Page 1

THURSDAY, JUNE 8, 2006

VOL. 11 NO. 7 NEWS HEADLINES

50 cents

CAPS AND GOWNS

DOORS CLOSING - A local grocery store is closing its doors next week because of rising utility costs. Page 3 NEW POLICE CHIEF - The new Blades police chief has an impressive background in police work. Page 5 TOP TEACHER - People say there is “something magical” going on this Woodbridge Teacher of the Year’s classroom. Page 8

Jill Lewandowski Teacher of the Year

STANDOFF - After firing more than 50 shots, a distraught man turns a gun on himself as police negotiations fail. Page 11

FOR THE KIDS - There is plenty for children to do at the upcoming Kids’ Fest this Saturday. Page 20 SEAFORD EAGLES - 1948 is the next to last year for the Seaford Eagles as attendance starts to slip. Page 22 THE RAVENS - Sussex Tech High School has one of the biggest graduation classes in the area. Page 30 SUPER SOPHOMORE - Seaford’s Derrik Gibson is named to the first team all state as he high school baseball season comes to an end. Page 41 SUSSSEX HOUSING - Retirees are finding that their dollars go a long way in western Sussex as far as housing is concerned. Page 51

3 6

BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS CROSSWORD ENTERTAINMENT GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS

18 24 32 19 20 39 13 53

Even indoors, Seaford High graduation is a special event By Ronald MacArthur

Seaford’s Derrik Gibson

INSIDE THE STAR BEHIND PAGE ONE BUSINESS

GRADUATION TIME - Above, members of the Woodbridge High Class of 2006 laugh as high school teacher Russell Bean Jr. speaks during Sunday’s graduation ceremony. The class donated $500 for portable bleachers at the district’s new athletic fields. See more photographs on page 52. Photo by Mike McClure. Right, Seaford graduates Eric Kimpton and Claire Rekitzke are winners of the Seaford Kiwanis Club Honor Cups as the two members of the class with the most Honor Key points (most involvement in school activities). They received the cups during Seaford graduation on Friday night. Graduation was moved indoors because of rain. See more photographs and awards on pages 9, 12 and 16. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

LYNN PARKS MOVIES OBITUARIES OPINION POLICE JOURNAL SNAPSHOTS SPORTS TIDES/WEATHER TODD CROFFORD TONY WINDSOR

28 7 26 54 11 48 41-47 55 25 39

Even though for the first time in 14 years Seaford High commencement was held indoors because of inclement weather, there were still plenty of smiles from the 181 members of the Seaford High Class of 2006. High school principal Clarence Davis made the decision Friday morning to move inside because of conditions on the field at Bob Dowd Stadium from a heavy rain the night before, even though the rain held off throughout the day. It was a good thing because loud claps of thunder could be heard throughout the ceremony in the Madden Auditorium on Friday night. “The decision was really not based on me making a weather forecast but on the wet, muddy field conditions. There was one inch of standing water in some locations of the field,” he said.

“We try to be proactive and always practice for an indoor and outdoor graduation.” The overflow crowd viewed commencement in the gymnasium on video equipment. “Unfortunately, the number of family members the seniors were able to invite went from 17 to seven because of fire code regulations when we moved inside,” said Lynne Banning, a high school administrative assistant who helped to coordinate the ceremony. As always, commencement is a time to honor those who excel in academics. The class had its awards assembly earlier in the week (see a complete list of awards in this edition). Eric Kimpton, who is also a threesport athlete, is the class valedictorian with a 4.41 grade-point average and the salutatorian is Jennifer Stephens,

who is president of the National Honor Society, with a 4.34 grade-point average. The two participate in collegeprep classes at Delaware Tech College which allows for a higher than 4.0 grade-point average. Distinguished diplomas (averaging 4 or above on state testing out of a perfect score of 5) were presented to Victoria Carey, Rebecca Chambers, Clifton Ebron, Cassi Greenwood, Jeremy Halter, Charles Hildebrand, Eric Kimpton, Katelyn Mack, Shane McLaughlin, Mike Ruehr, Jennifer Stephens, April Stevenson, Myron Thomas, Zachary Townsend, Katelyn Webber, Jordan Wills, Haley Workman and Dana Young. Kimpton and Claire Rekitzke were presented with the prestigious Seaford Kiwanis Club Honor Key Cups for Continued to page 9




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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 3

Sports at the Beach investors seek bail out or want out By Ronald MacArthur The 95-acre Sports at the Beach complex on Rt. 9 in Georgetown may shut down this October without major financial support. Although the complex has a busy tournament schedule throughout the summer, officials claim the operation is struggling financially. Richard Derrickson and Louis Capano, who signed the note and are responsible for the debt, are asking another entity - the state, county or even the Delaware River and Bay Authority - to help bail out the operation. They claim the original project was to cost around $4 million and in reality it has cost more than $9 million. Rep. Joe Booth (R-Georgetown) is talking about getting discussions started to see if there is interest from the state or county officials in helping out the venture. Derrickson feels the county should take over the complex and expand the sports offerings beyond softball and baseball. LOST LAWSUIT - The problems within the Delaware State Police continue. On May 31, a federal jury awarded nearly $2 million to three state police troopers who accused two commanders of retaliating against them for exposing environmental conditions at the department’s firing range. It was the second lawsuit lost by former commander Col. Aaron Chaffinch and the first for current

BEHIND PAGE ONE commander Col. Thomas Mac Leish. Since 1997, seventeen state troopers and employees have filed federal lawsuits against the agency alleging civil rights violations or discrimination. The total cost of the lawsuits to state taxpayers to date has been approximately $8 million. There is still a sexual harassment lawsuit case pending. NOT MUCH MILEAGE - Think you have problems with gas mileage? The cars racing around the Monster Mile in Dover on Saturday and Sunday averaged about five miles per gallon. The good news is, at least for the races teams, that the highly refined racing fuel is supplied at no cost as a sponsorship deal. NEW MANAGER - Milton has a new town manager. George H. Dickerson Jr. was approved to fill the position left open when Hal Godwin left earlier this year to take a job as assistant county administrator. Dickerson is the former town manager of Camden and also served as a police officer in Milford and was police chief in Fenwick Island for 10 years. UNFAIR GAP - Senate Minority Leader John C. Still (R-Dover) is sponsoring legislation to protect military per-

sonnel deployed overseas from facing higher auto insurance premiums upon their return as a result of their military service. Still initiated the legislation after learning firsthand about the experience of a Delaware citizen who was deployed in Iraq for more than a year and had canceled his car insurance policy while he was away. When the soldier returned home, he found that he faced much higher car insurance premiums simply because his service created a gap in his insurance coverage history and placed him in a higher rate classification such as a first-time insuree. “It is wrong for our military personnel to lose the benefit of their insurance history, years

of safe driving and other discounts they may have earned, for no reason other than a break in their coverage caused by their service to our country,” Still said. REALLY HAPPY - Happy Harry’s is really happy now. Officials have announced that the drug store chain has been purchased by Walgreen. All stores in Delaware and Maryland will retain the Happy Harry’s name. Walgreen is a nationwide chain with more than 5,200 stores compared to Happy Harry’s with 76 stores in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania (will be converted to the Walgreen name).

Fresh Pride grocery store blames rising utility costs for store closing By Lynn R. Parks The Fresh Pride grocery store in the Nylon Capital Shopping Center, Seaford, is closing. Store manager C. J. Fitzhugh said Monday that the store’s last day will be Tuesday, June 13. Fitzhugh blamed the store’s closing on increased electricity costs. Those costs have jumped from $7,000 a month to $18,000 to $20,000 a month, he said. The store receives its power through the city of Seaford. “This store, that was making a profit, could no longer make a profit,” he said.

Fitzhugh said that the decision to close the store was made by the Camelia Food Stores corporate office in Virginia. Edward Dery, president of the company, did not return a request for comment. “This will be a loss for this town,” said Fitzhugh. “There is not much for grocery shopping on this side of town.” Fitzhugh said that the store employs 20 people. They have been offered jobs in Fresh Pride grocery stores in Georgetown and Cambridge, Md. Camelia Food Stores also owns Food City and BeLo grocery stores on the Delmarva Peninsula and in Virginia.

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PAGE 4

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Upcoming Seaford school budget reflects increase from referendum By Lynn R. Parks The tentative Seaford School District budget for next year is about $1 million more than this year's budget. That, said director of finance Lynn Lester, who is retiring at the end of this school year, is a good thing. "I'm pleased to be leaving the school district in a more positive condition," Lester said during the May school board meeting. The increased budget is because of a tax hike, approved in a referendum in February and set to go into effect July 1. That referendum was designed to pay for nearly $1 million in what the district called "unmet needs." The increase in taxes, as well as a three-percent growth in the district's total assessment value, will mean that local funds available to the district will increase from about $2.8 million to $3.9 million, Lester said. At the same meeting, superintendent Russell Knorr presented a tentative expense budget summary, detailing how the district plans to spend its money. The draft budget "represents our commitment to the public who supported the referendum," he said. "We have honored the commitment that we said we were going to do when we asked for the public's support." The biggest part of the district's budget

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is salaries. The proposal calls for increasing salaries from $6.796 million this year to $6.858 next year. "We want to have competitive salaries, so we can attract and retain good employees," Knorr said. The tentative budget also includes increases in individual school budgets, from $214,695 to $245,996, and in spending on athletics, from $125,745 to $143,040. Spending on building and grounds would also get a boost, from $155,660 to $190,421. "These areas are getting caught up to where they should be," Knorr said. "We have cut back and cut back and cut back." Local contributions to pay for energy would also go up, from $146,402 to $175,925. Even so, "energy costs will be a problem," Knorr said. Also getting boosts would be the district's reserve account, from $367,800 to $500,000, and the district's set-aside account, from $505,039 to $918,397. "Because of the support of the community via the expense referendum, it is really good to be able or replenish the set-aside account," Knorr said. The budget will come back before the school board at its June meeting, 7 p.m. in the district board room in the district office, on Market Street across from the high school. For further information, call 629-4587.

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NOT A SCIENTIST - The Seaford Middle School added a twist to its Career Day with a “What’s My Line” format. Business people from the community visited classrooms last Thursday and students asked prepared questions in an effort to “guess” their profession or job. Once the students guessed the job or were stumped, the business people spent a few minutes explaining what their job entailed and answered questions. In the photos, Ray Lanier (far left), who is the manager of the parts, service and body shop at i.g. Burton in Seaford, explains how a diagnostic computer works once they “guessed” his job (they also thought he was a scientist and engineer). Also, Shanice Cannon checks off an answer from the list of questions and Alancantara Osbaldo and Tolga Ceylan (above) are ready to make a guess. The students are sixth graders in Lucas Conner’s class. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 5

New Blades police chief has 25-year background with DSP By Cathy Shufelt The new Blades police chief comes to the town with 25 years of experience in the Delaware State Police. Edwin C. Cooke, who graduated from Seaford High School in 1967, didn’t envision a career in law enforcement, but the military draft was a lifechanging experience for him. He graduated from high school with a certificate in masonry from Sussex Vocational School and had intentions of starting his own business. He was drafted however and entered the Army soon after and was a combat medic in Vietnam. After leaving the Army in 1977 he became a Delaware State Trooper and joined the Army National Guard. He has enjoyed a 25-year career with the Delaware State Police and a 34-year military career. He served the Delaware State Police in a number of capacities including being a K-9 officer for five years. He used his training as an Army medic during his early years as a Delaware State Trooper, and attended college and received training as a paramedic as well as graduating with a nursing degree and is a licensed LPN. This enabled him to be a “trooper medic” with the aviation squad for six years. He was then transferred to work in the public relations/ community policing office for seven years. Prior to retiring from the Delaware State Police, he was shift commander at Troop 7 in Lewes and Troop 5 in Bridgeville. For the last year of his career he worked as court liaison. “I have enjoyed giving back to the community of Delaware,” he said. He added that he did not want to sit back in retirement. “I am of the opinion if that I am so excited about what I have done yesterday, and what I have done yesterday still excites me, then I am not doing much today,” he said. “I feel I have a lot more to give and that the best is yet to come. So, I was not happy in retirement and being away from policing when I still have a desire to be active.” Cooke said that he was looking for a municipal department Blades was what he was looking for. “Some people would want to be in a department that is more established but, to start in a department like this, to start anew almost, is more exciting to me. I will have a chance to be in on the ground level to get some things in place and to know they will last because they are the right things to have in place,” he said. “It’s really great to know that in a few years when you look

back and just see our department and hear our reputation being right where it needs to be. That will be good to hear and I Iook forward hearing that. It’s not for my fame or reputation but for the citizens of Blades. The citizens here can be proud of that.” Cooke has been in the new job for a month. Some of the first projects he has taken on are the administrative needs of the office, creating a department and divisional manual for officers and staff, and refining the office’s daily routine. Cooke believes that the first priority is the departmental manual. “This is the bible of how we operate with everything in writing, and is a tool for officers as well as important for our accreditation. When they want to know how we do what we do, it will be in writing and available,” he said. He believes that another need is for the office to get up to speed on proper filing systems in order to keep accurate records of police activity so information can be easily retrieved. Also, records of daily activities such as calls reported to and actions taken will be kept so monthly reports will be easily available. Everything will be computerized making these processes easy to maintain. Another priority is the hiring of new officers which Cooke believes will take place soon. They would like to hire one full-time officer right now in order to help Lt. Von Thenen with all of the responsibilities he has taken on the last several months. Cooke stated that it has been difficult for Lt. Von Thenen trying to split his hours to cover patrols and code enforcement needs. Bringing in a seasoned full-time and part-time officer would help to supplement patrols and cover other needs. Cooke said that he is making an effort to make the department look more professional and is in the process of getting new uniforms. “I am tickled to death that we have just designed and ordered our new uniforms and patches,” he said. “It is going to be super, and we won’t take a back seat to anyone in the state as far as how we look. We are going to look sharp. This is how you start improving your image in the community. When we look good and we do the right thing, the image will just be that much more positive. The image is a big part of what happens to the department.” Cooke has started the process of meeting with other departments in the area he will be working with, and he feels great about the connections he already has. “With a 25-year history in the criminal justice community I am familiar with pretty much the entire state, and the great thing

about that is that I can just pick up the phone and on a first name basis call the person I need to get help from. This will be absolutely helpful to the Blades community,” he said. He also wants to network and connect more with the Sussex County communications center and Seaford Police dispatch center in order to keep better track of Delaware State Police response in the area. This will allow the Blades Police office to track service calls to the area and have a record of what actions were taken on these calls. Cooke understands that the Blades community is growing rapidly and this will increase their responsibility in terms of the need for more patrols. He feels this will give them the opportunity to increase their level of service to the community, and said as the community continues to grow it will be “great working with and serving more people in the Blades area.” Cooke is married and lives outside of Felton.

New Blades Police Chief Edwin C. Cooke in his office at Blades Town Hall. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

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PAGE 6

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Business Moving day near for Laurel Happy Harry’s Happy Harry’s Pharmacy will celebrate the grand reopening of its 12,000-squarefoot store in Laurel, on Monday, June 12, at 9 a.m. The new store will replace the existing Happy Harry’s located just a short distance from the new store. “For years Happy Harry’s has been privileged to serve the people of Laurel. The new store will continue that level of service with the people you have come to rely on and with the services you need to make your lives easier,” states Alan Levin, president and CEO for the Delaware-based drug store chain. The same management team will be serving the community at the new location. Christopher Rimmer, pharmacist-incharge, will continue to serve patients of the Laurel area. Rimmer has been employed by Happy Harry’s Inc. since 1995. Joyce Shultie has also worked for the company since 1995 and will remain as store manager in the new location. A ribbon cutting ceremony will be held at 9 a.m. Attendees will include Happy Harry’s executives and local community representatives. Customers can start their day enjoying complimentary coffee and donuts as they spin the Happy Harry’s prize wheel. In addition, pharmacists will be available from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. offering health screenings. Froggy 99.9 will be onsite from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to help Happy Harry’s celebrate the new store opening. As a thank you to its customers, Happy Harry’s will offer the first 100 people through the door on Monday through Thursday a coupon for a free gift. In addition, beginning Monday, customers can enter to win a prize a day through Thursday. Prizes include a digital camera, TV, DVD player and an Apple i-Pod. The new Laurel store features a pharmacy drive-in service. Happy Harry’s also offers customers a variety of product selections in departments such as health care, cosmetics, photo processing, gifts and greeting cards. Happy Harry’s carries an array of products for every season and holiday - from decorations to snack items. Happy Harry’s, Inc., based in Newark has 76 locations in four states — Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland and

New Jersey. On Monday the merger of Happy Harry’s drugstores with Walgreen Co. was announced. The Deerfield, Illinois, drugstore chain is the largest in the United States with more than 5,200 stores and $42 billion in annual sales. Happy Harry’s is the 20th largest pharmacy chain with 76 stores and annual sales of $480 million.

Rash earns broker’s license Wanda Rash, a realtor with Coldwell Banker Broadcreek Realty in Seaford, has completed a highly specialized course in real estate brokerage. Requirements needed to obtain a broker’s license are 99 hours of education, five Wanda Rash active years in the business and 30 sales within that period. After completion of the course, Rash successfully passed the state and national testing and has received her broker’s license. Rash is a Sussex County native and resides in Milford. She is a graduate of Milford High School, received her associate’s degree in business administration from Goldey Beacom College, and her bachelor’s degree in business administration from Wilmington College. Rash joined Coldwell Banker Broadcreek Realty eight years ago and is a member of the National Association of Realtors and the Sussex County Association of Realtors. She can be reached at the U.S. 13 office or by calling her directly at 6295575, ext. 10. She can also be reached via her cell phone at 542-8024.

Brenda Johnson joins Tull/Ramey Brenda Johnson is a licensed Realtor and Sales Associate with Tull/Ramey Real Estate. Johnson grew up in Hurlock, Md., graduating from North Dorchester High School. She has lived in Sussex County for 30 Brenda Johnson years. Johnson currently lives in Seaford. Johnson worked for DuPont for 25 years and is also currently employed by Invista. She has one daughter, Sharonne,

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and four grandchildren, Whitney, Bryant, Kyle, and Trinity. Johnson enjoys home decorating and hosting special events for her family and friends. She is a member of the Hurlock United Methodist Church.

Top Selling and Listing Agent Frank Parks and Rob Harman, broker-owners of Home Team Realty, are pleased to announce Mike Procino was the Top Listing Agent and Top Selling Agent for May 2006. The Home Team Realty office is located at 1258 Mike Procino Norman Eskridge Highway, behind McDonald’s, in Seaford.

Dow Jones adds Fulton to Index Dow Jones Indexes, a well-known global financial index provider, has added Fulton Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: FULT) to its Dow Jones U.S. Select Dividend Index, effective June 1. The Dow Jones Select Dividend Index reflects the performance of the 100 leading U.S. dividend-paying companies. According to Dow Jones, the index universe is defined as all dividend-paying companies in the Dow Jones U.S. Total Market Index that have a non-negative five-year dividend-per-share growth rate, a five-year average dividend to earnings-per-share ratio of less than or equal to 60%, and a three-

month average daily trading volume of 200,000 shares. The index represents approximately 95% of U.S. market capitalization. “We are very pleased that Dow Jones has added us to its Select Dividend Index,” said R. Scott Smith, Jr., chairman, CEO and president of Fulton Financial Corporation. “We work very hard to create attractive total returns to long-term shareholders, and our history of 32 consecutive years of dividend increases helps us to achieve that goal. For Dow Jones to recognize our 10.2% compounded annual growth rate in dividends per share over that 32 year period in one of its key performance indexes is a tribute to the commitment of our employees throughout the company who make this recognition possible.” Dow Jones Indexes is part of Dow Jones & Company, a worldwide publisher of financial news and information, including the Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, Dow Jones Newswires and MarketWatch. Together with Wilshire Associates, Dow Jones Indexes markets and licenses the Dow Jones Wilshire index family, which includes the Dow Jones Wilshire 5,000 and its size, style, and sector indexes. Fulton Financial Corporation is a $14.4 billion financial holding company that employs 4,400 people throughout its family of 15 locally managed affiliate banks in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia.


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14 , 2006

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

WOODBRIDGE TEACHER OF THE YEAR: JILL LEWANDOWSKI

‘There is just something about her in the classroom that’s magical’ Lewandowski teaches at Phillis Wheatley By Lynn R. Parks The eighth-graders filing into the classroom of Jill Lewandowski had work to do: "What is one piece of advice you would give to someone starting eighth grade?" their writing assignment was already written on the front board "Why is it important?" Walking from desk to desk, Lewandowski encouraged her students to write down their feelings about what it means to be an eighth grader. Then, one by one, the students read their compositions to the class. When the readings were complete, Lewandowski collected the papers to hand out to next year's fresh batch of eighth graders. As a child, Lewandowski wanted to be a writer. Even though she ended up in the classroom, "we write in here just about every day," she said. "We look beyond the structure of writing to get to the voice that's behind it. And the voice that comes through is fabulous." Lewandowski teaches special education math and language arts in the Phillis Wheatley Middle School, Bridgeville. She is this year's Woodbridge School District Teacher of the Year. "There is just something about her in the classroom that's magical," said Sean Jackson, who shares a classroom with Lewandowski. "To see her interact with the kids and to watch her innate ability to communicate, it's something else." As a first-year teacher, Jackson had Lewandowski as a mentor. Even now, two years later, he comes to her with questions. "Everyone feels that they can talk with her, because she is very honest," he said. "It might not be something you want to hear, but you can count on her to be honest." Lewandowski, 40, grew up in Bridgeville and graduated from Woodbridge High School in 1983. She went to the University of Delaware, graduating in 1987 with a bachelor's degree in communications. "I was going to be a newspaper reporter," she said. "But when I was doing projects, my roommates would say, 'Oh,

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you're such a teacher,' because I would do charts and displays. But I would say that I was not interested in teaching." Lewandowski started working at the Woodbridge School District in 1993, as a secretary at the elementary school in Greenwood. There, "I saw so many good role models, and I thought, 'This is what I want to do.'" She began teaching fourth grade in 1999 and last year moved to the middle school, to teach seventh-grade special education. "When I taught fourth grade, I had regular and special education children," she said. "I enjoyed the special education children more, because they are more willing to do the work. They know they have to work harder, and they want to." Lewandowski said that with special education students, it is important for her to take her time in teaching a lesson. "I explain and explain and explain, 10 different ways if necessary, to make sure they understand," she said. "They appreciate that I am willing to give up time after school, or time during lunch, to make sure that they've gotten what they need."

Jill Lewandowski and student Angela Fritz listen as another student reads a paper about advice to incoming eighth-graders. Lewandowski is the teacher of the year in the Woodbridge School District. She believes that it is important to include lots of writing in her students’ classwork. Photos by Lynn R. Parks

Lewandowski is the daughter of Joe and Joann Conaway of Bridgeville. She has two sisters, Joanne Collison, who teaches English at Woodbridge High School, and Jenyfer Conaway of Columbia, S.C., and a brother, Joseph II, who is

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 9

Eric Kimpton, three-sport athlete, is Class of 2006 valedictorian Continued from page 1

compiling the most Honor Key points during their high school careers. Students receive points for participation in school activities. Class officers are Bitty Hood, president, Cindy Pierre, vice president, Jena Banning and Shannon Crockett, secretaries, Laura Riddle, treasurer, Darian Libby, historian, and Rachel Thomas, member at large. Hood, the class president, a three-sport athlete, member of the National Honor Society and an Honor Key recipient, told her classmates that “they were rounding third base and heading for home.” “We are coming together as a class tonight,” she said. “The memories that we hold are unforgettable. Our senior year has been a wake up call to me as it’s time to get ready to face the future.” She thanked several people including principal Clarence Davis. “We thank our former music teacher who has followed us from the middle school - he is one who we idolize. He is a go-getter. And I personally want to thank my mother who taught me to stand proud,” she said. Her mother, Carla Hood, was fighting back the tears as she patted her heart as the two exchanged glances. She urged her fellow graduates to “over achieve” as they go forward following graduation. Art Doakes, a Seaford High School wellness center counselor and coach, was selected by the class as the graduation speaker. The “dynamic dreamer” as he is called as a motivational speaker, started his talk by saying,”What do you say to a group of students who knows it all? Good job!” He then had everyone (graduates and audience) repeat the words “good job” several times. “We are in a district that strives for excellence and that is evidenced by the young leaders and graduates behind me,” he said. Doakes called graduation an interlude between school and life and he said that it was now time for the graduates “to get on their mark, get ready, get set, go.” “You must leave a mark for the rest of us to enjoy because each of you is unique. The mark of greatness is in you,” he said. “You are one of 3 million U.S. graduates this is a tremendous accomplishment. “Get set. Let’s do something radical; let’s make a change. I say to all of you, let’s lift up the Class of 2006. Let’s go and meet new challenges. You will meet many obstacles and that’s why education can

Class advisor: Sandra Fulton Class colors: Navy and silver Class flower: White rose Class song: “The Graduation Song” by the Dave Matthews Band Class motto: “What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”

never stop,” he added. “You are Seaford’s finest in 2006. This is your night; there is no one like you.” The Seaford High band and chorus provided music during the commencement. Other speakers included Dr. William Parmelee, president of the Seaford Board of Education, Dr. Russell Knorr, superintendent, and Eric Kimpton, valedictorian of the class, who told his classmates that their journey is just beginning. Even though the class was confined to a small space on the stage, several members of the class did toss their caps in the air after the traditional change of tassels. Following the ceremony, the graduates assembled for photographs and hugs from friends and family members in the packed gymnasium and lobby of the school. AWARDS - The following members of the Seaford High Class of 2006 received awards during the senior awards ceremony last week: Jena Banning - AAUW Charlotte T. Mach Memorial Scholarship; Allen Family Foundation Scholarship; Student Government Scholarship; Adele Tibbitt Hall Scholarship; VFW Ladies Auxiliary Post 4961 Scholarship; Woodland Ferry Association Scholarship; Blue Jay Pageant Award - runner-up. Gina Baker - Savings Bond Mortgage Associates, DARE Certificate. Eric Fisher - American Legion Award Scholastic Excellence. Tobias Harris - American Legion Award Military Excellence. Tiarra Horne - Ferguson Scholarship (DSTP). Chesney Hudson - Ferguson Scholarship (DSTP). Haley Workman - AAUW Charlotte T. Mach Memorial Scholarship; Kiwanis Sports Award (fall cheerleading); Rev. David B. Mulford Memorial Scholarship; William Fry Benson Memorial Scholarship; Miss Blue Jay Award. Cindy Pierre - Acorn Club Scholarship; Callaway, Farnell & Moore Scholarship; Horatio Algier Award; John H. Porter Chapter, Tuskegee Airman Scholarship; Ladies of Distinction Scholarship; Soroptimist Club of

Seaford Class of 2006 president Bitty Hood talks to her class and pauses a moment as she gets emotional during graduation on Friday night. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Seaford Scholarship; VFW Post 4961 ROTC Senior Award; MBNA Delaware Scholar. Everett Roberts - Academic Challenge Participation Award. Davency Leroy - Acorn Club Scholarship; J. Oliver Tibbitt Scholarship. Charles Larimore - Aerospace & Maritime Scholarship Award; Drama Service Award. Jeremy Halter - Allen Family Foundation Scholarship; George E. Gordy Award; Kiwanis Club of Seaford Scholarship; Seaford Educational Secretaries Association Gertrude Jester Scholarship; Ted and Bev

Continued to page 12

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Arthur Doakes, a counselor and coach at Seaford High, tells the graduates to get ready, get set and go. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Blades Scholarship; VFW Post 4961 ROTC Senior Award. Caitlin Morris - Allen Family Foundation Scholarship; Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship; Eugenia A. Gibbons Memorial Nursing Scholarship; Irene Larrimore School Citizenship Award; Seaford Alumni Association Scholarship. Laura Riddle - Mary Elizabeth Allen Memorial Scholarship; Kiwanis Athletic Award (field hockey); Kiwanis Athletic Award (tennis); Pauline Miltonberger Award;

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 11

POLICE JOURNAL Man commits suicide after stand-off with area police A 41-year-old Nebraska man committed suicide on May 31 after a three-hour standoff with police outside his ex-wife’s home located in the 30,000 block of Beaverdam Branch Road near Laurel. According to Cpl. Jeffry C. Oldham, Delaware State Police public information officer, the incident started when Anthony J. Windels, 41, of Omaha, Neb. allegedly fired several shots into the unoccupied home of the ex-wife’s boyfriend (victim) in the 18,000 block of Arvery Road, Laurel, around 5:30 a.m. Oldham said that Windels left that location and went to the home of his ex-wife and parked his pick-up truck near the driveway. According to Oldham, as the victim was pulling out of the driveway at the Beaverdam Branch Road residence on his way to work, Windels began shooting at him. He was armed with a .223 caliber rifle (similar to a AR-15) and .40 and .45 caliber handguns. Oldham said that one round struck the vehicle and, in an attempt to elude the shooter, the victim drove around the house and fled and called 911. Oldham said that the ex-wife and two children (ages 8 and 112) in the home heard the gunshots. In addition, after the victim drove off, Windels confronted a newspaper delivery

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Assault rifle rests next to seat in Windels’ truck. Photos by Pat Murphy

Windels’ truck sits in front of the house of his ex-wife.

Delaware State Police sent this armored vehicle to the scene.

woman and pointed a weapon at her. While this was taking place, a Laurel police officer arrived and began talking to Windels, ordering him to drop his weapons. Then several Delaware State police officers arrived and began talking to him. While police officers attempted to get Windels to surrender, two troopers went around to the back of the house and made contact with his ex-wife who was still on the phone on the 911 call. The troopers were able to remove the mother and her two children from the home. Oldham said that the Delaware State Police Conflict Management Team (CMT) and Special Operations Response Team (SORT) were called to the location. The first member of the CMT team arrived at

6:30 a.m. and took over negotiations with Windels. Oldham said that CMT members talked with him for the next three hours as he stood outside his pick-up truck in front of the house. Oldham said that during the negotiations he placed his rifle on the seat of the pick-up truck, but he kept one of the handguns in his hand and the other in a shoulder holster. During the negotiations, officers talked with him by cell phone and a landline that had been delivered to him by police. At 9:25, while standing in front of the home, Windels fired one of his handguns at his ex-wife’s vehicle that was parked in the driveway, and then he turned the gun on himself and fired. He was transported to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital where he

was pronounced dead at 9:56 a.m. Oldham said that Windels was apparently still despondent over his divorce, which occurred approximately one year ago. Windels’ ex-wife had obtained a protection from abuse order against him last July, and she had not seen him since, according to Oldham. During the incident, Windels fired more than 30 rounds while on Beaverdam Branch Road and more than 50 rounds while on Arvery Road. One round that was fired on Beaverdam Branch Road entered a home over a quarter mile away and lodged in a wall. In addition to the Laurel Police, members of the Delmar and Georgetown Police and Delaware Department of Transportation assisted state police.

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Seaford High graduates receive awards and scholarships Continued from page 9

Key Club of Seaford Scholarship; Student Government Scholarship. Jordan Wills - Warren T. Allen Family Scholarship; Kiwanis Sports Award (girls’ soccer); Seaford Alumni Association Scholarship; Seaford Education Association Scholarship. Wybens Titus - Warren T. Allen Family Scholarship; Olive May Fones Scholarship. Eric Kimpton - (Valedictorian) American Legion Post 6 Scholarship Excellence Award; Ashok J. Champaneria Scholarship; DIAA Senior Scholar Athlete Award; Bausch & Lomb Honorary Science Award; Bob Dowd Scholarship; Business Department Award; DAR Mary Vining Chapter American History Award; Kiwanis Club of Seaford Scholarship; Social Studies Department Academic Award; University of Delaware Scholars Award; WBOC Scholar/Athlete Scholarship Award; Blue Jay Pageant Award - runner up; Academic Challenge Jenny Moore Award; Fred Douglass Wizard Award; Koch Scholarship; Delaware Secretary of Education Scholars Award. Darian Libby - Elizabeth Draper Award. Jennifer Stephens - (Salutatorian) Art Department Academic Award; J. Fred and Louise Miles Memorial Scholarship; University of Delaware Scholars Award; Laurel Alumni Association Scholarship; Delaware Secretary of Education Scholars Award; Academic Challenge Participation Award.

As she hugs class president Bitty Hood, Seaford graduate Claire Rekitzke flashes the top of her cap wishing her mom a “Happy Birthday.”

Kelly Emory - Ashok J. Champaneria Scholarship. Claire Rekitzke - Babe Ruth Award; Kiwanis Sports Award (girls’ swimming); Seaford Star Athlete of the Year Award; Drama Service Award; Seaford Lioness Club Scholarship; Seaford Support Staff Scholarship. Ryan Hastings - Babe Ruth Award; Seaford Star Athlete of the Year; Brian R. Franceschi Memorial Scholarship. Mike Ruehr - Bob Dowd Athletic Award; Kiwanis Sports Award (track and field); Science Department Academic Award; Thomas A. Thomas Memorial Scholarship; Ferguson Scholarship (DSTP); U.S. Air Force Academy appointment; National Youth Leadership Forum. Angie Owens Diamond State Classic IABBO Scholarship; Kiwanis Sports Award (girls’ basketball); full athletic scholarship Coppin State University. Mike Alexis - Kiwanis Sports Award (boys’ basketball). Alice Thomas - Kiwanis Sports Award (winter cheerleading). Matt Daudt - Kiwanis Sports Award (baseball). Bitty Hood - Kiwanis Sports Award (softball); Horatio Algier Award. Dana Young - DAR Mary Vining Chapter Good Citizenship Award; Overall Academic Citizenship Award; VFW Senior Class Veterans Family Award; Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship Program; Diocese of Wilmington Bishops Scholarship; Johnson Sons and Daughters Award; Academic Challenge Participation Award. Fritzy Rodriquez - Comcast Student Achievement Scholarship; Ebony Doyle - Delaware State University Upward Bound Scholarship. Jennifer Goodwin - Drama Service Award. April Stevenson - Drama Service Award; Kiwanis Club of Seaford Scholarship; Seaford Education Association Scholarship; University of Delaware Scholars Award; Delaware Hispanic Student of the Year; Miss Seaford 2004; Ferguson Scholarship (DSTP). Matt Terry - Drama Service Award; Mr. Seaford; Ryan Long Memorial Scholarship. Katelyn Webber - English Department Academic Award. Shannon Crockett - Ernest A. Simon Memorial Scholarship; Seaford Lioness Club Scholarship; Odd Fellows Hebron Lodge 14 Scholarship. Zachary Townsend - Foreign Language Department Award. Rachel Thomas - George E. Gordy Award; Seaford Alumni Association Scholarship. Ashley Lockwood - George E. Gordy Award; Martin N. Willey and Flora N. Willey Scholarship. Victoria Carey - George E. Gordy Award. Tara Truitt - Beta Sigma Phi Legacy Scholarship; Michael Hastings Memorial

Class officers listen while president Bitty Hood speaks during Seaford High graduation. Officers are, from the left, Cindy Pierre, vice president, Jena Banning, secretary, Shannon Crockett, secretary, Laura Riddle, treasurer, Darian Libby, historian, and Rachel Thomas, member at large (not pictured). Photos by Ronald MacArthur

Jennifer Stephens is the salutatorian of the Seaford High Class of 2006.

Scholarship. Amber Truitt - JDG Special State Award Poetry. Victoria Carey - Laverty Memorial Band Scholarship; Rebecca Webb Stewart Music Award; Helen Tibbitt Johnson Scholarship. Mary Massey - Lucy T. Smarte Award; Seaford Alumni Association Scholarship; VFW Virgil Wilson Post Senior Class Award; Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship Program. Dan McCluskey - Math Department Academic Award; U.S. Air Force Math/Science Achievement Award. Caitlin McGee - McDonald’s Spirit of Giving Award; Seaford Support Staff Scholarship; Mary Ann Tibbitt Scholarship; VFW Virgil Wilson Post Senior Class Award; Academic Challenge Participation Award; Arcadia Merit Scholarship; Winner Soroptimist Youth Forum; Academic Challenge Participation Award; Boys & Girls Club Youth of the Year. Ashley Truitt - Most Inspiring Graduate Class of 2006. Erik Mulford - Rev. David B. Mulford Memorial Scholarship. Myron Thomas - Naval Science Department Academic Award; VFW Senior Class Veterans Family Award; VFW Post 4961 ROTC Senior Award; U.S. Air Force Math/Science Achievement Award; Ryan Long Memorial Scholarship. George Brown - Special Education Department Award. Mike Wright - Technology Department Academic Award.

Eric Kimpton, class valedictorian and three-sport athlete, talks to members of the Class of 2006.

Presidential Awards for Academic Excellence were presented to the following: Jena Banning, Victoria Carey, Shannon Crockett, Cassi Greenwood, Stephen Kieffer, Eric Kimpton, Leon Lahman, Darian Libby, Ashley Lockwood, Mary Massey, Caitlin Morris, Kathryn Mulford, Melinda O’Bier, Claire Rekitzke, Laura Riddle, Everett Roberts, Michael Ruehr, Jennifer Stephens, April Stephenson, Emily Stone, Matt Terry, Myron Thomas, Zachary Townsend, Ashley Truitt, Katelyn Webber, Jordan Wills, Haley Workman and Dana Young. Honor Keys were presented to: Jena Banning, Victoria Carey, Shannon Crockett, Bitty Hood, Eric Kimpton, Darian Libby, Mary Massey, Caitlin McGee, Caitlin Morris, Cindy Pierre, Claire Rekitzke, Laura Riddle, Jennifer Stephens, April Stephenson, Emily Stone, Matt Terry, Rachel Thomas, Jordan Wills, Haley Workman and Dana Young. Academic Challenge recognition was given to Eric Kimpton, Everett Roberts, Caitlin McGee, Jennifer Stephens and Dana Young. Senior members of the National Honor Society are the following: Jennifer Stephens, president, Eric Kimpton, vice president; Jena Banning, secretary, Dana Young, executive council, Victoria Carey, Kiara Collins, Shannon Crockett, Cassi Greenwood, Jeremy Halter, Ryan Hastings, Bitty Hood, Stephen Kieffer, Leon Lahman, Darian Libby, Katelyn Mack, Mary Massey, Caitlin Morris, Claire Rekitzke, Laura Riddle, Everett Roberts, April Stephenson, Emily Stone, Matt Terry, Myron Thomas, Zachary Townsend, Katelyn Webber, Jordan Wills and Haley Workman.

Seaford High School principal Clarence Davis tells the graduates “you are meant to shine.” See more photographs on page 16.


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 13

Health Children are wiser than adults give them credit for By Dr. Anthony Policastro Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Medical director

One of the things that we do as adults is underestimate the intelligence level of our children. This starts very early in life. Toddlers understand a lot more than they speak. We assume that they only understand what they also express verbally. That is not true. This underestimation continues as children get older. They sometimes surprise us with their level of understanding. They sometimes surprise us with their wisdom. I recently came across something that illustrates this. It was published by a firstgrade teacher. She had 25 students in her class. She gave each student the first part of a common proverb. She had them complete the proverb. All 25 came up with an answer. Every answer was more profound than you might expect from a first grader. We need to realize how much our children understand. Sometimes they hear us say things and do not understand them. However, they repeat them. A good example of this is the last one on the list. I hope you enjoy them. A Bit Of Humor A first grade teacher had 25 students in her class and she presented each child in her class the first half of a well-known proverb and asked them to come up with the remainder of the proverb. It’s hard to believe these were actually done by first graders. Their insight may surprise you.

While reading these, keep in mind that these are first graders — 6-year-olds — because the last one is classic. 1. Don’t change horses — until they stop running. 2. Strike while the — bug is close. 3. It’s always darkest before — Daylight Saving Time. 4. Never underestimate the power of — termites. 5. You can lead a horse to water but — how? 6. Don’t bite the hand that — looks dirty. 7. No news is — impossible. 8. A miss is as good as a — Mr. 9. You can’t teach an old dog new — math. 10. If you lie down with dogs, you’ll — stink in the morning. 11. Love all, trust — me. 12. The pen is mightier than the — pigs. 13. An idle mind is — the best way to relax. 14. Where there’s smoke there’s — pollution. 15. Happy the bride who — gets all the presents. 16. A penny saved is — not much. 17. Two’s company, three’s — the Musketeers. 18. Don’t put off until tomorrow what — you put on to go to bed. 19. Laugh and the whole world laughs with you, cry and — you have to blow your nose. 20. There are none so blind as — Stevie Wonder. 21. Children should be seen and not —

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

It is best to be prepared before a hurricane hits As another Atlantic hurricane season commences, and with forecasts for an above-average year of storm activity in 2006, the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is taking this opportunity to remind residents and visitors to southern Delaware that they need to prepare now. Preparation in advance of a storm is key to limiting or preventing loss of property, as well as loss of life. “From what we’ve seen in the last few years, particularly last year with Hurricane Katrina along the Gulf Coast, it’s imperative that people plan ahead and prepare themselves in the event that the area is staring down a major storm,” said Joseph Thomas, director of the Sussex County EOC. “It is also very important that our residents and visitors follow these storms when they do form, keep track of the forecasts, and then heed the advice of their emergency managers and public officials.” To help make the storm season safer for everyone, here are some steps you can take to make your home and family ready for the hurricane season: • Be prepared to evacuate. Plan your evacuation route now. Emergency managers will notify the public, via the media, of what areas should evacuate and when. In the event you evacuate, take a storm kit with you. Take valuable and/or important papers with you. Secure your house by locking the windows and doors. Turn off all utilities (gas, water, electric, etc.) Notify a family member or someone close to you outside the evacuation area of your

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destination. • Property owners who have homes along the coast may want to check to see that all outdoor items are secure and not subject to being blown around when a hurricane and/or storm watch is put in effect. Property owners also will need to secure their boats. Area residents should clear rainspouts and gutters and trim any trees that may pose a problem during high winds. • Have a family disaster kit. This kit should include the following items: • A three-day supply of water. This should include at least one gallon of water per person per day • Non-perishable foods and a manual can opener • A change of clothes and shoes for each person • Prescription medicines • A blanket or sleeping bag and pillow for each person • Personal hygiene items • A flashlight and extra batteries for each person • Special needs items such as formula and diapers for infants and items needed for elderly or disabled family members • A portable radio with extra batteries • Money. During power outages ATM machines will not work • Fuel. Gas pumps are also affected by power outages, so it is a good idea to have fuel in advance • In the event of an approaching storm,

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try to make your plans for traveling during Expect polluted water, limited daylight hours. Do not wait until the last minute to make plans or to purchase gasocommunications, no electricity, line and supplies. When a storm watch is overflowing or backed up sewers, issued, you should monitor the storm on undermined foundations, beach the radio and television. An evacuation erosion and heavy damage to could take 24 to 36 hours prior to a storm’s onset. homes and roadways. • If ordered to evacuate and seek shelter elsewhere, follow the instructions of local fects, as we all have seen. In the event a emergency managers on where to seek hurricane hits our area, expect polluted shelter. Authorities will announce shelter water, limited communications, no eleclocations in advance of their opening. tricity, overflowing or backed up sewers, Make provisions for your pets, however, undermined foundations, beach erosion as many shelters will not accept animals. and heavy damage to homes and road• If not ordered to evacuate, and you ways. decide to take shelter in your home, have Do not re-enter an affected area until your disaster kit ready. Keep your imporrecommended to do so by local authorities. tant papers with you or store them in the As you re-enter the area, be aware of poshighest, safest place in your home, and in a waterproof container. Even if you shelter sible hazards such as downed trees and in place, you need to secure your home by power lines. Be aware of debris and water on roadways. Have your identification and locking the doors and windows. Turn off all utilities (gas, water, electric, etc). Mon- important legal papers ready to show officials proof of residency upon re-entering. itor the storm by portable radio to keep up Continue to use your emergency water with the latest information. Stay indoors. supply or boil water until you are notified Try to stay in an inside room away from that the drinking water is safe. Take predoors and windows. cautions to prevent fires. • Use your phone sparingly. Make only Sussex County officials continue to essential calls and keep the calls brief. Replan, prepare and work with outside agenport emergencies to 911. When calling in emergencies, identify yourself and your lo- cies to ready Sussex County for hurricane season, which ends Nov. 30. cation speaking clearly and calmly. If you For more information on preparing for have a cell phone, make sure it is charged the hurricane season, contact Debbie and ready to use at all times. But rememJones, Public Information Officer, at (302) ber, cell phones might not work in your 002 Quest Seaford-Laurel.eps 5/24/06 9:08:23 AM area during, and especially after, the storm. 855-7801 or visit the Web site at www.sussexcountyde.gov. Hurricanes can have devastating ef-

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 15

We have stars among us, but

Health briefs NHS auxiliary to meet June 14 Members of the Nanticoke Health Services Auxiliary will gather on Wednesday, June 14, at the Seaford Golf and Country Club, for the final meeting of the season. Dan Werner, CEO of Nanticoke Health Services, will be guest speaker and will give an update on happenings at the facility. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m., with the speaker and business session to follow. Membership in the auxiliary is open to anyone within the Nanticoke service area. Those interested in becoming involved in the auxiliary are asked to call membership co-chairs, Jan Grantz, 628-8478, or Jane Foskey, 875-5629.

Safe sitter classes to be offered Safe babysitting classes for girls and boys aged 11 to 13 will be offered at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. The two-part course will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., on June 20 and 22. The Safe Sitter program is a medicallyaccurate instructional series that teaches youngsters how to handle emergencies when caring for younger children. The cost is $35. Participants are to bring a bag lunch. To register, call 629-6611, ext., 2540.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR

Seaford graduate Ariana Cortez adjusts her cap as she waits for the start of commencement on Friday night.

Seaford Class of 2006 president Bitty Hood talks to her class. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

Some of the officials at Seaford High graduation include Dr. Russell Knorr, superintendent, Dr. William Parmelee, president of the board of education, Art Doakes, guest speaker, and Sandra Fulton, class advisor.

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Jena and and her mom Lynne Banning get in a hug following Seaford High’s commencement ceremony on Friday night.

Rachel Thomas is all smiles during commencement.

Seaford High graduate Stephen Kieffer receives his diploma from principal Clarence Davis.

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Sixth-grade writing scores on state tests to be delayed Delaware Department of Education (DOE) staff found unusual patterns with the grade-six writing responses for this year’s Delaware Student Testing Program (DSTP). The patterns revealed inconsistencies between the responses from the field test and the responses from the actual testing situation. DOE has requested that Harcourt Assessment Inc., the vendor for the DSTP, validate the grade six responses for the

writing portion of the DSTP. This is not a scoring error on the part of Harcourt but a misalignment between the field test and the actual test. DOE conducts quality assurance checks every year in all content areas so that schools and families can be assured of the accuracy of test results. Because the validation is currently under way, the grade six writing results were not released May 31 along with all other

Applications are open for Riverfest pageants It will soon be that time again, to crown the next Little Miss and Junior Miss Riverfest for 2006. This year’s pageant will be held on Friday, July 14, at 6 p.m. in the Mt. Olivet Church parking lot. The Little Miss category is for girls ages 3 through 6 and the Junior Miss is for girls ages 7 through 10. Applications and information can be obtained at Seaford City Hall, 414 High St., by calling 629-9173 or online at www.nanticokeriverfest.com. This year’s pageant is limited to 25 girls and registration will

be on a first-come, first-served basis. Deadline for registration is June 30. Appearing at this year’s pageant will be Miss Teen Delaware USA 2006, Erika Savidge, Miss Delaware USA 2006, Ashlee Greenwell and Mrs. Delaware America 2006, Laura Fedale. They will be participating as judges, as well as doing an autograph signing session following the pageant. Reigning Little Miss Riverfest 2005, Britney Smith, and Junior Miss Riverfest 2005, Alexis Hudson, will crown the new Little Miss and Junior Miss Riverfest for 2006.

individual student scores. Individual student results in reading and mathematics for grades two through 10 and writing for grades three through 10, except for grade six, are being made available to school staff in the password protected on-line reports. A letter from the Secretary of Education has been made available to all schools affected by this situation so that families can be informed.

DOE conducts quality assurance checks every year in all content areas so that schools and families can be assured of the accuracy of test results.


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14 2006

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BENEFIT EVENTS CONCERT FOR NANTICOKE SR. CENTER Gospel concert, Saturday, June 24, 6 p.m., St. John’s U.M. Church, Seaford, sponsored by the Country Gospel Music Association to benefit the building fund of the Nanticoke Senior Center. Free admission; offering will be taken. Phone Jerry Jones, 629-9689.

LYNYRD SKYNYRD BENEFIT CONCERT Tickets are on sale for the July 4th Lynyrd Skynyrd benefit concert at Perdue Stadium, Salisbury. Proceeds will benefit the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club. Fireworks will follow. For information, phone 410-219-3112.

SUPPORT THE JULY 4TH FIREWORKS The 4th of July Laurel fireworks celebration fund raising is taking place. All contributions should be mailed to: Laurel Fireworks Celebration, PO Box 934, Laurel, DE 19956.

COURSES AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM AARP driver safety course for people 50 and over, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday and Tuesday, June 26 and 27, Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford. The two-day program, sponsored by the American Association for Retired persons, stresses how older drivers may operate vehicles safely. Upon completion, participants receive a certificate entitling them to a reduction in their auto insurance. A 15 percent reduction is given to anyone repeating the program within three years. For information and registration, call 629-8081. The cost is $10.

FOOD CENTENARY CHURCH DINNER Centenary United Methodist Church, Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, all-you-can-eat fish fry dinner on Saturday, June 10, 4 to 7 p.m. Adults $8; children $4 (under 6 years free). Sponsored by the Sunshine Class.

ELKS BEEF AND DUMPLING DINNER Saturday, June 17, 6 p.m., Seaford Elks Lodge dinner -roast beef, dumpling, mashed potatoes, gravy, corn, along with coffee and dessert. The price is $8 per person. No advance tickets and the public is invited. For more information contact Janice Cecil, 875-3810. The lodge is located on Elk Road, North of Seaford where U.S. 13A and U.S. 13 merge.

BREAKFAST AT THE VFW VFW Post 4961 Ladies Auxiliary (Middleford Road, Seaford) all-you-can-eat breakfast, Sunday, June 18, 8 to 11 a.m. The cost is $6 for adutls. This event is now smoke free.

BETHEL CHURCH CHICKEN DINNERS On Friday, June 23, barbecue Eming’s chicken dinners, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Bethel Church community house, west of Seaford, north Oak Grove Road. Carry outs only and tickets only. Deadline for tickets June 19. Donations to Bethel Community House Building Fund. Delivery will be provided tor businesses if necessary. For tickets call 629-7117 or 410-754-8681.

MELSON’S ICE CREAM SOCIAL Melson’s United Methodist Church ice cream social, Melson’s Road, Delmar, Md., Saturday, June 24, 2 p.m. Oyster sandwiches, hotdogs, hamburgers, chicken salad, potato salad, homemade ice cream.

Submit Bulletin Board items by Friday at noon. E-mail: publisher@seafordstar.com Mail: 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 Items appear in both the Seaford and Laurel Stars. Mail to: Star Newspapers PO Box 1000 Seaford, DE 19973 BEST BET: Kids’ Day Out in Laurel, Saturday, June 10, Laurel River Park, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

MEETINGS COAST GUARD AUXILIARY Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. This month’s meeting is Thursday, June 8, at 7:30 p.m. Anyone interested in promoting safe boating and would like to work with men and women who do vessel inspections, safety patrols and teach public safety courses, are welcome to join the Flotilla. Boat ownership is not required.

AARP CHAPTER 3543 MEETING Southeastern Sussex Chapter 3543, AARP, Inc. meeting, Jakes, Rt. 1 Rehoboth Beach, Tuesday, June 13, at noon. Cost of luncheon is $15. Program: Annual picnic meeting; entertainment by Betty Stevens’ grandson. Call Cathy Fisher for reservations at 945-0938

crafts, fishing, face painting. Laurel River Park. Phone 875-2244 for more information.

SUMMER SHOWCASE The Ballroom Blitz will present the second annual Summer Showcase, on Sunday, June 11, from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Rusty Rudder, Dewey Beach. Performances by adults and children, dancing, light hor d’oeuvres and a cash bar will be available. Attire: Jacket and shirt for men; comparable for women. Adults $15/person; children $12/person. Additional information and tickets may be obtained by contacting 645-2211.

CHEER DINNER DANCE Thursday, June 15, CHEER Community Center, 20520 Sand Hill Road, Georgetown, oldies and big band dinner dance, 5 to 9 p.m. The cost is $8 a person. Cathy Gorman of Georgetown will be the deejay. For more information or tickets call 854-9500.

GEORGETOWN BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL Bluegrass Festival, Friday, June 16 and Saturday, June 17, at Marvel’s Carriage Museum, Georgetown — Friday, 3 to 11 p.m., $12 per person; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., $24 per person. Weekend $36 per person; free rough camping with weekend ticket. Call 875-3708 or 302934-1143.

CHEER SUMMER FIESTA Tuesday, June 20, Greenwood CHEER Center, 12713 Sussex Highway, second annual Summer Fiesta, 10:30 a.m. The Pinata party, on the side deck, will start after lunch. Call 349-5237.

LAUREL’S JULY 4TH CELEBRATION 12th annual Old Fashioned Independence Day Celebration, Tuesday, July 4, Laurel. Events all day concluding including the Red, White and Blue Parade, talent show, vendors, entertainment, food, watermelon seed spitting contest, rides and ending with fireworks. Contact the Laurel Chamber of Commerce at 875-9319.

12TH ANNUAL NANTICOKE RIVERFEST 12th annual Nanticoke Riverfest in downtown Seaford, Friday, July 14, and Saturday, July 15. Entertainment, food, carnival, children’s activities, float-in, mayor’s challenge, car and motorcycle shows, vendors and more. Headliner concert on Friday night is the Funsters. Contact the city of Seaford at 629-9173.

FREE CONCERT AT ROSS MANSION Chesapeake Brass Band concert, free, Gov. Ross Mansion lawn, Saturday, July 8, 5:30 p.m., sponsored by city of Seaford and Seaford Historical Society. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. In case of rain, the concert will be at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club.

REUNIONS WOODBRIDGE CLASS OF 1986 Woodbridge High School Class of 1986 20-year class reunion at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 12, at the Suicide Bridge Restaurant in Hurlock, Md., on the air-conditioned “Choptank River Queen,” a reproduction of an authentic 80-foot turn-ofthe-century river boat. There will be a sit-down dinner with a menu of shrimp cocktail, crab cakes, and prime rib or stuffed chicken breast.

DEMOCRAT WOMEN MEETING Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club meeting, Thursday, June 15, Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown; dinner at 6 p.m. The guest speaker is Delaware’s State Treasurer Jack Markel. Cost of the dinner is $12. Call Thelma Monroe 934-9716 for reservations by June 12.

EQUINE COUNCIL MEETING Delaware Equine Council meeting, Monday, June 19, at 7 p.m., at the AmericInn Lodge & Suites, Harrington, followed by speaker, acting state vet, Dr. Robert Rickers, who will talk about vaccines. All those interested in horses are welcome. Call 422-4094 or 629-5233.

WIDOWED PERSONS SERVICE Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service meeting, Tuesday, June 20, 12:15 p.m., at the Golden Corral U.S. 13, Seaford. The guest speaker will be Dolores Slatcher, city manager of Seaford. All Widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

SPECIAL EVENTS BETHEL MUSEUM IS OPEN The Bethel Maritime Museum on First Street, Bethel, will be open to the public every Saturday and Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

SEAFORD PRAYER MARCH Second annual prayer march, Saturday, June 10, 9 a.m. Seaford Mission, Third and North streets, Seaford. Sponsored by Seaford Neighborhood Watch. Phone Pat Jones, 628-1908.

KIDS’ DAY OUT IN LAUREL Second annual Kids’ Day Out, Saturday, June 10, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., sponsored by the Laurel Police Department (rain or shine). Games, food,

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✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

MORNING STAR

COMMUNITY BRIEFS Summer Fun Club registration is under way The following times and dates are in place at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club: Summer Fun Club begins on Monday, June 12, for ages 5-13 with registration ongoing. Club hours on June 8 and 9 are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Plans taking shape for Laurel’s July 4th Plans are well under way for the Laurel July 4th Celebration scheduled for Tuesday, July 4. Sponsors and vendors are needed as well as participants in the 4th of July Talent Contest. Forms are available at the Laurel Chamber of Commerce, Bev’s Specs, the Laurel Library and Laurel Petroleum. The deadline to enter is June 26. Competition will take place in three age groups - 12 and under, 13-18 and 21 and over. For more information, contact Bob Jones at 875-7767. For information about the celebration, contact the chamber office at 875-9319.

Cocktails by cash bar. Cost will be $60 per person or $120 per couple. Dress is casual. Mail checks no later than July 15 to: Woodbridge High School Class of 1986, c/o Rhonda VanVorst, 1150 Hickman Road, Greenwood, DE, 19950. Call Russ Carlisle (302-228-9145); or Rhonda VanVorst (Green) (302-245-6546).

PAGE 19

yard sale, bake sale and scrapple/egg sandwiches, hotdogs and drinks. Doors open, rain or shine, from 7 a.m. to noon, Saturday, June 17, Gethsemane’s fellowship hall, Stein Highway, four miles west of Seaford, near Reliance, Md.

TRIPS RED HATTERS BUS TRIP

YARD SALES YARD AND BAKE SALE

The Chatter Hatters of Laurel are sponsoring a bus trip to the American Music Theater, Aug. 19, to celebrate Red Hat Society Week. Cost is $75 which includes transportation, show

Youth of Gethsemane United Methodist Church third annual yard sale extravaganza including a large

and dinner. Leave Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel at 10 a.m. For more information call 875-3278.

TRIP TO CAPE COD Laurel Senior Center trip to Cape Cod and the islands, June 19-23. Cost: $599 per person which includes round trip motor coach, four nights at Heritage House Hotel, four buffet breakfasts, four full dinners, guided tours to Martha’s Vineyard, Hyannis and Nantucket Island, harbor cruise, taxes and tips, baggage handling. For more information call 875-2536.

Rod & Custom Jamboree is shore’s largest The 17th annual Rod & Custom Jamboree, sponsored by the Southern Delaware Street Rod Association, will take place at the Delaware State Fairgrounds on June 23, 24 and 25. Registration is open June 22, 23, and 24, and 25 for the “largest car show on the peninsula.” Check the website at www.sdsra.com for more information. Spectator admission is $5 with children under 12 free. Awards will be presented on Sunday at 2 p.m.

Boys & Girls Club hosts cheerleading clinic The Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club will host a Universal Cheerleaders Association Youth Cheer Camp for youth ages 9 to 15 at the club, 310 Va. Ave., Seaford, on Saturday, June 24, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The cost is $40 by May 29 and $45 after that date (no registration will be accepted the day of the camp). Shorts and sneakers must be worn. To college instructors will offer clinics on safety, stunt technique, cheers, sidelines, tumbling, dancing and more. The camp is limited to 30 participants. Contact Karen Schrieber, 629-8740, Cathy Lewis, 629-2168, of Shelly Larrimore, 628-8361, for more information.

Get the most out of your PDA during course Get the most use out of your handheld computer or personal digital assistant (PDA) with a one-session course offered on June 14 at Delaware Tech, Owens Campus, Georgetown. Just a few seats are available for last-minute registration. PDAs, commonly known as “Palm Pilots,” can help organize schedules, contact information, to-do lists, and other important data. But to reap the benefits, users must learn how to utilize the PDA effectively, and that’s where Delaware Tech’s course comes in. “Palm Hand-held Computer—Organizing Your World” teaches how to set up and use Palm hardware and software for basic tasks, how to exchange documents with Microsoft Office applications, and how to configure units for wireless Internet and e-mail access. The instructor also discusses other available software applications and how to find them. Students who already own a Palm Pilot or Palmcompatible handheld should bring it to class. For more information, or to register, contact the corporate and community programs division by calling 302-854-6966.

Read Aloud needs volunteers during summer Read Aloud Delaware is accepting applications for summer volunteers in Sussex County now through June 30. Students 14 and over are encouraged to volunteer. Children, ages 8-13, may volunteer with an adult parent/guardian. Volunteers can read one-on-one to children in child care centers in all areas of Sussex County or help with special events on weekends. A minimum of two hours per week is required; days and times are very flexible. Call Read Aloud Delaware at 856-2527 for an application. For more information, please visit our website: www.readalouddelaware.org.

Nanticoke Riverfest taking place July 14-15 Plans are under way for the 12th annual Nanticoke Riverfest. This year’s theme is “Tugging on the Nanticoke.” Volunteers are needed for a variety of tasks during the event on Friday, July 14, and Saturday, July 15. Anyone interested in volunteering can contact Leigh Ann DePope, volunteer coordinator, at 629-2524. For general information about Riverfest, contact the chairpersons, Amy Walls or Trisha Booth at 629-9173. Vendors and sponsors are needed.

58. Before 59. Liquid portion of a fat 60. Artificial Intelligence (abbr.) 61. Modern oven 64. Between north and east 65. Sharpshooting 67. Corrected 69. Resembling glass 70. Demanded payment

37. __ Angeles 38. Temples 39. Affirming 17 19 16 18 42. Affirmative 21 24 20 22 23 43. Long feather or 28 25 26 27 fur scarf 46. Priesthood 31 33 29 30 32 47. Masticated 34 35 37 36 49. Afflicted 50. Had 39 38 40 CLUES DOWN 52. Colorado river 41 42 43 1. Located on outskirts of city 54. Not con 2. Hectometer (abbr.) 47 48 49 50 44 45 46 55. John _, first in space 3. Tears down 57. Jacob _, American 52 55 51 53 54 4. Native Nebraska journalist 56 57 58 59 American people 59. Used for baking 5. A large vessel 61 64 60 62 63 or drying 6. Waltzed 62. Central nervous system 66 67 68 65 7. Irish or Gordon (abbr.) 69 70 8. Bye, Bye Miss American __ 63. ___se: to entertain 9. Adam & Eve's garden 66. Lincoln’s state CLUES ACROSS 31. Short for recreation 10. Fu_: burial observances 68. Delaware 1. Turin relic 33. Petrol 11. Withdrawl symptom (abbr.) 7. Pays out 34. First Chinese dynasty 12. Copy SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEKS PUZZLE 13. W. Indonesian island 36. Upper surface of mouth 13. Spherical bacteria 14. Extraordinary visual recall 38. Walkway brick in pairs or chains 16. Tuberculosis 40. Minute skin openings 15. Articles 17. Fixed verse composer 41. Where birds are kept 18. Long time 19. Milliliter (abbr.) 43. Type of pear 21. State capital 20. Characters 44. Shower soap alternative 24. Tall tropical grass 22. Collapsible bed 45. Sec. & Exch. Comm. with jointed stalks 23. Nat. Association of (abbr.) 26. Cry made by sheep State Units on Aging 47. To swindle 27. Month (abbr.) 25. Periods of time 48. Military mailbox 30. Ethiopian currency 26. Edvard __, Czech. Pres. 51. French airport (pl.) 28. Nickname for Louise 53. First 32. Castrated male 29. Nova TV network 55. Chew chicken 30. Not good 56. Gloomy 35. Ocean 1

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

ENTERTAINMENT Summer fun begins at Kids’ Fest at State Fairgrounds Saturday, June 10, event with a horsey flavor has something for children of all ages Kids are invited to celebrate the start of summer vacation with a day full of nonstop fun this Saturday, June 10, when Kids’ Fest returns to the Delaware State Fairgrounds. This is the ninth year for the annual event that runs from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Fun at Kids’ Fest has always had a definite horsey flavor. This year will be no different. The fun includes pony rides and pony-cart rides that will be available all day long. In addition, there will be a chance to climb aboard the Equiciser. This is a simulator that duplicates the real motion involved in riding a horse. For hands-on fun, the Delaware Equine Council will present a Breyer Fun Fest that will give kids an opportunity to paint a model horse. In addition, Sharon Miner and JoAnn Dawson, authors of children’s horse books, will be on hand to meet readers and sign books. “Buttercup” will also be returning to the fairgrounds. A burro adopted from the wild, Buttercup is a part of the family of Mark and Marge Davis of Milford. The Davises will also bring a rescued mustang adopted through the Bureau of Land Management’s Rescue Program. All through the day, kids and their families can take a break in Quillen Arena where a summer quarter horse show will be ongoing. This is an opportunity to watch horses in action in a variety of competitive classes that include adults and youth, English and Western riding styles, and pleasure driving. “Healthy Kids Get Fit” Each year a Healthy Kids Expo has been a part of Kids’ Fest. This year’s Expo, in Kent Pavilion, will have a variety of activities for young people. It will also be an information hub connecting kids and families with organizations and services to stir interests and address needs. Nemours Health and Prevention Services will use the day to spotlight its “5-2-1 and Almost None” message aimed at promoting good nutrition and physical activity among youth. Bayhealth Medical Center will be on hand to highlight the many programs, support groups and screenings that are available at low or no cost to the community. A Safety Trivia Wheel will challenge kids and offer prizes. Other area organizations serving young people will have information booths and provide special hands-on activities. These include gymnastics, martial arts, dance and crafts to entertain and engage healthy minds and bodies. The fun will last for the day, but families will go home with information about programs and services that will enrich their lives throughout the year. Comedy, juggling and magic A day filled with free entertainment is in store. Professional illusionist Joe Romano will bring books to life on the Nemours Stage in Kent Pavilion. His show, “Books: The Magic Is Real,” will

Michael Rosman’s zany antics will keep everyone on the edge of their seats and laughing at Kids’ Fest on June 10. He will be on the Nemours Stage in Kent Pavilion at 2:30 p.m.

use magic, music and audience participation to entertain and to generate excitement for reading. The production has been captivating kids in elementary schools all over the east coast since 1998. The show begins at 1 p.m. At 2:30 p.m., entertainer Michael Rosman will bring his balance of comedy, juggling and stunts. Rosman blends jokes with action as he balances on a board or bowling ball, teeters on a six-foot unicycle or catapults fruit into a blender strapped to his head. He is also known to involve his audience in the show, calling up volunteers to help him on stage. Rosman is a graduate of Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey’s Clown College. On the Kirby & Holloway Stage under the tent, the day begins with the Nanticoke Dancers at 10:30 a.m., a steel band from the Southern Delaware School of the Arts at 11 a.m. and continues with a variety show from noon until 4 p.m.. Entertainers include a youth rock band, Berlin Incident; the dance team of Move US; juggling with Charlie Benton, and more. Talent show stars youth A youth talent show will spotlight young people ages 4 to 18 competing in performing arts and athletics. Both solo and group performances are anticipated. Judging will be on natural ability, quality of performance, showmanship, choreography (where applicable) and audience appeal. The show will be on the Nemours Stage in Kent Pavilion from 10 a.m. until noon. Immediately after the talent show, kids will see the antics of Cakey’s Charac-

ters — Elmo, Dora and Sponge Bob. Entertainment On Ice & More Entertainment goes cool with a first for Kids’ Fest — three shows on ice at the Centre Ice Rink. This will be a test run for new synthetic ice which will enable the rink to take its shows on the road. The half hour shows are set for 11:30, 1:30 and 3:30. Free tickets to the shows are available at the Centre beginning at 10 a.m. On the grounds near Kent Pavilion, there will be AKC dog obedience demonstrations scheduled at 11, noon and 1 p.m. The little train and the mini fire engine will offer rides throughout the day. There will be an appearance by Captain Willie and Chopper 16 along with WBOCTV’s on-air personalities. They will be on hand to greet visitors and sign autographs. The Clowns of Delaware will entertain in Kent Pavilion with balloon animals and face painting. Kids can try out their talent at the karaoke station, or make a CD to take home at “Grizzed Out Deziners.” Inflatable Fun As always, a popular part of the Kids’ Fest activity will be an “Inflatable Fair” with fun from start to finish. All day long, kids will line up at the rides where they can climb, slide, crawl, joust, bop and bounce. The inflatable rides and games will be located in the grassy area in front of the ice rink. There will be moon bounces, slides, obstacle courses, a ball pond and more including a giant inflatable soccer game and hoop shoot. For an extra splash of fun, there will also be a dunk tank, the Twin Spin, carnival games, “Olde Tyme” photos and rubber duck races. Admission to the fairgrounds is $1 per person; parking is free. Ride and game tickets may be purchased at 25 for $5; some activities are individually priced, and many, including all entertainment, are free. A variety of food will be for sale throughout the day.

Up, up and over, down and around for another go at the action! Once again an “Inflatable Fair” will be a major attraction at Kids’ Fest. This year’s event will be held at the Delaware State Fairgrounds on Saturday, June 10.

For more information, call 302-3985194 or 302-542-6065 or visit the website: www.kidsfestde.org. Kids’ Fest is made possible through the generosity of Nemours Health & Prevention Services, Bayhealth Medical Center, Kirby & Holloway, Delaware Electric Cooperative, Intervet, Delaware Federal Credit Union, Tilcon, Chick’s, WBOC-TV, Comcast Cablevision and Eagle 97.7.

Bike Night at the Delmarva Shorebirds on June 10 On Saturday, June 10, members of the Delmarva Shorebirds in Salisbury will bewearing limited edition Harley-Davidson jerseys that will be auctioned off following the game to benefit the Spuck & Lib Bennett Scholarship Fund. The Spuck & Lib Bennett Scholarship Fund is supported by the employees and ownership of HarleyDavidson of Ocean City, Seaford and Rehoboth Beach, as well as others who make donations to the scholarship fund.

Seaford hosting Chesapeake Brass Band on July 8 The city of Seaford will host the Chesapeake Brass Band in a concert at the Gov. Ross Mansion in Seaford, on Saturday, July 8 at 5:30 p.m. Formed in 1996, the Chesapeake Silver Cornet Brass Band is comprised of amateur and professional musicians from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware. The band performs a varied repertoire of contemporary and traditional brass band music throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. The public is invited to view this free performance on the lawn of the Gov. Ross Mansion. Chairs will not be provided and visitors are encouraged to bring blankets or lawn chairs for casual seating. The event is sponsored by the city of Seaford and the Seaford Historical Society. In the event of rain, the concert will be moved to the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club. Call Amy Walls at 629-9173 for more information.


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 21

Delmarva Chicken Festival taking place in Snow Hill, Md. June 23-24 When the 57th Delmarva Chicken Festival is held in Snow Hill, Md., on June 23 and 24, food will play a key role in the line-up of activities. At the top of the festival menu will be chicken cooked in Delmarva’s renowned giant fry pan. The 10-foot pan has been a featured attraction at the annual festival since 1950. During the two-day event staged in Snow Hill’s Byrd Park, more than four tons of chicken will be cooked in the giant pan by members of the Snow Hill Lions

Club. Fried chicken platters for the bargain price of $5 each will include one chicken quarter, baked beans, applesauce, and roll. Buckets of four chicken quarters with rolls will be available for $8 and a “shortie” order of a single chicken quarter will be just $3. The Snow Hill Fire Company will be manning the barbecue pits turning out Delmarva-style barbecued chicken dinners that include a half chicken, potato chips, pickles, and roll for $6 each.

Chicken will also be available in many other forms including chicken strips, grilled and barbecued chicken sandwiches, chicken hot dogs, chicken pizza, chicken salads, chicken fajitas, chicken kabobs, Thai-flavored chicken, and more. To round out the menu, diners will find French fries, blooming onions, nachos, funnel cakes, peanuts, kettle corn, ice cream, homemade baked items and other desserts, along with fresh squeezed lemonade, fruit smoothies, and a variety of Pepsi products.

The Delmarva Chicken Festival will open at 10 a.m. on Friday, June 23, and will conclude at 9 p.m. on Saturday, June 24. Admission and parking are free. The event is sponsored annually by Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI) and is hosted in 2006 by the Town of Snow Hill and the Snow Hill Chicken Festival Committee. For additional information, contact Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI) at 800878-2449, (302-856-9037), or the Snow Hill Committee at 410-632-1944.

Megan Thomas will sing lead in Clear Space production of ‘Hello Dolly!’ One audition was held in New York City on April 24. The notice read “Dancers needed for Hello, Dolly! in Beautiful Rehoboth Beach.” Men and women from all over New York City came to the 8th Avenue Studios to pirouette and belt out a song for a chance to come to the beach for a working vacation. A second audition was held on May 13 at Cape Henlopen High School. Forty local actors performed their best audition song and were led through a dance combination to see how they compared to the talent found in New York. Clear Space artistic director Ken Skrzesz explained to each group auditioning, “We have held auditions in New York City, but our goal is to cast local talent first and fill in the spaces with the out-oftown performers.” With that philosophy, Ken and co-artistic director Doug Yetter, began to match faces, voices and danceability with roles. The final cast is led by Broadway veter-

an Megan Thomas. Thomas has appeared in Hello, Dolly! with Carol Channing, Beauty and the Beast as Mrs. Potts; Evita as Eva Peron; Ragtime as Emma Goldman; The Unsinkable Molly Brown as Molly Brown; Annie Get Your Gun as Dolly Tate; Music Man as Marion; Sweeney Megan Thomas Todd as the Beggar Woman; Grease as Marty; Menopause - the Musical; Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg at the Metropolitan Opera and the International company of

Cats. Yetter states, “I think this is a list of credits that speaks for itself. It’s not every Dolly that can dance well enough to be in Cats and sing well enough to appear at the Met! Not to mention she’s already done the show hundreds of times, and is eager to create a Dolly that is uniquely her own.” Dick Pack, recently seen as Ebenezer Scrooge for Clear Space will play opposite Thomas as Horace Vandergelder. Ken Skrzesz, a member of Actor’s Equity Association with many professional roles to his credit, will step from behind the scenes to play the song and dance role of Cornelius Hackl. His side-kick, Barnaby Tucker is played by David Button, who will leave the beach to pursue acting in the Big Apple in September. Other principal cast members include Melissa Tice Martin as Irene Malloy, Tara Marie Windley as Minnie Fay, Ashley

Adams as Ermengarde and Schyler Conaway as Ambrose Kemper. The ensemble includes Erika Conaway, Sydney Dodd, Sherrie Donecker, Insley Fowler, David Hebrank Vinny Quintero and Destiny Kerstetter who are joined by six professional dancers to arrive on July 8 for eight long rehearsal days. The cameo role of Ernestina Money will be played by local celebrities. Yetter is musical director and will conduct the orchestra for the performances. Hello, Dolly! will be performed at the Rehoboth Beach Convention Center on Tuesday, July 18, and Wednesday, July 19, at 6 and 8:30 p.m. The show then moves to the Schwartz Center for the Arts in Dover for one performance on Friday, July 21, at 7 p.m. Tickets are already selling and may be purchased by calling 644-3810, ext. 1. For more information on Clear Space Productions, please visit www.ClearSpaceProductions.org.

Carnival Days! SPRING CARNIVAL June 7, 8, 9,10

with a Horsey Flavor! Saturday, June 10 • 10 - 4 DE State Fairgrounds • Harrington

Horse, Pony & Cart Rides Quarter Horse Show Inflatable Rides & Games Healthy Kids Expo Presented by Nemours Health & Prevention Services

Meet Captain Willie & WBOC TV's Chopper 16 Free Entertainment Youth Talent Show Arts, Crafts & Carnival Games Clowns, Jugglers, Magicians Admission $1 • Parking Free Ride & Game Tickets 25 for $5 Call Greater Milford Boys & Girls Club 302-422-4453

FIREWORKS JULY 4TH

FIREMAN’S CARNIVAL June 28, 29, 30, July 1 July 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 July 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Bring the Family - Enjoy the Rides •Bingo •Ferris Wheel •Merry-Go-Round •Take a Chance to Win Prizes Including a $10,000 Cash Jackpot!!!

RIDE ALL RIDES ALL NIGHT FOR $10 Oyster Sandwiches, Homemade Crab Cakes, Soft Crabs, Hamburgers, Fries, Cotton Candy, Ice Cream, Funnel Cakes Food Booths Open at 6:30 PM Rides Start at 7:15 PM

HEBRON VOLUNTEER FIRE CO. MAIN ST., HEBRON


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

SEAFORD’S BASEBALL HISTORY: 1946-1949 WERE THE YEARS OF THE EAGLES - FOURTH IN A SERIES

1948: Year after the championship was beginning of the end By Mike Lambert Dallas Culver from Seaford was named president of the Eastern Shore Baseball League for the 1948 season, and after the Eagles championship run in 1947, all looked well in the baseball world for the town of Seaford. The defending Eastern Shore League champions and their fans were all hoping for a repeat of the last season’s excitement and success. However, neither would take place during the long season of 1948. Attendance at the Seaford ball park dropped from over 50,000 fans to 31,850 as the entire league saw a huge reduction of support for baseball. The total attendance for the Eastern Shore League dropped from 374,479 in 1947 to 267,942 in 1948. At least two of the teams would fold after the season and rumors were floating that the entire league would collapse after one more year. The Eagles dropped to sixth place and missed the playoffs completely with a 5670 won-loss record. The 1948 team batting average fell over 50 points from 1947 to a lowly .242. Manager Bobby Westfall was fired on July 1st and replaced by former Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Braves pitcher Harry “Sox” Seibold. The managerial change didn’t save the Eagles from collapse. By the end of the year players were actually giving up and some even quit the team before the season ended. Nonetheless, there were a few bright spots for some of the Seaford players. Don Ford hit .341 with 10 home runs and 91 RBIs, and before he was released Westfall was hitting .342. The Seaford catching duo of Hal Price and Dave Gabrielli combined to throw out 42 base runners, with Price finishing first in the

league with 23 runners shot down and Gabrielli third with 19. But the big story for the Eagles for 1948 was the pitching of John Andre, who finished the season with a record of 21-12 and an ERA of 3.35. Andre led the league in many categories including wins (21), complete games (29), strikeouts (228) and innings pitched (263). Not only did Andre have a great year on the mound; he also led the league in pinch hitting, going 8 for 19 for a .420 batting average. There were several players on the 1948 Eagles roster who were Eastern Shore natives, including Seaford’s own John Allen who saw action at second base for the Seaford club. Other local men on the Seaford squad were Dick Townsend from Shad Point, Don Musser from Frankford and George McPhail from Salisbury. Even though his record was only 9-14, McPhail’s ERA was a respectable 3.64 and he once stuck out 17 batters in a game against Dover. As for the other teams in the Eastern Shore League, the Milford Red Sox had the slugging trio of future major leaguers in Ray Jablonski (.354,26,131), Frank Malzone (.304,10,77) and Norm Zauchin (.353,33,138). Other notable players from the 1948 Eastern Shore League were former Boston Brave Ducky Detweiler from the Federalsburg club and former Philadelphia Phillie Gene Corbett of the Salisbury team. Both of these men also managed their clubs in 1948. One other noteworthy player from the 1948 season was Jack Sanford from the Dover Phillies. Sanford went on the win the 1957 National League Rookie of the year award for the Philadelphia Phillies with a 19-8 record. With attendance down considerably and teams on the verge of folding, it seemed as though the 1948 season was

DeShields display at museum The Seaford Historical Society is now showing a collection of Delino DeShields memorabilia in the Seaford Museum. The items are the property of Chip Lank and Mike Lambert and were put in place by them. This special exhibit was arranged to coincide with DeShields having been inducted in the Delaware

Sports Hall of Fame which took place in Wilmington on May 17. There is also an exhibit of Seaford Eagles memorabilia at the museum. The Seaford Museum is at 203 High St. and is open Thursday through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m.; or by appointment at any time. Call 629-9828 for details.

Flag Day to be celebrated Flag Day, June 14, will be celebrated at 7 p.m. at the Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 on Governors Avenue in Greenwood. The ladies auxiliary will sponsor a program for the event. Certificates of appreciation for displaying the U.S. flag will be presented to households and businesses that have been observed en-

gaging in this patriotic practice. The JROTC Instructor at Woodbridge High School, Gunnery Sgt. Michael Juniszewski, will be on hand to instruct those in attendance on the proper display of the flag and respect of the flag. Light refreshments will be served. The public is invited to attend.

the beginning of the end for the Eastern Shore Baseball League. It was inevitable that the 1949 season would be the last for

this class “D” baseball league. E-mail questions or comments to seafordeagles@comcast.net

John Andre pitched for Seaford in 1947 and 1948 and Rehoboth Beach in 1949. He went on to pitch in the major leagues with the Chicago Cubs in 1955.

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EPWORTH CHRISTIAN SCHOOL partnering with parents in equipping children academically and spiritually to fulfill God’s purposes for their lives while reflecting the character of Christ in all we do

Congratulations, ECS 8th Grade Class!

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS Director of Athletics Epworth Christian School (ECS) is pleased to announce the recruitment of their new Director of Athletics, Greg LaFreniere. Greg comes to ECS from the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club as Athletic Director and Teen Director. He possesses a Bachelor of Science Degree in Sport Management from Liberty University. Welcome Greg!

POSITIONS AVAILABLE Kindergarten Teacher 1/21/2 Day Kindergarten Teacher Part-time MusicTeacher Teacher Part-time Music Part-time Nurse Part-time Nurse

Back R ow Row ow: Ryan Marion, Bethany Redman, Katie Fleetwood, Daisy Wharton, Jillian Phillips, Cody ow Jones Middle R Row ow: Amanda Shockley, Heather Spicer, Emily Pentoney, Beth Johnson, Samantha Derr, ow Katelyn James, Brooke Miller Front R Row ow: Kasey Hummer, Jessica McCleaf, Brooke Fuller, Jessica Zoch

Contact the school office for an application package!

Parent Teacher Partnership Thanks to all our wonderful teachers and parents!

WHAT WE ARE PLANNING

Kim Bennett, President; Mary Beth Rimmer, VP Preschool & Kindergarten; Debbie Bryant, VP Elementary Shirley Jardine, VP Intermediate; Nancy Miller, VP Middle School; Millie Hudson, Secretary Cathy Lewis, Treasurer; Bill Knopf, Fundraising Coordinator; Chrystal Willey, Board Liaison

ECS Summer Camp

“The teachers at Epworth Christian School have a deep knowledge of their subject matter as well as assessment strategies and individual learning styles. They provide all this in a safe and loving environment.” Jeanette Smith, parent

Computer Curriculum for K-8

“I love the school. I like the close knit atmosphere. I like the fact that all children interact and get to know each other in a family-type setting.” Sandy Dickerson, parent “I love and appreciate the Christian attitudes of all the teachers.” Glen Clowser, parent and local pastor “We just love this school. We have been affiliated with other schools and this one outshines them all. Ms. Spicer was a God-send.” Bob and Dori Cummings, proud grandparents

June 12-August 14

Techno Kids Servant Leadership Academy Cross-curriculum activities to challenge students in the development of their Christian values enabling them to see beyond their own circumstances into the lives of others

Core Essentials

SEATS AVAILABLE as of 6/1/06 Preschool-3 yr program- 8; Preschool-4 yr program-8 1/2 Day Kindergarten-11; Full Day Kindergarten-4 First grade-3; Second grade-2; Third grade-2 Fourth grade (2 classes) -10; Fifth grade-3 Sixth grade-1; Seventh grade-10; Eighth grade-7

Call us today!

Partnering with Delmarva Christian High School

A Higher Standard

K-5 Character Development Program

JUMP Courses High school courses offered to eligible 7th and 8th graders of DCHSpartner schools

Internships College and high-school student interns serving in areas such as elementary computers, chapel, aides and academic coaching

14511 Sycamore Road - Laurel, DE 19956 - 302.875.4488 - www. epworthchristianschool.org


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

CHURCH BULLETINS Third & North prayer march The second annual prayer march will take place on Saturday, June 10, 9 a.m., starting at the Seaford Mission, Third and North streets, Seaford. The event is sponsored by Seaford Neighborhood Watch. Prayer will be led by the Rev. Tyrone Johnson, founder and director of Churches Take a Corner in Wilmington. He has pledged to bring a group of people from Wilmington to pray for a transformation in the Seaford community, according to Pat Jones, a Seaford councilperson helping to coordinate the event. She is asking for each church in the community to send two or more representatives. Phone her at 628-1908 for more information.

St. John’s yard sale St. John’s Community Thrift Shop, 259 Conwell Street, Seaford, is renting tables for a yard sale, Saturday, June 17, 8 a.m. until noon. Each table will be $7. Call 629-9466 to make a reservation. Regular Saturday sales are 9 a.m. until noon.

Gospel Cafe Centenary United Methodis Church, Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, is hosting a Christian music hour each Saturday 6 - 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. June guest singers are: Donald White, June June 10; Shannon Whaley and C. Bud Scott, June 17; and “Lights of Home,” June 24. Every week, Mary Ann Young sings Gospel favorites.

Everyone is invited to attend. Come as you are. Contact the Church office at 8753983 or Bruce Willey at 875-5539.

Fun and fellowship dance St. John’s United Methodist Church will have a fun and fellowship dance on Saturday, June 17, from 5:30 to 10 p.m. The dinner (choice of steak or baked chicken breast) will be catered by the Seaford Men of the Moose. Christian and dinner music will be provided during dinner by Jerry Jones and Mark Lowery CD Specials with live performances by “Lights of Home” and musical memories by Charles Michel (music from the 1940s to 1980s). The price is $18 a person with advance tickets only. Groups of six or more must reserve a table in order to sit together. Call Ruth Rhoades at 629-0789 for tickets and table reservations. All adults are welcome with proceeds going to missions projects.

Seaford Nazarene Gospel Concert Seaford Church of the Nazarene, located at 520 South Dual Highway, will be featuring the Reunion Quartet on Saturday, June 17, at 7 p.m. The concert admission is free; a love offering will be taken. For additional information, call 629-3929 or 381-6514.

Financial conference in June There will be a financial empowerment conference, “Exodus 2006,” presented by Dr. Nasir K. Siddiki.

In the 1980s, Dr. Siddiki was a successful Muslim businessman by secular world standards. He raised millions of dollars in revenue for companies worldwide. As a seminar speaker, he attracted crowds of up to 10,000, who came to listen and learn about his keys to success. Having achieved his dream of financial success, he drove expensive cars and lived in luxurious homes. For years he accomplished great feats and set performance records in marketing and sales. Then one day, he was diagnosed with shingles — a deadly virus that attacked his nervous system. It was a life threatening situation for which there was no cure at the time. The doctors gave Nasir no hope, so in desperation he cried out to God and his life changed forever. The conference will take place at Christ Evangelistic Church in Laurel on June 11 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on June 12 and 13 at 7 p.m. Phone 875-2915 for more information.

Gospel concert for Senior Center There will be a gospel concert to benefit the building fund of the Nanticoke Senior Center on Saturday, June 24, starting at 6 p.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church. The event is being sponsored by the Country Music Association, Seaford chapter. The emcee will be Jennifer Burke of WOLC radio. Artists taking part include

Tony Crowe, Jerry Jones, Laura Mitchell, Kathy Wright, “Revived” and C. Bud Scott. Admission is free; an offering will be taken. For more information, contact Jerry Jones at 629-9689.

United Fellowship convention The United Fellowship Churches of The Lower Eastern Shore will have its 10th annual convention June 19-25 in Pocomoke, Md. at 403 Market St. Special events are planned each day during the convention. Phone 410-9574735 for more information.

No Name Band at Grace UMC The No Name Band will be at Grace United Methodist Church Hall, Georgetown, on Friday, June 9, at 7:30 p.m. For further information, contact everett Warrington at 337-7198.

Laurel Baptist Church concert Laurel Baptist Church will have a concert featuring The Cash Family on Sunday, June 11, beginning at 7 p.m. Vacation Bible School, The Artic Edge, will kick-off on Sunday, June 25, at 5 p.m. and will continue through June 30 every evening at 6 p.m.. For further information, call Helen Close at 875-5624.

Episcopalians convention Episcopalians from around the country will gather in Columbus, Ohio, June 11-22 Continued on page 25

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Tina Whaley

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 Web site: http://home.dmv.com/-stjohns/ E-mail: stjohns@dmv.com NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Sunday Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday Night 7 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 11 a.m. • Sun. School 10:00 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Bethel Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., P.O. Box 293 Laurel, DE 19956 ~ (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector Mid Week Eucharist & Healing Service - Wed. @ Noon Holy Eucharist & Church School Sunday @ 9:30 am

“Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771

Church Of The Nazarene

94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE 19956

Phone 875-7873 SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. Prayer & Bible Study Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. 7 p.m. God’s Big Back Yard THURSDAY 9:30 a.m. Underground - 6:00-8:00 Evening Service. - 6:00 p.m. “Investing in People”

Central Worship Center 4 Mi. East of Laurel, Del. (on Sycamore Road)

875-7995 - Pastor Bob Miller SUNDAY Adult Classes..................9 a.m. Worship/Kid’s Ministry. .....................9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Youth.........................6:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY Bible Study................7:00 p.m. Nursery Provided

EPWORTH CHRISTIAN SCHOOL PRE-SCHOOL-GR. 8 Featuring A Beka, Traditional Program For More Information Call

302-875-4488

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del. Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 25

Check out Laurel’s new library for the best summer reading By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford Laurel Wesleyan Church

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Have you checked out Laurel’s With summer already upon new library? I’ve traveled extensively and seldom seen its equal us, it is a great idea to get within a township of its size. Just your kids (and yourself) as exciting is the access you have to Delaware libraries through your out from in front of the TV library card. Sitting at home from and into a good read. your computer, you can access the card catalog, put holds on books, even renew your materials. family, providing your children are about With summer already upon us, it is a 12 or older. great idea to get your kids (and yourself) The hiding place will be a reminder of out from in front of the TV and into a God’s love in action during one of the good read. most hideous moments in human history. With that in mind, let me make a few It will also stir you personally to a new book recommendations that are worth gratefulness for how good God has been your time- all available through our lito you as you hear of the sufferings that brary system. others have triumphed through. For fiction, try out author Ted Dekker’s For teens, many have enjoyed (and my masterpiece “Blink.” It is a high paced daughter would strongly recommend) just nail-biter encompassing the United States about anything by Brian Jacques. His Red and the Middle East as well. Wall series as well as “Castaways of the Dekker plays off the question, “what Flying Dutchman” are worth checking out. would you do if you could see just ahead Finally, no matter what else you read of you before you made each decision?” this summer, make sure you get into the Furthermore, what if you began to see best seller of all time. multiple future possibilities that all unfold The Bible has more to offer than all the in your mind based on that decision? other books of the world combined. It This book has it all — suspense, action, alone stands as the living word of God. even some romance thrown in. It’s a page Even if you’ve read it cover to cover, turner like few I’ve ever read. the Holy Spirit will be faithful to bring For non-fiction, the classic story of something new to you every time. So, Corrie Ten Boom entitled “The Hiding grab the lemonade, the sun tan lotion, a Place” will stir you. If you find it a bit great book and the Good Book and make heavy as a read, you can check out the it a super reading summer. sound recording recently released by Focus on the Family by the same name. The Rev. Crofford is Senior Pastor at Laurel Wesleyan I recently listened to it myself. It is Church. His views do not necessarily represent the views of three hours of entertaining listening and the congregation or Wesleyan Church International. You may email pastortodd@laurelwesleyan.org would be appropriate for you to listen as a

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor MON. Youth Meeting SUNDAY 6:30 - 8 p.m. Sunday School ..... 9:45 a.m. WEDNESDAY Worship...............11:00 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30-5 p.m.; Sun. 8-8:25 a.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth: Ben Colegrove Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

Laurel, Del.

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE

“Come and Experience JESUS!”

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area

Sunday Morning: Worship 10:00 AM Wednesday: Prayer & Praise 7:00 PM Located in Hickman Commercial Park www.LivingWaterLaurel.org 302-875-7814

YOU ARE INVITED! Come into This Church and Gather in Christ’s Name to Worship Him! Psalm 95:6 Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor, Stacey Johnson

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

“A Growing Church For All Ages”

2 miles N. of Laurel, DE on Alt. 13

302-877-0443 410-957-4696

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-7693 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Ron Mayers • Rev. Andrew Kerr SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School to grade 6) & Divorce Care 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & 7:00 Evening Service Youth Group (grades 7-12)

To Come! Revelation 2 ime 2:1 T The Ark 7 It's Seaford Wesleyan Church

United Methodist Churches

Worship Sun. Sch.

King’s Gordy Rd. .......... 8:50....10:00 St. George’s St. George Rd. .... 10:10..... 9:00 Mt. Pleasant Mt. Pleasant Rd...11:30....10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

River of Life Christian Center 17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Rev. Ron Wuest, Pastor Sunday School - 10 am Praise Service 10:45 - 11 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628 parsonage 875-2996

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby, Rector

CHURCH BULLETINS Continued from page 24

for the church’s general convention. On the agenda will be the election of a new Bishop to succeed Presiding Bishop Frank Griswold, who will retire later this year. The convention delegate from St. Luke’s Episcopal Church is Herb Quick of Seaford. Convention information can be found on the official website of the Episcopal Church: www.episcopalchurch.org.

Summer Camp at Mt. Olivet There is still time to check out Mt. Olivet Preschool’s Summer Camp. This enrichment program is offered Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings from 9 a.m. to noon, for children ages 3-6. The six-week camp program runs Tuesday, June 20, through Thursday, July 27.

For information on either of the preschool programs, call Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church at 629-4458 or Linda Stephenson at 629-2786.

Sunday School - all ages 9 a.m. Worship 9 a.m., 10:15 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Rainbow Day Care / Pre-School Rt. 13 South, Seaford, DE 302-628-1020

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Latin Mass June 18 A Latin mass according to the Missal of 1962 is celebrated on the third Sunday of every month at 3 p.m. at Holy Cross Church in Dover. The mass will be celebrated on June 18. The mass is always a Missa Cantata using traditional Gregorian chant. For further information, call 302-674-5781.

Send us your Church news Send items for Church Bulletins to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or you may email to morningstarpub@ddmg.net

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 & 10:45 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship and Children’s Ministries 6 p.m. Wednesday Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Connecting People with Christ since 1804

CONCORD

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 25322 Church Road, Concord Seaford, DE 19973 Sunday Worship - 9 am Sunday School (all ages) - 10:30 am For More Information call 302-628-8114 Rev. Diane E. Melson, Pastor


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR

OBITUARIES Bobby Lee Harris, 71 Bobby Lee Harris of Seaford passed away Sunday, May 28, 2006 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. He was born December 15, 1934, in Keller, Va., a son of Robert E. and Ruby Alice (Tyndall) Harris. Mr. Harris was employed as a sales agent for Briarwood Estates in Laurel. He served in the U. S. Coast Guard. He loved fishing, boating, yard work, and most of all he loved his children and grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by two sons, Kenny Harris and Allen Harris. He is survived by his former wife and long-time companion, Betty Jean Riggs; three sons, Rickie Harris, Edward Harris, and Bobby Wells; two daughters, Michelle Schultz and Marie Lee Harris; a step-son, Bill Riggs; two step-daughters, Denise Jefferson and Beverly Webb; 13 grandchildren; four step-grandchildren; five step-great-grandchildren; and a brother, William “Dink” Harris. His funeral service was on June 3, at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel, Bridgeville. Interment followed at Bridgeville Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Blades Volunteer Fire Company, Ambulance Service, 200 E. Fifth Street, Blades, DE 19973. Online condolences may be sent to: condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches.

Arrangements were in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home. Visit www.delmarvaobits.com to send condolences to the family.

Wyatt Stewart Winfree, 80 Wyatt Stewart Winfree of Delmar died Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at his home, surrounded by his loving family. Mr. Winfree was born on July 16, 1925 in Kernersville, N.C., a son of Robert E. Lee Winfree and Mattie Bodenhamer Winfree. He served his country in the US Navy during World War II aboard the U.S.S. Whippet, serving in the South and Central Pacific. He worked as an electrician for the International Brotherhood of Electricians, Local 379 in Charlotte, N.C., where he was a 50-year member. He was a life member of Spartan Lodge #70, in Spartansburg, N.C., where he earned his 32nd degree and was proud to receive his 50year Masonic pin a few years ago. Other memberships included a life member of Delmar VFW Post 8276, a life member of the Order of Eastern Star, Caesar Rodney Chapter 8 and the American Legion, Post 19 in Laurel. He was an avid Washington Redskins fan. He loved spending time outdoors and working in his lawn and garden, growing vegetables such as tomatoes, squash, peppers, cucumbers and onions. He is survived by his loving wife,

The family of Caryn M. Vanderwende would like to thank everyone for the kind expressions of sympathy extended to them through the outpouring of prayers, cards, visits, calls, and support following our tragic loss. Friendships have truly been our source of comfort. We also are deeply grateful to the first responders including paramedics, Delaware State Police, the DE Victim’s Unit Counselor and the Delmar Police Department for their care and compassion at this most difficult time.

Edith M. Winfree, whom he married on March 29, 1944; three daughters, Patricia A. Disharoon and her husband Fred of Delmar, Nancy S. Walls and her husband Neal of Delmar, and Deborah D. Johnson and her husband Bunky, of Laurel; seven grandchildren, Rick Disharoon, Chuck Distler, Dawn Rothermel, Nancy Distler, Corey Johnson, Binky Johnson and Josh Johnson; 12 great-grandchildren, Ryan, Jaclyn, Victoria, Joel, Jaime, MacKenzie, Skyler, Logan, Makayla, Blake, Zoe and Bay; two brothers, James Robert Winfree and Grover C. Winfree; and three sisters, Lois Fuqua, Harte Eloise Harrelson and Mattie Lee Routh. Several nieces and nephews also survive him. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by four brothers and four sisters. His funeral service was on June 2, at the Short Funeral Home, Delmar. Pastor Gary Tulak, Delaware Hospice Chaplain, officiated. Interment with a Masonic service and military honors was held at Springhill Memory Gardens. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to Delaware Hospice, 20167 Office Circle, Georgetown, DE 19947. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.delmarvaobits.com.

Audrey M. Wolf, 86 Audrey M. Wolf of Laurel died May 31, 2006 at Arbors At New Castle in New Castle. She was born in Mt. Vernon, Md., on Oct. 31, 1919, a daughter of Earle McIn-

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly

Barbara Ann Outten, 41 Barbara Ann Outten of Greenwood died May 28, 2006 due to injuries suffered in a motorcycle accident. She was born in Seaford, a daughter of Loretta Wooters and Leonard Horseman. She is survived by her two daughters, Stephanie Outten of Nassau and Stacey Outten of Harrington; a son, Scott Outten of Seaford; a brother, James Horseman of West Va.; four sisters, Nancy Horseman and Debbie Weaver of Ellendale, Terri McCraney of North Caroline and Diane Sinclair of Berlin, Md.; a granddaughter Kyleigh Carpenter of Laurel. She was also to be the grandmother of Madison Lynn Benton of Greenwood. A memorial service was June 2 at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.) “We may not be Dairy Queen but we have Great “Sundays”.

Show them how proud you are with a beautiful floral bouquet!

Welcome… 701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

WE DELIVER

Quality Flowers For All Occasions

John’s Four Season’s Flowers & Gifts Stein Hwy. at Reliance, John Beauchamp 302

629-2644

410-754-5835

Myrtle V. Sipple, 93 Myrtle V. “Mickey” Sipple of Winter Park, Fla., formerly of Frederica and Largo, Fla., died on Thursday, May 25, 2006 in Manor Care of Winter Park. She was born March 14, 1913 in Pennsylvania, the daughter of Humphrey and Alice S. Vandegrift. She graduated from Caesar Rodney High School in 1932. She loved to square dance and play shuffleboard. She was a

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Christ Lutheran Church

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

tyre and Carrie Jones McIntyre. Mrs. Wolf was a homemaker and a member of the All Saints Episcopal Church, Delmar, Del. She is survived by three sons, Denis Wolf of Chesapeake City, Md., Jeffery Wolf and his wife Hilary of Rockville, Md. and Stephen Wolf and his wife Debbie of Salisbury, Md; a granddaughter Pamela Dolde and her husband Jim, and a great-granddaughter Hannah Dolde, all of Chesapeake City, Md. Besides her parents, she is preceded in death by her husband Harry S. Wolf, Jr., who died in 1996, and two sisters, Mabel Conley and Nancy McIntyre. A graveside service was on June 5 at Springhill Memory Gardens, Hebron, Md. Contributions may be made to John Wesley Methodist Church, c/o Charles Ott, 14451 Reading Ferry Road, Princess Anne, MD 21853. Arrangements were in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel. Visit www.delmarvaobits.com to send condolences to the family.

Corner of Shipley & Spruce Sts.

A Family Friendly Church Home for You Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 am Phone: 629-9755 www.ChristLC.net Bible School for the Mentally Challenged Saturday at 10 am

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH

Senior Pastor

Located halfway between Seaford & Bridgeville, turn off Rt. 13 East at Cannon Rd. light, 4th place on left.

Harold Daniels 7046 Seashore Hwy. Bridgeville, DE 19933

1611 KJV, Independent, Fundamental, Soul Winning

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 10:00 Sunday School 7:00 Prayer Service 11:00 Worship Service 6:00 Evening Worship Nursery Provided Rev. William Goslee - Ph. 349-0190

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor Ed Kuhling Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

302-337-3044

Church of God

Fax 302-337-8769

Worship Services: Seeker Service 8:30 am • Sunday School 9:30 Morning Worship 10:45 am • Wed. Night 7 pm

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

senior grand master in bridge and belonged to many bridge clubs. She retired from Caesar Rodney as school secretary. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Arthur N. Sipple in 1974; a daughter, Alice S. Will in 1981; a brother, Robert Vandegrift, and a sister, Dorothy McColpin. She is survived by her son, Arthur V. Sipple and his wife Connie of Seaford; three sisters, Ruth Cataldi of Kitty Hawk, N.C., Irene Quillen of Dover, and Mary Ann Plante of Winter Park, Fla.; four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Services were held on May 30 at the Pippin Funeral Home, Wyoming, followed by burial in Barratt’s Chapel Cemetery, Frederica. The family requests memorial contributions to the Shriners Hospital for Children, 3551 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA 19140.

Shirley Marie Nichols, 72 Shirley Marie (Carey) Nichols of Laurel passed away Friday, May 26, 2006, at her home. Mrs. Nichols was born in Laurel on April 19, 1934 and graduated from Laurel High School in 1952. She married and raised her family in Laurel, and in her later years worked at the Laurel Auction Market during the summers. She loved caring for her cats and working crossword puzzles, but found her greatest joy in her grandchildren. She was a loving wife, sister, mother and grandmother and she will be dearly missed by all whose lives she touched. Mrs. Nichols is survived by her husband of 44 years, Howard Sherman Nichols, and four children, Cathy Dawn Kennard of McDonough, Ga., Sandra Gaye Honess and her husband Frank of Delmar, Tom Reid and his wife Joanne of Harrington, and Frank Nichols and his wife Kathy of Laurel. She is also survived by a sister, Betty Jane Chamberlin of Pleasant Gap, Pa.; and three grandchildren: Frank C. Honess IV; and Breanna and Kaitlyn Reid. Her memorial service will be held on Saturday, June 10, at 1 p.m. at the Dagsboro Church of God, 32224 DuPont Boulevard, Dagsboro. The family suggests a tribute or memorial gift in Shirley Nichols’ name to Delaware Hospice, www.delawarehospice.org; or to the American Cancer Society, www.cancer.org.

Lena C. Wilckens, 75 Lena Catherine Wilckens of Laurel, formerly of Seaford, passed away Saturday, June 3, 2006, at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Md. Born in the Shenandoah, Va., on March 6, 1931, she was the daughter of Floyd and Florence Good Henderson. Mrs. Wilckens graduated from Eldorado High School Class of 1949 and went to college at the McQueen-Willis School of Nursing in Easton, Md. She was a nurse early in her life as well as helped with the family farm as a poultry farmer from 1966 to 1995. Besides her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Warner Wilckens, who passed away on Jan. 26, 1990; and by a son, Ronald Wilckens, who passed away on Oct. 6, 1989. She is survived by two sons, Wayne Wilckens of Seaford and Garry Wilckens of Laurel; one daughter, Elaine Wilckens of Hurlock, Md.; and by one brother, John

PAGE 27

Henderson of Florida. She is also survived by five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Her funeral service was on June 7, at Williamson Funeral Home, Federalsburg, with the Rev. David Hesitand officiating. Interment was in Hillcrest Cemetery, Federalsburg.

TH

OR F A E ES

D/L

ST L E R AU

AR

Barry Dee Nolt, 46 Barry Dee Nolt of Georgetown and Seaford died on Friday, June 2, 2006 at home. Mr. Nolt retired from Allen Family Foods after 24 years. He was a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford. He was also a gold medal winner in Special Olympics Delaware. He was predecesed by a brother, Michael Nolt and a sister, Lisa Nolt. He is survived by his parents Lester and Helen Nolt of Seaford; a brother, Gregory Nolt and his wife Cherie of Seaford; nieces, Jennifer Wright and her husband Adam, and Alison Nolt; and a great nephew, Breyden Wright. His funeral service was on June 5, at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Seaford. There is also a service Thursday, June 8, at 1 p.m., at the Paul L. Gravenor Home For Funerals, 100 West Main St, Ephrata, Pa., where friends may call from noon to 1 p.m. on Thursday. Burial will be in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Ephrata, Pa. The family suggests donations be made to Special Olympics Delaware, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-1901. Local arrangements were by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford, DE.

John W. Keegan, 87 John W. Keegan of Bradenton, Fla., died May 24, 2006, at Blake Medical Center in Bradenton. A graveside service was held at Odd Fellows Cemetery in Laurel on June 1. Arrangement by the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

What must I do to be saved? Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. — Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. — Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. — Romans 10:9

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

A little inconvenience should be least of our sacrifice I confess: I have a yard. As good environmentalists, my YNN ARKS husband and I know that the best thing we could do with the one and Yard owners who do not a half acres that we own is to manage it as a bioscape, with lots of bag their grass spend 38 native trees, shrubs and grasses. And we do that with the back part percent less time of our acreage, where the goldenrod, button bushes, winterberry and mowing. native water irises are thriving. But the front two-thirds of our collect our grass clippings. We let them lot is mown grass. Not fertilized, not herbi- fall where they may, putting some sustecided, not watered, but mown all the same nance in the soil and keeping those clip— in nature’s eyes just about the biggest pings out of overburdened landfills. waste of land we could have, unless we The Delaware Department of Natural were to cement it all. Throw in the exhaust Resources and Environmental Control is from the ridiculously-big mower that I proposing legislation that would ban yard power through the yard every week and the waste from landfills. The proposal is part precious gasoline we pour into that mower, of a larger recycling proposal, Senate Bill and I think we might as well admit that the 225, currently pending in the Senate. Environmentalists of the Year awards comAccording to the Division of Air and mittee is going to bypass us again this year. Waste Management, the proposed legislaBut wait, I say to those committee tion would require residents and businessmembers. Perhaps there is something rees to keep yard waste separate from other deeming in the way we keep our yard. The trash and would require trash haulers to abundance of weeds is proof that this lawn take that yard waste to composting and has never seen a weed killer. And the fact mulching facilities rather than to landfills. that our dog, despite being told she is not On its own, DNREC is already working to, continues to dig up and gobble down to ban yard waste from the Cherry Hill delicious grubs is proof that pesticides are landfill in New Castle County. But some similarly missing. legislators are speaking out against that Our lawn is just there. We do little to ban, saying that it would not be fair to help it along, other than admire it in early property owners, who would have to make spring when it is freshly green and worry other arrangements for the grass clippings about it when dry spells turn it brown and that they and their yards generate. crackly. I want to make several points. First, that And, committee members, we do not grass clippings, mulched and left on the

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lawn, are good for that lawn. According to a study conducted by Texas A&M and the Texas Department of Agriculture, clippings, with four percent nitrogen, .5 percent phosphorus and 2 percent potassium, as well as essential minor elements, increase the soil’s organic matter content, saving about one fertilizer application per year. Clippings boost the lawn’s ability to retain moisture and nutrients and to resist erosion. They also help the lawn to maintain cooler temperatures during the summer. And, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, yard owners who do not bag their grass spend 38 percent less time mowing. As well as more time for sitting under a shade tree, that translates into lower gasoline consumption. According to newspaper reports, House Majority Leader Wayne Smith, who spoke against the yard waste ban at the Cherry Hill landfill, said that such a ban would “inconvenience” homeowners. Well, doing something that is environmentally unsound should be an inconvenience. If a homeowner insists on bagging

grass clippings — even though they are good for his lawn, even though they could partially replace the chemical fertilizers he uses, even though doing so wastes energy, not to mention the petroleum-based plastic bags he into which he packs the clippings — he should not be enabled in his practices by the state. Maybe a little inconvenience will make him stop and consider what he is doing. And maybe that consideration will lead to reduced energy consumption, reduced use of chemical fertilizers — which by the way are also petroleum-based — healthier watersheds and healthier ecosystems. Our impact on nature is tremendous, and we must accept that our part in protecting nature should be equally tremendous. We have decided that lush, green lawns are a mark of success. Fine. But we should at least understand the true costs of those lawns in terms of the environment and of energy consumption, and be willing to do whatever we can to minimize those costs. A little inconvenience should be the least of our sacrifice.

Brenda Rambo 302

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Roomy Ranch Home, very clean, move right in condition, 3 BR, 2 BA, new appliances, new roof, laminate wood floor throughout house, new heated sunroom off kitchen/dining combo, large garage, Must see between Seaford & Laurel. $249,000 mls 533301

New Construction being built by quality builder, 1300 sq. ft, in-town Seaford corner lot, great open floor plan, 10x10 deck off dining room, 1 1/2 detached garage 3 BR, 2.5 BA Only $179,000 mls 524907

Great Spacious Ranch on .8 acre of country living! 3 BR, 2 BA, lg. walk-in closets in Mstr BR, beautiful cherry cabinets it kitchen, hardwood floors in foyer, separate laundry w/ steps up to a possible 510 sq. ft of living space upstairs. Built by quality builder in Cannon, Woodbridge School District. 1625 sq. ft. for only $259,000 w/view of horse pasture out back! mls 535474


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 29

FRESH PRODUCE

Bridgeville men’s club donates money to help pay for new concession stand CANDLES BY:

Club hopes donation will spur others to donate to the stand at the Little League park

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By Mike McClure Bob Jefferson of the LD Club of Bridgeville presented Woodbridge Little League President Mark Fields with a check for $1,000 to help rebuild the concession stand at the Bridgeville field. The concession stand that was there was recently destroyed in a fire. According to Fields, JBS Construction of Greenwood did the construction of the new concession stand. There is still paneling and other work in the interior left to do. Jefferson said the club donated the money as a kick off for a fund-raiser to pay for the new concession stand. He said he’d like to see other businesses and organizations step up and help out. The LD Club is made of men who are 60 and older and get together each morning. The club helps senior citizens and provides candy for kids at Christmas time. Anyone wishing to donate to the building fund can call Fields on his cell phone, 302-228-1312.

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A Little Bit of Country Just Down the Road

Woodbridge Little League President Mark Fields, left, receives a check from Bob Jefferson, representing the LD Club of Bridgeville. Also shown are Little Leaguer Hunter Rogers and Diane Carmean, who is in charge of concessions at the Little League park. The donation was made to help kick off the building fund for a new concession stand at the Bridgeville park after the old stand burned down.

11465 Sycamore Rd. MON. THRU SAT. 10-5:30 Laurel, DE SUNDAY 12-4 (1/2 mile from Rt. 13)

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Lauren Correll is Sussex Tech Class of 2006 salutatorian Sussex Tech High School graduation was on June 1 at Raven Stadium, Georgetown. Guest speaker was U.S. Navy Rear Admiral, Medical Corps (Ret.) Donald L. Sturtz. Valedictorian was Benjamin Nathaniel Berg. Salutatorian was Lauren Taylor Correll. There were 236 members of the Class of 2006. Class officers are: Janise Henderson, president; Marian Drayton, vice president; Monique Malabet, secretary; Phillip Lewis, treasurer; Erica Hinton, parliamentarian; Katera Elzey, historian; Brittney Hall, reporter; and Nancy Massaro and Jim Friedel are the class advisors. (See a complete list of local seniors in the graduation section inside this edition.) The following local seniors at Sussex Technical High School received academic awards: Matthew Adams (Laurel) - New England Institute of Technology Award, Outstanding Communications Club Award. Joseph Bailey (Greenwood) - National Honor Society, Presidential Gold Seal, Volunteer Appreciation Award. Sophia Bay (Seaford) - Army ROTC Award, Business & Professional Women’s

Sussex Tech valedictorian Benjamin Berg speaks during last Thursday’s graduation ceremony. Berg told his classmates “always stay motivated and never give up.” “No matter what path you choose things are going to be more difficult.”

Tyrell Hopkins of Seaford acts like he has to dry his eyes at the thought of leaving school.

Club Scholarship, JROTC Cadet Lieutenant Colonel Distinction, Daughters of the American Revolution Award, Navy ROTC Award, Presidential Silver Seal, Spanish Honor Society, Volunteer Appreciation Award. Michael Belle (Laurel) - Delaware Association of Educational Office Professionals Award, Discover Bank Foundations Scholarship, Horatio Alger Scholarship, Howard H. Simon Memorial Award. Bryan Blocker (Laurel) - Industrial/Engineering Technologies Cluster Award, Electrical Apprenticeship, Outstanding English-Auto Award, New England Institute of Technology Award, Outstanding Electrical Award, Presidential Silver Seal. William Blucher (Seaford) - Presidential Silver Seal. Ryan Brown (Seaford) -American Citizenship Award, New England Institute of Technology Award. Diane Burns (Seaford) - Volunteer Appreciation Award. Erica Chituck (Bridgeville) - CNA Certification. Kevin Christophel (Laurel) - Electrical Apprenticeship. Lauren Correll (Bridgeville) - Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association Scholarship, Elizabeth J. White Memorial Award, National Honor Society, U.S. Navy Athletics Award, Outstanding Athletic Health Care Award, Outstanding History Award, Presidential Gold Seal, Salutatorian, Scholar Athlete Award, Delaware Secretary of Education Scholar, Sportsmanship Award, Volunteer Appreciation Award. Amanda Curtis (Laurel) - CNA Certification, Michael C. Ferguson Scholarship, National Honor Society, Presidential Gold Seal, Volunteer Appreciation Award. Lori Dahling (Bridgeville) - Presidential Silver Seal. David Demarest (Bridgeville) - Sportsmanship Award. Adam Dickerson (Laurel) - Martha Rebekah Lodge #21 Scholarship. Marian Drayton (Laurel) - Franklin Pierce College Scholarship. Patrick Dubinski (Laurel) - Volunteer Appreciation Award. Lyndsey Ellsworth (Georgetown) CNA Certification, Wesley College Scholarship. Katera Elzey (Seaford) - George E. Gordy Scholarship. Janise Henderson (Greenwood) - Otis P. Carmine Memorial Award, Discover Bank Foundations Scholarship, Michael C. Ferguson Scholarship, National Honor Society, Presidential Gold Seal, Denison University Scholarship, Marietta College Scholarship. Jennifer Hubbard (Seaford) - Lynchburg College Scholarship. Tyler Humpton (Bridgeville) - Jeffrey Carey NHS Memorial Scholarship, National Honor Society, Presidential Gold Seal. Christopher Huskey (Seaford) - National Honor Society, Presidential Gold Seal. Colin Jackson (Greenwood) - American Citizenship Award, New England Institute of Technology Award, Outstanding Carpentry Award. Michelle Jackson (Laurel) - CNA Certification.

Sussex Tech class of 2006 salutatorian Lauren Correll of Bridgeville leads classmates and audience members in a prayer during commencement exercises last Thursday. Photos by Mike McClure

Tashona James (Bridgeville) - New England Institute of Technology Award, Presidential Silver Seal. Joshua Kunde (Laurel) - New England Institute of Technology Award. Lauren Magaha (Seaford) - New England Institute of Technology Award. Tom Mancuso (Seaford) - U.S. Air Force Math Award, American Citizenship Award, Electrical Apprenticeship, Outstanding English-Industrial / Engineering Technologies Cluster Award, Kyle Holland Memorial Award, Presidential Silver Seal. Brittany McAllister (Seaford) - Volunteer Appreciation Award. Jamie Molz (Seaford) - CNA Certification, Lion Eleanor M. Kircher Memorial Scholarship. Robin Myers (Laurel) - CNA Certification, Laurel Fire Dept. Ladies Auxiliary Scholarship. Amanda Palmer (Greenwood) - American Citizenship Award, Michael C. Fergu-

son Scholarship, New England Institute of Technology Award, Presidential Silver Seal, Franklin Pierce College Scholarship, Immaculata University Scholarship, Lynchburg College Scholarship. Hiral Patel (Seaford) - CNA Certification, MBNA Delaware Scholars Foundation Scholarship, MBNA-HBCU Scholarship, National Honor Society, Presidential Gold Seal, Spanish Honor Society. Ashley Pitti (Seaford) - New England Institute of Technology Award, St. John’s University Scholarship. Derek Rambo (Seaford) - Outstanding Student Trainer Award. Melissa Rankin (Bridgeville) - Outstanding Digital Publishing & Print Design Award, Presidential Silver Seal. Bryan Schieferstein (Seaford) - Volunteer Appreciation Award. Amos Scott (Laurel) - New England Institute of Technology Award, Volunteer Appreciation Award.

Lyndsey Ellsworth of Laurel shares a laugh with Sussex Tech school board president Richard Lewis during the school’s commencement exercises last Thursday.


âœł JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

MORNING STAR

PAGE 31

Calvin Sears (Seaford) - Outstanding Auto Diesel Award. Bethany Short (Laurel) - Outstanding Choir Award. Ceasar Skis (Bridgeville) - Michael C. Ferguson Scholarship, Horatio Alger Scholarship, Wesley College Scholarship. Erika Springer (Laurel) - CNA Certification. Thomas Timlin (Seaford) - Electrical Apprenticeship. Jonathan Val (Seaford) - New England Institute of Technology Award, Upward Bound-Delaware State University Scholarship. Tara Voss (Seaford) - Dependability Award, Presidential Service Award Renee Warrington (Bridgeville) - George E. Gordy Scholarship, Long & Foster Scholarship, Outstanding Health Professions Technology Award, Presidential Silver Seal. Dajaunaira Weal (Bridgeville) - Comcast Scholarship. Ashlie Wilkerson (Greenwood) - CNA Certification. Candice Windsor (Greenwood) - CNA Certification, Key Club Award.

Sussex Tech’s Amanda Palmer blows a kiss to the crowd during the Sussex Tech graduation ceremony last week.

Donald Sturtz, a retired Rear Admiral in the United States Navy Medical Corps and a Professor of Military and Emergency Medicine at Bethesda Naval Hospital, was the guest speaker at the 2006 Sussex Tech graduation ceremony. “Teachers raise the bar and challenge us to excel,� said Sturtz, who has four grandchildren who graduated from the school. “Serve a higher cause than yourself.�Photos by Mike McClure

Ricker Adkins of Laurel receives his diploma during the Sussex Tech graduation ceremony.

Lauren Magaha of Seaford is all smiles after receiving her diploma during Sussex Tech’s commencement exercises last Thursday.

The Sussex Tech High School chorus performs prior to the start of the graduation ceremony which took place last Thursday night.

W O N ILURE  A F T R M HEA CARRYHI S A H $AD TURNTO -Y 

Sussex Tech class of 2006 President Janise Henderson gets ready to receive her diploma during commencement exercises last Thursday. “Every moment of the last few years and the last few days have been anticipating the next,� Henderson said in a speech to her classmates. “06 I can’t say you’ll change the world but don’t let the world change you.�

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MORNING STAR

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✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 3 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.30/inch Legals: $6.30 per inch LOST 14 YR. OLD BLACK MALE CAT with 1 eye. Lost in West 8th St. area, Laurel. Reward offered. Family pet. 875-9228. 5/11 ORANGE PENCIL BOX containing addresses. Possibly lost in Wal-Mart parking lot. 875-2342. 5/11

GIVE-AWAY FREE KITTENS (asst. colors) to good home. 8757421. 6/1 LOTS OF BRICKS, 2” blocks, 4” blocks, 8” blocks. 629-2111. 6/1

HELP WANTED CHAPLAINS Part Time At Delaware Hospice, our consistent commitment to excellence and service to our community speaks for itself. Join us and help us meet the needs of those people who need it most while enjoying rewarding work. We are currently seeking Chaplains for our Wilmington, Dover and Georgetown locations. Ordained Minister or Master of Divinity required. Must be experience in pastoral care. Experience with the caring end of life patients and their families, a plus. Must be committed to the hospice philosophy of care and be able to work as a member of an interdisciplinary team in the provision of hospice care. Please contact blenzin@ delawarehospice.org. Fax: 302-478-1351. For more information visit us at www.delawarehospice.org EOE.

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STAFF RN’S At Delaware Hospice, our consistent commitment to excellence and service to our community speaks for itself. Join us and help us meet the needs of those people who need it most while enjoying rewarding work. • Positions In New Castle, Kent and Sussex Counties. • Weekend/Evening/On Call Shifts Available. • Get Paid For Full-Time Work Only A Few Days/Evenings • 3 Shifts To Choose From! 1) Sat. & Sun. 8am-4:30pm Secondary, On Call Fri., Sat. & Sun. 4pm-8am 2) Wed. & Thur. 4pm-8am 3) Sat. & Sun. 8pm-8am Secondary, On Call Wed. & Thur. 8pm-8am Must have DE license, minimum of 2 years experience and excellent critical thinking and computer literacy skills. Hospice experieence a plus. Send your resume to blenzin@delawarehospice.org Fax: 302-478-1351. For more information visit us at www.delawarehospice.org EOE.

DELAWARE HOSPICE 6/8/1tc

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY LOOKING TO PARTNER WITH 4 BEAUTY CONSULTANTS. If you have tried other cosmetic companies, only to be let down, we need to talk. Call 1-800211-1202 x 16387. Leave your name and phone & the best time to reach you.

LOVE TO DECORATE? Earn $30-$50 per hour for part time fun. Call Debbie at 629-0402. 5/4/4tnc

NOTICE FUNDRAISER Are you looking to raise money for a school, church, sports team, scout troops, clubs, day care centers, civic organizations, Relay for Life, or any other worthy cause? (Ask me more details about worthy causes). I can help you have fun while raising money. Call Debbie at 629-0402. 5/4/4tnc CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that really works! Call today! 302-875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

YARD SALE SAT., JUNE 10, 7:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Tools, household items, etc. Pinecone Dr., off Middleford Rd., look for Eastern Optical sign, Seaford. 6/8 SAT., 6/10, 9850 Nanticoke Circle, 8 am - noon. Tools, household items, jewelry, grandmother’s clock, etc. NO EARLY BIRDS. 6/8

WANTED! NEED NORELCO ELEC. RAZOR Repair Service. 629-6238. 6/8

AUTOMOTIVE PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR CYCLE, FLHTC, garage kept, $10,500 OBO. 875-3115. 6/8

SUPERIOR SALON IN SEAFORD UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP Is now hiring hair stylist, nail techs, and estheticians. If you are looking for a fun, friendly atmosphere and Unlimited earning potential then call us at 302-841-5678 Ask for Mike.

‘95 GRAND AM, good cond., 60K mi., needs trans., $1000. 629-4446. 6/8

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‘92 VAN, good motor, good tires, needs brakes, $250 OBO. 846-2599. 6/8

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‘03 GREEN KAWASAKI Prairie KVF 360 4x4, 3l3c. eng., low hrs & mileage. $4000 OBO. 875-4181. 6/1 ‘91 FORD CROWN VICT., power everything, AC. 116K mi., car very well taken care of. $1500 OBO. 841-5795 or 934-5506. 6/1

BOATS 21;’ FIBERGLASS BOAT, Dixie, walk around cuttie, selling due to health. $10,500 OBO. 875-3115. 6/8 12’ JON BOAT, Endura 30 elec. motor (like new) plus extras. $400 OBO. 8754181. 6/1 YAMAHA O/B MOTOR, 115 hp w/oil injecting system. Runs good, $1500. 3377861 for info. 5/25

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‘95 WINNEBAGO BRAVE, 29’. Chev. Chassis, queen bed, TV, VCR, microwave, generator, awning, outdoor entertainment center, 52K mi., exc. cond., asking $20,500. 877-0231. 6/8

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES ‘70 and ‘71 LAUREL H.S. YEAR BOOKS, $50 ea. Exc. cond. 628-9157. 6/8 UNITED METHODIST CHURCH PLATES: Blades UMC, Blades; Epworth UMC, Sycamore Rd., Laurel; St. Johnstown UMC, Greenwood. 245-6973. 6/1 ANTIQUE BRASS DBL. BED, $300 OBO. 3370737. 4/20

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CAR TAG (License plate) Digits: 39336, $500 OBO. 875-7169 for info. 6/8 ABOVE GROUND POOL, 24’ round, w/ladder, pump, filter & access. Must be taken down. $300. 8759283. 6/8 TOMATO CAGES (20), 75¢ ea. 875-1862. 6/8 TABLE SAW, 10” w/2 hp motor, $100. 875-8677. 6/8 PRESSURE WASHER, Honda 9 hp, 2400 psi, $300. 875-8677. 6/8 BED FRAME, heavy duty, fits double to king size bed, $25. 628-0617. 6/8

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A&J GERMAN HAMMER Drill w/SDS bits, 1/4 - 1 1/4 in. $100. 628-0617. 6/8 POLE BEAN PLANTS, Dr. Marten, 75¢ ea. 875-3023. CHILD’S ROCKER, wooden, $5. Desk & chair, $10. 875-3744. 6/8 Interested In Sprucing Up Your Home Decor for Spring & Summer… With fresh new ideas? Call Debbie today for your personal appt. at 629-0402. 6/8/4tnc TODDLER BED, $20. 8757421. 6/1 PLANTS & FLOWERS: Lilac bushs, $5 & up. Rose of Sharon $8 - $12. Day Lillies, $2.75. English Ivy, Buy 1 get 1. Money plant, $3. & more! 875-5217. Trap Pond Road. 6/1

PROJECT SUPERINTENDENT General Contractor/Construction Manager looking for qualified project superintendent(s) for new construction. Experience required in site development and new building construction. Multiple projects include 5,000(+/-) square feet new building construction, petroleum islands and car wash building. Applicants will need to provide previous project(s) experience and references in the construction industry. Projects are located in Southeast Maryland & Southeast Delaware areas. Please email your resume to: ambrose@fmharvey.com or fax to 410-584-9154. No phone inquiries please.

New & Used - Name Brand 302-846-3037

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PORCH FURNITURE, fan & storm door. 629-8324. 6/1 TRACTOR: 284 Int’l. Diesel w/975 operating hrs. 59” belly mower, 6’ scraper blade & 2 wheel utility trailer. $7000. 629-2111. 6/1 DUMP CART, 10 CF, pull behind, exc. cond. $65. 628-0596. 5/25 MOUNTAIN BIKE, 26”, 12 spd., men’s, $25. 2361398. 5/25 MOVING - MUST SELL: 6 Pc. LR set, exc. cond., $450. 2 wooden end tables & 2 lamps, $30. 5 pc. Kit. set, good cond., $80. Old time stereo system w/record player: 33’s, 45’s & 78’s, nice hardwd finish, $40. 19” TV w/wooden stand, $40. Stand alone stereo sys. w/2, 3’ speakers, $60. 5 pc. wicker set, $50. 2 lg. dog houses, $20. JVC VHS-C video camdorder $100. 245-2850. WATER LILIES. 875-2729. 5/18 REMODELING SALE: Sleep sofa $85; recliner rocker $35; swivel chair $50; (2) lamp tables, $25 set; (2) lamps, $25 set; dry sink $75; misc. odds & ends. 629-4182. 5/18 SWIMMING POOL, diving board, mesh safety pool cover for 20x40 pool, 6’ high slide, & stainless ladder. Best offer. 875-7495. 18,000 - 220V AIR COND., 2 yrs old, works good, $100. 875-4358. 5/11 3 FOLDING BOAT SEATS, 3/$10. 628-0617. 5/11 CRAFTSMAN LAWN MOWER, Briggs & Stratton (6.75 hp) eng., self-propelled, elec. starter, like new, $250. 628-8546. 5/11


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ATTORNEYS AT LAW

*Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

FAX 302-875-3229

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PAGE 34 PFALTZGRAF Yorktown pattern dishes, 23 dinner plates, many serving pcs. 629-0619. 5/4 SOFA, 2 cushion, green, $100. Pecan DR set, table w/3 leaves & 6 chairs, lg. china cabinet w/glass shelves, $600 OBO. 8755376. 5/4 ELEC. HOSPITAL BED, $450 OBO. Travel wheel chair, $100 OBO. 8755376. 5/4 DR SET, TABLE & 6 chairs, china cupboard, 2 buffet servers, dark wood, good cond. Made in 60s? $550 OBO. 334-4681. 5/4

ANIMALS, ETC.

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

MORNING STAR 3 JACK RUSSELL TERRIERS, $175 ea. 875-4181. 6/8 DOG KENNEL 10’x10’x6’, chain link, canvas roof. Dog house incl. Great cond. $400. 344-4681. 5/4

WANTED TO RENT SENIOR LADY seeking to rent home or mobile home, in the country. On SS income. Have ref., no pets, no children. Wants long term. Need by end of June. 846-2599. 6/8

FREE CLASSIFIEDS

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Personal Items for Sale. No Vendors Please.

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or send to P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973.

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DISCLAIMER: be aware that Morning Star Publications has no control over the Regional ads. Some employment ads and business opportunity ads may not be what they seem to be.

Driver - FLATBED DRIVERS can earn $950+ / week at PGT. Home Weekends, great benefits & Equipment. CDL-A. Students welcome. Call 800824-0723 DRIVERS - COMPANY DRIVERS “We Have It All” 9 pd Holidays-Vacation, Personal & Sick Pay, Health Benefits, 401K, Weekly Home Time, Avg $1250 plus weekly. Excellent Equip & More. We need 3 yrs Exp CDL-A Hazmat. 3pts or less MVR. Call Bob P&P 866476-6843

Home Improvement FREE GRANITE - Let the Fabricator bid for your granite job. Countertops / Kitchens / Bathroom / Vanities. Free Granite vanity program (some restrictions apply). www.GRANITE101.com Land For Sale NYS LAND LIQUIDATION, '06 SPRING SALE. 97 Acres with Cabin, Was $149,000- Now $99,900. 175 Acres Bordering State Land, Was $159,900- Now $125,900. 48 Acres- Trophy Hunting, Was $69,900- Now $59,900. 6+ Acres Southern Tier Hilltop Views, Was $17,900- Now $15,900. 82 Acres- Tug Hill Camp & Creek, Now $119,900. 54 Acres- Southern Tier- State Land Surrounds, Now $109,900. 191 Acres Adirondack Ponds, Borders State Land, Now $523 Per Acre. Selected as Cabela's Trophy Lands. Call C&A @ 800-229-7843 www.landandcamps.com. Over 75 New Bargains! 4+ Ac near Bruceton Mills, WV w/Streamfront $39,900. 30+ Ac in Garrett Co., MD. Big views & creek $119,900. 800-898-6139 A.L.S. www.landservice.com 20+ acres $134,900 w/ private, deeded river access.

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Enjoy over 1,000 ft of seasonal streams. Only one! Long term financing avail. 1-800-888-1262 20 acres & larger parcels Deeded river access. 3 state views, hardwoods, mins to town & interstate. 2 hrs DC Beltway. Ready to enjoy for recreation or build LandinWV.com 2 ACRES- RIVERFRONT On the Middle Fork River, 45 min from Snowshoe ski resort. 15 min to historic Elkins, WV. Great views of the river. Beautiful hardwoods. Only $69,500. Call for appt. 866-403-8037. For Sale By Owner. 20+ acres for $189,900. This parcel has large oaks w/ untouchable 50 mile mtn views! Also, has private river access for fishing & canoeing. Exc. Financing. Call (304)262-2770 Top of the World! 20+ acres -$279,900. Best mtn views available anywhere! Very usuable w/ private river access! Low- rate financing. Nothing else compares! Call 1-800-888-1262 VA MOUNTAINS 5 acres with frontage on very large pristine creek, very private, excellent fishing, canoeing, good access, near New River Trail State Park, $39,500. owner 866-7898535 www.mountainsof VA.com CABELA'S TROPHY PROPERTIES. NY State's best hunting & fishing properties. 5 Acres with new Adirondack camp @ $19,900. 191 Acres with wilderness stream bordering state land @ $99,900. Call Christmas & Associates, participating broker. Land experts for over 16 years. 1-800-229-7843 or www.landandcamps.com Miscellaneous Airline mechanic rapid training for high paying Aviation career. FAA predicts severe shortage, financial aid if qualify. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1-888349-5387 FREE DIRECTV SATELLITE, 4 rooms. FREE TiVo/DVR. Add HDTV. 220 Channels+ locals, packages from $29.99 / month. Cheaper than cable TV. Switch Today! 800-3609901, Promo #14700 Mobile/Mnfctrd Hms The Village of Jefferson Crossroads LAND/ HOME packages from $170's Single family homes on 3/4+ acre homesites near beaches. Move in fast. Models and closing assistance available. (302)674-5504 x111. Or e-mail jeff@atlantishomesllc.com


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for free backyard survey! Crown Pools 888-5906466. Real Estate EASTERN SHORE, VACHESAPEAKE BAY: Extraordinary new community "Underhill Creek Landing". Spectacular sunset views, deep waterfront and water access homesites from $79,900. Toni Trepanier, Agent 888-824-0009 or 757-894-8909 Email: tellam1227@msn.com

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PUBLIC AUCTION

OF CONTENTS OF FRENCH’S FOOD RITE GROCERY STORE IN LAUREL, DELAWARE Friday, June 16, 2006 -- 10:30 A.M. Location: French’s Food Rite, 1001 S. Central Ave, Laurel, Delaware. From the intersection of U.S. Rt. 13 & Del. Rt. 24 in Laurel, travel west on Rt. 24 towards Laurel for 0.9 mile. Turn left at second light onto Central Ave. and travel for 0.4 mile. French’s Food Rite will be on left. Inspection: Friday, June 16 from 8:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M. Auction will include all of the hot food, produce, bakery, deli, meat, & computer supplies & equipment & miscellaneous contents of Laurel landmark French’s Food Rite. Hot Food: Henny Penny Model HC 900 Holding Cabinet, Henny Penny Model 500 Electric Fryers, Hobart HSF3 Steamer, 8 ft. Alto Sham Hot Case with Oven, Insta-Burger Machine, Two Burner Star Mfg. Electric Stove, & Stainless Steel Hand Sink, & many other items too numerous to mention.

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 35

Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservation www.holidayoc.com Waterfront Properties Spectacular Virginia Waterfront Gated, private community on Eastern Shore of VA. 3 acre lots avail. from $130k to $500k with immediate, deepwater access to Chincoteague Bay. Amenities include community pier, boat launch & beautiful community center w/ guest suites, pool, spa, & fitness room. Spectacular views, mild climate, low taxes, abundant wildlife. Privacy close to quaint villages, shopping & water activities. Phase 1 sold out. Lots in Phase 2 avail. 757-709-9525 or visit www.corbinhall.com

LEGALS NOTICE The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, June 12, 2006, to receive public comment concerning the FY-07 Budget. The hearing will take place at Bridgeville Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, at 7:30 P.M. The FY07 Budget is available for review on Monday - Friday, from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. at the Town Hall. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY, COMMISSION PRESIDENT 6/8/1tc

Produce: 48 ft. Hussman Multi-Deck Display Cases, Hobart Scale with Printer, Wrap Station, Produce Carts, & Fruh Basket Heat Gun, & many other items too numerous to mention. Bakery: 3 ft. Donut Case, 3 ft. Wooden Bakery Racks, Bakery Craft Copy Confection Cake Scanner with Printer, Baker’s Aid Four-Deck Oven (7 ft. long), Proof Boxes, 6 ft. Fleetwood Bakery Cold Case, 8 ft. Stainless Steel Tables with Bottom Doors, Copy Rite Copy Cake Machine, Bread Slicer, & Four Slice Toaster, & many other items too numerous to mention. Deli: Toledo 8427 Deli Scales, Hobart 512 Slicers, Hobart Wrap Station, Three-Tub Stainless Steel Sink, Two-Tub Stainless Steel Sinks, 12 ft. McCray Deli Case, 5 ft. Stainless Steel Tables, 5 ft. Marble Top Tables, & 3 ft. Marble Top Table, & many other items too numerous to mention. Meat: Hobart Mixer Grinder, Hobart Saw, Berkel Tenderizer, Toledo 685 Solo Auto. Wrapper, Toledo 8460 Scale with Wrap Station, Toledo 8427 Scale with Wrap Station, Marble Top Cutting Tables, 8 ft. Hussman Meat Case, Assorted Stainless Steel Dunnage Racks, 6 ft. Stainless Steel Table, One-Tub Hand Sink, & 54 ft. Hussman Mult-Deck Meat Cases, & many other items too numerous to mention. Computer supplies & equipment: Dell POS Systems with Magellen scanner scales, Dell back office PC (wireless), Dell server with backup, Symbol hand-held POS, I.T. retail software with backups, Trans. 330 credit card machines with printers, Pan Ousten checkouts, Canon multifunction laser printer, H.P. printer, ADC computer with time & attendance software, Canon adding machine, Camera system, Safe, Cash drawer, Office chair, Battery backups, ADC battery backup (server), Phone system with auto. attendant & 4 extentions, Radio with P.A. system, & Guardian alarm system, & many other items too numerous to mention. Walk-ins: Frozen walk-in freezers, Dairy walk-in cooler, Deli walk-in coolers, Produce walk-in cooler, & Meat walk-in cooler. Grocery & Misc. Supplies: 48 ft. Hussman Dairy Cases, 36 ft. Hussman Stand-Up Door Freezers, 104 ft. Hussman Coffin Freezers, Electric Pallet Jack, Hand Jack, & Freight Carts, & many other items too numerous to mention. Terms: Cash or Approved Check day of sale. A 10% buyer’s premium will be charged on all purchases. All items are sold “AS IS” with no warranties of any kind. All items must be paid for day of sale. Prompt removal.

Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons

NOTICE The Tax Assessments for the City of Seaford for the tax year 2006-2007 have

been completed. The Tax Assessment Books will be posted at Seaford District Library (402 N. Porter Street), Happy Harry’s Drug Store (575 N Dual Highway), Rite Aid (Stein Highway and Atlanta Road) and the City Office (414 High Street) for public inspection. The Mayor and Council have set Tax Appeal Night for Tuesday, June 13, 2006, from 7:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Anyone wishing to appeal their assessment to the City Council should contact the Tax Department, City of Seaford, P.O. box 1100, Seaford, DE 19973, (302) 629-9173, by 4:00 P.M. on Thursday, June 8, 2006. CITY OF SEAFORD Sharon H. Drugash Tax Department 6/8/1tc

is seeking a site plan review for the addition of a 22,000± square foot building and 182 additional parking spaces. 3. Davis, Bowen and Friedel, Inc. on behalf of the property owners of Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 5.00 11, located on Bridgeville Road, (near Herring Run Professional Park), are seeking a preliminary site plan review for the residential development, Lawrence Crossing. Should you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 8th day of June 2006 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher, City Manager 6/8/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING

You are hereby notified the below matters will be before: The Mayor and Council for their determination on Tuesday, June 27, 2006, at 7:05 P.M., in the City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: 1. Case No. S-28-06; AAM, LLC, is requesting a subdivision of 4 acres of land from the larger parcel identified as Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 5.00 50.07, located on Bridgeville Road (formerly known as “Strikemasters”). 2. Seaford Village LLC, property owners of Seaford Village Shopping Center, Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 5.00 50, Sussex Highway,

Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 9554 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-25, Item C of said ordinance of SANDRA L. HYNSON who is seeking a variance from the side yard setback requirement, to be located northeast of U.S. Route 13A, 850 feet northwest of Road 468, being Lots 16 and 17, Section B within Lands of David Moore. See LEGALS—page 36

PUBLIC AUCTION

OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE & HOME IN LAUREL, DEL. Friday, June 23, 2006 -- 4:30 P.M. Location: 12033 Laurel Road, Laurel, Delaware. From the intersection of U.S. Rt. 13 & Del. Rt. 24 in Laurel, travel east on Rt. 24 for approx. 0.8 mile. Property will be on left (Signs Posted). Inspection: Tues., June 13 from 4:00 to 5:30 P.M. & Tues., June 20 from 4:00 to 5:30 P.M. The property is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 3-32 Map 2.00 Parcel 59.02 and is further described in Deed Book 2395 Page 247. The property consists of 0.83+/- Acre of land and is improved with a 3 BR/1 BA home & outbuildings. Terms: $10,000.00 non-refundable down payment on day of sale in the form of Cash, Cashier’s, or Certified Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons with the balance to be paid in 45 days when a good & marketable deed will be given. Buyer & Seller will equally share all State & County transfer taxes. State and County and municipal taxes and assessments to be adjusted as of the date of sale. Buyer will be required to pay all costs of preparing and recording the deed. The property is being sold in “AS-IS” condition. Failure to comply with these Terms of Sale will cause the down payment paid on day of sale to be forfeited and the property will be resold at the buyer’s expense. A 2% buyer’s premium will be added to the final selling price. Seller(s) have the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property.

Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons

AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS, INC.

AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS, INC.

11112 Laurel Road, Laurel, DE 19956

11112 Laurel Road, Laurel, DE 19956

302.875.5261• 1.866.866.8756 www.onealsauction.com

302.875.5261• 1.866.866.8756 www.onealsauction.com


PAGE 36 LEGALS - from Page 35 The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, JULY 10, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 6/8/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Nanticoke Hundred Case No. 9555 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XXV, Subsection 115-185, Item C of said ordinance of MARTHA LIMA who is seeking a variance from the maximum allowable height requirement for a fence, to be located south of Route 18, 500 feet west of Road 528, being Lot 2. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, JULY 10, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard.

All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 6/8/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Little Creek Hundred Case No. 9557 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 11523, Item A of said ordinance of IRMA J. BALL who is seeking a special use exception to place a manufactured home on a medical hardship basis, to be located north of Road 506 (Shockley Road), 610 feet southwest of Road 498 (Ellis Grove Road). The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, JULY 10, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearSee LEGALS—page 37

Town of Bethel, Delaware Bethel Town Office Main Street, P.O. Box 310 Bethel, Delaware 19931 PUBLIC NOTICE SCHEDULED MEETINGS OF THE TOWN OF BETHEL PLANNING COMMISSION The Town of Bethel has appointed a Town of Bethel Planning commission in accordance with Delaware state law. The Planning Commission will guide the preparation and later the implementation of the Town of Bethel Comprehensive Plan. It will also advise the Town Council on planning and zoning matters, oversee an update of the Town’s Zoning Ordinance once the Comprehensive Plan has been completed and be responsible for reviewing conservation, building and development activity. The Planning Commission will meet on the fourth Wednesday of each month at 7:30 PM in the Town of Bethel Community Center on Main Street. It will meet on the following dates: April 26, 2006 June 28, 2006 August 23, 2006 October 25, 2006 December 27, 2006

3 Upcoming Auctions in Sussex Co., DE www.marshallauctions.com Real Estate Auction – 3 BR, 1.5 BA Home & Contents in Seaford, DE Friday June 9 th , 2006 at 4 PM & Real Estate at 6 PM 221 Bradford Street, Seaford DE – Sussex Co. Dist. 5-31 Map 13.06 Parcel 216 Nicely maintained 3 BR, 1.5 BA Living Estate home in the City limits of Seaford Directions: At the intersection of Rt. 13 and Middleford Rd in Seaford (Next to Tru Blue), turn west onto Middleford Rd (Turns into High St.) and follow for 1.6 Miles to N. Bradford St. Right onto N. Bradford St. & follow to the Home on the right. Signs posted. Description: Nicely maintained 3 BR, 1.5 BA 1,277 Sq. Ft. home in a nice neighborhood in the City limits of Seaford, DE. Home is situated on a 50’ x 150’lot & features updated windows, some hardwood floors, screened porch, basement, oil heat & is on Town water & sewer. The property features frontage on a rear alley with a 1 car garage. The home is located near local shopping, school, dining & recreation areas. Don’t miss the chance to own this wonderful home. Glass & collectibles: Blue & Grey Stoneware Crock, Haviland Apple Blossom China Dinner Service, sterling silver, Victorian portrait plates, Lg. American Fostoria Service, Dinner set of Imperial china Whitney, Johnson Bros Fruit Sampler China, Silverplater flatware service, etched stemware, Shirley Temple mugs, ruby glassware, Hall teapots w/cream & sugar, pedestal cake plate, Northwood carnival, Pr. Victorian walnut oval frames, gilt mirror, umbrella stand, Ansonia porcelain clock, Pr. of amethyst lamps, amethyst glass, 4 oil lamps, finger lamp, milk glass scent bottles, Hubley bull dog doorstop, Pr. of walnut deep frames w/ original watercolors, lg. fashion print, cruets, Delaware glass, pitcher collection, china shoe collection, satin glass lamp, coo coo clock, watercolors, Fenton, Nippon, strawberry trays and much more. Furniture: Bagby 10 pc. Mah. dining room suite w/shield back chairs, Seth Thomas grandmother clock, Pr. oval marble top tables, Eastlake settee and 2 matching chairs, Up. Rocking chair, Mah. lamp & coffee tables, Hickory 7 pc. Mah. bedroom suite & more. Tools: Seeder Fertilizer sprayer, tool chest, power tools, hand tools, McCulloch Leaf Blower, garden tools & more! Terms Real Estate: $7,500.00 down day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, including lead paint, prior to the auction, Auction Co. makes no representation or warranties of any kind. BROKER PARTICIPATION. Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details. Terms Personal Property: Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 3% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold “As Is” with no warranties of any kind. 2 Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Food by Millie’s. Personal Property Preview: 2 Hours prior to the Auction!

Real Estate Auction - 3 BR, 1.5 BA Home & Contents in Laurel, DE Mrs. Annabelle Defelice is downsizing & Marshall Auctions is honored to sell her home.

Friday June 23rd, 2006 at 4 PM & Real Estate at 6 PM -10596 Georgetown Rd., Laurel, DE - Sussex Co. Dist. 2-32 Map12.00 Parcel 42 Nicely maintained 3 BR, 1.5 BA Living Estate home on 1.19 Ac lot in Laurel, DE. Real Estate Preview: Tue. June 13th 6-7 PM & Sun. June 18th 2-4 PM Directions: At the Intersection of Rt. 9 (Georgetown Rd) & Rt. 13 in Laurel DE travel West on Georgetown Rd. for 0.3 miles to home on the left. Signs Posted. Description: Nicely maintained 3 BR, 1.5 BA Living Estate ranch home on a wonderful 1.19 Acre lot in Laurel, DE. Home is situated on a 152’ x 242’ lot & features an excellent floor plan with large kitchen, hardwood floors, basement and a recently updated roof & windows. The property features a large attached 1 car garage and outbuilding on the rear of the property. Terms Real Estate: $7,500.00 down day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, including lead paint, prior to the auction, Auction Co. makes no representation or warranties of any kind. BROKER PARTICIPATION. Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details.

Public Real Estate Auction - 2-3 BR, 1 BA Home on a corner lot in Bridgeville, DE Marshall Auctions is honored to sell for the Estate of Mabel Clifton of Bridgeville, DE.

Saturday, June 24th, 2006 at 10 AM & Real Estate sold at Noon -Home & Contents - 101 Jacobs Ave., Bridgeville, DE Real Estate Preview: Wed. June 14th 6-7 PM & Sat. June 17th 2-4 PM Directions: At the intersection of Rt. 13 and Rt. 404 East in Bridgeville (Next to the new Royal Farms) turn West onto Business Rt. 13 towards downtown Bridgeville and follow for 0.9 miles to the home on the left. Signs Posted. Description: Nicely maintained 2-3 BR, 1 BA home on a large half acre corner lot in the town of Bridgeville. The home features a full basement, updated windows, hardwood floors, an enclosed porch, 3 fireplaces, an attached garage and a den that could be converted to a 3rd bedroom. Don’t miss the chance to own this wonderful home. Personal Property: To be listed soon. Real Estate Terms: $7,500.00 down day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of any kind. BROKER PARTICIPATION. Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details.

View Our Website for Additional Information & Pictures!

May 24, 2006 July 26, 2006 September 27, 2006 November 22, 2006

The public is invited to attend all meetings of the Planning Commission.

Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers Phone: 888-986-SOLD(7653) Auction Site: 443-614-4340 www.marshallauctions.com


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36 ing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 6/8/1tc

sion no later than June 16, 2006. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY, COMMISSION PRESIDENT 6/1/2tc

NOTICE Estate of Ruth I. Cable, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Ruth I. Cable who departed this life on the 12th day of May, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Carol J. Crouse on the 25th day of May, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 12th day of January, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Carol J. Crouse 806 Hurley Park Dr. Seaford, DE 19973 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 6/20/3tc

PUBLIC NOTICE The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing to afford interested parties of 15 Oak Street, Bridgeville, Delaware, an opportunity to show cause why the building investigated by the Dangerous Building Inspection Committee should not be declared to be a hazard to life and property and why it should not be ordered to be demolished. The Public Hearing is scheduled for the monthly Commission Meeting on Monday, June 12, 2006 at 7:00 P.M. at Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY, COMMISSION PRESIDENT 6/1/2tc

PUBLIC HEARING The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a public hearing on June 19, 2006 in the Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, DE at 7:00 P.M. The Commission will receive comments on a conditional use request submitted by Gerry Royal to extend the hours of the day care/learning center located at 219 First Street, Bridgeville, Delaware to 24-hour operation. Written comments will be received by the Commis-

LEGAL NOTICE American Legion Home, Inc. T/A Laurel Post #19 have on May 15, 2006, applied with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner seeking a 3,920 square foot patio pavilion extension and a 40x300 square foot walkway between the main building and the pavilion. Licensee also request variances to allow a wet bar, paging system, external speakers or amplifier and live entertainment on licensed patio. Premise is located on Laurel-Millsboro Highway, Route 24, P.O. Box 329, Laurel, DE 19956. Persons who are against this application should provide written notice of their objections to the Commissioner. For the Commissioner to be required to hold a hearing to consider additional input from persons against the application the Commissioner must receive one or more documents containing a total of at least 10 signatures of residents or property owners located within one mile of the premises or in any incorporated areas located within one mile of the premise. The protest must be filed with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner at the 3rd Floor, Carvel State Office Building, 820 North French Street, Wilmington, Delaware 19801. The protest(s) must be received by the Commissioner’s office on or before June 20, 2006. Failure to file such a protest may result in the Commissioner considering the application without further notice, input or hearing. If you have questions regarding this matter, please contact the Commissioner’s office at (302) 577-5222. 5/25/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Kathleen V. Davidson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Kathleen V. Davidson who departed this life on the 9th day of May, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Charles Bruce Davidson on the 15th day of May, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons hav-

ing demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 9th day of January, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Charles Bruce Davidson 3789 Catawba Valley Drive Salem, VA 24153 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 5/25/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, June 20, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situated in a subdivision known as G.D.V.P. Corp., Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, the lot herein described being known as the “Residue” lot of the said subdivision, which said subdivision plan was prepared by Elliot Surveying, dated 6/15/99 and recorded in Plot Book #65, page #302, said lot lying on the easterly side of County Road #44, Blacksmith Shop Road (60 feet wide) and being bounded as follows: on the North by Lot #3, on the East and South by lands now or late of Ivan Wayne Mast and Darlene L. Mast, and on the West by Lot #4 and the said Road #44, and being more particularly bounded and described in accordance with a survey by William L. Sapp, Professional Land Surveyor, dated August 29, 2002, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a pin found on the easterly side of Road #44, a corner for this lot and Lot #3, said pin being located 0.5 miles more or less South of County Road #614, Bender Farm Road; thence proceeding from the said point of Beginning, with line of Lot #3, South 65 degrees 08 minutes 40 seconds East 379.96 feet to a pin found in line of lands of the said Mast in a ditch known as “West Branch Ditch”; thence with line of lands of the said Mast, generally along the center of said ditch, which said ditch is approximately 28 feet wide, top of bank to top of bank, and having 140 foot wide construction easement, which said course is the center of the said easement, South 24 degrees 47

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006 minutes 20 second West 996.29 feet to a pin found; thence continuing with line of lands of the said Mast, generally along the center of another ditch, which said second noted ditch is approximately 18 feet wide, top of bank to top of bank and having the same 140 foot wide easement as noted above, said course being the center of the said easement, North 73 degrees 09 minutes 55 seconds West 384.88 feet to a pin found opposite the center of a headwall on the easterly side of Road #44; thence with the easterly side of Road #44, North 24 degrees 51 minutes 20 second East 245.00 feet to a point found, a corner for Lot #4; thence with the same the following three (3) courses and distances: (1) South 65 degrees 08 minutes 40 seconds East 310.90 feet to a pin found in the westerly easement line for the above first noted ditch; thence with the said easement line, (2) North 24 degrees 47 minutes 20 second East 205.0 feet to a pin found, thence (3) North 65 degrees 08 minutes 40 seconds West 310.66 feet to a pin found the easterly said of Road #44; thence with the same North 24 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds East 600.00 feet to a pin found, the point of Beginning. Be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Russell Vadakin by deed of Russell Vadakin and Charlotte Vadakin, dated September 6, 2002 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex county and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2748, Page 193. Tax Parcel: 4-30-3.0065.00 Property Address: 11021 Blacksmith Shop Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before July 3, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on July 7, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject

PAGE 37 to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RUSSELL A. VADAKIN and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 6/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, June 20, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the South side of East 5th Street, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Victor L. & Barbara E. Timmons, said beginning point being 650 feet East of Cannon Street; thence by and with East 5th Street, North 88 degrees 47 minutes 12 seconds East 204.46 feet to a concrete monument found, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of David B. Webb, Jr.; thence turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of David B. Webb. Jr., South 25 degrees 41 minutes 09 seconds West 112.87 feet to a concrete monument, a corner or this lot; thence turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Donald S. Sr. and Lianne K. Trice, South 88 degrees 37 minutes 00 seconds West 152.98 feet to a concrete monument found, a corner for this lot; thence turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Victor L. & Barbara E. Timmons North 01 degrees 26 minutes 59 seconds West 101.11 feet to the place of

beginning, containing therein 18,024 square feet of land, more or less, as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, Inc., dated October 28, 1998 and as updated survey prepared by Michael L. Adkins, P.E. dated June 13, 2003. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Dwight W.H. Perkins, Sr. by Deed of Jennifer C. Atkinson dated July 25, 2003, and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County at Georgetown, Delaware at Deed Book 02866 page 315, dated November 22, 2003. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.164.01 Property Address: 211 East 5th Street, Blades Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before July 3, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on July 7, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DWIGHT W.H. PERKINS, SR. and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 6/8/2tc See LEGALS—page 38

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PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, June 20, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being all of Lot 56 and a small portion of land located west of Lot 56 in “Woodside Manor” and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument located on the westerly edge of a sidewalk running parallel to Magnolia Drive, said concrete monument being located at a corner for this lot and Lot 57 plus other lands in “Woodside Manor”; thence South 80 degrees 05 minutes West a distance of 149.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 11 degrees 35 minutes West along other lands in “Woodside Manor” a distance of 108.75 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 80 degrees 05 minutes East along the southerly edge of a sidewalk running parallel to the right of way line of Arbutus Avenue a distance of 137.15 feet to a nail; thence by and with a curve which bears South 54 degrees 55 minutes East an arc distance of 23.56 feet and having a chord 21.21 feet in length to a nail; thence South 09 degrees 55 minutes East along the westerly edge of the sidewalk running parallel to the right of way line of Magnolia Drive a distance of 93.70 feet to a concrete monument, said concrete monument being the place of beginning, said to contain 16,318 square feet of land, more or less, as surveyed by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. P.L.S. 242, dated February 5, 1978, a copy of which survey is attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. BEING THE SAME lands and premises by which Robert O. Elam, Jr. and Sandra K. Elam, h/w in Deed Dated February 22nd, 1978, Recorded February 27th, 1978 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and the State of Delaware in Deed Book 881, Page 175, did grant and convey unto Dennis P.

MORNING STAR Simpson and Kathleen M. Simpson, h/w. Tax Parcel: 5-31-10.17102.00 Property Address: 810 Magnolia Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before July 3, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on July 7, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DENNIS P. & KATHLEEN M. SIMPSON and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 6/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, June 20, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, it being about four (4) miles North of Seaford, Delaware, being known and designated as

Lot No. 8, in Section C., on a Plot of Sussex Farm Labor Association, said Plot being of record in the Office of the Recorder of deeds, Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book No. 2, Page 11, it being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: FRONTING forty-two and one-half (42 1/2) feet on the Westerly side of County Road leading from formerly Browns School to Delaware Dual Highway No. 13, thence extending Westerly 41 degrees long with the Southerly side of Lot no. 7 to a point, thence turning and running in a Southerly direction with other lots in the subdivision about 300 feet to a point in the center of a ditch, thence turning and running in an Easterly direction with the center of said ditch about 435 feet to the edge of said County Road first above mentioned, containing what they may be within these bounds. SUBJECT, FURTHER, to all restrictions, reservations, covenants, conditions, easements and agreements of record. AND BEING the same land said premises which Kapell A. Tilghman, by deed dated January 18, 1997, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2178,. Page 258 et. Seq., did grant and convey to Kapell A. Tilghman and Eleanor Tilghman, in fee. Tax Parcel: 1-31-19.0042.00 Property Address: 20568 Camp Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before July 3, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on July 7, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006 of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KAPELL A. & ELEANOR TILGHMAN and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 6/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, June 20, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, State of Delaware, located on the Southerly side of County Road 508 and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point located on the Southerly right of way boundary of County Road 508, said point comprising the Northeasterly corner of adjoining Lot No. 7 and the Northwesterly corner of this Lot; thence running along said same Southerly right of way boundary line, North 86° 45' 20” East 100 feet to a monument; thence South 03° 41' 00” East and through a monument set on said line 300 feet to a point (said line comprising the common boundary line of this Lot and other lands of Joseph N. Elliott); thence South 86° 45' 20” West 143.88 feet to a point located on the Easterly right of way boundary line of a reserved 50 foot right of way; thence running along said same Easterly right of way boundary line, North 24° 31' 20” West 64.38 feet to a point; thence running along the line forming the common boundary line of adjoining Lot No. 7 and this subject Lot, South 86° 45' 20” West 66.27 feet to a point; thence continuing on another such common boundary line North 3° 33' 40” West 240 feet back to the place of beginning, containing 33,383 square feet of land, more or less,

designated as Lot No. 6, according to a survey prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Associates, dated February, 1988, and recorded herein. BEING the same lands and premises which Joseph N. Elliott did grant and convey unto Ricky G. Richardson by deed dated March 17, 1988 and recorded on March 17, 1988 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 1554, Page 42. Tax Parcel: 5-32-11.0033.11 Property Address: 6060 White Deer Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before July 3, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on July 7, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RICKY G. RICHARDSON and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 6/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, June 20, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Com-

plex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, located on the northwesterly side of County Road No. 482, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument in the northwesterly right of way line of County Road No. 482, at 50 feet wide, which concrete monument is located 481 feet, more or less, in a northeasterly direction along said County Road No. 482 from County Road No. 470 and marks a corner for these lands and for other lands of Marion F. O'Neal et ux; thence from this point of BEGINNING, by and with said other O'Neal lands, North 57 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West, 269.46 feet to a pipe in line of lands of Delmarva Campground; thence turning and running by and with said Delmarva campground along a fence North 29 degrees 24 minutes 27 seconds East, 88.99 feet to an iron fence post found in line of another tract of Marion O'Neal, et ux; thence turning and running by and with the same, South 87 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds East 362.61 feet to an iron marker found in the northwesterly right of way line of County Road No. 482; thence turning and running by and with said northwesterly right of way line of County Road No. 482, South 40 degrees 36 minutes 00 seconds West, 274.74 feet to concrete monument at point and place of beginning, containing 1.17 acres of land, more or less, as surveyed by Gene R. Littleton & Assoc., in August of 1987. BEING the same lands and premises which Robert M. Howard, Sr. and Mary E. Howard did grant and convey unto Robert M. Howard, Jr. & Ginny Lynn Howard, tenants by the enSee LEGALS—page 39

For All Your Business Stationery Needs • Business Cards • Stationery • Envelopes • Announcements • Tel-A-Dex Cards • Rubber Stamps

Stop By Our Office:

Morning Star Publications, Inc. 628 West Stein Highway (next to Medicine Shoppe)

Seaford, Del. • 629-9788


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 39

From native of Italy comes quintessential Italian cookbook Mario Batali has been making a lot of noise lately with his new cookbook, Mario Tailgates NASCAR Style. This latest gift to racing fans notwithstanding, Mario always makes a lot of noise. The flamboyant shorts-wearing, clogshod chef knows how to get attention. But this notice is well deserved. Chef Anthony Bourdain, no slouch himself in the flamboyant department, says, “Mario Batali is a madman/hero. Is there nothing he’s not good at? Great chef, successful restaurateur, an author, an intellectual, host of a ridiculously informative and much-too-good-for-television TV show, aficionado of fine rock and roll and a man of Falstaffian appetites.” Once again, the James Beard Foundation agrees, awarding Batali its prize for best cookbook in the international category. Molto Italiano includes some of his best recipes from eight years of TV programs. Along with these recipes comes Batali’s unique perspective on the culture and history of the 21 regions of his beloved Italy, all the while simplifying, shortening and, naturally, joking. Sample some of his recipes and you may agree with one reviewer that “this book is the only Italian cookbook needed on the home cook’s shelf.” Basic Tomato Sauce Makes 4 cups. “A good Basic Tomato Sauce is a kitchen staple throughout Italy.” 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 Spanish onion, chopped in 1/4–inch dice 4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced 3 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme leaves, or 1 tablespoon dried 1/2 medium carrot, finely shredded 2 28-ounce cans peeled whole tomatoes, crushed by hand and juices reserved Salt to taste In a 3-quart saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook until soft and light golden brown, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add the thyme and carrot and cook 5 minutes more, until the carrot is quite soft. Add the tomatoes and juice and bring to a boil, stirLEGALS - from Page 38 tireties by deed dated May 29, 1998 and recorded on June 8, 1998 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02293 Page 323. Tax Parcel: 1-32-12.0069.01 Property Address: 28778 Boyce Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check,

The Practical Gourmet ring often. Lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes until as thick as hot cereal. Season with salt and serve. This sauce holds one week in the refrigerator or up to six months in the freezer. Linguine Cola coda/with Monkfish, Thyme and Zucchini Serves 4. “Monkfish, one of my favorite fish, is not yet hip enough to be on the endangered species list, or even cost too much. It barbeques beautifully and does well in the oven, roasted like meat. And it is nearly impossible to overcook, so it stays moist and juicy.” 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 medium red onion, finely chopped 1 medium zucchini, cut lengthwise in half and then into thin half-moons 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves 8 ounces monkfish fillets cut into 1/2-inch cubes Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 and 1/2 cups basic tomato sauce 1 cup dry white wine 1 pound linguine 1/4 cup Italian parsley, finely chopped Bring 6 quarts of water to boil in a large pot, and add 2 tablespoons salt. Meanwhile, in a 12-inch sauté pan, heat the oil over medium heat until smoking. Add the onion, zucchini, and thyme and sauté until onion and zucchini are lightly browned and very soft, 10 to 12 minutes. Season the monkfish with salt and pepper, add to the pan, and toss until the fish is starting to whiten, about 1 minute. Add the tomato sauce and white wine and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Drop the linguine into the boiling water

is required. The balance is to be paid on or before July 3, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on July 7, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the per-

centum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of GINNY LYNN & ROBERT M. HOWARD, JR. and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 6/8/2tc

NOTICE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that STEPHEN M. FURMAN of Bridgeville, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 6/8/1tc

and cook until al dente; drain. Toss the pasta into the pan with the monkfish, add parsley and toss over medium heat until well mixed. Transfer to a warmed serving bowl and serve immediately. Pollo Canzanese/Chicken in the Style of Canzano Serves 4. “This Canzanese recipe is anything but a peasant dish, with the prosciutto and wine- it probably descended from Spanish royalty, long-time tenants in and around Napoli.” Two 3-pound chickens, cut into 8 serving pieces each 1 tablespoon salt 2 sprigs rosemary 2 fresh sage leaves 4 bay leaves 3 cloves garlic, sliced 12 whole cloves A small handful black peppercorns, crushed 1 small dried hot chili Two 1/4 –inch-thick slices prosciutto, finely chopped 3/4 cup dry red wine 2 tablespoons finely chopped Italian parsley

Along with these recipes comes Batali’s unique perspective on the culture and history of the 21 regions of his beloved Italy, all the while simplifying, shortening and, naturally, joking. Place the chicken in a large bowl and season with the salt. Add cold water to cover, and set aside for 30 minutes. Drain the chicken, rinse, and pat dry with paper towels. Place in a large Dutch oven and add the rosemary, sage, bay leaves, garlic, cloves, peppercorns, chili, prosciutto, and wine. Cover, bring to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the chicken is almost tender, about 35 minutes. Remove the lid and simmer to reduce the sauce by half, about 15 minutes longer. Remove the chili, if desired. Transfer the chicken to a warmed serving platter, garnish with the parsley, and serve.

Without gadgets, we played — and got hurt — outside MP3 players, computers, video games, cell phones, Internet chatONY INDSOR ting, and the list of recreational opportunities for today’s young peoI wonder how creative ple goes on. Kids don’t even have today’s youth would be if to leave their homes to chat with and even play action video games they were cast outside with other young people anywhere with their friends, forced in the world. I had Cootie Bug and to use sticks as rifles and Rock’em, Sock’em Robots. I do not mean to sound jealous, rocks as hand grenades. but I can’t help but imagine how different life would have been if tually feel fortunate that we had to spend the age of technology has exploded back the summer days plotting and creating our in 1965 instead of over the last 10 years. fun. If I had been stuck in the house with All of the technical gadgetry used by toa computer or video game I would never day’s youth is self-contained and has few, have had the opportunity to learn first if any, additional parts. Everything I ever hand the science of gravity as I leaped off got as a kid had hundreds of moving parts Miss Townsend’s outhouse roof holding and accessories, most the size of a dime an open umbrella and out the second story and most somewhere under Mom’s feet a window of Mae Ford’s abandoned house, week after I got it. landing on two mattresses stacked on the But I think today’s technology is really ground below. diminishing the opportunity for young I would never have experienced the joy people to get outside in the great outdoors of fishing for minnows with my head and be creative. I ask myself many times stuck down inside the sewer grate outside how today’s kids would react to having to my Richardson Avenue home or hanging use an outhouse or a washtub, or to being off the makeshift bridge over the Marylimited to one black and white television land Avenue ditch with my hands clutchchannel that they watch in a house with no ing bits of bread for bait while immersed in the muddy, silt covered water. air conditioning. Our music was either a If I were in the house playing video 12-inch long playing album or a 6-inch 45-rpm record, both of which were played games or chatting on the Internet, I ceron a record player that could go no farther tainly would never have had the chance to experience the life-altering opportunities than the length of its power cord. of being struck in the head by a 5-inch I also wonder how creative today’s clam shell, a tin can full of water, a baseyouth would be if they were cast outside ball, a softball, a 4-inch chunk of coal, with their friends, forced to use sticks as three assorted styles of tennis shoes, sevrifles, rocks as hand grenades and the eral hundred varieties and sizes of dirt crawlspace under Miss Addie’s house as a clods and a partridge in a pear tree. fort. Actually, I think I do have reason to be I guess I sound a little envious of toenvious of today’s youth and their stateday’s young people and their access to of-the-art technology. awesome electronic technology. But I ac-

T

W


PAGE 40

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Peninsula Water Conditioning, Inc. Eddie Porter has received acknowledgment for his position among the top two percent of Water-Right dealers in the nation. By Cindy Lyons Taylor Are you concerned about possible contaminants in the water you drink? Is your water hard, or producing iron stains on fixtures and laundry? You may already have taken precautionary and corrective measures— if not, perhaps you should consider it. There are methods that can insure the safety and quality of the water we use. Peninsula Water Conditioning in Fruitland has been providing thousands of satisfied customers—your neighbors—with great tasting water, and peace of mind with purer water systems. Established in 2000, the company offers sales, service and rental options in premier water treatment and filtration. Eddie Porter, president of Peninsula Water Conditioning, is a Certified Water Specialist with a thorough understanding of water treatment systems from the ground up. As an authorized dealer for Water-Right, Porter has received acknowledgment for his position among the top two percent of WaterRight dealers in the nation. He has been recognized nationally by Water Technology magazine for his expertise in successfully treating groundwater. Porter was born and raised in Salisbury and worked for a local water treatment company for 10 years. Throughout this 10-year period he developed a close relationship with associates of Somerset Well Drilling and in 1999 went to work with them. During that time he and Somerset Well Drilling owner, Mike Hall, realized their customers deserved a “one-stop-shop” for well drilling and water treatment systems. Together they founded Peninsula Water Conditioning.

Since his partnership with Hall, Porter has forged one of the premier water treatment companies on the Shore. Peninsula Water Conditioning has the solution for all residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Porter comments, “Our success is a direct result of our understanding of well systems and our knowledge of groundwater issues in this area. We thoroughly test and inspect each well before recommending any treatment options. This guarantees our equipment is applied correctly and our customer is satisfied.” Customers report they “love their water, and are happy with the quality of installations.” They are pleased with “quick and efficient service after the sale.” Peninsula Water Conditioning is a customer driven organization. Porter remarks, “Our goal is to provide quality water for every family. All of the water in our area comes from wells. We completely understand the waters aquifer, and wells and pumps, which allows us to apply the correct equipment on the treatment side.” Peninsula Water Conditioning is a member of the Water Quality Association. All technicians are certified by Water-Right. Owen Ashley serves as Water Consultant for the company and Michelle Nock is Office Manager. The company is reputable and has performed large and small jobs. Peninsula Water Conditioning engineered and constructed one of the area’s largest treatment plants for the Steeplechase community with a flow rate of 300 gallons of water per minute. Porter enjoys talking with customers after they have received equipment installations. He feels rewarded hearing their comments and “how impressed they are with the water quality, the installation crew, and the overall satisfaction with our company from start to finish.” Turn off the worry and concern over your water system, and turn on a cleaner water system. Call the company that uses advanced technology for effective water treatment—Peninsula Water Conditioning. Call 410-341-6500. The office location is 404A Irl Lane, Fruitland, MD 21826. Visit the company website for more information, www.peninsulawater.com.

EXCLUSIVE RIVER’S END HOME FOR SALE! Newly decorated and landscaped, 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home on 3/4 acre lot. A Four Season Porch off the Family Room looks onto a large back yard and secluded common area. This home has a security system, gas fireplace, tiled baths and hardwood floors throughout. $395,000

View additional details about this home on the web at:

www.listingcheckout.com/102678 Showings scheduled by appt. only at 302-629-6886

PENINSULA WATER CONDITIONING DELMARVA’S PROBLEM WATER EXPERT 410.341.6500 www.peninsulawater.com

Featuring the

A Single System to Effectively Remove • Iron • Hardness • Acid • Unpleasant Odors

Cleans and Sanitizes Automatically! Exclusively at PENINSULA WATER CONDITIONING 410-341-6500 • Salisbury, MD www.peninsulawater.com

S u n d a y, Ju n e 1 1 t h Kyle Holloway will be ministering on Sunday, June 11th along with the Vineyard Worship Team at 9:30 a.m.

L a d i e s P r a ye r B r e a k f a s t Heather Holloway will be speaking on Tuesday, June 13th at our next Ladies Prayer Breakfast att 8:30 a.m. All ladies are welcome to attend.

Pa t r i o t i c M u s i c a l We will be performing a Patriotic Musical entitled: “One Nation Under God” on Saturday, July 1st at 7:00 p.m., Sunday, July 2nd at 9:30 a.m., and Sunday, July 2nd at 7:00 p.m.

Wo m e n o f I n f l u e n c e Sunday, August 6th will be our first annual Ladies Night at 7:00 p.m. Our theme will be “Women of Influence.” Our special guest speaker will be Lisa Vaughn for the Father’s House. We will have a special testimony by Donna Haney. Special Music by “Abundant Joy.” We welcome all ladies to come out and attend a high energy, praise and worship anointing service. For more information, please visit our website at www.messiahsvineyard.org or call our church office at (302) 875-4646.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Rt. 13 and Discountland Rd., PO Box 60, Laurel • 875-4646 Sr. Minister - Dr. Carl G. Vincent Sr. Pastor Barry B. Dukes Visit website at www.messiahsvineyard.org


PAGE 40

MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Peninsula Water Conditioning, Inc. Eddie Porter has received acknowledgment for his position among the top two percent of Water-Right dealers in the nation. By Cindy Lyons Taylor Are you concerned about possible contaminants in the water you drink? Is your water hard, or producing iron stains on fixtures and laundry? You may already have taken precautionary and corrective measures— if not, perhaps you should consider it. There are methods that can insure the safety and quality of the water we use. Peninsula Water Conditioning in Fruitland has been providing thousands of satisfied customers—your neighbors—with great tasting water, and peace of mind with purer water systems. Established in 2000, the company offers sales, service and rental options in premier water treatment and filtration. Eddie Porter, president of Peninsula Water Conditioning, is a Certified Water Specialist with a thorough understanding of water treatment systems from the ground up. As an authorized dealer for Water-Right, Porter has received acknowledgment for his position among the top two percent of WaterRight dealers in the nation. He has been recognized nationally by Water Technology magazine for his expertise in successfully treating groundwater. Porter was born and raised in Salisbury and worked for a local water treatment company for 10 years. Throughout this 10-year period he developed a close relationship with associates of Somerset Well Drilling and in 1999 went to work with them. During that time he and Somerset Well Drilling owner, Mike Hall, realized their customers deserved a “one-stop-shop” for well drilling and water treatment systems. Together they founded Peninsula Water Conditioning.

Since his partnership with Hall, Porter has forged one of the premier water treatment companies on the Shore. Peninsula Water Conditioning has the solution for all residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Porter comments, “Our success is a direct result of our understanding of well systems and our knowledge of groundwater issues in this area. We thoroughly test and inspect each well before recommending any treatment options. This guarantees our equipment is applied correctly and our customer is satisfied.” Customers report they “love their water, and are happy with the quality of installations.” They are pleased with “quick and efficient service after the sale.” Peninsula Water Conditioning is a customer driven organization. Porter remarks, “Our goal is to provide quality water for every family. All of the water in our area comes from wells. We completely understand the waters aquifer, and wells and pumps, which allows us to apply the correct equipment on the treatment side.” Peninsula Water Conditioning is a member of the Water Quality Association. All technicians are certified by Water-Right. Owen Ashley serves as Water Consultant for the company and Michelle Nock is Office Manager. The company is reputable and has performed large and small jobs. Peninsula Water Conditioning engineered and constructed one of the area’s largest treatment plants for the Steeplechase community with a flow rate of 300 gallons of water per minute. Porter enjoys talking with customers after they have received equipment installations. He feels rewarded hearing their comments and “how impressed they are with the water quality, the installation crew, and the overall satisfaction with our company from start to finish.” Turn off the worry and concern over your water system, and turn on a cleaner water system. Call the company that uses advanced technology for effective water treatment—Peninsula Water Conditioning. Call 410-341-6500. The office location is 404A Irl Lane, Fruitland, MD 21826. Visit the company website for more information, www.peninsulawater.com.

EXCLUSIVE RIVER’S END HOME FOR SALE! Newly decorated and landscaped, 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home on 3/4 acre lot. A Four Season Porch off the Family Room looks onto a large back yard and secluded common area. This home has a security system, gas fireplace, tiled baths and hardwood floors throughout. $395,000

View additional details about this home on the web at:

www.listingcheckout.com/102678 Showings scheduled by appt. only at 302-629-6886

PENINSULA WATER CONDITIONING DELMARVA’S PROBLEM WATER EXPERT 410.341.6500 www.peninsulawater.com

Featuring the

A Single System to Effectively Remove • Iron • Hardness • Acid • Unpleasant Odors

Cleans and Sanitizes Automatically! Exclusively at PENINSULA WATER CONDITIONING 410-341-6500 • Salisbury, MD www.peninsulawater.com

S u n d a y, Ju n e 1 1 t h Kyle Holloway will be ministering on Sunday, June 11th along with the Vineyard Worship Team at 9:30 a.m.

L a d i e s P r a ye r B r e a k f a s t Heather Holloway will be speaking on Tuesday, June 13th at our next Ladies Prayer Breakfast at 8:30 a.m. All ladies are welcome to attend.

Pa t r i o t i c M u s i c a l We will be performing a Patriotic Musical entitled: “One Nation Under God” on Saturday, July 1st at 7:00 p.m., Sunday, July 2nd at 9:30 a.m., and Sunday, July 2nd at 7:00 p.m.

Wo m e n o f I n f l u e n c e Sunday, August 6th will be our first annual Ladies Night at 7:00 p.m. Our theme will be “Women of Influence.” Our special guest speaker will be Lisa Vaughn from the Father’s House. We will have a special testimony by Donna Haney. Special Music by “Abundant Joy.” We welcome all ladies to come out and attend a high energy, praise and worship anointing service. For more information, please visit our website at www.messiahsvineyard.org or call our church office at (302) 875-4646.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Rt. 13 and Discountland Rd., PO Box 60, Laurel • 875-4646 Sr. Minister - Dr. Carl G. Vincent Sr. Pastor Barry B. Dukes Visit website at www.messiahsvineyard.org


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8- 14, 2006

PAGE 41

Seaford Star Sports Blue Jays struggle at times, but end up in state tourney Seaford’s Derrik Gibson is all-state first team By Ronald MacArthur

Kari Bergh- Seaford- Junior 2nd team All-Conference- 3B

Rachel Hovermale- Woodbridge 2nd team All-Conference- Fwd.

Ariana Cortez- Seaford- Sr. 2nd team All-Conference- MF

John Rutkowski- Woodbridge 2nd team All-Conference- OF

It’s hard to find one word to describe the Seaford High School baseball season. The 2006 edition of the Blue Jays was loaded with talent, yet the team played inconsistently and had to fight to get a berth in the state tournament. The team (ranked 13th) finished with a 13-7 record and lost in the first round of the state tournament 1-0 to Dickinson. Yet, the Jays defeated some of the best teams in the state including Henlopen champ Cape Henlopen (their only conference loss), St. Mark’s and Salesianum. “We had some big wins. We seemed to play to the level of the team we were playing against,” coach Kenny Cummings said. Cummings was named Henlopen Conference Coach of the Year and was also Delaware Small Schools Coach of the Year. “We lost some tough games we should have won, like Delmar and Woodbridge, and that put us in a spot where we had to battle to get into the tournament,” he added. The coach also talked about taking some teams too lightly. “Even as coaches I think we probably didn’t get as intense to play some teams that we normally beat. We have learned a lesson from that,” he said. The team also had a player named first team all state. Sophomore Derrik Gibson, who led the team in just about every offensive category, received the honor after being named to the first team all-conference as well. “We expect a lot from Derrik,” his coach said. “Sometimes we forget that is

Josh Miller- Seaford- Junior 2nd team All-Conference- Dbls

Grace Reardon- Woodbridge- Fr. 2nd team All-Conference- OF

Senior Matt Daudt’s contribution to the Blue Jays this season came from an unexpected spot - the plate. He was one of the team’s top offensive producers this season. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Derrik Gibson takes a lead off first base during a game this past season for the Blue Jays. His hard work and dedication to the sport paid off as he was named to the first team all state. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

only a sophomore.” Gibson, who plays short stop and pitches, finished the season leading the team in batting average (.415), slugging percentage (.631) and on base percentage (.583). He also scored the most runs (22), had the most total bases (41) and hit the most triples (three). He hit one home run and five doubles and had 12 RBI. Senior Matt Daudt, who led the team in pitching last season, turned around and was one of the top batters this season and was a first team all conference selection as designated hitter. He finished with a .342 batting average (second on the team), with 19 RBI (second on the team), seven doubles (team-leading), two triples, one home run 39 total bases (second on the team), a .534 slugging percentage and a .429 on-base percentage. Senior Leon Lehman led the team in RBI with 21 and he batted .298 with 30 total bases, two doubles and a triple. He also scored 14 runs. Paul Widerman batted .319, coming on strong at the end of the season, scoring 13 runs with a .458 on-base percentage. Matt Terry batted .268 with 12 runs scored and a .482 on-base percentage (second on the team with 12 walks) and Seth Hastings, a freshman, worked into the starting lineup from the start of the season and finished with a .266 average, hitting two home runs and five doubles. As a team, the Jays batted .261 on the season. In the field, Zach Long, sharing time at first base, didn’t make an error in 32 chances. In 118 chances, Terry only had three errors (.975) and Lehman had one error in 37 chances. Catcher Widerman, Continued on page 43


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR

Brandon Krause- Sussex Tech 1st team All-Conference- PV

Regina Fiacco- Tech- Soph. 1st team All-Conference- Fwd.

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Kylee Rickards- Tech- Soph. 1st team All-Conference- MF

Desmond Cephas- Sussex Tech 1st team All-Conference- Disc

Western Sussex baseball players named to all-state baseball team Seaford’s Derrik Gibson (sophomore shortstop) and Matt Daudt (senior DH) were the lone Western Sussex players named to the all-state baseball teams. Gibson was named first team all-state and Daudt was named second team all-state. Seaford head coach Ken Cummings was also named co-coach of the year.

Seaford Swimming Association to begin practice on June 12 The Seaford Swimming Association (SSA) will begin swim team practice for member children on Monday, June 12, beginning at 8:30 a.m. for children ages 11 and up and at 10:15 a.m. for children under 10 years of age. SSA is happy to welcome Mrs. Alison Venables as head coach for the SSA Dolphins team. SSA is located on Craigs Mill Pond Road, west of Seaford, and is presently welcoming new members for the summer season. For further information in regards to swim team or summer pool membership, please call the pool at 629-8773.

$ Bethany Pavlik- Tech- Senior 1st team All-Conference- SS

Ian Stewart- Tech- Sophomore 1st team All-Conference- Att.

2.39 9

Per Gallon

Post 6 Sussex West Patriots American Legion baseball ‘06 schedule June- 6/9- home vs. Georgetown (6 p.m.); 6/13 vs. Fox Post 2 at DSU (6); 6/17home vs. Post I (noon DH); 6/20- home vs. Milford (6); 6/22- home vs. Sussex East (6); 6/24- vs. Newark at St. Mark’s (noon DH); 6/25- all-star game at Wilson Field; 6/27- at Georgetown (6); 6/29- home vs. Fox Post 2 July- 7/1- vs. Elsmere at Vilone Park (noon DH); 7/6- at Milford (6); 7/11- vs. Sussex East at Indian River (6); 7/13- home vs. Georgetown (6); 7/15- home vs. Del Vets (noon DH); 7/18- vs. Fox Post 2 at DSU (6); 7/22- home vs. Milford (noon DH); 7/23vs. R.C. DuPont at Brandywine (noon DH)

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302-855-0500 NEW LISTING

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Excellent Rental opporturnity in place. Corner Lot Near shopping center & easy access to RT 13, Seaford. Great price $189,900. Call for your appointment to see #536602

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Serving Wicomico, Worcester & Somerset Counties In Maryland & Sussex County Delaware


MORNING STAR

Derek Page- Seaford High2nd team All-Conference- HJ

Ryan Messick- Woodbridge- Sr. 2nd team All-Conference- Util.

✳ JUNE 8- 14, 2006

Shane McLaughlin- Seaford- Sr. 2nd team All-Conference- Singles

PAGE 43

Page Johnson- Seaford High 2nd team All-Conference- PV Post 6 Sussex West Patriots to open American Legion baseball season this week The Post 6 Sussex West Patriots are scheduled to open the 2006 American Legion baseball season this week. The Patriots were to open the season last weekend with a doubleheader against Stahl Post but the games were rained out. Sussex West was scheduled to visit Sussex East on Tuesday, June 6. Post 6 hosts Georgetown on Friday (6 p.m. at the Seaford High School field) in a rematch of last year’s Delaware American Legion state final game. The Patriots also visit Fox Post 2 on Tuesday, June 13 before hosting Post I on Saturday, June 17 at noon. The Post 6 Sussex West Patriots features top baseball players from Laurel, Seaford, and Woodbridge high schools.

Alyssa Casey- Seaford High 2nd team All-Conference- PV

Stephen Kieffer- Seaford- Sr. 2nd team All-conference- Dbls.

Matt Bowman- Woodbridge- Sr. 2nd team All-Conference- OF

Seaford baseball continued one of the top catchers in the conference, had only two errors in 134 chances (.979). The team’s go-to pitcher turned out to be a player who didn’t play last year, senior Ryan Hastings, another first team all conference selection. Hastings finished with a 4-3 record and a 2.10 ERA leading the team in strikeouts with 43 and innings pitched (50). Daudt was 4-2 with a 2.92 ERA, Seth Hastings was 1-1, Gibson was 2-1 and Widerman was 2-1. Cummings admitted that pitching caught the coaching staff off guard at the start of the season. Pitchers who were expected to see a lot of action didn’t. Matt Wheatley and Gibson. pitchers who were supposed to be busy on the mound, were both bothered with arm problems at the start of the season. Wheatley didn’t throw a pitch and played third base and Gibson saw very limited action on the mound. And the team’s ace last year, Daudt, struggled at times this season. So, Cummings used players who had pitched in the past like Ryan and Seth Hastings and

Widerman. “The surprise of the season for us was the pitching of Ryan Hastings,” the coach said. “It was a blessing for us that he came out for the team this year. And it helps when you have sometime steady like Paul Widerman behind the plate. “Another surprise for us was how well Matt Daudt hit the ball this season. We didn’t play good defense with him on the hill this season. We had several mental lapses and we seemed to get in a hole,” he added. Seniors on this year’s team were Ryan Hastings, Matt Daudt, Matt Terry, Leon Lahman and Matt Wheatley. Cummings said that the Seaford High baseball program is respected all over the state. “We have a great thing going here. We have great kids who do whatever we tell them to do. All of the coaches get along and we are all doing the same thing at all levels from middle school to varsity,”he said. “We teach the kids to respect the game and then they will always play to the best of their ability.”

All-Conference photos by Ronald MacArthur and Mike McClure

seafordstar.com

The Hastings brothers. Ryan, a senior, and Seth, a freshman, were able to play on another Seaford High varsity sport together (they also were on the Seaford swim team). Both contributed to the success of the team - Ryan, left, on the mound and Seth at the plate. Photos by Ronald MacArthur


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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8- 14, 2006

Mac’s World By Ronald MacArthur

Eric Kimpton excels in the field, court, classroom Eric Kimpton is the real deal. The Seaford High graduate is not only a three-sport athlete but the top student in his class. Kimpton, who played soccer, basketball and tennis this past year, was named the Seaford High Class of 2006 valedictorian during commencement this past Friday night. Eric has also won two prestigious athletic-scholarship awards to go along with the other awards he garnered as a graduate winning the WBOC Scholar/Athlete Scholarship and the DIAA Senior Scholar Athlete Award. In addition, he was named, along with Claire Rekitzke, as the winner of the prestigious Seaford Kiwanis Honor Key Cup. The cup is given to the two seniors who have the most points based on the number of activities they participate in. Eric has been involved in just about every student activity at Seaford High. One has to wonder when he had time to think when you consider he has had practice just about every day after school since before school started. It’s rare to find a find a good athlete like Eric who is also a top student. He plans to attend the University of Virginia. I don’t know where he found time, but he was also a member of the Seaford Parks and Recreation Commission, a group of citizens who advise the parks and recreation staff. Eric is one of those rare young people who has it all. Claire Rekitzke, Kelsey Riggleman and Ryan Hastings have been selected as the Seaford Star Athletes of the Year. There were many athletes who qualified for the award; the decision was a tough one this year. The main qualification is that the athlete must play three sports. Being a senior also adds to the selection, but the athlete does not have to be a senior. For the first time since the award has been given, there are two female winners in 2006.

Claire, who won the award last year, played goalie for the field hockey team, was one of the top swimmers on the girls’ swim team and played defense for the girls’ soccer team. Claire is one of those great young student-athletes who comes along once in a great while who not only excels in sports but also in the classroom. Kelsey, who is a sophomore, was the field hockey team’s leading scorer, ran on the winter track team and played short stop and pitched for the softball team. Her raw talent to excel in a variety of sports is what sets her apart from other athletes. Ryan played mid-field and defense for the Blue Jay soccer team, was one of the top swimmers on the boys’ swim team and was a first team all-conference pitcher for the baseball team. Ryan has a great love for competition that forces him to give 100 percent at all times in whatever sport he participates in. By now, you are probably aware that the Sports at the Beach complex in Georgetown has big financial problems. In fact, investors are going to pull out and force the complex to close this fall if someone doesn’t step in and bail them out. Although I doubt it will happen, this would be a perfect chance for Sussex County to finally get into the parks and recreation business. The complex is already built with more acreage available for expansion of other activities and sports besides softball and baseball. For whatever reason, the Sports at the Beach Complex is in trouble. The county should bail it out and take over the complex. Sitting in the county seat, the complex would be a perfect, central location for the start of a county recreation program. Or perhaps the county could partner with another group (such as the Sussex Youth Foundation) to take over the project. It would be a crime to let the complex go.

KIWANIS SPORTS AWARDS- Underclassmen receiving the Seaford Kiwanis Sports Awards as the top athletes in their respective sports are (l to r)) Kelsey Riggleman (indoor girls’ track and Seaford Star Athlete of the Year), Lindsay James (girls’ cross country), Dan Flagg (wrestling), Trevor Lee (soccer), Barrett Smith (boys’ cross country) and Andrew Halter (boys’ swimming). Missing from the photo because they were participating in the state track and field meet are Ambre Burbage (spring track) and Gernie Purnell (boys’ indoor track). Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Seaford’s Ewing, Elliott qualify for high school state golf tournament The Seaford High golf team finished the regular season with a 6-8 record, winning its final match of the season on May 24 over Polytech 167-174, which was also the team’s lowest score of the season, according to coach Tim Lee. Jared Elliott was the medalist for the Jays shooting a 39 followed by Cory Ewing (41), Josh Sandifer (43), Michael Zakrewsky (44), Shane Brinson (52) and Ryan Budke (57). Five of the top six golfers on the team are sophomores (Zakrewsky is a junior) and another who figured in the scoring occasionally, Matthew Lank, is a freshman. “We should have everybody back next year with a lot of freshmen and sophomores,” the coach said. Five Seaford golfers participated in the conference tournament at Maple Dale in Dover. Elliott (with a season average of 47) had the best round for the Jays with a 92 in 18 holes. Ewing, who had the best overall season average on the team with a 45, shot a 94 in the conference tournament. Brinson fired a 102 and Sandifer carded a 109. Only Elliott and Ewing qualified for the state tournament. Seaford had a mixed bag in the state tournament played on May 30 at the Back Creek Country Club near Middletown. Although Elliott shot a 92, the score was not enough to qualify play for the second day. Ewing, on the other hand, had a rough day and succumbed to the elements. He was forced to quit play and ended up at the doctor’s office. “It was a very hot day with the temperature at 94 degrees,” Lee said. “He was overcome by the heat. In fact, three kids were over come during the day. The group he was playing with was very slow and he would have been out there more than seven hours. The last group took just under eight hours to play 18 holes. “Although neither got to go back the second day, I was pleased with Jared’s performance in the state tournament and both players’ performances in the conference tournament,” the coach said.

Woodbridge Little League baseball results (as of June 5)

Seaford Pop Warner registration upcoming on June 10 Registration for the Seaford Pop Warner football and cheerleading teams will take place on Saturday, June 10, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sign ups are on a first-come, firstserve basis. There are no tryouts and all players are guaranteed playing time on the traveling squad. The first 35 who register are selected. Seaford Pop Warner has two teams (football and cheer): Pee wee (ages 9-12) and midget (ages 12-15) with weight limits in each division. For more information, contact Karen Schreiber at 629-8740.

Nanticoke Little League baseball results (as of June 5) Baseball- Major League- Giants 5, Dodgers 0For the Giants, Colby Hastings went the distance with 12 strikeouts, giving up three hits and no walks. Jordan Stanley was 2-3 with two triples and one run scored. Dustin Seymore had an RBI. For the Dodgers, Conner Cooper went 2-3 with two doubles. Taylor Baynum went 1-3 with a single. Coaches- Send your scores and results to the Star at publisher@seafordstar.com or 302-629-9243 (f).

seafordstar.com

Baseball- Minor League- JBS Construction 17, T.G. Adams 12- Joshua Vazquez picked up his third win of the season as he struck out five and allowed one hit and one earned run in three innings on the mound. Vazquez also singled, doubled, had five RBIs and two runs and Bruce Wardwell struck out five and allowed no runs and just two hits in two innings of work and also had a double and three RBIs and two runs. Jacob Borders and Nicholas Rosado got their first opportunities to pitch in the sixth and showed promise. Borders also singled and had two runs; Kani Kane had a single and three runs; and Noah Bibb and Trevon Jones each had an RBI single a run. Chris Eck and Garrett Temple each scored twice. For T.G. Adams, Brent Adams had a two-run double and two runs. Jarred Hopkins doubled and scored a run and Joseph Hutson had a single. Hunter Rogers and Trey Warren each scored twice and Kirby Williams, Collin Breeding, Ryan Parker, Jawuan Rodriguez, and Isaiah Ortiz-Fisher each scored a run. Junior League- Seaford Moose #1728 15, New Process Fibre 11- Tyler Dickson pitched a complete game and struck out six for the win. Dickson also doubled, had two RBIs and two runs. David Elliott had a double, triple, three RBI’s and a run; Greg Callaway singled and scored four times; Jeremy Messick had an RBI double and scored three runs and Eric Pearson had an RBI double and two runs. John Briggs had a single; DeVante Parker and Matt Rosado each had an RBI. For New Process, Robbie Miller had a two-run home run, a single and three runs; David Walls was 2-4 with an RBI and two runs; and Aaron Shores was 2-4 with two runs. Tom Jefferson had an RBI triple and a run; Spencer Williams singled and scored a run; and Shane Riley had two runs; and Ronnie Wisseman had a single.


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8- 14, 2006

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SSA, SGCC 2006 summer swimming schedules are announced The following are the Seaford Swim Association (SSA) and Seaford Golf and Country Club (SGCC) 2006 summers swimming schedules (as posted on the Delmarva Swim Association website): SGCC- 6/19- home vs. Sea Colony; 6/22home vs. Salisbury; 6/26- at Sussex Community; 6/29- home vs. Shawnee; 7/6- at Riptide; 7/10at Ocean Pines; 7/13- at Shawnee; 7/17- home vs. SSA; 7/20- home vs. Elks SSA- 6/26- at Kent; 6/29- at Lake Forest; 7/6- at Sussex YMCA; 7/10- at Dover; 7/13- at Salisbury; 7/17- at SGCC; 7/20- at Green Hill Coaches are asked to send results and information to the Star at publisher@seafordstar.com or 302-629-9243 (f).

Sussex West falls to Sussex East in American Legion opener

Sussex Tech’s Rhonda Warrington takes a practice cut during last Wednesday’s loss to Caravel in the state semifinals. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech softball falls to Caravel in state semifinals By Mike McClure The Caravel Academy softball team scored six runs in the first two innings on a pair of home runs in last Wednesday’s 14-0 win over Sussex Tech in the state semifinals. The Ravens had just one hit against Caravel starter Alisha Paige. Caravel jumped out to a 4-0 lead in the bottom of the first when Kathleen Smith doubled, Alex Winstead reached first on an error, Paige walked, and Sarah Reeves hit a grand slam. In the top of the second Sussex Tech’s Bethany Pavlik was hit by a pitch and Melony Thompson reached on a fielder’s choice before Paige recorded an inning ending strikeout. Caravel’s Alex Winstead hit a two-run home run in the bottom of the inning before Raven second baseman Hope Cornell speared a liner to end the Buccaneer scoring. Sussex Tech starting pitcher Brittany Joseph drew a two out walk in the top of the third but was stranded on base. Joseph allowed an RBI double by Danielle Lafferty in the bottom of the third before giving way to freshman Brooke Tull. Caravel’s Cara Stecher and Ashley Bragg each hit RBI singles to make it 9-0. Reeves drew a two-out walk in the bottom of the fourth before being caught

Office: 629-7711 Fax: 628-7747 Email: angie@4htr.com

The 20th annual Kiwanis Foundation Golf Tournament will take place on Friday, June 16, at the Seaford Golf & Country Club. All proceeds from the tournament go toward scholarships provided by the Kiwanis Club to local seniors. This year’s recipients from the Seaford High Class of 2006 are Eric Kimpton, April Stevenson and Jeremy Halter. Players and sponsors are still being accepted. Contact Ron Breeding at 6299173.

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Come Enjoy Our Sussex Tech second baseman Brittany Joseph makes a catch during last week’s state semifinal game against Caravel. Photo by Mike McClure

trying to steal second by catcher Kristen Burns. Lyndsey Ellsworth led off the top of the sixth with a double for the Ravens’ first hit of the game. Joseph walked and a throwing error put a pair of runners in scoring position, but Paige struck out the side to end the threat. Caravel scored five runs on four hits and two Sussex Tech errors in the bottom of the sixth for the 14-0 win.

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The Post 6 Sussex West Patriots fell to the Sussex East Post 28 Warriors in the season opener on Tuesday, June 6. The Patriots held a 3-0 lead through the first four innings before the Warriors scored one in the bottom of the fifth and five in the sixth for the win. Matt Dodson allowed one run on three hits in five innings but had to leave after being hit by a batted ball. Marcus Bounds and Taylor Jones each had a hit and a run, Chuckie Jefferson contributed a hit and an RBI, Dodson and Danny Hamilton each had a hit, and Trent Passwaters and Lance Kelley drove in one run apiece.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8- 14, 2006

Seaford Bowling Lanes Tuesday Nascar High games and series Tim Reedy 298 Kelly Wolf 298 Tori Carey 787

Summer Senior Express

Weds. No-Tap

High games and series Boycie Clayton 275 Gilbert Williams 734 Judi Uccello 307, 841

High games and series Harold Smart 322, 1165 Barbara Hall 324 Marion Terry 1125

Thursday Summer Mixed

Weds. Summer Adult/Youth

High games and series Rhonda Messick 273 Ruth Newman 740 Hank Lovett 281 Garrett Sammons 795

High games and series Tiffany Messick 253, 752 John Bibb 280, 762 Mini Blackwelder 238, 692 Josh Graver 321, 767

Delaware Stingers hosting “Building for the Future” summer camp The Delaware Stingers field hockey club wants to help you build for the future. Over the past four years the DSFHC has grown to over 120 members from all over Sussex County, playing indoor and outdoor field hockey. The camp will focus on individual skills and team play. Players will learn the basics of field hockey: driving, dribbling, passing, shooting, etc. The Stingers are committed to making you a better, stronger player and to helping you develop your self confidence in the game. Camp will take place in the Woodbridge area. Campers must have a stick, shin guards, and a mouth guard. Camp will be coached and staffed by members of the DSFHC, many of who are all-state and all-conference players with lots of field hockey experience. Camp will run from 9 a.m. until noon daily. The cost is $75 and space is limited. Week one is July 31 through August 3 (grades 3-8), 9 a.m. to noon. You can download a camp application and find out more about the Stingers by visiting the club’s website at www.lloydlee.com/DelawareStingersFieldHockey.htm.

Kay Grachowski and Ed Wilson are presented checks by Pepsi Cola of Salisbury advertising representative Sonny Adams, right. Grachowski and Wilson earned $430 as the champions of the Division A in the Pepsi Mixed Doubles Tournament which was held at the Seaford Bowling Lanes in the Nylon Capital Shopping Center.

Donna Brasko and Charles Shaw are presented checks by Pepsi Cola of Salisbury advertising representative Sonny Adams, right. They were the champions of Division B of the Pepsi Mixed Doubles Tournament, earning them $639. There were 100 entries in Division B.

TIGERS ROAR- After losing their first game, the U-8 NYSA Tigers soccer team (71) finished with a team party at Coach John Hanenfeld’s home on Sunday after finishing their game earlier. The players and parents enjoyed a barbecue and were awarded trophies. “I had supportive families involved, which made an enjoyable season for all,” said Hanenfeld. Shown (l to r) are the Tigers: Bottom: Raekwon Willey and Chris Gualpa; Middle row: Courtney Willey, Jorge Gualpa, Brad Morgan, Nathan Hanenfeld and Shelby Pucci; and Top row: Coach John Hanenfeld.

Western Sussex’s source for local sports- the Seaford/Laurel Star

Ed Wilson and Robin Messick were the winners of a cooler and several cases of Pepsi products as the male and female highest set with handicap during the Pepsi Cola Mixed Doubles Tournament which was held at Seaford Bowling Lanes. Also shown, center, is Pepsi Cola of Salisbury advertising representative Sonny Adams.


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8- 14, 2006

PAGE 47

Tom Ford- Sussex Tech- 1st team All-Conference- 4X800

Lauren Peabody- Sussex Tech1st team All-Conference- 4X800

Ken McCallum- Sussex Tech 1st team All-Conference- 4X800

Andrew Townsend- Sussex Tech 1st team All-Conference- 4X800

Shown (l to r) are Sussex Tech’s senior athletes who were honored recently: front row – Lauren Correll, Jacques Bowe, Bethany Pavlik, David Demarest; back row – Jason Rickards, Desmond Cephas, Amanda Palmer, Mike Small, Ricker Adkins and Tyler Humpton.

Top senior athletes named for Sussex Tech class of 2006 The following members of the Class of 2006 were recently named top athletes for their sport at Sussex Technical High School: Fall Cheerleading – Tiffani Carroll (Georgetown); Cross Country – Dave Demarest (Bridgeville) and Bethany Pavlik (Lewes); Football – Jacques Bowe (Milford); Field Hockey – Bethany Pavlik (Lewes); Boys’ Soccer – Ricker Adkins (Millsboro); Boys’ Basketball – Jacques Bowe (Milford); Girls’ Basketball – Janise Henderson (Greenwood); Winter Cheerleading – Amanda Curtis (Laurel); Indoor Track – Dave Demarest (Bridgeville) and Lauren Correll (Bridgeville); Wrestling – Mike Small (Laurel); Baseball – Ricker Adkins (Millsboro); Golf – Jason Rickards (Ocean View); Lacrosse – Tyler Humpton (Bridgeville); Softball – Bethany Pavlik (Lewes); Girls Soccer – Amanda Palmer (Greenwood); Track – Desmond Cephas (Lincoln) and Lauren Correll (Bridgeville); Trainer – Derek Rambo (Seaford); Sportsmanship Award – Dave Demarest (Bridgeville) and Lauren Correll (Bridgeville); Scholar Athlete – Zach Spece (Millville) and Lauren Correll (Bridgeville); Overall Outstanding Athlete – Jacques Bowe (Milford) and Bethany Pavlik (Lewes)

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to publisher@seafordstar.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOTS

LEARNING ABOUT CAREERS - Tom Darby of Seaford, who does biomedical research, speaks to children at the West Seaford Elementary School during the What in the World? program which took place last week. There were 120 fifth and sixth grade students in attendance at the program which is designed to encourage elementary school students to look at careers that require a science, math, or technology background. Photo by Mike McClure

AT THE TEA - More than 150 women and girls enjoyed an indoor garden tea for mothers and daughters on May 11 at Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford. The menu included scones, finger sandwiches and desserts. The speaker was Dr. Patricia Johnson of the Washington, D.C., Campus of Nyack College. Pictured from left to right are Kimberly Beard, Olivia Kane, Sarah Kane and Alyssa Murray.

RIGHT CHOICE AWARD - Terrell “Tara” Truitt was honored at the Seaford City Council meeting on May 23 as recipient of the Mayor’s Right Choice Award. As winner, she received $500. She was nominated for the Award by Saundra Hochstedler and Charlotte Wheatley, both of Seaford. A Seaford High School graduate, Truitt is also a junior member of the auxiliary of the Seaford Fire Department, an ambulance attendant with the fire department and a student at the Delaware Fire School. She intends to attend Delaware Technical and Community College to study nursing. Her parents are Betty and Wayne Truitt. From left: Betty Truitt, Tara, Wayne Truitt and Seaford vice mayor Rhea Shannon. Photo by Lynn R. Parks.

ABOUT THE WEATHER - David Aldrich (right), a meteorologist for Fox 29 in Philadelphia, talks to students at West Seaford Elementary during the Delaware Business Industry, Education Alliance’s What in the World? program last Friday. The purpose of the program is to help positively influence elementary school students into looking at careers that require a science, math, or technology background. Photo by Mike McClure

MOOSE DONATION - On April 9, at the 7th District meeting of the Loyal Order of the Moose, a joint community service donation was made to the Nanticoke Senior Center. Chapter 1384 Senior Regent Virginia Metzler and Lodge 1728 Gov. Bernie Miller, presented checks in amount of $250 each to the center. Accepting the checks was Susan Franckowiak, executive director of the Nanticoke Senior Center. Also in attendance were several members of the center. This is another community service program of the Loyal Order of Moose 1728 and Women of the Moose Chapter 1384.

WOMEN OF THE MOOSE - On April 11 the Seaford Chapter 1384 Women of the Moose held their monthly enrollment meeting. Four new candidates were enrolled in honor of chairman Michelle Short and her committee. Following the enrollment ceremony, college of regents/sunshine chairman Helen Hare presented a check in amount of $1138 to the American Diabetes Association. Funds were raised by sponsoring a chicken and dumpling dinner. The benefit was done to honor a past coworker and collegian, Anna Parker, who passed away Dec. 2, 2005. Accepting the check was Carlos Lamarius, far right. Also in attendance were Anna’s husband, Dale Parker; son, Carl Thacker and grandson, Carl Thacker Jr. This function is one of many charitable events that the Women of the Moose perform througout the chapter year.


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✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 49

Community prayer march starts this June 10 at mission The second annual prayer march will take place on Saturday, June 10, 9 a.m., starting at the Seaford Mission, Third and North streets, Seaford. The event is sponsored by Seaford Neighborhood Watch. Prayer will be led by the Rev. Tyrone Johnson, founder and director of Churches Take a Corner in Wilmington. He has pledged to bring a group of people from Wilmington to pray for a transformation in the Seaford community, according to Pat Jones, a Seaford councilperson helping to coordinate the event. She is asking for each church in the community to send two or more representatives. Phone her at 628-1908 for more information.

Gospel concert will benefit Nanticoke Senior Center There will be a gospel concert to benefit the building fund of the Nanticoke Senior Center on Saturday, June 24, starting at 6 p.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church. The event is being sponsored by the Country Music Association, Seaford chapter. The emcee will be Jennifer Burke of WOLC radio. Artists taking part include Tony Crowe, Jerry Jones, Laura Mitchell, Kathy Wright, “Revived” and C. Bud Scott. Admission is free; an offering will be taken. For more information, contact Jerry Jones at 629-9689.

Seaford employees transition to earlier working hours Seaford’s city hall has transitioned to extended hours during the summer season. The new hours are 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The extended hours will remain in effect until after the Labor Day holiday. At that point they will return to the regular 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. schedule.

Seaford Historical Society picnic upcoming on June 25 The annual picnic for members of the Seaford Historical Society (SHS) will be on Sunday, June 25, at 4 p.m. on the lawn of the Ross Mansion. Each family is asked to bring a vegetable, salad or dessert. The society provides chicken and beverages. The charge is $3 per person payable at the door. Reservations are necessary and must be made by June 19. Call Gloria Burton at 629-3470 or Anne Nesbitt at 628-7788 to make reservations. A recent suggested revision to by-laws was included in the June issue of the newsletter. These revisions have been approved by the SHS operating board. A vote will be taken for the whole membership to accept or reject the changes. Anyone who is not a member but would like to attend may join that day. Annual dues are $15 per person or $25 per family.

Puppet theater kicking off Summer Reading Program The Seaford District Library will be hosting several programs throughout the summer in collaboration with the 2006 Summer Reading Program. On June 14, at 6:30 p.m., Tuckers’ Tales Puppet Theatre will present “Trickster Tales.” The puppeteers will perform four trickster stories from around the world. Br’er Bear Goes Farming, Coyote Meets the Pitchman, Anansi and the Two Feasts, and Goat’s Two Close Calls. Tuckers’ Tales Puppet Theatre, the performing division of Puppet Perceptions, Inc., is a Philadelphia-area-based performing company founded in 1981. Co-directors Marianne and Tom Tucker have performed at puppet, folk, ethnic and street festivals; also at craft fairs, shopping centers, theaters and schools around the country.

MATH WHIZ IS STATE CHAMP - Myles Gray, the seventh grade state champion in the Delaware Math League contest, shows off his trophy along with his mother and father, Valerie and Glenn Gray, and teacher Amber O’Brien. Myles is a student at the Seaford Middle School. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

SEAFORD DISTRICT LIBRARY EVENTS Here is what’s happening at the Seaford District Library June 8-15: • The Summer Reading Program entitled “Paws, Claws, Scales and Tales” is open for preschool through fifth-grade students. Children unable to read may be read to by family members for this program. The grand prize at the end of the SRP will be a “new bike,” with other prizes awarded throughout the summer. Keep a look out for the weekly programs for the SRP. Registration for the SRP begins on June 14. Contact Cindi Smith at 629-2524. • Come join the Tucker’s Tales Puppet Theatre at the library, as they present

“Trickster Tales.” Tucker’s Puppeteers will present four trickster stories from around the world on June 14, at 6:30 p.m., for all ages. • New this year. The library is introducing a Teen/Young Adult Summer Reading Program (T/YASRP) entitled “Creature Feature.” Registration for this program began on June 7, for 6-12 grade students. The grand prize at the end will be a “2G iPod Nano”, with other prizes to be awarded weekly. Contact: Kenda Kile at 629-2524. • The library offers story time on Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

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AARP DONATION - Sue Franckowiak, executive director of the Nanticoke Senior Center, second from the right, accepts a $500 check from Wilton Porter, community service, chairman, AARP Seaford area chapter 1084, far right, while fair volunteers stand by. AARP chapter sponsored a fund-raising raffle at the Towne & Country Fair on May 27 to benefit the center’s building fund. Sixteen area merchants donated gift certificates as prizes. AARP volunteers are left to right Helen Skjoldager, president; Stanley Sholette, Cornilia Sholette, Don Bailey and Kathryn Bailey.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Welcome rains meant postponement of Day in the Park Well, the weekend rains were a welcome sight for many. But SaturAT URPHY day morning, with perhaps 20 to 25 vendors set up for Delmar’s 30th Debbie Flood had a flood Day In The Park, the timing was real bad. After dumping over an of her own Friday inch Friday night, stopping Little League games in progress, it evening, after dropping picked up where it left off Saturday her grandson off at the morning and rained until afternoon in scattered showers. It forced the Little League Park. frustrated members of the Delmar Chamber of Commerce to hold an Well, Happy Harry’s new store in Lauemergency meeting under an open tent rel, next to Delaware National Bank on Rt. with the rain blowing in on them. Probably 13, is set to open with a ribbon cutting their decision to cancel was not a popular next Monday, June 12, at 9 a.m. one but there was actually little else they The three other stores in the building could do. They have decided to have a are not ready to open, as it looks to me for make up date to be announced. a while yet. Debbie Flood had a flood of her own Pastor Todd Crofford and members of Friday evening, after dropping her grandthe Laurel Wesleyan Church should be son off at the Little League Park. Riding happy with the turnout for their Block Parwith the sun-roof open is enjoyable, most of the time, except Debbie’s car would not ty held at Market Street Park a couple of start when she got in to leave the park Fri- weeks ago. I understand there were perhaps 2,000 day, and she also could not close the repeople there. Wow! tractable roof. She ended up with an umbrella sticking As I rode by the Armory — well, the out the retractable window as the rains Boys and Girls Club — in Laurel, the othcame down and in. Yes, she had flood insurance. Just kidding. Amazing how funny er day I noticed that someone was dismantling the old quonset hut just outside the things seem later! main building. For many of us the memories of that building being the National DelDOT has announced that it will Guard Armory are just too strong for them complete nine surface treatments on roads to go away — not that there is anything around Laurel, including the Trap Pond wrong with the Boys and Girls Club being bridge just before the entrance to the state there. That organization has made it a nice park. The bridge has caused an inconvenience for area residents since some time last year. All of this should be about finished (June 9) by the time you read this. See the resurface list elsewhere in the paper. I understand that Sussex County has more of these tar and chip-surfaced roads than any other county.

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looking place. This quonset hut was used by the motor pool of the guard, I believe. I’m sure Louis O’Neal or Jimmy Neal, or any of the many who were involved with that position in the guards, can tell me what it was used for. The armory was built in the 1920s and from its earliest times it has been a center of activity for Laurel people. Some of you might recall the old league basketball games before a packed armory court and dancing, boxing and wrestling matches at the armory. Everyone knew where the armory was and several generations of youngsters played basketball in church league games and after school. It was a very popular place. It was, in fact, where I decided that basketball was not for me, after a Salisbury boy gave me a nice elbow in the nose while we fought for a ball off the rim in the mid 1950s. Yes, there are many memories of that place and people such as Ronnie Wharton, Herbie Dayton, Elwood Baker and scores of others could tell you stories of the National Guard well past sunset. It was a familiar scene to see lots of activity at the armory one weekend a month as both units came together for drills in addition to the Monday night and others that often kept the lights on until 11 p.m. or so. Well, for now we will save some of those great stories for a later date. I can see you smiling now as those days reenter your memory bank. Fun isn’t it?

Ray Adkins, a Seaford barber and agent for Home Team Realty, is going to turn the old car wash off the Stein Highway into office space and he expects to have it done in a few months. It has to be said that the exchange student program in the local schools is one of the best tools for promoting international relationships. Whether a U.S. student goes to a foreign country or one comes here — the students go home, most of the time, with great memories of the country they have visited. Frank Bosquin of Belgium and a 2006 graduate would be a great example. At the graduation Frank presented his classmates with a flag and the applause told you just how popular this young man is with his classmates. “I learned a lot about the American country, I enjoyed my stay here,” said Frank. Close friends Blaire Walker and Alie Parrott say they leaned a lot, too, and an emotional Alie told me after graduation, “He has a wonderful personality; one of my best friends. I certainly learned about his family and Belgium.” Yes, another year churns by, another set of graduates goes out to face life’s challenges. Wouldn’t it be nice to put it in the hands of the Frank Bosquins, Alie Parrotts and Blair Walkers? See you soon.

ANTIQUE SHOW

A melancholy mood was apparent in talking with several of the vendors at Bargain Bill’s Flea Market this past weekend as they learned of the death of long-time vendor Ron Simpler. For those of you who do not know, Ron was the sports card dealer in the back building of the market. Ron was 57 and was found dead in bed from an apparent heart attack. He recently had colon cancer surgery. He was very quiet, but liked by all. Ron lost his son about six months ago and it seemed things went downhill for this Vietnam veteran after that. Ron did not have much in life but he always gave cards to my grandkids and was good to everyone. Many at the market took care of him, often taking him home and bringing him in as he did not drive. Gary Spence and Larry Muguni were especially close to him, but we all shall miss just one more of the familiar faces gone from the market. Laurel police department will be holding its second “Kids Day Out” on Saturday, June 10, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., at Laurel River Park. Chief Jamie Wilson and the officers of the department work hard on this event, whose goal is to let children interact with the officers in a positive way. There are to be games food, fishing, crafts and much more for all our youngsters. Yours are invited.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 51

Retirees are finding new homes in the area Home prices increasing as more and more outsiders are calling Sussex home By Ronald MacArthur If you believe what you read and hear, thousands of new residents (mostly senior citizens) are heading to this area to make western Sussex their new address. They are leaving areas where taxes are high and urban sprawl is out of control. Heritage Shores is a microcosm of what is taking place in Sussex Country. The fast-growing, senior-oriented development in Bridgeville is being built in phases with 1,000 units planned for the first phase. According to Bonnie Walls, town manager of Bridgeville, the population of Heritage Shores is close to 100 as of June 1. More than 100 more units (single family, duplexes and town houses) are being constructed at any given time. Walls said that she has been surprised at the former addresses of some of the new residents of Bridgeville, including Florida and Arizona, but that most of the transplants are from the Mid-Atlantic area. “Most of the people are coming from Maryland, around the Baltimore area, and New Jersey,” she said. “That’s been pretty prevalent, but not centralized in that area alone. I can understand people getting away from those areas, but Florida and Arizona came as a surprise. I wondered how they learned about this?” And why are they moving to Bridgeville? “It’s because of the low property taxes and the amenities they are offering at Heritage Shores,” Walls said. “There’s a pool and recreation center right there in their backyard and if you play golf, it’s right there too. People like it that they don’t have to get out on the roads to drive. And when we get our commercial development there, it will be even more of a drawing card.” People are also coming for the price. New developments in western Sussex are offering homes in a wide price range from

AFFORDABLE HOUSING Housing overview in western Sussex County Middle income residents struggle to find housing. What are companies doing for their employees? What is available? How to enter the housing market A SNAPSHOT VIEW OF HOUSING. WHO IS COMING? $150,000 to $300,000 and above. The average price of a new home in western Sussex is in the $200,000 to $250,000 price range. Double that for the eastern side of the county.

Couple sold home in one day Nancy and Joseph Thompson moved to Bridgeville and Heritage Shores after living in the same house in Ellicott City, Md. for 44 years. On their trips from their home in Ellicott City, Md. to Bethany Beach and Assateague, the Thompsons passed through the town with the sign “If You Lived Here You Would Be Home Now” numerous times. Never in their wildest dreams did they envision their retirement address would be that town - Bridgeville. For the past nine months, the Thompsons have been residents of Heritage Shores on Amanda’s Teal, the first street to be nearing completion in the massive development just off the intersection of U.S. 13 and Rt. 404. One-thousand units are planned for the first phase of the project which also includes a championship golf course, tennis courts, walking trails, pool and recreation center - most of which are still under construction. The Thompsons, like so many others, are discovering that their retirement dollars are going a lot farther in western Sussex County than eastern Sussex County.

“We had planned to live forever and die in our home in Ellicott City,” Nancy said,” but it got to be too much.” The couple said that rising taxes, sprawl and a changing neighborhood - all the reasons most use for moving away from urban areas in their retirement forced them to make a decision. They had lived in the same house in Ellicott City for more than four decades. Nancy is a retired nurse and Joseph is a retired pharmacist. Nancy said they had stopped at Jimmy’s Grille restaurant in Bridgeville on a trip to the beach and saw houses being built out in the field across the street. “We took our first look in April of 2005 and talked it over,” she said. “We decided it was time to make the move.” They put their house on the market and it sold in one day. To their surprise the house was demolished to make way for a new larger home on the one-acre lot. “We looked in Bethany Beach, Ocean View and Millville and other areas on the east coast and even Dagsboro, but we waited too long and couldn’t afford it,” Joseph said. They also looked at retirement developments in North and South Carolina and Florida. Joseph said that they had looked at a house in a development in the Delaware resort area four years ago that was listed for $174,000. “We should have bought it then, because last year the same house was listed for $450,000,” he said. The Thompsons had a specific “want list” as they looked for a new house to spend their retirement years. Joseph explained that they wanted to be on town water and sewer, wanted to be close to Bethany Beach (they own a condominium at Sea Colony) and they wanted amenities including a community or recreation center, pool and golf course. Heritage Shores had what they wanted and the price was right. The Thompsons said that it has been an experience “down sizing” but they love their new home in Bridgeville. “Everyone is friendly here,” said Joseph.

The Beards, like the Thompsons, had traveled through Bridgeville many times on trips to the beach and to Assateague and Chincoteague. “We found out quickly that Rehoboth and Milton were out of our price range,” Russ said. They were also attracted to Sussex County by the low property tax rates compared to what they were paying in Calvert County. The couple had a specific goal in mind to start their retirement - they wanted to sell their house and use the cash to purchase their retirement home without having a mortgage. “We looked at houses in Easton and Centreville as well and the taxes were more in those communities than they were in Calvert County,” Russ said. They sold their house in three weeks. Since the Beards officially retired in the mid 1990s, they had been looking for a place to retire for several years before settling on western Sussex County. “It’s lower-slower and we love it,” Russ said. They did work part time up until last year. He said that many people may think that living in this area is a sacrifice for those who like to remain active. “It’s not been a hard move for us although some are having a little problem adjusting,” Ginny said. The couple said that the area is centrally located for trips to the beach resort area and to Dover and Salisbury. “But you can find just about everything you need in Seaford and Bridgeville, but I do wish we had another grocery store,” Ginny said. “And I can’t get the Washington Post here - I miss the Post,” Russ added.

Bridgeville is in central location

Russ and Ginny Beard, formerly of Calvert County, Md. were the second couple to move to Heritage Shores. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

The second couple to call Heritage Shores their home moved from Huntingtown, Md. in Calvert County. Russ and Ginny Beard, who are both retired from NASA at the Goddard Space Center, decided to make the move without even seeing a model home. “I have an aunt and uncle who live in Seaford and they have always told me to come live in Delaware - they love it in Delaware,” Russ said. “Plus we wanted to be close to some friends we have in Rehoboth.”

Joseph and Nancy Thompson and their dog Travis are at home in Heritage Shores in Bridgeville. Photo by Ronald MacArthur


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 52

WOODBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2006

CLASS VALEDICTORIAN - Valedictorian Kacie Pinnock, who will major in music industry and recording technology at York College (PA) speaks during Woodbridge High School’s commencement exercises last Sunday. “Graduates, if you thought high school was tough, the outside world will be a shark tank. You alone control your life,” said Pinnock. “If you stay true to your hearts I know each one of you will do amazing things.” Photos by Mike McClure

WORDS FROM THE PRINCIPAL Woodbridge High School principal Gary Rosenthal talks to the graduates.

GRADUATION SPEAKER - Woodbridge High commencement speaker Jack Hassman, who served as the school’s principal for six years before retiring last year, gives the class of 2006 some advice. “Without God’s love and mercy I wouldn’t be standing here because I’m a cancer survivor,” said Hassman, who was an educator for 33 years. “As a teacher you can be an arrow that sets the path straight for your students.”

CLASS PRESIDENT - “We are now free to embark on our own journeys,” Woodbridge class president Rachel Hovermale told her fellow graduates. “Hold on to your dreams. Don’t let anyone tell you you can’t achieve what you set your minds on.”

CLASS SALUTATORIAN - Woodbridge High salutatorian Ryan Messick, right, is shown with principal Gary Rosenthal following his speech during commencement exercises last Sunday. “This afternoon marked a turning point in our lives,” said Messick, who will major in mechanical engineering at the University of Delaware in the Fall. “Smile a lot, laugh a lot, and be nice to everyone you meet. Love your life, it’s the only one you have.”

COLOR GUARD - The Woodbridge MCJROTC presents the colors at the start of the Woodbridge High graduation ceremony on Sunday.

INTRODUCTION - Woodbridge Class of 2006 treasurer Laura Bailey is shown with commencement speaker Jack Hassman during the school’s commencement exercises last Sunday. Bailey introduced Hassman, who retired as the high school principal last year.


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 53

Letters Relay raises $160,000 plus On May 17 18, 19 a momentous celebration of life occurred in Seaford. The eighth Western Sussex Relay For Life to benefit the American Cancer Society was held at the Cancer Center of Nanticoke Hospital. With the help of the western Sussex community, we were able to raise more than $160,000 for cancer research and patient services. On behalf of the committee, we would like to thank the following for their generous support in the fight against cancer: Thank you to our host sponsor Trinity Transport Foundation. They were there from the beginning and helped make our job easier. Thanks to our gold sponsor, H&M Bay, Inc., because without hope we cannot succeed. Our silver sponsors were The Guide, Print Shack, Inc., Nanticoke Health Services, Pizza King, Pepsi, Seaford and Laurel Star, The Leader, Wal-Mart, Soroptimist International of Seaford, Inc., GMB, David Horsey, Integra and Money Mailer. They helped by supporting the relay in whatever way we needed. Thanks to Jimmy’s Grille who sponsored our survivors reception. Survivors are our inspiration and you have honored them in a special way. Many other businesses supported us along the way and we appreciate them. They were Creative Kitchens, Johnny Janosik, Peninsula Oil, Golden Corral of Seaford, Seaford Hardees, Seaford Ice, Inc., French and Ryan, Hoober, Inc., Atlanta Road Alliance Church, WaWa, Food Lion, Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club, Tropical Touch Massage Therapy and Tanning, Waste Management, Foot and Ankle Center of Delaware, St. John’s United Methodist Church, Provi-

Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net dence of Brookfield Homes, and the city of Seaford. Thank you to all our participants for making this the best relay ever. Maybe it will be one of the dollars raised that will make the difference in finding a cure. A very, very special thanks to our cancer survivors for reminding us why we do what we do. Your courage is truly an inspiration to all of us. While we take a moment to pause and give thanks, we are already planning next year’s relay, “There’s no place like hope.” The survivors reception will be held May 17 and the ninth Relay For Life will be May 18 and 19. We will continue until there is a cure. We hope you will join us next year in our fight against cancer. Mary Catherine Hopkins and Mary Lee Groton, Relay for Life co-chairs

AARP tax counselor activity I just received a summary of AARP tax counselor activity for tax year 2005 from Bill Watt, district coordinator of western Sussex County and longtime member of AARP Seaford area chapter 1084.

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What an amazing job done by Jerry Bringenberg, Bob Davis, Nancy Hickman, Melvin Koster, Ben Martin, Robert Maykrantz, Jon Noteboom and Aileen Watkins. These wonderful volunteers helped the low to medium income area residents with their income tax filing at Delmar Library, Methodist Manor House, Seaford Library, Nanticoke Senior Center, Boys & Girls Club, Bridgeville Library and Greenwood Library. These same volunteers did 527 federal returns, 477 E-file returns, 486 reviews and put in 590 hours of work. There was an increase of 55 percent of federal returns from last year and 80 percent increase of E-filed returns. The tax returns done by AARP-IRS in the state totaled 4,865 federal returns and 3,970

state returns — a total of 8,835. Every year more residents use AARP/IRS free tax returns services. What a great way to serve a community of thankful clients. Job well done AARP volunteers. President Helen Skjoldager AARP Seaford area chapter 1084

Town had no choice I am writing in response to the letters to the editor concerning the group from Kansas and the permit being issued to them to demonstrate on the same day as the town and families had set aside to honor our fallen heroes for their sacrifice for their loved ones and their country. Unfortunately, if you check officially, I think you will find the town officials had no choice. It is sad that anyone can “hate

so much.” This was a very cruel thing to happen, especially for the families. I find it very hard to understand such hate, and I am sure that most people feel the same way. The only thing I can find thinking on this matter is this: We are “blessed by God” to live in a country where people have the right to express themselves, even when it seems contrary to what this country stands for. They have that right to express themselves without being put in prison for years, or being put to death. Try to remember that these young brave heroes gave their lives, so that we have the freedoms that we do. However, let’s remember freedom is not free. James F. Horne Sr. Seaford

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MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

Opinion Boom time in western Sussex

VIEWPOINT Affordable housing issue needs attention to keep workers here Over the past two months, we have published a series on affordable housing. It is an issue confronting every one in western Sussex County as we face the prospects of rising home prices driven by a market geared for the high-price home buyer. According to local realtors, there are more than 10,000 listings available currently in the county. Affordable housing is really in the eye of the beholder. What is affordable to one person, may be out of reach to another. A retired couple who worked for the government moving to Sussex County from Montgomery County, Md., can easily afford a $300,000 to $400,000 home. The average working couple in western Sussex with a combined income of $60,000 would struggle to afford a home in the $150,000 to $200,000 range. Unfortunately, developers are gearing their projects to the first group, not the second group, of people who live here. The facts and figures tell the story. More than half of the workers in Sussex County make less than $11 an hour; and nearly half of those make less than $9 an hour. The average annual wage in Sussex County is $29,000 — compared to $23,400 in Kent and $47,500 in New Castle. According to the Delaware State Housing Authority, it takes a wage of $12 an hour to afford a twobedroom house in Sussex County. We dispute that figure and doubt that anyone can afford to purchase a home and make ends meet (especially with skyrocketing utility bills) on $12 an hour. Couples with combined incomes stand a little more of chance. The average price of a house in Sussex County is $310,000 which is driven by the exorbitant prices in the resort area. Houses in the $400,000 to $600,000 price range are commonplace. The average price of a home in western Sussex is a little more modest at less than $200,000, but rising on a monthly basis. But it all depends on where you live. Some developments in western Sussex are advertising homes in the $250,000 to $300,000 and above range. Even “professional” people are struggling to find housing within their price range in certain areas of the county. Several agencies and businesses (including Nanticoke Health Services and Trinity Transport in this area), town officials in Seaford and Bridgeville and county officials are looking for ways to provide affordable housing to residents being shut out of the housing market in Sussex County. We applaud their efforts and urge them to continue to “think out of the box” to find ways to provide quality affordable housing for people who live and work here. People need to live near where they work, especially with high gasoline prices. The rising influx of retirees who do not work should not be the driving force in the housing market.

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If you take a ride, walk or bike ride anywhere in the area, it’s not hard to see the growth spurt currently under way. And believe me, we are just getting started on the western side of the county. You ain’t seen nothing yet. At some point, it will be impossible to determine where the towns of Seaford and Bridgeville start and end along the U.S. 13 corridor. Once Lowe’s and Home Depot are built, you will see a new wave of commercial development along the highway. And once the intersection improvements are made at U.S. 13 and Rt. 404 in Bridgeville, commercial development in that area will take off. And on that topic, as you will recall, the improvements at the dangerous and heavily traveled intersection were put on hold because of the budget problems with DelDOT. Yet, DelDOT has money to repave the highway between Seaford and Bridgeville and right through the intersection in question. Although I am not a genius, it seems to me that a better expenditure of highway funds would have been to get that intersection improved so that Bridgeville officials and developers can continue with their plans for commercial development in the area. That’s my two cents worth on that issue. Commercial development along the highway corridor in Delmar is also exploding at a fast pace as the town melts into Salisbury. Eventually that development will spread to the north as well and Delmar and Laurel will melt into one along the highway as well. That process will be speeded up if Sussex County officials have their way and build a western Sussex sewer district within the next decade by running a sewer line along U.S. 13. That move could be the best thing or the worst thing that could happen to western Sussex. It all depends on your point of view. President Bryant Richardson Vice President Pat Murphy Secretary Tina Reaser

Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson Executive Editor Ronald MacArthur

Managing Editor Mike McClure Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Kay Wennberg Cindy Lyons Taylor Circulation Karen Cherrix

BOOM TIME - I wasn’t around during ONALD AC RTHUR the boom home construction time with the At some point, it will be coming of the DuPont impossible to determine plant in Seaford in the where the towns of early 1940s and then the boom time right Seaford and Bridgeville after World War II and start and end along the into the early 1950s. It U.S. 13 corridor. was a big time for home construction in this area, but it can’t for what exists because they are compare to what is going on today. actually buying the land — not the On a windless day, if you listen existing structure. The structures really close, you can actually hear are being torn down to make way the sound of hammers in the disfor townhomes, condos or expentance from some of the many projsive homes. ects currently under construction. Local construction companies Houses are being built all over the cannot keep up with the work so place — from the 100 or more at other companies from out of state Heritage Shores in Bridgeville to and upstate are coming in to build. those under construction at MearThousands of new people are field, Governor’s Grant and Belle moving into the area each year — Ayre in Seaford and the Villas at and most are retirees. Broad Creek in Laurel. And that The tide of retirees coming to doesn’t take into account other western Sussex is not yet a tidal projects in and around the towns wave, but it soon will be as more and homes being built on single and more retirees discover that lots. their money goes farther on this If you want to see a “town” beside of the county. ing built right before your eyes, With home prices skyrocketing take a ride in Heritage Shores on a out of sight on the eastern side of weekend day. You will be amazed the county ($500,000 and above is at how much construction is going the norm), people are discovering on. that average new home prices I suggest you go on a weekend range from $200,000 to $400,000 late in the day because during the on this side of the world (of course week, there are so many construcyou can spend much more if you tion vehicles on the streets, it’s like want). a maze in some sections of the deRetirees from Maryland and velopment. (Residents tell me that the golf New Jersey are selling their homes course will not be open this fall as and in many instances paying cash predicted, but will open next fall. for their new residences in western The lack of rain in early spring put Sussex. Not a bad deal. the project behind.) Many builders are catering to It seems that every vacant lot this wave of buyers who can easily within a town in western Sussex is afford homes in the $300,000-plus a gold mine and will eventually range, which cuts many home buyend up with a house on it. There ers who live in the area out of the are not many building lots left that market. are not part of planned developDuring the biggest home buildments. ing boom in the county’s history, In many locations, builders and the affordable housing debate has developers are buying up parcels never been more of an issue in the with houses, buildings or existing county. businesses on them without regard Ironic isn’t it?

R

Sales George Beauchamp Barbara Conn Rick Cullen Carole Kauffman Jimmy McWilliams Debbie Bell Composition Rita Brex Catherine Doyle

Laurel Star Advisory Board Dale Boyce Sandy Davis Toni Gootee H. Robert Hickman Jane Hudson Linda Justice Albert Jones Kendal Jones Mike Lambert

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Janet Lee Don Phillips Cora Selby Richard Small Debbie Waller Seaford Star Advisory Board Shirley Baynum Beverly Blades Tommy Cooper

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Edward Cranston Mike Hall Nancy Harper John Hollis Karen Johnston Jan Lundquist Ron Marvel John Rittenhouse Bill Royal Steve Theis Layton Wheeler

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR

✳ JUNE 8 - 14, 2006

PAGE 55

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Day High Low Thurs. 12:15 p 6:57 a Fri. 12:40 a 7:41 a Sat. 1:24 a 8:24 a Sun. 2:08 a 9:08 a Mon. 2:54 a 9:52 a Tues. 3:40 a 10:38 a Wed. 4:27 a 11:25 a

High —1:03 p 1:49 p 2:34 p 3:19 p 4:06 p 4:55 p

Low 6:39 p 7:23 p 8:09 p 8:55 p 9:43 p 10:32 p 11:25 p

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursday’s weather. High Low Temperatures are Thursday’s highs Day and Thursday night’s lows. Thurs. 3:15 a 9:50 a Fri. 3:59 a 10:34 a Sat. 4:43 a 11:17 a Sun. 5:27 a 12:01 p Mon. 6:13 a 12:45 p Tues. 6:59 a 12:36 a Wed. 7:46 a 1:25 a

High 3:34 p 4:22 p 5:08 p 5:53 p 6:38 p 7:25 p 8:14 p

Low 9:32 p 10:16 p 11:02 p 11:48 p —1:31 p 2:18 p

High 2:56 p 3:44 p 4:30 p 5:15 p 6:00 p 6:47 p 7:36 p

Low 8:54 p 9:38 p 10:24 p 11:10 p 11:58 p —1:40 p

An afternoon t-shower possible

A thundershower possible

Partly sunny

Mostly sunny

Mostly cloudy and turning warmer

Humid with clouds and sun

Intervals of clouds and sunshine

79/54

76/59

78/61

80/65

87/69

87/68

86/64

Almanac Statistics through Tuesday June 6 at Georgetown, Delaware

Temperatures

Precipitation

High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average temperature . . . . . . . .

. 94° . 57° . 78° . 56° 73.7°

Total for the week . . . . . . . . . . 2.77” Total for the month . . . . . . . . . . 2.77” Normal for the month . . . . . . . . 0.60” Total for the year . . . . . . . . . . 12.09”

Smyrna 76/56 Dover 76/56

Apogee and Perigee

Vienna, MD

The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Date June 16 July 1 July 13 July 29

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Time 1:09 p.m. 4:14 p.m. 1:36 p.m. 9:03 a.m.

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Date August 10 August 25 September 7 September 22

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .5:38 a.m. .5:38 a.m. .5:38 a.m. .5:37 a.m. .5:37 a.m. .5:37 a.m. .5:37 a.m.

Full June 11

Harrington 77/56

Time 2:29 p.m. 9:24 p.m. 11:08 p.m. 1:22 a.m.

Milford 77/56 Greenwood 78/55

Lewes 72/56

Bridgeville 79/54

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

Set .8:25 p.m. .8:26 p.m. .8:26 p.m. .8:27 p.m. .8:27 p.m. .8:28 p.m. .8:28 p.m.

Last June 18

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

Moon Rise Thursday . . . .5:37 p.m. Friday . . . . . . .6:45 p.m. Saturday . . . . .7:54 p.m. Sunday . . . . . .9:01 p.m. Monday . . . . .10:01 p.m. Tuesday . . . .10:52 p.m. Wednesday . .11:33 p.m.

New June 25

. . . . . . .

Set .3:12 a.m. .3:40 a.m. .4:16 a.m. .5:01 a.m. .5:56 a.m. .7:03 a.m. .8:16 a.m.

First July 3

SEAFORD 79/54 Blades 79/54

Rehoboth Beach 72/55 Georgetown 79/55 Concord 79/54 Laurel 78/54 Delmar 77/53

Millsboro 78/55

Bethany Beach 73/56 Fenwick Island 74/56

Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High 2:37 a 3:21 a 4:05 a 4:49 a 5:35 a 6:21 a 7:08 a

Low 9:12 a 9:56 a 10:39 a 11:23 a 12:07 p 12:53 p 12:47 a

Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High Low 4:46 a 10:39 a 5:31 a 11:24 a 6:17 a 12:23 a 7:03 a 1:09 a 7:50 a 1:55 a 8:39 a 2:42 a 9:28 a 3:30 a

Rehoboth Beach High 5:14 p 5:58 p 6:44 p 7:30 p 8:18 p 9:07 p 9:56 p

Low 11:37 p —12:09 p 12:54 p 1:40 p 2:28 p 3:20 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006


500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com

This Is My Family Tree - Bev Blades, CFM Realtor conveniently located home in Seaford town limits w/3 BRs & 2 baths. Kit. has new cabinets, countertops, sink & appl’s. New Lenox gas heat/ AC system. Updated wiring, windows & other improvements. Formal DR & det. outbldg. #535927 conveys w/this historic home in Bethel, DE, as it relates to the original family that lived here. Stately in its appearance this home has been beautifully maintained w/much of the original house intact. Attractive kitchen, formal DR, FR, den, parlor, 3 BRs, 2 baths. Exceptional established landscaping includes 2 fish ponds, beautiful gardens, a latticed Jacuzzi area, a 2 sty., 2 car garage w/ workshop & several outbldgs. #536301

for new heat/AC & septic systems. This attractive 2 BR home in Oak Grove, west of Seaford, has had many recent improvements including roof, siding & interior paint. Call to see MLS#536822

3 BR, 2 bath home has following improvements: new roof, insulation, new windows, kit. cabinets, countertops & appl’s., new baths, floor covering & painting throughout. Has much to offer w/original wooden banister & staircase & classic maid’s stairway. #533997

4 BR, 2.5 bath colonial east of Seaford has 2772 sq ft of charm. It features 2 fireplaces, immense FR, beautiful new kitchen with all amenities, full basement w/25x25 recreation room, plus a workshop & a 2 car garage. Nicely landscaped. #534647

is directly across the street from the lovely Laurel Lake w/access to a lg. fishing pier. Home has remodeled kit. & bath, a formal DR, rear deck, plus recent heat pump, paint & carpet. Immediate occupancy. #525881

ready for horses w/fencing & outbuildings existing OR property is ready to be developed. This listing has 4 lots about .75 acres each on Vine St & 3 accesses to remaining 21.24 acres. Also includes 2 BR, 1 bath home w/bsmt. walkout, outbldgs, pasture & orchard. About 8 acres are in Bethel town limits. Parcel totals 25.44 acres & can be purchased #536561 for

4 BRs, 2.5 baths, a remodeled kitchen, efficient heat pump, beautiful hardwood flooring, 2 unique fireplaces, pocket doors, butler pantry & heated attic ready for remodeling. All in good condition. Det. garage. #530329

This 4+ acre horse farm offers so much. 2 BR home is in good condition w/ laundry area, + hot tub. Detached garage & office. Four stall stable & 4 fenced pastures, attractive landscaping w/fruit & nut trees. #536393

Poplar St., than Seaford, DE. Vintage 3 BR, 1.5 bath home has been remodeled w/new kit., baths, carpet, paint, plus some electric & plumbing. It has an enclosed sun porch, separate laundry rm. & formal DR. Seller will pay $2000 closing costs. #527579

in Laurel. 4 BR, 1.5 bath home was built in 1860 on a corner lot & has been enjoyed by its present owners for many yrs. Improvements include replacing roof & heating system. Features formal DR, FR & laundry rm. #533711

on Beach Plum Dr., Broadcreek Beach, DE. 75x100 ft lot has a beach easement & site work for LPP septic. #524789 - Lot w/survey, LPP site evaluation + culvert. .74 acre wooded lot is located in Fleetwood Estates & is ready for the builder. #536638 - About 5 miles east of US 13, Laurel gives you a head start to the beach. You can build your home on this 2+ acre wooded lot w/212’ road frontage. Takes an LPP system. #534895

east of Bridgeville describes this 4000 sq ft gem that features cathedral ceilings, hdwd. flooring, sunroom, skylights, granite countertops, 30’ wide 2 car garage & incredible mstr. bath. Stg. galore & corner FP w/pellet stove. 4 BR, 3 bath home has a finished bonus rm. #534650

3 BR, 2 bath home located on an acre lot in Fox Glen, north of Seaford, DE. Front is accented w/stone w/rear sunporch & adjoining deck, irrigation & an oversized garage. Custom built in ‘02, features cathedral ceiling, hdwd. flooring, plus all appl’s. & window treatments convey. #530138

styled for the times near Bethel, DE. 2000 sq ft cape cod w/4 BRs & 3 full baths. Attractive floor plan makes this home sunny with no wasted space. Extra lg. master BR & whirlpool tub in mstr. bath. Loads of stg + utility rm. Concrete walkway, brick foundation & blacktop driveway. #534651

waiting for development in north Seaford’s comprehensive plan for growth. 107 acres of excellent farm land has 7 wooded acres adjacent to Seaford wastewater lift station & city water. Corner lot w/ abundant road frontage. Call for more information. for this 1.31 acre property fronting both concord Rd. & 2nd St., Blades, DE. Next to a medical center. Property could possibly be divided into 6 bldg. lots & the 7th lot has an existing house on it or it could be zoned for an approved business. #51075 Builders take notice of this 153x200’ lot in Rivers End, Seaford, DE. #535574

has 2 BRs, 2 baths, formal DR & attractive kit. w/some new appl’s. Lg. FR has brick fireplace & could easily become 3rd mstr. BR. New tile floors in kit., DR & bath & new carpet & paint throughout. One car garage w/lg. stg. area, plus outbldg. in good condition. Established landscaping. #532594

in Hollywood Park, Laurel, DE. Wooded lot on Meadowbranch Dr. has 135’ on Horsey Pond. Can ‘n fill septic evaluation on file. #530148 to occupy a 18,500 sq ft masonry bldg. on 8.48 acres, US 13, Delmar, De just north of the MD line. Bldg. in very good condition containing attractive offices, shop, plus shop/stg. area. Fenced area encloses building and lg. asphalt parking lot. Possibility of purchasing additional 10.81 acres north of property making total 1,249 ft on US 13. Possible owner Total Pkg. #511043 financing.

You Provide the Family, I’ll Provide the Home.

June 8, 2006_S  

NEW POLICE CHIEF - The new Blades police chief has an impressive background in police work. Page 5 THE RAVENS - Sussex Tech High School has...