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THURSDAY, november 11, 2010

vol. 15 No. 29

50 cents

News GIFT GUIDE - Need ideas for the special people on your Christmas shopping list? Look inside for our special Gift Guide magazine. FASHION - Online auction added to Del Tech Fashion Show fundraiser. Page 2 HEROES - Tina Washington works to help members of armed forces. Page 8 VETERAN - Michael Kardash served as a messenger to General MacArthur. Page 30 DEER SEASON - Driver safety and other advice for deer season. Page 35 ELECTION - How did Sussex Countians compare to those in the rest of the state in their votes for the statewide candidates? Page 36 LETTERS - Look on pages 57 and 58 for some insightful letters from our readers. FINAL WORD - We can’t stop the spin, but we can at least offer a balanced approach to our coverage. Page 59

Departing Sen. Ted Kaufman, in the white raincoat, and Congressman Mike Castle, on the far right, walk in the Return Day parade. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Stars - A Woodbridge soccer player and a Sussex Tech cross country runner are this week’s Stars. Page 39

Return Day tradition

State tournament - The Sussex Tech field hockey team was home Tuesday in the first round. Page 43

By Lynn R. Parks

Sports Top in class - Seaford senior Molly Cain excels on the sports fields and in the classroom. Page 37

Index Bulletin Board Business Church Classifieds Final Word Gas Lines Gourmet Health Letters Lynn Parks

13 6 17 48-55 59 59 45 21 57, 58 33

Movies Obituaries Police Puzzles School News Sports Tides

7 19 10 34 25-29 37-44 40

Rainy ceremony caps stormy 2010 election cycle Teressa Smith didn’t mind that it was raining. She and her friend, Joe Willene, both of whom live in Georgetown, sat on a bench on The Circle in Georgetown last Thursday and waited for the annual Return Day parade to get under way. “I love the bands, and it’s always exciting to see the politicians,” she said. “And this year, I’m getting my roast ox sandwich,” a Return Day tradition. “Last time, the wait was so long that I gave up. This year, I’m sticking

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it out. And I don’t care whether it rains or not. It’s only water.” Elwood Baker of Laurel was of a similar mind. He and his wife, Barbara, set their chairs up on The Circle and covered them with an umbrella before heading off in search of something to eat. “In 20 years, I haven’t missed a single Return Day,” he said. “I live in Sussex County. I don’t let the rain stop me.” Despite the dedication of Return Day fans, the crowd at the traditional celebration of unity following political

squabbling was down this year, perhaps because of the weather, on and off showers that, when on, were drenching, or perhaps because of the security that was a hold-over from 2008, when then Sen. and Vice President-Elect Joe Biden attended. While there were no metal detectors or rooftop sharpshooters as there had been when Biden was there, much of Georgetown was closed to traffic, meaning that people had to rely on shuttle buses to get to The Circle. In addition, the parade route was Continued to page 46

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Online auction added to Del Tech Fashion Show fundraiser

Before fashion takes the stage at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, the public has an opportunity to participate in the event. The Couture & Class fashion is offering an online auction which, as the show does, helps to fund international scholarships. The date of the annual show is Saturday, Nov. 20, with the online auction site open for bids until Nov. 18. Visit the fashion show’s website at www.dtcc.edu/fashionshow to view an eclectic selection of 33 bid items. Travel items include trips to Cancun, Florida and Spain. Consider a short getaway to Dewey Beach or Washington, D.C. or bid on trips to Coronado Bay,

Operation helps soldiers

Operation We Care, started by the Eastern Shore HarleyDavidson Owners Group (HOG), has set a goal of 300 boxes to be delivered to service members serving in theaters of conflict. The boxes will be packed the Sunday after Veterans Day and delivered before Christmas. Last Veterans Day, the group placed and shipped more than 260 of the U.S. Postal Service boxes with products donated by residents of Delmarva’s three states. The group did another 226 boxes in May, after Armed Forces Day. The boxes are the equivalent of a warm hug from home, extended to those serving our country abroad. Each package contained at least one box of Girl Scout cookies, donated by the Chesapeake Bay Girl Scout council. Members of Troop 688 decorated all 226 boxes with handdrawn artwork and messages of support before they were packed. The top 10 items needed for the projected 200 boxes to be shipped include bars or bottles of body soap, small packs of baby wipes, pull-top cans of pasta, hot chocolate packets, cotton balls, playing cards, dental floss, deodorant (non aerosol), shampoo and tea bags. Zip-lock bags in the sandwich, quart and gallon size are also needed to separate items for shipping. The donation list is available online at www.easternshorehog. com, Minuteman Press in Salisbury and most drop-off points. Donations can be dropped off at Minuteman Press and Clear

California or the Rocky Mountains. If you have an adventurous spirit, consider one of these unique experiences: soar freely in a world-class glider or fly a military jet. If land travel is your preference, enjoy driving six luxury exotic cars. You can also experience a vineyard or brewery tour, lacrosse game at Johns Hopkins University, spa services, or a professional cooking class. Fine jewelry, personal services — including wardrobe/closet reorganization – a laptop, food and gourmet items, fitness and dining opportunities complete the bid selection. Fashion show attendees will also have an opportunity to bid

on those items during the event as well as other silent and live auction items. Sponsored by the Owens Campus Development Council, the show features men’s and women’s clothing in the categories of casual, business, holiday and resort wear from Carltons, Pineapple Princess, Rose Garden, Sole, Liquid, Clothes 2 You, all in Rehoboth; Deanna’s, Tiger Lili

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Bay Moon Design, Angels in Air, Shell Affair, FolksyArt, Mary Kay, Josephine’s Daughter, Joanne DeFiore, Books R Fun and Amway Skin Care. Tickets for the Couture & Class fashion show and luncheon are $35 per person and $225 for a table for eight. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit the website or call 855-1659.

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Channel Radio in Salisbury, BB&T Bank in North Salisbury, Dr. John Schneider in Easton, Mr. Baldy’s Family Restaurant in Chincoteague and HarleyDavidson of Seaford. Cash donations will be used for postage, as each box costs $12.50 to ship to the troops. The Ocean City Post Office delivers most of the boxes to Iraq and Afghanistan in about a week to 10 days. If you know a local member of our military who is deployed or is soon to be deployed, contact Jeff Merritt, coordinator of Operation We Care at 410-7138940 or jemerritt314@yahoo. com.   The first “Ride For Research” Motorcycle Ride, presented by 97.5 & 105.9 CAT COUNTRY, took place in October, as 161 riders from all over Delmarva came out to support the life-saving work of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. The event raised $4,000 for the hospital, which turns no child away regardless of a family’s ability to pay. The event was sponsored by Harley Davidson of Seaford and Seacret’s of Ocean City.

and Twila Farrell, all in Lewes; Coolspring Cottage in Milton; and Nicole J. Designs in Middletown. Attendees will be able to purchase clothing and store items at the show’s shopping bazaar with 15 percent of those sales being donated to the scholarships. Bazaar participants include Coolspring Cottage, Tiger Lili, Pineapple Princess, The Olive Branch,

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

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Victorian Christmas kicks off with wine & cheese by Anne Nesbitt The ever-popular wine and cheese party will be the starting event of the 2010 Victorian Christmas at the Governor Ross Mansion, Seaford, on Friday, Dec. 10, from 6 to 8 p.m. The committee in charge of this party, under the leadership of Carolyn Griffith, is reaching new levels with unusual hors d’oeuvres. They are preparing a seared tuna and

Seaford Star

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Seaford Star (USPS #016-428) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $21 a year in county; $26 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown, and Federalsburg, Maryland; $31 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

a smoked salmon presentation along with the old favorites such as sweet potato biscuits with ham and all kinds of cheese items. The mansion in candlelight will be open for tours. In addition to the delicious food, wine and punch, anyone who attends will receive a free raffle ticket for one of two baskets of wine with accompaniments. This event is open to the public. No reservations are required. The charge is

$10 per person, payable at the door. Every day of the Victorian Christmas, December 10, 11 and 12, offers tours of the fully furnished 13 rooms of the mansion and of the slave quarters. In addition there will be an art show and an opportunity to meet the impersonators of the Ross family. A children’s activity will take place Saturday morning. This is free for the children but each child must be accompanied by an adult at the cost of $3 per person.

Music will entertain guests in the afternoons of Saturday and Sunday along with refreshments. Charge for those days is $7 per person. Anyone who buys a ticket for the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion is given a free ticket for admission to the Seaford Museum to see the train exhibit there. For further information about these events, call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828.

Laurel Star

‘Lunar Fun’ planned for Ross Mansion Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 By(302) Anne629-9788 Nesbitt • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is “Lunar published Star Fun”weekly is howby theMorning activity schedPublications Inc., 95116, Norman Eskridge uled for Friday, Nov. is being deHighway, Seaford, 19973. Perwhole iodiscribed. This outsideDE event for the cals postage paid at Dover, DE. family will take place from 7 to in 8:30 p.m. Subscriptions are $21 a year counon the grounds of the Ross Mansion Planty; $26 a year in Kent and New Castle tation. Counties, Delaware, Delmar, SharpViewers will be divided into three$31 town and Federalsburg, Maryland; elsewhere. address groups. TheyPostmaster: are: grades 1Send to 5, grades LaurelScott Star,Davidson P.O. Boxwill 1000, 6changes to 8 andtoadults. Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

lead discussions which will include moon phases, lunar landscapes, moon stories and manned exploration, to make the viewing more meaningful. Reservations are not required. There is no charge. Persons attending should bring telescopes or binoculars. This event is part of the 150th anniversary of the opening of the Ross Mansion. Vistors will be reminded when looking at the moon that it appearance is exactly

what the Ross family and children would have seen when they lived on the plantation in the 1860s. This event can be held only in clear weather. Check the website at www. seafordhistoricalsociety.com for the lastminute decision. For more information about “Lunar Fun” or any of the 150th anniversary events call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-8928.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Mountaire Farms to expand operations By Lynn R. Parks

The Mountaire Farms poultry processing plant near Millsboro is planning an expansion that will bring an additional 31 jobs to Sussex County. Announcement of the $34.5 million project to construct a rendering and resource-recovery facility came last Thursday, just one day after the state OK’d a permit required for the project by Delaware’s Coastal Zone Act. The permit, signed by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control secretary Colin P. O’Mara, says that the expansion will mean an infusion of $5.6 million into the state’s economy. A ceremony to celebrate the announcement of the expansion was held at the poultry processing plant last Thursday morning. “It’s fitting that…just a few miles away from where people will, at Return Day, literally bury the hatchet and move past the political season, we’re together to talk about jobs,” Gov. Jack Markell said at the ceremony. “Mountaire is a critical part of the state’s economy and we are so glad to see their strong commitment to this community renewed.” With the new rendering and resourcerecovery facility, Mountaire will be able to convert poultry processing leftovers such as blood, feathers and entrails from its Millsboro plant as well as its Selbyville plant into meal and feed-grade fat for use in the production of pet food. The new facility, to be constructed on the current Mountaire campus east of

Millsboro, is expected to be open by December 2011. More than 300 workers are expected to be used during its construction. The Delaware Economic and Development Office is providing a $787,500 grant from its Delaware Strategic Fund for the project. “The state’s support of this expansion would continue our commitment to this important sector of our economy, while helping to create jobs and make improvement to the environment,” said DEDO director Alan Levin. “It is a solid investment in the future of our state.” “Support for the resource-recovery plant project is paramount in solidifying Mountaire’s total integration poultry business in Delaware,” said Mountaire Farms president Paul Downes. Under the provisions of the Coastal Zone Act permit, odors from the rendering facility will be abated through thermal oxidation. To offset expected air emissions from the new facility, Mountaire will replace two of its three oil-burning boilers at its main facility with burners that use natural gas. “This will reduce complex air emissions by approximately 71 tons per year,” the permit says. In addition, Mountaire will also upgrade and expand its existing wastewater treatment facility to reduce by 64 percent the nitrogen load in the waste that it discharges onto cropland. This will more than offset the additional nitrogen load that is generated by the rendering plant, the per-

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Administrative professionals meeting

Administrative professionals can learn how to work smarter with documents to improve workflow, accessibility, time management, and overall efficiency by attending the First State Chapter, International Association of Administrative Professionals (IAAP) meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 23, featuring Rick Drish of Esselte. Drish will demonstrate new office products, answer questions and provide product samples. The event will be held at Kent General Hospital, Bayhealth Medical Center, in the General Foods Conference Room beginning with dinner at 5:30 p.m. followed by the program at 6. Cost for the dinner is $15, and there is no charge to attend the program portion only. However, registration is needed to ensure adequate seating. Visit www.firststateiapp.com to learn more about the group and for a meeting notice/registration form. Contact Kathy Kucek, CPS/CAP at Kathy_Kucek@bayhealth.org to register. Registration deadline is Nov. 17.

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Delaware State Conservationist Russell Morgan recently announced the ranking period cut-off date for producer applications for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) has been extended to Jan. 7, 2011.  CSP is offered in all 50 states, District of Columbia and the Pacific and Caribbean areas through continuous sign-ups with announced cut-off dates for ranking periods. The program provides many conservation benefits including improvement of water and soil quality, wildlife habitat enhancement, and adoption of conservation activities that address the effects of climate change. All producers are encouraged to apply for CSP. The program, authorized in the 2008 Farm Bill, offers payments to producers who maintain a high level of conservation on their land and who agree to adopt higher levels of stewardship. Eligible lands include cropland, pastureland and nonindustrial forestland.  A CSP self-screening checklist is available to help producers determine if CSP is suitable for their operation. It is available from local NRCS offices or online at http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/ programs/new_csp/csp.html. To apply for CSP, visit your local USDA Service Center. In Sussex County, call 856-3990, ext. 3.

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mit says. “Mountaire deserves our sincerest congratulations and gratitude for the commitment they are making to Delaware, Sussex County and to the poultry industry,” said Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee. “The resource-recovery center is a great example of addressing environmental issues and creating new business opportunities with a singular plan.”

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A representative of Downtown Delaware, a program of the Delaware Economic Development office, is pleased to present an informational session on downtown revitalization activities. This informational presentation will be directed to stakeholders of the City of Seaford, including downtown business owners, property owners, citizens and others interested in the future of the downtown and will touch on the following important issues: As someone with a vested interest in the City, how might you help shape the “future” downtown Seaford? Common-sense way to address a variety of issues and problems that challenge traditional business districts. Using the Main Street Four-Point Approach® and other effective tools to revitalize the core of your community. As a key stakeholder in guiding the future of downtown Seaford, your participation and input is vital! Please join us: Tuesday, November 16, 2010, 6:30 PM Seaford Volunteer Fire Hall 302 E King Street, Seaford, DE 19973 Please RSVP by Noon on November 16th: Trish Newcomer, 629-9173 tbooth@seafordde.com

Diane Laird Delaware Economic Development Office Diane.Laird@state.de.us www.delawaremainstreet.com www.preseration.org/main-street

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 5

SARA makes space station contact

Members of the Sussex Amateur Radio Association (SARA), one of the largest and most active amateur radio organizations on Delmarva, have made ham radio contact with the International Space Station.   Thousands of hams worldwide are trying to achieve this coveted radio contact yet comparatively few actually make the connection. A combination of luck and skill have allowed 15 SARA members to talk via amateur radio directly to Mission Commander and fellow ham Colonel Doug

Wheelock, KF5BOX. The timing of a call and knowledge of the track are essential as the orbiter is 214 miles above the Earth and traveling at more than 17,000 miles per hour making it within radio range of Delmarva only a scant few minutes each day. Terry Hastings, W3TRY, of Milford, was the first SARA member to speak to the space station. “It was absolutely great to hear Col. Wheelock return my call,” he said. “I felt the enthusiasm of a child again.”  

Longneck residents and SARA members Jerry Martin, KB3NZJ, and his wife Paula KB3TCH, have also enjoyed the experience. “Jerry turned on his ham radio and asked me to call and I got through on my first try!” said Paula. Later Jerry made his contact and has since helped others with orbital and prime time data.   To learn more about this experience, joining SARA, or getting your ham radio license, contact Joe Stormer at W3TL@ arrl.net or visit www.sussexamateurradio. com.

Festival of Trees benefits hospice The Festival of Trees is the annual event ushering in the holiday season statewide. Hosted by Delaware Hospice to support its programs, the Festival features a magnificent display of decorated trees and wreaths and enjoys thousands of visitors each year.  Hundreds of volunteers help organize and run each Festival; businesses and individuals sponsor trees and wreaths, which are decorated by artisans who donate their time and talent.  At the close of the Festival, the trees and wreaths are delivered to the sponsor’s selected destination, which is often another nonprofit organization.

The following events will be held at Delaware Technical & Community College, Carter Partnership Center, Rt. 18, Georgetown: General Admission Saturday, Dec. 4, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 5, Noon to 3 p.m. $3 Adults; $1 Students Featuring the Gift Shoppe, Sweet Shoppe, Raffles, and Delaware Hospice Craft Elves. Gala and Auction Friday, Dec. 3, 6 to 9 p.m. $30 per person by reservation only.

Premier holiday event to usher in the season featuring live entertainment, a live and silent auction, and heavy hors’ d’oeuvres. Call 855-2344 for reservations. Basket Bingo Saturday, Dec. 4, 1 to 4 p.m. $20 in advance; $25 at door. Tickets: 855-2344. Featuring a variety of Christmas and original baskets and pottery. Jingle Jamboree: Family Fun Night Saturday, Dec. 4, 6 to 9 p.m. $10 per person; under 10 free. Information: 855-2344. With dancing, games and refreshments.

TOYS FOR TOTS LITERACY - The UPS Store in Seaford, located at 23000 Sussex Highway, is a participating member of the Toys for Tots Literacy Program. After many years of supporting Toys for Tots, The UPS Store launched an initiative alongside the United States Marine Corps, to encourage literacy in America’s underprivileged communities. “The UPS Store in Seaford is excited to participate this year,” said Laura Rogers, store manager. “This is our first holiday season in business, so we are not sure what to expect. We are hoping to collect lots of money and at least 100 new books for kids in the Seaford area.” New books will be donated to The Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club before the New Year. All monetary donations will be donated to the WSBGC next year, just in time for the holidays.

PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Business

RIBBON CUTTING - The Georgetown Chamber of Commerce held a special ribbon cutting on Saturday, Oct. 16, to celebrate the grand opening of the new Elmer’s Market and enjoyed the market’s Fall Festival. The huge, open air retail market is located on Rt. 404W (13257 Seashore Hwy.) and features fresh fruit and vegetables, a garden and greenhouse, gift shop, and more. From left are Karen Duffield, executive director, Georgetown Chamber; Ruth Briggs King, District 37 Representative; Ray Hopkins, president, Georgetown Chamber; Kathy Giovoni, assistant manager, Elmer’s; Lee Snyder, store manager, Elmer’s; Alfie Oakes, owner, Elmer’s; Sarah & Chris Willey, owner, Elmer’s; Helen Kruger, chamber membership chair; Sam Wilson, Sussex County Council; Norma Elliott, office assistant, Georgetown Chamber; Julie Wheatley, director, Sussex County Economic Development; Annie Besche-Martin, Georgetown Town Council; amd Emma & Olivia Duffield, honorary chamber ribbon cutters. For more information, call Elmer’s Market at 337-8110.

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INTEGRA PROMOTIONS - INTEGRA Administrative Group, Inc. announces promotions within its senior management team. Kris Lee Smith has been promoted to president, Lydia C. Trice to chief operations officer, D. Scott Smith to chief marketing officer and Linda L. Wainwright to chief financial officer. Charles H. Landon, executive vice president, will retire on Dec. 31 and maintain a position as management consultant. In the front row from left are Lydia Trice; David W. Smith, CEO; and Linda Wainwright. In the back row are D. Scott Smith; Charles H. “Chuck” Landon; and Kris L. Smith. INTEGRA provides a full range of administrative services to more than 40 self‐ funded employers located throughout the mid‐Atlantic region.

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MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

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Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 11/12

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Washington works to help members of armed forces By James Diehl Georgetown-area resident Tina Washington will never forget the day more than nine years ago when she was sitting in a classroom at the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pa. People were running in and out of the room; everyone knew something out of the ordinary was going on, they just weren’t sure what it was. When she learned exactly what was happening, she took a deep breath, thought of her friends and family and realized how lucky she was. The date was Sept. 11, 2001 – just a month earlier, she was working at the Pentagon and could easily have been in the section of the building where terrorists crashed an airliner into the hub of the American military earlier that morning. “I realized two things right away. First, if I had been at the Pentagon, I wouldn’t have been too far away from where the plane actually hit,” remembers Washington, who spent most of her career with the Defense Department, but retired from the Department of Homeland Security in 2006. “I also realized that there were a lot of people in that area of the building who I knew. I lost some ladies that day who I had close relationships with.” The attacks were hard to get over; they affected everyone in her class at the War College and most of the people she knew. “It was eerie because just a month before the attack, we were all working together,” she remembers. “That really just put my life more into perspective.” Washington always knew that when the time came for her to retire and she had a little more free time on her hands, that she would like to volunteer with an organization that aided members of the military, both present and past. Today, she spends much of her free time working with the ladies auxiliary of the Oak Orchard-Riverdale American Legion near Millsboro. Currently serving as the organization’s vice president and community service chairperson, one of her main goals in life these days is to help the members of our nation’s military. Sometimes, that involves working closely with veterans of the United States armed forces. Other times, it involves community awareness and working with area children.

Heroes Series

If you know of someone who has dedicated his or her life to service to others, suggest their names for this series. Contact James Diehl at 302-222-2685 or email Bryant Richardson, brichardson@ mspublications.com It all revolves around helping members of the armed forces, men and women she once worked so closely with. “One of the things we do with the auxiliary is to go into the schools with our ‘veterans in the classroom’ program, which has been very well received in our local school districts,” says Washington. “We show the kids how to do pocket flags and we’ll also take the honor guard with us. They’ll do the folding of the flags and tell the children what each fold in the flag means. The young people are very enthusiastic about this.” After Washington finished the yearlong program at the War College, she returned to her job at the Pentagon, where her interest in helping veterans and veterans’ organizations grew. She had the opportunity to see first hand what the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were really all about – the real life examples of the conflicts were hard to ignore. “The generals started bringing in these kids who were coming back from Iraq; they would bring them to the executive dining room once a week and sit and have dinner with them,” Washington remembers. “These were just kids, most of them 18 to 20-years-old who were coming back with no legs or in wheelchairs. But they were so grateful that people at the Pentagon would sit and have a conversation with them.” Washington thinks back on those moments today when she’s organizing special events, coordinating press coverage or simply spending time with veterans of the United States military. Some are younger, some are veterans of Vietnam or World War II – all laid their lives on the line for our country. It’s Washington’s goal to garner them some much-deserved recognition, whether they

Georgetown-area resident Tina Washington has been volunteering with American Legion Post 28 for more than four years, currently serving as the vice president and community service chairperson for the ladies auxiliary. She is flanked in this photo by pictures of her son, Bernard Hynson, left, and her nephew, Walter Harvey.

desire it or not. In 2008, one of these humble warriors touched Washington’s life in a special way. She will never forget the way World War II veteran Otis Handy reacted to his special day. “I arranged for him to come to our post for lunch the day the national commander was here,” recalls Washington. “Everybody was just so in awe of him and he is such a humble man; I was really amazed at the treatment he got here. He couldn’t understand, though, why people were making such a big fuss over him. But he kind of took it all in and appreciated it.” Be it programs in the schools, spending time at Post 28 or merely doing her part to help the ladies auxiliary be as successful as it can possibly be, Washington is doing her part to help veterans and veterans’ causes throughout the area. She even goes out of her way to do what many don’t take the time to do – say a simple “thank you” to members of our

military whenever she can. “If I’m in the airport and I see people in military uniforms, I’ll walk up to them and thank them for their service,” says Washington, with a big smile creeping onto her face. “It’s not just saying that, but it’s their reaction to me that always makes me feel good. They are almost incredulous because most people don’t take the time to do that. But I do.” Washington has been volunteering on a regular basis for American Legion Post 28, the third largest American Legion in the world by membership, since 2006. Her father was a military man and her son, Bernard Hynson, currently serves in the United States Army. She has a special connection to America’s military, a connection she honors and treasures every single day. “As long as I’m doing what I need to do and I know it’s helping our veterans, then I’m happy,” she says matter-of-factly. “That’s really what life is all about.”

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Police Journal Cyclist dies from crash

Delaware State Police responded to a crash involving a bicyclist and passenger van on Nov. 8 at 5:47 p.m. on Wilson Farm Road, approximately half a mile north of SR 18, south of Bridgeville.   The crash occurred as a 2007 Dodge Caravan driven by Elna M. Watt, 57 and the 54-year-old victim, both of Seaford, were traveling southbound on Wilson Farm Road toward SR 18 Cannon Road, Bridgeville.  The victim, a bicyclist, was traveling on the right side of Wilson Farm Road which has unimproved shoulders. Watt was driving southbound on Wilson Farm Road approaching the victim from the rear.  For an unknown reason, the victim turned left into the path of the Dodge Caravan and was struck. The victim was initially taken to Nanticoke Hospital where he was stabilized but was then flown to Christiana Hospital where he died on Nov. 9 from injuries sustained in the crash.  Delaware State Police has positively identified the victim and are attempting to notify next of kin, however, it is possible that the victim is homeless. The last known address for the victim is Concord Road, Seaford.    Anyone who may have known a 54-year-old male who traveled via a bicycle in the area of Wilson Farm Road on a regular basis is asked to contact Delaware State Police Crash Reconstruction Unit at Troop 7 at 644-5020, ext. 112.

Leffew receives prison sentence

Gary Leffew Jr., 22, a senior airman stationed at Dover Air Force Base, was sentenced recently by U.S. District Judge Sue L. Robinson to five years in prison for possession of child pornography, in violation of federal law. Leffew was also sentenced to five years of supervised release, which will begin following his prison term. He will also be required to register as a sex offender in any jurisdiction in which he lives, works or attends school. 

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According to statements made at the sentencing hearing and documents filed in court, in March 2009, Leffew contacted an undercover detective from Kirksville, Mo., who was posing as a child sex offender in a chat room. Leffew then invited the undercover detective to join a private computer network used to trade images of child pornography. Leffew engaged in online conversations with the detective and others as they downloaded images of child pornography that Leffew posted on the network.  Leffew’s attorney argued for a 40-month sentence, noting that Leffew was found in possession of only 38 images and 16 videos of child pornography and that his conduct was largely limited to viewing the images. United States District Judge Sue L. Robinson rejected that request, noting that each image depicts a real child being abused and that “there is nothing casual or innocent about the viewing of child pornography.”  This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Delaware State Police High Tech Crimes Unit. This case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Edward J. McAndrew.

Man killed in pedestrian crash

Delaware State Police is investigating a fatal crash involving a pedestrian that occurred early Sunday morning, Nov. 7., sometime between 12:30 and 9 a.m. The victim, Joshua D. Weiss, 31, of Dover, was found along the roadway on Willow Grove Road west of Berrytown Road, approximately three miles west of Camden.  Police have learned that Weiss was at a party on Saturday into Sunday morning with his wife and left suddenly. Weiss was speaking on the cellular phone with his wife sometime after midnight. Weiss’ wife and others attempted to locate him unsuccessfully.  At 9 a.m. Police received a 911 call from a passing motorist who observed Weiss’ body in a ditch off the north side

of Willow Grove Road. Police responded to the crash site and discovered several articles of clothing on the shoulder of the roadway belonging to Weiss.  Police were able to collect several vehicle parts, however, the exact identification of these parts is pending. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call investigators at 302-697-4454, ext. 216 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

Man assaults woman in Bridgeville

On Saturday, Nov. 6, Delaware State Police investigated a domestic assault which occurred in the parking lot of the Bridgeville Business Center off Seashore Highway and at a campsite off of Chaplin’s Road, Bridgeville.  Police learned that the assault began around 2:48 p.m. when the 24-year-old victim of Pasadena, Md., her ex-boyfriend, William J. Brady Jr., 23, of Huntingtown, Md., and a mutual friend from Media, Pa. went to purchase alcohol.  Allegedly, the victim told the mutual friend that she loved him for taking them to the liquor store which angered her exboyfriend, Brady.  When the friend went inside the liquor store, Brady grabbed the victim by the neck as she sat in the rear of the truck, squeezing her neck making it difficult to breathe.  Brady also continued to strike the victim about the face and torso before eventually biting her on the cheek.  By the time the friend returned, Brady had stopped assaulting the victim until they reached their camp site off of Chaplin’s Road in Bridgeville.  All of the aforementioned information was witnessed by a concerned citizen in the Bridgeville Business Center parking lot. The citizen followed the victim onto Chaplin’s Road where he contacted a trooper working at the entrance to Punkin’ Chunkin’ and advised him of what they had seen. A second concerned witness also contacted troopers advising of a female being kicked, punched and thrown against a

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Reward for bald eagle incident

Delaware Wildlife officials are seeking information about the suspected poisoning of two adult bald eagles. The birds were found in an agricultural field near the intersection of Beaver Dam Road and Sammons Road near Lincoln in Sussex County on Oct. 21. One eagle was dead, and the other survived following treatment at Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research in Newark and was released back into the wild on Nov. 2. DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Agents and special agents of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are conducting a joint investigation into the incident. The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $3,500, and Delaware Fish and Wildlife is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to a conviction. Anyone with information should contact Sgt. Gregory Rhodes with the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement at 302-739-9913 or 302-542-6102, or Special Agent Daniel Collins with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement in Dover, at 302-730-9184. Information may also be provided by calling Delaware Fish and Wildlife Operation Game Theft at 800-292-3030, or by going to the Operation Game Theft website: www.fw.delaware.gov/Hunting/ Pages/OpGameTheft.aspx. The federal Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act protect bald eagles. Maximum criminal penalties for violating the Eagle Act include a $100,000 fine and one year in prison. Until 2007, bald eagles were also protected under the Endangered Species Act.

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truck at an adjacent campsite. The troopers responded to the campsite and took Brady into custody.  Brady was charged with strangulation, third degree assault, offensive touching and disorderly conduct. He was remanded to Sussex Correctional Institute on $3,600 secured bond. 

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CORNER IN-TOWN LOT! Offers 3 bedrooms, enclosed porch, 2.5 car garage, beautiful landscaping, concrete driveway. $169,900. Call Tammy Reagan’s cell 302-2497355.

This home has it all! Great location, granite counter tops, sun/ Florida room, landscaping w/exterior landscape lighting. $240,000. Call Michelle Mayer’s cell 302249-7791.

Premiere 55+  golf course community!  2592 sq.ft. home w/large master suite & dream chef’s kitchen w/island. Call Wanda Rash’s cell 302-542-8024.

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A sense of history w/ modern convenience. Expansive lawn w/ pond  & large out building. 5BR home on 18 acres! Call Jessica Bradley’s cell 302-245-7927. $879,000

Wonderful villa w/ upgrades! 55+ golf course community. 3 season room, custom landscaping, tile bathrooms. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710. $240,000.

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Move in condition!! 3BR, 2BA on over 1 acre. Huge fenced in backyard with deck. Call Russ Griffin’s cell 302-745-1083. $210,000

Great Deal! 3BR, tile entry, gas fireplace, master  BR on  1st floor, Large screened porch. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

Meticulously maintained! Just move in! 3BR w/ nice mstr Bdrm w/soaking tub, 2-car attached & 3 car detached garages. Call Steve Cooper’s cell 302-448-0047. $315,000.  

Lovely manicured irrigated lot! 4BR, 4 full baths, hardwood floors, Expanded family or in-law suite. Call Dana Caplan’s cell 302-2495169. $264,900. 

New roof in 2010! Hardwood flrs thru-out, extra lg screened porch,  wood insert in fireplace, blacktop driveway. Call Wanda Rash’s Cell 302-542-8024. $159,900.

Kitchen is a cook’s dream!  2nd & 3rd floors offer in-law suite/ game room, sunroom, hardwood floors, 3-car garage. Call Tammy Reagan’s cell 302-245-7355. $399,900.

GREAT PRICE!! 3 BR, 1 1/2 Bath Rancher, formal dining room.  Close to town but no town taxes. Call Dianne Reece’s cell 302-745-1151. $149,900.

Very tidy open floor plan! 3BR, family room w/ fireplace, Huge lot w/ above ground pool and deck. Call Dana Caplan’s cell 302-2495169. $229,000.

15 min. to Lewes, Longneck, Georgetown, Millsboro. On Morris Mill Pond next to Blue Heron Estates. Standard gravity septic. 3/4 ac lots. Invest in up-scale community now. For a short time lots starting $42,000. Call Ed Higgins’ cell 302-841-0283.

New home with water view!  3BR,  kitchen has hardwood flrs w/  island, corion counter tops. Call Angie Zebley’s cell 302-2287653. $139,900.

LOTS 13+/-  Acres can be subdivided into several lots. $205,000

Spacious home on shaded lot with full basement, 4 BR, 2 BA with garage 21.6x21. Call Michelle Mayer’s cell 302-249-7791. $129,900.

Fabulous 4BR contemporary! 1st flr master, granite counter, new carpet, full dry basement, landscaped, rear deck. Call Nancy Price’s cell 302-236-3619. $234,900.

33 +/- Acres. Owner’s will subdivide. $221,000. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489

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Massive rancher on oversized lot in Historic Bethel! Tons of living space, 4BR, sunroom, formal dining rm. $209,900. Call Lee Johnson’s cell 302-245-2145.

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So many updates to this country home! All new windows, doors, roof. Must see to much to list!! Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710. $155,000

Isolated Country Living! Fully subdividable 4 acre wooded tract bordering Trap Pond State Park. Attached & detached 2 car garages. Call Lee Johnson’s cell 302-245-2145. $270,000.

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Area Baby Pantry helps families

seaford Contest. The annual Seaford Halloween contest was held on Oct. 27 at the Seaford Fire Company. In the photo at left Abigail Guy, 5, of Laurel parades her clown costume as her mother Angela looks on. At right, Gabrielle Guy, 9, of Laurel shows her 1st-place trophy for ‘Funniest’ costume - a taco with sour cream.

CASINO NIGHT Laurel American Legion Post 19 Located on Rt. 24 Friday, November 19, 2010 7:00 pm til 12:00 am Black Jack - Money Wheel - Poker Tables Bridgeville contest - Bridgeville Lions Club held their Annual Halloween Costume Contest at Bridgeville Park on Oct. 30. Thane Keim, of Bridgeville, (dressed as pirate, Jack Sparrow) was the winner of the Bridgeville Lions Club Annual Halloween Costume Contest held on Oct. 30, at the Bridgeville Park and received a savings bond from the Lions Foundation. 

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Less than two years ago Pastor Kevin Gillespie of Greenwood United Methodist Church wanted to start a mission that would help the community in response to the tough economic times. The need for baby diapers, formula, food and cereal was a place to start since families with infants and small children had been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis, and so the idea for the Baby Pantry was born. As volunteer Fran Meadows relates, “the Baby Pantry was opened on a prayer”. The congregation responded with drives for the items needed by families with infants. Pastor Kevin put out the word to social service agencies, and several church members who worked at local hospitals also let people know about the pantry. Although it started slowly, the Baby Pantry has grown from a few families to 28 and growing. The Greenwood UMC congregation is a small one with only 120 members and the Baby Pantry is now serving a group of infants equal to 25 percent of the entire congregation. The Pantry now depends on other churches, organizations and individuals for donations. Fran Meadows notes “we are in desperate need. Sometimes we get so low that we just think, what’s going to happen, and God provides. We get a check or donation

and we are able to open another week.” Every Wednesday morning between 9 a.m. and noon, items are distributed to families in need free of charge. Although the original babies have aged out of the program, there is a growing influx of new children to be served. In addition to social service referrals, word of mouth has increased the numbers of babies helped. The Pantry now serves families from as far away as Lincoln, Milford, Harrington, Dagsboro and Salisbury. Given the current economy, the need is expected to grow. Your church or group can sponsor a baby shower to obtain disposable diapers, formula, baby food and cereal. Fran Meadows says “We thank God for everything we can get.” Between now and Christmas, Greenwood UMC is asking your church or group to have a “Baby Shower for Jesus”. When items have been collected, contact Greenwood UMC to arrange pick up. All items must be new. Food items must be unopened and with a good date. This ministry exists as a cooperative ministry between Greenwood UMC, Todd’s Chapel and the Ellendale Charge, in addition to many caring and generous people. For more information, contact Greenwood UMC at 349-4247 or pastordoug.harbaugh@gmail.com.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Rt. 13 & Discountland Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-4646

www.messiahsvineyard.org

Dr. Carl G. VincentSenior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes – Senior Pastor

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Will be Ministering

“The House of Praise” Musical A Thanksgiving Community Celebration

We would like to invite the entire community to raise up grateful hearts before the Lord to thank Him for his awesome goodness. Saturday, Nov. 20 at 7:00 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21 at 9:30 a.m. Refreshments will be served after Saturday’s Performance

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 13

Community Bulletin Board Bethel Christmas House Tour

The Bethel Christmas House Tour will be held on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 5 p.m. Pick up your map at the museum located on First Street. Tickets are $10 each. For tickets, call Pat at 875-2793 or email annilawrie@hotmail.com.  Proceeds benefit the Bethel Historical Society.

Salvation Army concert

To kick off its annual fund drive, the Salvation Army in Sussex County will sponsor the Pendel Brass, Singers and Timbrelists in concert. While admission is free, the performance is intended to draw attention to the Salvation Army and to its needs not only of contributions during the Christmas season but also of volunteers to ring bells next to its familiar red collection kettles. The Pendel Brass, Singers and Timbrelists will perform Saturday, Nov. 13, 6 p.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford. Admission to the concert, sponsored by the Salvation Army in Sussex County, is free. For details, call Debbie Engel, 628-2020.

iPad raffle at Nanticoke

The Look-In Glass Shoppe at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will raffle an iPad just in time for the holiday season. Tickets are on sale for a 16GB Wi-Fi Apple iPad with case and adapter, retailed at $540. Tickets are available for sale at The Look-In Glass Shoppe (located at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital) through Dec. 17 and cost $5 each or five for $20. The drawing will be held at noon on Dec. 17. For more information, call 6296611, ext. 4955. Payroll deductions are available for eligible employees.

Charity fundraiser

There will be a charity fundraiser to help with the mounting medical costs and

Laurel

related expenses of the Mike Cherrix’ family of Laurel. Mike is recovering from cancer treatment/orthopaedic surgery. The event will be Sunday, Nov. 21, from 1-5 p.m. at Station 7 at the Laurel Junction, located at the corner of Rts. 13 and 9, formerly Bargain Bill’s. The cost is $10 per ticket in advance or at the door. There will be live and silent auctions and entertainment by the Bo Dickerson Band. Snacks will be provided. A cash bar and full menu will also be available. For more information, ticket purchase, or to contribute items for auction call Laurie Short at 236-7642, Karen Cherrix at 875-7460 or Cheryl Macklin at 875-8505.

Basket Bingo at Seaford Elks

There will be a Basket Bingo fundraiser at the Seaford Elks Lodge, 8846 Elks Road on Friday, Nov. 12. Doors open at 6 p.m. Game starts at 7 p.m. Door prizes, raffle and 50/50 tickets. Food is available for purchase. Proceeds benefit Courtney Painter of Delaware Job’s Daughters. Advance tickets are $20; $25 at the door. Call Carol for tickets or information, 7454570.

Flapjack fundraiser

Applebee’s Flapjack Fundraiser Breakfast on Saturday, Nov. 13, 8-10 a.m., to benefit the Barracuda Swim Team.  Tickets are available through swim team members or at the door for $5 each.

Eat at IHOP to help the library

Enjoy a meal any time at the IHOP restaurant in Seaford and support the Greenwood Library. Simply fill out a comment card after eating and give it to the cashier as you pay. You will be given a special receipt which you then take to the Greenwood Library on your next visit.

Historical Society cookbook

The Seaford Historical Society has collected more than 340 recipes in the traditional, old-fashioned style and compiled them into an attractive, hardcover, keepsake cookbook, “A Recollection of Recipes.” Books are now on sale for $12. Featured are heirloom

Come join the Bethel Historical Society and be part of the specials that Wheaton’s will be offering to our guests on Thursday, Nov. 18, from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $5 per ticket. Specials include: discounts on all items except for furniture, door prizes and light refreshments. Wheaton’s is located on Stein Highway in the old Tull’s location. Call Helen at 877-0231 for tickets.

Eat pancakes, help the library

The friends group of the Bridgeville Public Library is raising money through area IHOP restaurants. Patrons can eat at IHOP in Seaford, Rehoboth Beach, Salis-

Now Open Sundays 300 Delaware Ave 302.875.0555

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Starting

November 7th

recipes, Civil War era recipes and Victorian Tea recipes. Books will be sold at the gift shops of the Gov. Ross Mansion at 1101 North Pine St. Ext. and the Seaford Museum at 203 High St., Seaford. For more information, call 628-9828.

Olde Seaford Block Watch dinner

The Olde Seaford Block Watch is holding a covered dish dinner on Monday, Nov. 15, at 6:30 p.m. The program will be “Safety for the Holidays.”It will be held at the Seaford City Hall. Use the ramp entrance. Drinks and desserts will be furnished. Call 629-5643 for information.

Fall Social

The Seaford High School Alumni Association is sponsoring their Fall Social at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades on Friday, Nov. 26, from 6 to 9 p.m. If you are a member of the Alumni, feel free to bring a friend who is a SHS graduate or attended Seaford schools. Light snacks and a cash bar will be available. For more information, call Donna Angell at 629-8077.

Crafty U

Last call for crafters to register for Crafty U on Nov. 13. Crafty U is a quarterly paper crafting school that will teach

4th Annual Distant neighbors

Wheaton’s special sale

Brunch • 11-2

www.EatGH.com

bury, Md. and Dover and then take their receipts and restaurant comment cards to the library or to Bridgeville Town Hall. The library will receive a payment from IHOP for every receipt and card that is collected. For details, call Pat McDonald, 337-7192.

Fair Trade Festival BENEFITS

Several Local Nonprofit Organizations & Artisans who Created the Products

FRIDAY

9 am to 7 pm

November 19th & 20th

SATURDAY

9 am to 3 pm

AffordAble ChristmAs shopping 32 in. Flat Unique Handmade Gifts Screen HD LCD from Around The World TV Raffle EtHniC LunCHES Fri. & Sat.

$5

00

Entertainment Popular Eastern Shore Flutist and Music Composer, Bryan Gall

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

122 E. Pine Streets, Georgetown, Del.

Directions: From rt. 113 n take N. Bedford St. (404/18) east into the Circle in Georgetown, a right at Citizens Bank, an immediate left on East Pine and a right on Academy St. From rt. 113 s take Rt. 9 east into the Circle in Georgetown, a right at Citizens Bank, an immedate left on East Pine and a right on Academy St.

www.stpaulsgeorgetown.org

PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

you six projects and techniques that you can transfer to your own crafting. Registration is $20 - includes a stamp, snacks, written instructions for each project and hands-on learning. Class runs from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Call 381-4372 for more information or e-mail jessica@learntostamp. com.

Master Gardener Lisa Arney

A special session is being offered at the Ross Mansion on Saturday, Nov. 13, starting at 10:30 a.m. Master Gardener Lisa Arney will guide and instruct each person attending with making a fall centerpiece for the Thanksgiving table. Arney will provide the materials which all are natural and are found growing in this area. Anyone participating in the class should bring clippers and gloves to use while working with the provided materials. Cost of the class is $25 per person. Attendance will be by reservation only. To make a reservation, call Pat Davidson at 629-4619. This is part of the Seaford Historical Society’s 150th anniversary celebration of the opening of the Ross Mansion. For further information call the SHS office at 628-9828.

Library poinsettia sale

The Friends of the Seaford Library & Cultural Center are taking orders for poinsettias arriving just in time for the upcoming holiday season.  Poinsettias, which are in 5” pots and available in red, white and pink, are $6 each or 4 for $20. Pick up is Friday, Dec. 3, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Warren Allen Room of the library. Delivery is available to local businesses and order forms are available at the circulation desk of the library. All orders must be prepaid and turned into the library no later than Monday, Nov. 22. All proceeds benefit the Seaford Library & Cultural Center. For more information, contact Connie Halter at 628-0554.

Magic Cards. • There is a Pre-K and Kindergarten “Story Time” at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center on Thursday, Nov. 18 and Thursday, Dec. 2, at 10:30 a.m. • Mary Anne Nichols book signing, “A Nichols Worth, Growing Up in Delaware” is Thursday, Nov. 18, from 10 a.m. to noon and 4 to 6 p.m. • There will be no “Baby Bookworms” on Tuesday, Nov. 23. • There will be no “Family Fun Night on Wednesday, Nov. 24. • There will be a Seaford Library and Cultural Center Board meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 23, at 6 p.m. • The Seaford Library and Cultural Center will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 25, for Thanksgiving. The Library will open for its regular business hours on Friday, Nov. 26.

Book signing

Mary Anne Nichols will be at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center to sign her book on Thursday, Nov. 18, from 10 a.m. to noon and 4 to 6 p.m. Her book is available for sale at Beaver Branch and Seaford Florists in Seaford and Avery Hall Insurance in Bridgeville.

AARP Driver Safety Program

An AARP Driver Safety Course will be given from 1 - 4 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 15 and Tuesday, Nov. 16, at the Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Rd., Seaford. The 2-day program, sponsored by AARP, stresses how older drivers may operate vehicles safely. For information and registration, call Mr. Devone at 629-8081. The cost is $12 for members and $14 for non-members.

Seaford Library

• The Science and Religion Book discussion will meet at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center Monday, Nov. 15, at 6 p.m. • The Seaford Library and Cultural Center will have “Baby Bookworms” on Tuesday, Nov. 16 and Tuesday, Nov. 30, at 10:30 a.m. This program introduces infants through 36 months old to the world of nursery rhymes and books. • The Seaford Library and Cultural Center will have Magic Cards Club Tuesday, Nov. 16 and Tuesday, Nov. 23, at 3 p.m. This is for teens who like to play

Homeschool Book Clubs

The Laurel Public Library monthly book clubs are designed especially for homeschoolers. Children must be at least 5-years-old to participate. Each club meets once a month on Wednesdays at 1 p.m. For details, call Becky Norton at 875-3184 or email rebecca.norton@lib.de.us.

LHS Class of 75 reunion

Laurel High School class of 1975 is planning their 35th class reunion and vol-

Basket Bingo Fundraiser

Friday, November 12, 2010 Seaford Elk’s Lodge, 8846 Elks Road

Doors Open at 6pm, Game starts at 7pm Food is available for purchase Door Prizes, Raffle, and 50/50 Tickets Proceeds Benefit Courtney Painter of Delaware Job’s Daughters

Advance Tickets $20, Tickets at Door $25 Call Carol: (302)745-4570

unteers are needed. For more information, call Melinda Rogers Tingle, 875-0355; Debbie Calloway, 875-4160; or Denise Elliott Cugler, 245-5631.

Children and teen programs

The following programs will be held for children and teens in November at the Laurel Public Library. • Triple T StoryTime, Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m. - Designed for toddlers (ages 2 and 3); brings stories, rhymes, music and movement together for a morning of active fun for your little ones. • After School Action, Thursdays, 3-5 p.m. - Students in grades 5-8 are invited to “After School Action” where they can enjoy video games, board games, crafts and snacks each Thursday. Homework help available. No programs on Nov. 11 and 25 because the library will be closed for Veterans Day and Thanksgiving. • Preschool Pajama Party, Monday, Nov. 22, 6:30 p.m. - Preschoolers and their families are invited to our “Preschool Pajama Parties,” a fun, active evening StoryTime program. Siblings welcome. • NightLife@the Library, Friday, Nov. 19, 7-9 p.m. - An after-hours, teens-only (grades 7-12) evening of video games, board games, pizza and good times. Teens new to our teen programs must come as a guest or pre-register. • Saturdays@the Library, Saturday, Nov. 20, 12:30 p.m. - Thanksgiving crafts, games and fun for kids in grades K-6. • Science After School, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 4 p.m. - Students in grades K-6 are invited to an afternoon of hands-on science fun.

Purse bingo

The Delaware Diamonds Blue Travel Ball team is holding a Longaberger and Thirty-One purse bingo on Friday, Nov. 19, at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Fire Hall. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. For tickets, call Tammy at 228-6298.

Laurel Business Persons of the Year The founders of Delmarva Digital have been named the Laurel Chamber of Commerce’s business people of the year. A banquet to honor Tim Smith and Alan Cole will be Wednesday, Nov. 17, at the Georgia House restaurant in Laurel. Social hour will start at 5:30 p.m. and dinner at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 and must be reserved by Friday, Nov. 12. For details or reservations, call the chamber of commerce, 875-9319.

Cub scouts seeking memorabilia

This year (2010) is the 100th anniversary of scouting. Cub Scout Pack 90 is looking for former scouts interested in joining then for an upcoming show and tell. They would love to see your scout uniforms, books, photos, patches, and hear your stories about your adventures with scouting. Contact Cub Master, Clifford Alpert at 228-2390.

Laurel Pride in bloom

You can now donate to purchase or maintain planters that change with the seasons. You can also donate for seasonal plantings or toward maintaining a planter in general. For more information, contact

The Laurel Football Boosters

Support John McCoy.

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010 Barbara Wise at 875-5537. Contributions of any amount can be made to Laurel Pride in Bloom, c/o The Bank of Delmarva, 200 E. Market St., Laurel, DE 19956.

Portsville UMC bazaar

Portsville United Methodist Church is holding their annual Fall Bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 13, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch, starting at 11 a.m., features oyster fritter sandwiches, chicken salad sandwiches, hot dogs, homemade vegetable beef soup, sodas and pie. There will be a bake table, white elephant table and hand-crafted items for sale, as well as raffle tickets available. The church is located on Dogwood Lane, Laurel. For information, call Karen at 8413596.

Holiday candle light tour

The Delmar Historic and Art Society (DHAS) will hold a holiday candle light tour on Friday, Dec. 10 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. This fundraiser is the first community-wide event to benefit and support the DHAS mission of offering the Delmar community a vision of the past while making a contribution to the future. Tickets are $8 and include coffee and cookies from 8 to 9 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge in Delmar. Tickets may be purchased at Wilmington Trust in Delmar, from a board member or by calling Faith at 846-2546. Raffle tickets will be sold at the Masonic Lodge for a horse and carriage ride courtesy of Gary Horseman.

Holiday craft show and sale

There will be a holiday craft show and sale on Saturday, Nov. 13, at 601 E. Jewell St., Delmar, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The show features wreaths, bears, angels, snowmen, gift baskets and more.

PAGE 15

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library present Bridgeville’s own Norman Reynolds at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at the Bridgeville Library. Reynolds was the honoree of the Friends’ 2009 fundraiser, “For the Love of Books.” Having taught English and French for 35 years in the Bridgeville/Woodbridge School District, Mr. Reynolds had a significant impact on many lives.

Museum, addmission to the park for a bus tour of the Festival of Lights. Also a stop at the Kruger Street Toy & Train Museum. Bus driver tip included. Cost: $349 per person/doubles; $435 single. Dec. 16 - “A Holiday Tradition Christmas Show” at the American Music Theatre sponsored by the Georgetown AARP. Cost: $90. Contact Hilda Parker at 856-2760. For more information, contact Rose at 629-7180.

Oyster fritter fry at Hope Lodge

Tour the White House

Literary readings by Mr. Reynolds

Hope Lodge #4 will be having an oyster fritter fry on Saturday, Nov. 20, at their hall on 6th Street, from 11 a.m. till 2 p.m. or until its gone. Oyster sandwiches, crab cakes and homemade cream of crab soup will be served. All are welcome.

Free Thanksgiving Dinner

Union United Methodist Church, 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, will hold their 12th Annual Free Community Thanksgiving Dinner at noon on Thursday, Nov. 25, in the Fellowship Hall. For details call 337-7409.

Delmar Christmas parade

The 2010 Delmar Christmas parade is Saturday, Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. with a rain date of Sunday, Dec. 12. Participation in the parade, which is sponsored by the Greater Delmar Chamber of Commerce is free. Trophies will be awarded to the winners. This year’s theme is “What Christmas Means to Me.” For a parade application, call the chamber of commerce voicemail at 846-3336, pick up an application at Delmar Town Hall, or download from www.delmar-chamberofcommerce. com. The application deadline is Dec. 8.

Book signing in Delmar

C.R. Webster, a Finksburg, Md. resident, will sign copies of her autobiography, “From the Cradle to the Cyclone Fence,” at The Edge Family Ministries in Delmar, on Friday, Nov. 19, at 6 p.m. Webster saw many forms of substance abuse as a nurse, but when addictions threatened her own son, it was no longer a job. After a shoulder injury dashed his dreams of playing college baseball, her son sought refuge in all the wrong places. Webster had to watch as he went from job to job, court date to court date, and eventually, incarceration. From the “Cradle to the Cyclone Fence,” tells a tragic story about a mother’s struggle to save her son and her decision to turn it over to God. For more information, contact James Branscum at 888-361-9473 or james@tatepublishing.com.

Citizen of the Year banquet

The Delmar Citizen of the Year banquet, sponsored by the Greater Delmar Chamber of Commerce, is Monday, Nov. 29, at 6:15 p.m., at the Delmar VFW. Tickets are $21 and may be purchased from the Bank of Delmarva (Delmar), Wilmington Trust (Delmar), or Delmar Town Hall through Nov. 22. The 2010 Delmar Citizen of the Year is Pam Schell of the Delmar Public Library.

Dinner Club

Join us for Dinner Club with the Good News Tour Ministries at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center on Thursday, Nov. 18, from 5 to 8 p.m. Cost is $6 per member and $8 for non-members. For more information, call 349-5237.

Seaford AARP trips

Dec. 6-8 - Wheeling Island Casino Hotel in Wheeling, W.V. Two meals per day including a dinner show. Tour the Glass Museum, Colonel Oglebay’s Mansion

Limited tickets are available for a White House Holiday Tour with the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. This trip is open to the general public. Delight in the beautiful holiday decorations during this wonderful tour. Enjoy an independent lunch and spend the afternoon visiting museums or strolling through the National Mall. The tour will be held on one of the following dates: Tuesday, Dec. 7; Thursday, Dec. 9; or Tuesday, Dec. 14, pending White House confirmation. Registrants will need to provide personal information for a background check. Bring photo identification on the day of tour. Adults ages 50 and up can become Adult Plus+ members for $18 per year. Benefits of membership include unlimited use of the Stephen J. Betze Library located on campus; exclusive advanced registration and special discounts on trips, courses and events; and a free drink with purchase of a meal in the dining hall on campus. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302856-5618.

Wellness Wednesday

Every third Wednesday of the month, from 2 to 4 p.m., Consumer Health Librarian for Sussex County, Linda Leonard, will be available at the Greenwood Library to help patrons locate current information and resources about health-related topics. The next scheduled date is Nov. 17. This is an excellent opportunity to get some of those nagging questions answered. This service is free and open to everyone.

Bridgeville Library

The following events will be held at the Bridgeville Public Library. • Story time - Tuesdays 11 a.m.- 2 to 4-year-olds; Thursday 11 a.m. - 4 to 6-year-olds; Lap Sit on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for ages 3 months to 2 years • Family Nights - Third Tuesday of each month, 6:30–8 p.m.; Nov. 16 Thanksgiving Delight; Dec. 21 - Holiday Extravaganza • Genealogy Discussion Group - Our Genealogy Discussion Group meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 10:30 a.m. For more information or special needs, contact the library at 3377401.

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PAGE 16

Delmar Alumni trip

Delmar Alumni Association members will be traveling with Holloway Tours to attend the American Music Theatre’s Christmas Show 2010 on Saturday, Nov. 13. Cost is $107 per person which includes bus transportation to Lancaster, Pa., smorgasbord lunch at Hershey Farm Restaurant and tickets to the Christmas Show. For more information or to request a reservation form, call Dot Wolfgang at 846-2366 or Jean Maloney at 875-2337.

Caribbean trip

Dr. Marie Wolfgang is sponsoring a winter getaway cruise to the Southern Caribbean as a fundraiser for Relay for Life, sailing from Port Liberty, New Jersey on Jan. 16, returning on Jan. 28. The itinerary includes Labadee, Samana, St. Thomas, Basseterre, St. Kitts, Antiqua and St. Maarten. Call 629-4471 for brochure.

Travel with Del Tech in November

Limited seats are available for upcoming trips sponsored by Corporate and Community Programs at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Find out what happens when a village tries to raise money for a tiny English church by gambling without the vicar’s knowledge in “Pool’s Paradise” on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at Rainbow Dinner Theatre in Lancaster, Pa. Visit Shady Maple Farmers Market in Lancaster, Pa., on Saturday, Nov. 20. Enjoy a smorgasbord of authentic Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine for lunch. View or buy original gifts, artwork and fair-trade items from around the world at the Holiday Gift Bazaar on Tuesday, Nov. 23, at Salisbury University. Delight in the special holiday exhibits at Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, Pa. on Sunday, Nov. 28. A Brandywine Christmas features an extensive model railroad, a Victorian dollhouse and thousands of ornaments.

‘White Christmas’ show trip

Laurel Senior Center is sponsoring a trip to the Christmas Show at Lancaster Apple Theater to see “White Christmas” on Wednesday, Nov. 24. Cost is $72 and includes transportation, meal and show.

Miracle of Christmas trip

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center is offering a motor coach trip to see the Miracle of Christmas at Sight & Sound Theater in Lancaster, Pa., on Tuesday, Dec. 7. Cost is $90 per person for members or $100 for non-members and includes transportation, show ticket and smorgasbord dinner at Hershey Farm Restaurant. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Sussex County Marines

Marine Corps League Detachment #780, Devil Dog Detachment, meets the first Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at American Legion Post #6, “the log cabin,” in Seaford.

USPS

United States Power Squadron (USPS) meets at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. For more information, contact C.M. Kohlenberg at 629-0687 or Rob Hutton at 628-0312.

SARA

The regular monthly meeting of the Sussex Amateur Radio Association (SARA) is Wednesday, Nov. 17, at the Marvel Museum in Georgetown. FCC license testing for all levels begins at 6:30 p.m. An informal social starts at 7 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 7:30. The meeting is open to anyone with an interest in amateur radio. For more information on this and other SARA club events, visit www.sussexamateurradio.com.

GFWC-Acorn Club

GFWC-Acorn Club is celebrating women veterans, Air Force, Army, Navy, Marine and Cadet nurses at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11, at the Methodist Manor House. Sara Lee Thomas is chairman for this meeting.

Craft fair at Del Tech

Get a head start on holiday shopping at the 27th Annual Craft & Art Fair on Friday, Nov. 12 and Saturday, Nov. 13 at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. From 3 to 7 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday in the William A. Carter Partnership Center, numerous crafters will offer everything from floral arrangements, country gifts, glasswork, and ceramics to needlework, woodcarvings, jewelry, dolls and more. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus + program at 856-5618.

Genealogical Society events 

On Saturday, Nov. 20, the society will hold a membership meeting. Matt Metz, a local surveyor, will speak on the aspects land records play in family research. This meeting will be held at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 875-5418 or visit www.scgsdelaware.org.

Couture & Class Fashion Show

Couture & Class, Saturday, Nov. 20, 11 a.m., Carter Partnership Center, Delaware Technical & Community College, George-

The Seaford Republican Women’s Club will meet on Thursday, Nov. 18, 10:30 a.m., at the Pizza King Restaurant. This is a departure from the usual fourth Thursday because of Thanksgiving Day conflict. The speaker will be Mary Costello, a representative of Hospice, to talk about the program here in Sussex County. For further information call Gloria Burton at 629-3470.

H.A.P.P.E.N.

The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearns Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization, will meet at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11, at the Seaford Museum. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Laurel Cub Scouts

Laurel Cub Scout Pack 90 holds their weekly meetings at 6:30 every Monday night, in the basement at Centenary UMC in Laurel. The Cub Scout program is designed for boys from 1st grade through 5th grade.

Seaford Widowed Persons

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 16, at 12:15 p.m. at the Georgia House in Laurel. The planned guest speaker will be Richard Hutchinson. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Holiday Open House

Join Santa and Mrs. Claus, Frosty, Rudolph and the elves for pictures, games, cookies and hot chocolate from 5 to 7 p.m.

town. Event includes shopping bazaar, online auction. Tickets are $35/person; $225/ table for eight. For information or to purchase tickets, visit www.dtcc.edu/owens/fashionshow/ or call 855-1659.

Adult Plus activities in November

Form friendships, improve computer skills or develop a new hobby by participating in activities offered in November by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Discover how to use the Internet in First Steps to the Internet on Nov. 16. Develop the knowledge needed to create professional documents in First Steps to Microsoft Word on Nov. 23. Learn to use text and graphics to create presentations in First Steps to PowerPoint on Nov. 30. Novice to intermediate artists can receive informal instruction in Portrait Workshop on Thursdays, Nov. 16 to Jan. 6, from 1 to 4 p.m. Discover how to add a special touch to celebrations with easy to create hors d’oeuvres specialties on Tuesday, Nov. 16 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy hands-on demos and prepare tasty recipes in Easy & Elegant Desserts on Tuesday, Nov. 16 and Wednesday, Nov. 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 856-5618.

Submit Bulletin Board items by noon Thursday, at least one week before. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email to ­editor@mspublications.com.

Seaford Republican Women

Needlepoint Guild 

The Delaware Seashore Chapter of the American Needlepoint Guild meets on the first Monday of each month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cheer Community Center in Georgetown. For details, call Linda at 644-1523.

on Monday, Dec. 6, at the Georgetown office of Delaware National Bank. For more information, call 855-2406.

The

Lone Elm Country Shop

10 -50 Off %

%

The Shop will be open for a

Clearance

e l a S Christmas Hours

Will Vary Thurs., Fri., Sat. 12 - 5:30 Sun. 1-5

Arrangements, Wreaths, Baskets, Hanging Lights and Antique Items

22507 Bridgeville Hwy. Seaford, DE

Ph: 302-629-4165 (leave message) Cell: 302-245-0744 (for appt.)

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 17

Church Bulletins ‘Fresh Connection’ services

Centenary UMC, located at the corner of Market and Poplar Streets in Laurel, is starting a new service, “Fresh Connection.” This service will be held the third Saturday of each month through May, at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. For more information, contact Blair Hall at 8758106.

200 Years of Christian Service

Sailors Bethel United Methodist Church will celebrate its 200th anniversary on Nov. 14. The service will begin at 2 p.m. There will be special music featuring the Jones Boys. The Rev. Randy Booth of Wisconsin will be our special speaker. Fellowship will follow at the community house following the service.

Clarence Street memorial service

There will be a memorial service on Saturday, Nov. 20, at the Clarence Street Church of God. It will be a celebration of life for those who have gone before us. The service starts at 5 p.m. with Bishop Carlton Cannon officiating. All are welcome to attend. For more information, call Pastor Cannon at 4480852, Beatrice Jenkins at 858-8265, Roberta Posley at 448-0755 or Esther Roberts at 228-7036.

Free weekly soup social

A free weekly soup social is held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Christ United

Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel. All are welcome. For more information, call the church office daily, 9 a.m. to noon, at 875-4233.

Magi Choral Festival tickets on sale Tickets for the 2010 Magi Choral Festival are available at several locations. The Magi Choral Festival features the National Christian Choir and the Magi Children’s Choir. The event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 20, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 21, at 2 p.m. at the Wicomico High School Auditorium in Salisbury. Tickets are $15 and are available in Salisbury at The Gospel Shop and all branches of First Shore Federal Savings and Loan. Ticket proceeds go directly to the Christian Shelter and Joseph House Center, two Christian crisis ministries serving the needy on the Lower Eastern Shore. For more information, call Bonnie Luna at 410-749-1633.

Operation Christmas Child

This is the fifth year that St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seaford will be participating in filling shoe boxes for Operation Christmas Child, which is a project of Samaritan’s Purse.  All boxes are designated for either a boy or a girl within a certain age group. They should be brought to the church by Sunday, Nov. 14.   

Recreational Night at Trinity UMC

Trinity UMC near Trap Pond in Laurel will be having Recreational Night (Rec night) every Tuesday when school is in session. These events will start at 6:30 p.m. and end at 8.  All teens are invited and there will be games including basketball and board games.

Christmas yard sale

Christ United Methodist Church in Laurel will hold a Christmas Yard Sale on Saturday, Nov. 13, from 7 to 11 a.m.

Parish Mission

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Seaford is sponsoring a “Parish Mission” at the end of November. The Parish Mission begins Sunday, Nov. 28, at 6:30 p.m. and continues each of the next four evenings at 6:30 p.m., concluding on Thursday evening. For details call the church office at 629-3591.

Evening worship and Bible study

A study, “Revelation and The End Times: Unraveling God’s Message of Hope,” will be offered on Sunday evenings beginning Oct. 31 at Union United Methodist Church in Bridgeville. Each session is from 6 to 7:15 p.m. and will be held in the Colonial Room. Nov. 14: The Other World: Heaven and Hell Nov. 21: Raising the Dead

Nov. 28: The Afterlife: The Rapture, the Millennium, and the New Heaven and the New Earth The book, which accompanies the study, is available in the church office. Sign-up is not required and attendees are invited to come to individual sessions as their schedule allows.

Family and Friends Day

Mt. Calvary United Methodist Church in Bridgeville, will observe Family and Friends Day on Sunday, Nov. 14, at 4 p.m. The theme is, “Letting Go of the Past and Embracing the Future,” from Phillipians 3:13. A fellowship meal will be served before the service at 2:30 p.m.  Guest preacher is Pastor C. Guy Robinson of Jones Tabernacle Baptist Church, Baltimore. Pastor Robinson received formal music training at Morgan State University. As a composer, his music has been recorded by numerous gospel music artists. He is also the lead organizer of Authentic Revelation Ministries.  The public is invited to join in this celebration of family and friends.  There will be a free will offering. For more information, call 337-8198 or 542-5752.

Advent and Christmas worship

Union United Methodist Church in Bridgeville will hold the following Advent and Christmas worship opportuni-

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Centenary UMC

www.laurelcentenaryumc.org

875-3983

200 W. Market Street, Laurel, Del. Contemporary Worship, 8:45 a.m. Traditional Worship, 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, for ALL Ages, 9:45 a.m. Wednesdays: Bible Study 1 p.m.; & Youth Ministry 6:45 p.m.

Stein Highway Church of God

425 E. Stein Highway, at Market Street Seaford, DE 19973 Lighted Pathway Pre-School, Infant to age 6

Mrs. Casey Davis, Director Worship: Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study & Youth Service 7:00 p.m. E-mail: SteinHwyCOG.gmail.com Web page: www.steinhwychurchofgod.com Facebook: Stein Highway Church of God Pastor Robert W. Clagg • Church 302-629-8583

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Seaford

C H R IST IA N C H U R C H of

22581 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship 10:30 (Nursery & Jr. Church)

Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Service 7:00 p.m.

Know, Grow, Show & Go in our Walk with Jesus Christ

Centrally located at

14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org Pastor Timothy Dukes, Senior Pastor Pastor John Lanzone, Youth/Family Pastor

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: Bible Study 7 PM

PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

ties. All events are free and the public is cordially invited. Come and bring a friend. Nov. 28 - Blue Christmas Gathering, 2 p.m. Dec. 5 - Capital Ringers Concert, 3 p.m. Dec. 12 - “Star Journey” - a dramatic children and youth Christmas program Dec. 19 - Choir Cantata, 7 p.m. Dec. 24 - Silent Holy Communion, 6 p.m.; Christmas Eve worship, 7 p.m. For more information, call 337-7409.

St. Luke’s Church news

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church offers its newsletter online and also via email. “Luke’s Letter” is published quarterly and will be available online at www. stlukesseaford.org. You can also join the email list if you send a request to StLukesEpis@comcast.net. St. Luke’s services are Sunday, Holy Eucharist at 9 a.m., and Thursday evenings, Holy Eucharist and Healing at 6 p.m.   

Weekly Bible Study

A weekly Bible study is being held every Wednesday night from 7:15-8:15 p.m. at the Days Inn, Rt. 13 South, Seaford (next to KFC). Family oriented Bible lessons for all ages. Sunday worship service is at 12 noon. Elder Cornell Johnson, of Jesus The Christ Apostolic Ministries, is pastor. Call 628-0349 or 302-344-9672 for more information.

Bible Study

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seaford is conducting a Bible Study every Tuesday morning from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. in the Parish House.  

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seaford meets every Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Parish House. They are also studying the booklet, The Story of Scripture.  For more information, call St. Luke’s church office at 629-7979.

Music Dinner Gala Concert

Christ the Cornerstone Community Church is having their Annual Music Dinner Gala Concert on Saturday, Nov. 13, featuring Jim and Patty Jennette. Tickets are $7.50 per person.

Reserve your ticket in advance by calling 875-5415. Dinner includes roast beef and ham and will start promptly at 5:30 p.m. No tickets will be sold at the door.

Woodland Homecoming service

The Woodland United Methodist Church annual Homecoming service is Sunday, Nov. 14, at 2:30 p.m. Guest speaker is the Rev. Barbara Wilson and Reunion gospel group will provide special music. A covered dish dinner will follow in the Fellowship Hall. There will be no morning worship service.

Fellowship seeks teen essays

The Vine & Vessels Christian Writer’s Fellowship is sponsoring a special “I Love to Write Day” contest for young writers. Under the topic of “My Dream is Bigger than my Environment,” youth between the ages of 10 and 16 can submit an essay with the potential of winning money and other prizes. Submissions must be between 300 and 500 words in length. The entries will be judged on creativity, content, grammar, spelling and topic/subject conformity. Prizes will be awarded on Saturday, Nov. 20, at the Vine and Vessels meeting at the Seaford District Library. Entrants must be in attendance in order to win. Mail essay entries to: Vine & Vessels, P.O. 1716, Seaford, DE 19973. For more information contact Betty Ricks-Jarman at 448-5939, or Joyce Sessoms at 382-9904.

Father Daughter Dance

Mt. Olivet UMC Father Daughter Dance tickets are available. The dance will be held Friday, Jan. 28, from 7 to 9:30 p.m., at the Seaford Volunteer Fire Dept. For tickets, which are $7.50 each, contact David and Becky Genshaw at 629-9014.

Christmas House fundraiser

The Christmas House Fundraiser at Christ the Cornerstone Community Church in Laurel, will reopen on Thursday, Nov. 11 and stay open through Saturday, Dec. 18. Hours are Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There are designer wreaths plus many new items for the season.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the whole family 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY EVENING

8:30am Worship / Nursery 9:45am Classes for all ages 11:00am Worship / Kids Church & Nursery 7:00pm Evening Service

6:45 AWANA (K-grade 6), Catalyst Youth (gr. 7-12), DivorceCare support group, 7:00 Intercessory Prayer, Men’s Group

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE

(302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburyworship.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458

United Methodist Church

Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. Nursery Provided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s

Episcopal Church Front & King St., Seaford, DE

629-7979

Holy Eucharist: Sunday, 9:00 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Pastor

2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

GETHSEMANE

Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Pastor - O. Kenneth Scheller 302-875-0140

A Safe Sanctuary & Stephen’s Ministry Church Rev. E. S. Mallozzi

All are welcome to worship here every Sabbath.

302-875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Union

Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church

26295 Sussex Highway (south on 13), Seaford, DE

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Welcome…

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Contemporary Services ... 8:45 & 10:30 a.m. Nursery Care & Children’s Church Provided Corner of Woodland Ferry Rd. & Stein Hwy., 4 miles West of Seaford • 629-2862 Jeans Expected! No Halos Required!

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouseld.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 1:30 p.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 19

Obituaries Mary E. Farrelly, 80

Mary E. Farrelly of Laurel, passed away at her home on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010. Mary was born in Laurel, a daughter of the late Isaac Cordrey and Maude Mitchell Cordrey. Mrs. Farrelly had worked at many of the local restaurants as a waitress. She was a 70-year member of Shiloh Community Church in Laurel and a member of the American Legion Ladies Auxiliary, Post #19. A loving wife and mother, she is survived by her husband, Brian Farrelly; their sons, Brian E. Farrelly and wife Virginia, Donald W. Farrelly, Michael L. Farrelly and wife Ruth, all of Laurel and James E. Farrelly and wife Kelly of Seaford; a brother, Melvin Cordrey; and a sister, Peggy Ralph, both of Laurel. Eleven grandchildren, 18 greatgrandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews also survive her. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her brothers, James and Richard Cordrey and sisters, Louise McGee and Grace Holloway. A funeral service was held on Friday, Nov. 5, at Shiloh Community Church, Laurel. The Rev. Mark Erskine officiated. Interment was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel. Contributions may be made in Mrs. Farrelly’s memory to Shiloh Community Church, Shiloh Church Rd., Laurel, DE 19956. Arrangements are in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel. Online condolences may be made to the family by visiting www.hsdfuneralhome.com.

Russell E. Jackson, 72

Russell Edward Jackson of Laurel, passed away on Sunday, Oct. 31, 2010, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford.  Russell had been a poultry grower for Allen’s Family Foods. He enjoyed shooting pool, NASCAR, carpentry and making things. His biggest hobbies and interest were his wife and children. He was preceded in death by his parents, Garland and Florence Jones Jackson.  He is survived by his wife, Shirley Ann Jackson; 5 children, Darlene Burns and husband Lawrence of Baltimore, Md., Linda Whitelock of Mardela Springs, Md., Michael Russell Jackson and wife Lisa of Seaford, Barbara Ann Wooten and husband Billy of Dagsboro, and June Shirley Jackson and companion Larry Samuelson of Laurel; one sister, Margaret Smith of Powellville, Md.; 9 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and his beloved feline friend, Blue Girl. He is also survived by nieces, nephews, cousins, extended family and friends.  A funeral service was held on Friday, Nov. 5, at Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro. The Rev. Robert Hudson officiated. Arrangements are in the care of Watson Funeral Home.

Willard F. ‘Buddy’ Marvel, 69

Willard F. ‘Buddy’ Marvel of Laurel, died Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford. Born in Milford, the son of the late Blossom Juanita Russell and William Thomas Marvel III, he was a custodian in the Seaford School District before retiring.

Buddy was a member of Portsville United Methodist Church, Portsville, where he served as a trustee. He also served in the Army Reserve. He is survived by his wife, Rita Wright Marvel; two sons, Joseph Todd Marvel and wife Cynthia of Magnolia and Michael W. Marvel and wife Joy of Seaford; 2 grandchildren, Sage Michael Marvel and Courtney Lord; and a great-grandchild, Justin Michael Lord. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his twin brother, William T. Marvel IV. Services were held Sunday, Nov. 7, at Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford. The Rev. Arthur Smith officiated. Burial was in Bethel Cemetery, Bethel.

Ann B. Nocar, 77

Ann B. Nocar of Laurel, died Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010. Ann is survived by her husband of 38 years, Albert F. Nocar; a stepson, Richard Nocar; and two grandchildren. Funeral services were Monday, Nov. 8, at Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Laurel.

Donald “Scott” Weaver, 48

Donald “Scott” Weaver of Seaford, died Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010. Donald worked in Salisbury for University Tire. He loved Nascar racing and was a Dale Jr. fan. He also loved drag racing and was a member of the American Pool Association and the Finisher Pool Club.  He is survived by two daughters, Shannon and Kelly; three grandchildren, Blake and Matthew Dean and Anthony Weaver; his parents, Donald Miles Weaver and Billy Louise Weaver of Seaford; a brother, Kenneth Miles Weaver of Hebron, Md.; a sister, Monica Ogel of Seaford; and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were Saturday, Nov. 6, at Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Henlopen Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations to the American Diabetes Association.

Patricia Ann Rizia, 67

Patricia Ann (Patsy) Rizia of Federalsburh, Md., died Nov. 7, 2010, at Talbot Hospice House in Easton. Born April 2, 1943, in Easton, she was the daughter of the late Lacy Dorman of Federalsburg and Christine Figurski of Rehoboth. Patsy is survived by her husband of 18 years, Junior N. Rizia of Federalsburg; son Harry R. Lewis and his wife, Terry, two granddaughters, Meghan and Caitlyn of Milton, Del.; Stepson Allen N Rizia of Easton; sister-in-law Helen Wagner and her husband, Smiley, of Easton. She took early retirement from the Dupont Company in Seaford, with 27 years of service. She started on shift work and retired as clerical assistant. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her stepmother, Margaret Dorman, of Federalsburg. At Patsy’s request, there will be no service. If you would like to make a donation, please do to Talbot Hospice Foundation, 586 Lynwood Dr., Easton, MD 21601.

James B. Seabrease Sr.

James B. Seabrease Sr. of Seaford, passed away peacefully on Sunday, Nov. 7, 2010, at his residence. He was born July 28, 1939, in Bridgeville, son of the late Otho and Lulu (Layton) Seabrease. Mr. Seabrease was a Sussex County resident all of his life. He loved firearms and playing pool. He enjoyed a long military career with the U.S. Army retiring in 1977 as a Sergeant First Class. He served both in Vietnam and Korea. Mr. Seabrease was Seabrease a member of VFW Post 4961 where he spent many an hour. He also loved spending time with his family and friends. In addition to his parents, Mr. Seabrease was preceded in death by his brother, William Seabrease and his sister, Betty Mitchell. He is survived by his son, James B. Seabrease Jr. and his fiancé, Carol Lynn Brown both of Seaford; and two grandchildren, Thaddeus Seabrease and Christian O’Neal, both of Seaford. A chapel service with military honors will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 12, at Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery, 26669 Patriots Way, Millsboro. Arrangements are in the care of Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Bridgeville. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions to VFW Virgil Wilson Post 4961, 4961 Middleford Rd., Seaford, DE 19973. Visit the life memorial webpage for Mr. Seabrease and sign the online guestbook at www.parsellfuneralhomes.com.

James E. Quick Sr., 69

James E. “Jimmy” Quick Sr., 69, of Pocomoke City, Md., died suddenly, Sunday, Nov. 7, 2010, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born Jan. 26, 1941 in Laurel, he was the son of the late Gilbert and Evelyn (Mitchell) Quick. Mr. Quick graduated from Laurel High School and was a life member of the Pocomoke Elks Lodge #1624. He enjoyed fishing and loved his children and grandchildren. He retired three times, 30 years with A&P as the produce manager, 10 years with Beauchamp Construction, and Quick 11 years with Lankford Sysco. Following retirement, he and his son worked together providing rental housing. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Donna Marriner Quick; a son, James “Jay” E. Quick Jr. and his wife Charma, all of Pocomoke City; a daughter, Teresa “Terry” Quick Thompson of Camden-

Wyoming; a sister, Barbara Q. Smith and her husband Wayne of Laurel; two grandsons, Tyler and Devin Quick of Pocomoke City; three nieces, Shelly Dayton and her husband John of Westminster, Md., Donna Breasure and her husband Bobby of Delmar and Tracy Smith of Laurel; two greatnephews, Lucas and Cole Dayton; and his faithful Shitzu, Baylee. Family and friends may call at Holloway Funeral Home in Pocomoke City, Wednesday, Nov. 10 from 6 to 8 p.m., where there will be an Elks Memorial Service at 6 p.m. A funeral service, officiated by the Rev. Connie Pruitt, will be held at 2 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 11, at the funeral home. Interment will follow in Wattsville Methodist Cemetery in Wattsville, Va. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Pocomoke EMS, P.O. Box 29, Pocomoke City, MD 21851 or the American Heart Association, Eastern Shore Chapter, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058. Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, 107 Vine St., Pocomoke City, MD 21851. To send condolences to the family, visit www.hollowayfh.com.

Marlene Elizabeth Owens, 76

Marlene Elizabeth Owens of Chestertown, MD died Thursday, Oct. 28, 2010. She was 76 years old. Born on October 21, 1934 in Laurel, Delaware, she was the daughter of the late Warren and Kathalene Hastings Boyce. Mrs. Owens was a Loan Review Specialist for the People’s Bank of Kent County until 1984. Marlene was a member of the Christ United Methodist Church in Chestertown, MD. Mrs. Owens enjoyed sewing, reading, traveling and crafts, especially dolls. She loved collecting lighthouses, and other related items. Mrs. Owens is survived by her husband, E. Roy Owens, a daughter, Susan Broyles and her fiancé, Charles Ashley of Chestertown, MD; a son, Jeffrey Elliott and his wife, Cheryl of Seaford, DE; a step-son, Alan Owens and his wife, Melissa of Columbia, SC; a step-son, Dean Owens and his wife, Elisa of Contoocook, NH; a step-son, Edward Owens and his wife, Kathy of Laurel, DE; as well as 12 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. Relatives and friends called on Sunday evening at Fellows, Helfenbein & Newnam Funeral Home in Chestertown, Md. Friends and family also called at Christ United Methodist Church, Chestertown, Md., on Monday, Nov. 1, at 10 a.m., before the 11 a.m. funeral services. Interment was in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Laurel, Del., on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 at 12 noon. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to Christ United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 262, Chestertown, MD 21620; The Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc., P.O. Box 451429, Atlanta, GA 31145-9429, or the Alzheimer’s Association, P.O. Box 96011, Washington D.C. 20090. Arrangements were handled by Fellows, Helfenbein & Newnam Funeral Home Chestertown, Md. www.fhnfuneralhome.com

PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Grant will protect state archives ABA awards racial justice grant

these targeted funds will be used to purchase foreclosed homes at a discount and to rehabilitate or redevelop them in order to respond to rising foreclosures and falling home values. Today, 95 cents of every dollar from the first round of NSP funding is obligated – and is in use by communities, buying up and renovating homes and creating jobs.

RAM DELI MARKET & Central Ave. Package Store

302

875-9233

511 North CeNtral ave. laurel, De 19956

Full Line of Groceries Beer - Wine - Liquors hot & CoLd deLi

New Releases Starting at & Hot Movie $ 4.99 Hits VIDEO GAMES Starting at $

7.99

Nintendo Wii Play Station 2 • Play Station 3 X Box • X-Box 360

OVER 600 TITLES!

We Receive New Titles Every Month!

County employees help Habitat

Nearly two dozen Sussex County government employees traded in their computers and calculators for hammers and hardhats recently to benefit a local charity and needy family. County employees in October volunteered their time to Sussex County Habitat for Humanity by helping build a house at the corner of Greene Avenue and West Sixth Street in Laurel. Volunteers gave six hours of their ‘sweat’ to hang walls and perform other jobs in the home that benefits a single mother and her four children, who hope to move in by Christmas. The Build Day is the latest partnership between Sussex County government and Habitat for Humanity, a non-profit organization whose mission is to build decent, affordable homes in partnership with lowincome families. In March, the County donated to Habitat for Humanity the use of two vacant houses near Georgetown, which will be used as temporary housing for families waiting to move into their new homes and as quarters for AmeriCorps volunteers.

The Portsville Annual Fall Bazaar Saturday, Nov. 13, 2010 Dogwood Lane, Laurel

8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Lunch Starting at 11 a.m. Menu: Oyster Fritters, Chicken Salad, Vegetable Soup, Hot Dogs, Baked Goods & Homemade Pies White Elephant Table & Raffles!

Hand-Crafted Items On Sale!

Criminal Justice Council that certifies compliance with the Declaration will be given preference over any applicant that does not certify compliance. The Declaration is available at http://cjc.delaware.gov. The Declaration of Leading Practices began to take shape in 2007 when the Delaware Supreme Court and the Delaware Criminal Justice Council co-sponsored a two-day summit on racial and ethnic fairness. The summit brought together more than 70 key stakeholders from state government and the community, representing every element of the justice system from arrest to prisoner re-entry, to meet with state and national experts in criminal justice and juvenile justice systems. In 2008, the Sentencing Project recognized the summit as an administrative best practice for state agencies. Justice Ridgely said, “This grant recognizes Delaware’s ground-breaking work to protect civil rights and promote racial and ethnic fairness in our criminal justice system. It will allow us to move forward with achieving and maintaining throughout Delaware the important leading practices which the Delaware Criminal Justice Council has endorsed.”

Delaware will receive a portion of $330 million to develop a new generation of tests designed to provide ongoing feedback to teachers during the course of the school year, measure annual student growth, and move beyond narrowlyfocused bubble tests. The tests will assess students’ knowledge of mathematics and English language arts from third grade through high school. The grant requests are part of the Race to the Top competition and will be awarded to the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) and the SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) in the amounts of approximately $170 and $160 million respectively. Delaware is part of both coalitions. The PARCC coalition will test students’ ability to read complex text, complete research projects, excel at classroom speaking and listening assignments, and work with digital media. PARCC will also replace the one end-of-year high stakes accountability test with a series of assess-

ments throughout the year that will be averaged into one score for accountability purposes, reducing the weight given to a single test administered on a single day, and providing valuable information to students and teachers throughout the year. The SMARTER coalition will test students using computer adaptive technology that will ask students tailored questions based on their previous answers. SMARTER will continue to use one test at the end of the year for accountability purposes, but will create a series of interim tests used to inform students, parents and teachers about whether students are on track. For both consortia, these periodic assessments could replace already existing tests, such as interim assessments that are in common use in many classrooms today. Moreover, both consortia are designing their assessment systems with the substantial involvement of experts and teachers of English learners and students with disabilities to ensure that these students are appropriately assessed.

Grants will improve assessments

CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS TODAY. DON’T HESITATE! OLD Address

U.S. Senators Tom Carper and Ted Kaufman (both D-Del.) recently announced $5 million in funding to help reverse the effects of the foreclosure crisis in Delaware. The funding was made possible through the U.S. Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Neighborhood Stabilization Program and will provide targeted emergency assistance to state and local governments to acquire, redevelop or demolish foreclosed properties. “Communities across Delaware, and across the nation, were hit hard by the foreclosure crisis,” said Senators Carper and Kaufman. “This HUD funding will help speed up the process of redeveloping and reselling foreclosed properties, nurturing our communities back to their former health. The Neighborhood Stabilization Program also helps prevent similar problems in the future by offering economic assistance and housing counseling for low income homebuyers. It’s programs like these that will ultimately help our state get back on track.” The funding is provided under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. To date, there have been two other rounds of NSP funding: the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA) provided $3.92 billion and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) appropriated an additional $2 billion. Like those earlier rounds of NSP grants,

Grant helps area neighborhoods

The American Bar Association has selected Delaware as one of four states to receive a two-year $24,000 grant to support a Racial Justice Improvement Project. The grant will allow Delaware to enact key practices to support a justice system that strives to be fair, efficient and accountable. The grant will build on the state’s existing efforts to protect civil rights and promote racial and ethnic fairness. In April 2010, the Delaware Criminal Justice Council, which is dedicated to making positive changes throughout Delaware’s criminal justice system, unanimously approved a “Declaration of Leading Practices to Protect Civil Rights and Promote Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Criminal Justice system in Delaware,” which has been recognized as a model for other states. The Declaration addresses early intervention strategies to protect civil rights and to promote racial and ethnic fairness, civilian and internal complaint processes, management of the use of force by law enforcement, bias-free decision making, personnel and data management, and community outreach. Effective Jan. 1, 2011, any applicant for a grant administered by the Delaware

Name: _________________________________________ Old Address: ____________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

NEW Address

such as temperature and humidity. The results of the Heritage Health Index (HHI), found that 80 percent of collecting institutions throughout the country did not have an emergency plan for their collections or trained staff to carry it out. They concluded that approximately 190 million objects could be lost in just a few short years without immediate attention. The following workshop will be held at the Lewes Public Library: Collections Management: Essential Policies and Procedures for Cultural Institutions - Thursday, Dec. 2 - Discover how to design and implement a collections management policy and handling and maintenance guidelines. You will also learn how to delegate staff responsibilities and work with volunteers and boards of directors. To register, call 302-739-4748, ext. 5116 or e-mail beth-ann.ryan@state.de.us.

MOVING?

The Delaware Division of Libraries (DDL) has been awarded a $220,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences (IMLS) to train staff and volunteers in small museums, libraries, archives and historical societies to properly care for collections that are important to their communities. Delaware is one of only five states to receive this grant.  A large portion of the grant funding will be used for staff education. The funding will also be used to develop a methodology and custom databases for cultural heritage organizations to properly inventory their collections. Working with leading Delaware institutions, such as the University of Delaware, will allow for sustainability of the project past the end of the grant period. A portion of the grant will be used to purchase kits with equipment to measure conditions which can damage collections,

Name: _________________________________________ New Address: ___________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

Mail to the Seaford/Laurel Star Circulation, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE or call Karen direct at 752-4454

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 21

Health Respiratory Care Week celebrated

In honor of national Respiratory Care Week, the respiratory care students at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus celebrated with an open house on Oct. 27. In this fast-growing field of cardiopulmonary science, respiratory therapists help people manage a wide variety of breathing problems and the prevention of chronic lung disease. A respiratory therapist cares for a diverse group of patients ranging from newborn to the elderly, working in a variety of health care environments, including hospitals, diagnostic laboratories, emergency rooms and home care. The open house featured the various types of equipment used by the students in the instructional lab every week. Students also demonstrated their skill with and knowledge of the equipment and answered questions. For information about the fully accredited respiratory care program at Delaware Tech, call Jay Little, dept. chair, at 8555935.

Research center receives grant

The Center for Pediatric Research (CPR) at the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children was recently awarded an additional 5-year, $9.5-million Center for Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Center for Research Resources (NCRR). This competitive award will allow Nemours to continue to expand the CPR and support the recruitment of additional faculty to this diverse pediatric clinical and research facility. The Center for Pediatric Research was established to not only sustain translational research programs by clinicians and scientists, but also to build independent, cutting-edge programs at Nemours. This funding has assisted Nemours Biomedical Research in the development of eight such Center programs, including Applied Clinical Genomics, Cardiac, Orthopedic, Childhood Cancer, Clinical Diagnostics, Clinical Pharmacology, Pediatric Auditory and Speech, and Pediatric Lung Research. “Grant applications and renewals are intensely competitive,” said Dr. Thomas H. Shaffer, director and principal investigator of the CPR. “Grants like this from the NIH help fulfill a main goal of the Center for Pediatric Research—to attract some of the best and brightest translational researchers to Delaware, while building state-of-the-art

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pediatric research programs and expanding our existing programs on pediatric disorders.”

‘Coping with the Holidays’

A special workshop on “Coping with the Holidays,” offered by Delaware Hospice will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 16, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Cancer Care Building, Seaford. The grief journey can be difficult to navigate, especially during the holiday season. Participants will find help in coping through the discussion and ideas presented at this workshop, and each will receive a free copy of James Miller’s book, “How will I get through the Holidays.” There is no fee for this workshop which is offered as a community service by Delaware Hospice. However, registration is required. Register by calling Paul Ganster, LCSW, at 357-7147 or email pganster@ delawarehospice.org.+

Breast cancer support group

Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition, Inc. (DBCC) has expanded its Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey, a program for women newly-diagnosed with breast cancer, by partnering with Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center in Seaford. The free, monthly program is offered at the Cancer Center located at 801 Middleford Road, Seaford, the third Thursday of each month from 3 to 4 p.m. The program is facilitated by Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center professional staff - Terri A. Clifton, MS, NCC, Cancer Care coordinator; Mary Brown, RN, DSN, manager Cancer Care Center; and Wendy Polk, nutritionist – with assistance from Lois Wilkinson, DBCC special projects manager, who helps facilitate the program at Bayhealth. Of particular value to newly-diagnosed women is DBCC’s Peer Mentor Program through which they are paired with a long-term survivor for one-on-one support. To learn more about Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center, call Lois Wilkinson at 672-6435. Registration is required and light refreshments and small gifts are provided.

Cancer Support Group

The Wellness Community-Delaware offers a general cancer support group for people affected by cancer and their loved

Mark Evangelista, M.D. Board Certified in Internal Medicine

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ones held at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. The monthly support group meets in the second floor conference room of the Cancer Care center on the third Monday of each month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. The next meeting takes place on Nov. 15 at 4:30 p.m. The Wellness Community, an affiliate of the Cancer Support community, is dedicated to helping people affected by cancer enhance their health and well-being through participation in a professional program of emotional support and hope. Facilitators are trained mental health professionals with a master’s degree or more. Call 645-9150 for information or to register. All support groups offered at the Wellness Community are free of charge. This program is made possible by the support of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital.

Competition to improve school meals

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced the Recipes for Healthy Kids Challenge to improve school meals and the health of children across the nation through the creation of exciting new recipes for inclusion on school lunch menus. The competition will draw on the talents of chefs, students, food service professionals, and parents or other community members working together to develop tasty, nutritious, kid-approved foods. There will be a grand prize chosen by the judging panel as well as a Popular Choice winner based on public voting. The judges will also choose award winners for the top two recipes in each category. Winning teams will be invited to prepare their nutrition-

packed meals alongside White House chefs. The top ten recipes in each category will be published in a Recipes for Healthy Kids Cookbook to share with students and families. To learn more about the First Lady’s Let’s Move! campaign, visit www. LetsMove.gov. The deadline for recipe submissions is Dec. 30. For more information, visit recipesforkidschallenge.com.

Bereavement luncheons

Delaware Hospice’s “New Beginnings” bereavement luncheons are an informal way to meet and talk with others, who have had similar loss experiences.  Lunch begins at noon and is followed by a brief program. The location rotates each week of the month according to the following schedule:  • 1st Thursday: Grottos Pizza, Rte. 26, Bethany Beach; • 2nd Thursday: Georgia House, 300 Delaware Ave., Laurel; • 3rd Thursday: Millsboro Pizza Palace, Rt. 113-southbound lane, Millsboro;  • 4th Thursday: Blue Ocean Grill (formerly Milton House), 200 Broadkill Rd., Milton; • 5th Thursday (when applicable): Texas Grill (formerly Ocean Point Grill), 26089 Long Neck Rd., Millsboro. “New Beginnings” luncheons are open to the public. Registration is not required. There is no fee except the cost of your lunch. For more information, call Carol Dobson or Paul Ganster at 8567717.

PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

You don’t always have to be on the front lines to experience war

I usually try to confine myself to medical topics. However, this week’s issue is being published on Veterans’ Day and coincides with the 15th anniversary of my retirement from the Air Force. I thought it would be useful to spend some time discussing the mental health issues related to serving in the military. One of the things that people think about individuals who have not seen front line combat is that they do not experience real warfare. That is not necessarily true. I was serving at RAF Upper Heyford in England in the mid 1980’s. One morning I woke up to find that aircraft from our base had bombed Libya. While that brought an end to Qadaffi’s misbehavior, it was not clear at first how he would react. My youngest daughter was attending a school outside the base limits at the time. There

was a concern about the safety of being in the school. For that reason, all of the students in the school had to be moved to a safer location on base. We lived in the base housing area. There was a concern about the safety of being in an unprotected area. For that reason Security Police were assigned to the housing area. They patrolled the streets with their M-16’s for weeks. I never went to Libya. However, I did experience it. I was the commanding officer at the Shaw Air Force Base Hospital in the late 1980’s. The US military attacked Panama. They ousted Noriega from power. I had to send some of my medical people there to support the operation. One of them wrote me a letter a few weeks later. He told me how scared he was to be there. He told me the kind of living conditions that he had

there. He also told me that the reason he was writing to me was that he never knew his father. I was the closest thing that he had to a father and he felt comfortable telling me about how he felt. I never went to Panama. However, I did experience it. I was the commanding officer of Langley Air Force Base Hospital when Saddam Hussein overran Kuwait. The United States responded quickly. However, the Air Force was able to send its forces more quickly than the Army and Navy. In that first wave, I sent 175 of my people to Saudi Arabia. They set up the first field hospital in the Gulf War. It was in place within 8 days after the invasion of Kuwait. My people were ready to go. The location they were going to was classified. I knew where it was. I could not tell them ahead of time. What I did know was that when they arrived in that country there would be 90 miles of sand between them and Saddam Hussein’s troops. There would be no army forces or marines there yet. I had no idea what Saddam Hussein’s plan was. I did

ACCIDENT? INJURY? Dawn Davidson,  operations specialist with the Point of Care training team assists Lisa Wood, Peninsula Home Care nurse, during a Point of Care training session.

Peninsula Home Care is wireless Peninsula Home Care (PHC), a leading licensed and certified home health service provider on Delmarva, has launched a new field-based data management system called Point of Care. The Point of Care technology allows PHC healthcare professionals to record accurate, real-time data during patient home visits on wireless laptops. Point of Care’s electronic records can then be accessed and commented on by all PHC professionals providing care to a patient – from the case manager to the physical therapist to the occupational therapist and so on. The files are encrypted and cannot be accessed without authorization. “Point of Care provides an immediacy that paper records cannot provide and the continuity of case management that patients need,” said Kay Satchell, branch director of Peninsula Home Care’s Seaford office, the first to employ the system. “With Point of Care, each Peninsula team member who serves a patient can view and share information in real time – it’s a tremendous advantage for keeping files up to date and ensuring that everyone on a case understands what everyone else on that case is doing.” Physician communication also greatly benefits from Point of Care. The system mandates that information about the patient’s care is sent to the patient’s physician in real time, which in turn ensures that proper plan of care changes, such as treatments and medications, are made in a timely manner. Decreasing the paper trail In addition to improving efficiencies and interdisciplinary communication,

Peninsula Home Care initiated the Point of Care system to stay ahead of increasing demands for accountability from the healthcare industry. New government healthcare guidelines and rulings from the National Health Care Reform Act have implemented great incentives for the physicians to participate in the electronic healthcare record (HER) or the electronic medical record (EMR). Proposed changes to be implemented between 2011 and 2013 are being driven by two things: a need for real-time data and a method by which to access a patient’s medical record, regardless of where they are located geographically. Recognizing how these benefits affect healthcare quality, in coming years Medicare, Medicaid and commercial payers plan to decrease reimbursement to practices that are not using EHRs, providing an even stronger push for adoption. “We have gone from documenting twenty pages of records for each patient to having everything at our fingertips,” said Chris Hall, clinical manager, Peninsula Home Care. By 2011, the more than 150 professionals working in all three Peninsula Home Care branches will be using Point of Care. Peninsula Home Care, established in 1985, provides customized health care case management, nursing, physical and occupational therapy, speech language pathology and access to medical social workers and home health aides in patients’ homes based on each patient’s doctor’s individual orders. For more information, visit www.PeninsulaHomeCare.com.

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not know at the time that he would stay in Kuwait and not invade Saudi Arabia to attack the people that I was putting in harm’s way. When my people got there, I was responsible for keeping their family informed about how they were doing. I did that by receiving phone calls on a classified line every few days from my in field hospital commander. I only got the calls when he was able to make them. One morning I woke up to see a story on the news about heat stress in the deployed troops. The story took place at the hospital that my people had set up. The patient was one of the people I sent. He did fine. However, his wife saw the story as well. She called me up and let me know that I was not doing my job of keeping her informed. The fact that I didn’t know about it, didn’t seem to matter. I never deployed during the First Gulf War. However, I did experience it. There are a lot of aspects about being in the military that are not apparent to the average person. Some of them are things that you might not even think about.

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BRIDGEVILLE Saturday November 20 10 am to 12:30 pm

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1 Heritage Shore Circle Bridgeville, DE 19933

Participants will also be asked to take part in an interactive computerized research survey. Sessions will begin and end promptly.

Leslie Merriken is an advocate of forest planning for her farm in Greenwood. As a member of the Delaware Tree Farm Committee and the Delaware Forestry Association, she works with many public, private, nonprofit, and industry groups to promote the many benefits of a Forest Stewardship Plan. A good plan is a written blueprint to guide the activities to achieve a landowner’s unique goals. Merriken’s goals include: Establishing better wildlife habitat for quail and other species. Joining with local hunting groups to practice quality deer management. Working with forestry experts on strategies for profitable and sustainable timber harvests.

Register by email — Send your name, address, phone number, and the date and location of the information session you’d like to attend to: John.Petersen@state.de.us Office: 302-698-4552

PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

New drinking water quality site Intent on making information about vital services and resources more accessible to the public, the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and Delaware Health and Social Services’ Division of Public Health (DPH) has launched a new drinking water quality website. Delawareans can now find comprehensive drinking water information by visiting www.waterquality.delaware.gov. The new site provides easy access to drinking water quality data, including water system reports, violation notices, well test information, and the location and status of contaminated sites. An interactive map enables visitors to locate annual water quality reports for public water systems, from which 82 percent of Delawareans get their drinking water. The website, created with help from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, also links to EPA websites and databases. DPH’s Office of Drinking Water enforces the federal Safe Drinking Water

Act by testing public drinking water supplies, reviews water system plans, certifies water system operators, and manages the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, a loan program for infrastructure improvements. DPH regularly monitors 490 public water systems for more than 80 chemical and bacterial contaminants. Private well owners, advised to test their water annually, can learn how to purchase test kits from the Delaware Public Health Laboratory. DNREC’s Division of Water regulates surface water quality, administers a source protection program, evaluates the location of private and public wells for potential contaminants during well construction, and conducts and oversees groundwater cleanups. For more information about drinking water testing, contact the Office of Drinking Water at 741-8630. For information about surface water or groundwater, contact DNREC’s Division of Water at 7399949.

Attorney General Beau Biden recently joined 31 states and the District of Columbia to announce an agreement with sweepstakes company Publishers Clearing House.  The agreement comes after a multistate investigation into the company raised concerns about deceptive trade practices, especially those targeted at low-income and elderly individuals.

“There is no excuse for misleading vulnerable people into spending their hardearned money,” said Biden. The agreement modifies the terms of a prior agreement reached with the company in 2001. That earlier agreement resolved States’ allegations that Publishers Clearing House engaged in deceptive marketing practices by mailing promotional materials designed to mislead customers into be-

RETURN DAY WINNER - Winner of the Kiwanis Return Day Package at the Brick Hotel, Julie Beebe (right), receives her itinerary and tickets to the events at the Brick from Innkeeper Lynn Lester. Mrs. Beebe is an elementary school reading resource specialist at Indian River School District and a member of the Rehoboth Beach Kiwanis Club.

31 states reach an agreement with Publishers Clearing House

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lieving that purchases from the company would increase their odds of winning.  As a result of the current investigation, the states believe that Publishers Clearing House was not in full compliance with the 2001 agreement, and that consumers would still be confused. The investigation revealed the marketing was directed toward elderly and low-income individuals. The most recent agreement includes

stronger provisions and additional conditions to help ensure that consumers are not further misled or pushed to make purchases. Publishers Clearing House agreed to pay $3.5 million to cover the cost of the states’ investigation. Delaware will receive $40,000 in the agreement, which will go to the State’s Consumer Protection Fund.

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 25

Laurel High School gets the ‘Dr. Oz’ health program By Tony E. Windsor

Seeking to help promote opportunities for healthy lifestyles, especially in the areas of fighting obesity and the mental resilience crisis, Laurel High School has become a part of the nationally recognized “HealthCorps” project. Started by Dr. Mehment Oz, heart surgeon and host of The Dr. Oz Show, the proactive health movement has a mission to work with high school students and within the communities where they live. Laurel High School is one of only 50 sites throughout the United States hosting the HealthCorps program. In addition to the program at Laurel High School, Delaware has a second HealthCorps site at Thomas McKean High School in Wilmington. The project has been adopted by Nemours Health and Prevention Services who has become the founding sponsor in Delaware. Dr. Oz was in Wilmington earlier this year to announce the launching of the HealthCorps program in the First State. At a press conference held at the Nemours/Alfred I. dupont Hospital for Children in May, Dr. Oz said HealthCorps’ core mission is to empower teens and communities to become agents of change and help the country reach the tipping point

School News pages sponsorship The School News pages are published monthly in the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers. Thank the sponsors on these pages by supporting their businesses. Businesses or schools interested in advertising to help sponsor the pages should email brichardson@mspublications.com

towards wellness now and for the future. As part of the organization’s mandate, the school program extends to the community through health festivals and liaisons with local health resources and non-profits who share HealthCorps’ mission. The program at Laurel High School is being coordinated by University of North Carolina medical student, Sumaiya Sarwar, of Wichita, Ks. To promote the program in Laurel, Sarwar attended a Laurel Mayor and Council meeting and presented information. She made it clear that the program is not restricted to the high school and its students. She said it is important that the health mission be integrated into the community as well. It is the goal of the HealthCorps program, according to Sarwar, to develop interactive activities that will make learning about healthy lifestyles and mental resilience something that is both fun and educational and incorporates practical outcomes. She said there are several activities occurring at the high school both during and after school. There is an after-school club which promotes fitness and nutrition. Mental resilience workshops are incorporated throughout the curriculum by promoting self-esteem, enhancing decision-making and communication skills, fostering healthy relationships and setting long-term goals. The HealthCorps program also demonstrates to students the close relationship between physical health and mental health. Sarwar said there are also special nutritional activities held in the high school common area called, “Commotion in the Commons,” where students are exposed to special lunch time demonstrations and tasting of healthy foods. The program also

Sumaiya Sarwar, a medical student from the University of North Carolina, is coordinator of the HealthCorps program at Laurel High School. The health program was started by heart surgeon, Dr. Mehment Oz, of the television show, Dr. Oz. Photo by Tony Windsor

incorporates school staff through special fitness programs. The HealthCorps program also offers opportunities within the community. Sarwar recently appeared before Laurel Mayor and Council expressing the desire to meet with members of the community and offer special nutrition, fitness and mental resilience enhancement seminars and special opportunities for collaborations. HealthCorps’ community outreach project will seek to make Laurel a candidate for its, “FitTownUSA,” program which connects and empowers citizens and organizations to bring about health awareness and affect change. It is Sarwar’s goal to

develop ties with the Laurel business community, community service organizations and community health agencies in order to have a community-wide approach to healthy living. Sarwar said she is planning to be a part of a special Health Fair in December at Laurel High School and hopes to have students learn to cook foods from various cultures around the world. She said she is actively pursuing a special “People’s Garden Grant.” The USDA grant has been offered nationally and will provide $1 million to five schools in five states to develop and operate a community garden. Continued to page 26

Harry A Lehman, III, MD, FAAP

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Our mission is to provide the best care to our patients. We are continuously learning, then teaching. We strive to provide timely access to care and positively influence the standard of pediatrics in Sussex County.

Students, your mission is to learn and we are proud of you for a job well done!

PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Brittany Cooper inducted into Pi Gamma Mu Society

Brittany Shannon Cooper, a junior communications major at Salisbury University, was inducted into the University’s Maryland Gamma Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, an International Honor Society in the Social Sciences. The initiation ceremony took place in the Ritual Room of the Scarborough Student Leadership Center on October 23, 2010. Juniors, seniors and graduate students become eligible to join when they meet the following criteria: upper 35% of the class, a grade average of 3.6 or better, and 20 semester hours in the social science courses with a “B” average or better. Brittany is the daughter of Fay Cooper of Laurel and the late Barry Cooper.

Dr. Judith Tobin visits Woodbridge High School

KICK BUTTS PARTICIPATES IN PARADE - The Kick Butt Generation Group at Woodbridge High School participated in the Return’s Day Parade last week. The group helps raise awareness about the dangers of cigarette smoking.

‘Dr. Oz’ health program Continued from page 25

If Laurel were able to get the grant program Sarwar would coordinate the garden and teach students about agriculture production practices, diet and nutrition; and evaluate the learning outcomes. The People’s Garden would also incorporate culinary skills and promote volunteering opportunities. According to the USDA, along with helping to provide children access to a nutritious and safe diet, this initiative also aims to influence healthier choices for all American households. Produce raised in the gardens can be used in the schools’ meals and by student households, local food banks or senior center nutrition programs. The USDA Food and Nutrition Service plans to use the project as a way to

identify models of successful school garden initiatives which then can be marketed to schools throughout the country. Sarwar will coordinate the HealthCorps program in Laurel for two school years. After that, funding will be necessary to keep the program in the school. The national HealthCorps website advocates community-based fundraisers, such as walk-a-thons, auctions, raffles and bake sales featuring whole grain baked goods as ways to help maintain the program. The program costs about $75,000 per year. For more information about the HealthCare program at Laurel High School or to coordinate a seminar or other community health awareness opportunity, contact Sarwar at 316-210-7763 or Sumaiya.sarwar@ healthcorps.net.

Students in Richard Crisci’s Forensic Science classes at Woodbridge High School got a special visit from guest speaker, Dr. Judy Tobin, who served as the State’s Assistant Medical Examiner for Kent and Sussex County for 42 years.  She answered many questions from the students and shared stories from the over 5,000 autopsies she performed during her tenure and spoke of the importance of Forensic Science in this line of work. This is the first year Woodbridge High School has offered Forensic Science, which was chosen in response to student feedback on what electives they would like to see offered, and is one of the most popular of these new electives.

Hall earns bachelor’s degree

Cynthia Hall, of Seaford, has earned a bachelor of science degree in human services at Springfield College, Mass., for studies completed this past August.

Adult ed offers series of classes

Pharmacology - The Sussex Tech Adult Division is offering a 60-hour Pharmacology class designed for individuals already working in a pharmacy and seeking certification as a pharmacy technician. The 60-hour class is scheduled for Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6 to 9 p.m. on Dec. 1 through Feb. 16.

All classes will be held at Sussex Tech, County Seat Highway (Rt. 9), west of Georgetown. Text materials are approved by the American Pharmacists Association. The class will prepare students for certification examinations. Ophthalmic Medical Assistant - The 60-hour Ophthalmic Medical Assistant class is designed for individuals already working in an eye doctor’s office and seeking certification as an ophthalmic medical assistant. The class is scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 9 p.m. Nov. 30 through Feb. 17. Most classes will be held at Sussex Tech. Some will be held off-site in an eye doctor’s office to provide students with direct experience with the office and equipment. Text materials are approved by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The class will prepare students for a certification examination. ServeSafe Certification Class - Individuals wishing to become employed in the food service industry should plan to enroll in a 60-hour class being presented by Sussex Tech Adult Education. The class meets Dec. 1 through Feb. 16. Classes will meet Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6 to 9 p.m. at Sussex Tech. The course will use materials from the National Restaurant Association and could lead to food handler certification, and possibly manager certification. Contact the Sussex Tech Adult Division at 856-9035 for more information, or visit www.SussexTechTraining.net.

Book fair to benefit charities

Attend a Scholastic Book Fair hosted by the Education Club at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus on Thursday, Nov. 11 and Friday, Nov. 12. Books will be available for all ages; the selection will include fiction and nonfiction books in English and Spanish, recipe books, posters and craft kits. The book fair is open to the public and will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the dining hall of the Student Services Center. Don’t miss this great opportunity to buy educational holiday presents; proceeds will benefit charities which serve children.

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Sussex Academy: Rated ‘Superior’ Eight Years in a Row

The Sussex Academy of Arts & Sciences invites parents, guardians of current fifth grade students to learn more about our unique public school opportunity for middle school students in grades 6-8. As the only charter school in Sussex County, we provide a challenging; accelerated academic curriculum. In order to introduce interested parents and fifth grade students to our school, we are holding the following events: • PUBLIC INFORMATION meetings at the school on November 16 and 17, 2010 at 6 p.m. • SCHOOL TOURS on November 15, 16, 17, & 18, 2010 at 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, or 10:30 a.m. No appointment necessary. The APPLICATION PERIOD for incoming sixth grade students for the 2012 school year begins November 19, 2010 and ends January 7, 2011. Applications are available online at www.sussexacademy.org For more information, please visit our website.

Sussex Academy of Arts & Sciences

21777 Sussex Pines Road • Georgetown, DE 19947 • 302.856.3636

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 27

Seaford Middle School announces quarterly honor roll The following students have been named to the honor roll for the first marking period at Seaford Middle School.

Distinguished Honor Roll Grade 6 - Emiliano Alvarado-Ibarra, Antonio Ambrosino, Kayla M. Arnett, Kate Emily Bagshaw, Kayleigh Lyn Barnes, Shamar Douglas Bell, Benjamin Lee Burket, Lillian Sandria Byington, Joshua James Cay, Morgan Paige Cooper, Victoria Jean Dalton, Ryan Lee Delgado, Linda Jean Dinenna, Hannah R. Doyle, Moriah Lynn Ebron, Daniel Elliott, Lizbeth Figueroa-Rivera, Madison Taylor Freshour, Ariana Gomez-Martinez, Brianne Arlene Gray, Christopher Gualpa, Adam Branden Hastings, Jairus V. Hinds, Fantasy Nicole Laine Hopkins, Alison Jordan Janvier, Michelle Marie John, Mason Joseph Johnson, Andrez Ta’juan Jones, Kadara Lynn Kahyaoglu, Brandon Sven Kasinath, Yeliz Busra Kurt, Michael Robert Lepter, Jordyn Amyia Corie Lewis, Anthony Phillip Lighthiser, Dominic Marcus Longo, Sophia Eilean Martinez, Jessica Mauricette, Maggie Ann Morris, Karen Kristine Neville, Evan Dennis Nibblett, Shianna Nunemann, Elizabeth Leigh Oliver, Jacob Christopher Olock, Daniel J. Paul, Abby Mae Pearson, Abigail Lynn Phillips, Joseph Ramirez, Coreye’ Ross, Jana Lee Ruark, Hunter Sammons, Efrain Miguel Santiago, Sierra Snigier, Jessica Lynn Stewart, Liam Daniel Thompson, Diego Torres-Gutierrez, Demetrius Michael Towers, Kelly Beatriz Velasquez-Perez, Hannah Kate Venables, Kurtis Reed Webber, Sydney Alexis West, Taylor Nicole White, Dylan Dwayne Wilkerson, Anthony Charles Wilson Grade 7 - Nayab Abid, Brady Cole Absher, Kai Anderson, Sheila Artiga, Michaela Noelle Brodie-Willey, Samantha

Pageant seeks contestants

The Miss Delaware Organization, an affiliate of the Miss America Organization, seeks contestants for upcoming local preliminary pageants leading to the Miss Delaware 2011 Pageant. The winners of each local title will receive scholarship awards and then compete for additional scholarships and title of Miss Delaware 2011 at Dover Downs Hotel & Casino, June 9-11, 2011. To be eligible to compete in a Miss Delaware preliminary pageant, a young woman must: be between the ages of 17 (and a High School senior) and 24; a citizen of the United States; never been married; and meet residency requirements for the state of Delaware, or be a full-time student in a Delaware college or university, or have full-time employment within the state of Delaware. For more information about the pageant and how to become a contestant, visit www.MissDE.org. Upcoming local preliminary pageants can be found by clicking on the link “Calendar.” To become a contestant for the Miss Delaware 2011 Pageant, contact Dulcena Kemmerlin at Kemmer32@ hotmail.com or 302-393-1483, or Sandy Soucek at SandySoucek@yahoo.com or 302-745-1619.

Marie Brown, Haley Aleen Cannon, Alican Ceylan, Taylor Lynn Conley, Ludjina Dwardine Edouard, William Robert Elliott, Christyn Ashley Geniesse, Jorge Gualpa, Nathan Jon Hanenfeld, Ti’Asha Lee-Ayre Johnson, Kiara Bone’E Kilgo, Matthew Tyler King, Amber Lovelace, Zachary Brian Marine, Robinson Metelus Jr., James David Moore, Rylie Jennifer Moore, Peyton Perkins, Emily Elaine Richardson, Somantha Signey, Chelsea Aylin Sosa, Shianne Paige Sparrow, Brennan Nicholas Stark, Arlenys Torres-Rivera, Joshua Kenneth Trammell, Zaneilia Diamone West, Stephanie Brooke Wheatley

Grade 8 - Jose Antonio AlmanzaBaltazar, Kristie Jo Beyer, Rose Charlotte Brittingham, Joseph Gonzalo Castel De Oro, Michael Erin Coggin, Gretchen Emily Daehn, Michael Edward Delgado, Jeremy Grant Dulis, Taylor Ashley Feyl, Nicholas A. Gray, Omar Torres Gutierrez, Jeffrey Kyle Hill, Ryan Allen Hubbard, Amanda Jean Jones, James L. King II, Quinn X. Kirby, Austin David Kraft, McKensie Quay Lewis, Kimberly Brook Lipsett, Zenobia A. McIvor-Smalley, Megan L. Messick, Malenta Michinard, Pierrevil Mondestin, Tuyet-Kha Thi Nguyen, Alyssa Lee Nichols, Trung Tin Pham, Guadalupe Pineda-Gonzalez, Hannah Pollock, William A. Pruitt Jr., Devin James Redding, Sydney A. Ricketts, Cody Phillips Robison, Tory Lynne Ruark, Rian Annabeth Shirey, Diamond Thomas, Rosa Hilda Torres, Shania Mona’E Trammell, Zachary M. Truitt, Susan Belinda Velasquez-Perez, Zachary David Zellhart Regular Honor Roll Grade 6 - Alexis Abbott, Makayla Ackenbrack, Dylan Michael Allen, Da’Zhira Aunyah Batson, Tyjair’E Jermiah Bennefield, Lester Bennett IV, Chandler Reid Berger, Elijah Bivens, A’Nailah Kiara Blake, Hannah Nicole Blann, Mohit Gautamkumar Brahmbhatt, Benjamin Oliver Brumbley, Kaitlyn Ann Call, Da’Jah Monique Cannon, Tyler Shane Carpenter, Brandon Isaiah Cay, Christopher A. Cazares-Zagal, Summer Lynn Clagg, Sean Robert Clendenin, Travis G. Collins, Samantha M. Cotten, Hannah Olivia Covey, Shawnaya Rose Crosley, Dwayne Eugene Dashiell Jr., Keirstin Brooke Depew, She’Mar Lynn Deputy, Kaliyah A. Deshields, Khiry T. Deshields, Ricardo Diaz, Dyland Jordan Dorey, Stacey Ann Elvira, Devin Flamer, Ann M. Fourquet, Jordan C. Gambrell, Luz Selena Garcia-Silva, Bradley Green, Tori L. Grimes, Taylor Brooke Hare, Ryan Michael Hearn, Christopher Jason Heiser, Anthony Joseph Dwayne Henson, Jacob Alberto Herrera-Zavala, Samantha Nicole Holleger, Andrea Felicia Horsey, Kerri Lynn Hoyer, Joseph Lee Hubbard, Kirsten Victoria Huffman, Donovan Jeremy Johnson, Shianne Mya Johnson, David Mulford King, Devon Shemar Lake, Shannon Rene’ Le, Kalah Lofland, Nathali Marcelina Luna-Bahena, Nykya McCray, Cody James Melton, Edward Bradley Morgan, Brendin Cody Mote, Ja’Quan Martez Mouche’, Haleigh A. Nichols, Trevon Nichols, Scotty Alan O’Riley Jr., Iris Perez-Mazariegos, Treasure J. Robinson, Noemi Roblero-Puac, Alberto Saldana Torres, Timneshia Zhauneen Sampson, Sabrina Marie Savage, Stephon L. Short,

Marty Demetrius Smith Jr., Rosure R. Smith, Keishawn Spady, Autumn Rose Stanley, Lateisha Linnette Taylor, Jeremiah Jordan Teagle, Tanner Quinn Tiritilli, Morgan Leigh Trammell, Johan Edwardo Trejo, Cierra Dakota Truitt, Luis Anthony Vega-Ortiz, Liana Elise Waples, Kelsey Shealyn Welch, Jaira Naree’ West, Trevor Jonathon Whaley, Shelby N. Williams

Grade 7 - Dai’Ron Antuan Abbott, Tai’Ron Andre Abbott, Anthony Brian Alanis, Colin Christopher Bergh, Autumn Lei Bone, Cierra Renae Bramble, Katelynn Simone Brittingham, Austin James Carmean, Heaven Lee Carter, Shawn Kwanita Chartin, Robert Swisher Clagg, Taylor Renee Collins, Nicholas Ryan Coulbourn, Breanna Summer Dean, John Domond, Janeise Drayton, Carine Duverger, Cuauhtemoc Espinoza, Kayla Alexis Fleming, Raheem Griffin, Nanette La’Vera Griffin Edwards, Mi’ch’ael Marrion Hackett, Dylan Lee Harris, Jessica Shae Hennessey, Rashawn Hitchens-Ingram, Sabrina Madison Jefferson, Shelby Marie Lankford, Jacob A. Lee, Elisha Raven Marks, Anthony Wayne Marshall Jr., John Tyler Martin, William Joseph Meddings, Deonise Mondestin, Kelsee Moore, Reece Oliver Morris, Gabriella Olivince, Ashil Patel, James Connor Pennington, Makayla Monet’ Perry, Jody Pimental, Pajuah Mariah Purnell, Antynesha Denise Roach, Evan Garrett RothO’Day, Brandon Nicholson Rouse, Angela Lee Rust, Greggory Jaren Schwamberger, Travis P. Shockley, Ashley Marie Stew-

art, Theopolis Demartinez Teagle, Dylan O’Toole Wagner, Alexys Danielle Welch, William Louis Willey, Rachel Faith Wootten, Michael Julian Yelverton Grade 8 - Briana M. N. Abbott, Nelson Amisial, Teona Shawnte Andrews, Ronnie Barrios, Robert Alvin Bay, Joseph Christopher Bell, Taylor LaFaye Biles, Precious Franchesca Bivens, Christian Russell Brightwell, Kiana Danielle Brown, Haylee Lynn Cain, Kayprece Cannon, Brock Cataldi, Adam Christopher Connelly, Sara E. Davis, Darius Tyree Deshields, Dwardly Valner Edouard, Shawnna Esham, Nicholas Thomas Etienne, Samantha Marie Flynn, Katherine Harte Gladding, Kathryn Anne Harris, Cooper E. Hearn, Corrinna A. Hitch, Kyle Mason Jester, Ricky Johnson, Demontraye Lamere Jones, Breona Kellam, Richard Lamontagne, Krista Marie Lepter, Michael Thomas Mahetta, Allissa Ann Mann, Jeremy D’Shea Mann, Keyli Yanira Mazariegos Diaz, Justice Isaiah McFadden, Tiffany Mendible, Sheila Merilus, Aaron Van Milligan, Sabrina Motta, Mary Catherine Niles, Roxanne Arlene Patrick, Quisean Tremane Pettit, Diana Zamora Ramirez, Esdras David Ramirez, Aylea Sandifer, Tyler Andre Savage, Mark Edward Spicer Jr., Kyle Tingle, Tana N Tingle, Josue Reno Toledo, Rufino Bahena Toledo, Erykah Lach’E Tolliver, Thalia Marivel Torres, Terry-Ann Lee Weiss, Benjamin Eric Whitelock Jr., Benjamin Tyler Wright, Rebecca Lynn Zachry

PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Tatum Jones of Bridgeville to compete in Teen USA pageant

Tatum Jones, 16, of Bridgeville, will compete for the title of Miss Delaware Teen USA 2011 on Nov. 27-28, at the Sheraton Dover Hotel in Dover. Tickets will be available at the door. Jones, who is a junior at Sussex Technical High School, participates on the volleyball, basketball and softball teams. She is a volunteer coach/ Jones instructor for the Seaford Parks & Recreation’s young girl’s field hockey program. Jones is the daughter of Cory and Christine Jones and sister to Ashley, Savannah and Noah Jones. She is the granddaughter of Mary Catherine and Richard Bashelor and Gail and Jim Bailey; and the great-granddaughter of Virginia Schaffer. Jones’ humanitarian project for the pageant is a coat drive to benefit Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Delaware Children & Families. She is collecting new or gently worn coats until Nov. 21. To donate a coat for those who are in need this winter season, call 745-1241. The Miss Delaware Teen USA and Miss Delaware USA pageants are the official preliminaries to the Miss Teen USA, Miss USA and Miss Universe pageants.

HONOR SOCIETY INDUCTIONS - Sussex Technical High School recently held induction ceremonies for 64 students into the National Honor Society/National Technical Honor Society. Students must have a cumulative scholastic average of 92.5 percent or better throughout the school year to qualify for both honor societies. Leadership, service and character are also criteria for admission. Inducted this year are, from left: Front row - Seniors: Jake Jones, Milford and Kenneth Smith, Millsboro; Juniors: Joe Garvilla, Georgetown, Ellie McNatt, Seaford, Alissa Morgan, Milford, and Erin Quillen, Lewes; Sophomores: Travis Anderson, Seaford, Victoria Baker, Lewes, and Raven Berner, Georgetown; Row two - Sophomores: Caly Bones, Georgetown, Paige Boylen, Lewes, Zoe Callaway, Seaford, Kellen Cannon, Milton, Zachary Cannon, Seaford, Caitlin Cook, Laurel, Michael Dopler, Seaford, Kyle Doherty, Lewes, and Gabrielle Fazio, Lewes; Row three Sophomores: Emilie Fleuette, Millsboro, Madeline Gallagher, Lewes, Albert Green, Millsboro, Emily Hall, Millsboro, Julia Hawkins, Georgetown, John Hearn, Lewes, Victoria Hearn, Seaford, Taylor Hatfield, Georgetown, and Nicole Heck, Georgetown; Row four - Sophomores: Adam Kelly, Milton, Cailey Isaacs, Georgetown, Ryan Johnson, Bridgeville, Ashley Jump, Laurel, Bethany Killmon, Bridgeville, Benjamin King, Seaford, Chelsea LeCates, Seaford, Shannon Lecates, Seaford, and Kirstin Lockwood, Rehoboth; Row five - Sophomores: Miriam Lopez-Perez, Georgetown, Crystal Loudon, Seaford, Kira Lyle, Millsboro, Kelsey Magill, Ocean View, Hannah Menendez, Georgetown, Imani Nichols, Greenwood, Erica Parkhurst, Milton, Priyen Patel, Seaford, and Lacey Perdue, Millsboro; Row six - Sophomores: Christina Piper, Milton, Hannah Powers, Georgetown, Matthew Rosas, Seaford, Elyse Rubino, Georgetown, Amanda Sava, Seaford, Salina Schirtzinger, Laurel, Kate Schroeder, Bridgeville, Lauren Shapley, Bridgeville, and Hannah Smith, Seaford; Row seven - Sophomores: Alysa Swingle, Seaford, Sarah Timmons, Millsboro, Briannon Troyer, Lincoln, Isaac Van Curen, Millsboro, Dylan Varrato, Georgetown, Tyler Whaley, Seaford, Chelsea Wootten, Georgetown, Crystal Williamson, Seaford, Joseph Yawn, Laurel, and Patricia Yoc-Roblero, Georgetown.

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Teen drivers too often are not Eskridge designs winning poster prepared to take to the highway ...few teens gained significant experience in more challenging situations, such as driving in inclement weather or in heavy traffic. The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety recently released the first naturalistic study using in-vehicle cameras to capture teenage drivers and their parents during their supervised driving phase. Nearly half (47 percent) of parents in the study reported that after the year-long learner’s stage, there was still at least one condition in which they did not feel comfortable letting their teen drive. Yet, more than one-third (37 percent) of these families allowed their teen to obtain a license within a month of being eligible, although a few families restricted driving in certain scenarios. The average amount of weekly driving varied greatly among families, ranging from just twenty minutes to almost five hours the study found. Sixty-eight percent of parents reported that opportunities to drive together were limited by busy schedules of both parents and teens. Teens averaged just over an hour and a half of supervised driving per week, mostly on routine trips along the same routes. Meaning few teens gained significant experience in more challenging situations, such as driving in inclement weather or in heavy traffic. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers in this country. The first few years of unsupervised driving are the most dangerous – 1,363 U.S. teen drivers age 15-18 died in traffic crashes in 2008, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). However, teens are clearly a danger to

others as well because the total number of deaths resulting from these crashes was 3,495. In Delaware, 3 teen drivers age 1518 died in traffic crashes in 2008, while the total number of deaths from these crashes totaled 8. Although graduated driver’s license (GDL) systems vary by state, most require at least six months of supervised driving for beginners while several states require up to a year. Delaware requires 12 months of Valid Driving Authority where the teen driver has a Level One Lerner Permit. During the first 6 months, teen drivers must be supervised by the sponsor at all times and must complete 50 hours of driving training, 10 of which must be nighttime driving. After 6 months of driving the level one permit holder may drive without supervision between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. For the first year of driving the only passengers allowed in the vehicle with the permit holder are the supervisor and 1 passenger. When the teen driver with a Level One Learner’s Permit has been driving for a full year and is in good standing (without suspension, revocation etc), the permit will automatically convert to a Class D License. During the supervised stage of GDL, the research showed parents need to: • Ensure ample practice in all driving situations– including frequent practice at night, in bad weather, in heavy city traffic, on rural highways and on busy interstates. • Share their driving “wisdom” to help teens spot dangers that aren’t obvious and see the “big picture.” Parents should use “I” statements, explaining what they would do in critical situations, so teens will be more likely to listen and remember. • Teach teens to drive defensively, be wary of other drivers and anticipate the unexpected things they might do. For example, “Even when I have a green light, I always glance both ways to make sure other cars are stopping, because sometimes they don’t.” For more information about the teen driving study or to see the full report, visit www.AAAFoundation.org.

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Campbell University student Megan Eskridge wanted to capture the cartoon quality of the characters for the fall musical, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown,” but she didn’t want to draw a cartoon. So she found another way to design the poster. The result was the winning poster design for the Department of Theatre Arts fall production. “Cartooning isn’t my thing,” Eskridge said, “but I tried to incorporate the characters and their names and make the design come together in a textual way.” In order to accomplish this goal, Eskridge, whose poster was selected out of a field of other graphic design students, filled the main character’s silhouette with the names of characters and sayings from the strip using a handwriting comic strip font. The result was a comic strip feel without the comic strip images. Eskridge, a junior graphic design/ elementary education major from Laurel, discovered she wanted to be a graphic designer when she took a course in high school.  “Both of my parents are teachers, so I knew I wanted to go the education route, but then I got interested in doing design,” Eskridge said. “Now I would like to find some way to combine the two fields like working as a designer for an organization that helps children.” To be a graphic designer, one must know the different technologies and principles of design and be able to combine them in a way that fulfills a specific message. But you must also be persistent, Es-

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Megan Eskridge of Laurel, designed the winning poster for “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown,” the fall musical at Campbell University. Eskridge is a junior at Campbell.

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MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Kardash served as a messenger to General MacArthur The following profile is one of 50 that will appear in James Diehl’s upcoming release titled “World War II Heroes of Coastal Delaware,” the follow-up to the award-winning “World War II Heroes of Southern Delaware.” By James Diehl As American leadership planned for the next push against Imperial Japan in 1944, Gen. Douglas MacArthur remained firm in his stance that Allied troops must not forget about the Philippines and the Filipino people. He had promised to return to the island nation, and he was not going to bypass the country on his way to Japan. Any offensive maneuvers against the Japanese must involve liberating the Philippines, held MacArthur. The famed American general soon presented a blueprint to do just that to Admiral Ernest J. King, commander in chief of the United States fleet and chief of naval operations – then he waited patiently for a response. A coded message of approval came through a couple of days later to Port Moresby, New Guinea, where MacArthur and other Allied leaders were plotting their next move against Emperor Hirohito. The note was delivered by a man who today resides in coastal Delaware, just a couple of blocks from the sandy shores of the Atlantic Ocean. “It was about 2 o’clock in the morning when the message came through, so I jumped in my jeep and drove to the top of Fairfax Hill, where the general was staying,” remembers Michael Kardash, who is originally from Baltimore but moved to coastal Delaware in 1951. “I knew what the message was because I had broken [the code]. When I got there, Gen. [Richard K.] Sutherland (MacArthur’s chief of staff) looked at me and asked if we needed to wake up the general.” After replying with a Navy-style ���yes sir,” Kardash followed Sutherland into the bedroom and watched as the Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces studied the note, expressed his thanks and offered that there would be no reply. Kardash repeated the routine several times during that week in early 1944, breaking coded messages and delivering

them to MacArthur at a hilltop mansion where he had taken up residence. Having close personal contact with a man so important in American military history still holds a special meaning to him today, more than 65 years later. “We were really lucky to have someone like that in command; it was just like working for a boss who you knew was extremely knowledgeable about things,” says Kardash. “I was certainly glad he was on our side. Your duty takes you where your duty takes you when you’re in the military, but I felt very fortunate. I mean, how many chances do you have to come in contact with the Supreme Allied Commander?” Kardash’s World War II story is a memorable, a unique and an exciting one. But what he left to enter the Second World War was just as exciting – he was a gifted shortstop with the Baltimore Orioles organization back when “The Birds” were members of the International League, years before becoming a Major League Baseball franchise. Showcasing his skills at the old Oriole Park at the corner of 29th Street and Greenmount Ave. in downtown Baltimore, Kardash played for a team that history has come to remember as the “forgotten birds” in the storied past of the Baltimore Orioles. Then, everything suddenly changed. Baseball season had been over for several weeks by Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked the United States naval fleet at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, setting off a chain of events that would send the young shortstop’s life in an entirely different direction. “When we heard about Pearl Harbor, we couldn’t believe that we had been attacked and we were going to war with Japan,” remembers Kardash, who also had a factory job long before the days when the country’s baseball players made the exorbitant salaries they do today. “I was playing baseball at the time and I remember a lot of guys felt they needed to leave the game and volunteer for the service.” Kardash, a newlywed and first-time father, did not enlist in the United States Navy until April of 1943, following the lead of many of the country’s better known athletes. “I kept seeing more and more players

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Michael Kardash served on board the HMAS Shropshire during World War II, also working for a time at the headquarters of the 7th fleet in Brisbane, Australia. A veteran of the United States Navy, Kardash personally delivered several messages to Gen. Douglas MacArthur during a short trip to Port Moresby, New Guinea, in 1944.

going into the service, guys like Ted Williams and Bob Feller, and I just thought that I had to be a part of this. I wanted to be a part of this,” Kardash recalls. “It was tough leaving, but I knew we had a mission and a job to do. We had to make America safe for our families, so I went.” After indoctrination school at King’s Point, N.Y., Kardash spent several weeks in communications school learning the electric coding machine (ECM). In the class with him was none other than Aldo Forte, an all-pro tackle for the Detroit Lions and a man Kardash would run into many more times over the years. After completing school, orders came through to report to the 7th fleet, “wherever they may be.” Finding his new duty

station was a challenge, one that wound it’s way through San Francisco and New Guinea before finally ending in Brisbane, Australia, at the headquarters of the 7th fleet. Their ship, the West Point, left San Francisco on Thanksgiving Day 1943 – enjoying turkey their first evening on board – and arrived in Australia nearly two weeks later. Along the train trip through the Australian countryside to Brisbane, many well wishers greeted Kardash and his fellow passengers. “It was one of those old steam engines and we could only go about 25 miles before we had to stop,” remembers Kardash. “All along the route, there were women

Our Veterans, Our Heroes It’s time to honor the brave soldiers who safeguard our peace and freedoms. Thanks, veterans. We salute you for your extraordinary courage and dedication to your country.

Veterans’ Day - November 11, 2010

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010 there with food. We loved that because we didn’t have any food aboard the train, unless it was curried mutton. These women were really glad to see American troops and it was just their way of helping out.” A group of about 30 sailors and nurses reported to Brisbane a couple of days later and quickly learned that their headquarters, on the fourth floor of one of the city’s large insurance buildings, was just two floors below MacArthur’s sixth floor office. After decoding messages for several months, Kardash flew to New Guinea with MacArthur’s staff for a summit meeting, an assignment he got because he was one of the fastest available men on the ECM machine. One of the first men who greeted him in New Guinea was none other than Aldo Forte, who was stationed at Port Moresby. “He looked at me right away and said ‘Kardash, good to see you. Now I know you brought some stuff with you. Let’s have it,’” Kardash recalls. “I had put a couple of bottles of gin in my duffle bag, so they filled a washtub with pineapple juice, then poured in the two bottles I had. All Aldo said was ‘Gentlemen, tonight we will drink to Ensign Kardash.’” After a week of decoding messages for Allied brass – as well as a little time serving as a “second” for a makeshift American boxing team there – Kardash returned to Australia and spent several more months decoding messages. Then he got the itch to serve at sea, aboard “any ship that needed personnel.” He got just that, not serving on an American ship, but aboard the HMAS Shropshire – HMAS was an acronym for Her Majesty’s Australian Ship. The Shropshire was an Australian heavy cruiser that volunteered to serve as part of the 7th fleet, as most ships of the Royal Australian Navy did between 1943-1945. The HMAS Shropshire was commissioned on Sept. 24, 1929 and served the British government until August of 1942. Following the loss of the heavy cruiser HMAS Canberra on Aug. 9 of that year, the British government approved the transfer of the Shropshire to the Royal Australian Navy as a replacement. Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced the transfer in the House of Commons on Sept. 8, 1942. “His Majesty’s government considers that the commonwealth [of Australia] should not bear this grievous loss following the sinking of other gallant Australian ships. We have therefore decided to offer, freely and unconditionally, to transfer His

Majesty’s 8-inch gun cruiser Shropshire to the Commonwealth government. This offer has been most warmly received,” said the British leader. There were only four Americans on board the Shropshire, including Kardash, in a crew of more than 800 Australians. All four were responsible for running the ECS machines and, when duty called, were required to be on four separate sections of the ship. “When we went into action, we had to separate in case the ship got hit by fire or by a kamikaze,” says Kardash. “If we were all in one spot and they wiped us out, the ship would have no communications.” An older ship, the food on board the Shropshire was “pretty rough,” according to Kardash, as the ship did not have appropriate refrigeration or storage for food. So, every now and then, the captain of the ship would send Kardash and his friends out scouring for food. There was one advantage to serving on board an Australian vessel during a time of war, however – unlike on American ships, alcohol was permitted, and consumed on a regular basis. The Shropshire survived numerous kamikaze attacks and two typhoons during her time as part of the 7th fleet, and participated in five battles. On its way to Lingayen Gulf, in the northern Philippines in 1944, the 7th fleet came under attack by Japanese fighter planes and kamikaze pilots. The Shropshire was never hit, but many ships in the fleet were. “We were bypassing Manila when this kamikaze comes out of nowhere, just misses us and hits the Nashville,” Kardash remembers. “Luckily, we were never hit, but we saw so many ships get hit. And we had to bury a lot of men at sea. You’d see the boys wrapping the flags around them and sliding them over the side of the ship. It was very sad, but we had to keep going because the war was going on and we still had missions to accomplish.” Four days after MacArthur’s triumphant return to the Philippines on Oct. 20, 1944, when the general waded ashore with Philippine President Sergio Osmeña before repeating the landing a second time for the media, Kardash and the men of the Shropshire were at Leyte Gulf to secure the nearby beaches and unload troops. The Japanese, meanwhile, were not standing still and soon engaged the Americans in the infamous three-day sea battle at Surigao Straights. “When this began, we were immediately dispatched to Surigao Straights via orders by Admiral [Thomas] Kincaid. Our

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job was to go down there and demolish the Yamishiro group,” says Kardash. It was a beautiful battle plan on our part; half the fleet was starboard and half was port. We were the first to hit them and, within a few hours, we had sunk the whole Japanese fleet. We even machine-gunned anyone who was in the water, because we couldn’t let any prisoners go ashore. We didn’t want anyone to know that the 7th fleet was at Surigao Straights.” Gaining the upper hand, the men of the Shropshire, and the 7th fleet, were feeling pretty good about themselves. MacArthur was ashore, the Yamishiro battle group had been destroyed and the war was beginning to go America’s way. Then came a radio message that Kardash will never forget – he was sure his World War II experience was about to come to a sudden and disastrous end. “We got a message that we had to report to San Bernardino Straights [to the north] because [Fleet Admiral William Frederick] Bull Halsey had been suckered out by a decoy and the Yamato was free coming down and sinking everything in its path,” remembers Kardash. “The Yamato was bigger than anything we had and they would have blasted us out of the water. If we had engaged them, I would not be here today. We wouldn’t have had a chance against it.” Named after the ancient Japanese Yamato province, the Yamato was the lead ship of the Yamato class of battleships. She and her sister ship, Musashi, were the largest, heaviest and most powerfully armed battleships ever constructed at the time, featuring nine 18.1 inch main guns, each capable of firing nearly 3,000 pound shells about 25 miles. “We were going up to meet them and I remember thinking ‘Bull, where the hell are you?,’” recalls Kardash. “We were saying our prayers the whole way. This was the one time during the war that I really thought it was probably the end for us.” And it likely would have been, if not for a sudden, and heroic, effort by other members of the United States military. Pilots taking off from nearby American cruisers, men who were nearly out of ammunition but went into battle anyway against the heavily armed Yamato, saved Kardash and the men of the Shropshire. “I don’t know if those boys threw monkey wrenches and screwdrivers at them or what, but they made dummy runs with hundreds of planes that worked in pairs,” Kardash remembers. “Those were brave boys to do that, and the Yamato was suckered out by those planes. One pair after

another came down, and they thought they would be bombed out.” The Yamato turned around and the Shropshire was saved. Later, on April 7, 1945, the Yamato was attacked and sunk by American carrier-based bombers and torpedo bombers. The ship’s sinking all but ended the Japanese naval threat in the Pacific. In addition to Surigao Straights, the Shropshire also served during the battles of Halmahera, Leyte Gulf, Corregidor and Lingayen. In February of 1945, it was assigned to go to Singapore and help out the British – her service with the 7th fleet was over. Soon after, Kardash returned to the United States aboard a tanker. The trip took 21 days to reach California and was highlighted by some sad news coming out of the homeland. “We heard when we were coming back that President Roosevelt had died and we were all very sad to hear about that,” Kardash recalls. As for his thoughts about new President Harry S. Truman’s decision to drop atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945, he feels the same way nearly every member of the American military felt in the 1940s. “I think it was a good thing because the landings would have been so difficult; the Japanese would have fought to the bitter end,” he says. “We all felt it was a quick way to end the war and all the devastation. We felt it was the right thing for President Truman to do and we all supported him in that decision.” Kardash spent most of his post-military life as a manager for a distilling company in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia, though he did spend one season managing a minor league affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles soon after his return from the Pacific Theater of Operations. He and his wife, Eleanor, had two children, who both served in the military. They also have five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. As for his wartime experiences, he wouldn’t hesitate to do it all over again. “I feel I served my country honorably and I would do it all again,” he says. “We were invaded by an enemy and I felt that to fight for your country was an honorable thing. I was very proud of my service record.” To preorder “World War II Heroes of Coastal Delaware,” or to learn more about Diehl’s project honoring Sussex County’s World War II veterans, visit www.ww2heroes.com.

A SPECIAL THANK YOU! Thank you for your support and your votes in the Campaign to Re-Elect Dave Wilson 35th District State Representative.

ARCHITECTS

ENGINEERS

FACILITIES SOLUTIONS

Your Support Was Greatly Appreciated!

Dave Wilson,

Your Representative in the 35th District

H DAVE WILSON H 35TH REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT

www.studiojaed.com

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MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Coast Day essay, video and recipe winners recognized Attendees recently enjoyed the annual Coast Day event held on Oct. 3, at the University of Delaware’s Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes. Essay and Video Contest The winners of two Coast Day contests for Delaware school kids were honored during a ceremony at the University of Delaware event, held Sunday, Oct. 3, at UD’s Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes. Coast Day highlights the state’s coastal resources. With that in mind, both contests asked students to reflect on this year’s theme, “Making the Most of Our Coast.” Emily Cook, a student in Bonnie Reidy’s class at William Henry Middle School in Dover, took first prize in the Fifth-Grade Essay Contest. She wrote about Cape Henlopen Beach and ways to protect it for future generations. Taking second place was Nick Outten, a student in Tanya Mock’s class at East Millsboro Elementary School. Third place went to Matthew Lashbrook, of Peter Metrinko’s class at Brandywine Springs School in Wilmington. Three honorable mention essayists also were recognized: East Millsboro’s Madison Baker and Cameron Hall, both in Karen Saylor’s class, and Callie Freda, of Marilyn Vallego’s class at St. Ann School in Wilmington. In Coast Day’s High School Video Contest, now in its second year, students were asked to produce videos under two minutes. A group of students from Caesar Rodney High School in Camden, earned top prize for their submission, “One Person Makes a Change, A Lot of People Make an Impact.” Under the direction of teacher Mary Stokes, the winning students were: Jarid Keen, James Clough, Nick Burkhardt, Tequan Pitts, Abigail Hall, Jessica Hansen, Alex Cox, Ashley Jones, Bradley Schepens, Ashlee Loera, Harry Simon, and Simon Geddie. You can view their video at Delaware Sea Grant’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/deseagrant. Second place in that competition was Jennie Elliott, under the direction of Paris Crockett at Caesar Rodney High School. Third place was awarded to Amanda

Bilow and Ashton Dummitt, also Crockett’s students. Food competitions Also honored were the seafood creations. In the Crab Cake Cook-Off, a panel of three judges unanimously chose chef Steven Ruiz’s “Pan Seared Blue Crab Cakes with Pepper and Onion Jam” as first place. They raved about the recipe, saying it was a classic cake with spices that amplified the taste of the crab. Ruiz, chef de cuisine at Maris Grove, a retirement community in Glen Mills, Pa., chalked his win up to determination. This was his third attempt at the competition. He finished second last year. “I use the same base for the crab cake and change the accompaniment,” he said. “Last year I did something a little more mild, and this year I went for something with a little more zing.” Ruiz squared off against seven other finalists in the 21st edition of the contest. He received a $200 cash prize and a sterling silver serving plate. Second place and a $150 prize went to Charles Parkhill of Millsboro, for his “Sussex County Low Country Crab Cakes with Crabanero Remoulade Sauce.” Winning third place and $100 was Keith Starkey and Joe Joyce, both of Wilmington, for their “Chesapeake Crab Cake.” Other finalists in the competition included Carl Zampini of Newark, Pam Field of Rehoboth Beach, Crystal Maccari of Elkton, Md., Terri Carr of Lewes, and Jack Bartley of Lincoln University, Pa. Coast Day guests also got a chance to try the winning soup in the Chowder Challenge. Prior to the event, members of the ACF First State Chefs Association held a competition among 10 of its members to determine which recipe they would serve. The winning entry was created by William Stant, president of the Delaware Technical and Community College Culinary Student Club. Stant, whose usual specialty is desserts, combined clams donated by Seawatch International Inc., of Milford, with Red Bliss potatoes, butter, onions, celery, cream, Worcestershire sauce, parsley, and garlic with one other very special ingredient - bacon - to produce a winner.

Guests enjoyed sampling the many delights in the seafood competition.

Winning Recipes First Place - Pan Seared Blue Crab Cakes with Pepper and Onion Jam by Steven M. Ruiz, Wilmington Crab Cakes 2 pounds lump crab meat 1-1/2 cups mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Old Bay 1 tablespoon dry mustard 2 eggs 1/4 cup lemon juice 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon Sriracha hot sauce 1 cup Panko bread crumbs 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper 1 cup olive oil 1 cup flour Pepper and Onion Jam 2 red peppers 1 jalapeno 1 small white onion 1 jar of red currant jam 4 tablespoons red-wine vinegar In bowl, place mayonnaise, eggs, Old Bay, dry mustard, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce and Sriracha hot sauce. Mix well. In a separate bowl, take 2 pounds of crab meat, slowly add wet mix and 1/2 cup of the Panko bread crumbs. Fold together lightly then pat out 4-ounce cakes with that mix. Then, with the remainder of Panko, lightly bread the outside of each cake. Sauté in olive oil until crispy and golden brown. Dice the peppers and onions finely and sauté until caramelized, deglaze with red-wine vinegar and stir in a 1/4 cup of the red current jam. Second Place - Sussex County Low Country Crab Cakes with Crabanero Remoulade Sauce by Charles Parkhill, Millsboro 2 pounds lump crab meat 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1 egg plus 1 yolk 1 tablespoon butter 1/4 cup fine diced celery 1/4 cup fine diced red and yellow bell pepper 1/4 cup shredded scallion 2 tablespoons minced parsley 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons course mustard 1 tablespoon Crabanero brand hot sauce 1-1/2 tablespoons Crabanerobay* seasoning 1 cup Panko bread crumbs 1/2 cup Matzo meal Crabanero Remoulade 1 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup ketchup 1/4 cup minced celery 1/4 cup minced red onion 1/4 cup minced dill pickle 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 2 tablespoons course ground mustard 1 tablespoon Crabanero brand hot sauce 1 tablespoon minced capers Majick to taste Sauté peppers, celery in 1/2 the butter till wilted. Turn off heat and add Worcestershire sauce and course mustard; toss, set aside and allow to cool before proceeding with remainder of recipe. Blend pepper mixture with mayonnaise, 1 egg plus yolk, Crabanero, mustard, and 1/2 the scallion and bay seasoning. Pick through crab meat for shell or cartilage, gently toss crab meat with

parsley, bay seasoning and enough Matzo meal to absorb some of the crab liquid (you may not use all Matzo meal, you don’t want to be accused of a crab cake with too much filler). Next add the pepper mayonnaise mixture gently. Allow to stand in cooler before you pat out the crab cakes. Portion crab cakes out, form into 3-4 ounce cylinders. Toss Panko crumbs with remaining scallions, scatter on plate or sheet pan, and place cylindrical crab cakes on plate to coat with crumbs on plate. Gently press remainder of scallion crumbs into flat top of crab cakes. Add remaining butter to a medium high heat skillet (do not crowd). Brown one side then the next. Put into oven at 350 for 10-15 minutes. Remoulade Sauce Combine all ingredients well, set aside (best if chilled for 15–20 minutes). Garnish plate with lemon, 1 crab cake and remoulade sauce. *Crabanerobay is the original bay seasoned habanero sauce located in Millsboro. Third Place - Chesapeake Crab Cake by Keith Starkey and Joe Joyce, Wilmington 2 pounds crab meat 2 tablespoons yellow mustard 1/8 teaspoon allspice 1/8 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/8 teaspoon hot sauce 1/8 teaspoon Old Bay 1 cup mayonnaise Panko – firm to touch Combine mustard, allspice, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, Old Bay, and mayonnaise. Toss lightly. Add Panko and form crab cake. Chowder Challenge Winning Recipe by William Stant, ACF First State Chef’s Association 2 quarts canned clams with juice 1-1/2 quarts water 1 pound 4 ounces Red Bliss potatoes, sliced then quartered 8 ounces hickory smoked bacon, small dice 4 ounces whole butter 1 pound onions, small dice 8 ounces celery, small dice 3 cloves garlic, minced 4 ounces flour 1 quart half and half 1 quart heavy cream Salt and pepper to taste Worcestershire sauce to taste Fresh parsley, chopped, to taste Drain the clams, reserving both the clams and their liquid. Add enough water so that the total liquids equal 2 quarts. Simmer the potatoes in the clam liquid until nearly cooked through. Strain and reserve the potatoes and the liquid. Render the bacon with the butter. Add the onions, celery and garlic to the rendered fat and sweat until tender but not brown. Add the flour and cook to make a brown roux. Add the clam liquid to the roux, whisking away any lumps. Simmer for 30 minutes, skimming as necessary. Bring the half and half and the cream to a boil and add to the soup. Add the clams and potatoes, and season to taste with the salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce and parsley.

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

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A pot of beans seemed like the perfect meal after the elections

What better week than one in which there’s an election to cook a ynn arks big dish of beans? So that’s exactly what I did ...it was especially apand it was especially appropriate this year, when there was enough propriate this year, when political gas in the atmosphere to there was enough politisicken all of us. (Too bad that foolish and dispir- cal gas in the atmosphere to sicken all of us. iting palaver isn’t an antidote for the greenhouse gases with which we are poisoning our world. If that were the case, we would be well I was expecting, brought them home and on our way to solving climate change, a in one easy step, combined them with goal that, heartbreakingly, looks increasmustard, brown sugar and molasses. No ingly distant with the new crop of science soaking, no pre-cooking, and into the oven deniers who are going to Washington.) they went. Anyway, back to the beans. For the I don’t know if I didn’t have a recipe dish that I cooked last week, I followed a to follow or if I missed the part that must recipe that was included in the cookbook have told me to cook the beans first. In that our daughter wrote a couple of years any case, those beans, when they came out ago and handed out to friends and relaof the oven a couple of hours later, were tives for Christmas. as hard as they had been when they went Titled “Our First Year of Marriage in. They looked good and smelled deliCookbook,” it features recipes that she cious, but they were inedible. adapted and devised to help her reach her Only one guest, who said that he had goal of using local foods as much as posnever had baked peanuts before, and insinsible. It also includes photographs, taken uated that he never wanted to have them by her husband, of their farmers’ market, again, commented on the beans. But when of cows at the dairy farm that provided my visitors scraped their leftovers into a their milk and of meals that she made. trashcan that my husband had set out just I haven’t yet tried the strawberry tart, for that purpose, I could hear that most of the filling of which is made with whole the beans were being thrown away. The milk, whipping cream and eggs, or the trashcan was metal, you see, and every stuffed poblano peppers, which she debean that hit its side or its bottom made a scribes as “a nice, time-consuming and sharp pinging sound. complicated meal to make on a quiet “It sounded like rapid gunfire,” my Sunday.” But I have, on several occasions, husband, who was recently discharged made her version of Greek giant beans, from the Marines, said after everyone had something she learned to love during a gone home. “I kept thinking that we all month-long stay in Athens. should take cover.” “Greek cooking gets thrown together, I’ve learned since then and now can goes on the stove in the morning and stays whip up a pretty good dish of baked there patiently all day,” she wrote. The beans. The ones that I made last week in secret, I would add, is a fair quantity of honor of election day were satisfactorily good olive oil, which at the end of that cooked to tenderness and were delicious. long cooking is all absorbed but still adds Good thing I didn’t compile a cookdelicious flavor and texture. book of my first-year-of-marriage recipes. Giant beans are what I would call dried Along with Hard-As-Pebble Beans, it limas, and for this recipe their extended could have featured other favorites from cooking is done in the oven rather than those 365 days: Mouth-Puckering Elderon top of the stove. But as with all dried berry Pie, Popcorn Balls with Styrofoam beans, they must be cooked to tenderness and Fallen Cake, styles 1, 2 and 3. before they join the olive oil, tomatoes, Kitchen Nightmares, 30 years early. carrots, celery and greens in the casserole dish. AB&C acquires Lefton Co. Last week, as I chopped carrots into Aloysius Butler & Clark (AB&C), a discs and tore broccoli rabe into small full-service marketing communications pieces, I remembered the first bean cassefirm headquartered in Wilmington, anrole that I made, more than 30 years ago. nounces the acquisition of one of the My husband and I were newly married country’s longest-standing independent and for some reason that I can’t imagine advertising agencies, Al Paul Lefton Comnow, I decided to invite co-workers over pany (Lefton), based in Philadelphia, Pa. to our apartment for a summer picnic. I AB&C is an award-winning advertishad very few kitchen utensils, even less ing agency with clients in healthcare, knowledge about how to cook, yet here public health, higher education and finanI was, preparing food for a dozen or so cial industries. Al Paul Lefton Company people. will continue to operate from its office at Baked beans, I knew, are an integral Independence Mall in Philadelphia as a part of any picnic. But I didn’t want to division of Aloysius Butler & Clark. The just open a can — I wanted to prepare two agencies will immediately begin lethem in the old-fashioned way. So I veraging their combined services and team bought a bag of dried white beans, maybe members to provide additional capabilities even two, considering how many people to existing and prospective clients.

L

P

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MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

REMAX ABOVE AND BEYOND - Dignitaries gather Thursday, Nov. 4, for the ribbon cutting and open house for the real estate office of Re/Max Above and Beyond, located at 1310 Bridgeville Highway, Seaford. Shown from left to right in center are owners Brenda Rambo, Trey Hardesty and cutting the ribbon, Kevin Thawley. Photo by Rick Cullen

Murray promoted to vice-president 

Susan P. Murray, who joined Goodwill of Delaware and Delaware County in 1996, has been promoted to vice-president of sales and operations. Before assuming her most recent role as director of sales for all of Goodwill’s retail stores in 2009, Murray served as branch manager for several Goodwill retail stores and held sales management and staff development positions. Her current responsibilities include supervision of all of Goodwill’s retail locations Murray with accountability for sales, operations, customer service and expense controls. Murray earned an associate’s degree in buying and merchandising in 1984 from the Fashion Institute of Technology. She also holds a bachelor’s degree in human performance management from Immaculata University, and a master’s degree in social work from Widener University.

2011 Mrs. Delaware Pageant

The 2011 Mrs. Delaware Pageant will take place at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 20, at the Rehoboth Beach Theater of the Arts. Nine dynamic married women from around the state will compete for the opportunity to represent Delaware in the Mrs. America Pageant and will receive a prize package valued at over $5,000. The reigning Mrs. Delaware 2010, Amanda Shepard of Townsend, will crown her successor. The winner will spend a year traveling throughout Shepard the state making public appearances and supporting charities. The 2011 contestants are: Francine Edwards of Townsend, Leslee Hazard of Millsboro, Gretchen Spraul of Ocean View, Tara Greathouse of Middletown, Christine Rich of Dover, Deborah Edwards of Camden-Wyoming, Shana Williams

of Newark, Alesha Shaw of New Castle and Heather Baker of Middletown. Pageant host is Otise Schuk, Mrs. New Jersey America 2010 and entertainment will be provided by Southern Delaware’s Gems of Arabia and Kristina Maynard, Miss Wilmington 2011. The Mrs. America Pageant will be held in April 2011 at Greenbrier Resort in West Virginia. Tickets are $25 for ages 11 and up, $10 ages 4-10 and children under 3 are free. Tickets will be available at the door. For more information, visit www.mrsdelawareamerica.com or call 228-7741.

Specialty crop block grants issued

Dover-Delaware Department of Agriculture Secretary Ed Kee has announced the Delaware recipients of the Specialty Crop Block Grant funds that are awarded every year through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) for projects designed to enhance the competitiveness of Delaware’s specialty crops. This year, eight Delaware projects will receive a total of $251,741 from the USDA AMS Specialty Crop Block Grant Program established in the 2008 Farm Bill. Specialty crops are defined as “fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops (including floriculture). “These grants are given each year to assist Delaware growers with market expansion as well as the development of new products,” said Secretary Kee. “The competitiveness of Delaware’s specialty crops will be increased through continuing education, applied research, improved technology and genomic research.” This year’s projects include: • Partnering with the Bennett Orchards and the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension to develop a highly productive and cost effective method for establishing blueberries. • Providing students with an opportunity to grow and eat specialty crops as well as develop life skills regarding nutrition, resulting in a healthy lifestyle that includes consumption of specialty crops through school gardening and curriculum. • Partnering with the Delaware Christmas Tree Growers’ Association to improve the practices of growing Christmas trees, promote marketing of Christmas trees, educate members on best growing practices and educate the public on the benefits of growing Christmas trees.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 40

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 35

Driver safety and other advice for deer season It’s deer mating season which means you need to keep a watchful eye for deer at dusk and dawn when they are most amorous. White-tailed deer will go to any length to mate, and that includes right into the path of your vehicle, AAA Mid-Atlantic warns. Deer-vehicle crashes can be costly and deadly. Deer mating season began in October and will continue through December. Remember that deer are herd animals, so if you see one, more are likely nearby. Given the presence and prevalence of deer this time of year, area drivers should always wear a seat belt and drivers should remain awake, alert and sober, advises the auto club. In 2007, Delaware police departments logged a statewide total of 1,349 animal-vehicle crashes – the overwhelming majority involving deer – which resulted in one fatality, 43 personal injuries and 1,305 major and minor property damage-only cases. In 2008, a total of 1,474 crashes were reported, resulting in one fatality, 44 personal injuries and 1,429 property damage-only cases. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) estimates that approximately 1.6 million deer-motor vehicle crashes occur each year on roads across the nation. These collisions make up over $3.6 billion in vehicle damage per year, with each incident averaging $3,000 worth of damage, based on statistics from the IIHS. “Insurance agents say most damage from deer collisions occurs in the front or on the side of a car,” said Heather Foti, an insurance counselor with AAA Insurance. “If involved in a crash, our insurance agents encourage drivers to first call local law enforcement for assistance and then to make note of the date, time, street name and take any pictures to help document the incident.” The deer population in the United States is estimated at 20 to 30 million. While driving this fall, AAA insurance agents recommend drivers keep the following tips in mind to stay safe on roadways: • Be observant. Look for deer-crossing signs indicating areas where deer frequently travel. Deer are creatures of habit and may often use the same path again – remember where you see them. • Be alert. A deer standing near a roadside may suddenly run across the road. Slow down and use your horn to scare the deer. Use high-beams for greater visibility. • Look for groups. If you see one deer crossing the road ahead, more are likely to follow.  • Never swerve. Instead, slow down and brake. Swerving can cause you to lose control of your vehicle and strike another vehicle or object along the roadway. • Use your horn. There is no conclusive evidence that hood-mounted deer whistles and other such devices work. Use your horn instead to scare the deer. • Slow down. If a crash with a deer is unavoidable, AAA recommends slowing down and releasing your foot from the brake before impact. This will raise the front end of the car during the crash and increase the likelihood that the animal will go underneath the vehicle instead of through the windshield. • Buckle up and do not speed. Lower speed will increase your reaction time. • Do not try to move a deer. An injured deer might panic and seriously injure you. Call police or animal control for assistance.

Register deer by phone, online

The DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife reminds hunters that they are now required to register all harvested deer via the Division’s toll-free phone line, 866-511-DEER (3337) or www.dehip.com,

within 24 hours of harvest and before butcher shop processing. The old system using paper registration forms at check stations and butcher shops was discontinued last year. When registering a deer, hunters will need to know their hunting license numbers as well as the deer management zone in which the deer was harvested. Zone information can be found on pages 19 to 22 in the 2010-11 Delaware Hunting & Trapping Guide. After registering, hunters will be given a 12-digit registration number to record and keep as proof of registration. Hunters having deer processed by a butcher will need to give this number when dropping off the animal.  With both Delaware’s deer population and harvest numbers increasing, nearly 14,000 deer are harvested annually and nearly half of those were being registered at check stations. The time required to enter the paper forms used at check stations had become overwhelming in both staff time and expense. In addition, the old system was inefficient – harvest numbers could not be totaled until around May because of the time it took to enter the information into the computer.  The Division is continuing to collect data on chronic wasting disease (CWD) and biological harvest data, including antler measurements, weights, and ages. During the peak deer seasons, Division personnel will be stationed at deer processors statewide collecting this information. For more information, contact Wildlife Biologist Joe Rogerson at 302-735-3600. 

Sportsmen Against Hunger sites

The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife again will participate in the Sportsmen Against Hunger Program during the 2010-2011 Delaware deer hunting season. All donated deer will be processed, with the meat distributed to charitable groups participating in the program. Initially, there was some concern that the Sportsmen Against Hunter program might not be funded due to statewide budget cuts, but the Delaware Legislature was able to provide full funding for the upcoming season. The Division of Fish and Wildlife recently finalized deer donation locations for participating hunters, who may drop off their deer at any of the eight walk-in coolers maintained by the division. These coolers are checked periodically, and all donated deer are taken to the Sussex Correctional Institution where they are processed. If a hunter donates a deer, the division requests that he or she call the phone number posted on the cooler, so that the deer is transported to the correctional institution for processing in a timely manner.  Any deer dropped off at a cooler also must be field dressed and registered, with the registration number written on the field tag attached to the animal. All deer taken in Delaware must be registered online at http://www.dehip.com/deer/default.asp. The number on the field tag will allow the Division of Fish and Wildlife to verify that a deer has been registered. The coolers for donated deer in Sussex County are located at Assawoman Wildlife Area, Frankford; Division of Fish & Wildlife Mosquito Control Office, Milford; Gumboro Community Center, Millsboro; Redden State Forest Headquarters, Georgetown; and Trap Pond State Park, Laurel. Hunters may also take their deer to any of the participating private butcher shops found throughout the state. In Sussex County, these shops include Johnson’s Custom Cutting, 21404 Burton Road, Milton, 684-1790; JAKOR Enterprises, 18740 Whaleys Corner, Georgetown; 236-6801; and Mark’s Meats & More, 24910 Hollyville Road, Millsboro, 933-0307.

CONGRATULATIONS! Jami Allen of Bridgeville & Sylvia Milburn of Laurel!

to

Each Won 4 Free Tickets &

Allen Penrod, Seaford (2 Tickets)

to the Circus compliments of the Star. (Drawing held Oct. 25)

PAGE 36

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Top 10 reasons to visit IRS.gov

By Gregg Semanick IRS DE spokesperson

If you have a tax question or need a tax form – there’s no need to leave the comfort of your home. All you need is a computer and Internet access because IRS. gov has a wealth of information. Here are the top 10 reasons to visit IRS. gov. • Unlimited access - get answers 24 hours a day seven days a week. There’s no need to wait to get a tax form or an answer to a tax question – visit the IRS website anytime. IRS.gov is accessible all day, every day. • Find out all about electronic filing. You can e-file your 2009 federal income tax return through October 15, 2010 from the comfort of your home. Available in English or Spanish, E-file is fast, easy and there are free options for everyone. • Check the status of your tax refund. Whether you chose direct deposit or asked IRS to mail you a check, you can check the status of your refund through Where’s my Refund? at IRS.gov. • Find out how to make payments electronically. You can authorize an electronic funds withdrawal, use a credit or debit card, or enroll in the U.S. Treasury’s Electronic Federal Tax Payment System to pay your federal taxes. Electronic payment options are a convenient, safe and secure way to pay taxes. • Get tax forms and publications. You can view and download tax forms and publications directly from IRS.gov at any hour of the day or night.

• Calculate the right amount of withholding on your W-4. The IRS Withholding Calculator at IRS.gov will help you ensure that you don’t have too much or too little income tax withheld from your pay. • Request a payment agreement. Paying your taxes in full and on time avoids unnecessary penalties and interest. However, if you cannot pay your balance in full you may be eligible to use the Online Payment Agreement Application to request an installment agreement. • Get help in difficult financial times. Events such as a job loss, debt forgiveness or tapping into a retirement fund can have a tax impact. Find answers to these questions and more on the home page of IRS. gov. • Get information about the latest tax law changes. Learn about tax law changes that may affect your tax return. Special sections of the website highlight changes that affect individual or business taxpayers. Learn about the benefits provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act or the Affordable Care Act provisions • Get information about careers at the IRS. No matter what your professional specialty, the IRS can offer you a variety of full-time career or seasonal job opportunities. To assist Spanish speaking taxpayers, the IRS provides a wide range of free products and services on its Spanish Language website IRS.gov/espanol. Remember the address of the official IRS Web site is www.irs.gov. Don’t be confused by sites that end in .com, .net, .org or other designations instead of .gov.

Videos highlight Public Archives

The Delaware Public Archives has completed production on a set of 12 short YouTube videos, the first series of its kind from a State Archives. Videos take viewers “behind the scenes” at the Archives with host Tom Summers to highlight some of the Archives’ notable historic documents, programs, and services available to the public. As the official guardian of Delaware’s state, county and local government records, the Delaware Public Archives stores millions of records that reveal the cultural, social and political history of Delaware and the nation. The series has covered Delaware’s Ratification document, manuscript genealogies, photographic collections, vital statistics, and more. The most recent addition introduces viewers to the “Vietnam Mailbag” Exhibit, which is part of the Archives’ traveling exhibits program. The exhibit is currently on display at the Seaford Museum until Nov. 12. The videos can be viewed by visiting the State’s official YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/DelawareGovernment) and selecting the “Inside the Delaware Public Archives” playlist. Episodes run about 2 minutes each and were all produced with in-house staff and equipment in association with the Government Information Center (GIC), another agency of the Department of State. The first “season” of 12 episodes is now com-

plete, with a second season in the planning stages. The Delaware Public Archives is one of the oldest public archives programs in the country, having been created by the General Assembly in 1905. The Archives has been increasing its overall use of social media to share with the public what it does and how accessible its information is for the amateur genealogist, the history enthusiast, and any other person who is interested in learning about the First State’s history and people. For more information about the Delaware Public Archives, visit http://archives. delaware.gov. The Delaware Public Archives is located at 121 Duke of York St. in Dover. The Mabel Lloyd Ridgely Research Room is open to the public Monday - Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. On the first Saturday of every month the research room is open from 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

2010

Election Results New Castle

Kent

Sussex

State

Christopher A. Coons 123,678 Christine O’Donnell 57,649

22,315 25,059

28,019 40,345

174,012 123,053

office total

187,043

49,440

70,884

307,367

U.S. Representative John C. Carney Jr.

121,764

23,173

28,606

173,543

657

134

170

961

U.S. Senator

Glenn A. Miller James W. Rash

Glen Urquhart Earl R. Lofland Brent A. Wangen Jeffrey Brown

4,459 1,257

60,404 2,001 1,149

1,662 404

24,517 728 401

2,080 440

40,521 975 436

8,201 2,101

125,442 3,704 1,986

office total

185,975

48,953

70,708

305,636

Attorney General Joseph R. Biden III Doug Campbell

136,089 28,945

29,139 8,787

38,703 16,771

203,931 54,503

107,041 75,206 182,247

19,611 28,915 48,526

26,551 42,910 69,461

153,203 147,031 300,234

Auditor of Accounts Richard Korn 102,787

18,683

26,123

147,593

Districts Reported

68 of 68

65 of 65

438 of 438

office total

State Treasurer Chip Flowers Jr. Colin Bonini office total

165,034

37,926

55,474

258,434

HVAC-R program receives donation

The refrigeration, heating and air conditioning program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus received a donation of several pieces of equipment from a regional company. R.E. Michel Company, Inc., wholesale distributors of HVAC-R equipment, parts and supplies, recently donated two mobile home furnaces and a high efficiency residential boiler to be used as training tools in the program.

R. Thomas Wagner Jr. 77,938 office total 180,725 305 of 305

29,440 48,123

42,778 68,901

150,156 297,749

  MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 37

Seaford senior Molly Cain, accomplished equestrian and a goalie for the Seaford varsity field hockey team, is shown with her two loves: horses and field hockey. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Cain works hard in the classroom, on the sports fields to achieve goals

By Lynn Schofer

If you were to ask, what does field hockey, soccer, equestrian, Odd Fellows UN Ambassador, 2000 Little Miss Seaford, and future world leader all have in common; the answer would have to be Seaford High School athlete and academic leader Molly Cain. In a world and environment that has changed drastically in the past decade, Cain has remained grounded on her values and integrity that make her the role model every parent, school, and community dreams about. In a recent interview Cain said, “Education has always been a high priority in our household, education is the key to

success.” As a seven time Academic All Conference Student Athlete Molly has maintained a 4.0 GPA (un-weighted ) and 4.55 (weighted) in high school that ranks her first in the current senior class of 184. Cain believes balance and dedication is important when a student commits to playing athletics, “Time management is really important, I’m not a kid who goes out drinking on a Friday night” and pointed out, “I might miss some movies but it is all worth it.” An accomplished C3 equestrian, Molly joined the United States Pony Club in 2000 and achieved the highest national

The Raiders’ Willie Davis puts the ball in play during his team’s game in Laurel last week. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel boys’ soccer team tops Woodbridge, 5-1, in final game

The Laurel varsity boys’ soccer team defeated Woodbridge, 5-1, last Wednesday in Laurel in the final game of the 2010 season. Jeremy Taylor, Tyler Givans, and Marvin Vazquez each netted a goal in the first half for the Bulldogs while Heber Maldonado tallied a pair of second half goals. Woodbridge freshman Willie Davis scored the Raiders’ goal on a penalty kick in the second half.

Continued on page 41

Seaford goalie Molly Cain stretches to make a stop during her team’s varsity field hockey game against Woodbridge. Photo by Gene Bleile

JV CHAMP- Seaford’s Tynetta Washington, right, is congratulated by Seaford team captain Alexandria Smith after placing first in the Henlopen Conference JV race last Saturday in Harrington. Photo by S.D. Smith

PAGE 38

 MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

SHOT ON GOAL- Sussex Tech’s Kelsey Doherty looks to take a shot on goal against Delmar goalie Caila White as the Wildcats’ Taylor Elliott, left, looks to help out. Photo by Mike McClure MAKING THE SAVE- Woodbridge goalie Abraham Leon beats Tyler Givans to the ball during last Wednesday’s varsity boys’ soccer game in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

BULLDOGS-RAIDERS- Laurel’s Ryne Wood, right, and Woodbridge’s D.J. Jones battle for position during last Wednesday’s varsity boys’ soccer game in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech cross country teams finish in top three in conference meet

The Sussex Tech boys’ and girls’ cross country teams each placed in the top three in the Henlopen Conference varsity meet last Saturday in Harrington. The Lady Ravens, who won the regular season title, finished second behind Milford. The Milford boys’ team also won with Sussex Tech placing third. In the girls’ meet, Sussex Tech’s Emily Ritter (19:36.79) and Isabel Wharton (19:43.61) finished first and second while teammate Bethany Killmon came in seventh (20:32.95). Sussex Tech’s Briana Hall also placed 19th (22:15.17). Milford finished first with 45 points while Sussex Tech was second with 55. Seaford (253) placed eighth. In the JV race, Seaford’s Tynetta Washington finished first (22:49.52), teammate Verstel Ponder was 16th (26:57.62), and Sussex Tech’s Bansri Patel came in 17th (27:18.83) In the boys’ meet, Sussex Tech’s Robbie Robles was 10th (18:00.33), Ricky Hernandez came in 11th (18:00.94), Dylan Varrato finished 14th (18:10.49), and Ryan Fitzgerald added a 19th place finish (18:30.50). Milford (30) was first followed by Caesar Rodney (52) and Sussex Tech (81). Seaford came in 11th (322) in the meet. Sussex Tech’s Kyle Breckner won the JV race (19:08.48), the Ravens’ Matt Dopler was fourth (19:17.61), and Seaford’s Pierre Mondestin placed fifth (19:18.81). Sussex Tech’s Pyrani Patel also finished sixth (19:20.91) and Seaford’s Esais Derolus was 14th (20:04.88).

Join the Star sports nation. Over 300 people like the “Laurel Star sports” and “Seaford Star sports” Facebook pages.

DELMAR-SUSSEX TECH HOCKEY- Above, the Ravens’ Betsy Coulbourn hits the ball upfield as Delmar’s Caroline Phillips moves in to defend during last Tuesday’s varsity field hockey game. Below, Delmar’s Samantha Johnson, left, and Sussex Tech’s Darian Scott go for the ball during last week’s regular season finale in Delmar. Sussex Tech won the game, 4-1, after holding a 2-1 lead at the half. Photos by Mike McClure

     MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Seaford Stars of the Week

Female Athlete of the WeekEmily Ritter- Sussex Tech Sussex Tech senior Emily Ritter placed first in last weekend’s Henlopen Conference meet. Ritter, Isabel Wharton, Bethany Killmon, and Briana Hall each placed in the top 20 to lead the Ravens to a second place finish.

Male Athlete of the WeekWillie Davis- Woodbridge

Woodbridge freshman Willie Davis netted a goal on a penalty kick in the Raiders’ game at Laurel last week. Davis, who is also on the cross country team, placed 60th in the Henlopen Conference varsity meet.

Honorable mention- Jacques Jules- Seaford; Elder Alcantara- Woodbridge; Richard Alcantara- Woodbridge; Trez’mon Kane- Woodbridge; Aris Reynoso- Sussex Tech; Desmond Sivels- Sussex Tech; James Smith- Sussex Tech; Robbie Robles- Sussex Tech; Ricky Hernandez- Sussex Tech; Tynetta Washington- Seaford; Maria DeMott- Seaford; Molly Cain- Seaford; Abby Atkins- Sussex Tech; Maxine Fluharty- Sussex Tech; Izzy Wharton- Sussex Tech; Bethany Killmon- Sussex Tech

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PAGE 39

Low Gross first place winners of the Open Day event were: Mike Kaczmrek (second from left); Bud Jackson (third from left), Penny Short (fourth from left); and Dean Prozzoly (second from right). Also pictured are Lyndon Yearick, Nanticoke Foundation, Executive Director (left); and Tom Brown, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Senior Vice President (right).

Nanticoke Health Services holds Ladies Day, Open golf tournaments

On September 23 and 24, Nanticoke Health Services held its Second Annual Ladies Day Golf Tournament and 24th Annual Open Golf Tournament. For one great cause, 212 golfers took to the course at Heritage Shores. Proceeds from the tournaments benefit the purchase of cardio-respiratory monitors for Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s nursery. The monitors measure a newborn’s breathing rate, heart rate, and oxygen levels. Caregivers utilize the monitor’s measurements to determine the health of the child and assist in a treatment plan. The Presenting Sponsor for the Ladies Tournament was BNY Mellon, and the Community Partner for the Open Day Tournament was Nemours Health and Prevention Services. Returning this year was the Pink LINKS program. One hundred fifteen community members supported the program by purchasing a pink golf ball shaped sign in honor or in memory of a loved one. Winners of the Ladies Day event were: First place (Low Gross)- Jenny Davis, Pat Shannon, Laura Phillips, and Kelly Davis; second place- Janet Morgan, Cinda Allison, Janet Griffith, and Carol Schreffler; Third place- Ruth Sneller, Judy Slack, Mary Pegram, and Marianne Robino Winners of the Open Day event were: First place (Low Gross)- Dean Prozzoly, Bud Jackson, Mike Kaczmrek, and Penny Short; Second place- Tony Worm, Chris Sloan, Richard Gomez, and Russell Gesuero; Third place- Bob Boyd, Jack Riddle, Woody Logan, and Orell Saulsbury Sponsors for the tournaments included: Birdie Sponsors - Aramark, Huntington Insurance, ING Investment Management, LarsonAllen LLP, Richards, Layton & Finger, and Sodexo Healthcare; Cart Sponsor - Regional Builders; Team Pictures - PNC Investments; Par Sponsors - Complete RX, Emergency Physicians Medical Group, Heritage Seubert Financial, Nanticoke Wound & Hyperbaric Center, Owens & Minor Distribution Inc., Peninsula Home Care, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, RCM&D, Ricoh, Sysco Eastern Shore MD, The Insurance Market

ON THE RUN- The Blue Jays’ Myron Hayes looks to shake Indian River’s Jamir Hicks on a run during Indian River’s 42-0 home win last Friday. Also shown are Seaford’s Vernon Davis (76) and Kyle Kellam (52). Photo by S.D. Smith

Woodbridge football team unable come back in loss to Polytech

The Woodbridge varsity football team fell to Polytech, 21-13, last Friday in Woodside. The Panthers scored 14 unanswered points in the second quarter for a 14-0 lead at the half. Down 21-0, the Raiders answered with a six-yard touchdown run by Trez’mon Kane, a two-yard touchdown run by quarterback C.J. Pleasants, and an extra point by Brent Adams.

seafordstar.com

Low Gross first place winners of the Ladies Day event were: Laura Phillips (third from left); Jenny Davis (fourth from left); Pat Shannon (fifth from right); and Kelly Davis (right). Also pictured are Will Scarborough (left); Penny Short, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Chief Nursing Officer; and Lyndon Yearick, Nanticoke Foundation, Executive Director.

PAGE 40

   MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Pauch sweeps championship weekend with Big Block win By Charlie Brown

Sussex Tech’s Desmond Sivels runs with the ball during his team’s home loss to Lake Forest last Friday in Georgetown. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Sussex Tech soccer falls to Smyrna, 2-1, in overtime The Sussex Tech varsity boys’ soccer team lost its final regular season game to Smyrna, 2-1 in overtime, last Wednesday in Smyrna. Aris Reynoso tallied the Ravens’ lone goal while Dylan Lane made two saves. Sussex Tech out shot Smyrna, 145, and held a 6-1 advantage in corner kicks.

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Sussex Tech football team falls to Lake Forest, 20-17 The Sussex Tech varsity football team lost to Lake Forest, 20-17, in a non-conference home game last Friday. Desmond Sivels had touchdown runs of 32 and seven yards for the Ravens, but the Spartans’ Quadir Bryant ran for three touchdowns in a battle of the top two scorers in the conference. Sussex Tech kicker James Smith kicked a 27-yard field goal and added a pair of extra points in the loss.

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Sussex Tech defender Kayla Krause looks to pass during last week’s varsity field hockey game in Delmar. The Wildcats and Ravens each qualified for the state tournament which began earlier this week. Photo by Mike McClure

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

WINDING UP - Sussex Tech’s Izzie Delario prepares to put the ball in play during the Ravens’ road win in Delmar last Tuesday. Photo by Mike McClure

Billy Pauch of Frenchtown, N.J., capped off a profitable weekend as he won the 50-lap Big Block Modified Championship driving the Will Brown No. 1W. It was Pauch’s second big win of the weekend and his third in the classic the last of which came in 1993. Pauch took the lead from Matt Jester just before the halfway sign. Saturday night’s victory was worth $7,063 making Pauch’s two day total a hefty $12,588. Jester looked strong from the pole while Pauch, Richie Pratt, Jr., Wade Hendrickson and Jimmy Horton all diced for positions in the top five. A big tangle occurred on the third lap when Kevin Hirthler clipped the inside tires and spun in turn one sending the middle of the pack scrambling for real estate. In all eight cars were involved. Pratt worked his way past Pauch on lap 11. Five laps later, Hendrickson slowed bringing out the yellow and ending his challenge. Chic Cossaboone entered the top five on the restart with Jester again controlling the field. Pauch regained the second spot on lap 19 as Cossaboone got by Horton for fourth. On that same lap both Brett Ballard and Pratt came to a stop bringing out the yellow. Brad Trice powered into the top five but only for a lap as he slowed to bring out the yellow on lap 21. Pauch used the outside groove in the second turn to get by Jester on lap 24. At the halfway sign the top five were Pauch, Jester, Horton, Cossaboone and Howard O’Neal. Horton took second from Jester on lap 28 with Cossaboone following into third. By lap 32, Pratt had made a charge from the rear and was back running in the top five. Pratt got by Cossaboone for third with 10 to go. The final 10 laps were all green and Pauch opened a comfortable lead to take the win. Horton finished in the second spot with Pratt earning a well deserved third. Fourth went to Cossaboone and Jester ended an excellent drive in fifth. “It wasn’t easy by any means,” said Pauch. “The track was pretty demanding tonight and you had to hit your marks.

The only way it seemed to work good for me was getting in low and coming off the high side. I don’t know who was behind me or who was there but we were running hard every lap.” Heats were won by Hendrickson, Pauch, and Jester with H.J. Bunting taking the consolation. In the 25-lap AC Delco TSS Modified feature Brandon Blades was smooth as glass. Blades started on the pole and quickly settled into a rhythm in a race that would only be slowed by three cautions. 2010 point champion, Joseph Tracy stayed in the hunt in second while Westley Smith held down third. At the halfway sign the top five were Blades, Tracy, Smith, Scott Baker and Scott Hitchens. Ryan Anderson made a late race charge and climbed the fourth. The final yellow flew with two laps to go as John Curtis and Taylor McCracken tangled. Blades made no mistakes as he powered to his first fall championship win in his Blades HVAC/Blue Collar Cycles/ Bicknell. The win was worth $1,960. Tracy, Smith, Anderson and Hitchens rounded out the top five. Heats were won by Tracy and Blades. Kevin McKinney led at the start of the 25-Lap TUSA Mod Lite Championship. Kerry King, Jr. got by Tyler Reed for second with Tim White following into third. Brandon Dennis was on the move taking fourth from Ryan Charland and start his charge to the front. By the halfway sign Dennis had gotten by King for second and had reeled in the leader McKinney. Dennis moved on top with 10 to go and drove to his second fall championship win in the Back in Action/ Simpson Construction/Pro. The victory was worth $1040. McKinney finished in second with King, White and James Hill rounding out the top five. Heats were won by McKinney and King. In the 10 lap Vintage championship, C.J. Schirmer held off Jim Pride, Jr. to take the victory. Chuck Tucker took third with two laps to go with Mark Williams fourth and Eric Vent fifth. First sportsman went to Kelly Putz who finished in the sixth spot.

Cain continued academic rating attainable. The “H” rating is equal to a two year agricultural degree and Molly endured a grueling weekend of oral examinations and performance testing in both riding and academics. Cain was the youngest candidate at age 16 to pass the exam which places her in a select group of less than 1% nationwide to hold the “H” rating. She also serves on the International Academic Team for Pony Club, volunteers at riding camps, and has taught riding to younger students. In her freshman year Molly’s horse became ill with a neurological disease. “I couldn’t ride my horse so I decided to go out for field hockey,” said Cain. The beginning was not easy, “I got hit in the face and lost my tooth.” Molly laughed, “Miss Venables shoved it back in; it actually saved my tooth.” Molly became the goalie after coach Rob Perciful suggested she wear a helmet and the coaches tested her ability to block shots. “Coach (Robin) Verdery unleashed the team on me and only two balls went into the net.” Cain attended summer camps to improve her skills and by her junior year it showed. The 2009 Delmar game is a highlight. “It was an intense game and I think Delmar had 17 corners and 20 shots on goal of which none went in.” Molly remembers the coaches talking to her before the game. “They told me that we had to win this game to make the state tournament,” Cain said. Seaford won the game 2-0 and was awarded a seat in the state tournament. Every year brings change and this year was no different; 11 seniors graduated, coach Verdery retired, and coach Perciful retired, “I think our team has done exceptionally well and Coach Venables teaching skills are great,” said Cain. Molly said as goalie she had to learn to roll with the punches, “I emotionally survived a 10-1 loss to Sussex Tech my junior year; as goalie it is not supposed to be your fault but ultimately you are the one who is suppose to be blocking the goal.” Cain admits feelings of guilt and hurt when hearing comments from fans but said, “I learned to be confident in myself and move on to the next game.” Throughout the school year Cain is active in sports; she swims in the winter and plays soccer in the spring. “I’m definite-

  MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010 PAGE 41 ly not the best swimmer, but I’m a good cheerleader,” Cain said. Molly’s endurance and dedication to academics is mirrored in swimming, “I swim the 500 meter freestyle, the event no one wants.” Cain said she enjoys swimming, “I can see Coach (Bailey) Noel yelling for me, I get high five’s when I finish, and we are a team.” As a role model to other students Molly volunteers in several organizations and has been awarded the 2010 President’s Volunteer Service Award. Cain also represents Seaford along with fellow studentathlete and academic leader Ethan Lee on the Henlopen Conference Sportsmanship Liaison Committee. “I believe it is important that we all understand that there is a certain way a Seaford athlete conducts themselves; no matter what team you are on.” She added, “If you are getting repeated disciplinary referral in school maybe you shouldn’t be playing sports but instead focusing on beSEAFORD-INDIAN RIVER- Seaford’s Shaquil Turnage runs with the ball as Indian having better and doing well in school.” River’s Paul Mulrooney chases him during last Friday night’s game in Dagsboro. Photo by This is the same lesson she tells the S.D. Smith third grade class at Fred Douglass where she is a student mentor. “I always try to conduct myself in a mature, polite manner, and try to help others,” Cain added. Molly’s passion for education has helped her to define her future. “I want to save the world. After college I want to go to law school.” Molly continued, “There is no reason that children should be failing and it doesn’t make sense to penalize a school by reducing funding and firing teachers whose children don’t make the marks; then they really don’t make the marks. I would definitely work on that and make more accountability.” Cain said she can see herself in numerous careers, “A human rights attorney, a politician, State Senator or Representative, a Supreme Court Justice, and even President.” Molly may have to wait a few years to make her ultimate mark in the world; until then she is looking forward to spring soccer. “I didn’t get to play last year because I had a class that was scheduled on the day of games.” Molly loves soccer, “The game is fun, aggressive, and I definitely hope I get to play offense” Molly laughed, “I’ve been in the goal my high school career, I want to play a spot where I can score a goal.” FALL SPORTS- Above, Woodbridge’s

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

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Richard Alcantara is shown with the ball during his team’s game in Laurel. Sussex Tech’s Taylor Kieffer looks to advance the ball during her team’s game in Delmar. Photos by Mike McClure

ON THE MOVE- Woodbridge’s Taija Maddox looks to take the ball pas a defender during her team’s recent home win over Caesar Rodney. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford field hockey caps season with 1-0 win over Knights The Seaford varsity field hockey team ended the regular season with a 1-0 road win over Sussex Central last Wednesday. Maria DeMott scored the only goal of the game at 25:10 in the first half. Seaford held an 11-8 advantage in shots while the Knights had a 6-5 edge in penalty corners. Molly Cain made four saves in goal for the Blue Jays.

PAGE 42

    MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

STAR SPORTS SCRAPBOOK- FIELD HOCKEY- Shown (clockwise from top left) are scenes from the 2010 varsity field hockey season: Laurel’s Alyssa Givens looks to move the ball upfield against Lake Forest; Seaford’s Alexis Hawkins, left, and Mari Phares each scored a goal in a recent game against Cape Henlopen; Woodbridge’s Kelsey Johnson, left, and Erica Parker step to the ball during their team’s win over Caesar Rodney; Laurel’s Whitney Toadvine and Delmar’s Danielle Bradley look to put the ball in play; and Sussex Tech’s Maxine Fluharty takes the ball to the cage during her team’s home game against Seaford. Photos by Mike McClure and Gene Bleile

See next week’s Seaford/Laurel Star for the varsity boys’ soccer scrapbook page.

The Star Sports Nominations for 2010 Election season is over but the voting has just begun as Morning Star Publications once again presents the Star Sports Story of the Year and Team of the Year. Also this year, the Star will salute a Coach of the Year and an Athlete of the Year. Nominations are now being accepted at sports@mspublications.com, Seaford Star sports and Laurel Star sports on Facebook, and 302-6299243 (f). So... Get your nomination selections in today for: 1. Sports Story of the Year 2. Team of the Year 3. Coach of the Year 4. Athlete of the Year Everyone who makes a nomination for these awards will be entered into a drawing for a free one year subscription to the Star.

     MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 43

Sussex Tech’s Maxine Fluharty, left, shoots the ball past the CR goalie for an early goal as teammates Kelsey Doherty (12) and Abby Atkins look on during Tuesday’s first round win. Fluharty had two goals and two assists in the 8-1 home win. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech field hockey opens tourney with 8-1 win over CR By Mike McClure

The Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team opened state tournament play with an 8-1 home win over Henlopen Conference rival Caesar Rodney on Tuesday. The defending state champions jumped out to a 6-0 lead in the first half and didn’t look back. “We’ve been preaching it (getting off to a quick start) all year and they finally came out of the gates,” said head coach Nancy Tribbitt, who pointed out that her team held a narrow 3-2 lead over the Riders at half-time of their regular season match up. Sussex Tech wasted no time scoring as Abby Atkins scored off a feed from Maxine Fluharty (28:41) before returning the favor less than four minutes later. Atkins added two more goals off assists from Lindsay Rickards and Fluharty to make it 4-0 with 19:12 left in the first half. Logan Pavlik added a goal off a pass from Atkins (16:54) and Kelsey Doherty got into the action with under 10 minutes remaining in the first half. Atkins also picked up the assist on that goal to give her three goals and three assists in the half. “If my teammates hadn’t passed me the ball it wouldn’t have happened,” Atkins

said after the game. “This was one of her best games. She was moving, she was moving the ball around,” added Tribbitt. Sussex Tech held a 16-3 advantage and a 6-3 edge in corners in the first half of play. In the second half, Fluharty scored on a penalty stroke (22:26) and Franny Delrosario netted a goal at 17:08 for an 8-0 Raven advantage. Caesar Rodney’s Lynzi Yearick put the Riders on the board with a goal with 8:02 left, but Sussex Tech held on to win, 8-1. The Ravens ended the game with a 26-6 advantage in shots and an 11-7 edge in corners. Sussex Tech’s Megan Cannon had two saves and Erin Johnson recorded three saves as the duo split duties in the win. The Ravens continue their quest for a second straight state title this Saturday in Dover. But the team only has its sights on the next game, not the championship. “It’s a brand new season. We think about each game individually,” said Atkins. “Today our only focus was let’s beat CR.” “It’s a whole new season and we’re definitely taking it one at a time,” Tribbitt said. “Whoever we play (Saturday) we have to come out with our ‘A’ game.” The Ravens move on to a turf surface

TOUCHDOWN RUN- The Wildcats’ De’Vaughn Trader runs for a touchdown as Laurel’s Chris Jones looks to make a tackle. Trader had a pair of touchdowns in the 20-14 loss. Photo by Mike McClure

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Delmarva Christian girls’ volleyball falls in state tournament

The Delmarva Christian varsity girls’ volleyball team lost to Padua, 3-0 (25-13, 25-8, 25-12), in the opening round of the state tournament on Tuesday. Mallorie Parsons had six kills and four blocks and Lauryl Berger added eight assists for the Royals in the loss.

after playing at home on the Bermuda grass. “It’s (turf) a little bit faster. They like the Bermuda, I think they play better on Bermuda,” said Tribbitt. “It’s definitely a better skill game on turf.” Sports editor’s note- The Delmar field

hockey team and the Sussex Tech boys’ soccer team were scheduled to open state tournament play on Wednesday. Check out the Laurel Star sports and Seaford Star sports Facebook pages for results from those games.

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The Ravens’ Abby Atkins prepares to take a shot as teammates Maxine Fluharty, left, and Taylor Kieffer stand by. Atkins had three goals and three assists to help lead Sussex Tech to an 8-1 win over Caesar Rodney in the first round of the state tournament. Photo by Mike McClure

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  MORNING STAR • NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Seaford Bowling Lanes

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Lefty Left 28-8 Seaford Lanes 26-10 Two Plus One 26-10 New Bodies 22-14 ABC of It 19-17 Lucky Strikes 14-22 Bee Movie 14-22 Cougars 13-23 Jean and the Guys 13-23 High games and series Russ Leberknight 275, 736 Renee Johnson 257 Erma Baker 692

Club 50

Lucky Strike 23-13 Gamblers 22-19 2-1 20-16 Three Buddies 20-16 Magic Markers 20-16 Pretenders 20-16 The Untouchables 19-17 Deal or No Deal 18-18 Cowboys 17-19 Pinbusters 17-19 Hopefuls 15-21 3 Wise Men 14-22 New Friends 14-10 High games and series Roger Hall 294 Roland Tice 731 Fred Phillips 731 June Downes 777 Elizabeth Pinkett 303

Tuesday AM Mixed Fun Bunch Pin Drops Getter Dun Sparetimers Trouble

23-13 21-15 20-16 17-19 14-22

The Strikers 13-23 High games and series Mark Causey 264, 669 Jenn Kerr 267 Pam Good 636

Baby Blue Jays

New Beginnings 19-8 Jays 17-10 Hot Shots 9.5-17.5 Strikers 8.5-18.5 High games and series Adin Chambers 189, 342 Alisha Taylor 177, 320

Star

Ten Pins 27-9 Spare Timers 19-17 Strike Masters 18.517.5 Pin Destroyers 18-18 Dead Eyes 18-18 Strikers 7-28.5 High games and series Marcus Greene 244, 656 Kayla Arnett 213 Shelby Williams 604

Tuesday Early Mixed

Seaford Moose 26-10 Just Chillin 23-13 Payne + Two 22-14 Trouble 22-14 Half and Half 21-15 Cross Fire 20-16 Laurel Junction 19-17 Vacationers 18-18 Down N Out 18-18 Dreamers 16-20 Empty Pockets 15-21 Bass Awkwards 13-23 B Attitudes 12-24 High games and series Bill Wagner 275

Jerry Mariner Joyce Tull

703 271, 697

Mardel

Fairway Auto Sales 68-22 Walking Wounded 56-24 The Wiz 54-26 Team Dynasty 50-30 Buluga’s 50-30 Joey White Horseshoeing 48-32 Henry’s Furniture 44-36 Kernodle Construction 42-38 3 Jokers and a Queen 42-38 Delmarva Consignment 38-42 Sandbaggers 36-44 No Clue 34-46 Stoopid Monkey 28-52 Lewis Racing Stable 28-52 Who is That 20-60 High games and series Jerry Wooters 302 Michael Fletcher 755

Friday Trios

Puppies at Play 23-13 Win Lose or Draw 21-15 7 Up 20-16 Norma’s Crew 19.516.5 Wolf Pack 19-17 New Attitude 17-19 12 in a Row 17-19 Strikes and Spares 16-20 Terry’s Tigers 14.521.5 Can’t Touch This 13-23 High games and series Buzzy Watson 260

Alvin Berdaux Shirley Greene Elgi Austell

655 210 570

Seaford City

Seaford Lanes 20.511.5 Ruff Ryders 20-12 Easy Pickins 18-14 Git-R-Done 15-17 Guardian Angels 13.518.5 Phillips Construction 9-23 High games and series Mark Benson 294, 777

Senior Express

Curves Chicks 23.5-8.5 Mission 3 22-10 Just Us 19.5-12.5 New Comers 19.5-12.5 Under Warranty 19.5-12.5 New Crew 17.5-14.5 Just the Guys 17-15 Mighty Pioneers 16.5-15.5 Senior Survivors 15.516.5 Pin Pals 15-17 Strikers 14.517.5 Kellam’s Crew 14-18 Pinbusters 14-18 Chick’s Rollers 14-18 We Don’t Know 14-18 Rack Attack 11-21 Russ Morgan DDS 11-21 Attitude with Spares 10-22 High games and series Dick Trentler 282 Calvin Ellis 715 Gerri Wiberg 285, 753

SEAFORD BOWLING LANES Home of Galactic BowlinG

629-9778

302

Nylon Capital Shopping Center Seaford, DE

This week in Star sports history 10 YEARS AGO- The Seaford varsity girls’ cross country team won the county, conference and division titles. Jen Willis placed fourth in the Henlopen Conference meet while Caitlin McGroerty was fifth. The Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee team picked up a 40-20 win over Smyrna in the first round of the playoffs. Robert Reed ran for 193 yards and three touchdowns, Michael Belle added 85 yards and a touchdown, and Michael Small recorded seven tackles. FIVE YEARS AGO- The Sussex Tech field hockey team recorded three wins to move to 11-4 and host a state tournament game. Bethany Pavlik scored five of the Ravens’ 10 goals in the games. The Seaford soccer team fell to Tower Hill, 2-1, in double overtime in state tournament play. Trevor Lee had a goal and Matt Terry added an assist for the Jays. ONE YEAR AGO- The Delmar football team defeated Laurel, 12-6, to win the Henlopen South. Cameron Mattox ran for 68 yards and two touchdowns for Delmar while Chris Jones had 127 yards rushing and Nick Munoz made 10 tackles, blocked a punt, and recovered a fumble for Laurel. The Delmar field hockey team earned a 2-1 win over Milford in the first round of the state tournament to avenge a regular season loss to the Bucs. Mallory Elliott had a goal and an assist and Sam Johnson added a goal.

STAR TEAM PHOTO OF THE WEEK-- The Sussex Tech varsity cheerleaders are shown during a recent home football game. Photo by Lynn Schofer Next week- ?????????? Send photos and captions to sports@mspublications.com.

Ricky ‘The Rocket’ Elliott wins Delaware Late Model Championship

RESULTS: 50-Lap Late Model Championship Finish: Ricky Elliott; Darryl Hills; Mark Byram; Donald Lingo Jr; David Hill; Dale Lingo; Herb Tunis; Staci Warrington; Jere Wierman; Lou Johnson; Kelly Putz; Rick Hulson; Kevin Scott Jr; Rob Schirmer; Bob Geiger; Kenny Pettyjohn; Dave Hertz; Hal Browning; Derrike Hill; Bryan Driver; Jonathan Favinger; Austin Hubbard; David Pettyjohn; Andy Haus; Kerry King, Ray Davis Jr; D J Troutman; Randy Stoudt; Scott Haus; DNS; Andrew Mullins. 25-Lap Crate Model Championship Finish: Bobby Watkins; Clay Tatman; Ross Robinson; Joe Warren; Clint Chalabala; John Imler; Chris Hitchens; Tyler Reed; Dylan Evans; Mike Wharton; Kevin Hill; Matt Hill; Nick Davis; Justin Breeding; John Emory; Skip Syester; Randy Givens; Roy Hassler; Sparky White; Robbie Emory; Colby Steele; Donald Lingo Jr; Kelly Putz; Matt Glanden; Mike Wilson; Eric Vent.

Seaford Recreation Department Youth Basketball signups are taking place Signups for the City of Seaford Recreation Department’s Youth Basketball League are taking place for the following age groups: boys 8-10, boys 11-13, and girls 8-13. The deadline to register is Dec. 3 at the recreation office. There will be no sign-ups at the gym or on the day of tryouts. Practices will take place in December with the league starting in January. The cost is $25 which includes a shirt that you can keep. Signups for boys and girls ages 6-7: The deadline to register for boys and girls ages six and seven years old is Dec. 31 at the recreation office. The league starts in early February with all game being played at the Frederick Douglass gym on Saturdays. The cost is $25 which includes a free shirt that you can keep. The league must have at least 32 kids in order to play.

Seaford Recreation Department to hold Little Wrestlers program The City of Seaford Recreation Department is holding a Little Wrestlers program for children ages 6-12. The cost of the program, which will begin in mid November and will run through March, is $25 per child. All reegistration will be held at the recreation office. The deadline to register is Nov. 12 Junior Jordan Basketball Clinic to be held in January- The Seaford Recreation Department’s Junior Jordan Basketball Clinic, for boys and girls in grades K-3, will be held on Saturdays in January at the Fred Douglass gym. The cost is $5 per child. Basic fundamentals will be stressed at the clinic. The deadline to register is Dec. 31.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

LAUREL-DELMAR- Delmar’s Keandre Whaley carries the ball as teammates Matt Waldman, left, and De’Vaughn Trader block for him during last Friday’s game against Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 45

Helpful hints for a memorable Thanksgiving dinner I should be used to November sneaking up on me by now, but oretta norr somehow I never expect it to arrive while the coals are still smoldering from the Labor Day barbecue! Because cooking Thanksgiving Dinner is not an annual occurrence I look forward to, I seek advice from those who are slightly more adept at planning than I. When it comes to Thanksgiving, the experts say, you ‘gotta have a system. Here’s a bunch of hints: • Check off the recipes on your list as • Plan a menu - pretty basic you complete them. advice- but make sure not all cooking is • Assign duties to other family memconcentrated in one appliance. bers. • Choose your recipes and make a gro• Set your table a couple of days ahead cery list directly from them. of time. • Plan the day or days you’re going to Here’s what’s usually the final piece of shop and which stores you’ll visit. advice (which I take to be some kind of • Write out a cooking schedule and sick joke): “Relax”. timetable. Some dishes can be made I often like to think about dessert first, ahead, frozen and reheated. Others may just to get me in a better mood. Pumpkin have to be cooked at the last minute. and Pecan pies are traditional Thanksgiv• Collect serving dishes and utensils. Stick a post-it note on each dish with what ing fare. Here are two variations on the theme you might want to consider for a it will be used for. change of pace. • Clean out your freezer and refrigerator!

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

Pumpkin-Raisin Bars Bon Appétit, January 1998 Makes 24 2 cups all purpose flour 2 cups sugar 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves 1 15-ounce can solid pack pumpkin 4 large eggs 3/4 cup vegetable oil 1 cup raisins 6 ounces cream cheese, room temperature 1 cup powdered sugar 1/3 cup butter, room temperature Preheat the oven to 350. Grease 15 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 1-inch baking sheet. Stir first 8 ingredients in large bowl to blend. Add pumpkin, eggs and oil and beat until blended. Mix in raisins. Spread batter in prepared pan. Bake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Cool in pan on rack. Beat cream cheese, powdered sugar and butter in medium bowl to blend. Spread frosting over cake in thin layer. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Refrigerate until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated.) Cut cake into bars and serve. Pecan Pie Bars 24 small squares

Approximately 100 members of the community joined Nanticoke’s Cancer Care Center, the American Cancer Society and the City of Seaford for a vigil walk to Seaford’s Gateway Park. Speakers of the event included (from left), City of Seaford Mayor, Edward H. Butler, Jr.; Representative Daniel B. Short; First Lady of Delaware, Carla Markell; and Nanticoke Health Services President/CEO, Steven A. Rose.

Breast cancer awareness

In October, approximately 100 community members joined Nanticoke’s Cancer Care Center, the American Cancer Society and the City of Seaford for a vigil walk to Seaford’s Gateway Park to kick off Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Gateway Park was decorated in pink lights and ribbons. Each participant held a pink glow stick to honor survivors and remember those who lost their battle with breast cancer. Community members were encouraged to wear pink during the three-block walk along a lighted path from Nanticoke Cancer Care Center to Gateway Park. Mrs. Markell, First Lady of Delaware and breast cancer survivor, spoke to community members about mammography and early detection. During October, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Campus and Mears Health Cam-

pus were “Making Strides against Breast Cancer.” Several activities were planned to provide cancer awareness, and Nanticoke employees were encouraged to wear pink on Fridays throughout October. Along with adding pink breast cancer ducks in honor or in memory of someone to the main entrance’s water fountain, Nanticoke’s Employee Activity Committee hosted Basket Bingo to raise money for women’s services, and Nanticoke’s team “Pretty in Pink” participated in the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Sussex Walk on Oct. 3. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and The Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition hosted a breast cancer survivor’s tea. For more information, contact Melinda Huffman, nurse navigator, at 629-6615, ext. 3765.

If you like your bars less sweet, you may cut back on the sugar. Also, some cooks prefer to use a combination of Karo and molasses. Crust 1/4 cup sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/4 cups flour 1/2 cup butter or 1/2 cup margarine, softened Bars 2 large eggs 3/4 teaspoon vanilla 1 1/2 tablespoons butter or 1 1/2 tablespoons margarine 3/4 cup sugar 3/4 cup Karo syrup 1 1/4 cups pecan halves Preheat oven to 350. Prepare and bake Cookie Crust as follows: Spray 10 x 15-inch baking dish with Pam. Beat at medium speed the sugar, flour, salt and butter. Beat until mix is fine crumbs. Press into pan. Bake 20 to 30 minutes or until light brown. While baking prepare filling as follows: Beat eggs, corn syrup, sugar, butter and vanilla until blended. Stir in pecans. Pour over hot crust. Bake 30 minutes. Cool and cut into squares. Recipe courtesy of Food.com

PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Return Day tradition continues Continued from page one

tightly controlled: Gone were peddlers selling cotton candy and oversized balloons. No one threw candy to the crowd from passing floats, no one dashed from the sidewalk to embrace a candidate. And no candidate, after finishing the parade, walked the route a second time, greeting and talking with constituents. Return Day board member Jim Bowden guessed that the rain as well as memories of the 2008 Return Day and long lines at checkpoints kept people away this year. That, and the fact that Biden’s office announced on Wednesday that the vice president would not be there. But many other politicians were there. Congressman Mike Castle, who lost his bid to run for Biden’s former Senate seat to primary opponent Christine O’Donnell, walked in the parade with Sen. Tom Carper and Sen. Ted Kaufman, who was appointed to fill Biden’s seat until after this election. As Castle walked past the crowd, he thanked people for enduring the rain to watch the parade. O’Donnell rode in the first carriage of

the parade with Democrat Chris Coons, who defeated her in the general election. According to tradition, which demands that losers ride backwards in the carriages, she was facing the carriage’s back window. Before the start of the parade, the Approaching Storm, the marching band from Delaware State University, performed in front of the grandstand. “Election time is over and this is a time for all of us to work together to make Delaware as great as it can be,” director Randolph Johnson told the crowd. Miss Delaware Kayla Martel said that Return Day is a “great tradition.” She added, “This is a wonderful day to celebrate the fact that we have the freedom to vote.” Diamond and Chad Brockbrader, Laurel, attended Return Day with their son, Zane, 5. They were looking forward to the parade and to seeing the Seaford High School band, in which their 16-year-old daughter, Kara, plays clarinet, perform. “This is the first time I’ve been to Return Day,” said Diamond Brockbrader, who grew up in Georgetown. “I’m really excited. This is a unique celebration.”

70 years of marriage I, Granville Hearn, graduated from high school in Seaford in 1936. I spent most of my life there until transferred by the Pure Oil Co. to Charlotte, N.C., in 1958. I met my wife in high school. We were married four years later. The Charlotte Observer newspaper ran the enclosed item in the Oct. 10th issue. I would appreciate you doing the same in the Star. Thank you. Granville E. Hearn, Jr. Charlotte 70th wedding anniversary Granville Hearn Jr. Lt. Col. (USAR) Retired, 92, and Pearl Shaw Hearn, 90, of Charlotte, celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary on Sept. 24, 2010, at Providence Country Club. They were married Sept. 27, 1940, at St. Paul’s Methodist Church in Wilmington. After their marriage of 15 months, the bombing of Pearl Harbor occurred and two years later Granville was in the army. Ultimately, Granville served in occupied Germany and was a witness for two days of the Nuremburg War Crimes Trials. Upon returning home, Granville came back to Pearl and new daughters, Nancy Murray (deceased) and Carol Kuester. Granville realized at that time that his meaning in life was to care for his family. Pearl found herself immediately, as a mother, teacher, and friend to Nancy and Carol, and later Patricia Cline and Gran Hearn III. The couple transferred to Charlotte in 1958. Through the years, Pearl and Granville found time to visit all seven continents and 78 different countries. Today the couple has nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. They say, “We wish we could do it all over again.”

Soroptimist International of Seaford supports the Stars’ Newspaper In Education Program

“We at Soroptimist value education and feel that this program will be an asset to the learning environment for children in this area. We commend you on the creation of this program.” Soroptimist of Seaford Curiosity Service Foundation, Inc.

Thank You to Our 2010-2011 NIE SUPPORTERS Azar Eye Institute Michael Vincent Sussex County Betts and Biddle Eye Care Councilman First State O’Neals Antiques Fabrication Scott’s Frank Calio Furniture, Inc. Friends For Lee Soil Service, Inc. Kiwanis Club of Bridgeville Soropimist Kiwanis Club of Delmar International Laurel Civic Club of Seaford Laurel Lions Club Laurel Town of Bridgeville Lioness Club Trinity Transportation Maria Heyssel If you would like to support Newspapers In Education for the 2010-2011 School Year, please call the Star office at 302-629-9788 or clip this coupon and mail to Morning Star publications, Attn: Karen Cherrix, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 Your Name __________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Phone ________________ Enclosed $_____________

Or donate when you renew or subscribe to the Seaford / Laurel Star. (details on renewal notice)

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 47

Glimpses of Return Day 2010

State Rep. Dave Wilson and his challenger, Jim Westhoff, ride with their spouses in the Return Day parade. According to tradition, Westhoff, who lost, is riding backwards.

Sen. Tom Carper walking in the Return Day parade.

Joe Willene, left, and Teressa Smith sit on a bench on The Circle, waiting for the Return Day parade to start.

Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips gives a thumbs-up sign to one of his supporters during Thursday’s Return Day parade. Photos by Lynn R. Parks

State Rep. John Atkins walks the parade route.

A Sussex Central High School FFA float expresses a wish for cooperation among Republicans and Democrats.

PAGE 48

MORNING STAR

• NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

Classifieds COMPUTERS

*Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

SKI TELLURIDE, CO., with the Salisbury Ski Club.  Week of 1/29/11. Call 410 -546-0083, or visit the Trips/ Activities page at www.salisburyskiclub.com. 11/11

Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

ANGEL FOOD MINISTRIES

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(For Subscribers - Personal Use Only)

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

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LOST SIAMESE CAT, Seal Point, male, “Scrappy” missing since 10/28 from Phillips Landing Rd., Laurel. Reward. 8751165. 11/4

CALICO CAT, ‘Katie.’ I’ve had her 20 years & want her back, please! 301 Fifth St., Seaford, 629-4307. 10/14

FOUND FOUND ITEM at W.C. Truitt Tindall’s Store auction, Nov. 6. If you lost something, call Mike at 448-6467 and describe to claim. 11/11 SM. FEMALE DOG found in West Seaford area. Call with description to claim. 629-3642. 10/21

Subscribe Today! 629-9788

NOTICE

Laurel Nazarene Church, 875-7873 Lifeway Church of God, 337-3044 Our Lady of Lourdes, 629-3591 For more info see www. angelfoodministries.com

Help support a benefit for

Mike Cherrix, who is

YARD SALE

BO DICKERSON BAND

MEGA YARD SALE! 11/20 7 AM - until. Epworth Christian School Gym, 14511 Sycamore Road, Laurel. Mult-Family; Lots of Items. 11/11

recovering from cancer treatment/orthopaedic surgery and enjoy entertainment by the

Sun., Nov. 21 1-5 pm Station Seven at Laurel Junction (formerly Bargain Bill’s) Cost $10 in advance or at door Cash bar and full menu available.

Live & Silent Auctions for tickets or info call 236-7642 - 875-7460 - 875-8505

INVITATION TO BECOME A CERTIFIED CATERER IN DELAWARE STATE PARK SPECIAL EVENT FACILITIES

The Division of Parks and Recreation is accepting offers to become a certified caterer in Delaware State Park Special Event Facilities. Contracts are available from the Office of Business Services at the Division of Parks and Recreation, Richardson & Robbins Building, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, DE 19901 or by calling the Office of Business Services at 302-739-9220. Requests for contracts will be accepted through December 1, 2010 at 3:00 p.m.

WANTED TYPEWRITER, Electric or Manual, must be in good cond. 875-0747. 11/4

NEWSPAPER RACKS In Good Condition

for tab-size publications. Not interested in coin-operated. Call Karen at 629-9788.

AUTOMOTIVE 8’ CAP FOR P/U, fiberglass, $200. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28 ‘92 ACCORD DX. Runs great, 5 spd, 2 dr, AC, 220K mi. 1 owner. Tagged til 2012. Asking $1900. 7458911. 10/21 HEAVY DUTY BOX, Welded Alum., for small PU, 21” deep, $200 OBO. 6280617. 10/21 2 TIRES, 16” RIM, call for details, like new, $70. 6281626. 10/14 ‘92 RS CAMARO, $900 OBO. 245-6856 or 8754159. 10/14 LEER SM. TRUCK CAP, ladder rack & 2 side boes w/locks, $250 OBO. 2968484. 10/14

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS AIR SCOOP for trailer, $200. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28

BOATS OUTBOARD MOTOR, 15 hp, negotiable. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES 1918 CTRY STORE KEROSENE TANK & Pump, exc. cond. & 1-horse plow. 8755164 or 875-7531. 10/21 BLACKSMITH SHOP Equip., Forge, anvil, etc. 8875-5164 or 875-7531. 10/21

‘03 MAZDA PROTEGE, 87K miles, great cond., $6200. 410-251-8725. 10/7

CAST IRON CAULDRON, 3 legs, great shape. Used during old hog-killing days, $150. 846-9788. 10/21

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES

ANT. ROCKING CHAIR, 100 yr. old, great cond., $110 OBO. 519-0441. 10/21

‘04 ARTIC CAT ATV, 650 LE 4x4, 700 mi., like new, w/wench & grill guards, $3700. 410-251-8725. 10/7 HD MOTORCYCLE JAKLIFT, model 1800 (1200# cap.), used little. New $380, asking $125. 629-8077.

FOR SALE HARVARD FOOSE BALL Table, $150. Sportcraft full size pool table w/access. $150. 337-0710. 11/11

Mountaire Farms of Delmarva is hosting Job Fair in SEAFORD, DE. When: Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010 Where: HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 210 North Dual Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Time: 10:00am-4:00pm Immediate consideration for employment! Apply in person: We are looking to fill the following positions: • Poultry Processing workers • Garage Mechanics

Come join a team that offers steady work, competitive wages and excellent benefits!

Mountaire Farms of Delmarva is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Visit our Internet website to explore other exciting opportunities!

www.mountaire.com

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28 The Circle,Georgetown, DE

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MR. CONCRETE 410-742-0134

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Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

302-629-4281 Seaford, Delaware

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Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales

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239 E. Market Street Laurel, DE 19956

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IRRIGATION

Remind People You Are Here For Them!

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Brian Papp

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6299788

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PAGE 50 SNOWBLOWER, 3 hp, gas, 20” exc. cond., $225. 3377359. 11/11 JAZZY POWER WHEEL CHAIR, new batteries, good cond., $600 OBO. 410-6032724. 11/11 Hunting Coveralls Red­head insulated youth sz 16, Mossy Oak Breakup, new cond. $30. 337-3370. 11/11 CHANGING TABLE/dresser, white & crib mattress. $25/ both. 875-2233. 11/11 INVERSION TABLE, Life­ Gear, with instruction video-$65. 875-2233. 11/11 8 DBL. BED SHEET SETS, 1 Queen set. One set new, the others gently used, exc. cond. Luxury percale 200 thread count, $8/ set OBO. 2 Winter blankets, full/queen size $6 ea. OBO. 877-0622. 11/11 KNEEBOARD, Kiddier Red­ line. Used, best offer. 8770622. 11/11 MICROWAVE, EMERSON 900 BTU, new, $50. 410896-3433. 11/11 CHANDELIER, 5 petal light Model 811BOCO, SN CA9EO786X062, gold plated, exc. cond., $30 OBO. METAL DESK, blk., wood top, 2 drawers on right side, one file drawer on left, metal legs, good cond. & Blk swivel chair, $30/both OBO. 877-0622. 11/11 BOOK CASE, 5 shelves, walnut laminated 70x30x12, exc. cond. best offer. Hon 42” H Commercia 4 drawer lateral file cab., putty color, letter/legal, side to side or front to back filing, locking drawers, steel ball bearing susp. Above exc. cond. asking $500. 877-0622. 11/11 NEW 9X7 AREA RUG, $40, multi-color. Roll-away bed, $20. Baby stroller, $5. 8755881 or 875-5217. 11/11 EARLY AMERICAN SOFA, 3 cushions, very good cond., $50 OBO. (need the space). 629-6504. 11/4 BULLET HEATER, Kerosene, 35K BTU, good cond., $75 OBO. 349-4241. 10/28 BIKE CARRIER for 2 bikes, for bumper hitch or 2” receiver. $80. 875-4257, lv. msg. 10/28 CHINA HUTCH, solid wood, pine. 7 drawer lower chest, lit upper glass display, $300 OBO. 519-0441. 10/21 UPRIGHT PIANO, ivory keys, $150. 629-6730. 10/21

MORNING STAR FIREWOOD: Seasoned hardwood, $130/cord; $70 for 1/2 cord. Call John, 6299657. 10/21 DISHWASHER, built-in, Frigidaire, never used, exc. cond., best offer. 875-8134. 3 CAST IRON FRY PANS, 6.5”, 8” & 10.5”, good shape, $25. 846-9788. 10/21 DR LEAF VACUUM/Mulcher, 5 hp BNS eng., 2500 gal. leaf capacity, hardly used. $650. 629-5354. 10/14 RECLINER. Green, like new, $100. 628-3362. 10/14 2 EXT. DOORS, 1 storm, 1 reg.. Med. size FP insert, good for garage, etc. 3 Michelin tires, 245 65 17”, best offer. 628-9352. 10/14 7.5’ NORWAY SPRUCE Christmas Tree, $50. 6294768. No Sunday calls. 10/14 10” TABLE SAW, table top, new, $50. New coveralls w/ hood, 58 reg., $50. 6294768. No Sunday calls. ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD, like new, hardly used, $290. 875-7495. 10/14 DRY SINK, $150. 6 sets of Betty Boop salt & pepper shakers, $50 for all. 8759283. 10/14 CHANDELIER & MATCHING 44” Ceiling fan w/light, brass; 5 white glass shades on ea., w/all parts needed for hanging, exc. cond., $100 for both. 410-8832541. 10/7 VHS MOVIES: James Bond, Titanic, many more, 50¢ ea. 628-1880. 10/7 JVC DVD PLAYER, new, never out of box, $40. 6294482. 10/7 YARDMAN WEED WACKER, gas motor, $40. 6294482. 10/7 DEWALT WORK STATION RadIo w/built-in charger & auxiliary port, $100. 6294482. 10/7 GAS HEDGE TRIMMER, 22”, used 1 time, $70. 8755889. 10/7

ANIMALS, ETC. BORDER COLLIE, Female, 6 mos. old, registered, all shots, $450. 875-5164. 10/21

FREE  CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale. No Vendors Please.

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• NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

LEGALS PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

You are hereby notified the below matter will be before: The City of Seaford Planning and Zoning Commission for their review and recommendation on Thursday, December 2, 2010 at 7:00 P.M., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware; and, The City of Seaford Mayor and Council for their determination on Tuesday, December 14, 2010, at 7:05 p.m., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: 1) Case No. S-20-10: E. Gray Investments, LLC, property owner of 330 Market Street (Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.00 54) and 332 Market Street (Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.00 55) is seeking approval to realign the property line in order to create two lots in compliance with the R-2 lot widths. 2) Better Homes of Seaford, Inc., are seeking a preliminary plan review and approval for Hampton Circle, to be located at 600 Independence Drive, Tax Map and Parcel 3-31-5.004.25. This land is currently owned by the City of Seaford. The project consists of a 3-story, 36,000 sq. ft.+/low income senior apartment building with parking on a 6.28 acre parcel. If these projects are a concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 11th day of November 2010 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher, City Manager 11/11/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

You are hereby notified the below applications will be before: The City of Seaford Board of Adjustment and Appeals for their determination on Wednesday, December 8, 2010, at 12:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: V-19-10: Eldean, Inc. (Piraeus Realty Corp.), property owner of 12501258 Norman Eskridge Hwy is seeking a variance on behalf of Jesus The Christ Apostolic Ministries, in order to establish a church at 1258 Norman Eskridge Hwy; a church is not a stated use in a commercial district, as per Ch. 15, Zoning, Sec. 15-40

Uses by Right in C-2. V-21-10: E Gray Investments, property owner of 330 Market Street (Tax Map and Parcel 431 5.00 54) and 332 Market Street (Tax Map and Parcel 431 5.00 55) is seeking relief from the Ch. 15 Zoning, Sec. 15-21(5) Area and Bulk Requirements, specifically for side yard setbacks. If any of these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 11th day of November 2010 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 11/11/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

The following Ordinance was approved by Sussex County Council on October 12, 2010: ORDINANCE NO. 2152 AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 115 OF THE CODE OF SUSSEX COUNTY BY AMENDING ARTICLE I RELATING TO DEFINITIONS REGARDING MANUFACTURED HOMES. 11/11/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

The following Ordinance was approved by Sussex County Council on October 12, 2010: ORDINANCE NO. 2153 AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 115 OF THE CODE OF SUSSEX COUNTY BY AMENDING ARTICLE XXV § 115-187 C RELATING TO GROSS FLOOR AREA OF MANUFACTURED HOMES. 11/11/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING

The Planning and Zoning Commission of the Town of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, November 30, 2010 in the Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, DE at 7:00 P.M. The Commission will receive public comments and consider a zoning change request by Mr. Dale Wheatley to remove acreage from Residential Planned Community zoning and re-zone as AgriculturalIndustrial Overlay Zoning. Written comments will be received by the Commission no later than November 29, 2010. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE WILLIAM A. JEFFERSON PRESIDENT 11/11/1tc

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

Commonwealth of Virginia Code § 8.01-316 Charlottesville J&DR Juvenile Division Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court in re Mariah Nicole Jenkins v. Serita N. Jenkins. The object of this suit is to terminate the residual parental rights of Sarita N. Jenkins to the female child born August 22, 1994. It is ordered that the defendant Sarita N. Jenkins appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before 12/22/2010, 9:30 a.m. Dated: 10/27/2010 Signed: Edward D. Berry, Judge 11/4/4tc

NOTICE

Estate of Dorothy E. Eaves, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Dorothy E. Eaves who departed this life on the 23rd day of September, A.D. 2010 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Carol LePiere on the 22nd day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 23rd day of May, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Carol LePiere 7336 Lakeshore Dr. Quinton, VA 23141 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 11/11/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Thelma L. Ball, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Thelma L. Ball who departed this life on the 10th day of October, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Judy A. Thomas on the 25th day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 10th day of June, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Judy A. Thomas 26044 Butler Branch Road Seaford DE 19973

Attorney: James D. Griffin, Esq. Griffin & Hackett P.O. Box 612 Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 11/4/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Maureen Gorman Keck, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Maureen Gorman Keck who departed this life on the 7th day of September, A.D. 2010 late of Lewes, DE were duly granted unto Courtney B. Peksens on the 21st day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 7th day of May, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Courtney B. Peksens 8329 Wesleyan St. Vienna, VA 22180 Attorney: Michele Procino Wells, Esq. Procino-Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 11/4/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of David Webster Lovelace, II, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of David Webster Lovelace, II, who departed this life on the 10th day of October, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Shannon M. Lovelace on the 22nd day of October, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 10th day of June, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Shannon M. Lovelace 537 McKean St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 11/4/3tc See LEGALS—page 51

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MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 50

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot piece and parcel of land situate lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County State of Delaware being known and designated at Lot #2 of the Subdivision of lands of peter A. and Marjorie A. Eckert, as will more fully and larely appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Mann Associates Surveying Inc., dated January 25, 2002 and filed in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plot Book 76 Page 259. BEING the same lands and premises which Ricky L. Vickers and Marla Vickers did by deed dated May 19,2006 and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds, aforesaid in Deed Book 3323 Page 12 did grant and convey unto Mark Cox and Maria Cox. Tax Parcel: 4-30-16.0029.14 Property Address: 11903 ECKERT ACRES ROAD, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit

will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARK & MARLA COX and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that piece and parcel of land being known as Lot 18 of “John N. Wright’s Second Addition to Seaford - 1878” (Deed book 85-page 511 ) and situated in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and as shown on a survey by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated April 17, 2006 and more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at a rebar found on the easterly side of Pine Street and being a corner for this Lot and Lot 17; thence with Pine Street North 33°-59’-48” West a distance of 51.44 feet to a rebar found; thence with Lot 19 North 69°-12’-39” East a distance of 162.06 feet to a mbar found; thence with Lot 16 South 21 °-26’-46” East a distance of 49.52 feet to a rebar found; thence South 68°-59’-47” West a distance of 150.88 feel home to the point and place of beginning and containing 7.793 sq. ft., more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which Roger a. Shank and Melody Shank by Deed dated April 18, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3303, Page 219, did grant and convey unto Dana K. Parsons. Tax Parcel: 4-31-4.0065.00 Property Address: 405 PINE STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check

• NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DANA K. PARSONS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL those certain tracts, pieces or parcels of land, situate in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, containing a total of 4.992 acre of land, more or less, and being further identified of “Residual” (1.7940 acres) and “Parcel A” (3.1980 acres) as shown on a plot entitled “Revised Minor Subdivision, Lands of Diana L,. Jewell and Kimberly M. Absher” prepared by Simpler Surveying & Associates, Inc., as filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County,

Delaware, in Plot Book 108, Page 185. Subject to a 50’ wide Perpetual Cross-Access Easement for Ingress and Egress as shown on the plot filed for record in the Office aforesaid in Plot Book 108, Page 185, and subject to any other rights of way, easements and or restrictions of record. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Diana L. Jewell and Kimberly M. Absher by deed dated October 20, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3376, Page 255 did grant and convey unto PHILIP E. ROBERTS, III and DORIS A. ROBERTS. Tax Parcel: 2-32-5.002.01 & 2-32-5.00-2.02 Property Address: 29299 HEARN LANE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PHILIP E. ROBERTS, III & DORIS A. ROBERTS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

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629-9788

PAGE 51 SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece parcel and Ito of land lying and being situate in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, known as Lot No. l1 on a subdivision land of HEATHER GLEN, prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc., Registered Surveyors, dated April 28, 1995, revised May 2, 1995, and filed for record in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plat Book 54, page 142. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Pat Arost by deed dated May 29, 2002 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2771, Page 349 did grant and convey unto LEERONS SABB, JR. AND TASHANA Y. ROBERTS. Tax Parcel: 5-30-9.0032.10 Property Address: 12613 WOODBRIDGE ROAD, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time

of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LEERONS SABB, JR. & TASHANA Y. SABB F/K/A TASHANA Y. ROBERTS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the southerly right-of-way line of County Road No. 515 (40’ t/w), and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument (found), said concrete monument being located on the aforesaid southerly right-of-way line of County Road No. 515 at a comer for these lands and lands of Freddy T. Pusey; said concrete monument also being located 342 feet, ±, from the center line of the Penn Central Railroad; thence from said beginning point, by and with the common boundary line of these lands and lands of Freddy T. Pusey, South 06° 35’ 00” West a total distance of 183.58 feet, passing over a concrete monument (found), to a point located in the center line of a 10 foot, ±, wide ditch, a comer for these lands and lands of Philip Pinckney; thence turning and running by and with the center line of said ditch and lands of Philip Pinckney, the following two (2) courses and distances: (1) North 73° 509’ 15” West a distance of 106.88 feet to a point; and (2) North 54° 43’ 09” West a distance of 58.04 feet to a %” pipe (found); thence turning and running by and with the common boundary line of these lands and lands of R See LEGALS—page 52

PAGE 52 LEGALS - from Page 51

& B Investments, North 07° 05’ 40” East a distance of 129.96 feet to a %” pipe (found); thence by and with the southerly right-of-way line of County Road No. 515, South 86° 21” 23” East a distance of 155.34 feet to the point and place of beginning, and said to contain 25,438 square feet of land, ±, together with all improvements thereon, as surveyed by Simpler Surveying & Associate, Registered Surveyors, on February 13,2004, attached hereto and made a part hereof. BEING the same land and premises that Samuel C. Prettyman and Shirley D. Prettyman by Deed dated February 25,2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 2947, Page 209, did grant and convey unto Lisa Ann Peters and Raymond Clayton Peters III, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-6.0027.00 Property Address: 10110 BACONS ROAD, DELMAR Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LISA PETERS & RAYMOND CLAYTON

MORNING STAR PETERS, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, with the improvements thereon erected, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point marked by a monument set along the easterly edge of the 200 foot right of way of U.S. Route 13 and located 1366 feet more or less from the edge of the right of way of County Road 534, said point being a comer for these lands and lands nor or formerly of Arthur W. Crisfield, et ux.; thence along the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Arthur W. Crisfield, et ux., South 71 degrees 42 minutes 20 seconds East for a distance of 578.80 feet to a monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Arthur W. Crisfield said point also being located along the lines of lands of Hubert B. Tharp; thence along the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Hubert B. Tharp South 35 degrees 33 minutes 28 seconds West for a distance of 200.53 feet to a monument, said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard; thence by and with a division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard; North 54 degrees 40 minutes 00 seconds West for a distance of 252.10 feet to a monument; thence by and with a division line now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard North 88 degrees 48 minutes 31 seconds West for a distance of 278.93 feet to a monument said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Aubrey T. Dillard and being located along the easterly edge of the 200 foot wide right of way of U.S. Route 13; thence by and with the easterly edge of said right of way

• NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

the following two courses and distances: (1) North 14 degrees 31 minutes 00 seconds East 109.90 feet to a point; and (2) North 15 degrees 32 minutes 30 seconds East for a distance of 90.1 0 feet home to the point and place of beginning, containing 1.98 acres more or less, as surveyed by Gene R. Littleton, Registered Surveyors, dated September 1983. The above property is described more particularly in accordance with a Boundary Survey Plan prepared by Ramesh C. Batta Associates, P.A. dated May 9, 2007, as revised May 23,2007, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point marked by a monument set along the easterly edge of the 200 foot right of way of U.S. Route 13, said point being the following two courses from the northeasterly end of the comer cutoff connecting U.S. Route 13 with Tharp Road (County Road 534): (I) South 72 degrees 46 minutes 46 seconds West 36.48 feet to a point on the easterly rightof-way of V.S. Route 13 and (2) South 15 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds West 1335.63 feet to the point of Beginning, said point being a comer for these lands and lands nor or formerly of Milford HHMO Center, LLC; thence along the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Milford HHMO Center, LLC, South 71 degrees 42 minutes 00 seconds East for a distance of 578.10 feet to a monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Milford HHMO Center, LLC, said point also being located along the lines of lands now of formerly of Tharp Road Acquisition Company, LLC; thence along the division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Tharp Road Acquisition Company, LLC South 35 degrees 32 minutes 00 seconds West for a distance of 200.00 feet to a monument, said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of Sussex Ventures Inc.; thence by and with a division line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Sussex Ventures Inc. North 54 degrees 40 minutes 00 seconds West for a distance of25 1.50 feet to a point; thence by and with a division line now or formerly of James A. Davenport and Jeffrey M. Davenport North 88 degrees 51 minutes 19 seconds West for a distance of 279.01 feet to a monument, said monument forming a comer for these lands and lands now or formerly of James A. Davenport and Jeffrey

M. Davenport and being located along the easterly edge of the 200 foot wide right of way of U.S. Route 13; thence by and with the easterly edge of said right of way the following two courses and distances: (1) North 14 degrees 31 minutes 00 seconds East 109.90 feet to a point; and (2) North 15 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds East for a distance of 90.10 feet home to the point and place of beginning, containing 1.98 acres, more or less. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.009.02 Property Address: NOT AVAILABLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BUFFET REALTY OF SEAFORD, LLC; FRANK C. ALARIO; NANCY ALARIO; CHARLES P. ALARIO; JANET T. ALARIO and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

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SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and being known and designated as Lots 23 and 24 on Plot 1 of George R. Hutson, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a nail set 12 feet from the face of the curb at the intersection of the Southerly side of Spruce Street (36’ flf) with the Easterly side of Hall Street (35.8’ fit); thence with a line located 12 feet from the face of the curb on the Southerly side of Spruce Street, North 79 degrees 49 minutes 49 seconds East 150.00 feet to a pipe set in the line located 12 feet from the face of said curb; thence turning and running along Cypress Street, South 10 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East 153.62 feet to a point located 6.23 feet from a reference concrete monument found at a corner for lands now or formerly of Franklin L. and Betty I. Phillips; thence with the line of lands of said Phillips, South 79 degrees 10 minutes 13 seconds West 150.00 feet to a concrete monumf3nt found 12 feet from the face of the curb on the Easterly side of Hall Street at a corner for lands of said Phillips; thence by and with Hall Containing 23,172 square feet of land, more or less, together with the improvements located thereon, as shown on a survey prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc., dated February 4, 1999. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed to Felix Castrejon by Deed from Barry E. Parson and Cheri W. Parsons, his wife, dated December 28, 2006, and recorded on January 26, 2007, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3410, Page 39. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.06170.00 Property Address: 327 NORTH HALL STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale.

A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of FELIX CASTREJON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain parcel of land situated in the Nanticoke Hundred, County of Sussex, State of Delaware, being known and designated as follows: Lot 2 of R.B.K., Inc. Subdivision, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a found concrete monument located in the Southwesterly right of way line of Route 18, said point being 445 feet from See LEGALS—page 53

MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 52 Route 528; thence along Lot 1 South 06 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds West 1055.52 feet to a found iron pipe; thence along lands now or formerly of John M. Sharp, South 62 degrees 30 minutes 36 seconds West 259.47 feet to a found steel post; thence along Lot 3 North 07 degrees 37 minutes 52 seconds East 1132.46 feet to a found concrete marker situate in the Southwesterly right of way of Route 18; thence along the Southwesterly right of way of Route 18, North 77 degrees 01 minutes 39 seconds East 205.00 feet to the point and place of beginning, containing 5.10 acres, more or less, as surveyed by McCann, Inc. by survey dated September 24, 2002. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Felix A. Medina and Martha Lima, by Special Warranty deed of Martha Lima dated October 19, 2007, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, on November 1, 2007, in Deed Book 3516, page 128. Tax Parcel: 2-317.00-30.00 Property Address: 16500 SEASHORE HIGHWAY, GEORGETOWN Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with

these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARTHA LIMA & FELIX MEDINA, INDIVIDUALLY & D/B/A MEDLI FRAMING CONTRACTORS, INC. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Al1 that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more parlicu13rly described as follows to wit: Beginning at a concrete marker 400 feet along the east side of Jewell Street, North of the intersection with the centerline or Delaware Route No, 524: thence continuing North 18 degrees 32’ West 100 feet 10 a concrete marker: thence North 71 degrees 28’ East 123.65 feet to a concrete marker: thence South 18° 45’ East 100 feet to a concrete marker; thence South 71 degrees 28’ West 123.92 feet to the place of Beginning, containing 12.400 square feet of land be the same more or less and being known as Lot NO, 54, as plotted by T. B. Simpler on a revised plot of “LAKEWOOD DEVELOPMENT” of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in Plot Book 8, page 349. BEING the same lands conveyed to Abbott & Abbott Construction, Inc. by deed or O. Evans Denney, United States Marshal for the District of Delaware, dated January 22, 1993 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 1909, Page 267. BEING the same premises which Abbott & Abbott Construction, Inc by Deed dated June 4, 1993, and recorded June 7, 1993 in the Office for the Recorder of Deeds in and for the County of Sussex and State of Delaware in Deed Book Volume 1915 Page

• NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

320 granted and conveyed unto Doralene Davis grantor/mortgagor herein. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.00122.00 Property Address: 24741 JEWELL STREET, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DORALENE DAVIS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known and designated as

Parcel “A” as shown on a plot of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 69, Page 152, and as more particularly described in that certain May 13, 2002 survey prepared by R.B. Kemp, Ill, P.L.S., as follows, to wit: . BEGINNING at an iron bar found in the easterly right of way line of County Road 484 (at 50 feet wide), marking a corner for this lot and Parcel “B”; thence turning and running by and with the line of Parcel “B”, South 69 degrees 00 minutes II seconds East 534.59 feet to an iron bar found in the line of lands now or formerly of ABC Woodlands, LLC; thence turning and running by and with the line of lands now or formerly of ABA Woodlands, LLC, South 27 degrees 14 minutes 42 seconds West 199.41 feet to an iron pipe found in the northeasterly edge of a ditch; thence continuing South 32 degrees 54 minutes 44 seconds West 13.59 feet to a point in the center of ditch, marking a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Ralph A. Drumbore; thence turning and running by and with the line of lands now or formerly of Ralph A. Drumbore the following three (3) courses and distances: (1) North 65 degrees 40 minutes 04 seconds West 11.06 feet to an iron pipe found in the southwesterly edge of ditch; (2) thence North 65 degrees 40 minutes 04 seconds West 106.51 feet to a concrete monument found; and (3) thence North 65 degrees 40 minutes 04 seconds West 326.72 feet to an iron bar found in the southeasterly right of way line of County Road 484, marking a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Ralph A. Drumbore; thence turning and running by and with the southeasterly right of way line of County Road 484, along a curve to the left, having a radius of337.48 feet, a chord bearing North 01 degrees 16 minutes 44 seconds East 197.24 feet to an iron bar found, being the point and place of beginning, said to contain 2.182 acres of land, more or less, together with any and all improvements located thereon. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING a part of the same land conveyed unto P.A.F., LLC, by Deed of Lloyd E. Sammons, Jr. & Patricia J. Sammons, dated February 27, 1999 and re-

PAGE 53 corded March 5, 1999, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2269, Page 302. AND BEING a part of the same lands conveyed unto P.A.F., LLC by Deed of Ralph A. Dumbore dated May 19, 1999 and Recorded May 24. 1999, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2390, Page 146. BEING the same premises which P.A.F., LLC, by Deed dated May 20, 2002, and recorded May 22, 2002 in the Office for the Recorder of Deeds in and for the County of Sussex, and State of Delaware in Deed Book Volume 2709, Page 221, granted and conveyed unto Steven C. Graebner and Lisa B. Franklin grantor/mortgagor herein. Tax Parcel: 2-31-14.008.09 Property Address: 23007 RUM BRIDGE ROAD, GEORGETOWN Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LISA B. FRANKLIN & STEVEN C. GRAEBNER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All those certain lots and parcel of land located in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, knoVvi1 as Lots 42.43,44.45 and 46 al1d more fully described in Deed Book 363, page 85. THIS CONVEYANCE is subject to restriction as follows: 1. Only one (1) detached dwelling may be placed or erected on the property. A mobile home dwelling may not be placed on the subject property. 2. Any dwelling unit or conventional construction shall have a minimum of 1,200 square feet of living area. 3. No commercial chicken house shall be permitted on the property. 4. The property shall be maintained in an attractive condition and no trash, garbage or refuse shall be permitted on any portion of the property. 5. No unregistered vehicles or wholly or partially dismantled vehicles shall be permitted on the property unless housed in a garage or similar structure. Being the same lands conveyed unto K. Barry Kennedy and Beverly A. Kennedy by deed 0 Sarah Oliphant Phillips dated January 12. 1990 and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 1696, page 53. BEING the same lands conveyed unto K. Barry Kennedy by deed of K. Barry Kennedy and Beverly A. Kennedy dates May 11, 1995 and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2053, page 353 Tax Parcel: 3-322.00-65.03 Property Address: 31704 OLD STAGE ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be See LEGALS—page 54

PAGE 54 LEGALS - from Page 53 demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of K. BARRY & DEBRA KENNEDY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, on the North side of County Route No. 66, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a concrete monument set on the Northerly right of way line of County Route No. 66, the said monument being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Robert Clark; thence North 45 degrees 58 minutes 20 seconds West 287.96 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 46 degrees 10 minutes 36 seconds West 160.0 feet to an iron pipe; thence by and with the cen-

MORNING STAR terline of a ditch, South 46 degrees 41 minutes 49 seconds East 265.43 feet to a concrete monument located in the Northerly right of way line of County Route No. 66; thence by and with the arc of a curve, a chord distance of 159.11 feet along a bearing South 54 degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds West to a concrete monument, the point and place of beginning, said to contain one (1) acre of land, more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Assoc., as recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 779 page 318. Together as an improvement to the land that certain mobile home a used 2000 Norris Homes, 68 X 27, Serial# N02012756TNA and N02012756TNB, Model# WM WM2866SC permanently affixed to the above described property. Being the same lands and premises which Teresa Aydelotte, did grant and convey unto Allen B. Aydelotte, by deed dated June 21, 2007 and recorded on July 3, 2007 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3469 at Page161. Tax Parcel: 5-32-15.0011.09 Property Address: 15091 PEPPERBOX ROAD, DELMAR Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with

• NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ALLEN B. AYDELOTTE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being designated as Lot No. 301, in Woodside Manor, and being more particularly described, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the Southerly right-of-way line of Tulip and being a corner for this lot and Lot No. 713; thence with Tulip Place along a curve to the left having a radius of 595.99 feet, Delta 07 degrees 14 minutes 52 seconds, an arc distance of 75.27 feet, a chord of 75.22 feet and a bearing of South 59 degrees 36 minutes 58 seconds East to a concrete monument found; thence with Lot No. 303, South 23 degrees 26 minutes 21 seconds West a distance of 144.19 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and with Baynum lands, North 86 degrees 06 minutes 50 seconds West a distance of 84.20 feet to a concrete monument found; thence with Lot No. 713, North 24 degrees 55 Minutes 00 seconds East distance of 181.53 feet home to the point and place of beginning, said To contain 12,456 square feet on and, be the same, more or less, together with all improvements thereon, as shown on a plat by TempleSellers, Inc., dated February 23,2004. Being the same lands and premises which Ethel B. Engle and Gloria J. Thomas, did grant and convey unto James C. Bell, Sr., by deed dated February 26, 2004 and recorded on February 27, 2004 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2947 at Page 141. Tax Parcel: 5-31-10.18-

117.00 Property Address: 305 TULIP PLACE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMES C. BELL, SR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate and lying in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, More particularly described as follows, to wit: Commencing at a post on the North side of Highway Route No. 46 leading from Middleford to Georgetown on the division line between these and lands of Edward Hearn; thence North 5 degrees 15 minutes East with

line of land of Edward Hearn a distance of 150 feet to a point; thence North 83 degrees 10 minutes West a distance of 60 feet to a point; thence South 5 degrees 15 minutes West a distance of 150 feet to a point on the north right-ofway line South 83 degrees 10 minutes West a distance of 60 feet to a post, the place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. Being the same lands and premises which Rajun Cajun Homes, LLC, did grant and convey unto Russell Collins, by deed dated July 26,2005 and recorded on August 1, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03178 at Page 049. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.0047.00 Property Address: 12455 OLD FURNANCE ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RUSSELL COLLINS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

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SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the development known as “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known and designated as LOT NUMBER 40 , as shown on a certain Plot of lots entitled “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, Baltimore Hundred Sussex County and State of Delaware, dated July 30, 1981, prepared by Peter E. Loewenstein & Associates, Inc., Professional Land Surveyors, which said Plot was filed for Record in the office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, on October 6,1981, in Plot Book 24, Page 135, and was revised by a revised Plot of “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, which said revised Plot was filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, aforesaid, on April 7, 1982, in Plot Book 26, page 39, which said plots are now superseded by a revised Plot of “QUILLEN’S POINT SUBDIVISION”, which said revised Plot was filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, aforesaid on October 8, 1982, in Plot Book 27, Page 1, reference thereunto being had, will more fully and at large appear. TOGETHER with the right to use the common areas and roads in common with all present and future owners in Quillen’s Point Subdivision, pursuant to the “Declaration of covenants, Conditions and Restrictions”. THE ABOVE LOT is subject to the drainage and/or utility easement as required by Article 7, Section 6, of the Sussex County Subdivision Ordinance. THE ABOVE LOT OF LAND is subject to the “Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions”, dated November 30, 1981, as filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1094, Page 4, and are made a part hereof by express reference thereto, as fully and as See LEGALS—page 55

MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 54 effectually as though incorporated herein. Being the same lands and premises which John Y. Beck and Jean M. Beck, did grant and convey unto Joseph R. Foust and Lilia Foust, by deed dated December 29, 2006 and recorded on January 8, 2007 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3403 at Page 34. Tax Parcel: 1-34-5.00349.00 Property Address: 38874 COVE COURT, OCEAN VIEW Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOSEPH R. FOUST, LILIA FOUST & PARASKEVA SOTIROVA and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

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629-9788

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: COMMENCING at a pipe met in the north side of Delaware Road No. 24, said beginning point being easterly 217.5 feet from the intersection of Boyce Avenue with the aforesaid Delaware Road No. 24, thence with the north side of said Delaware Road No. 24 South 71 degrees East a distance of 100 feet to a pipe; thence North 19 degrees East a distance of 135 feet to a pipe; thence North 71 degrees West a distance of 100 feet to an iron stake; thence South 19 degrees West a distance of 135 feet to the place of beginning, together with the improvements thereon, containing 13,500 square feet of land be the same more or less, and being known and designated as Lots 10 and 11 and shown upon the plot of lots of Sussex County Development Co. as the same appears of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 310, Page 588. Being the same lands and premises which William R. Marshall and Julia Marshall did grant and convey unto Elmer A. Fuentes by deed dated December 28, 2004 and recorded on January 5,2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03084 Page 006. Tax Parcel: 3-32-2.0040.00 Property Address: 11333 LAUREL ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check,

• NOVEMBER 11 - 17, 2010

is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ELMER A. FUENTES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with the improvements erected thereon, situated in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, lying on the Southeast side of Meadow Drive, a short distance Southwest of Gum Branch Court; being bounded on the Northwest by Meadow Drive; on the Northeast by Lot No. 12; on the Southeast by lands now or formerly Morris L. and Denise L. Tatman; on the Southwest by Lot NO.1 0, and being designated as Lot No. 11 of the “Bridgeville Chase” Subdivision, as shown on the Record Plot Plan for the same as recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 48, page 136, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a found iron pipe in the Southeast

right-of-way line of Meadow Drive, at a comer for this lot and Lot No. 12, said point of beginning commencing from the South end of a 25.00 foot radius junction curve Southwest right-ofway line of Gum Branch Court with the Southeast right-of-way line of Meadow Drive on the following two courses: (1) running in a Southwesterly direction with a 725.00 foot radius curve to the right an arc distance of 521.48 feet having a chord bearing South 24 degrees 58 minutes 55 seconds West 510.31 feet to a point; thence (2) South 45 degrees 35 minutes 00 seconds West 354.57 feet to a point; thence (3) running in a Southeasterly direction with a 2001.30 foot radius curve to the left, an arc distance of 123.46 feet, having a Chord bearing South 43 degrees 48 minutes 58 seconds East 123.44 feet to the point of Beginning; thence running from said point of beginning with Lot No. 12, South 44 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds East 406.20 feet to a set pipe at a comer for this lot and Lot No. 12, in line of lands now or formerly of Morris L. & Denise L. Tatman; thence running with lands now or late of said Tatman, South 45 degrees 35 minutes 00 seconds West 150.00 feet to a set pipe in line of lands now or formerly of said Tatman, at a corner for this lot and Lot NO.1 0; thence running with Lot NO.1 0, North 44 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds West 391.24 feet to a set pipe at a comer for this lot and Lot NO.1 0 in the Southeast right-of-way line of Meadow Drive; thence running with the Southeast line of Meadow Drive running in a Northeasterly direction with a 2,001.30 foot radius curve to the right, an arc distance of 150.78 feet, having a chord bearing of North 39 degrees 53 minutes 26 seconds East 150.74 feet to the point and place of beginning. Said to contain 1.3763 acres of land, be the same more or less, as surveyed by Earl D. Smith, Inc., Registered Surveyor, January 15, 2007. Being the same lands and premises which S & L CONTRACTORS Inc., a/k/a S & L CONTRACTORS, Inc., did grant and convey unto Larry T. Karnes and Tammy A. Karnes, by deed dated February 20, 2007and recorded on February 22, 2007 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3418 at Page 75. Tax Parcel: 4-30-16.0064.00 Property Address: 17891 MEADOW DRIVE,

PAGE 55 BRIDGE­VILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LARRY T. & TAMMY A. KARNES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known as Lot 16 of Saddlebrook Subdivision as recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 72, at Page 202, be the contents what they.

BEING the same land conveyed unto Eric L. Willey and Julie M. Willey by deed of D & N Properties, LLC and Timothy Ramey Construction, Inc. dated August 12, 2005, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3186 at Page 99. Tax Parcel: 3-31-4.00214.00 Property Address: 21908 ANDALUSIAN LANE, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 20, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 27, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ERIC L. & JULIE M. WILLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 11/4/2tc

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PAGE 56

MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Delaware Libraries to expand broadband capabilities Governor Markell and Lt. Governor Denn have announced that Delaware will receive $1.9 million in federal stimulus funds to help bridge the technological divide, boost employment, and improve education in the First State. Delaware was named as one of the recipients of funding from the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP), administered by the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). Federal funds will be matched by a $750,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The foundation will also provide $150,000 to help Delaware secure additional federal E-rate funding to sustain broadband connection costs in the future. The combined grant award will fund a program to create specialized computer centers in four major libraries to improve workforce skills, assist with job searches, and provide adult education. Those same services will be delivered electronically to all 32 Delaware libraries. The program will bring mobile service to every library in the state, as well as videoconferencing

equipment and workforce development training. The approximately half a million people with Delaware library cards will be able to access the new services. The Delaware Library Job/Learning Labs project will involve all public libraries in the state and will provide broadband education, access, equipment and support to vulnerable populations in all three counties. The Delaware Division of Libraries will partner with government agencies, educational institutions, and local businesses to expand these services. The computer centers at the Dover, Georgetown, Seaford and Wilmington libraries will become Job/Learning Labs focused specifically on the needs of the unemployed, with specialized training for resume building, job search, and interview skills. Spanish-language training programs will be conducted in Wilmington. The program will fund instruction to as many as 2,000 residents with approximately 29,000 hours of teacher-led training over a three year period. The training will focus on digital literacy, test preparation, and workforce education. For the thousands of Delawareans who

do not have computers or Internet access at home, their public library is an especially important place in a world where employers, schools, and government are relying much more heavily on electronic communication. The grant will be used to upgrade public computer centers at all 32 public libraries statewide, to deploy additional new computers, improve Internet access speeds and reduce waiting periods for library computers.  Nearly 40 percent of Americans, often those with lower incomes and lower levels of education, still do not have high-speed Internet access at home. In many communities in Delaware, the public library is the only provider of free Internet access available to residents. The Delaware Division of Libraries will work with the Delaware Workforce Investment Board in implementing the training and job seeking aspects of the project. Other partners include the Delaware Department of Technology and Information, Delaware Technical & Community College, Literacy Volunteers Serving Adults, Christina Adult Education Program, Retired Seniors Volunteer

Program, Delaware Center for Distance Adult Learning, the Delaware Economic Development Office, and Delaware’s Departments of Education and Labor.

CHEER ‘Salute to Veterans’

The Nutrition Program of CHEER, Inc. will be honoring area Veterans at their Annual Veteran’s Day Celebration on Thursday, Nov. 11, at the CHEER Community Center located at 20520 Sand Hill Road in Georgetown. The evening will begin with a buffet dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.  After dinner, there will be a ceremony held that honors all branches of the armed forces as well as a POW/MIA remembrance. The evening concludes with a dance featuring local Disk Jockey, Sky Brady. A cash bar is available.  Tickets are free for veterans with proof of service and $10 for spouses or guests. Reservations are necessary for this well-attended and moving event. Tickets are available at all CHEER Centers and reservations can be made by calling Don Wood at 856-5187.

Sunday november

14 th

2 pm - 4 pm

plaNtatioN DrivE, GovErNorS GraNt 3 BR, 2 bath, open floor plan, split bedrooms. $199,000 Directions: North on Atlanta Road, turn right into Governors Grant, first right, next left, home on right. Host: Trey Hardesty cell 302-236-3344

RemaX aBoVe & BeyoND • 628-2500

530 N Willey Street, Seaford, DE This 4 BR, 3 ba Colonial Home is waiting for you. Home features 2 master BRs, vaulted ceilings, window treatments, appliances & a full basement. Don’t miss out on this ready to move in home! MLS# 574541 $199,900 Directions: Take Stein Highway W, turn Left onto Willey Street, home is on the right, look for sign. Host: Frank Parks 302-745-7653

22841 Bridgeville Highway, Seaford, DE 2 BR, 1.5 ba home offers an attached garage. Fresh paint inside and out, hardwood floors, newly remodeled kitchen & baths, new windows & new water pump. Shaded rear yard & much more. Close to town without the town taxes. MLS# 581093 $169,900 DirEctioNS: N on Route 13A in Seaford, just before The Oaks development on right, sign in yard. HoSt: Bobby Nibblett 302-236-2164

702 Heritage Drive, Seaford, DE This well priced & well maintained home offers charm & ROOM in great established neighborhood. Home offers a large eat-in kit., featuring a large center island with hidden storage and seating for 7. Office with skylight & custom cabinets, custom LR drapes including silhouette blinds and large private deck. MLS# 581711 $219,900 DirEctioNS: From Stein Hwy, turn R onto Atlanta Rd., turn R into Heritage Village (Wythe Lane), turn R onto Park Drive and follow to stop sign. HoStESS: Judy w 302-841-3725

218 SHiplEy StrEEt 4 BR, 2 bath, partial basement, new roof, new windows, 2 car detached garage on corner lot. $164,900. Directions: West on stein Hwy, turn left onto Shipley, house on the right. Hostess: Brenda Rambo cell: 302-236-2660

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207 VALLEY RUN, SEAFORD 3-BR, 2-BA ranch in Clearbrook Estates offers finished FR/ office or even a 4th BR over the 2-car att garage. Open floor plan w/ LR, DR, & KIT. Util rm is over 15’ long & offers plenty of room for laundry & other needs. 10’x10’ kennel & 10’x16’ stg. shed are included. $249,900 (#570519) HOSTESS: Sue Bramhall

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

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10073 MARVIL DRIVE, LAUREL 3BR ranch situated just outside Laurel’s town limits & ready for a new owner. HW floors, appliances, C/A, oversized 2-car det garage & fenced-in backyard. $145,000 (#572941) HOSTESS: Eileen Craft

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RemaX aBoVe & BeyoND • 628-2500

8555 GARDEN LANE, SEAFORD Affordable home in exceptional condition! Extensively remodeled 3-BR, 2-BA “Class C” offers new cabinets & counter tops, Whirlpool appliances, heat pump & central A/C, new flooring & fresh paint throughout, walk-in closets in all BRs, & storage shed. At only $99,900, owner is offering $5,000 closing costs assistance plus a washer & dryer! (#579883) HOST: Charles Kelly

32463 BI-STATE BLVD, LAUREL Wonderful location on Alt. Rt. 13A, just outside Laurel’s town limits. 3 BR home offers plenty of room for all your hobbies. Upgrades include newer metal roof & furnace. Great basement space has been finished. Lots of Potential! $119,900 (#582463) HOSTESS: Tina Moore

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MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

Letters to the Editor Liberal Kool Aid is the culprit!

With all due respect to Daniel Richardson’s lovely piece in last week’s “Final Word” responding to my letter to the editor the week before, I am moved again to weigh in on the truth. My comments were directed to a segment of our society that has become rabid and vicious over the thought of a Christian running for office. Mr. Richardson stated that I called anyone who supports the separation of Church and State a “bigot against Christianity.” In actuality my letter said the following: “Socialist college professors and “Bearded Marxists” (i.e. Chris Coons, it was like a joke only not as funny!) have twisted the Constitution to support their intolerance and bigotry against Christians who, compelled by conviction of truth (i.e. Christine O’Donnell), are running for office, very much like the Puritans who came to this country and our Founding Fathers.” If Mr. Richardson believes that Christians should not be allowed to run for office and that the First Amendment to the Constitution forbids Christians from doing so then, yes, I confirm my sentiments; he is a bigot against Christianity. However, I am quite sure Mr. Richardson is much smarter than that; unless he has been drinking too much Liberal KoolAid. Which brings me to the point of this my “Final Word” — the misquoting of my letter is indicative of the very reason the American people have become disillusioned with the media and why Fox News shows’ ratings are soaring. The liberal activists in the Democratic Party finally received the spanking they deserved in the national outcome of this election. The “Pravda” news networks MSNBC, CBS, ABC, NPR and PBS — as well as Delaware’s own New Journal to name just a few, did a horrendous job of being fair and balanced during recent mid-term election coverage and debate moderating. Too bad Delaware is swimming in so much Liberal Kool Aid that we won’t benefit from the turn around our nation is about to experience. We have the “sameold-same-old” Obama/Reid pets and rubber stamps to the leftist agenda. Will someone please let New Castle County know that the rest of the state is tired of their corruption and cronyism? While I’m at it let me say, I believe Keith Olbermann, former commentator on MSNBC, should be allowed, as a private citizen to contribute to the causes he chooses; in this case he should never have signed a contract which restricts him in the use of his own money. But what gets me is that he probably thought he would get away with it. The liberal media is so used to not being called on their pack of lies and manipulation of facts that they suppose they will get away with stuff like this. The worst perpetrators of biased reporting are CNN, MSNBC, NPR and PBS. The reporters on these networks act as if they live in an ivory tower and the rules don’t apply to them — elitist liberal extremists who think you and I don’t know any better when they manipulate the news and statistics to put the liberal candidates in a better light. I say it’s about time for some accountability in the media. Thank you Morning Star Publications for refusing the Liberal

Kool Aid; for the most part you have been fair and balanced. Associate Pastor Kim Birowski Seaford

A few random thoughts

The following was addressed to Bryant, Daniel and Lynn When I was hesitant about having my letter printed, I was hoping that perhaps I might have encouraged you to be more pro-active to balance out the negativity seen in the letters to the paper. And, lo and behold, both of you men took up my channeling and, indeed, wrote editorials in the Final Words section. Great!  Daniel, you made the excellent point to walk in others’ shoes, or, simply judge blindly. Bryant, unfortunately, we were conflicted between preventing the second Great Depression and getting our fiscal house in order.  I believe that the reason Clinton ended up with a budget surplus was that the economy was unexpectedly robust and tax receipts greater than expectations. The current tax cuts aren’t economically viable to the health of the government but, alas, it appears that Obama has become so bowed that he will cave into the Republicans, something we can ill afford. I found Paul Bradham’s comments on the negativity of the campaign ads, the lack of comity in the political spectrum, and that health care reform having fallen short, matching my own.  I am so, so glad to not be seeing one attack ad or another on TV, one right after the next and getting robo calls and the nasty mail ads done on really great paper stock, having all ceased. Lynn, I actually looked at those ugly things, but I applaud your more direct action. And, now that it is Friday, I am channeling back to Monday to say that general sweetness and light prevailed on Returns Day, so you can relax back there in time. One final thing, but just for this week only. Seeing as there was a decrease in the federal debt of $134 per citizen this past week, please send me a check for that amount. (Sorry about the alleged decrease. See this week’s note about your share of the debt on the Final Word page.) Richard Eger

Seaford

New life for the old Santa House

If you grew up in Seaford, you can’t help but remember the old Santa House that was placed at Woolworth’s at the NCSS. I’m sure every kid of the time has fond memories of the little shack. Hiram Lodge #21 (the Masonic Lodge) in a joint venture with the owners (Seaford Kiwanis Club) have started to restore the old shack that is need of some repair and updating. New shingles have been obtained for the roof, but there are other issues. We are soliciting donations and hope that we can place the shack at the Roses shopping center this holiday season.   Rick Stewart

Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc., Seaford

Editor’s Note: Additional comments about the election will appear next week. We are running the letters and comments on a first come, first published basis.

Opinion

PAGE 57

Constitutional attorney’s views on Health Care Choices Act By Michael Connelly Ret. Constitutional Attorney

Well, I have done it! I have read the entire text of proposed House Bill 3200: The Affordable Health Care Choices Act of 2009. I studied it with particular emphasis from my area of expertise, constitutional law. I was frankly concerned that parts of the proposed law that were being discussed might be unconstitutional. What I found was far worse than what I had heard or expected. To begin with, much of what has been said about the law and its implications is in fact true, despite what the Democrats and the media are saying. The law does provide for rationing of health care, particularly where senior citizens and other classes of citizens are involved, free health care for illegal immigrants, free abortion services, and probably forced participation in abortions by members of the medical profession. The Bill will also eventually force private insurance companies out of business, and put everyone into a government run system. All decisions about personal health care will ultimately be made by federal bureaucrats, and most of them will not be health care professionals. Hospital admissions, payments to physicians, and allocations of necessary medical devices will be strictly controlled by the government. However, as scary as all of that is, it just scratches the surface. In fact, I have concluded that this legislation really has no intention of providing affordable health care choices. Instead it is a convenient cover for the most massive transfer of power to the Executive Branch of government that has ever occurred, or even been contemplated. If this law or a similar one is adopted, major portions of the Constitution of the United States will effectively have been destroyed. The first thing to go will be the masterfully crafted balance of power between the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of the U.S. Government. Congress will be transferring to the Obama Administration authority in a number of different areas over the lives of the American people, and the businesses they own. The irony is that Congress doesn’t have any authority to legislate in most of those areas to begin with! I defy anyone to read the text of the U.S. Constitution and find any authority granted to the members of Congress to regulate health care. This legislation also provides for access, by the appointees of the Obama administration, of all of your personal healthcare direct violation of the specific provisions of the 4th Amendment to the Constitution information, your personal financial information, and the information of your employer, physician, and hospital. All of this is a protecting against unreasonable searches and

seizures. You can also forget about the right to privacy. That will have been legislated into oblivion regardless of what the 3rd and 4th Amendments may provide. If you decide not to have healthcare insurance, or if you have private insurance that is not deemed acceptable to the Health Choices Administrator appointed by Obama, there will be a tax imposed on you. It is called a tax instead of a fine because of the intent to avoid application of the due process clause of the 5th Amendment. However, that doesn’t work because since there is nothing in the law that allows you to contest or appeal the imposition of the tax, it is definitely depriving someone of property without the due process of law. So, there are three of those pesky amendments that the far left hate so much, out the original ten in the Bill of Rights, that are effectively nullified by this law. It doesn’t stop there though. The 9th Amendment that provides: The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. The 10th Amendment states: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are preserved to the States respectively, or to the people. Under the provisions of this piece of Congressional handiwork neither the people nor the states are going to have any rights or powers at all in many areas that once were theirs to control. I could write many more pages about this legislation, but I think you get the idea. This is not about health care; it is about seizing power and limiting rights. Article 6 of the Constitution requires the members of both houses of Congress to “be bound by oath or affirmation to support the Constitution.” If I was a member of Congress I would not be able to vote for this legislation or anything like it, without feeling I was violating that sacred oath or affirmation. If I voted for it anyway, I would hope the American people would hold me accountable. For those who might doubt the nature of this threat, I suggest they consult the source, the U.S. Constitution, and Bill of Rights. There you can see exactly what we are about to have taken from us. About the author For more information about Michael Connelly, visit http://michaelconnelly. viviti.com/. Publisher’s Note: The above article was about the first 1100-page draft of the bill. Connelly said the final version is worse with the exception that the “public option” was removed. Connelly has kept up with each new version and has written articles about them on his blog. His commentary was submitted to the newspaper by Tommy Cooper.

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MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

If you choose not to participate, will you choose to complain? If so, the blame for your dissatisfaction lies squarely with you.

Will of the people is loud and clear

With eager anticipation of what I hoped would be an historic display of the “will of the people,” I settled into my easy chair on November the 2nd for an evening of political spectating. I was not disappointed. You see, I am an individual who has a fervent belief in our political system, which I regard as simply the best on earth. Here’s why: Our forefathers, leaders of the “new world” were brilliant and visionary men, who took as their basis for government what they had lived in the “mother” country (England) to achieve an incredibly simplistic idea - freedom and liberty for all. Their greatest strength was, that by past experience, they knew what they did not want. They went on to craft an amazingly flexible, yet enduring document, our Constitution. Later, the Bill of Rights ensured that ordinary citizens were protected from tyranny or the “overreach” of expansive and/or ambitious government. Within the rule of law, citizens were granted welldefined freedoms and liberties, as well as the right to democratically elected representation. As good as it is, our Constitution remains to this day, a work in progress. If it were flawless, there would be no such thing as amendments, nor the need for legislators to write them. If it were not open to interpretation, there would be no need of a judicial branch. And if there were no need to determine a path or course for our country, there would be no need of an administrator to set the policy and priorities. This is what the people believed they had when they voted just 24 months ago. That is, a democracy, within a republic of united, sovereign states. My belief is, that Tuesdays’ mid-term Congressional election results were a direct reflection of a perceived failure by the elected representatives to respect the will of the electorate. No clearer message could be sent. The system works and the process works. But, it is only as good as the individuals who choose to participate. If you choose not to participate, will you choose to complain? If so, the blame for your dis-

Letters to the Editor Stars’ Letters Policy

All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or you may email editor@ mspublications.com

satisfaction lies squarely with you. I don’t believe that those who participated are expecting “exiled” Republicans to solve all of our problems, but they are expecting them to respect our granted rights and listen to our concerns. The tea partiers may have led this revolt, but I believe if it were not for them, there would have been another. And when tea partiers say “we want our country back,” geographically, this was accomplished on November 2nd. The center of the country is decidely “red” with the coastlines and some densely populated urban cities remaining “blue.” This is traditionally right where we have always been and, because this was a census year, with redistricting approaching, it will likely remain that way until at least 2020. The “ball” so to speak, now lies in our administrator (the President’s) court. The “shellacking” his party took last Tuesday night is a rightful expression of anger at an arrogant refusal to listen to the citizenry. It had little to do with “emergency actions” taken regarding tarp and stimulus and much more to do with partisan passing of health care, the suing of a state over immigration, the drive to try 9-11 terrorists in civilian criminal courts, the idea that veterans should pay for their own injuries in war, chronic apologies to Muslim countries for (so called) American misbehavior, as well as the idea that a nation of people can spend its way to prosperity. The people have spoken. Penny L. Atkins

Seaford

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One ad campaign stood out from all the other attempts

The 2010 election is almost complete and I am enjoying the void of campaign ads on the airwaves and in print. In viewing ads for local, state and national offices, it was sad to see some of the all out attack campaigns that were run. In some races, I wondered if some people really had a good choice to make when they were making their selection between candidates, based on the ad campaigns that were run. However, in all of the ads I saw, one candidate stood out among the rest. This candidate hailed from Somerset County. The candidate, Charles Otto, a small business owner, ran for Maryland State Representative and won. What made Mr. Otto stand out among the rest is he did not attack his opponent and he ended his ads with the statement, “It would be my honor to serve you in Annapolis.”  After seeing the results of this year’s election, I believe the number one reason elected officials were sent home from their office was they failed to serve the people they had been elected to serve. For those who have been elected during 2010, I hope that they will take the lead from Mr. Otto in Somerset County and they will serve the people that elected them.  When someone is elected, they are chosen to represent the people of a certain area. Some elected positions are volunteer positions, others are paid and the salaries are probably generated by the people they are supposed to serve.  So, my wish for this year’s winners of the 2010 election is they will serve the people that elected them. This includes those that did not vote for them because they still should represent the best interests of the people they are to serve. Maybe if they do a great job in their elected office, they will not have to run negative ad campaigns and re-election will be much easier the next time their term of office comes to a close. John Blevins

Seaford

Conference was insightful look into need to protect agri-business

The “Today and Tomorrow” conference held at Del Tech recently was very useful and insightful. The speakers were well prepared and the information was well worth my attendance. “Getting back to basics” was the theme and the main topic was agri-business. The keynote speaker was Agriculture Secretary Ed Kee and the other presenters from the

family farm, poultry and food processing industries are, and have been, Sussex County’s mainstays in the labor market. There were a few areas that stood out and most notable is the perception or reality of “over-regulation” by state and federal government. Many times these seemingly little annoyances can be problematic to farmers and related businesses and downright unattainable and expensive. Should we be looking for ways to validate the employment opportunities that agriculture brings to our county? Absolutely. I hear of no one questioning the impact of one dollar of sales being multiplied by five for the actual contributions agri-businesses make to our county and state economy. The most immediate concern is the Nanticoke Watershed Tributary. It is Delaware’s largest watershed and the state manages or owns well over 3,000 acres along its path. At issue is the regulations that will come from the Pollution Control Strategy that is in the developing stage. Hopefully the public will be well engaged and the end product will be achievable and affordable. My concern about this is born from the discussions and eventual adoption of the Inland Bays Pollution Strategy Plan. That plan has an estimated price tag of 90 million dollars and the inspection of over 17,000 individual septic systems. Also, not included in the costs is the relocation or removal of effluent discharge from local municipalities. That cost will be shared among the users. Most of the regulations will be developed by department employees and no further help or approval is required from the General Assembly. Public meetings will be held, some local, some in Dover, and a record will be kept, but the final product will be at the discretion of the Secretary of DNREC. For example, the Inland Bays Pollution Control Strategy was signed after the adjournment of the General Assembly and over the objections of some of the affected members. This is not good policy and what was signed took effect years down the road to boot. My point is we, the public, need to stay involved and make sure there are raw cost estimates and justification for what is passed out. This has the potential to ruin the agribusinesses in this area. Joseph W. Booth Senator, 19th District

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MORNING STAR • november 11 - 17, 2010

PAGE 59

Final Word A closer look at ‘The Spin’

Facts are facts, they say, but even undisputed facts can be reported in more than one way. Pundits call this “spin.” In the interest of being balanced, I chose two examples from the recently released unemployment figures as to justify how this principle works. First the announcement from the Bureau of Labor Statistics: Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 151,000 in October, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 9.6 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today (Nov. 5). Since December 2009, nonfarm payroll employment has risen by 874,000. First Perspective Today we learned our economy added 151,000 jobs in October, and the private sector was leading the way yet again, marking 10 consecutive months of uninterrupted private sector job growth for 2010. After losing over 8 million private sector jobs in 2008 and 2009, the private sector has started to recover, adding over 1 million jobs since the beginning of this year.

U.S. Senator Tom Carper (D-Del)

Second Perspective “October marks the 18th straight month that unemployment has been at or above 9.4 percent — the longest period of time

Gas Lines

Crude oil approaching the $90 a barrel mark means motorists can expect gas prices to rise.  It’s an ominous sign.  Just four years ago, on October 25 2007, oil prices hit a then record-high of more than $90 a barrel, within two weeks consumers were  spending in excess of $1.2 billion each day for gasoline. Crude Oil Prices Crude oil began the week just under $82 a barrel and never looked back, clawing its way up to $86.85 Friday, its highest level in more than two years (the last time crude oil closed higher was October 8, 2008 at $88.95).  Early Friday morning crude touched $87.22, its highest intra-day price since October 9, 2008 and surpassing this year’s peak of $86.19 on May 3. 

of sustained high unemployment since the Great Depression. That is as remarkable as it is sad for millions of American families who increasingly cannot make their mortgage payments. Foreclosures are still at all time highs, even as Barack Obama claimed that the worst of the crisis was behind us. Obama’s policies have failed to put America back to work.

Americans for Limited Government President Bill Wilson

I believe that an important function of the press is to help put information in perspective. Bryant Richardson Publisher

Vital Stats

Federal Debt as of November 10, 2010 at 9:55 a.m. $13,732,160,806,243 Population of United States 309,454,146 Each citizen’s share of debt $44,375 The average citizen’s share of debt increased $33 the past seven days. The debt increased by more than $12 billion and the population increased by 42,446. Source: brillig.com/debt_clock Note: Last week’s Federal Debt report had an error. The debt per person actually increased $134. The Federal Reserve’s announcement of a fresh monetary stimulus plan aimed at lowering interest rates, higher than expected U.S. jobless claims and a continued weakened dollar will remain the principal driving factors in the oil market. 

 A look ahead “Crude oil prices reached 2010 highs last week, which will likely translate to slightly higher gas prices in the week ahead, as gas prices typically follow crude oil trends,” said Jana L. Tidwell, AAA Mid-Atlantic spokesperson.  Local pricing On Wednesday gas stations from Delmar to Greenwood were selling regular gasoline in a range from $2.739 to $2.899 a gallon. The low is six cents higher than a week ago and the high is eight cents more.

Regular Unleaded Gasoline & Crude Oil prices

11/7/10

Nine days ago

Year ago

National

$2.85

$2.81

$2.67

11/5/10

Seven days ago Year ago

$86.85

$81.43

Delaware

Oil Barrel

$2.82

$2.79

$2.62

$79.00

Red Cross needs volunteers

The American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula is seeking volunteers to help them in local communities. A Volunteer Orientation is scheduled for November 16 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. It will be held at the Seaford Public Library. Why is your local Red Cross seeking volunteers? Volunteers make up more than 95% of our work force, providing many of the Red Cross services that your local community depends on. Free Disaster Response training is provided by the Red Cross for volunteers so they are ready to assist as needed. Other opportunities are also available, from teaching lifesaving skills like CPR and First Aid to conducting presentations stressing the importance of being prepared for emergencies to helping at local Health and Community fairs. To register call the local Red Cross at 1-800-777-6620, option 7 or send an email to volunteer@redcrossdelmarva.org. Sarah Gilmour

Red Cross of the Delmarva

A great tribute to farming

Woodland United Methodist Church was fortunate to be a very small part of the “Ross Mansion Fall Ag Festival” recently. The members of the Community Planning Committee under the leadership of Ron

and Sue Breeding arranged and produced this tribute to America’s farm family and agricultural industry and should be proud of a job well done. It was a pleasure to see people relaxing and enjoying the exhibits and entertainment in a beautiful park-like atmosphere as well as experiencing the history of both the Ross Mansion property and farming on Delmarva. Residents of this area should be proud of our history and the contributions farmers have made to our country. Remember that Delaware is the “first state.”

Last Laugh Dearly departed The graveside service just barely finished, when there was a massive clap of thunder, followed by a tremendous bolt of lightning, accompanied by even more thunder rumbling in the distance. The little old man looked at the preacher and calmly said, “Well... she’s there.”  

Final Word

The Final Word is a compilation of thoughts from Star staffers and members of the public. Email items to editor@ms publications.com or mail to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Include your name, hometown and a daytime number.

i.g. Burton Seaford -- Your Used Car Super Store!

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PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE PICTURES CREDIT ARE FORTHRU DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE TYPOGRAPHICAL DUE TO PUBLICATION SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD ANDAPPLY NOT AVAILABLE. ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCKFOR MODELS ONLY. PRIORERRORS. DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES ANDDATE TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL TO PUBLICATION DATE DEALERS SOME VEHICLES MAY BELENDER. SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON ERRORS. TIER ONEDUE APPROVED CREDIT THRU PREFERRED IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES ANMODELS TAGS EXTRA. RESTRICTIONS SEE TAGS DEALER FORCERTAIN DETAILS.RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK ONLY. CERTAIN PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. APPLY TAXES-AND EXTRA.


November 11 2010 S