

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Delaware Solid Waste Authority asks public to recycle analog TVs In preparation for the February 2009 switch to digital television, the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) is encouraging Delawareans, who decide to buy a digital television and no longer want their old analog television, to recycle them through DSWA’s Electronic Goods Recycling Program. DSWA’s Electronic Goods Recycling Program allows residents to drop off their unwanted electronic items for free. DSWA has 24 locations throughout the state for residents to recycle their old electronic goods. The drop-off program is designed to

accept electronic goods, telecommunications equipment, toys, radios, televisions, and electroacoustic equipment such as calculators, computers and their parts, keyboards, printers, copiers, cables, phones, fax machines, answering machines and VCRs. Since the inception of DSWA’s Electronic Goods Recycling Program in 2002, there have been almost eighteen million pounds of electronic goods kept out of the landfills. For more information, call the Citizens’ Response Line at 800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com.

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Deer collisions may not be covered by your insurance The peak of deer mating season comes mid-November and many drivers are already seeing an increase in the number of the animals on and around roadways. Each year, nationally nearly 200 people die and many more are injured in crashes involving deer. And damage sustained by vehicles can range anywhere from a few hundred to several thousand dollars. According to data from the AAA MidAtlantic Insurance Group, over the past 10 years in the Mid-Atlantic region, Delaware has the lowest number of animal collision claims. The average claim is $2,300. Over the 10-year period, the highest claim in Delaware was for $13,303. Many people assume that their auto insurance policy will cover the damage after an encounter with a deer. “Animal hits are typically covered under the comprehensive portion of an auto insurance policy, not collision coverage,” advised Donna Lee Williams, director of government and industry affairs, AAA Mid-Atlantic.”Motorists who choose to reduce the comprehensive part of their policy put themselves at risk of not being covered if they hit an animal. “A deer can do a great deal of damage to a vehicle,” noted Williams. “Deer are primarily focused on finding food, shelter and a mate, so it’s up to drivers to be vigilant particularly during the dawn and dusk hours when deer are most active.” Tips for drivers

• Be observant. Look for deer-crossing signs indicating areas where deer frequently travel. Deer are creatures of habit and may often use the same path again – remember where you see them. • Be alert. A deer standing near a roadside may suddenly run across the road. Slow down and use your horn to scare the deer. Use high-beams for greater visibility. • Look for groups. If you see one deer crossing the road ahead, more are likely to follow. • Never swerve. Instead, slow down and brake. Swerving can cause you to lose control of your vehicle and strike another vehicle or object along the roadway. • Do not rely on devices. No evidence that hood-mounted deer whistles and other devices promising to scare off deer work. Use your horn instead to scare the deer. • Slow down. If a crash with a deer is unavoidable, AAA recommends slowing down and releasing your foot from the brake before impact. This will raise the front end of the car during the crash and increase the likelihood that the animal will go underneath the vehicle instead of through the windshield. • Buckle up and do not speed. Lower speed will increase your reaction time. Do not try to move a deer. An injured deer might panic and seriously injure you. Call police or animal control for assistance. For more information, visit www.AAA.com.


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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Snapshots

IN RECOGNITION - President Ann Foskey and Shirley Johnson, junior activities chairwoman, of American Legion Auxiliary Unit #19 of Laurel, hold the American Legion Auxiliary Dept. of Delaware Jr. Activities Award for their achievements.

NEW OFFICER - Laurel Police Officer Jared Haddock brought the police department’s new K-9, ‘Kane,’ to the Laurel Town Council meeting recently. The two-year-old Belgian Malemois is trained in drug searches, patrols and crowd control. Photo by Tony Windsor

FROM HAWAII TO DELAWARE - Charity Lodge #27 I.O.O.F. had as a guest at a recent meeting,Richard Kim, a past sovereign grand master. Kim, center, traveled 18 hours to get to Delaware from Hawaii for the Mid Atlantic State Conclave. To his left is Vice Grand Tom Riggin and Noble Grand Brent Nichols is to his right. Photo by Pat Murphy.

ALL ABOUT THE WEATHER - On Friday, Kim Insley’s first-grade class at Paul Laurence Dunbar School was visited by Danielle Vollmar, meteorologist from WBOC news. Her visit was in conjunction with the students learning about weather science. Vollmar is the third from right, back row. Insley is on the right. Photo by Pat Murphy. WELCOME HOME - Sgt. Susie Calhoun received a hero’s welcome at Delmar VFW Saturday night after returning home from a one-year tour of duty in Iraq. Standing with her is Brian Maloney, a member of the VFW. Photo by Pat Murphy.

IN MEMORIAM - June Russell looks over the Memorial to deceased Laurel Fire Department members Sunday at the dedication. See story page 12. Photo by Pat Murphy.


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Quilt of life’s happiness is made up of swatches of joy Only in America. Only in small towns. And in particular, only in Laurel, or Delmar, or in Seaford, or in any other town throughout Sussex County, a very special part of this state of ours, Delaware. No matter what the type of reunion, the feelings are the same when a group gathers to celebrate a special occasion. And at these gatherings, there are inevitably those good folks who have not seen each other for a while. It is then that the real sense of happiness and the special bond that binds comes to the front. This is a close bond that does not appear in large cities, but is what makes small towns what this nation of ours is all about. On Election Day just a little more than one short week ago, Chuck and I went out to our designated polling place, Laurel Senior High School, to cast our vote in this very meaningful election. It was here that the reunion of sorts began. The first people we saw as our car came to a stop were Billy Hastings and Dale Boyce. Billy, as usual, was chattering a mile a minute and Dale was welcoming one and all to their designated polling place. Billy and his wife, Diane, a former registered nurse at Nanticoke Hospital for years and years, are members of Christ United Methodist Church where I am the organist. Even though they are at church each Sunday, I seldom get to see them, so it was good to see Billy, up close and personal, for a change. And, even though it was a very damp, nearly-raining day, his warm greeting as we exited the automobile made for a sunny day. Dale is a man we have known forever and whose daughter Brenda was a classmate of our son Philip from first grade through senior year. Dale is probably most well-known not as husband of the late Mimi and father of two daughters and one son, but as the voice of the Laurel Bulldogs, a voice that resounds from the pressbox at every home football game. It was good to see these two men again. Entering the voting area we were greeted by several former classmates of our offspring, former “kids” who are now mature adults with sons and daughters of their own. The former Nancy Nero, Cathy Mitchell Wootten and Bonnie Lowe, along with Ruth Feeney (nee Sullivan), were very much a part of our lives for many years. Even in this small town of ours, our

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Doing the Towns Together LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS SARAH MARIE TRIVITS • 875-3672

Moments With Mike VIRGINIA ‘MIKE’ BARTON paths rarely cross these days, and so it was good to see each of them. At the voting station we were greeted by former town manager of Delmar, Bob Martin, a man I met in his official capacity years ago when I was editor of the State Register. Now in her 90s, Mildred Windsor West, longtime polls worker, was on duty once again assisting special voters. She is a longtime friend who has always had more energy than that famous pink bunny, the Energizer. Leaving the polls, we traveled out to Whimsey Cottage, Laurel’s new quilt shop located beyond the Dutch Market and next to Ralph Todd’s tax office. Linda White and husband, Bob, chief cook and assistant, along with Jane Shields, were having the grand opening of this addition to our town. Here we were greeted by shoppers Kathy Otwell Whaley, Cindy Atkinson Mack, and one male who almost had me stumped when he spoke to me. It took me a few minutes, but finally the bell of recognition came when I looked in to his eyes and recognized Scott Hearn. Now a 50-year-old with a close-cut head of white hair, Scott is one of the “kids” we supported as a Little League team player for a number of years and throughout high school. On Election Day, Scott was the dutiful husband, patiently waiting for his wife to purchase fabric while he held two bolts of special cloth. (The perfect attitude of activity for the husband of a quilter). Each of these good folks has played a role in our lives and it was so good to see every one of them. Bits and pieces of our life, all coming together on a special day in the history of our nation. Rather like a quilt, as I think about it. Each small piece joined one to the other, making the quilt an article of joy. And, that, good friends, is what life is all about. Bits and pieces, coming together, creating joy.

Ralph, Blanche, Deena and Randall Hitchens, on a recent trip to Philadelphia, went to see the play, “Trial,” in which Josh Hitchens had the lead role. He has also written and directed a murder mystery, shown at the Maxwell Mansion, which all attended, accompanied by his Aunt Doris, on Oct.26. Josh also directed a production of “Macbeth” at the Shubin Theatre on Oct. 13-23. He works for the Constitution Center in Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Ghost Tours. Josh’s sister, Megan, also was in the audience for his plays. She is a junior at Arcadia, majoring in history, while her brother is an alumnus of that university, in Glenside, Pa. He has gone a long way with his theatre and drama career. Both these young people’s parents are Randall and Deena Hitchens of Georgetown and their grandparents are Ralph and Blanche Hitchens of Laurel. Members of the Laurel class of ‘60 met at the Georgia House on Oct. 5 to firm up plans for a 50th reunion. Those attending were: Rob Scott, Jean Henry Halston, Joyce Aringate Baker, Hope Hudson Huey, Carolyn and Frank Calio and from Middletown, Pat Gifford Howe with guests Barbara Vanarsdalen and Diane Windsor Johnson. Despite the busy election day on Nov. 4, the ladies of the Laurel New Century Club still found time to hold their monthly meeting at the Georgia House and following a tasty hot lunch, presented their guest speaker, Harriett MacVeigh whose topic was flag etiquette. Charlene Meade and Kim Trivits spent last weekend in Gainsville, Va., with their sister and her husband, Deborah and Michael Matalone. On Saturday they drove into D.C. to attend a performance of Cirque Du Soleil, about which their comment was that there are not enough adjectives to describe the splendor of that production! The Laurel Red Hat groups certainly don’t let any grass grow under their feet these days. The Bonnets and Boas, in October, had lunch at the Airport Restaurant

in Georgetown with hostesses Barbara Melvin and Jean Hickey. There were some very original and interesting door prizes awarded, supplied by Phillip’s Sign Co. and others of note. The group welcomed two new members into their fold. A busy Saturday last at the fire house saw the Lions of Laurel holding a train and toy show while the Lioness added to the event a luscious bake table from which goodies were hastily snatched up. The Senior Citizen Fall Festival will be tomorrow, Nov. 14, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with crafts, gift items and food. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Shop Hop, at three establishments on Sycamore Road, will be Nov. 20 through 22. There will be gifts, antiques, jewelry, refreshments and great door prizes from O’Neal’s Antiques, Hen House gift shop and Culver’s Antiques. Get well wishes sent to Delmar friends Gloria Adkins, Robert Truitt, Bob Horn, Daryl Haggar, Bob Christian, Joyce Lord and Louise Foxwell. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Delores E. Culver, Elizabeth Figgs, and E. Madelyn Hearn. We continue with prayers for our servicemen and servicewomen everywhere and for our friends who are ill: June Williams, Jim Spicer, Betty Hitchens, Grace Blackmore, Steve Trivits, Martha Windsor, Hattie Puckham, Philip Lowe, Donald Layton Sr. and Alvin Lutz. Happy birthday wishes to some November celebrants: Delores Todd on Nov. 14; Robert Allen, Nov. 15; Molly Collins and Emma Jean Hickey, Nov. 16; Barbara Melvin, Nov. 17; Rosemarie Hartshorn, Nov. 18; Betsy Davis and Helen Morris, Nov. 20. “Half of something is better than all of nothing.” See you in the Stars.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

Opinion Editorial Now is the time to unite Our nation and our state have new leadership. All our leaders are taking office during very disturbing times when the economic news is bleak to say the least. As the 44th president of the United States, Barack Obama is taking over the leadership of this great nation at a time when some have already given up hope and others are struggling to stay optimistic when all the evidence says we are headed into rough financial waters. As our governor-elect Jack Markell now has to live up to promises he made to get Delaware back on track, including helping to create 25,000 new jobs by encouraging entrepreneurship of small business. Tom Donohue, president and CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, offered the following comments about the election: “The voters have spoken. In January, Sen. Barack Obama will be sworn in as the 44th president of the United States. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce congratulates him and all those elected or re-elected to the House and Senate. “In the months ahead, the new government will face many challenges, but none is more urgent than economic recovery. Any successful and sustainable recovery must involve the business community, which creates the jobs, the growth, and the revenues on which all Americans and our government depend. The Chamber stands ready to work with President-elect Obama and his administration to spur a return to prosperity.” Now is not the time to unite behind our leadership in a show of unity. Our problems will not go away without the cooperation of everyone in the public and private sectors. President-elect Obama has a great gift of being able to convey ideas and to raise hopes for a brighter tomorrow. We encourage our leaders to come together and give the new president a chance to bring positive change to our nation. And we hope that Jack Markell will be able to deliver on his promises that he outlined in his book, “Blueprint for a Better Delaware.”

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

Moving day is on the Star’s horizon Morning Star Publications Inc. RYANT ICHARDSON will soon be moving to a new location. We support these orMorning Star Publications, which ganizations because we started in my home believe that small busiin 1996, has been renting office space ness is the backbone of at 628 West Stein America. Highway for 12 years. However, the taking place now. Rick Ewing (state time has come to take a bold step Rep. Ben Ewing’s son) is complet(considering the economy) and puring the project. chase our own building. Our phone number, fax number, Hopefully, by the end of this Post Office Box (1000) and email month our business will be located addresses will all remain the same. at 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, We will be adding “voice mail” Seaford, in the building with Home and other computer-age bells and Team Realty. whistles to our business operation. Home Team is on the east side and we are on the west side. ConIn a separate topic, I recently restruction of separate office spaces is viewed a list of our affiliations.

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They include • The National Federation of Independent Business • The Maryland Delaware DC Press Association • The Better Business Bureau • The Delaware State Chamber of Commerce • And Chambers of Commerce in Seaford, Laurel, Delmar, Georgetown, Lewes, Rehoboth BeachDewey Beach, Bethany Beach-Fenwick Island, Milford, Millsboro, Milton, and Dover (Central Delaware) in Delaware and Salisbury in Maryland. We support these organizations because we believe that small business is the backbone of America and these groups are working to strengthen our free enterprise system.

Letters to the Editor Was I being obsequious?

I would like to thank Richard Eger for his comments on my column on retirement. However, I didn’t realize that I had been so obsequious. He indicated that he was not sure what I meant when I wrote about the raising of the retirement age. The article was providing a historical perspective on retirement. The point about raising the retirement age was hypothetical. If the age had been raised over the years, we would not have an expectation of retiring at age 65 years now. That did not happen so we now have the expectation. My real purpose of writing the article was twofold. The first was to have people think about the concept. That clearly happened. The secondwas to point out the importance of meaningful work. Those people who are too busy in retirement do indeed have meaningful work. It doesn’t have to be a paid job to be meaningful.

As far as references to the 1973 movie Soylent Green, I have no desire to support that concept. Of interest is the fact that the movie took place in the future. At the time global warning had caused all the crops to dry up. People were starving to death around the world. So the Soylent company solved the starvation problem as described by Mr Eger. I will let someone else provide the historical perspective on “globa warming.” Dr. Anthony Policastro

Contributing writer

National Education Week

We need not only to thank our teachers this week, we need to thank them every day of every week. Teachers not only teach the three “Rs” — Reading, Writing and Arithmetic — they also teach our children the three “Rs” of Respect, Responsibility and Readiness for the adult world. Our teachers are educating the

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Frank Calio

Donna Huston Carol Kinsley Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Composition Cassie Richardson Rita Brex

future leaders of our town and county. Their caring compassion, understanding, and education cannot be measured. We of the Laurel American Legion, Auxiliary Unit 19, salute the teachers and staffs of our schools. Doris Kernaghon

Laurel American Legion

Laureate Epsilon Laureate Epsilon of Beta Sigma Phi would like to thank everyone for supporting our basket bingo. We especially would like to thank the Seaford Moose, Michelle Moyer, Mary Lee Groton, Amanda Potter, Delmar Pizza, Delmar Diner, Charlotte Wheatley, and Edna Millman. With everyone’s help we were able to support Hospice Festival of Trees Thanks for all of your help to make our basket bingo a success. Jane Burlingame

Laureate Epsilon Beta Sigma Phi

Sales George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams

Morning Star Publications Inc. Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Treasurer Circulation has been serving the Delmarva Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Karen Cherrix Peninsula since 1996. town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 13 - 19, 2008

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Conservative ideas were not on the ticket for the election It has often been said that writing your thoughts down is good therapy. On this day after the election, I’d like to give it a try. After the results were in on Tuesday night, I started to wonder if there was something I had missed. Sixty-three million people put their trust in Barack Obama. Can 63 million people be wrong? I wondered if I had given Barack Obama a fair shake. After thinking about it for some time I have come to the realization that I did give Barack Obama an opportunity to earn my vote. He simply did not. Once I stopped feeling sorry for myself and looked at the numbers again, I realized that 56 million people agreed with me. Even though 56 million isn’t as much as 63 million it’s nothing to scoff at. I thought it best to examine why conservative ideals lost out in this election. Then I realized that no one was campaigning on conservative ideals during this whole campaign. Barack Obama is a liberal and John McCain is a moderate. I think John McCain lost this election for two very important reasons. • First, and foremost, moderates do not win elections. John McCain mistakenly thought that he had to appeal to Democrats and Independents to win this election by being a centrist. While it is important to go after voters that sit on the fence, the way that is done is not by alienating your base. A candidate must attract new voters by repeating the truth of his or her message until the voters adopt it as their own. The Obama campaign was masterful at this. • Second, John McCain is an honorable man. Because of that he chose not to point out his opponent’s flaws. I am not suggesting that a candidate has to leave his or her honor at the door when they decide to run for office. I am suggesting that a person who is serious about serving his or her country has to be willing to point out why he or she is a better choice. John McCain failed miserably on that front. I have heard a lot of so-called conservatives muse about what might have been if John McCain had chosen Joe Lieberman or some other centrist politician instead of Governor Sarah Palin. I can only speak for myself, but in my opinion, Sarah Palin is the only reason John McCain earned 56 million votes instead of one million. Choosing Governor Palin was the only worthwhile decision John McCain made in this campaign. She energized the base, gave us hope for the future of the conservative movement and reminded us that there are still down-to-earth people who are willing to sacrifice their time, their privacy and their pride to serve their country. This morning when I turned on my television I saw hundreds of thousands of

Send us your Final Words The Final Word is a compilation of thoughts and ideas from Star staff members and members of the public. We encourage readers to submit items. If you have a pet peeve or word of encouragement you can express in a few words, email the item to us at editor@mspublications.com or mail it to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Sign it and include your hometown and a daytime phone number.

Final Word people in city streets crying and dancing and laughing because they were so happy that the ugly stain of racism is finally being washed from the American fabric. I was moved by their elation. I, too, am glad that America has reached a place where minorities can achieve great things. It’s just that this election was not about race for me. I don’t care about white and black. I care about concern for the sanctity of human life. I am motivated by a candidate who is willing to defend their country at all costs. I want someone who will not fan the flames of class warfare by taxing the rich to make things economically just. I want to vote for an American such as Governor Palin who is not afraid to say that she owns weapons, goes to a Pentecostal Church, and is in favor of preserving, protecting and defending the Constitution the way it is, not the way they want it to be. That’s why Senator Obama didn’t earn my vote. It’s that simple. Fifty-six million Americans feel angry, frustrated and abandoned today. The reason for this is a simple one; Americans

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need to feel like they are being heard. Barack Obama won this election because he took his message to the American people. They supported him because he knew their concerns and he offered solutions. In my opinion they were misguided solutions, but they were solutions nonetheless. John McCain did not give us any reason to vote for him. He offered little hope and pitiful solutions to the problems we face in America. John McCain lost because Barack Obama was doing all the talking. In four years my sincere hope is that the Republican party will die and something with resolve will take its place. This election should be all the proof Conservatives need that moderation isn’t getting it done. Conservative Americans want something more than a moderate who spends all his time reaching across the isle to hold hands with people who would never do the same for him. America just elected the most polarized member in the United States Senate. Contrary to what John McCain has believed for 30 years, bipartisanship is not a qualification a candidate must have to get elected. I pray that this is the last time I have to walk into a voting booth and decide which candidate would do the least amount of damage to my country. We need another Barry Goldwater. I could get excited about that. Laura Rogers

Star Staff

U.S. National Debt

According to the National Debt Clock, the Outstanding Public Debt as of November 11, 2008, stood at $10.6 trillion dollars. The estimated population of the United States is 305,077,013 so each citizen’s share of this debt is $34,871. The National Debt on April 9 was $9,443,835,491,300 and on July 2 was $9,494,054,462,500. The increase from April 9 to July 2 was $50,218,971,200 ($50.2 billion). The increase from July 2 to November 11 is $1,144,267,372,310 ($1.1 trillion). Where are we headed? Who bails out our government when it faces a financial crisis? How high can taxes be raised before people say, “Enough!” Finally, can we work through our problems without crushing the American spirit and preserve our free enterprise system? Bryant Richardson Publisher

Motivation

The victory of success is half won when one gains the habit of setting goals and achieving them. Even the most tedious chore will become endurable as you parade through each day convinced that every task, no matter how menial or boring, brings you closer to fulfilling your dreams. - Og Mandino, 1923-1996, American moti-


See, Believe, Achieve. ENROLL NOw! REgiStRAtiON BEgiNS NOvEmBER 17

Stephanie Fogel

Graduate, Respiratory Care Technology RCP II, Beebe Medical Center

Delaware Technical & Community College

856-5400 www.dtcc.edu


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