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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

VOL. 13 NO. 46

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

DaD’s Day - Father’s Day gift ideas. Pages 28 and 29 Cook House - The Laurel Historical Society is pleased to announce that their headquarter museum, the Cook House, will again be open for visits on Sunday afternoons from one o’clock until 4 o’clock during the summer and early fall seasons. Page 5

Laurel, he requested that the police department consider bringing it back. Chief Michael Wilson agreed and they were able to find a grant through the state to equip the program without costing the town taxpayers. Initially, it was hoped that the police department could get three bikes, but funding restrictions only allowed for two bikes. Callaway said the bikes were specially equipped for police work by “BikeSport” in Salisbury, who has done the same for the entire fleet of bikes being used by the Ocean City, Md. police Department. He said one of the accessories that he likes is the new backpack style hydration systems that are used to carry water for the officers who are on patrol. These nylon backpacks are able to hold water that can last the officers for as much as two hours at a time. The water is able to be dispensed to the officer through a hose that is attached to the pack. “This is a lot better than the single water bottles,” he said. “I am able to get the equivalent of four bottles of water in this pack.” Callaway said the goal of the police department is to use the bike patrols to

By Lynn R. Parks This year, for the first time since the late 1950s, Tom Wright of Laurel will not be participating in the Laurel Auction Market. Wright, who started taking produce to the Block, as it is popularly known, when he was a teenager and who has managed the market for 20 years, is recuperating at his home after being run over by a tractor on his farm west of Laurel. The tractor broke his pelvis and 18 ribs, Wright said, and “I’m not back on my feet yet.” Doctors expect him to fully recover, he added. “It’s just a matter of time.” But that recovery won’t happen quickly enough for him to run the auction this year. Instead, longtime bookkeeper, Betty Messick, and Wright’s assistant, Mike Norton, will take over the reins. “I have a lot of confidence that they will be able to keep things functioning,” Wright said. “I’m looking forward to a good year,” Norton added. Adding to the challenges facing the market is the fact that Dolores Culver, who as cashier managed the money flow, died last year of a heart attack. Two people are being trained to replace her, Wright said. “It will still be the same process at the market,” Wright said. “There will just be new faces.” Much of last year’s staff is returning this year, Norton added. “They are all dedicated and do a good job,” he said. Wright said that he will be available to answer any questions Norton and Messick have. Already, he said, they have called for help in preparing for the market’s opening, tentatively set for July 8. “It’s like baking a cake fol-

Continued on page 4

Continued on page 5

FourtH oF July - Register today for the Laurel Fourth of July 5K Run or Walk. The first 150 runners will receive a free T-shirt. A sign up form is available at www.laurelchamber.com. Anyone interested in being a sponsor of the Laurel Independence Day 5K Run/Walk and Health Fair and would like their business advertised on the back of the T-shirt, e-mail independenceday5K@gmail.com. laurel librarian - After an extensive search, Wendy Roberts, presently at the Baldwin Public Library in Birmingham, Mich., was chosen to be the new Laurel librarian. Page 4.

uPs anD DoWns - Running fewer than 80 days, it has been broken for about 150 days. What is it? Page 13

Sports Patriots- Baseball players from across Western Sussex are playing with the Post 6 American Legion baseball team, which had its home opener last week. Page 41 CHaMPs- The Delmar Shorebirds topped Delmar Kiwanis in a pitcher’s duel to win the league’s championship last Friday. Page 41

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Montessori sCHool - A group of parents and educators hope to open a charter school in the Laurel area. Page 12

PAGE 1

Laurel Police officers Det. Sgt. Derrick Callaway (left) and Pfc. Andy Will are the two officers who will be patrolling the streets of Laurel as part of the new Bike Patrol initiative. Photo by Tony Windsor

Laurel Police Department take to the streets on two wheels

By Tony E. Windsor

Don’t be surprised if you see a couple of “Laurel’s finest” pass you on the street on bicycles. The Laurel Police Department has reintroduced a resource to help police cover the community in a more intimate and interactive way. Using state grant funding from the State Aid to Local Law Enforcement (SALLE), the Laurel Police Department has purchased two specially equipped bikes and assigned two officers to do bike patrol throughout the community. Det. Sgt. Derrick Callaway and Pvt.1st Class Andy Will have been out on patrol over the past few weeks and look forward to using the patrol multiple times each week. Callaway said the onset of summer makes for a great opportunity for getting the patrol underway. “We have special nylon gear that is lighter and more conducive to the warmer days and allows us more mobility. We have nylon pants that will tear off into shorts and we keep a lot of water on hand. We are looking forward to being present in the community as often as we can,” he said. Callaway said the bike patrol was used by the Laurel Police Department back in 1994 and then went by the wayside the following year. Seeing it as a good fit for


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Seaford to buy into pension plan By Lynn R. Parks

The City of Seaford will spend $1.237 million to buy into the state’s pension plan for police officers. The city council approved the expenditure last week after city manager Dolores Slatcher told them that Seaford was one of the last municipalities in Delaware whose police officers were not covered by the state plan. The city plans to borrow the money from a local bank and pay it back over 10 years. Total cost to buy into the state pension is $3.73 million. The city was able to use the $2.49 million that it had in its own police pension plan toward that amount. The city agreed to allow its police officers to join the state pension plan as part of its contract negotiated last year with the police department.

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The grand opening of the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame exhibit in the Seaford Museum will take place on Friday, June 26, beginning at noon. In keeping with the traditional food offerings at sports events, hot dogs, sodas and beer will be served. H.C. Davis Co. of Bridgeville is donating the hot dogs. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery of Milton is providing the beer. Rolls are being supplied by the Food Lion Store in Seaford. There are 28 Hall of Fame inductees from Sussex County included in this exhibit. Eight are from Laurel and five from Seaford. From Laurel, listed in the order in which they were inducted, are: Ron Waller, George Schollenberger, Dallas Marvil, Carlton Elliott, Julie Ann Dayton, Doris Callaway Fry, Ron Dickerson and Ed Callaway. The five from Seaford are: Coach Bob Dowd, Mike Neill, Delino DeShields, Lovett Purnell and Coach Ron Dickerson. All Seaford Historical Society members, all Delaware Sports Hall of Fame members, all inductees, their families and survivors are invited at no charge. This reception will last until 2:30 p.m. Many people have helped make this special event a reality. Ben Sirman from Seaford, a member of Seaford Historical Society and vice president of the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame, has been very much involved. Jim Bowden from Georgetown, a member of the Seaford Historical Society and of the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame, is another. Mike Lambert from Seaford has contributed items to the exhibit. Pictures, biographies and memorabilia from the Delawre Sports Museum and Hall of Fame make up the major part of this exhibit. This is the first time that any memorabilia has been placed on display outside the Hall of Fame Museum located at Frawley Stadium in Wilmington. This exhibit will be in place throughout the summer months. The Seaford Museum is open Thursdays through Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. There is no charge for SHS members. Others pay $3 per person. For more information call 628-9828.

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

VOL. 13 NO. 46

THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 2009

Fourth oF July - Register today for the Laurel Fourth of July 5K Run or Walk. The first 150 runners will receive a free T-shirt. A sign up form is available at www.laurelchamber.com. Anyone interested in being a sponsor of the Laurel Independence Day 5K Run/Walk and Health Fair and would like their business advertised on the back of the T-shirt, e-mail independenceday5K@gmail.com.

Laurel, he requested that the police department consider bringing it back. Chief Michael Wilson agreed and they were able to find a grant through the state to equip the program without costing the town taxpayers. Initially, it was hoped that the police department could get three bikes, but funding restrictions only allowed for two bikes. Callaway said the bikes were specially equipped for police work by “BikeSport” in Salisbury, who has done the same for the entire fleet of bikes being used by the Ocean City, Md. police Department. He said one of the accessories that he likes is the new backpack style hydration systems that are used to carry water for the officers who are on patrol. These nylon backpacks are able to hold water that can last the officers for as much as two hours at a time. The water is able to be dispensed to the officer through a hose that is attached to the pack. “This is a lot better than the single water bottles,” he said. “I am able to get the equivalent of four bottles of water in this pack.” Callaway said the goal of the police department is to use the bike patrols to

By Lynn R. Parks This year, for the first time since the late 1950s, Tom Wright of Laurel will not be participating in the Laurel Auction Market. Wright, who started taking produce to the Block, as it is popularly known, when he was a teenager and who has managed the market for 20 years, is recuperating at his home after being run over by a tractor on his farm west of Laurel. The tractor broke his pelvis and 18 ribs, Wright said, and “I’m not back on my feet yet.” Doctors expect him to fully recover, he added. “It’s just a matter of time.” But that recovery won’t happen quickly enough for him to run the auction this year. Instead, longtime bookkeeper, Betty Messick, and Wright’s assistant, Mike Norton, will take over the reins. “I have a lot of confidence that they will be able to keep things functioning,” Wright said. “I’m looking forward to a good year,” Norton added. Adding to the challenges facing the market is the fact that Dolores Culver, who as cashier managed the money flow, died last year of a heart attack. Two people are being trained to replace her, Wright said. “It will still be the same process at the market,” Wright said. “There will just be new faces.” Much of last year’s staff is returning this year, Norton added. “They are all dedicated and do a good job,” he said. Wright said that he will be available to answer any questions Norton and Messick have. Already, he said, they have called for help in preparing for the market’s opening, tentatively set for July 8. “It’s like baking a cake fol-

Continued on page 4

Continued on page 5

Laurel Police officers Det. Sgt. Derrick Callaway (left) and Pfc. Andy Will are the two officers who will be patrolling the streets of Laurel as part of the new Bike Patrol initiative. Photo by Tony Windsor

Patriots- Baseball players from across Western Sussex are playing with the Post 6 American Legion baseball team, which had its home opener last week. Page 41 ChamPs- The Delmar Shorebirds topped Delmar Kiwanis in a pitcher’s duel to win the league’s championship last Friday. Page 41

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tony Windsor

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Laurel Auction Block will be without Wright

News

Sports

PAGE 1

Laurel Police Department take to the streets on two wheels

By Tony E. Windsor

Don’t be surprised if you see a couple of “Laurel’s finest” pass you on the street on bicycles. The Laurel Police Department has reintroduced a resource to help police cover the community in a more intimate and interactive way. Using state grant funding from the State Aid to Local Law Enforcement (SALLE), the Laurel Police Department has purchased two specially equipped bikes and assigned two officers to do bike patrol throughout the community. Det. Sgt. Derrick Callaway and Pvt.1st Class Andy Will have been out on patrol over the past few weeks and look forward to using the patrol multiple times each week. Callaway said the onset of summer makes for a great opportunity for getting the patrol underway. “We have special nylon gear that is lighter and more conducive to the warmer days and allows us more mobility. We have nylon pants that will tear off into shorts and we keep a lot of water on hand. We are looking forward to being present in the community as often as we can,” he said. Callaway said the bike patrol was used by the Laurel Police Department back in 1994 and then went by the wayside the following year. Seeing it as a good fit for


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Roberts selected as new librarian for town of Laurel By Carol Kinsley

You can’t “judge a book by its cover,” to borrow a familiar idiom, but if you can evaluate a person by her resume, the Board of Commissioners of Laurel Public Library have made a good choice for the new director. After an extensive search, Wendy Roberts, present circulation team leader at the Baldwin Public Library in Birmingham, Mich., was chosen from among the respondents to an ad in a library trade publication. The director’s position had been vacant since the retirement of Harriet Jarosh in December. Wenona Phillips, one of four full-time employees in addition to 10 parttimers, handled day-to-day operations in the interim. Although this will be Roberts’ first directorship, her qualifications are impressive. In her most recent position she managed a circulation staff of 20, overseeing all department operations, updating and maintaining electronic records, resolving patron issues and facilitating interlibrary loans. She has eight years of progressive supervisory responsibility in a busy library with a collection of 120,000 books in addition to magazines, newspapers, and other media. Roberts also has six years experience developing instructional and publicity

materials. She worked as assistant to the director at Park School in Baltimore before moving to Michigan. She recently earned a master of library and information science degree from Wayne State University with a grade point average of 3.94. She also holds a master’s degree in fine arts from Vermont College and a bachelor’s degree from Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. She taught art in Maryland and Michigan and has had several exhibitions of her own work, including an on-going exhibit at the Robert Kidd Gallery in Birmingham, Mich. Roberts — described by one of the commissioners as “a very articulate, lovely person,” grew up in Easton, Md., and can’t wait to return to the Delmarva Peninsula. She and her husband, Butch Ashman, who recently retired, will be moving to Laurel in advance of her starting date, July 1. They look forward to becoming an active part of the community. From her home in Michigan she sent this message: “It is my great good fortune to be returning to the Eastern Shore, but my past isn’t what brings me here. It is the tremendous privilege of participating in the Laurel Public Library’s present and future. This library is a real treasure. The town of Laurel has created a beautiful, welcoming facility. With its

unique collection of historic and archival materials housed in the Delaware Room, its resources for genealogical research, its active Friends group and its vibrant programs for young people, this library shines with accomplishment and possibility. I am delighted to be joining the talented staff that makes this all happen.” The commissioners — Terry Wright, Gene Wootten, Moggie Moyer, Jane Ward and Roy Jones, who is replacing retiring commissioner Sylvia Bradley in July — are equally delighted and plan to welcome Roberts with a reception and open house from 7 to 9 p.m. on July 22. The public is invited to greet the new director and to explore all the library has to offer. Rather than tap into limited library funding — from a trust fund and state and county budgets — for the reception, the commissioners are turning to local businesses and organizations for sponsorship. Checks payable to Laurel Public Library Reception Fund may be sent to treasurer Gene Wootten at 13502 Wootten Road, Laurel, Del. 19956. Visitors to the library at 101 East Fourth Street will discover, as one commissioner proclaimed, “This is not your grandmother’s library any more.” For one thing, a recent $4 million addition to the original library — built in 1951 in memory of Mary Wooten Carpenter —

Laurel Police to reintroduce bicycle patrol officers to town Continued from page 1

focus on a different council Ward each day they are out on the streets. The officers will travel independently to cover more area, however, in what are deemed “high-crime areas” the officers will travel together. It is hoped that along with helping the police department patrol in areas that are usually unable to be reached in a traditional patrol car, the bikes will also enable the

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

police officers to have a more intimate and interactive relationship with the citizens of Laurel. Bike patrols have been used throughout the country by law enforcement as an effective part of what has come to be known as “community policing.” Because the bikes are equipped with proper safety lighting, Callaway said the police department plans to do patrols throughout the day and well into the night for as long as weather permits.

Star PlanningLaurel A Wedding?

has quadrupled the space. There are lots of books, yes, but you’ll also find movies, music and other media, even computers for research, job search, homework or recreation. A summer program for teens offers free books for readers, pizza, games, movie nights and a talent show, with a drawing for a limo ride to be held Aug. 8. Younger readers in grades K through 6 also have special summer events to participate in, including story telling, magic shows, children’s theater and a craft club. There are also prizes offered in a summer reading challenge for kids who read the most books and submit a form before Sept. 3. A group of knitters use an upstairs room; there are other rooms available where groups can meet and not be disturbed. An elevator provides easy access to the second floor. Commissioner-tobe Jones said, “We are making an honest attempt to make the RobeRts library a friendlier, warmer place — the living room of our community.” He hopes the public will drop by on July 22 to “check out” the new director.

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Stop by the Wesley UMC • July 13-17 • 6:15-8:30 pm Norman 22025 Atlanta Rd., Seaford • 629-3029 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekEskridge Star office ly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 951 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 5

Historical Society announces Cook House Sunday hours The Laurel Historical Society is pleased to announce that their headquarter museum, the Cook House, will again be open for visits on Sunday afternoons from one o’clock until 4’oclock during the summer and early fall seasons. Members of the historical society will serve as hosts and visitors will be able to enjoy the holdings at their own pace. While there is no charge for admittance, a free-will donation from each group will help defray costs. Located at 502 E. Fourth St., the Cook House is where many of the society’s holdings are stored and displayed. Currently on display is a chronology of the Cook family’s 100 year association with the property. This display includes early photographs, deeds, wills, and clippings, which tell of one family’s history over the

last one hundred years. Also on display for the first time is a collection of memorabilia from the former Laurel Eastern Star chapter which has now merged with the Georgetown chapter, and a recently acquired map of Little Creek Hundred from 1868. Some other important pieces from the society’s permanent collection include a c.1840 Ralph corner cupboard, the ticket stand from the old Waller Theater, and the ever-popular collection of photographs from the local Waller Studio. These reprinted pictures document life in Laurel and western Sussex from 1896 until the early 1970’s and represent a detailed chronology of the buildings and lifestyles of the eras. Photographs and other items will change periodically over the summer.

Period furnishings decorate some rooms, reflecting various styles in Laurel’s history. Antique and contemporary quilts will also be on display, as well as original 19th

Continued from page 1

as Wright has. “I just can’t give that man enough credit. He knows the area and its farms so well, it’s almost like he can recognize what farm a watermelon came from just by looking at the melon. I’ll certainly be talking back and forth with him a lot.” Wright said that as a teenager, while still a student at Laurel High School, he started growing cantaloupes and watermelons and taking them to the Block. Accompanying him was his grandfather Tommy Phillips, who enjoyed the social

atmosphere of the auction and its traditional breakfast, a hot dog and a soda. Next year, Wright said, he plans to be back in his old position as market manager. In fact, Norton insists that this year, instead of managing the auction market, “I’m just filling in for Tom until he gets back.” As for this year, even if Wright can’t work there, he wants to at least visit once in a while. “I hope to be there, even if it’s nothing more than to drive through,” he said.

century books and documents. For more information or to volunteer to serve as a host, call 302- 875-2820 or email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com

NEW oFFiCErs - 2009-2010 officers of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit #19. From left are President Ann Foskey, Vice President Linda Derr, Secretary Vickie Higgins, Treasurer Joan Dillow, Chaplin Linda Chambers, Historian Casey Foskey, and Sergeant of Arms Cindy Ridenger.

Wright will miss running Laurel Auction Block for first time since late 50’s lowing your grandmother’s recipe, and it calls for a pinch of this and a pinch of that,” Wright said. “And you wonder, ‘How big a pinch is it?’ I have a lot of information that I never wrote down, that I just kept in my head. But they can call me and ask whatever they need, and I can tell them.” “There is so much that he did that I have no idea about,” said Norton, who has worked at the market nearly as long

tom WRight


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Plans move forward for a new Montessori School By Lynn R. Parks A group of parents and educators hope to open a charter school in the Laurel area. The Natural Discoveries Montessori Charter School would primarily serve children in the Delmar, Laurel and Seaford school districts, said Jennifer Whitcomb, Delmar, Md., president of the school’s board. The school would open in September 2011. Its application to be approved as a charter school by the state is due in December and a decision would be issued by the state by April 2010.

If approved, the board would have 16 months to get the school up and running. The school’s board is looking for property in the Laurel area on which to establish the school. It requires at least four acres, Whitcomb said, but would prefer six to eight. Charter schools are independent public schools. They were authorized by the state legislature in 1995 and each school’s charter has to be approved by the Delaware Department of Education and the state school board. They receive state funds for general education, based on student enroll-

ment, but do not get state funding for facilities. While they are not required to abide by many of the regulations traditional public schools are held to, charter schools are required to follow state curriculum standards and administer state tests. Currently, the state has 18 charter schools, only one of which, the Sussex Academy of Arts and Sciences, located in Georgetown, is in Sussex County. That school has about 325 students in grades six through eight. Whitcomb said that organizers of Natural Discoveries were attracted to western Sussex County by its lack of education choices. They decided on Laurel because of its central position between Delmar and Seaford. “Students in Delmar, Laurel and Seaford really lack options,” she said. “While there’s not anything wrong with public schools, sometimes students and their parents need choices.” In its first year of operation, the school would have kindergarten through the third grade. Plans are that every year after that, it would add a grade, up through the eighth grade. As planned now, the school would have a maximum of 360 children. Its goal would be to have no more than 20 students per classroom, Whitcomb said. The school would use the Montessori method of teaching, a child-centered method based on the child development theories originated by Maria Montessori, an Italian

educator who lived from 1870 to 1952. In a Montessori school, classroom work emphasizes self-directed activity on the part of the child, who is helped along by the teacher, or “guide.” The learning environment is adapted to the child’s own level and physical activity in learning abstract concepts and practical skills is stressed. Reading is taught through a combination of phonics and whole language. Natural Discoveries would also teach sign language to all of its students. It would especially welcome deaf and hearing-impaired children, Whitcomb said. Whitcomb said that the school’s board currently has nine members, including parents and certified Montessori teachers. It is looking for two additional members and would like for those two members to live in the Laurel School District.

For your information: Natural Discoveries Montessori Charter School will hold a public informational meeting Thursday, June 25, 6 p.m. in Laurel Town Hall. Its board meets the fourth Thursday of every month at 4:30 p.m., also in Laurel Town Hall. Those meetings are also open to the public. For additional information, or for details about the two vacancies on its board, call board president Jennifer Whitcomb, 410-7425052 or e-mail her at director@ndmschool. org. Information about the planned school is also available online at www.ndmschool.org.

Charlie Cordrey, a long-time golfer and Art Scott, Wood Creek Golf Links, looking over the Laurel and Seaford STAR newspapers.

BrEakFast mEEtiNg - Billy Banning of Trinity Transport was the speaker at the Laurel Chamber of Commerce’s May 28 monthly breakfast meeting. Banning told the audience, honesty and ethics, trust and loyalty, focus and compassion, servant-leadership and wisdom, teamwork and creativity, customer service and work ethics, and continuous improvement were qualities that they expect from everyone in their company. The company has five regional offices as well as the Seaford Corporate office. Photo by Pat Murphy.

Registration at Delmar High School By Cathy Shufelt The Delmar School District will be holding registration for the 2009-2010 school year during the district’s summer hours. Summer hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday beginning the week of June 15 and running through the week of Aug. 10. New students may register at the district/school office located at 200 N. Eighth St. during the following registration days: June 15-18, 22- 25, 29-30; July 1, 6-9, 13-16, 20-23, 27-30; and Aug. 3-6, 10-13. The office will be closed July 2-3 due to the holiday.

Students wishing to register with the Delmar School District must be accompanied by a parent and/or guardian and should report to the school’s main office. A guidance counselor will be on hand to help with the process of registration. The following documentation must be provided at the time of registration: birth certificate, immunization records, proof of residency (no P.O. Boxes), copy of student’s last repot card, school transcripts, completed withdrawal form or withdrawal letter from previous school, and copies of custody/guardianship papers if applicable. For more information, or to make an appointment, call 302-846-9544, ext. 135.

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PAGE 5

Historical Society announces Cook House Sunday hours The Laurel Historical Society is pleased to announce that their headquarter museum, the Cook House, will again be open for visits on Sunday afternoons from one o’clock until 4 o’clock during the summer and early fall seasons. Members of the historical society will serve as hosts and visitors will be able to enjoy the holdings at their own pace. While there is no charge for admittance, a free-will donation from each group will help defray costs. Located at 502 E. Fourth St., the Cook House is where many of the society’s holdings are stored and displayed. Currently on display is a chronology of the Cook family’s 100 year association with the property. This display includes early photographs, deeds, wills, and clippings, which tell of one family’s history over the

last one hundred years. Also on display for the first time is a collection of memorabilia from the former Laurel Eastern Star chapter which has now merged with the Georgetown chapter, and a recently acquired map of Little Creek Hundred from 1868. Some other important pieces from the society’s permanent collection include a c.1840 Ralph corner cupboard, the ticket stand from the old Waller Theater, and the ever-popular collection of photographs from the local Waller Studio. These reprinted pictures document life in Laurel and western Sussex from 1896 until the early 1970’s and represent a detailed chronology of the buildings and lifestyles of the eras. Photographs and other items will change periodically over the summer.

Period furnishings decorate some rooms, reflecting various styles in Laurel’s history. Antique and contemporary quilts will also be on display, as well as original 19th

Continued from page 1

as Wright has. “I just can’t give that man enough credit. He knows the area and its farms so well, it’s almost like he can recognize what farm a watermelon came from just by looking at the melon. I’ll certainly be talking back and forth with him a lot.” Wright said that as a teenager, while still a student at Laurel High School, he started growing cantaloupes and watermelons and taking them to the Block. Accompanying him was his grandfather Tommy Phillips, who enjoyed the social

atmosphere of the auction and its traditional breakfast, a hot dog and a soda. Next year, Wright said, he plans to be back in his old position as market manager. In fact, Norton insists that this year, instead of managing the auction market, “I’m just filling in for Tom until he gets back.” As for this year, even if Wright can’t work there, he wants to at least visit once in a while. “I hope to be there, even if it’s nothing more than to drive through,” he said.

century books and documents. For more information or to volunteer to serve as a host, call 302- 875-2820 or email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com

NEW OFFICERS - 2009-2010 officers of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit #19. From left are President Ann Foskey, Vice President Linda Derr, Secretary Vickie Higgins, Treasurer Joan Dillow, Chaplin Linda Chambers, Historian Casey Foskey, and Sergeant of Arms Cindy Ridenger.

Wright will miss running Laurel Auction Block for first time since late 50’s lowing your grandmother’s recipe, and it calls for a pinch of this and a pinch of that,” Wright said. “And you wonder, ‘How big a pinch is it?’ I have a lot of information that I never wrote down, that I just kept in my head. But they can call me and ask whatever they need, and I can tell them.” “There is so much that he did that I have no idea about,” said Norton, who has worked at the market nearly as long

Tom WrighT


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Business CFM names top producers

Kathy Farnell, vice president of Callaway, Farnell and Moore Real Estate, announces that Realtors Tina Moore and Terry Scott were the firm’s Top Producers for May. Tina was the top selling agent for the month and Terry ranked first in property listings. To reach Tina and Terry, call 628-8500.

the Sussex Tech campus, west of Georgetown. In addition to teaching appropriate workplace skills, participants will learn to prepare resumes, complete applications, respond to interview questions, search for jobs, and more. There will be an emphasis on helping individuals identify the skills they have and link them to the skills they need for available employment. Further training opportunities could be available. For more information about the project, contact the Sussex Tech Adult Division at 302-856-9035.

Sciple appointed president

Employees Dulce Balderas and Richard Thomas stand in the new Check And Mail Services on South Market Street in Blades. Photo by Brandon Miller

Check and Mail Services opens

By Brandon Miller

Richard Thomas once owned The Mailrooms, on Sussex Highway in Seaford, but he had to close the business due to medical issues. Bernard Michel, a former employee of BancTec, use to pick up computer parts at The Mailrooms every morning. He always thought that the mailroom business would be a good one to get into. He already owned a building at 800 S. Market St. in Blades, half of which he was leasing out to Cafe Milano. Michel decided to open a mailroom business in the other half of his building naming it Check And Mail Services. Michel hired Thomas to work for him. Thomas brings 17 years of field experience to the job. Another employee, Dolce Balderas, was chosen for her skills with computers. Her sister also works for Bernard in a different store. “We offer a little bit of everything, including packing, shipping, bill payment, money orders, faxing, copies and phone cards,” says Thomas. “And now we are offering 10 to 50 percent off of FedEx shipments. Soon you will be able to cash checks here too.” People can also make money through an eBay sales service. If you drop off your unwanted items, such as antiques or collectables, they will sell them for you on eBay and put cash in your pocket. Check And Mail Services serves the surrounding area within a 30-mile radius. “It’s a good business decision to open here in Seaford, because it’s a larger town,” Thomas says. Check And Mail Services is open Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and it is closed on Sundays. For more information, call 628-3033.

Scott

Moore

Help for displaced workers

The Sussex Tech Adult Division is working with the Delaware Department of Labor and the Delaware Workforce Investment Board (DWIB) to help displaced workers. Sussex Tech staff will conduct workshops to help these individuals find new employment. The program is funded through the DWIB using Federal Stimulus money. A key component in the program is assessment of and instruction in appropriate workplace behaviors. To be successful with this effort, input from employers is being sought. Employers are being asked to complete surveys that show what they consider important for an employee to be successful in their organization. The training program will attempt to teach potential workers appropriate workplace skills and behaviors. Individuals who complete the program will earn a certificate that will include a transcript of skills. The initial 18-hour assessment and workshop session will be held over a three-day period at the Department of Labor One-Stop Center in Georgetown. Follow-up sessions, called WIN Sessions (Workforce Improvement Network), will be held in the Career Training Center at

Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus announces that Judith A. Sciple, of Georgetown, assistant to the campus director, is currently serving as the national president of the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations (NCMPR). In her position as assistant to the campus director of the Owens Campus, Sciple oversees institutional advancement, marketing, public relations, strategic planning, alumni relations, and higher education Sciple partnerships. During

her 17-year tenure at the college, she also has held the positions of marketing and public relations director and college relations coordinator. Sciple has held several positions on the NCMPR Board including District 1 director, 2004-2006; treasurer, 2006-2008; and vice president/president elect, 2008-2009. Upon completion of her term as president in March 2010, she will serve on the executive board for two more years, as immediate past president in 20102011 and past president in 2011-2012. Sciple holds a master’s degree in public administration and is a candidate for a doctorate in Educational Leadership at the University of Delaware. She is a mentor for Delaware Tech’s Leadership Development Program and a member of the Sussex Economic Development Action Committee.

America’s Mattress opens

Rommel’s America’s Mattress located at 123 W. College Ave. in Salisbury, Md. recently opened for business on Memorial Day weekend. Joe Johnson of Fruitland, Md. guessed the correct amount of money stuffed in a mattress and went home with $795 in cash. Howard Twilley of Ocean City, Md. won a Spirit 310 Grill, retailing at $499 in a drawing. America’s Mattress is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday.

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PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

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PAGe 8

MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

Century 21 Ramey Real Estate celebrates growth By Lynn R. Parks

Since merging his two offices into one, Gordon Ramey, owner of Century 21 Ramey Real Estate in Seaford, has seen a 300-percent increase in sales. Some of that increase, he acknowledges, is due to low interest rates and the new first-time homebuyers’ tax credit. But much of it, he says, is because now, all 32 of his agents are together in one office, on U.S. 13 just south of Dukes Lumber. The company’s former offices in a building on Pennsylvania Avenue in downtown Seaford are for lease. “It builds energy and excitement to have more people together, all talking about real estate,” Ramey says. Even before the merger, though, the real estate company had the highest volume of sales in the area last year, according to the Sussex County Board of Realtors. The company sold 150 properties in 2008, totaling about $30 million in sales. It was also voted the best real estate company in Sussex County in 2008 and 2009 in reader surveys conducted by Metropolitan Magazine, Salisbury. Gordon credits his agents for the real estate company’s success. “We have great agents here,” he says. “We all have fun, always do the right thing and work hard. It’s all about making sure that the buyer and seller are both happy.” He is also proud of his company’s involvement in the community. Agents raise money for the Sussex County branch of

Easter Seals: They hand out bags in which people can mail in old electronic equipment to be recycled and Easter Seals receives a donation for every piece of equipment that is sent in. They sponsor monthly truckload sales of Schwan’s frozen foods and Schwan’s donates from 10 percent to 20 percent of its sales to Easter Seals. They even held a dance in March that raised $10,000 for Easter Seals. Agents also collect toys for Toys for Tots, collect food for St. John’s United Methodist Church, Seaford, and participate in the annual Seaford Christmas parade. Last year, they won the Mayor’s Choice award for their float, “There’s Snow Place Like Home,” featuring real estate agent Ed Higgins as a singing snowman. The company also sponsors teams for area benefit golf tournaments, including the Seaford Kiwanis Club tournament and the Horsey Foundation tournament. “We donate a lot to the community,” Ramey said. Ramey and Steve Tull opened their own real estate and development company, Tull Ramey Real Estate, about five years ago. In 2006, they became part of Century 21, an international real estate company. Tull Ramey merged with Broad Creek Realty about a year and a half ago, acquiring the office building on the highway. In May, the company changed again, becoming Century 21 Ramey Real Estate. Tull is operating Tull and Tull Builders, located in the office on Pennsylvania

Gov. Jack Markell said that the lawsuit filed against him, the Department of Health and Social Services, and DHSS Secretary Rita Landgraf by the National Association of Chain Drug Stores and another trade group will not intimidate the Administration into paying Walgreens higher State Medicaid reimbursement rates. State officials were not notified of the lawsuit before it was filed in U.S. District Court in Wilmington. The suit seeks to prevent the state from achieving savings from its recent changes to Medicaid pharmacy reimbursements. The changes are part of the Markell Administration’s plan to responsibly address the state’s historic $800 million budget

shortfall while preserving essential government services such as access to Medicaid. Instead of helping the state solve the budget challenge, Illinois-based Walgreens abruptly announced recently it was leaving the Medicaid program effective July 6 because of the reduced rates. Walgreens is the only member of the National Association of Chain Drug Stores that has withdrawn from Delaware’s Medicaid program. Other major pharmacies and independently owned pharmacies throughout Delaware remain in the Medicaid program and continue to serve Delaware’s Medicaid population. “Walgreens didn’t like the change to the reimbursement, so we met with compa-

Century 21 Ramey Real Estate now features 32 agents all together under one roof on U.S. 13 just south of Dukes Lumber.

Avenue. Barbara Smith, who has been a real estate agent for 23 years and who was working for Broad Creek Realty when it merged with Tull Ramey, said that Ramey runs a good office. “No one is ever forgotten here,” she said. “Whether it’s for birthdays or anniversaries, Gordon is always

sending us flowers, buying cakes or taking us out for lunch.” She also credits the company for having the most up-to-date equipment available. “We have the best technology,” she said. “All our computers are updated and new. And when you have the best technology, it makes your job easier.”

Governor Markell, state legislators respond to Walgreens lawsuit

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low-income health insurance program after Walgreens announced last week that it would drop out of the program rather than accept a 2 percent reduction in state prescription payments for Medicaid clients. State officials were seeking the reduction to help cover an estimated $800 million budget shortfall in the fiscal year that begins July 1. Walgreens was the only pharmacy chain in Delaware that rejected the state’s request to trim payments to deal with the budget crisis. Katz said he was outraged because of the influence Walgreens wields in the local marketplace. About 157,000 Delawareans – roughly one in five citizens – are enrolled in Medicaid.

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Speaker demonstrates benefits of humor to survivors By Lynn R. Parks

There’s nothing like a good belly laugh to make you feel better. At least, according to Dr. Paul McGhee, a doctor of psychology and founder of the Laughter Remedy, a program designed to help people improve their lives with humor. McGhee, of Wilmington, spoke Sunday during the western Sussex celebration of National Cancer Survivors Day. The event, sponsored by the Nanticoke Cancer Care Center, was held in the Moose Lodge, Seaford. Nearly 120 people attended, including nearly 60 survivors of cancer. A cancer patient is defined as a survivor from the moment of diagnosis to his or her death, said Terry Clifton, cancer care coordinator at the center. The event was open to all cancer survivors, no matter where they received their treatment, she added. “You’ve got to keep your sense of humor,” McGhee told the audience. “A sense of humor can be a powerful tool in learning to manage anxiety and uncertainty.” To get the audience in a humorous mood, he led them in several activities, including a game of Simon Says and a lesson in how to have a good belly laugh. “First you smile,” he said, giving an exaggerated demonstration. “Then you squint your eyes and raise your eyebrows. Next, let your lower jaw drop. Then laugh.” After the exercise, McGhee told the people in the audience to pay attention to how they felt. “There’s something about having a real let-go belly laugh that makes you feel better,” he said. McGhee also said that humor helps to relieve the stress of having to carry around a lot of “stuff,” or worries and anger. Walking around the room with a bar stool around his neck, he talked about the tools that cancer patients as well as their family members and friends can use to help relieve stress. “You might be having a three-chair day,” he said, picking up two chairs to add to his load. “Finding humor in your day can help you feel better and can break down barriers to emotional expression. I’m not saying that humor is going to extend your life. But there is all kind of evidence that it can improve the quality of your life.” This was the fourth year that the Nanticoke Cancer Care Center has sponsored an event to celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day. Clifton, who coordinates the event, said that participation has increased

Grafton Adams, Seaford, joins in a game of Simon Says, led by Dr. Paul McGhee, a doctor of psychology and specialist in the benefits of humor. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Anne Sulzbach, Seaford, has a good belly laugh, under the direction of Dr. Paul McGhee, right, a doctor of psychology and specialist in the benefits of humor. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Dr. Paul McGhee, of Wilmington, explains the benefits of humor and laughter. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

every year. “This is a day to celebrate our cancer survivors,” she said. “We have music, food, cake, entertainment and door prizes.” Mayor Ed Butler read a proclamation declaring that Sunday was Cancer Survivors Day in Seaford. He said that he is grateful to live in Seaford, home of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and its cancer care center. “I thank God that we have such a fine hospital and staff right here. It makes me proud,” he said.

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Lori Jones, patient advocate at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, sings during the celebration of Cancer Survivors Day held in Seaford Sunday. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Plans move forward for a new Montessori School By Lynn R. Parks A group of parents and educators hope to open a charter school in the Laurel area. The Natural Discoveries Montessori Charter School would primarily serve children in the Delmar, Laurel and Seaford school districts, said Jennifer Whitcomb, Delmar, Md., president of the school’s board. The school would open in September 2011. Its application to be approved as a charter school by the state is due in December and a decision would be issued by the state by April 2010.

If approved, the board would have 16 months to get the school up and running. The school’s board is looking for property in the Laurel area on which to establish the school. It requires at least four acres, Whitcomb said, but would prefer six to eight. Charter schools are independent public schools. They were authorized by the state legislature in 1995 and each school’s charter has to be approved by the Delaware Department of Education and the state school board. They receive state funds for general education, based on student enroll-

ment, but do not get state funding for facilities. While they are not required to abide by many of the regulations traditional public schools are held to, charter schools are required to follow state curriculum standards and administer state tests. Currently, the state has 18 charter schools, only one of which, the Sussex Academy of Arts and Sciences, located in Georgetown, is in Sussex County. That school has about 325 students in grades six through eight. Whitcomb said that organizers of Natural Discoveries were attracted to western Sussex County by its lack of education choices. They decided on Laurel because of its central position between Delmar and Seaford. “Students in Delmar, Laurel and Seaford really lack options,” she said. “While there’s not anything wrong with public schools, sometimes students and their parents need choices.” In its first year of operation, the school would have kindergarten through the third grade. Plans are that every year after that, it would add a grade, up through the eighth grade. As planned now, the school would have a maximum of 360 children. Its goal would be to have no more than 20 students per classroom, Whitcomb said. The school would use the Montessori method of teaching, a child-centered method based on the child development theories originated by Maria Montessori, an Italian

educator who lived from 1870 to 1952. In a Montessori school, classroom work emphasizes self-directed activity on the part of the child, who is helped along by the teacher, or “guide.” The learning environment is adapted to the child’s own level and physical activity in learning abstract concepts and practical skills is stressed. Reading is taught through a combination of phonics and whole language. Natural Discoveries would also teach sign language to all of its students. It would especially welcome deaf and hearing-impaired children, Whitcomb said. Whitcomb said that the school’s board currently has nine members, including parents and certified Montessori teachers. It is looking for two additional members and would like for those two members to live in the Laurel School District.

For your information: Natural Discoveries Montessori Charter School will hold a public informational meeting Thursday, June 25, 6 p.m. in Laurel Town Hall. Its board meets the fourth Thursday of every month at 4:30 p.m., also in Laurel Town Hall. Those meetings are also open to the public. For additional information, or for details about the two vacancies on its board, call board president Jennifer Whitcomb, 410-7425052 or e-mail her at director@ndmschool. org. Information about the planned school is also available online at www.ndmschool.org.

Charlie Cordrey, a long-time golfer and Art Scott, Wood Creek Golf Links, looking over the Laurel and Seaford STAR newspapers.

Breakfast meeting - Billy Banning of Trinity Transport was the speaker at the Laurel Chamber of Commerce’s May 28 monthly breakfast meeting. Banning told the audience, honesty and ethics, trust and loyalty, focus and compassion, servant-leadership and wisdom, teamwork and creativity, customer service and work ethics, and continuous improvement were qualities that they expect from everyone in their company. The company has five regional offices as well as the Seaford Corporate office. Photo by Pat Murphy.

Registration at Delmar High School By Cathy Shufelt The Delmar School District will be holding registration for the 2009-2010 school year during the district’s summer hours. Summer hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday beginning the week of June 15 and running through the week of Aug. 10. New students may register at the district/school office located at 200 N. Eighth St. during the following registration days: June 15-18, 22- 25, 29-30; July 1, 6-9, 13-16, 20-23, 27-30; and Aug. 3-6, 10-13. The office will be closed July 2-3 due to the holiday.

Students wishing to register with the Delmar School District must be accompanied by a parent and/or guardian and should report to the school’s main office. A guidance counselor will be on hand to help with the process of registration. The following documentation must be provided at the time of registration: birth certificate, immunization records, proof of residency (no P.O. Boxes), copy of student’s last repot card, school transcripts, completed withdrawal form or withdrawal letter from previous school, and copies of custody/guardianship papers if applicable. For more information, or to make an appointment, call 302-846-9544, ext. 135.

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PAGe 13

MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

New Woodland ferry is down more than it’s up Running fewer than 80 days, it has been broken, with one ailment or another, for about 150 days By Lynn R. Parks In the seven and a half months since the new Woodland Ferry was delivered to its docks on the Nanticoke River, the vessel has operated for fewer than 80 days. It has been broken, with one ailment or another, for about 150 days. And that’s a true inconvenience for Jack Knowles, who lives on the Seaford side of the river, and his daughter, Kelly Griffith, who lives on the other side. Kelly has multiple sclerosis and when she needs her parents’ help, they can’t rely on the ferry to get them there. They have to drive into Seaford, across the river at Blades and down River Road, about a 15-minute trip. “The ferry’s a real thorn in my side,” said Knowles, whose grandfather operated a two-car ferry at the Woodland crossing from 1948 through 1959 that was very rarely out of service. “I think whatever they do to fix it now is just temporary. It’s too much boat for the river.” The new, six-car ferry replaced the old three-car ferry, which was 46 years old. Both Knowles and Woodland native Donna Angell blame the new ferry’s woes on faulty engineering. “I think it just wasn’t tested enough before it left Salisbury,” home of Chesapeake Shipbuilding Corporation, which built the boat, said Angell, who now lives about a mile and a half from Woodland. “It was rushed.” But Delaware Department of Transportation spokeswoman Tina Shockley said that the ferry got a complete going-over before being put into service. “The ferry was inspected and tested thoroughly during construction and before leaving Chesapeake Shipbuilding,” she said. Angell said that the new ferry, when it’s working, “is beautiful crossing the river.” But she has no confidence that this latest round of repairs will be the end of it. “Something is definitely wrong with it,” she said. “Maybe it was too big of a project for the state to handle. Maybe they should have stuck with a smaller ferry.” Again, Shockley disagrees. “The size of the ferry…is irrelevant,” she said. “The issue here is that we have a unique, custom-made mechanical vessel that requires specialized maintenance and operation.” The first problems with the Tina Fallon were detected Dec. 19, a little more than a month and a half after the ferry went into service. Repairs to one of the boat’s two thrusters, the mechanisms that propel the ferry, and to the ramps, which had to be reinforced with steel, took until April 28. Numerous leaks of hydraulic fluid also had to be stopped. “Previous hydraulic leaks have been addressed and consequently we have been seeing less of them,” Shockley said last week. “As with anything mechanical, there are a lot of connections and workings, and we are working to ensure that they are all adjusted as to prevent any future leaks.”

Most recently, on May 26, the ferry was taken out of service because fishing line got caught up in one of the thrusters. “We want to emphasize that this is not a problem with the ferry,” Shockley said. “It is something that happened to it, not something that went wrong with it. This is not a reflection of the ferry.” While the ferry is out of commission, Shockley said, workers are correcting problems with the docks’ ramps. Work on the ramps, which at high tide do not meet correctly with the boat’s ramps, causing cars to scrape bottom when entering the ferry, started last Thursday. Shockley said that this latest round of work — fixing the ramps, removing the fishing line from the thruster and cleaning up oil that got into the thruster because of the fishing line — will be completed next month. “We are probably looking at after July 4th for a start-up date,” she said. Meadows Hydraulics, the Fruitland, Md., company that is repairing the thruster, and DelDOT “are working to get this repair done as quickly as possible,” she added. In the meantime, the state is also ordering a second thruster, to keep on hand in case the ferry has another encounter with fishing line. Shockley said that the state is spending $17,000 on repairing the boat’s thruster. All other repairs have been covered by a warranty from Chesapeake Shipbuilding. Angell said that the situation with the ferry is an embarrassment for DelDOT. “Now, whenever you mention the ferry, people just roll their eyes,” she said. And she hopes that the ferry is at least operational for the Woodland Ferry Festival, set for Sept. 12. “We can only hope,” she said.

Seaford voters okay proposal By Lynn R. Parks Voters have OK’d the city of Seaford’s plan to borrow $2.7 million for improvements to its water system. In Friday’s referendum, 44 people voted in favor of the plan and 9 against. A little more than half of the total debt, $1.4 million, will be paid by the federal government through the economic stimulus package. Interest rate on the remaining $1.3 million will be about 2.99 percent. The city will be required to pay 1 percent of the total loan, or $27,294, at the time of the loan approval. The project will improve the water systems in two areas: in Westview, the community near West Seaford Elementary School and the intersection of Sussex Avenue and Stein Highway; and along Bridgeville Highway, from Herring Run Road to Dutton Avenue. The city wants to replace water mains in the two areas. It also wants to install water loops, eliminating dead end pipes where water just sits.

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PAGe 14

MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

Realtors Association helping would-be homeowners By Carol Kinsley

The Sussex County Association of Realtors invited would-be homeowners to a “Go Local!” program at the association office in Georgetown June 11 where experts from the housing industry, including banking officials, mortgage counselors, home inspectors and, of course, real estate agents, were available to answer questions on how to make the dream of home ownership a reality. It was evident from the number of displays set up that help is available — lots of it. The Delaware Housing Authority recently has allocated to Sussex County $2 million in federal funding for its Neighborhood Stabilization Program, created under the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008, otherwise known as the housing stimulus bill. The program’s mission is to stabilize communities that have suffered from foreclosures and abandonment by offering low- and moderate-income buyers the chance to purchase homes left vacant. Homes are available in five targeted zip codes: Georgetown, Greenwood, Laurel, Milford and Seaford. “The whole idea behind this initiative is to create sustainable, long-term affordability for qualified home buyers so they can put down roots in communities that have been greatly affected by the foreclosure crisis,” said Brandy A. Bennett, Sussex County’s housing coordinator. “The goal is to build and strengthen a community by cutting down on vacant, foreclosed homes. That is precisely what ‘stabilization’ suggests.” Partners in the effort with the county’s Community Development and Housing office are Sussex County Habitat for Humanity, the Milford Housing Development Corp. and the Diamond State Land Trust. Sussex County would use the federal funding to lend money to those partners, which would buy and rehabilitate the homes, then pay back the program as houses are sold to new buyers. Homes could not be sold for profit, and all money collected back into

BASF given permission for trailer By Lynn R. Parks

The Seaford City Council last week gave permission to the BASF Corporation in the Seaford Industrial Park to put a temporary trailer on its property. The 24-foot by 64-foot modular office will be put on the west side of the BASF building, city manager Dolores Slatcher told the council members. It will allow the company to move its employees out of the manufacturing plant, where their offices are now located. “They want to do this for health and safety reasons,” Slatcher said. Trailers are not permitted under the city code. At a hearing held recently, the city’s Board of Adjustment recommended that BASF be granted a waiver to have the trailer for three years. “They will have to come back to the council for another waiver if the trailer is not removed in three years,” Slatcher said. BASF, which is a chemical company, employs 30 people in Seaford.

the fund would be used for future NSP purchases and rehabilitation projects. Buyers must meet eligibility and income requirements, and homes must be purchased for use as primary residences, not for investment properties or second homes. Sussex County plans to use a portion of the federal funding to establish a home buyer assistance program that would make up to $50,000 in zero-interest loans available to qualified buyers. The loans would be secondary to the buyer’s principal mortgage. The county will partner with NCALL Research Inc. and First State Community Action Agency to provide federally required counseling for all home buyers making use of the program. Community Development and Housing Director William Lecates said, “This is a team effort all the way around. Without this support from our partners, we would not be able to do this.” He added that the first loans under the program would be extended within the next month or so, and that the federal funding must be used by September 2010. Experts at the meeting were all in agreement that potential buyers should meet with a lender first. A list of lenders who have expressed willingness to participate in the county’s Homebuyer Assistance Program was distributed. It includes Wilmington Trust, Wells Fargo, County Bank and MetLife Home Loans.

Ruth Briggs King, executive vice president of Sussex County Association of Realtors, helps Ida Brown and her daughter Karen complete paperwork at a meeting June 11 in Georgetown. Brown is in the process of purchasing a home and is seeking help in making repairs on the house. Photo by Carol Kinsley

An even earlier step in the right direction would be to sign up for “Growing Your Money” classes offered in Newark, Dover and Georgetown to help participants take control of their financial future. The financial literacy course, offered in five two-hour sessions, is provided by NCALL Research Inc. For more information, call (302) 678-9400 or visit www.ncall.org.

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The summer driving season has been met with a pinch at the pump for motorists. The average U.S. retail price for regular grade gasoline reached $2.64 a gallon on last Friday, up 5 cents from a week ago. Although $1.47 below the record price of $4.114 set last July, gas prices have risen $1.02 (or 63%) since January 1. Crude oil broke through the $70 mark this week, trading above $73 (an eight-month high) on Thursday. However, a firmer U.S. dollar and views that prices have risen too far too fast despite signs of economic improvement led crude oil prices to fall below $73 on Friday to settle at $72.04 at the market’s close. Crude oil prices have more than doubled since hitting $32.40 a barrel in December (the weakest level in five years), but are still less than half their record peak last July at over $147 a barrel.

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The EIA reports U.S. crude oil stockpiles fell sharply by 4.4 million barrels due to sliding imports, but remain about 19% higher than a year ago. “We expect to see small gas price increases through the 4th of July. We do not expect dramatic price swings like we saw last summer. But, when people spend more money to fill up their gas tanks, they have less money in their pockets to spend on everything else and that doesn’t help economic recovery,” said Catherine L. Rossi, manger of Public and Government Affairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic. Local pricing On Tuesday one station in Seaford was selling regular gasoline for $2.579 a gallon, up 14 cents from a week ago. To help put that in perspective, if your car uses 15 gallons of gas a week, your cost increased $2.10 in one week. On May 14, about a month ago, the price of gas was $2.25 a gallon. In a little more than a month, the cost of those 15 gallons of gas increased $4.80.

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Once the financial questions are resolved, a realtor will assist in finding the right property and help “get you that key.” For more information about Sussex County NSP, contact (302) 885-7777 or go to the Sussex County Department of Community Development and Housing Web site at www.sussexcountyde.gov/dept/ communitydev.

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MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

PAGe 15

Looking for a few good Riverfest Survivor Castmates! If you missed it last year, Seaford Subway and Hungry Howie’s Pizza invite you participate in this year’s Nanticoke Survivor Challenge on Friday, July 10 at 5:30 p.m. Teams of five will participate in a series of challenges designed for maximum fun, without the starvation and deadly jungle animals.

The seven Nanticoke Survivor events will be unveiled to the participants the night of the event, and will test each team’s ability to work together, their balance and endurance, and showcase just how “close” each team really is. Several teams will take the course at one time to bring out

Legislation protecting cognitively disabled children, requiring municipalities to sign off on proposed charter changes and protecting first responders were among several bills released from House committees last week. One bill that cleared the House Judiciary Committee, House Bill 204, would add paramedics, EMTs, fire marshals and fire police officers to a list of first responders whose death can result in a first-degree murder charge. According to existing statutes, a person who recklessly causes the death of an on-duty law enforcement officer, corrections employee or firefighter while they are performing their official duties can be charged with first-degree murder and eligible for capital punishment. “All first responders – police officers, paramedics, firefighters and EMTs – put themselves in harm’s way each and every day under the most stressful situations, just to protect and in many cases, save our lives,” said Rep. Earl G. Jaques Jr., D-Glasgow, the lead sponsor of the bill. HB 204, dubbed “Michelle Smith’s Law,” is named after Delaware City Fire Co. paramedic Michelle Smith, 30, who was killed on Dec. 22, 2008 while attending to a man who fell off his motorcycle on U.S. 13. She was struck by a speeding BMW that also sideswiped a police cruiser on the scene of the accident before hitting her and the motorcycle rider. Taye, who allegedly fled the scene, has been charged with first-degree murder. The bill moves to the full House for consideration. The House Judiciary Committee also released legislation that would increase the penalties for sex offenders who commit a sex offense against a child with cognitive disabilities. House Bill 206, sponsored by Rep. E. Bradford “Brad” Bennett, D-Dover South, would increase the penalties for the crime of “sex offender unlawful sexual conduct against a child” when the victim is under 18 and has a cognitive disability. It also amends the definition of “without consent” to help protect those with cognitive disabilities. The bill defines cognitive

disability as “a developmental disability that substantially impairs an individual’s cognitive abilities including, but not limited to, delirium, dementia and other organic brain disorders for which there is an identifiable pathologic condition, as well as nonorganic brain disorders commonly called functional disorders.” It also includes “conditions of mental retardation, severe cerebral palsy, and any other condition found to be closely related to mental retardation.” “We need to protect our most vulnerable citizens in society. Children, especially children with cognitive disabilities, are not in a position to protect themselves from sexual predators,” Rep. Bennett said. HB 206 goes to the full House for consideration. The Housing and Community Affairs Committee released House Bill 209, which would require that a county or municipality seeking to change its charter or offer legislation that would affect its governance to submit evidence that the governing body supports the proposal. Under HB 209, sponsored by Rep. William J. Carson Jr., DSmyrna, the legislative body of a county, city or town must provide a document – letter, e-mail, resolution or other means – showing that the political subdivision endorses the proposal. “We have had situations where an administrative official from a local government has come to us with legislation, and we in the General Assembly were surprised to find out that the full council was not even aware of it,” Rep. Carson said. “This bill will ensure that any proposal a county or town sends us is voted on by the governing body so we legislators know that they support and endorse it.” HB 209 moves to the full House for consideration.

Several bills are released from House committees to full House

the best of their competitive nature, but teams will be ranked based on overall time. Teams interested are asked to log onto the website at HYPERLINK “http:// www.nanticokeriverfest.com” www.nanticokeriverfest.com and complete the registration form and sign the waiver. The cost to participate in this year’s event is

still $30.00 per team and all participants must be at least 16 years of age. The Nanticoke Riverfest is a community festival held in downtown Seaford on July 9-11. Festivities include a carnival, food and craft vendors, artisans, children’s activities, car, motorcycle and antique tractor shows,

live entertainment and more! Teams are encouraged to participate from local businesses, fire departments, ladies auxiliary, civic groups, church groups or just a group of friends who want to have some fun! For more information, call Trisha Newcomer at 302.629.9173 or visit www. nanticokeriverfest.com.

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Monthly Coffee

State Rep. Daniel Short will be holding his Monthly Coffee Friday, June 19, at 7:30 a.m. in the Pizza King back dining room. He invites his constituents in the 39th Representative District to attend and bring their questions and concerns.

On1Annual OctoberPercentage 3, 2008, FDIC Yielddeposit (APY). This offer applies to personal accounts only. CD rate based on a $1,000 minimum balance and insurance fromterm. A penalty may be charged for early CD withdrawal. Fees could reduce earnings on the appliestemporarily to a 3-yearincreased and 5-year $100,000 $250,000 rate per depositor account.toAdvertised is valid as of 6/9/09 and subject to change daily without notice. through December 31, 2009. 2 On 10/3/08, FDIC deposit insurance temporarily increased from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor, per deposit category, through 12/31/13.

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

I have written about 1000 columns this past 20 years I have had an astonishing realization. It came to me last week, when ynn arks I was asked how long I have been writing this column. ‘I had no idea, when “Well, let me think,” I said. I started this, that it When I started, my son had just completed the second grade and my would continue for so daughter was 4. She was born in long. To be honest, I 1985… am surprised that it “I think it was sometime in 1989 has and that ... I had that I started,” I said. 1989, and this so much to say.’ is 2009. Two thousand and nine minus 1,989, that’s 19 — no 20. Twenty. Twenty! graduate school, made to our pediatrician. “Hey, I’ve been doing this column for “He had to stop to read the eye chart at 20 years,” I announced. “We should have a the end of the hallway,” I wrote. “Thank party!” goodness he has learned his shapes.” In fact, it could even be 20 years this The many stories about our pets, espeweek, because in my first column I wrote cially Maisey, about my parents and about about Flag Day, and hanging out the Stars and Stripes to celebrate. Flag Day, June 14, my husband. And of course tales of our old farmhouse and our back porch renovation. was Sunday. I had no idea, when I started this, that “So, how many columns have you writit would continue for so long. To be honten?” my husband asked later when I told est, I am surprised that it has and that, as it him about my realization. Another calculaturned out, I had so much to say. tion — good thing paper and pencil were I don’t promise another 20 years, or handy. even another two. I never know where my Let’s see, I murmured. Twenty years, brain, which I often say has a mind of its times about 50 columns a year. Zero times own, will take me. So for now, at the end 0, 5 times 2, carry the 1… of Column No. 1001 (approximately), let’s “Oh, about a thousand,” I concluded. just say Happy Anniversary, with no promOne thousand columns, from the first ise of many happy returns. about the flag to the most recent about And — Who’s bringing the cake? writer’s block. No wonder, after all those columns, that I was drawing a blank last week. In all that writing, I have covered a variety of topics, from the mundane — a mouse breathing its last under our Christmas tree 11465 Sycamore Rd., — to the momentous — the inauguration Laurel, DE • 302-875-6922 of President Obama. The humorous — me (1/2 mi. from . 13) falling down the steps in mid-February and Hrs: Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30; Sun. 12-4 landing on a heart-shaped cookie cutter, Complimentary Gift Wrapping resulting in a bruise “you know where, and www.thehenhousede.com just in time for Valentine’s Day” — to the sad — the deaths of several friends and relatives, including my grandfather, and of two dogs, Goshen and Maisey. I have told readers about my daughter’s first day of kindergarten and her college graduation. About my son’s prom — classmates teased him for weeks about him asking me, “Where’s the cummerbund go?” and I’m sure he’ll appreciate me bringing it up again — and about the weddings of both our children. And I have written on occasion about politics, in particular about what I believe is an imperative to protect the environment. If I ever learn that I convinced even just one person to pay attention to climate change and to reduce his or her carbon footprint, I will consider myself a success. Through the years I have won a few awards and received a number of compliments, including a letter from a woman who agreed with my rantings about the Bush Administration and who included in the envelope a few sheets of George W. Selected Framed ART Bush toilet paper. I have also heard complaints, most memorably from a woman who, after I wrote about the mockingbirds in our yard, told me to “get a life.” Handbags - Willow Tree - Bath & Body Among the many columns I have composed, I have my favorites: The Aprils Yankee Candles - Rowe Pottery Fools column when I announced that I was Fashion Jewelry - Framed Art quitting then took it back. The columns Garden Flags - All Occasion Cards about my daughter’s first visit to the college that she would end up attending, and about HANGING BASKETS & PATIO POTS! the last trip my son, who was preparing for

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 17

Every day is Independence Day at Manor House! Join us for a BBQ to celebrate our nation’s independence, and yours!

Seaford Golf & Country Club held an after hours mixer for the Seaford Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, June 11. From left are Charles Butler, president; Judy Cullen, House Committee chair; Jenny Davis, secretary; Tom Darby, Membership Committee chair; and Pattie Kretchmer, general manager. Photo by Brandon Miller

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PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Community Bulletin Board is Wednesday, July 1 at 10:30 a.m. • “Be Creative @ Your Library” hosts “Don’t Wait, Create” with Entertainer Bruce Fite on Thursday, July 2 at 1 p.m. • “Express Yourself @ Your Library” presents “Xtream Photography Part 2” on Thursday, July 2 at 3:30 p.m.

Farmers and Artisans Market

Seaford’s Farmers and Artisans Market will be open for the 2009 season from Saturday, June 13 to Saturday, Sept. 26 in Kiwanis Park on Saturday mornings from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Kiwanis Park is located at the intersection of Atlanta Road and Stein Highway. We encourage local growers to join us by bringing your locally grown and/or organic fruits, vegetables, cut herbs, plants and cut flowers. For registration information, visit www. seafordmarket.vpweb.com or email or call the Market Master, Sonja Mehaffey at 2cats-sonja@comcast.net or 302-2459494.

Seaford Historical Society picnic

The annual picnic for members of Seaford Historical Society will be held on Sunday, June 28, at the VFW Banquet Hall on Middleford Road at 6 p.m. Each family is asked to bring a covered dish of vegetable, salad or dessert. Chicken and beverages will be provided. The charge is $5 per person. Anyone who would like to attend but is not a member may join that evening. Membership costs $20 per person or $35 per family. Reservations are required and must be made before June 22 by calling Anne Nesbitt at 628-7788.

Seaford Library

• “Be Creative @ Your Library” this summer and explore the worlds of music, dance, art, books and more. The 2009 Summer Reading Program is open to young people from birth to entering the sixth grade. Registration for the Reading Program starts on Monday, June 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with make and take crafts. All programs are open to the public and free of charge. • Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. starting June 24, Baby Bookworms and Toddler Time are combining during the Summer Library Reading Program. • “Be Creative @ Your Library” presents “Strike up the Band” Instrument Petting Zoo on Thursday, June 25 at 1 p.m. • “Express Yourself @ Your Library” presents “Xtream Photography Part 1” on Thursday, June 25 at 3:30 p.m. • The Seaford District Library has joined IHOP in an effort to raise money for the Library. All you have to do is eat a meal at Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth or Salisbury IHOP locations and return an itemized receipt along with a comment card to the Seaford District Library. We must have the comment cards with itemized receipts in order to receive the reimbursement. The Seaford Library will receive 10% of the total receipt. • “Be Creative @ Your Library” will be showing “Ratatouille” on Monday, June 29 at 1 p.m. This movie is Rated PG. • “Be Creative @ Your Library” presents “Family Comedy Jam” presented by the Delaware Comedy Theatre on Tuesday, June 30 at 6:30 p.m. • Baby Bookworms and Toddler Time

‘Books and Birdies’ Golf Classic

Seaford Library and Cultural Center: The 1st Annual “Books and Birdies” Golf Classic will be held at the Seaford Golf & Country Club on Friday, July 24. The cost is $125 per player and includes use of the driving range with range balls, greens fee and cart, a hospitality cart, buffet luncheon, and prizes for many on-course contests, tee gifts, door drawings, and putting and chipping contests. Proceeds from the tournament go toward construction of the new Library and Cultural Center. Registration forms are available at any Sussex County Library and at the Seaford Golf & Country Club. For more information, contact the Pro Shop at the Club at 629-2890.

‘Send a Kid to Camp’

Morning Star Publications, publishers of the Laurel Star and Seaford Star newspapers is joining the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club to help send area kids to summer camp. The “Send a Kid to Camp” project features a series of “parking lot” performances by local singer, Tony Windsor. Any business interested in hosting the performances in their store parking lot can contact Maria Motley at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club by calling 628-3789.

Mansion which is open Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. At other times call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828 for tickets. The drawing will take place at the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion on Dec. 13, 2009. The income from this raffle helps with the maintenance of the Seaford Museum and the Ross Mansion.

Get a tax write off and help someone with life controlling problems. Call Delaware Teen Challenge at 629-2559.

SSA opens for season

The Seaford Swimming Association is open for the 2009 season. Hours are noon to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. SSA, a family-oriented pool located in a wooded setting on Craigs Mill Pond Road, is welcoming new members. Recreational swimming, picnics, swimming lessons, swim team, parties and family activities are offered throughout the summer. For more information or a membership application, call 629-8773 or visit www.swimssa.com.

Class of ‘98 reunion

The Seaford High School Class of 1998 is planning a reunion on Friday, June 26 at the Dogfish Head Brewpub in Rehoboth Beach. For more information, email Andrea Jones at seaford98@gmail.com.

Delaware Teen Challenge

Do a good deed today for Delaware Teen Challenge (formerly Seaford Mission). Donate your old or unused vehicle.

American Legion Auxiliary

Laurel American Legion Auxiliary is offering two - $1,000 scholarships. Applications can be picked up at the office of Laurel High School.

Yard Sale

Don’t miss all the treasures from the “This and That” yard sale on Saturday, June 20, from 7 a.m. until 11 a.m. This yard sale will be held at Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Avenue, Laurel. Scrapple sandwiches will also be available for sale.

Community mentors needed

The Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program seeks adult volunteers to mentor a middle school-aged child. Mentors can meet during school lunch time or after school.

Blades VFC 75th anniversary

Blades Volunteer Fire Company is offering a 75th Anniversary collector basket featuring a special laser engraved lid. The American Traditions Basket Company in Canal Fulton, Ohio makes the hard maple handmade baskets. Celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Blades Volunteer Fire Department by buying a commemorative basket. The “Buckeye” Basket features a special laser engraved wood lid, commemorative brass tag, bicentennial weave, and plastic protector. The basket measures 6.50” x 3.75” and sells for $45 each. For more information or to pre-order baskets contact James Bratten at 629-4896. Cash or checks are accepted for payment.

Seaford Historical Society raffle

The Seaford Historical Society is offering a raffle featuring a day on the Nanticoke River in the Spring of 2010. This all-day excursion accommodates a party of six people on a boat ride that leaves from the Marina at Nanticoke River Marine Park in Blades, Seaford. Other festivities included with this trip are mid-morning snacks on-board ship, lunch in Vienna, Md., a self-guided walking tour of historic Vienna, a visit to the Vienna Heritage Museum and refreshments on the ride back to Seaford in the afternoon. A raffle ticket to win this trip costs only $5 or five tickets may be purchased for $20. Tickets are available at the Seaford Museum which is open Thursdays through Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m., or at the Ross

Tony Windsor’s

‘Parking Lot Tour to Send a Kid to Camp’

Sponsored by Morning Star Publications in partnership with the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club

Tony will be performing Country music, Motown and the classic rock sounds of the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s in area store parking lots. Visit your favorite store and stop by to make a donation to help send a local child to the WSB&G Club’s “Summer Fun Club.” For more information about the “Send a Kid to Camp” project, including how to have your store featured in the tour, call Maria Motley at 302-628-3789.

Tax deductible contributions can be made to: Send a Kid to Camp, W.S. B&G Club, 310 Va. Ave., Seaford, DE 19973


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009 Mentors and students meet throughout the summer at the Laurel Public Library and enjoy the benefits of scheduled field trips and events. Mentors are asked for a one hour per week commitment for 12 months. For more information, contact Shawn Phillips at 629-7790, ext. 17.

Laurel Mayor & Council

The Laurel Mayor and Council will be holding a public hearing on Monday, June 22, beginning at 7 p.m. or as soon as possible thereafter. The purpose of the public hearing is for the presentation of the town’s proposed FY 2010 Budget. The public hearing will be held in Mayor and Council Chambers, 201 Mechanic St., Laurel.

Summer Reading Program

• Tuesday, June 23, 2 p.m., Michael Forestier’s Storytelling Concert - all ages • Tuesday, June 30, 2 p.m., Shake, Rattle and Roll with Suzanne and Jim - all ages • Tuesday, July 7, 2 p.m., Megan Hicks, Storytelling Empress and Origami Swami - all ages • Tuesday, July 14, 2 p.m., Mike Rose, magician - all ages • Tuesday, July 21, 2 p.m., Movie and Munchies - Pre-k through 6th grade • Tuesday, July 28, 2 p.m., Winterthur Museum presents “Design Like Dupontâ€? grades K-6 • Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2 p.m, Rehoboth Summer Children’s Theater presents “Anansi, the Tricksterâ€? - all ages • Weekly Programs (beginning Monday, June 22) • Acting Club, Mondays, 6:30 p.m. grades 2-6 – be part of a real play! • Preschool Storytime, Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m. - day care homes welcome • Kids Create Art Club, Wednesdays, 2 p.m. - grades K-6 • 10-Page-A-Day Book Club, Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. - grades 2-6

Old Christ Church opens

Old Christ Church services will continue through the first Sunday in October. All services begin at 9:30 a.m. Old Christ Church is 237 years old and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The church is unique in that it’s never been altered from its original condition. A free will offering will be taken up at the concert to benefit the church. For information or directions, call 2286097. The church will open for tours during Laurel’s 4th of July celebration at noon, 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Tours will be led by Vice President Kendal Jones. Any donations given to the Old Christ Church League are now tax deductible as the League was recently successful in becoming a 501C3 (nonprofit) organization.

Laurel VFD event

On Saturday, July 25, from 6-9 p.m. (Doors open at 5 p.m.) the Laurel Fire Dept.; 205 W. 10th St., will have a dinner, a 50/50, a Chinese auction and door prizes. Dinner menu includes: hot roast beef sandwiches, fried chicken, corn on the cob, bake beans, coleslaw, chips & pretzels, desert, beer, soda, ice tea, cash bar. Tickets are $20 a person, or $35 a couple. Advance ticket sales only. For tickets call 875-3081 or email sbrittingham@lauelfiredept.com.

PAGE 19

board in a relaxed atmosphere. Registration is required, so call 349-5309 or come by the library to sign up.

Scrapbook classes Chicken BBQ

A benefit for Wicomico Relay for Life will be held June 27 from 2 - 6 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Church at 101 E. State Street, Delmar. Cost is $7.50 and includes chicken, roll, beans, slaw and dessert. Contact the church office at 302-846-9501 or Peggy Moore at 302-846-3901 for more information.

D.H.S. class of ‘84 reunion

Delmar High School Class of 1984 celebrates its 25th class reunion on Friday, July 31 through Sunday, Aug. 2. On Friday, July 31 - social/cocktails, location to be announced. On Saturday, Aug. 1 - Delmar VFW, dinner dance at 6 p.m., tickets $27 per person. On Sunday, Aug. 2 - Old Mill Crab House at 3 p.m. Contact Lisa (Payne) Henry at 410-8962214 or LDHenry84@comcstnet. RSVP by July10.

Scrapbooking classes will be held at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center on the first and third Thursdays, each month from 1 - 2:30 p.m. Join us at the center for free scrapbooking classes in June. July classes are $3 each class. For more information call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Craft supply swap

The Craft Supply Swap at the Greenwood Public Library on Thursday, June 18, at 6:30 p.m. There is no charge for this event. For questions, please call 349-5309.

Wii Fit at CHEER Center

Wii Fit Exercise begins this month on Mondays and Thursdays at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center, 41 Schulze Road in Greenwood. Wii Fit is a combination of fitness and fun. By playing a little every day, you can work toward personal goals of better health and fitness. For more information call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Take and fill out the comment card, staple your reciept to the comment card and drop it off at The Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or The Providence Sales Cottage at Heritage Shores. For more information, call Pat McDonald at 337-7192.

Bridgeville VFC yard sale

Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company will hold a yard sale on Saturday, June 20, from 7 a.m. to noon, in the Fire Company back parking lot. Vendors Wanted. $10 per space; $15 with a table. Call to reserve space 302-337-0381.

People’s Place fundraiser

The Red Hat Lady Bugs of Bridgeville are sponsoring a fashion show fundraiser for the People’s Place, an abused women’s shelter. The event, which will take place on Thursday, Oct. 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Heritage Shores Clubhouse, includes a fashion show (clothing courtesy of Peebles), lunch, chinese auction, 50/50 and door prizes. Tickets are $20 per person. For ticket information, call 337-9733.

Charity Open golf tournament

Friends fundraiser Summer Reading Program

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library have another delicious fundraiser to promote. All you have to do is enjoy a meal

The Town of Bridgeville’s third annual benefit golf tournament, the Charity Open, is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 9, at Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville. Registration and a continental breakfast begin at 8 a.m. with the shotgun start for the four-player scramble starting at 9 a.m. sharp. A luncheon and awards ceremony will follow the tournament. Proceeds will be used to support the

The Greenwood Public Library’s adult summer reading club, “Book a Summer Getaway @ Your Library,� will be going on until Aug. 17. The summer reading club is open to anyone 18 years and older or those who have graduated from high school. To participate, register at the Greenwood Library and start reading or listening to your favorite books. Entry slips are filled out for each book; these entry slips enter you in weekly prize drawings and a grand prize drawing on Aug. 17. In addition, $1 worth of fine forgiveness will be granted for each week’s participation. For more information, contact the Greenwood Library at 349-5309.

Patriotic celebration planned

The Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 in Greenwood is sponsoring a patriotic celebration on Monday, June 22 at 7 p.m. at the Post. Guest speaker, Professor Darlene Spitzer-Antezana, history and women’s study professor at Prince Georges Community College, will highlight historical information on June’s patriotic observances: Flag Day, The Pledge of Allegiance Recognized by Congress in 1942, and the G.I. Bill signed into law in 1944. The District 4 Honor Guard will present the Colors, and light refreshments will be served. The public is invited to attend. The evening will conclude with the Ladies Auxiliary annual Patriotic Auction to benefit Operation Uplink, a program to provide phone cards for active duty military personnel and hospitalized veterans. If you are unable to attend and would like to support our troops, contact President Michaele S. Russell at 302-349-4220.

Beginning computer classes

Visit the Greenwood Public Library every Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 4 p.m. and learn the basics of a mouse and key-

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PAGE 20 Bridgeville Kiwanis Foundation, the Bridgeville Lions Foundation and the Bridgeville Senior Center. This year’s tournament will have a new format whereby more players will have a chance at winning a prize. The event will feature a scramble, but the field will be separated by flights according to handicap. Hole sponsorships are available for $125. The single-player registration fee for the tournament is also $125. To become a sponsor or to register for the golf tournament, contact Peggy Smith at 337-7135.

Railroad Garden Tour

The 2009 Western Area Shoreline Railroad Garden Tour will be held at the following locations: Saturday, June 27 - 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (rain date Sunday, June 28) • Hollis and Mary Noel’s (18272 Progress School Road, Bridgeville) • Don and Sylva Park’s (26209 Old Carriage Road, Seaford) Sunday, June 28 • Jay and Cindy Davis (6347 Underwoods Corner Road, Smyrna) Saturday and Sunday, June 27-28 • Jay and Sandy Ruark (102 S. Park Lane, Federalsburg, Md.) Look for Railroad signs. The trains run weather permitting. For a complete list, visit www.trainweb.org/shoreline.

Heritage Day in Harrington

The city of Harrington extends an invitation to all those who would like to participate in its 31st Annual Heritage Day celebration on Saturday, August 28. That includes exhibitors, crafts demonstrators and vendors offering food and other merchandise who would like to reserve space for the day. Planners are also looking for anyone who would like to join the parade - individual marchers, groups, floats, organizations, vehicles, bands and others. For information or entries, call Bill Falasco, Harrington Parks & Recreation, 398-7975.

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009 wide variety of music will be provided by D.J. Jennifer, as well as two dance instruction sessions during the evening. The event is B.Y.O.B., and will include a 50/50 drawing. Snacks will also be available. Must be 21 or older to attend. Proceeds from the event will benefit Kiwanis programs for local children and youth. For more information, call 302-9348424 or e-mail gmillsborokiwanis@mchsi. com.

Bluegrass Festival

The 15th Annual Peninsula Bluegrass Festival will be held at the Marvel Carriage Museum Grounds, Georgetown, on Friday, June 19, at 3 pm. until 11 p.m. and Saturday, June 20, 10 a.m. until 11 p.m. Friday Admission is $15; Saturday is $25; and weekend $40. Free rough camping with weekend ticket. In case of inclement weather it will be held indoors. For more information, call 875-2595 or 430-4036.

Sussex Pomona Grange Picnic

Sussex Pomona Grange Picnic will be held Sunday, June 28, 2 p.m., at Bedford Street Park (next to Georgetown Presbyterian Church, at 203 North Bedford St., Georgetown. This is hosted by Midland Grange #27.

Amateur Radio Field Day event

The Sussex Amateur Radio Association (SARA) in association with the Sussex Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) will participate in the annual Amateur Radio Relay League (ARRL) Field Day event that begins at noon on Saturday, June 27 and ends at noon on Sunday, June 28. The event will be held at the Army National Guard Training Center in Bethany Beach. The two-day event, that will run continuously through the night, will feature local amateur radio operators, “hams,” who will make radio contact with other hams throughout the United States and around the world. This event is open to the public and all age groups. For more information about ham radio in this area, visit www.sussexamateurradio.com.

Strikes for St. Jude Kids

The first “Cat Coutry/Dr. Pepper Strikes for St. Jude Kids” Bowling Tournament is Sunday, June 28 from noon to 2 p.m. at Millsboro Lanes on Mitchell Street in Millsboro. All proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Bowling enthusiasts and businesses are encouraged to form a four-person team and raise a minimum of $50 per bowler ($200 per team). Corporate partnerships are also available. Teams will receive a game of bowling with free shoe rental, free food and drinks courtesy of Dr. Pepper, a chance to win door prizes and more. There will also be a Chinese auction table and 50/50 raffle drawings. To sign up your team or to find out more, call 410219-2500.

Millsboro Kiwanis to host dance

The Kiwanis Club of Greater Millsboro will host a dance on Saturday, June 20 at the Millsboro Fire Hall, on State Street in downtown Millsboro, from 7 to 10 p.m. Tickets are $10 per person at the door. A

Visit to Salisbury Zoo

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center will visit the Salisbury Zoo on Friday, June 19. We will leave the center at 10 a.m. and the zoo at 2 p.m. Cost, which is $4 for members and $6 for non-members, includes transportation and a picnic lunch. The public is invited to attend. For reservation or more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Wheel 2 Wheel Show

Join the Wheel 2 Wheel Show crew as they head to the Bridgeport Speedway for the George Wingate Memorial Race on Tuesday, June 23 in Bridgeport, N.J. The bus leaves Seaford from the Quiznos Subs parking lot at 2:30 p.m. then stops at the Georgetown Wal-Mart, and possibly in

Milford. Tickets are $40 which includes your trip, ticket into the speedway, a hot dog and soda. For tickets or more information, call Jessica at the Delaware office at 302-8754196 or email Wade Perdue at Wade@ wheel2wheelshow.com. The Wheel 2 Wheel Show is hosted by Wade Perdue along with his brother Brandon, Kelly Putz and meteorologist Harlan Williams. The show can be heard live every Tuesday night from 8 to 9 p.m. on 97.5 and 105.9 Cat Country Radio. For more information, visit www.wheel2wheelshow.com.

Seaford AARP trips

Seaford AARP Chapter 1084 is offering the following trips to the public. Sept.2 - Rainbow Dinner Theater“Uncle Chick’s Last Wish.” The uncle everyone loved who was so full of humor and left a last wish including a nude beach. Cost: $70. September 12-18 - Mackinac Island, Michigan. In Michigan you’ll visit Frankenmuth, Mackinac Island, Sault Ste. Marie, and St. Ignace. Cost: $790 pp double. October 16 - Strasburg Railroad with lunch on the train. Cost: $69. November 16-20, Christmas at the Biltmore Estates in Ashville, N.C. Cost: $589 pp double. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180 for more information on all the above trips.

Rails & Trails

Escorted motor-coach trip to Waterville Valley, New Hampshire sponsored by the Seaford WPS, Sept. 21-24. Four days and three nights – cost $639 per person, includes lodging, three breakfasts, three dinners, entertainment, cruise on Lake Winnipesaukee, Castle in the clouds, Rock Estates, Mt. Washington Cog Railway, dinner on Lake Winnipesaukee Railroad, Wolfeboro Village, all gratuities, taxes and baggage handling. For additional information contact Frances Horner at 629-4416.

Branson trip

Nanticoke Senior Center and Curran Travel are providing a trip to Branson on Tuesday, Oct. 13, to Wednesday, Oct. 21. The trip includes: round trip Motorcoach transportation, eight nights accommodations, great sightseeing tours, admission to nine great shows including Mickey Gilley, Lee Greenwood & the Bellamy Brothers and Shoji Tabuci. Cost is $1,075 per person-double occupancy, $1,355 single occupancy. A $200 deposit is required. Call the center for more information, 629-4939.

NAARFE The Georgetown Chapter (1992) of the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees will hold their next meeting at noon on Monday, June 22 at the Pizza King Restaurant in Seaford. We will be installing the new slate of officers for 2009-2010. For more information, call Charles Singman at 302-337-0337.

Knitting Guild Association The “Sea Purls” chapter of the Knitting Guild Association meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 10 -2 p.m. at the Cheer Community Center in Georgetown on the corner of Route 9 and Sand Hill Road. The next meeting is on Wednesday, July 1. Lunch is available. New members always welcome. For details, call 302854-6776.

39th District Democrats The 39th District Democrats will hold their monthly meeting on June 18, at Pizza King in Seaford. Join us in welcoming guest speaker, Pat Ewing, the new Sussex County Democratic chairperson. There will be a “Meet & Greet” at 6:30 p.m., followed by the meeting at 7 p.m.

Georgetown AARP Join Georgetown AARP Chapter 5340 at their monthly luncheon meetings held on the first Monday of each month at 11:30 a.m. at the Sussex Pines Country Club. For details contact Dee Richards at 302-841-5066.

Women’s Democrat Club On Thursday, June 18, the Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club will meet at 5:30 p.m. in the Sussex Pines Country Club in Georgetown. The guest speaker is Hugh Leahy from the Delaware Community Foundation. Contact Catherine King for details and reservations at 628-9080 or e-mail Ladyedk@comcast.net. Members are asked to bring a friend. Guests are always welcome.

Republican Women’s Club The Seaford Republican Women’s Club will hold its annual picnic on Thursday, June 25, at the home of Sally Higgins on 115 North Hall St., at 11 a.m. Each member is asked to bring a covered dish of salad, vegetable or dessert. Chicken and beverage will be provided. Lt. Richard Jamison of the Seaford Police Department will talk to the group about how the downturn in the economy has caused an increase in crime and how one needs to protect one’s self from personal attack. Anyone who has not been contacted regarding a reservation should call Anne Nesbitt at 628-7788.

Embroiders’ Guild The Sussex Chapter of Embroiders’ Guild meets on the second Monday of the month - Sept. through June at 10 a.m. at the CHEER Center in Georgetown. We welcome all levels of stitchers from beginner to advanced. For details call 410-208-9386.

Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications.com or drop off at 951 Norman Eskridge Hwy., Seaford (Home Team Bldg.)


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 21

Bacon Switch memories to downtown Laurel problems

I really thought it was Mark Twain as the featured lecturer at at urPhy the Laurel Historical Society Annual Dinner on June 11. “I say we start Jay Hill certainly drew a large keeping east Market audience, 119 people to be exact and some such as Reid Williamson cleaned up or push traveled some distance to hear Jay tell “The Bacon Switch Story.” It it down like the rest was an evening to remember and of the downtown.” the audience participation told everyone just how much it was enjoyed, by all. Jay with deep emotions told Program this year, but plenty of other everyone about the groups will be there. More later! many generations The Laurel Dutch Inn dining room is of his family who undergoing renovations. I am sure this will grew up in Bacon be an even nicer place when this is comSwitch. pleted. From the two general stores to the One morning early last week as I exited school to the railthe Bank of Delmarva in a hurry, typical road and how many for me, I could not help but notice this family heirlooms tremendous pile of cans, bottles and trash had been passed on on the sidewalk from the narrow alley beto him from previtween the Globe Building. ous generations, he Jay ‘Mark Twain’ Hill As I got close to the scene, from the covered it all and as Alley came David Sully pulling another I said many in the audience added to the pile of that garbage that for sure had been story. thrown out there by residents of the Globe Mrs. Elanor Paradee almost stole the building. A conversation with the pershow, as she stood up and said, “I am so spiring Sully revealed to me that he just proud of him (Jay).” cleaned up that mess three months ago. Jay was one of her students back in David owns the Odd Shop next door but 1973 and she had the audience in stitches as I can see this is a constant challenge for as she told of his early shy school days. him. He also said that I should see the roof A great evening for the Laurel Historical of his building where they have thrown evSociety. erything from diapers, to more of the same as what is in the alley. Skywatch Electronics has moved I do know the back alley is almost alfrom Delmar to their new location at ways littered with trash and this is right 537 Fourth St. in Laurel. Actually, they next door to one of the nicest libraries in moved during the first week in May. Pres- the state. ident Tommy Dunn can be at the store David certainly never created this probin five minutes as he lives in Laurel. Ida lem, nor can he do anything about it. I’m Hitch is the sales consultant and secretary. sorry to say but this seems to be the pattern She has been with Skywatch 10 years or for responsibility the last few years. more. Now she has a little longer to travNo, I am not happy about this. David el, but not much as she is from Delmar. should be compensated for his efforts and Welcome to Laurel folks! the Town of Laurel and the owner of the Globe Building should get together and resolve, I mean “solve” this problem once The sign inside Bayside Seafood on and for all. Rt. 13 says it all, Mary and Charles are back and many old friends and customers I also learned Thursday evening that are certainly happy and glad to see this David Calloway asked the town for the Laurel business running on all cylinders piece of cement that was used as a mail again. Mary says she is very touched by box holder at the corner of Market on the the calls and people stopping to tell them east side of the Globe Building. They were how glad they are to see them. Well, they very accommodating and in a few minutes did say when they went to Belize to live cut the 1941 cement piece from the sidethey might be back in a couple of years walk and gave it to David. and sure enough. This tells me that my pleas to have this removed because of the rebar sticking out At the next Bethel Town Council went unnoticed until David came along. I meeting they are to discuss 40 building say we start keeping east Market cleaned lots on School Lane as well as dedicating up or push it down like the rest of the some public streets to individuals. I can downtown. see ole “mo” Elmo Stoakley now, “Can you name one Elmo Avenue after me.” David Sully as a shopkeeper deserves I’m sure Mark Shaver would really like better. Look at how nice the Chamber that as Elmo is one of his most loyal cusbuilding has become. Well, I could say tomers. more and I am sure I have burned a few

P

I have just learned that the Funsters will not be on the Laurel Fourth of July

M

people’s ears. Hope we are still friends. Laurel is my town, and yours, too.


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Church Bulletins St. Luke’s special events

The parishioners of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church has recently observed Ascension Day, Pentecost, and Trinity Sunday. On Pentecost, which commemorates the coming of the Holy Spirit in a rush of fire, parishioners all wore red. On Trinity Sunday, the Athanasian Creed, also known as Quinque Vult, was recited in unison.

Hymn Sing

Christ the Cornerstone Community Church celebrates its 13th anniversary on Sunday, June 28, at 2 p.m. The church is located on the corner of 13A and Bethel Road. There will be a hymn sing. Come and make a joyful noise unto the Lord. Outdoors – rain or shine — oyster fritters and hot dogs will be available. Call 8758150 for information.

Concert at Christ Lutheran

A Summer Evening Concert will be held at Christ Lutheran Church, 315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, on Saturday, June 27, 6-9 p.m. Bill Primrose, O’Day Family, and Esther Foskey. A love offering will be taken.

Delaware Teen Challenge

Delaware Teen Challenge Fundraising Banquet will be Friday, June 19, at 7 p.m. at Sam Yoder’s Community Building, 89 Hunting Quarter Road, Houston. Tickets are $15 and includes dinner, beverages and program, Teen Challenge Choir and Testimonies. For tickets and table reservations of eight contact Sue

Bramble at 629-2559. Love offering to follow. Guest speaker: Pastor Tim Dilena, visiting pastor at Times Square Church. Pastor Tim has been the visiting pastor at David Wilkerson’s Time Square Church for the last 12 years, where he ministers monthly.

Free community luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (subs and homemade ice cream) on Saturday, June 20 from noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard (west side of 13A, approximately 2 miles south of town). Any questions, call Shirley at 875-2314.

Ninety and Nine celebrates 25 years

The Ninety and Nine extends an invitation to all women to join them for their 25th Birthday Celebration at The Cannon Mennonite Church in Bridgeville, on Monday evening, June 29, at 6:30 p.m. The Ninety and Nine is a ministry, which was formed in 1984 by a group of women who care about the needs of others. If you would like a night out full of fun, food, fellowship and lots of encouragement, then The Ninety and Nine is the place for you. There are no membership dues to pay. We welcome your presence. Our guest speaker for the evening will be Margie Biasotto of Ocean View, Del. It was Margie’s mother’s godly example and prayers that brought Margie to the Throne of Grace. As a result her growing love for Jesus and His Word led her to Bible Study

Old Christ Church offers services Old Christ Church services will continue through the first Sunday in October. All services begin at 9:30 a.m. with the exception of the Blessing of the Animals at 4 p.m. This year, the SPCA will join in the Blessing of the Animals and all donations will benefit the SPCA. All services will The Old Christ Church east of Laurel is 237 years old. be led by the Rev. Blanche Powell and Ken Athey. Music will be provided by Janet Jones. Old Christ Church is 237 years old and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The church is unique in that it’s never been altered from its original condition. A free will offering will be taken at the concert to benefit the church. For information or directions, call 228-6097. The church will open for tours during Laurel’s 4th of July celebration at noon, 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Tours will be led by Vice President Kendal Jones. Any donations given to the Old Christ Church League are now tax deductible as the League was recently successful in becoming a 501C3 (nonprofit) organization.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010S.C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Centenary United Methodist Church

“Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford

Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956

Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: BibleS tudy 7P M


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009 Fellowship. After many years of study she became a substitute teaching leader before becoming one of the lead teachers to “The Women’s Fellowship” of Fellowship Bible Church in Roswell, Ga. She also has trained women to teach the Word of God and speaks at retreats and church conferences. Margie attended the University of Texas Margie and her husband, Larry, have two sons and a daughter.

Victory in Grace Tabernacle

Victory in Grace Tabernacle (VIGT), formerly located in Laurel, at 11528 Commercial Lane in Hickman Commercial Park behind Johnny Janosik Furniture Store, has moved to 128 East Market Street (Rt. 24 West) between Delaware and Central avenues. Look for our logo on the window. Sunday School is at 10 a.m.; Sunday morning Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Sunday afternoon Worship Service, time to be announced each week; Prayer Gathering, Tuesday, 6 pm.; Bible Study, Wednesday, 7 p.m.; Love First Fellowship, Friday, 7 p.m.; Healing and Miracles Service , first Sunday, 5 p.m. Victory in Grace Tabernacle has served the Laurel community since opening its doors July 5, 2004. In addition to Laurel, Missions in the Appalachians in Kentucky and West Virginia; migrant farms on the Eastern Shore of Delaware and Maryland; Native American Indian Reservations on the East Coast; communities in Jamaica, West Indies; and the Royal Family Kids Camp in Pennsylvania have all been supported by VIGT.

PAGE 23

Laurel Baptist Church VBS

Vacation Bible School (Theme: Wildwood Forest) is scheduled for June 22-26 at Laurel Baptist Church from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Ages three years to sixth grade. For details call Pastor Steve Booth at 8752422.

VBS at Union UMC

Vacation Bible School will be held at Union United Methodist Church in Bridgeville on June 22-26 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Program is for ages 3 to grade 5. Free dinner served. For details call 302-337-7409.

Latin Mass

A Latin mass according to the Missal of 1962 is celebrated on the third Sunday of every month at 3 p.m. at Holy Cross Church in Dover. The mass will be celebrated on June 21. The mass is always a Missa Cantata using traditional Gregorian chant. For further information, call 302674-5781.

Centenary UMC VBS

Centenary United Methodist Church, Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, will be holding Vacation Bible School, entitled Son Rock Kids Camp, from June 22-26, 9-11:30 a.m. Children from the ages of 3-12 years are welcome to attend. Each day children will learn through the Bible story, music, songs, crafts, games and snacks. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. Register by picking up a form at the church office. For details contact Sharon Whaley at 875-2778.

Answers from the Bible

Q: A:

Pastor Gerald Cliver

Is it time to revise the bible again to keep up with current ideology?

It is a dangerous mistake in dating truth with a calendar. Truth is always truth and never needs to be updated. Truth stays the same, whether we know it is true or not. Just because I do not know a candle's flame will burn my hand does not mean it will not burn my hand. Sincerity nor culture are the test of truth. In Leviticus 17:11 that there is life in the blood, but this was not known until modern times. Even our forefathers here in America were bled to get rid of bad blood, when we know today that giving blood is the gift of life. All statements in the Bible are as true in the age of computers as it was in the age of chariots. The psychology and character as explained by God of man is still fresh and right because it is truth for man, not because of man. This is why Paul could make the statement, "All scripture is God-breathed ...so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work." 2 Timothy 3:16-17

Welcome…

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

The Gift of His Love Let others know where you are and when you meet. To advertise in this directory,cal l

629-9788

Union

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

22606 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE

302-359-6331 Weekly Services: Sunday: 10 am Tuesday: Prayer 7-8 pm Thursday: Bible Study 7 pm

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

VICTORY TABERNACLE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids-Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12), DivorceCare 7:00 Prayer Meeting, Men’s Group, KidStuf 103 (K-6 Kids & their parents, 1 & 3rd Wed.)

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel

Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries

Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Obituaries Emogene Elizabeth Custis, 86

Emogene Elizabeth Custis passed away on Tuesday, June 9, 2009, at Seaford Center Genesis HealthCare in Seaford. She was born July 31, 1922, in Laurel, the daughter of William and Louise Shelton Stewart. She worked for more than 40 years as caregiver, cook and housekeeper for the former Governor Elbert Carvel and family. She had also worked as a cook at Dutch Inn. She was a lifetime member of New Zion Methodist Church in Laurel where she served as a steward. She is survived by three daughters, Arlene Harris-Holmes of Tampa, Fla., Marilynn Dunbar-Smith of Seaford, and Lavonda Mills-Cromwell of Laurel; eight grandchildren, Amber L. Custis of Atlanta, Ga., Tonda L. Milton and Anthony L. Mills of Seaford, Bryan K. Mills of Laurel, Toni N. Grant of Salisbury, Md., Brent S. Milton of Harrington, Darrin L Mills of Seaford, and Trina L. Milton of Laurel; 28 great-grandchildren, four great-great-grandchildren; three sisters, Ethel Griffin of Laurel, Ann Armstrong and Corrine Wade, both of Waterbury, Conn.; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Albert J. Custis; a sister, Helen Holden; two brothers, Alfonso “Skinny” Stewart and William “Boots” Stewart; and a stepson, James Copes. The funeral was held Saturday, June 13 at St. Matthews First Baptist Church in Laurel. The Rev. Nathan McCoy and

Minister Reginald Morris Sr. officiated. Interment followed at Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Laurel. To share memories with the family, visit www.framptom.com.

Janet Jenkins, 56

Janet Jenkins, of Laurel died Tuesday, June 9, 2009, of injuries sustained from an accident while vacationing in North Carolina. Born in Russelville, W.Va., on Sept. 11, 1952, she was the daughter of Calver and Elizabeth Callison of Delmar. She graduated from Delmar High School in 1970. She married Ted Jenkins on Aug. 20, 1971. She loved to get out and ride her motorcycle alone or with friends. She was a charter member of the EMANON Riders Riding Club. In addition to her devoted husband, she is survived by her two children; a son, Matthew Jenkins and his wife Jody of Laurel; a daughter, Elizabeth Jenkins of Laurel; two grandchildren, Matthew and Cody Jenkins of Laurel; two sisters, Hazel Coleman and her husband, Ralph of Rocklin, CA and Velma Callison from Dublin, VA; several nieces and nephews and uncle, Granville Whaley of Laurel. Along with her parents, she was preceded in death by a sister, Judy Callison of Dublin, VA. A memorial service is 10 a.m. on Thursday at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church located at Susan Beach Rd and Providence Church Rd., west of Delmar.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her name to the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation (RFK), 302 Ridgefield Court, Ashville, N.C. 28806 or St. Mark’s Churchyard Fund, 5491 Watson Road, Laurel, DE 19956.

Virginia Sacks, 87

Virginia “Ginny” Sacks, of Seaford, passed away at the Seaford Center on June 11, 2009. She will be missed by her family and the many people she loved and who loved her. Ginny was born on September 25, 1921 in Brooklyn, NY to Celisa and Pierrepont Van Cott. She grew up in Valley Stream, NY and graduated from Valley Stream Central High School and Scudder Secretarial School. She worked for Standard Brands, Inc. and the National City Bank of New York in New York City. In 1944 she married David Sacks while he was in the Army Air Corps. After World War II, they lived in Lexington, KY. David attended the University of Kentucky and Ginny worked in a Lexington bank. They settled in Seaford, in 1952 where Ginny worked as a bookkeeper. She was an active member of the Mt. Olivet U.M. Church serving as treasurer of the United Methodist Women and in many other capacities for the church. She was a member of P.E.O. Sisterhood, Chapter J, and a member of DAR, Mary Vining Chapter. Ginny loved spending time with her family and friends; she also enjoyed doing needlework, volunteering at the Methodist Manor House Gift Shop, and traveling. She was an avid sports fan; the UNC Tarheel basketball team and the NY Yankees have lost a staunch supporter. Ginny will be missed by many including her husband of 65 years, David Sacks; daughter Kathleen S. Heller and her hus-

band Mark J. Heller and their children Scott and Jeff; daughter-in-law Kathryn S. Sacks and her children, Lauren and Benjamin; sister Marion Lynch and her husband Brian J. Lynch; sister-in-law Alberta Sacks Erbe and many nieces and nephews. Ginny was predeceased by her son David M. Sacks in April 2009. A memorial service was held at Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church, 315 High Street, Seaford, on June 17. Family and friends visited at Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford, on June 16. Burial was private. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church or P.E.O. Foundation c/o Dottie Van Helmond, 50 Whistling Duck Drive, Bridgeville, DE 19933.

Charles M. Truitt, 91

Charles M. Truitt, of a lifelong resident of Delmar, died Saturday, June 13, 2009 at Delmar Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. He was born December 30, 1917 in Delmar, a son of Larry and Lovey Foskey Truitt. Following graduation from high school, Charles proudly served his

In Loving Memory of

DENNIS MESSICK Who Passed Away June 14, 1997

There are not enough words to say how much we miss you and love you. You will never be forgotten. Sadly missed by THE MESSICK FAMILY

Memory of Helen Mae Bennett Departed March 18, 2009 My heart aches for what it has lost It is hard sometimes to let someone go who means so much to me. I let the memories warm my heart and cherish the memories to ease my sorrow. I think of the times together and joy you brought to me. Missed but not forgotten.

Happy Anniversary June 15, 1956 Loving Husband, Dick Bennett


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009 country in the US Army during WWII where he was wounded in combat. He retired in the late 1970s from E. I. DuPont in Seaford as a Safety Inspector after many years Charles Truitt of service. Charles was passionate about the history of his town of Delmar and authored many writings recording the history of Delmar. He was instrumental in forming the Railroad Museum, along with the late Grover Lecates, which is housed in the Delmar Public Library. He served many years on the Board of Trustees at the Delmar Public Library and was a former member of the Delmar Lions Club. He was also a long time, active member of St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church in Delmar. Being awarded the Delmar Citizen of the Year Award was one of his greatest achievements. He cherished time spent with family and especially enjoyed camping trips with family to Treasure Beach. He was very artistic and loved working with stained glass. He is survived by daughters, Peggy

Morris and her husband, Donald, and Penni Truitt, all of Delmar; grandchildren, Cathy Quay and her husband, Sam of Hollidaysburg, PA and Scott Morris and his wife, Linda of Waldorf, MD and Delmar; great grandchildren, Samantha and Shane Quay; a great-great grandchild, Aiden Carsten; and a brother, George B. Truitt of Delmar. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife of 61 years, Irene D. Truitt, who passed January 10, 2001, a sister, Helen Livingston, brothers, Russell Truitt, Louis Truitt and Jimmy Truitt and a great grandson, Kane Carsten. A funeral service was held on Tuesday, June 16, 2009 at Short Funeral Home, 13 E. Grove Street, Delmar, where family and friends called one hour prior to the service. The Reverend Marsha Carpenter will officiate. Interment will follow at St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church, 100 E. State Street, Delmar, DE 19940, or Riverton United Methodist Church, c/o Mrs. Glenda Beauchamp, 11260 Sharptown Road, Mardela Springs, MD 21837. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

What Must I Do to Be Saved? Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. ~ Romans 3:23

Stella Mae Lewis, 83

Stella Mae Lewis of Seaford, went home to be with the Lord on Monday, June 1, 2009, at the Seaford Center. She was born in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, a daughter of James and Lillie Wyatt. Stella was a wonderful homemaker and will be dearly missed by her son, Tommy Lewis and wife Linda of Lewes; daughters, Carol Cook and husband Bob of Lewes, Charlotte Clark and husband Bobby of Smyrna, Lillie Stivers and husband Tom of Smyrna, Susie Spicer and husband Jimmy of Seaford and Lynn Rogers and husband John of Seaford; a sister, Edna Roberts of North Carolina; 11 grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; and several loving nieces with their husbands and nephews. She is preceded in death by her husband, Albert Lewis; brothers, Willard and Roma Wyatt; and sisters, Pearlie Huffman, Rosalie Hawkins and Johnsie Wyatt. The funeral was held at Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home in Laurel, on Tuesday, June 2. The Rev. Ronnie Wyatt officiated. Interment was in Blades Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Stella Mae Lewis’s name to: Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. ~ Romans 10:9

John Farlow Higgins, 78

John Farlow Higgins, of Seaford, passed away peacefully at home June 14, 2009. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edwin and Edith Higgins and three brothers, George, Dick and Joe, all from Seaford. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Joyce Hallman Higgins, and four children: Iva and husband John Morris and granddaughter Shelsea from Roxana, Amy and husband Tom Grassey and grandchildren Austin and Julia from Morrisville, N.C., Ed and wife Amy Higgins and grandchildren Alex and Ross of Seaford, and Luke Higgins and fiance Missy Wilgus of Roxana. He was a graduate of Seaford High School, Class of 1949, and of the University of Delaware. He was a member of Sigma Nu. He was an United States Air Force Veteran, member of Virgil Wilson Post 4961, Nanticoke Post 6 American Legion, and a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford. Services and burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions to Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963. Arrangements by Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

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The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. ~ Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ~ Romans 5:8

PAGE 25

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PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

MERIT program teams talk about finding their ‘voice’

By Carol Kinsley

Six teams of young people in the Minority Engineering Regional Incentive Training (MERIT) program made presentations at the Boys and Girls Club in Seaford on Saturday, June 6, telling how they have found their voice. The topic idea came from Steve Covey’s book, The Eighth Habit of Highly Effective People — that being to “find your voice and inspire others to do likewise.” Finding your voice, Covey said, means engaging in work that genuinely taps your talents and fuels your passion.” The MERIT program was started 32 years ago by the DuPont Company in Seaford and included students in Sussex County and the Lake Forest School District. It has been under the leadership of public school educator and administrator John Hollis since that time. Students who have completed sixth grade are nominated for the program by school officials, with recommendations focused on citizenship, love of learning and potential for college level performance, explained Diaz Bonville of Rehoboth, president of the parental advisory group. The MERIT program includes a science club, a three-week summer enrichment program, field trips, residential college campus experience for older students and family social gatherings. On May 30, MERIT teams made quite an impression on a group from Delmarva Power, which sponsored a wind-powered electrical generation project, providing kits for teams challenged to employ basic engineering skills to design blades for a wind machine. “We help sponsor a project each year,” said Bryan Clark, reliability process manager for Delmarva Power, who worked with regional vice president John Allen. In addition to designing blades able to generate the greatest speed and carry the maximum load, each team was interviewed as if they were a design team going before a potential purchaser, answering prepared

and off-the-cuff questions. Competition was “neck in neck down to the end,” Clark said. “There was a lot of excitement during the testing phase, with teams cheering each other.” At the “Finding Your Voice” competition, teams with names such as Top Priority, Future Brains and Transformers had 15 minutes to talk while judges rated them on organization, creativity, content, change factor and communication. The Royal Force made the first presentation, with a make-shift stage decorated like a tropical island where several treasure chests were found. While the students feigned delight at finding treasure, one among them offered a reminder that there were new treasures to be discovered and opened, and that the greatest treasure to be found is your own voice. Dorronda Bordley, for example, said her voice is public speaking. Her passion for public speaking develops her character, her personality and her chosen career as a lawyer. Teresa Jackson discovered her empowering and helping voice and uses it by volunteering and helping with computers and mathematics. Alexis Jones found her empowering voice released a passion for math and business concepts. Kyle Kellam found his voice in helping others in a variety of situations from fund-raising to theatrical performances. With his new voice, he has made several changes in his life, Kellam said. “I have become a man and put away childish things.” These young people — and teammates Nykea Fountain, Shelton Gray, Kaelyn Maull and Adwoa Nyame — each have an impressive list of achievements from scholarships won to outstanding grades, selfless volunteering and personal goals accomplished. Their coaches, the Rev. Jean Briggs and Otelia Oliver, are rightly proud of them. As Oliver frequently told them: “Good, better, best. Never let it rest, until your good is better, and your better is best.” In a tiebreaker for this competition, Royal Force was declared the best.

MS WALK - Kelly’s Crusaders MS Walk team participated in Delaware MS Walk at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville on April 19. Kelly and team raised more than $3900 to benefit residents in Delaware with Multiple Sclerosis. Thanks to all for their donations.

Members of the “Royal Force” team, Kaelyn Maull, left, Alexis Jones, Teresa Jackson, Kyle Kellam and Dorronda Bordley, went all out to include visual aids in their presentation on “Finding Your Voice: A Habit, The Habit.” On the back row are coaches Otelia Oliver and the Rev. Jean Briggs. Other members Adwoa Nyame, Nykea Fountain and Shelton Gray were unable to attend.

Coaches of the “Royal Force,” Rev. Jean Briggs, left, and Otelia Oliver beam as team members Alexis Jones, Teresa Jackson, Kaelyn Maull, Kyle Kellam and Dorronda Bordley pose for photos after their presentation for the judges on June 6.

Emily Wheatley, president of the Youth Council, encouraged participants in the Merit program to remain active and join the council. John Hollis, right, who has served as volunteer director of the Merit program for 32 years, introduced Wheatley as “one of my heroes.”


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 27

Councilman Wilson sees red when topic turns green

By Ronald MacArthur

Sussex County Councilman Sam Wilson turns red when the subject is green. Whenever the word “green” surfaces during council debates, Wilson gets on a soapbox, as he did Tuesday, June 2, during a vote on a solar electric system for a new county paramedic station in Laurel. “This green mess is a waste of money,” Wilson said. “There is no way we will make money; it will cost us money.” Although Wilson joined in the unanimous vote to purchase the $49,995 green technology system for the station, he let everyone know he wasn’t happy about it. Wilson represents residents in District 2, which includes Bridgeville and Greenwood. The county will actually pay $22,498 thanks to a 40-percent reimbursement from the state paramedic fund and a 25-percent grant from the Delaware Green Energy Fund. Robert Schoonover, county emergency medical technical services division manager, said the Delaware Office of Energy predicts the system will save the county a minimum of $3,000 annually in electricity costs, with a payback on the system in less than eight years. Wilson was upset the state reduced the energy grant percentage by half and no maintenance costs were included in the discussion. “You talk about payback, but what about maintenance costs over 10 years?” he asked. Schoonover replied maintenance costs should be minimal. Schoonover added the state does not contribute funds to the energy fund and the reason for the drop in percentage is the demand for grants has increased. The Green Energy Fund, which totals about $3.2 million annually, is subsidized by Delmarva Power & Light customers who pay an additional .000356 cents per kilowatt hour for renewables and .000095 for a low-income assistance program. For comparison, James Griffin,

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county attorney, was asked to describe his home’s solar electric system. He said the system cost $61,000 to install and he received a 50-percent Green Energy Fund grant, plus he is eligible for annual tax credits.

He said his electric bill averages about $7 a month, compared to about $200 to $300 during the peak summer months. His annual savings is about $3,000 with payback on the system in about seven years.

Wilson said the county is not getting the same deal Griffin received because of the 25-percent reduction in the state energy rebate. Griffin reminded Wilson he did not get the 40-percent reimbursement from the state paramedic fund.


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PAGe 30

MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

Police Journal Attempted murder charge follows fight in Seaford

Seaford Police report that an attempted murder occurred in Chandler Heights Apartments, Building 3, Seaford. Police said that on Saturday, June 13, at approximately 7:20 p.m. officers responded to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital for a report of a subject in the Emergency Room with multiple stab wounds. Officers learned that the victim was at an apartment at Chandler Heights when the defendant entered the apartment and began arguing with the victim. A physical struggle ensued and the defendant displayed a knife and stabbed the victim several times in the upper torso before fleeing the apartment on foot. The victim was transported to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital by private vehicle and is currently listed in stable condition. Officers began a canvass of the area and at approximately 10 p.m. located the defendant walking in the area of Woodland Mills Apartment Complex on Bridgeville Highway. Police said the defendant attempted to hide in shrubbery, but was taken into custody without incident. The defendant was processed at Seaford Police Dept. and arraigned at the Justice of the Peace #3 in Georgetown. He was committed to the Department of Corrections in lieu of $100,000 bond. Sylvester Deshields, 28, of Milford, was charged with attempted murder, possession of a deadly weapon during commission of a felony, possession of a deadly weapon by person prohibited, carrying a concealed deadly weapon, and endangering the welfare of a child. The victim was a 25-year-old male from Lincoln.

Child pornography arrest

On Thursday, June 11, the Delaware State Police Child Predator Task Force and troopers from Troop #3 executed a search warrant at a home located in the 200 block of Fox Chase Drive, Felton. The search warrant was obtained as Webster a result of an online undercover investigation into persons who are using the Internet to distribute child pornography. In this instance, law enforcement personnel were able to identify a computer or other device that was distributing these child pornography files. Follow up investigation determined the physical location and the search warrant was obtained at the Fox Chase Drive location. As a result of the search, six desktop computers, six laptops, 11 hard drives as well as other digital media was seized from the residence. Investigators interviewed several subjects until a suspect was developed. Robert L. Webster, 35, of Felton, was taken to Troop #3 for ad-

ditional investigation. Based on interviews with the subject and a forensic preview of his computer, troopers arrested and charged Webster with 29 counts of using a computer to unlawfully depict a child engaging in a prohibited sexual act (Del C 11-1109). Webster was arraigned and committed to the Department of Correction in default of default $870,000.

Trooper shoots dog during search

On Saturday, June 13, a state trooper shot a dog while attempting to arrest a suspect for threatening to kill a woman. The incident occurred on Mill Park Drive located in Coverdale Crossroads when the suspect, Edward J. Stewart, 19, Bridgeville, allegedly threatened to kill a woman. The woman later flagged down a state trooper who was patrolling in the area. The trooper was also a K-9 officer. The woman was familiar with Stewart and pointed him out while the trooper was on Mill Park Drive investigating the incident. The trooper told Stewart to stop but Stewart began to run. The trooper and his K-9 partner gave chase on foot and all three ran toward a wooded area. As the trooper rounded the back of a building, he was confronted by a dog that became very aggressive. The trooper halted along with his K-9. As the dog began to close in on the trooper, he pulled his duty weapon and fired at the animal striking it. The dog ran off after the gunfire. The trooper continued to search for Stewart, however, due to the stormy weather the search was discontinued. The SPCA was notified to take custody of the dog. No collar was present and no owner came forth to claim the dog. Stewart was arrested later in the evening when troopers returned to the area.

Moped crash fatality

Delaware State Police are investigating a crash that took the life of a 72-year-old Millsboro man. A 2001 Dodge Stratus operated by Sarah K. Hopkins, 18, of Millsboro, was traveling east in a private business drive, stopped at the intersection of Long Neck Road waiting for congested traffic to clear so she could cross to a convenience store on the opposite side. A 2008 Motofino moped, operated by Lyle L. Sutton also of Millsboro, was southbound on Long Neck Road. It is unclear whether Sutton was on the shoulder or in the travel lane. The Dodge proceeded to cross Long Neck Road. Sutton ran into the left rear fender/bumper of the Dodge Stratus with its front wheel causing the operator to be projected over the handled bars and to the ground. Sutton was not wearing a helmet, and sustained a fractured skull and other blunt force injuries which led to his death at Beebe Hospital. The crash remains under investigation. It is unknown if alcohol was a factor in this crash.

Attorney General’s Office offers advice for fighting home improvement fraud

mends using the following checklist to help protect yourself against home improvement fraud:

The Delaware Attorney General’s Office is warning consumers to be aware of home improvement fraud and announced criminal sentencings in two construction fraud cases: From June to August 2007, Wilbert C. Saunders, 53, of Newark, received over $11,000 in payments for home renovations which were never completed. Saunders pled guilty on Feb. 18, 2009 in New Castle County Superior Court to Home Improvement Fraud by False Pretense and Theft by False Promise over $1,000. He was sentenced on April 24 to 3 years and 6 months in prison, followed by 18 months probation, and was ordered to pay $11,169 restitution to his victims. During July and August 2007, Keith Tracey, 41, of Wyoming, and Deana Irwin, 43, of Camden, collected $8,316 as a down payment for deck construction and never completed the work. Tracey pled guilty on April 28 in Kent County Superior Court to Felony Home Improvement Fraud and was sentenced to 6 months in prison, followed by 18 months of probation, in addition to paying restitution to the victims. Irwin pled guilty on April 30 in Kent County Superior Court to Misdemeanor Home Improvement Fraud and was sentenced to 12 months of probation in addition to paying restitution to the victims. “Protect yourself against contractor fraud by being an informed consumer,” stated Timothy Mullaney, director of the Attorney General’s Fraud and Consumer Protection Division. “Shop around, check references, and never pay the full price in advance. By following these basic rules you’ll go a long way to avoiding many common home construction scams. And if you or a loved one has become a victim, contact the Attorney General’s office for help.” The Attorney General’s Office recom-

What to do before you hire a contractor 1. Know what work you want to have completed. Make a specific list. This will allow you to easily negotiate with contractors 2. Know what permits are needed. Even though a qualified contractor should be aware of necessary permits and inspections, you should know them too. Check with your local building and codes office before beginning a project. 3. Shop around. Meet with multiple contractors, obtain written quotes for the work you want done and compare. Think carefully before making a decision. 4. Get references and check them. Ask friends and neighbors which contractors they used for home improvement projects and whether or not they were satisfied with the results. Ask contractors for references and speak to former customers. 5. Get a timeline. Find out the proposed timeline for when a contractor will start and complete the project. 6. Never pay the full price in advance. Establish a payment schedule and stick to it. This may include an initial down payment, followed by additional incremental payments until the work is completed. 7. Put it in writing. The contractor should provide a written contract which includes a timeline for work to be completed, a payment schedule and as many specifics as possible about the project, such as types or brands of materials. Do not be induced into signing a contract by high-pressure sales tactics. Consumers who are aware of home improvement fraud and/or who have questions are encouraged to call the Attorney General’s Consumer Hotline at 1-800-2205424.

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, in conjunction with the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, is updating a fish consumption advisory for striped bass and continuing to maintain the state’s current advisory for bluefish. In addition to PCBs, these fish are known to contain other contaminants that contribute to health risks. Delaware’s new advisories recommend that those in high risk groups – pregnant women, women who may become pregnant and children under the age of six – not eat striped bass caught from Delaware’s Atlantic coastal waters, the Delaware River and Bay. For people not in the high risk groups, consumption of striped bass should be limited to no more than two meals per year for stripers caught in the Delaware Bay and, also for the first time, Atlantic coastal

waters. The public is also reminded that no one should consume striped bass or any other fish caught from the Delaware River between the mouth of the C&D Canal and the Delaware/Pennsylvania/New Jersey state line north of Wilmington. With bluefish, those in high risk groups are advised to not eat bluefish larger than 14 inches caught from the Delaware Bay and Atlantic coastal waters. For people not in the high risk groups, the public is advised to eat no more than one meal per year of large bluefish caught from the Delaware Bay and Atlantic coastal waters. With small bluefish measuring less than 14 inches, which contain less contaminants, Delaware advisories recommend up to one meal per month for all groups. For more information, contact Rick Greene, DNREC Division of Water Resources, 302-739-9939.

Fish consumption advisories


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PAGE 32

MORNING STAR

• JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Classifieds

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Resumes are now being considered for a Pastoral position in a small independent country church in Sussex County. Please send resumes to: PO Box 117 Milford, DE 19963 6/18/4tc

PART-TIME AIDE St. John’s Preschool is presently accepting letters of application for a part-time aide position (Tues, Wed., Thurs., 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.) for the 2009-2010 school year. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age and have experience working with preschool age children. Letters of application may be submitted to Preschool Administrator Connie Halter, St. John’s Preschool, PO Box 299, Seaford, DE 19973 by Thursday, July 2. 6/18/2tc

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YARD SALE YARD SALE, Fri. & Sat., 6/19 & 6/20. 505 Oak Rd., Westview, Seaford. 6/18 BIG GARAGE SALE: Rain/ shine 7am June 19 & 20. Tools, furniture, baby, household, clothing. Items from A to Z, low prices. 10293 Fawn Rd off Rt 13, 1st road past Redden, Bridgeville. 6/18 MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE, Snug Harbor, 6/20, 7 am - 1 pm. Across fr VFW, Seaford. Many household items, collectables, tins, kit. table & chairs, more. 6/18 BARN YARD SALE, Thurs., Fri. & Sat., 6/18-6/20. Early 1900 RR luggage wagon, Winross truck collection, handcrafted car & truck collection, furniture, desks, tables, adult saddle, etc. 6479 Ry Rd., Bville. 381-6119 for directions. 6/11

YARD SALE, June 27, 6 am - Noon. 23575 Young St., Seaford. Directions: 6297996. 6/18 W. SEAFORD COMMUNITY Yard Sale, Sat., 6/27, Rain Date: July 4. 1403 Allen St. Lots of items, collectibles, Longaberger, Precious Moments & more. 6/18

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AUTOMOTIVE ‘92 F-150 Standard Bed, 4 wh. dr., AT, 41k mi., AC, cassette player, $3300. 629-8526. 6/11 ‘07 PT CRUISER, blue, AC, AT, 40k+ miles, (still has warranty). Selling for $11,500 (payoff value). 2451492 before 9 pm. 6/11

WWII FOOT LOCKER, $50. 875-1862. 6/18 ANTIQUE WOOD & COAL Stoves, several; 2 Antique Wood cook stoves. Best offers. 337-8961. 6/18 OLD WOOD SIDING, 500 sq. ft., $475. 846-9788. 6/11 FOOTBALL CARDS - Tops & Stadium Club. Asking $500. I have 100’s of them in binders. I will deliver to buyer. Call for info, 6297996. 6/4

FOR SALE

SNAPPER 12.5HP, 33” HiVac riding mower with bagger, mulching blades, lights, very good cond., Asking $649 OBO. 337-3370 h; 258-4095 c. 6/18 JITTERBUG CELL Phone, 98% new in orig. box w/ access. & instruct. book. Paid $140, asking $60. 875-5086. 6/18

7.5” CRAFTSMAN MITER SAW, $25. Stihl Weed Wacker, prof. model, $100. 398-0309. 6/18

POWER PLUS EXERCISE MACHINE, nearly new, $100. 875-9401. 6/18

HARMONY GUITAR w/ case, great shape, $85. 398-0309. 6/18

‘86 LINCOLN TOWN CAR, $800 negotiable. Good running cond. 875-9401. 5/14

SWIMMING POOL PUMP & Filter by Hawyward, $250. 875-5517. 6/18

‘95 WINNEBAGO RIALTA 22’ MH, exc. cond., every option, low mi., BO over $12,000. Can be seen at 3265 Old Sharptown Rd. 875-3656. 5/14

TABLE SAW, 10” Craftsman, with stand & cast iron top, asking $150. 337-3370 h; 258-4095 c. 6/18

NORITAKE CHINA, 1 set, 12 pl. setting, Andorra Pattern. 50 pc. set Princess House Crystal. 875-2897. 6/18

5 DIGIT DE TAG #38-226, blk./wh. porcelain tag incl., $650 OBO. 629-7140. 5/21

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS

SEV. 3-PHASE ELEC. MOTORS, best offers. New 15 hp Horz air comp., cost $4000, selling $2000. 2 hp High Volume Air Compressor, $500. Post & Piling Peeler, $1500. 337-8961. 6/18

2 CRAB POTS, large, like new, $40. 875-5517. 6/18 HAMMOND ORGAN, 2 keyboards, pedals & seat, $250 OBO. 875-2113. 6/18

HANDMADE JEWELRY necklaces, earrings, bracelets, eye glass holders, lanyards for work id’s. also do minor repairs & re-string broken jewelry, reasonable. 629-7996. 6/18 RIDING LAWN MOWER, 12.5 hp, 38” cut, used 1 season. $375 OBO. Mike, 245-2278. 6/18 SELMER CLARINET in hard case, $60. 628-1880.

WINDOW AIR COND., 220 volt, 15,000 BTUs, Sears Kenmore, 25 1/2 x 18 3/4”, good cond., $125. 8469826. 6/11 HP PRINTER, DeskJet 840, exc. cond., plus unused tricolor cartridge, $40. 629-8765. 6/11 HP SCANJET 4470c Scanner & handbook, $10. Corningware French white 1 1/2 & 2 1/2 qt. round casseroles w/covers, & two 7-oz. ramekins, $20. 236-9075. 6/11 FUEL OIL TANK, 275 gal., used, $90 OBO. Mike, 2452278. 6/11 LAZ-Y-BOY ROCKER Recliner, cranberry, almost new, $50. Dehumidifier, $50. 875-8677. 6/11 QUALITY FURNITURE, several pcs., incl. color T◊, long bureau w/2 mirrors & tall bureau, likenew. 8755749. 6/11 STONEWORKS CONESTOGA Fieldstone, 150 -160 sq ft., $800. Call 629-9208. GIRL’S BICYCLE, 26”, in exc. cond. Come see at 6833 Robin Dr., Atlanta Estates. Asking $25. GARDEN CART/WAGON, new, yellow, fold down sides, 1200 lb. cap., $65, 875-9431. 6/4

TOW DOLLY: 2002 Demco Kar Kaddy with surge brakes & turning axle. Will accept up to 72” wheel base. $1,200. 628-4151. 5/14

BOATS ‘99 STINGRAY 19ORS 3.0 Mercruiser 135 hp. Great river ski boat, includes many extra, $7800. Ask for Mark. (Seaford area), 302841-8230. 6/4 ATOMIC 4 MARINE ENGINE w/Walters V Drive. Rebuilt & bench tested. $2000. 628-0312. 5/28

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES ANTIQUE WOOD & COAL Stoves, several; 2 Antique Wood cook stoves. Best offers. 337-8961. 6/18 BEATLE ALBUMS for sale, 398-0309. 6/18

Mountaire Farms of Delmarva is hosting a job fair at our plant located in Selbyville, DE. When: Saturday, June 27th Where: 55 Hoosier Ave, Selbyville, DE 19975 (Right behind the Food Lion in Selbyville) Time: 9:00am-8:00pm Immediate consideration for employment! Apply in person: General Laborers

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Are you an experienced Shoulder Cutter, Wing Roller or Tender Scorer? Would you like an opportunity to join our team and have the potential to earn up to $14.00 per hour? Come join a team that offers steady work and great people! Transportation Available Mountaire Farms of Delmarva is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Visit our Internet website to explore other exciting opportunities! www.mountaire.com


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The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777 *Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

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PAGE 34 DR SET for sale. 2 piece hutch & dining room tablemedium wood finish. $750. 337-3063. 6/4 OVER 200 VHS MOVIES, $75. 628-1880. 6/4 COLOR TV’s, 25”, $35. 19”, $25. 628-1880. 6/4 WASHER & DRYERS FOR SALE, Repairs done also. 629-9809. 5/28/2t RECLINING MASSAGE CHAIR, black, $55. 6297920 or 443-783-0845. SWIIMING POOL MOTOR & Filter by Hayward, $300. 875-5517. 5/28 PRINTER, LASER COLOR, HP1500L, Works. $70 OBO. (Seaf./Laurel) 302-2221600 gingersotheremail@ yahoo.com. 5/28 STANLEY FRONT DOOR 6 Panels w/sidelights. Brand new. Paid $654.95. $300 Firm. 628-0312. 5/28 PRESTO PRESSURE CANNING COOKER, $25. 629-6719. 5/21 FLOWERING PERENNIALS, 15 diff. types avail., $1 ea. 628-8639. 5/21 ACCORDIAN, full sized, exc. cond., $250. 16 78RPM records, variety, $25 for all. No Sunday calls. 629-4768. 5/21 QUILT & PILLOW SHAMS, $40. Computer desk, $35. 875-2233. 5/21 LEATHER CLUB ladies med. motorcyle jacket w/ zip-out Thinsulate liner, vest, chaps & riding gloves, pd. $250, worn 2x, $125. 875-2233. 5/21 GOLF CLUBS: left-hand XPC-200, $50; right-hd. Nomad, $100. 20” RCA XL100 TV, perfect cond., cable ready, $50. Hughes Network High-Speed Broadband Internet system w/satellite dish, $75. 8752233. 5/21

MORNING STAR BABY ITEMS: Fisher-Price Kick ’N Play bouncy seat, $10. Cosco stroller, $20. Graco swing, $65. 8752233. 5/21 WICKER GROUP: Sage green, 2 rockers, side table & chaise, $400. 5-digit DE tag #55588, make offer. 875-2233. 5/21 SLEEP SOFA, LA-Z-BOY, like-new queen, stripe fabric, navy, tan, burgandy, $300. 629-6337. 5/14 GAS GRILL, Charm Glow, stainless, 4 burners & 1 side burner w/elec. igniters, 2 propane tanks, 1 full, 1 used 4 times; Outdoor cvr. & locking wheels, instruction booklet, 1 yr old $235. Must sell! 875-2460. 5/14 CRAFTSMAN RIDING MOWER, mid-engine, 13.5 hp, elec. start, 30” mower/ mulcher, hydrostatic drive, model 536.270282. approx. 2 yrs. old, Sears price $1399, asking $775. 6299083. 5/14 ROTO-TILLER, Craftsman, 6.5 hp, 17”, rear tines, $500. 875-0688. 5/7 ELEC. RANGE, white, $75 OBO. 443-510-2447. 5/7 KIT. APPLIANCES: Sideby-side refrig., 20 cu. ft., water/ice in door. 30” Freestanding gas range. 24” built-in dishwasher. 30” Microwave hood combo, all white GE. All 4 $1100, you haul. 875-7775. 5/7 INT’L. 2 BOTTOM PLOW on Rubber, spare parts, great shape, new red paint, $275. 846-9788. 5/7

ANIMALS, ETC. WIRE HAIR TERRIOR & Chihuahua mix, 12 wk. old female. Lonely, needs good home, asking $75. 8750964 before 8 pm. 6/11 BIRD CAGE & FINCHES, $25. 629-7920 or 443-7830845. 5/28

• JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

LEGALS NOTICE

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that Kristin Marie Leverage of Bridgeville, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 6/18/1tp

NOTICE

On Saturday, 07/18/09 at 11:00 a.m., Peninsula Mini Storage, located at 40 S. Market St., Blades/Seaford, DE will hold a public auction pursuant to the State of Delaware Self-Storage Facility Act Title 25 Chapter 49. The following storage units will be sold or disposed of for Non-Payment of storage rent. Tenants name and last known address are listed below. Joshua Heppner, Laurel, DE, Unit 319; Edward Sanders, Seaford, DE, Unit 248. Call 629-5743 for details. Frank Passwaters, Storage Manager Peninsula Mini Storage 6/18/2tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

Bryan’s Bowling Center has on June 9, 2009 applied with the Alcoholic Beverage Control (“Commissioner”) for a bowling alley and Sunday liquor licenses, located at 1103 South Central Ave. in Laurel. Persons who are against this application should provide written notice of their objections to the Commissioner. For the Commissioner to be required to hold a hearing to consider additional input from persons against the application, the Commissioner must receive one or more documents containing a total of at least 10 signatures of residents or property owners located within 1 mile of the premises or in any incorporated areas located within 1 mile

of the premises. The protest(s) must be filed with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner at the 3rd Floor, Carvel State Office Building, 820 North French Street, Wilmington, DE 19801. The protest(s) must be received by the Commissioner’s office on or before July 9, 2009. Failure to file such a protest may result in the Commissioner considering the application without further notice, input or hearing. If you have questions regarding this matter please contact the Commissioner’s Office. 6/11/3tc

day of May, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 20th day of January, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Shirley B. Bowden 5067 Boyce Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 6/11/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Nellie E. Huston Dolby, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Nellie E. Huston Dolby who departed this life on the 14th day of May, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto James Robert Huston, Carol Jean Huston on the 1st day of June, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Administrators without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Administrators on or before the 14th day of January, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Administrators: James Robert Huston P.O. Box 465 Seaford, DE 19973 Carol Jean Huston 9131 Middleford Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 6/11/3tc

Estate of George Daniel Isenhower, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of George Daniel Isenhower who departed this life on the 9th day of February, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Dorothy Faye Johnson on the 4th day of June, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 9th day of October, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Dorothy Faye Johnson 1101 Bridgeville Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 6/18/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Herbert F. Friedel, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Herbert F. Friedel, Jr. who departed this life on the 20th day of May, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Shirley B. Bowden on the 28th

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NOTICE

Estate of Beatrice Frye Laing, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Beatrice Frye Laing who departed this life on the 11th day of April, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Barry Johnson on the 4th day of May, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 11th day of December, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Barry Johnson 647 Massachusetts Ave. N.E.

Washington, DC 20002 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 6/11/2tnc

NOTICE

Estate of Herman Levater West, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Herman Levater West, Jr., who departed this life on the 24th day of February, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Valvetta L. West, Crystal A. Woolford on the 26th day of May, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrices on or before the 24th day of October, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrices: Valvetta L. West 805 Woodland Mills Dr. Seaford, DE 19973 Crystal A Woolford 24160 German Road Seaford, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 6/4/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Dorothy S. Smith, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration WWA upon the estate of Dorothy S. Smith who departed this life on the 24th day of April, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Cathaleen S. Guessford on the 26th day of May, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix WWA without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix WWA on or before the 24th day of December, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix WWA: Cathaleen S. Guessford 415 Shepherd Ave. Cambridge, MD 21613 Attorney: James A. Yori, Esq. Fuqua & Yori, P.A. 28 The Circle Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 6/4/3tc

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 35

Taking advantage of the fifth element of flavor Right about the time that Father’s Day rolls around, the inevioretta norr table, continuing debate surfaces: which is superior – charcoal or gas? There are those who contend that you really couldn’t tell the difference if you didn’t know how the food you’re tasting was prepared. That may be open to question. For me, since I’m the one doing the backyard grilling, the easier, the better and that means I’ve got gas. I can push a button and the fire appears; I can turn a knob and adjust lid closed for 10 to 12 minutes. the temperature; and if I want to add ad3. Place the beef ribs on the grill, close ditional flavor, I can throw in some wood the lid, and reduce the heat to medium. chips. This may be heresy to the serious Turn the ribs every 3 to 5 minutes or so, so charcoal champ but consider this: 17 milthat every side gets slightly caramelized, lion grills were sold in 2008 and 70% of 15 to 20 minutes total. (If your short rib them used gas. There must be a few people pieces are small, it won’t take quite this out there on my side. Fred Thompson, long.) The ribs should yield easily to the author of Barbecue Nation knows a good touch, not unlike a medium-rare steak or bandwagon when he sees one. Out just in the way the tip of your nose feels. Reduce time for Father’s Day gifting is his new the heat a little more and brush the ribs book, Grillin’ With Gas with “everything with the sauce. Cover the grill and let cook you need to know to make gas grilling for a minute or two for the sauce to set up, simple and satisfying.” I’m with ya, Fred. and then continue to turn and brush until Here’s a sampling from Grillin’. all sides of the ribs have been glazed. 4. Remove to a platter and let sit for 5 Darned Good Boneless Short Ribs to 10 minutes, covered with foil. Serve. By Fred Thompson, Grillin’ with Gas In the Kitchen - The seasoning mixture Serves 4 to 6 or rub makes more than you will need for 1/2 cup packed light brown sugar this recipe, and it’s fabulous sprinkled over 1/4 cup granulated sugar beef brisket, pork chops, pork tenderloins, 1/2 cup paprika (try 1/4 cup smoked or, of course, pork ribs. Store the mixture paprika and 1/4 cup sweet paprika) in an airtight container for up to 2 months. 2 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt 2 1/2 tablespoons freshly ground black Virginia Pruitt’s Perfect pepper Barbecue Sauce 1 tablespoon granulated onion By Fred Thompson, Grillin’ with Gas 1/2 teaspoon cayenne Makes about 2 cups 2 pounds boneless beef short ribs, 1 large onion, chopped connective tissue removed 1 cup sugar 1 cup Virginia Pruitt’s Perfect Barbecue 1 cup ketchup Sauce or your favorite thick barbecue 1/2 cup distilled white vinegar sauce 1/4 cup yellow mustard 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black 1. In a medium bowl blend together pepper both sugars, the paprika, salt, pepper, gran1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce ulated onion, and cayenne. Sprinkle the

L

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short rib pieces liberally with this mixture until coated on all sides. Let sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes. 2. Oil the grill racks. Preheat your grill using all burners set on high and with the

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thick. Serve on anything your heart desires. Pour into an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 3 weeks. Grilled Bread and Tomato Salad By Fred Thompson, Grillin’ with Gas Serves 6 to 8 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter 2 garlic cloves, minced 8 ounces day-old Italian bread, cut into 3/4-inch-thick slices 6 dead-ripe meaty tomatoes, cored, seeded, and cut into quarters 1/4 cup minced red onion 1/3 cup fruity extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 7 or 8 grindings black pepper

1. Place a small saucepan over medium heat and add the butter. When it’s about half melted, throw in the garlic and cook

for 3 to 4 minutes, allowing the garlic to take on a little bit of color. Remove from the heat and brush this mixture on both sides of each slice of bread. 2. Oil the grill racks. Preheat your grill using all burners set on high and with the lid closed for 10 to 12 minutes. 3. Place the bread on the grill, close the lid, and cook, turning once, until well marked. Careful here; depending on the moisture content of the bread, this could happen as quickly as 2 minutes (or about 1 minute on each side), but it usually takes about 4 minutes. Place the tomatoes on the grill, close the lid, and cook for a few minutes per side. 4. Remove the bread to a cutting board, cut into 3/4-inch cubes, and place in a large mixing bowl. Add the tomatoes, onion, olive oil, vinegar, herbs, salt, and pepper. Toss gently with your hands to combine. Taste and adjust the seasonings if you desire. Serve at room temperature.

Del Tech begins theatre series Theater lovers can enjoy a series of shows at the DuPont Theatre, sponsored by Delaware Technical & Community College’s Adult Plus+ program. Don’t miss this great opportunity to see six fantastic shows with convenient transportation from Delaware Tech in Georgetown. Excellent orchestra seats are available but going fast for the Wednesday and Sunday 2 p.m. matinee series. Participants in the Wednesday series will leave Delaware Tech at 10 a.m. and eat lunch in Wilmington; Sunday theatergoers will leave at 11 a.m. and stop for lunch enroute. In October, follow the yellow brick road to the “The Wizard of Oz” inspired by the Royal Shakespeare Company’s lavish production, featuring breathtaking special effects and classic songs from the 1939 MGM movie. In December, take a journey with sorority girl and fashion merchandizing major Elle Woods to Harvard Law School where she struggles to be taken seriously and win back her ex-boyfriend in “Legally Blonde,” based on the novel and film of the same name.

In January 2010, see Australian Comic Barry Humphries’ purple-haired character Dame Edna Everage in the Tony Awardwinning “Dame Edna.” In March, hear the life stories of 17 dancers competing for eight spots in a casting call audition for a new Broadway play in “A Chorus Line.” Enjoy the longest-running American musical (premier 1975) and winner of nine Tony awards including best musical and the Pulitzer Prize for drama. In April, see the two-time Tony Awardwinning comedy “The 39 Steps” which is packed with laughs, an on-stage plane crash and romance. The play is an adaptation of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1939 movie of the same name. In May, follow a beautiful Greek muse in her journey to inspire a struggling artist to create the first Venice Beach Roller Disco in the hit musical “Xanadu,” based on the 1980 Universal Pictures’ movie of the same title. For more information or to reserve your seats, contact the Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302-856-5618.


PAGe 36

MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

Health E-mails and text messages are poor samples of proper writing By Dr. Anthony Policastro

One of the routine questions that we ask at well child exams is about reading. We expect parents to start reading to their children during the first year. We expect older children to read books on their own. There are limited hours in the day for reading. Therefore, reading material should be chosen carefully. That means that there should be some time devoted to reading books every day. That is not too hard to do with very young

children. They are a captive audience. It is a little harder to do with older children. They might want to use their reading time for reading things other than books. They might want to look up information on the computer. Reading stories on the computer is about the same level as reading books. They might want to use their reading time for reading e-mails. The caution here is that any reading of e-mails should be over and above other reading time.

Endoscopy - Seaford Endoscopy Center held an open house on Thursday, June 11. From left are Dr. Relova, Donna Whaley, Cheri Watts, Robin Butler, Joyce Mackler, Dr. Bradley Mackler, David Chandler, Rose Hastings, and Dr. Griffin. Photo by Brandon Miller

Bill will allow a review of health insurance rates by commissioner Regulation of health insurance rates would be on a par with other forms of insurance under a bill approved recently in the Senate. Senate Majority Whip Patricia Blevins, D-Elsmere, said the bill is a good balance for the insurance industry and consumers. It was approved by the Senate on a 21-0 vote. “Up until now, health insurance rates have not been reviewable by any regulatory body in the same way that they review life insurance or auto insurance,” said Blevins. “Having health insurance rates come under review could be a really consumer-friendly piece of legislation.” If approved by the House and signed by Gov. Jack Markell, the Insurance Commissioner’s office would have 30 days to review a health insurance company’s request to change rates. It would have the same authority to adjust an increase as it

does for other types of insurance. If the review could not be completed in time, the commissioner’s office could file for an extension. If the commissioners office does not request changes or seek an extension, the new rates would go into effect at the end of the initial 30-day review period. Blevins has worked with the industry and consumers on the measure for four years. In the past, the bill had cleared the Senate but was stalled in the Republicancontrolled House. However, Rep. Bryon Short, D-Highland Woods, has said the bill will get a hearing in his House Economic Development, Insurance and Banking Committee. “I think we’ve finally reached agreement on something that will protect consumers and is still business-friendly,” Blevins said.

There should not be a plan to read eTherefore, reading time needs to be mail and nothing else. separate from time spent texting. It is up to While it is valuable to communicate parents to make sure that happens. with others, it is not necessarily educaOf interest is the fact that texting has tional. spilled over to e-mail. Many e-mails do Thus the grammatiThe alphabet soup not contain very good cally correct sentence that text messages grammar, spelling, structure and language punctuation or capitalis non-existent in these contain are nothing ization. communications. like real writing. They Parents need to enEncouraging readsure that their children ing is just one of the do not prepare the construct grammaticalmany tasks that fall to individual for anything parents. ly correct e-mail messages to their friends. Just like any of those other than text That will help them tasks there are some messages. when they need to conways of doing it corstruct reports for school. rectly. School reports need to There are also some look like school reports. They should not ways of doing it incorrectly. The challenge look like e-mails to the teacher. is to find the correct balance. Another type of reading is related to Children need the opportunity to be part text messages. Again, while there is not an of the culture that their friends are part of. issue in communication, there might be an However, they also need to know that it issue in terms of how communication preis necessary to prepare for the culture of pares you for writing other things. the adult world that they will grow into. The alphabet soup that text messages That is not likely to happen all of a sudcontain are nothing like real writing. They den when they enter college. They need to do not prepare the individual for anything grow into that culture with their parents’ other than text messages. assistance.


MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

PAGe 37

Health Briefs Blood drive program sets records

Students on Delmarva reached a new milestone this school year. Seventy-five high schools and colleges across the Peninsula held more blood drives this past school year than ever before, resulting in a record number of blood donations. A total of 6,909 blood donations were collected at 119 school blood drives from September 2008 to May 2009 – up nearly 3.5% from the last school year. School blood drives consistently contribute 8% of all the blood donated on Delmarva. The program started in 1984 with just 140 donations at two schools. Today the program is critical for attracting students to become lifelong blood donors. Currently less than 7% of all Blood Bank members are under the age of 35. By giving first-time donors a good experience, the Blood Bank hopes to reverse this trend. Students, their families and friends can continue to give blood and get credit for their schools in the blood drive competition this summer by giving blood at any Blood Bank location through Aug. 31. For more information about the Blood Bank or to request an appointment to give blood, visit www.delmarvablood.org or call 1-888-8-BLOOD-8.

Cancer Care Center hosts program

Women undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer can receive free professional help to cosmetically disguise the appearance-related side effects of their treatments. Look Good...Feel Better trains volunteer cosmetologists to help women with cancer, conceal loss of hair, skin problems, and other side effects that can result from cancer therapy. The next program will be hosted by the Cancer Care Center at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital on Monday, July 20, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Cancer Care Center’s 2nd floor conference room. The program is free to all patients in active cancer treatment. Registration is required, and space is limited. To register, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Cancer Care Center at 302629-6611, ext. 2588.

Family Caregiver Training planned

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group meets in the Second Floor Conference Room of the Cancer Care Center at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford on the third Monday of each month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. The Wellness Community-Delaware is dedicated to helping people affected by cancer enhance their health and well-being through participation in a professional program of emotional support and hope. All facilitators of these groups are trained mental health professionals. For more information and to register, call 6459150.

National MS Society added to list

There will be a free bimonthly Depression Support Group meeting in Laurel on the second and fourth Wednesday evenings from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Any person who has signs and symptoms of depression and is under the care of a professional counselor/MD is welcome to attend. To

On June 4, the 145th General Assembly of the State of Delaware introduced House Bill 191 to create a check-off for Delaware taxpayers who want to designate contributions to the Delaware Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Entitled “An Act to Amend Title 30 of the Delaware Code Relating to Personal Income Tax,” HB 191 needs to pass both the state house and senate before being presented for the governor’s signature. The chapter urges MS advocates across the state to tell their legislators to vote “Yes.” All the contributions raised by the state tax form will help pay for the programs and services needed by more than 1,500 Delawareans with MS and their families. For more information, call 302655-5610 or visit www.MSdelaware.org.

NMH holds diabetes classes

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will hold a four-session diabetes educational program beginning July 22 and continuing July 29, Aug. 5 and 12 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the hospital. Registration is required. The cost of the program may be reimbursable by insurance. This four-session program includes weekly education sessions and individualized meal planning for diabetes self-management. Family members and significant others are welcome to attend the weekly sessions. To register and to obtain more information, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Diabetes Education department at 302-629-6611, ext. 2446.

Cancer Support Group

The Wellness Community-Delaware offers a General Cancer Support Group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones. The free monthly support

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NMH offers Stroke Support Group

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s next Stroke Support Group meeting is Thursday, July 16 at 1:30 p.m. at Nanticoke Memorial’s 2nd Floor Cancer Care Center Conference Room. The support group is designed for individuals who have survived a stroke as well as their families and caregivers. The two-hour support group meetings will consist of guest speakers and breakaway sessions, in which caregivers and stroke survivors will meet in two groups to discuss concerns, provide support, and allow for networking. Refreshments will be provided. Pre-registration is not required for this free support group. For more information, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at 302-629-6611, ext. 8626.

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PAGE 38

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Education James H. Groves Adult High School graduates 65 The 45th annual commencement ceremony of the James H. Groves Adult High School, Sussex Center, was held Tuesday, June 9, in the Sussex Technical High School gymnasium. Sixty-five graduates from age 17 to 74 walked up on the stage to accept their high school diplomas from Sussex Technical School Board President Richard Lewis and Lieutenant Governor Matt Denn. Before the conferring of the diplomas however, graduates heard some very inspiring words from three of their classmates. Kevin Tibbs of Laurel told the members of the audience that if they have not completed their high school education, “let tonight be the night you start,” he said. Kevin plans to use his high school education to help him get a commercial driver’s license in his effort for better employment. The oldest member of the Class of 2009 was 74-year-old Elias Watkins of Rehoboth. Having taught himself to read many years ago, Elias was able to own and operate his own trucking business for 22 years without a high school education. However, he wanted to be a role model for his greatgrandchildren. “I will always remember taking my first test,” recalled Elias after seven years of study. “Now I can tell my great-grandchildren that I’m able to preach what I have practiced.” Beth Hastings of Seaford was one of the youngest members of the Class of 2009. The mother of a six-month-old, Beth

complimented the helpfulness and caring for the students from the members of the James Groves staff. “If my teachers at college are like you,” she told her instructors, “I know I will be successful.” Beth plans to attend college to become a physical therapist. Two of the James Groves Adult High School instructors were honored with the Distinguished Staff Award. Receiving the recognition of their peers were Kelly Whaley of Laurel and Mark Fisher of Frankford. The prestigious Perfect Attendance award was presented to 68-year-old Jennie Davis of Bishopville, Md. who never missed a class in her six years of enrollment. Several scholarships were also awarded to local graduates as follows: $300 OAASIS scholarship - Megan Oliver of Laurel Ethel Cook Scholarship for $500 - Anthony Parillo of Seaford $1,000 Sussex Tech Adult Division Scholarship - Melissa Castrejon of Bridgeville $500 Principal’s Scholarship - David Napier of Delmar $1,000 Linda Shea Scholarship - Courtney Melson of Bridgeville The Rev. David Mulford Memorial Scholarship - Terrance Nock of Bridgeville All graduates qualified for SEED scholarships at Delaware Tech. So far,

The Rev. David Mulford Memorial Scholarship was presented to Terrance Nock of Bridgeville by the Rev. Mulford’s daughter Kristi King (left) and widow, Ruth Mulford.

15 graduates have applied for the SEED scholarship. Plus, each student in the Class of 2009 will receive a $100 scholarship from the Sussex Tech Adult division to be used towards any career training or college education. Local members of the Class of 2009 are: Bridgeville – Timothy Banks, Melissa Castrejon, Jessica Fraser, Deja Joseph, Courtney Melson, Amy Morgan, Terrence Nock; Delmar – Staci Hammerer,

Cierra Massey, David Napier; Greenwood – Julian Cuffee; Laurel – Jessica Cash, Jennifer Colburn, Gail Hill, James Jarin, Megan Oliver, Victoria Snell, Kevin Tibbs; Seaford – Ryan Allan, Dustin Bailey, Peter Duryea, Beth Hastings, Shalonda Houchens, Travis Major, Theodore McLaughlin, Julianna Moore, Anthony Parillo, Marsha Vazquez-Quino, Rhonda Walls

School welcomes a new leader Social studies, science, mathematical fractions and even literature learned during a cooking lesson? “Absolutely,” according to long-time progressive educator Connie Hendricks. Even before so-called “progressive” teaching methods became accepted in the mainstream of American education, she knew they made perfect sense. She believes that such approaches – which reach beyond a child’s intellect – develop a socially and emotionally grounded child who surpasses the task of merely absorbing information. Hendricks was recently named the new head of school at The Jefferson School, an institution that has an impressive record of accomplishment for using nontraditional approaches to learning. Founded in 1992, it’s Delaware’s only independent school in Sussex County. Many schools experiment with progressive education in small increments, but few embrace it as their main philosophy and adhere to the progressive education ideals throughout the grades and in every subject. Jefferson does and that’s why Hendricks said she’s proud to join the staff. “When I visited one classroom recently, every single child could tell me what the lesson was about,” Hendricks said. “They were really learning. They owned the material.” “Owning the material” is half the battle

in education because once children are intrinsically motivated and take possession of their knowledge, they open up to a world of learning. Currently, more than 45 percent of Jefferson students qualify for programs at The Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, a world leader in the assessment and development of highly gifted children. When Hendricks, of Milton, starts her new position on July 1 she’ll be responsible for overseeing operations of the K-8 school, which enrolls around 100 students a year. She replaces interim head of school Lisa Crim, who is now the director of Early Childhood Services at Children & Families First. As a 20-year veteran educator, Hendricks has taught various subjects including art, math, language arts and social studies in preschool through eighth grades. She transitioned to administration in 1999 when she became head of the upper level of Centreville School in Wilmington. She served in this leadership position until 2008 when she moved to the central office to direct enrollment and financial aid for the school. Hendricks plans to connect with parents in a bi-weekly post on the school’s blog, http://jeffersonschool.wordpress.com/. She also wants to offer coffee hours, open to the general public, to discuss what parents can do to encourage their children to develop a passion for learning.

Students in a mixed first-and second-grade class share their work with incoming Head Of School Connie Hendricks. From left are Pete Vasilikos, Karli Sunnergren and Miranda Perez-Rivera.

Parker graduates from UDEL

Hugo King Parker of Seaford was awarded a bachelor of science degree from the University of Delaware on Saturday, May 30. Parker majored in Behavior Health Science with a minor in Coaching and plans to continue his studies in the health care field. He is a 2004 graduate of Seaford High School.

Parker is the son of Joseph F. Parker Jr. and Nancy L. King. His grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Parker Sr., Mrs. Catherine D. King and the late Edwin Reese King.

Parker


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 39

DCHS holds its fifth annual graduation ceremony Delmarva Christian High School Valedictorian Luke Mathews encouraged his younger schoolmates during a graduation ceremony to always remember that their first love should be Jesus Christ. He repeated the words of Christian author Oswald Chambers: “We have to learn to walk according to the standard which has its eyes focused on God.” Mathews, one of 25 graduates, said that thanks to his relationship with Jesus he was able to persevere. DCHS Principal Scott Kemerling told a crowd of more than 600 people that gathered for the May 29th ceremony that he’s personally seen each graduate grow and mature. The Delmarva Christian High School Class of 2009 is composed of Caleb Craig, Kolby Dukes, Peter Gorgui, Kelsey Guarna, Justin Hawkes, Lindsey Headley, Keri Hudson, Chloe Johnson, Sabina Mall, Luke Mathews, Chris McIntosh, Jessica Mixon, Jeff Mohr, Tara Munro, Kate Nathan, Kattie Parsons,

Congratulations abound for Adam Troyer of Greenwood after his receipt of a DCHS diploma.

Jasmine Rideau, Wes Scott, Mason Small, Sam Thomas, Brittany Trammell, Adam Troyer, Amanda Vaughan, Meghan Whittington and Emma Wilkins. Lindsey Headley, this year’s salutatorian, shared during her address that these four years at Delmarva Christian High School have been “the most wonderful years of my life.” “I pray that I’ll be able to keep the faith in the world – and as

Flanked by fellow soon-to-be graduates Caleb Craig of Seaford and Peter Gorgui of Seaford, Kolby Dukes of Laurel listens intently to Principal Scott Kemerling as he announces the recipients of the Royal Service Award and Royal of the Year winners.

long as I trust in God, I know I will.” The 2009 Delmarva Christian High School Graduation marked two milestones. It was the school’s fifth graduation ceremony and as the last graduate

took her diploma and crossed the stage, the school witnessed the 100th student to graduate from DCHS. Delmarva Christian High School in Georgetown, trains students spiritually, academi-

cally and physically to know and accomplish God’s will for their lives. Applications for the fall semester are still being accepted. For more information, visit www.delmarvachristian.com.

State awards merit scholarships The Delaware Higher Education Commission (DHEC) has announced the recipients of five state merit scholarship programs for the 2009-2010 academic year. Merit scholarships are competitive and awarded based on a student’s academic performance, participation in school activities, and service to the community. Students can apply for Delaware merit scholarships in their senior year of high school. All five awards are renewable. Three of the programs are memorial scholarships that honor state legislators and provide full tuition, fees, room, board and books at the public colleges in Delaware. Those scholarships are: The B. Bradford Barnes Memorial Scholarship, in honor of the former Speaker of the State House of Representatives, is awarded to one student each year enrolling at the University of Delaware. This year’s winner is Christine Gregg of the The Charter School of Wilmington. The Herman M. Holloway, Sr. Memorial Scholarship, in honor of the first African-American State Senator in Delaware, is awarded to one student each year enrolling at Delaware State University. This year’s winner is Valerie Irma Hyett of Paul M. Hodg-

son Vocational Technical High School in Newark. The Charles L. Hebner Memorial Scholarship, in honor of the former Speaker of the State House of Representatives, is awarded annually to one student at each school who is majoring in the humanities or social sciences. Preference is given to political science majors. Dylan Cole Oakes of Christiana High School in Newark and Chantel S. Sessoms of Caravel Academy in Bear are the recipients. The Diamond State Scholarship and the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship assist students attending regionally accredited colleges in any state. Winners of the Diamond State Scholarship receive $1,250 per year while Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship recipients receive $1,500 per year (based upon funding from the U.S. Congress). For the 2009-10 academic year, 50 students were awarded Diamond State Scholarships while 28 students received the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship. Local Robert C. Byrd recipients include Zachary Noah Cain of Seaford Senior High School. Local Diamond State Scholarship recipients include Jose Rodolfo Oyola of Woodbridge High School.

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PAGE 40

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

People

Bill Lucks, managing broker for Sperry Cheer, Inc. receives a check for $200 thanks to Shirley Price Van Ness-Miller Commercial, Rehoboth, of Long and Foster, Bethany, who received a Good Neighbor received the Realtor of the Year Award for Award for her volunteer work with Cheer. Sussex County.

Whaley, Jewell welcome baby

Kimberly Whaley and Justin Jewell of Seaford welcomed a daughter into the world, Jalynn Audrey Jewell, on April 28, 2009 at 2:14 a.m. at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Jalynn weighed 7 lbs. 10 oz. and measured 21 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Greg and Carla Johnson of Laurel, and Wesley and Carol Whaley of Seaford. Charlon McElroy of Seaford is the maternal great-grandmother. Her paternal grandparents are Danny and Barbara Jewell and Bobbi-Ann and Dave Fox, all of Seaford. Her paternal great-grandparents are William “Ace” and Elizabeth Hines of Seaford. Jalynn was welcomed home by her big brother, Kamden.

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SCAOR holds award luncheon The Sussex County Association of Realtors (SCAOR) held their annual award luncheon on Tuesday, June 9 at their new complex on Route 9 in Georgetown. The event highlights member contributions to the association and the real estate profession as well as volunteerism in the community. Four special awards were presented including: Realtor of the Year, President’s Award, Good Neighbor Award and Realtor Emeritus. Bill Lucks, managing broker for Sperry Van Ness-Miller Commercial, Rehoboth, received the Realtor of the Year Award for Sussex County. He has been an active member of SCAOR Board of Directors and currently serves as past president. He currently leads the Public Policy Committee and is first vice president with the Delaware Association of Realtors. SCAOR President, Steve Alexander, presented Susan Mills

from Jack Lingo Inc., Realty, the President’s Award in recognition of her commitment and service to the Realtor Service Program (RCS). She was instrumental in providing for the needy in Sussex County by coordinating realtor efforts to raise money and oversee a program that has filled a void in Sussex. Kathy Goodman, Remax by the Sea in Fenwick, received the Good Neighbor award for her countless hours of community service to Habitat for Humanity. Shirley Price of Long and Foster, Bethany, also received a Good Neighbor Award for her work with Cheer, Inc. Both received checks for their charity. George Farnell, with Callaway, Farnell and Moore of Seaford, was surprised with special honors for 40+ years of continual membership with the Sussex County Association of Realtors and received the National Association of Realtors, Realtor Emeritus Presentation.


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 41

The Delmar Shorebirds celebrate winning last Friday night’s National League championship game against Delmar Kiwanis. Photo by Mike McClure

The Patriots’ Chris Cutsail runs to first after putting down a sacrifice bunt in last week’s American Legion game at Seaford High School. Photo by Mike McClure

Post 6 Patriots fall in doubleheader, lead Milford through six innings By Mike McClure

The Post 6 Patriots lost a doubleheader to R.C. DuPont last Saturday after falling in the season opener the previous week. The Patriots also hold a 7-1 lead over the Milford Red Sox in a game stopped due to darkness on Thursday. On Saturday, R.C. DuPont took game one, 14-4, in a game played in Seaford. For the Patriots, Jordan Stanley went 1-3 with a run and an RBI; Zach Reynolds batted 1-3 with an RBI; Jacob Williams scored a pair of runs; Kyle Mister was 1-2 with an RBI; and Garrett Eskridge went 1-2 with a run. Post 6 rallied from an early deficit in game two to knot the score at 4-4 through four innings. R.C. DuPont took an 8-4 lead with three runs in the top of the sixth and added another run in the seventh. The Patriots put one run on the board in the sixth and three in the seventh, but fell short, 9-8. Stanley batted 1-2 with two runs and an RBI; Reynolds went 2-4 with a pair of runs; Eric Sharff hit 2-3 with two runs and two RBIs; and Hunter Absher was 2-4 with a run and an RBI. Williams and Chris Cutsail each had a hit, Casey Zitvogel drove in a pair of runs, Micah Idler scored a run, and Mister drove a run in. On Thursday, Post 6 held a 7-1 lead over Milford after six innings of play. The game was stopped due to darkness with the Patriots needing just three outs to end the game. The contest will be finished on Thursday when Post 6 hosts the Red Sox in a regularly scheduled game.

Delmar Shorebirds win National League baseball championship By Mike McClure

The Delmar Shorebirds defeated the Delmar Kiwanis, 2-0, in a pitcher’s duel in the Delmar Little League’s National League championship game last Friday night. The Kiwanis stranded a pair of runners in the top of the first inning. Austin Bergeron walked and Ethan Walker singled, but the runners were left on second and third. The Shorebirds put a run on the

board in the bottom of the second when Bruce Johnson singled in Tyler Baker (double) before moving to second on the throw home. Jessie Harpool singled, went to second on an error, advanced to third on a ground out, and was thrown out at the plate following a wild pitch as the Shorebirds and pitcher Chad Wien continued to keep the Kiwanis off the board in the third inning. Continued on page 45

Korey Hearn of Post 6 prepares to pitch during his team’s home contest against the Milford Red Sox last Thursday in Seaford. Hearn struck out 10 in six innings before the game was stopped due to darkness. Photo by Mike McClure

The Patriots put a pair of runs on the board in the bottom of the first when Reynolds drew a leadoff walk, went to second on a wild pitch, moved to third on a fly out by Zitvogel and scored on a ground out by Sharff. Paul Elliott walked, stole second, and scored on a balk. Continued on page 43

The Shorebirds’ Aaron Holland slides into second base as Kiwanis second baseman Shamar Watts looks to throw to first for the double play during the Delmar 11-12 year old baseball championship game. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 42

   MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

FIFTH PLACE- Elizabeth Ferber, 18, of Seaford won a fifth-place ribbon in the 50-meter dash at the 2009 Special Olympics Delaware Summer Games, held June 12-13 at the University of Delaware.

Four local players to play in Carpenter Cup baseball tourney Delmar’s Dylan Shupe and Jeff Fleetwood and Sussex Tech players Justin Allen and James Smith are on the Delaware South roster in the Carpenter Cup Classic baseball tournament.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

MASTERS IN KARATE- Del Tech student from Laurel, Eric Johnson received his Masters Rank in karate on Saturday, June 6. Johnson is shown with Master Lee Clarkson, his instructor at the Delaware Tang Soo Do Academy since he was seven years old. Tang Soo Do is a Korean martial art with Okinawa and Chinese roots.

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Sat., June 20th • 11 am - 7 pm SPECIAL OLYMPICS- Tyler Whitney of Laurel High School participates in the bocce event at the 2009 Special Olympics Delaware Summer Games, held June 12-13 at the University of Delaware.

Seaford Recreation Department summer programs

Mystics-Sparks game- The Seaford Recreation Department will take a trip to see the WNBA game between the Washington Mystics and the Los Angeles Sparks on Saturday, July 11. The cost is $50 which includes transportation and lower level ticket to the game. Call 629-6809 to reserve your tickets. Tennis Clinic- SRD’s tennis clinic will take place Mondays and Wednesday from 8:30-10 a.m. The clinic, which takes place June 22- July 15, is open to children ages 6-12 at a cost of $40. It is designed to help kids learn the basic fundamentals and rules of the game Team Tennis- The Seaford Recreation Department will hold team tennis on the following days: Ages 6-14 ($50)- Tuesday and Thursday 8:30-10 a.m., Ages 10-18 ($60)- Tuesday and Thursday 5:30-7:30 p.m. The program will feature fun game play combined with instruction based on skill level.


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 43

Richard Jarvis Jr. earns Delaware Mix and Match win By Charlie Brown

It was obvious in last month’s “Mix & Match” Late Models vs. Modifieds combination event that bragging rights between the divisions were important. It was a hotly contested event with some contact and tempers at the end and Jamie Mills coming out on top for the Modified contingent. On Saturday night at the Delaware International Speedway in delmar it was round two of the “Mix & Match” format and again it was a highly competitive but cleanly contested event with Richard Jarvis, Jr. evening the score by taking his Super Late Model to the 30-lap win. Qualifying was intense with rookie Barry Beauchamp and veteran Hal Browning winning the Late Model heats and “Stormin’” Norman Short and Mills winning the Modified heats. The final qualifying spots were filled by consolations won by Dale Lingo in the Late Models and Joseph Watson in the Modifieds. The driver with the highest point average that did not qualify was also added to the field. Defending Late Model champion Ray Davis, Jr. and opening night winner Scott VanGorder were the beneficiaries. Mills drew the pole with the Late Models lined up on the inside row and the Modifieds on the outside row in the 26 car starting field. Mills jumped out to the early lead with Donald Lingo, Jr. in hot pursuit. The first of only two yellows flew on lap two when the front suspension on Rick Whaley’s Late Model broke bringing him to a stop in the fourth turn. Mills again set the pace on the restart with Lingo close behind. Ross Robinson held third as Jarvis worked his way past H.J. Bunting for fourth. Lingo, Jr. was able to keep the pressure on Mills until lap 11 when Mills suddenly slowed on the back straight with mechanical problems bringing out the final yellow. Jarvis had gotten by Robinson just prior to the yellow and immediately went to work on Lingo on the restart. At the halfway sign the top five were Lingo, Jarvis, Bunting, Matt Jester and Robinson. The Late Models of Lingo and Jarvis put on a wheel to wheel battle for the next four laps that had the crowd pumped. Jarvis would lead down the front straight and Lingo, Jr. would take the lead down the back straight with the two fender to fender in the turns. Jarvis would finally get the clean advantage on lap 19. Meanwhile, Bunting in his Jake Marine Modified, had run down the leaders and immediately went to work on Lingo for second. Bunting finally garnered the spot on lap 27 but Jarvis was working traffic to perfection and had built a solid lead. Mark Pettyjohn was making a late race charge and drove his Late Model into fifth. With the race staying under the green the final laps clicked off quickly with Jarvis, in the Mid-Coastal Siding/Rocket Late Model taking the checkered. Bunting finished 3.6 seconds back in second with fellow Modified driver Jester finishing third. The Late Models of Lingo, Jr. and Mark Pettyjohn rounded out the top five. Sixth was the Late Model of Robinson with the Modified of Joseph Watson seventh. The Late Models of Austin Hubbard and Hal Browning were eighth and ninth and the Modified of Howard O’Neal rounded out the top 10. “We certainly had a good car tonight,” said Jarvis with a grin. “We started seventh and just started taking our time working our way up through there. Lingo had a good car and we were able to get by him.” Dale Crouch invades and wins Super Pro at U.S. 13 Dragway- Dale Crouch made his tow from Elkton worthwhile as he kicked off the first Friday night of racing at the U.S. 13 Dragway with a win in Super Pro. Jesse Long of Preston piloted his ’70 Mustang to the win in Pro and Josh Blank of Snow Hill rode into victory lane in Pro Bike. Other winners on the night were Crystal Hudson of Millsboro in Street, Jake Mash of Bridgeville in Import, Rob Webber of Salisbury in Bike Trophy, Katelyn Muir of Delmar in Jr. Dragster 1 and Amy Jo Jackson of Newark, Md., in Jr. Dragster 2. Crouch, in his dragster, faced the eight-second ’55 Chevy of Jim Swagler, III of Berlin in the Super Pro final. The pair were even at the starting line but Swagler was too quick and broke out with an 8.843/152.98 on an 8.85 dial. Crouch was right on for the win running a 7.568/172.91 on a 7.56 dial. Semi-finalists were Billy Groton of Seaford and Chris Wigfall of Salisbury. Long met Jim Williams of Seaford in his ’81 Camaro in the Pro final. Williams broke out with a 9.625/135.80 on a 9.63 dial and Long took the win with a 10.976/119.03 on a 10.93 dial. Semi-finalists were John Parks of Denton and Eric Fairbee of Georgetown. Blank, on his Suzuki, rode up against Tony Mumford of Berlin on his Kawasaki in the Pro Bike final. Blank had the better reaction tine and took the win with a run of 9.918/136.54 on a 9.87 dial. Mumford ran a solid 9.748/140.47 on a 9.68 dial. Semifinalist was Tyrone Dale of Salisbury. Defending point champion Hudson was paired against Kenny Davis of Seaford in the Street final. Hudson got her third win and increased her point lead with a 12.540/105.34 on a 12.47 dial. Davis left too early and fouled. In Import, Mash defeated Matt Pry of Millsboro. Mash had the better reaction and took the win with a 19.006/73.71 on an 18.65 dial while Pry broke out with a 12.540/92.36 on a 13.00 dial. James West had a red light foul and Webber posted the win in Bike Trophy with an 11.140/125.27 on a 10.85 dial. In Jr. Dragster 1 it was Muir up against Kody Mariner. Mariner left too early and fouled and Muir took the win with a 9.010/72.79 on an 8.99 dial. In Jr. Dragster 2 it was Jackson putting together back to back wins as she defeated Christopher Kahler of Ocean View. Jackson had the better reaction and ran a 7.989/78.74 on a 7.96 dial while Kahler ran an 8.247/77.67 on an 8.20 dial.

Delmar and Laurel’s only source for news and sports, the Star.

Sussex West’s Paul Elliott dives into third base following a wild pitch last Thursday in Seaford. Elliott has scored three runs in the game against the Milford Red Sox, which will be completed on Thursday. Photo by Mike McClure

American Legion continued Post 6 added three more runs in the second inning as Absher walked and went to second on a sac bunt by Cutsail; Zitvogel reached first on fielder’s choice with Absher moving to third; and Elliott walked to load the bases. Sharff knocked in two more runs with a single and Elliott came home on a single by Tyler Ruark after the second baseman bobbled the ball (5-0). Korey Hearn notched his third and fourth strikeouts of the game in the top of the third inning. Milford broke up the shutout in the fourth. Matt Faulkner walked, stole second, went to third on a bloop single by Sam Grahovac, and scored on a wild pitch to make it 5-1 before Hearn struck out a pair to end the inning. The Patriots answered with a run in the bottom of the inning as Elliott was hit by a pitch and scored on a wild pitch (6-1). Post 6 turned a double play in the top of the fifth when Hearn struck out the batter and catcher Chris Cutsail gunned down a would be base stealer for the strike-em out throw-em out double play. The Western Sussex club put one more run up in the fifth inning thanks to a leadoff double by Absher who scored on a single by Reynolds. Hearn struck out two more batters in the sixth following a leadoff single by Adam Darling. Hearn allowed one run on three hits over six innings while striking out 10. Reynolds has a hit, a run, and an RBI; Elliott has drawn two walks and scored runs; Sharff is leading the team with three

Post 6 first baseman Eric Sharff is all smiles as he stands at the plate during last week’s home contest against the Milford Red Sox. Sharff drove in three runs in the first six innings of the game. Photo by Mike McClure

RBIs; Ruark has two hits; and Absher has the team’s only extra base hit (double) and has scored a pair of runs. Post 6 opened the season with a 10-0 loss to Fox Post 2 last Monday. Absher struck out five in the loss.

Reed, White get first wins of season at Delaware International RESULTS: 15-Lap Crate Model Feature: 1. TYLER REED; 2. Ryan Walls; 3. Mike Wilson; 4. Clint Chalabala; 5. Matt Hill; 6. Chris Hitchens; 7. Joe Warren; 8. John Imler; 9. Amanda Whaley; 10. Nick Davis; 11. Russell Dadds; 12. Herb Tunis; 13. Darin Henderson; 14. Jack Mullins; 15. Michael Wilkins; 16. Skip Syester; 17. Roy Hassler; 18. Richard Harden; 19. Scott Fenner; 20. Corey Cohee; 21. Jeff Swartz; 22. Eric Vent; DNS: Randy Givens. 15-Lap Mod Lite Feature: 1. TIM WHITE; 2. Paul McGinley; 3. Brandon Dennis; 4. Ty Short; 5. Curt Miles Jr; 6. Cody Belote; 7. Kirk Miles Sr; 8. Chad Passwaters; 9. Scott Tessman; 10. TJ Williams; 11. Kevin McKinney; 12. Tony Aguilar; 13. Matt Glanden; 14. James Hill; 15. Alan Passwaters; 16. Steve White; 17. James McKinney. 15-Lap AC Delco Modified Feature: 1. TIM TRIMBLE: 2. Michael White; 3. Shawn Ward; 4. Matt Hawkins; 5. Herman Powell; 6. Joseph Tracy; 7. John Curtis; 8. Scott Calhoun; 9. Kyle Fuller; 10. Andy Hammond; 11. Brandon Blades; 12. Bobby Ballantine; 13. Garrie Bostwick; 14. Ted Reynolds; 15. Herbie Hempel; 16. Danny Smack; 17. Mark Rowe; 18. Scott Baker; 19. Brad Trice; 20. Westley Smith; DNS: Mark Williams. 10-Lap Vintage: 1. MARK WILLIAMS; 2. CJ Schirmer; 3. Rick Loveland Jr.; 4. Dave Schamp; 5. James Laplant; 6. Adam Laplant; 7. Chuck Tucker; 8. Gary Scott; 9. Morris Tucker.

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PAGE 44

         MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Laurel Star spring sports scrapbook

Shown (clockwise from top left) are: Laurel’s Nick Munoz receiving the football team’s Defensive Player of the Year award from assistant coach Glenn Phillips; Laurel pitcher Stephanie Wheatley making a pitch; Delmar catcher Gabby Andrade throwing to first; Delmar’s Spencer Fothergill looking to make a pass; and Laurel’s Branden Fischer delivering a pitch. Photos by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 45

District III Little League all-star schedules

The following are the Western Sussex teams’ schedules (subject to change) in the Delaware District III Little League all-star tournaments: 9-10 softball (winners bracket at Milton, losers bracket at Nanticoke)- 6/22Laurel vs. Milton at Milton, 6 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Nanticoke at Nanticoke, 6 p.m.; 6/23- winners bracket 6 and 8 p.m., losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 6/24- losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 6/25- winners bracket 6 p.m., losers bracket 6 p.m.; 6/26- losers bracket 6 p.m.; 6/27 championship at Milton, 6 p.m.; 6/28- championship 2 at Milton, 6 p.m. 9-10 baseball (winners bracket at Lewes, losers bracket at Georgetown)- 6/22Laurel vs. Georgetown at Georgetown, 6 p.m.; 6/23- Nanticoke vs. Lewes at Lewes, 8 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Lower Sussex at Georgetown, 6 p.m., Laurel-Georgetown winner vs. Rehoboth at Georgetown, 8 p.m.; 6/24- losers bracket 6 p.m. at Georgetown; 6/25- winners bracket 6 and 8 p.m., losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 6/26- losers bracket- 6 and 8 p.m.; 6/27- winners bracket 6 p.m., losers bracket 6 p.m.; 6/28- losers bracket 6 p.m.; 6/29- championship 6 p.m. at Lewes; 6/30- championship 2 6 p.m. at Lewes Major softball (winners bracket at Rehoboth, losers bracket at Millsboro)- 7/8Laurel vs. Lower Sussex at Rehoboth, 8 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Millsboro at Millsboro, 6 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Lewes at Millsboro, 8 p.m.; 7/9- winners bracket 6 and 8 p.m., losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 7/10- losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 7/11- winners bracket 6 p.m., losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/12- losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/13- championship 6 p.m. at Rehoboth; 7/14- championship 2 6 p.m. at Rehoboth Major baseball (winners bracket at Millsboro, losers bracket at Milton)- 7/10Laurel vs. Milton at Milton, 6 p.m.; 7/11- Woodbridge vs. Laurel-Milton winner at Milton, 8 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Georgetown at Milton, 6 p.m.; 7/12- losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/13- winners bracket 6 and 8 p.m., losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 7/14- losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 7/15- winners bracket 6 p.m., losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/16- losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/17- championship 6 p.m. at Millsboro; 7/18- championship 2 6 p.m. at Millsboro Junior softball (winners bracket at Woodbridge, losers bracket at Lewes)7/13- Laurel vs. Lower Sussex at Woodbridge, 6 p.m.; 7/14- Nanticoke vs. Millsboro/ Georgetown at Woodbridge, 6 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Lower Sussex/Laurel winner at Woodbridge, 8 p.m.; 7/15- losers bracket, 6 p.m.; 7/16- winners bracket 6 p.m., losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/17- losers bracket, 6 p.m.; 7/18- championship game 6 p.m. at Woodbridge; 7/19- championship 2 6 p.m. at Woodbridge Senior softball (winners bracket at Lower Sussex, losers bracket at Laurel)7/17- Laurel vs. Cape at Lower Sussex, 8 p.m.; 7/18- Woodbridge vs. Lower Sussex/ Goergetown-Millsboro winner at Lower Sussex, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Laurel-Cape winner at Lower Sussex, 8 p.m.; 7/19- losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 7/20- winners bracket 6 p.m., losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/21- losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/22- championship 6 p.m. at Lower Sussex; 7/23- championship 2 6 p.m. at Lower Sussex Senior baseball (winners bracket at Laurel, losers bracket at Lower Sussex)7/11- Laurel vs. Cape at Laurel, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Woodbridge at Laurel, 8 p.m.; 7/12- Georgetown-Millsboro vs. Laurel-Cape winner at Laurel, 6 p.m., Lower Sussex vs. Nanticoke-Woodbridge winner at Laurel, 8 p.m.; 7/13- losers bracket 6 and 8 p.m.; 7/14- winners bracket 6 p.m., losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/15- losers bracket 6 p.m.; 7/16championship 6 p.m. at Laurel; 7/17- championship 2 6 p.m. at Laurel

Maryland District 8 Little League All-Star Schedules

The following are Delmar’s District 8 all-star schedules (subject to change). The 9-10 softball, Major softball, Junior baseball, and Senior baseball schedules have not been released. 9-10 baseball- 7/1- Delmar vs. Fruitland at Delmar, 6 p.m.; 7/7- Delmar vs. Princess Anne at Delmar, 6 p.m.; 7/9- Delmar vs. Snow Hill at Snow Hill, 6 p.m.; 7/11Delmar vs. Berlin at Berlin, 6 p.m.; 7/13- semifinals at TBA, 6 p.m.; 7/15- championship at TBA. 6 p.m. 11 baseball- 7/2- Delmar at Berlin, 6 p.m.; 7/6- winners bracket at TBA, 6 p.m.; 7/8- losers bracket at TBA, 6 p.m.; 7/10- winners bracket at TBA, 6 p.m., losers bracket at TBA, 6 p.m.; 7/12- losers bracket at TBA, 6 p.m.; 7/14- championship at TBA, 6 p.m.; 7/16- championship 2 at TBA, 6 p.m. Major baseball- 7/10- Delmar at Willards, 6 p.m.; 7/12- Princess Anne at Delmar, 6 p.m.; 7/14- Delmar at Snow Hill, 6 p.m.; 7/16- Fruitland at Delmar, 6 p.m.; 7/20semifinals at TBA, 6 p.m.; 7/22- championship at TBA, 6 p.m.

Chad Wien of the Shorebirds delivers a pitch during the Delmar National League baseball championship game last Friday. Wien struck out 12 in his team’s 2-0 win over Delmar Kiwanis. Photo by Mike McClure

Little league continued

Wien led off the fifth inning with a double, went to third on a passed ball, and scored on a sac fly by Baker to make the score 2-0. Wien struck out the side in the top of the sixth to seal the 2-0 win. Wien doubled and scored a run and allowed three hits and stuck out 12 in six innings for the win. Baker had a double, run, and RBI; Johnson singled and drove in one; and Craig Miller and Aaron Holland each had a hit for the Shorebirds. Walker, Harpool, and Nate Smith each had one hit and Walker allowed two runs on five hits in five innings for the Kiwanis.

Send us your sports scores

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

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The Shorebird’s Craig Miller takes a lead off first base during last Friday’s Delmar 11-12 year old baseball championship game against Delmar Kiwanis. Photo by Mike McClure

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PAGE 46

   MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Seaford Bowling Lanes Tuesday Nascar Whatever Yankee Haters King Pins

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STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK- Shown above is the Woodbridge varsity girls’ soccer team. Send your team photo to sports@mspublications.com to be a Star Team of the Week.

Delaware Tech-Owens to host sports camps this month

Young athletes can have fun and stay fit by participating in a variety of sports camps in June at Delaware Technical and Community College, Owens Campus. Children should wear appropriate clothing to the camps which will be held Monday-Friday from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m., unless stated differently. Baseball, baton, and cheerleading begin on Monday, June 22. In baseball, campers ages 7-12 will concentrate on fundamentals and drills as well as the basic mechanics of pitching, infield/outfield plays, hitting, base running, and sliding; camp will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Children ages 7-14 will learn the basics of baton twirling with single and double batons; class gives an intro to tossing the baton, marching and rhythm; baton is a full-day camp from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. In cheerleading, students ages 7-12 will explore the basics of arm movement, voice and crowd control as well as learn new cheers, chants, cheerleading techniques, cartwheels, flips and jumps. Baseball pitching, flag football, soccer, and tae kwon do camps begin in July. Scholarships and sibling discounts are available for camps. To find out more information or to sign up, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

S P R I N G HOOPSAbove, Kahleed Hopkins sprints for the loose ball against Federalsburg in a recent Seaford Recreation Department 10 under basket ball game. Tyneta Washington, left, takes the ball down court against Federalsburg for the Seaford Huskies Middle School team during a Seaford Recreation Department spring basketball league game at the Seaford Middle School. Photos by Lynn Schofer

NYSA BANDITS- Shown (l to r) are the NYSA U8 Bandits at their year end party: frontClaudia Carey; Dylan Drace, Cameron Drace, Trevor Hardesty, Delaney Collins, Grace Chaffinch, Shelby Evick, Gadee Groten, and Shawn Willin. The team’s head coach is Doug Collins and the assistant coach is Mark Hardesty.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

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MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 47

Maury Morin, left, and Matt Dayton were the overall winners during the Heritage Shores Mens’ Member Guest Tournament. They came out on top from a field of 36 teams. Photo courtesy of Shore Shots Camera Club

Will Scarborough, golf pro, places scoring sheets before the beginning of the Heritage Shores Mens’ Member Guest Tournament. Photo courtesy of Shore Shots

Heritage Shores members and guests had a putting contest during the recent Mens’ Member Guest Tournament which was held this past Friday and Saturday, Photo courtesy of Shore Shots Camera Club

Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club offers summer sports

The Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club is offering the following summer sports programs (age determined as of June 1): Bitty Soccer- ages 3-5- cost $10 per player- Bitty soccer is designed for the 3-5 year olds to keep them active and learn the skills and rules of soccer. This is an introduction to soccer. Members will be placed on teams and will practice and learn the game of soccer. The league will run July 13-30 and will take place on Mondays and Wednesdays from 5-6 p.m. Bitty Flag Football- ages 3-5- Cost $10 per player- Bitty Football is for those siblings who are not old enough for league play. Players will learn the basics of football and play games. The league will take place July 21-29 on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5-6 p.m. Football Camp- ages 7-15- Cost $15 per player- This camp is designed to enhance skills on and off the field. This conditioning camp is great for beginners and advanced players. It will take place July 21, 22, 23, 28, 29 and 30 from 6-8 p.m. Times and dates of leagues are subject to changed based on enrollment. All registration fees along with completed membership forms are due prior to start of the league. Sneakers are required for all athletic events. If you have any questions, please call Karen at 302-628-3789.

Delmar Little League results for the week of June 8 Senior League baseball- Delmar 2, Fruitland 0- The Delmar Senior League team was outhit by Fruitland on Monday night, but won where it counted, on the scoreboard. Fruitland had eight hits to Delmar’s six, but Delmar found a way to score in the top of the eighth to win the game, 2-0. The defense for Delmar stole the show behind a good pitching performance by Tom Gray. Delmar was able to thwart Fruitland’s attempts to get on the board with double plays in third, fourth and eighth innings. They also caught a runner stealing and picked off a runner at first. Neither team could get on the board until the top of the eighth. Brady Scott led off the inning striking out but getting to first on a passed ball. Scott advanced to second on a passed ball, then to third on a straight steal. With two outs and runners on second and third Geoffrey Wells hit a liner to left to score the game winning run. Kyle Dykes then stole home to make the lead 2-0. Wells and Dykes were both 2 for 3 in the game. Gray got the win, pitching seven innings and striking out five. Nick Cooper came in to get the final three outs in the eighth to seal the win.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Answers page 51


MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

PAGE 49

Sussex council continues to start meetings with prayer By Ronald MacArthur

The issue of prayer by elected officials hits home every Tuesday afternoon when Sussex County Council members begin meetings with the Lord’s Prayer. At least two letters from national watchdog organizations have been circulated among members over the past month asking council to reevaluate what they do. Council members are not talking about it, except behind closed doors in executive session. The most recent letter, dated May 20, comes from the Alliance Defense Fund (ADF) and includes a detailed six-page policy regarding legislative invocations for council to consider. Council President Vance Phillips of Laurel said he would not comment on action to adopt a policy because any discussion on the issue would take place in an executive session. He said there is the potential of litigation over the matter. “As you know, I am not in a position to talk specifically about that issue, but any council member can make a motion to do anything they want and with three votes we'll do it,” Phillips said. In a letter to council, J. Michael Johnson, ADF senior counsel, wrote there is no question that a legislative body may open its sessions with an invocation. “Contrary to some recent claims, such prayer can also include sectarian references without running afoul of the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause,” he wrote. Johnson included a policy adopted by other government entities with his letter. It includes a specified list of what the council can do legally to begin meetings with a prayer. Adopting the policy would mean changes – including stopping the practice of Phillips leading the prayer. Under the suggested policy, a rotating group of volunteer clergy members would lead the prayer for the

benefit of council. The invocation would not be considered part of the public meeting. Currently, the prayer is not included on the agenda. A disclaimer would need to be printed on each agenda stating the council does not endorse the speaker’s views. Johnson said the alliance is so confident the policy will stand up in court, if the county adopts the policy and later faces a legal challenge to it, the alliance will defend the county free of charge. As with the letter from the Americans United for the Separation of Church and State sent to council April 28, Johnson included several examples of legal references to back up his organization’s claims. He also pointed out that elected officials in several cities and counties have received threatening correspondence from groups such as Americans United. “These groups have made extraordinary demands for public invocations to be censored or altogether prohibited,” he wrote. Johnson wrote the general rule of thumb is that government cannot compel someone to pray in accordance with one preferred religious viewpoint. “For this reason, a policy which mandates only nonsectarian prayer would itself likely be unconstitutional.” Johnson wrote the best policy is one that provides an open forum for individuals to pray according to their own consciences – on a rotational basis. “Under such a policy, the viewpoint expressed – whether sectarian or nonsectarian – is then left to the individual prayer-giver, rather than the government,” Johnson wrote.

The invocation or prayer would be for the benefit of council only. It would not be listed as an agenda item and not be included as part of the public portion of the meeting. No one would be required to participate in the prayer. The prayer or invocation would be led by an eligible clergy member

(voluntarily) on a rotating schedule with no more than three appearances per year. If the clergy member was unable to attend, the council president would announce a moment of silence for those who wished to participate. The policy would state the council did not have preference for or against any faith or reli-

gious denomination. The policy would also include a disclaimer to be printed on the agenda: “The views or beliefs expressed by the invocation speaker have not been previously reviewed or approved by the council, and the council does not endorse the religious beliefs or views of this or any other speaker.”

“YOU GOTTA DIE FROM SOMETHING.

I could drown in a bathtub.”

Proposed policy includes rotating clergy to lead prayer The following are highlights of a proposed invocation policy provided by the Alliance Defense Fund to Sussex County Council:

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*SOURCE: National Safety Council, 2004 data **SOURCE: American Cancer Society

For more information please call

1-800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com

DELAWARE HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES Division of Public Health Tobacco Prevention and Control Program


PAGe 50

I was stunned that the broad-

cast that evening did not include any of what I said...

Time for the truth to be told In response to the town of Laurel’s yetagain PR campaign on behalf of developers, I must throw the truth out there to see if it sticks these days. Mr. Fasano’s assertion that the court declared that S.C.O.L.D.M. “did not have standing to challenge the action in the first place” is simply false. In fact, the court ruled that we did have standing to challenge the zoning issues and that we were correct in that challenge. The court declared that the zonings are invalid and ineffective which means there is no zoning applied to the lands. There can be no development without zoning and we will continue to monitor the town in this regard now that we have “standing.” Mr. Fasano invited WBOC to help him with his PR campaign last week. I was contacted by the TV station and explained the “split decision” which is an accurate description of the court’s rulings. I was stunned that the broadcast that evening did not include any of what I said and implied that the court ruled entirely in the town’s favor, which is simply not the case. It validates my distrust of much of the media these days. We will be addressing the issue with the so-called “reporter.” Now some BF (before Fasano) news. We are credited (and blamed by a few) for Discovery’s demise. Our intention from day one was to preserve the property values of those living in that area. The stadiums (Tony Windsor’s article only understated the seating capacity by 12,000 seats, but the truth is hard sometimes), amusement park, etc. would have destroyed the property values of “those people out there,” as Ms. Wright calls us. We also asserted that the whole project could only succeed with some sort of gambling (casino) and we were acused of fearmongering. Well lookee here! The same Preston Schell who was backing Discovery is now planning the Del Pointe Racino in Millsboro. What a coincidence. He’s even offered the state of Delaware $20 million for a casino permit. The bottom line is that we insist that annexations and zonings be done in accordance with the law. That means in compliance with zoning codes, comp plans, state law and town charters. That’s not too much to ask. We’re still here and we’ll remain until...Frank Calio is seen sporting an NRA cap! WD Whaley

S.C.O.L.D.M

MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

Letters to the Editor

Stars’ Letters Policy

All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or you may email editor@ mspublications.com

Atkins resorts to a personal attack

Recently, Rep. John Atkins posted some distasteful remarks about me on a well read local Internet information network. The remarks were picked up and read on the air by a local radio talk show host and treated as fact. By doing this, Rep. Atkins has proven my point that he is continuing his slide into Liberalism. He has lowered the Del Pointe debate from the academic level to the personal attack, used solely by the radical left wing. I, however, will continue on the high road but will take a moment to respond to his personal attack even though it seems wrong that I must divulge publicly my career with Bodie’s Dairy Markets to do so. The Bodie’s Dairy Markets chain of six stores was established, owned, operated and sold by my father, Bodie. I was his employee for 30 years. He alone established the product line and ignored my requests to remove any products, including the lottery tickets that Rep. Atkins wrote were “polluting our community.” For example, when in 1997, WAWA (the regional leader in the industry) removed lottery sales from all of its stores, I wanted Bodie’s Dairy Markets to follow suit but was admonished for the thought. I plead guilty to the sin of working hard, for many years, behind the counters of my father’s convenience stores. Using Rep. Atkins’ logic, I am guilty of “polluting our community.” Likewise, in Rep. Atkins eyes, there are loads of other cashiers in convenience stores, drug stores, supermarkets and liquor stores just as guilty. During the many years I sold lottery tickets, I personally saw the horrible effects that gambling has on innocent peoples’ lives. Our state government is as guilty as I am for having placed the sinful stumbling block of lottery sales before them

in the first place. For this reason and for the reason of my faith, I am against any expansion of gambling in Delaware and therefore Del Pointe. In personally attacking me, Rep. Atkins has won my argument for me. He wrote that “Bodie’s stores were polluting our community” by selling lottery tickets. Yet he is in favor of the new Del Pointe gambling casino that would further the “polluting (of) our community.” Will he condemn the builders and employees of Del Pointe as people “polluting our community” as well someday? How have we gotten to a point where an elected official publicly attacks, on a personal level, a private citizen for that citizen’s personal stance on an issue? This is being played out on a national level every day. No wonder no one wants to speak out against government’s wrongdoings. We elected these officials to lead us, not attack us and they should lead us down a good and moral path, not a path of sin, no matter how much we beg them for it. Just because the majority of people want something does not make it the correct and moral thing to do. If, for instance, a vote was taken back in the 1840’s whether or not to abolish slavery, the majority of people would have voted in favor of keeping it. Would that have made slavery the correct and moral thing to do? The majority of the people of Germany thought Hitler was right; did that make the Nazis correct and moral? Leaders should do the right thing, not the politically expedient thing. How many of our leaders are only concerned about getting re-elected and worship a God that looks just like a dollar bill? God gave these leaders their authority to lead us and they will answer to God someday for the abuses they have rendered upon us. Please pray for our state and our nation. Eric Bodenweiser

Georgetown

Cutting spending shows strength

This budget process is separating the weak legislators from the strong. Senator Schwartzkopf stated in a committee meeting this week that the body was elected to make tough decisions if taxes need to be raised. I strongly believe that any senator or representative who reacts by trying to raise taxes instead of stepping on toes to trim back spending is weak. It is easier to impose new taxes than to demand thrift from the government they were elected to control. Every vote to raise taxes, whether by imposing fees or by increasing the costs to Delaware businesses, shows that legislator’s inability to do their job. They give in to the system which protects their own territory. They give in to the political cronies who look out for their own best interests instead of the people’s interests. They give in to the Delaware

Way, and every citizen will be forced to pay for their weaknesses. Where are those who speak for their constituents? Who in Legislative Hall has the courage to stand up against the bloated state of Delaware? Why are we standing by while the process of self protective government steamrolls over us? Brian Shields

Sussex County Chair Libertarian Party of Delaware

School consolidation a great idea

One rarely hears a Democrat say anything that makes common sense anymore, but I’ve got to give kudos to Frank Calio in his column in the June 11th edition. I disagree with him about 99.9% on everything else he espouses in his weekly column, but I thought he wrote an excellent column about school consolidation. The one thing I would like to see added to this idea is a school voucher program for parents who would like to have a choice as to where their children are educated. This would also save the State of Delaware a chunk of money and provide some competition within the educational system. Imagine! Saving money and improving education. What a novel idea! Larry Calhoun

Laurel

Legislator shocked by mistake

Recently, I was incorrectly listed as a sponsor of a bill that would allow beer and wine to be sold in Delaware supermarkets. I do not support the legislation and I was astonished that my name had been placed on House Bill 193. After questioning the sponsor of the legislation, I was told my name had been inadvertently added to bill due to a clerical error. That mistake has since been corrected. In fact, as a supermarket owner, the legislation presents a perceived conflict-ofinterest for me. Should HB 193 come to the floor of the House of Representatives, I will not engage in the debate, nor will I cast a vote on the measure. Personally, I believe alcoholic beverages are already easily available in Delaware and I do not see any need to change the way in which these products are retailed. However, should HB 193 be enacted, I would be forced to carry beer and wine in my stores. I would rather not do this, but the nature of the business requires that I offer the same convenience as other markets. Failing to do so would give competitors an edge and place the people employed at my stores at risk. House Bill 193 is currently in the House Revenue & Finance Committee. State Rep. Gerald Hocker

38th District

Editor’s note

Frank Calio will be taking the summer off from writing his column.


MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

PAGe 51

Life is enriched by experiences and acquaintances As I recall he was nothing to write home about in the looks deony indsor partment, but he made up for that with his overwhelming presence. There are certain peoHe was not a bad kid, just a child who felt it necessary to garner ple we meet along the some sense of attention, even when way that are able to it resulted in less than desirable outcome for him, as well as those leave us with a lifetime around him. Even with all his shortcomings, of assurance... especially his inability to focus on the job at hand, namely his school leaves me somewhat envious. work, he was usually well-meaning. Like most of us, I thought those effortI never understood why he found it so less, devil-may-care days of childhood necessary to do things that he knew would would never end. As I remember those result in some type of retribution from summers of my youth they all seem to be his father, or a school official. I warned made up of beautiful, sunny days, with a him, but to no avail. It was like he was on constant, cool wisp of breeze in the air. a mission to follow through on whatever The grass seems so green and the dirt unspontaneous action he felt compelled to der our feet like a soft downy pillow. do, throwing caution to the wind. They are my favorite memories and he Perhaps his behavior oftentimes left was my favorite friend. No matter what much to be desired. But, whenever I have anybody thought, he never meant any a few minutes in my busy day to cast my memories back to my childhood, he imme- harm, even when he was up to no good. I appreciate how he would take me diately comes to mind. into unchartered territories, pushing the When I consider the potential he had, envelope of people’s tolerance, even when I become frustrated that he did not apply inside, I was scared about where he was himself more than he did. But there was taking us. always something about his carefree, less The fact is I miss him very much. than structured lifestyle that even today

T

W

When I consider the challenges, stresses and deadlines of daily duties and responsibilities, I wonder how he would handle it. I quickly realize that he would not handle it at all; after all, he was just a kid. I often wonder where he went. I wonder why he left so abruptly, just as life started to become so complicated. I guess he decided that complication was not something he could tolerate. He was more about simple and fun, without the trappings of responsibility, and for that I miss him. I suppose at this moment he is still running around the yards and streets of Crisfield, making swords, rifles and baseball bats out of old discarded lumber, throwing dirt clods like grenades and drinking water from a yard hose or outside spigot. He is running barefoot on the green grass and across the dirt lanes that are as soft as a downy pillow. There is no doubt the sky is blue and the sun bright as the constant cool wisp of a summer breeze blows past his face. I wish I could be there with him as I once was, but that’s not possible. So, who was he? He was me. Note: I write about growing up in Crisfield, Md. on a regular basis in my weekly column. I was shocked and deeply saddened

to learn of the passing of one of my classmates who I shared a classroom with from first grade through high school graduation. Hopefully the condolences I sent to his mother, Janet “Tease” Price and the rest of David’s family can serve as a tribute to one of my first and fondest friends:

My Condolences: My heart and prayers are with you. To be completely honest, I am not sure how I could possibly put into words the sadness I am feeling right now. Even though I have not seen or spoken to David in a number of years, the memories I have of him are so clear and present. I believe when we start out in life there are certain people we meet along the way that are able to leave us with a lifetime of assurance that there is truly good in people, even when life causes us to doubt. David is one of those people in my life. I am a better person having met him and having the honor of sharing time with him. My memories of David are graced with his ever-present light of honesty, kindness, and true compassion for people. Heaven is a much brighter place, and Crisfield and our hearts are dimmed with sadness at the loss of such a wonderful man. Miss Tease, thank you so much for sharing him with us. God Bless — Tony

Legislation would reform health Next Tea Party will be July 2 insurance for small businesses

100%

April 15th marks the day when over 2,000 Delawareans added their voices to over 1 million voices in every state in this Country to stop reckless spending. These voices will unite once again for a health care reform plan that will actually solve the health care problems facing our country. Tea Parties are scheduled all over our country during July 4th week. The citizens that gather under the name of the Tea Party support wise spending and feel that Congress is not offering any real solutions. Supporters also feel our Constitution is being tossed to the wind, our freedoms are being infringed upon, and the results are crippling our country. The pattern continues with the proposed health care legislation that offers many features that we all might be enticed to support, but it also sets up the system to control its citizens and ration health care. On July 2, the Delaware Tea Party calls to everyone to join us in front of our

U.S. Congressmen’s offices to demand health care reform that actually puts the patient first.

We want the following: • to keep medical decisions between  the doctor and the patient • legislation that does not give an  advantage to the government, the insurance companies, or the pharmaceutical companies • health care to stop being a big business • to place health care choices in the  hands of the patients, guided by their physicians We will call for legislation that will not cause our children to pay for our mistakes. Now is the time to speak. In Sussex County, a tea party will be held at The Circle in Georgetown from noon to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, July 2. For more information, visit www. delawareteaparty.org or email Delawaretaxteaparty@gmail.com.

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

ing rules for small employer group health insurance by compressing the top and bottom insurance rates, reducing the variance between rate premiums and limiting the adjustments that can be made year to year. Delaware State Chamber of Commerce senior vice president of government relations A. Richard Heffron said that it is not uncommon for some individuals to see a 25-percent spike in their health insurance premiums. The legislation would cap those adjustments at 15 percent. Mr. Heffron said the bill would help control rising costs of health insurance for small businesses and their employees, adding predictability to the process. “Health care costs are one of the biggest challenges facing the small business community,” Rep. D. Short said. “I’m thrilled that our caucus has been able to look past political ideologies to arrive at a consensus on a bill that will help small businesses deal with this reality. My hope is that it’ll be the first of many collaborative efforts by our bipartisan membership and Delaware’s business owners.” Rep. B. Short noted that the legislation had languished in recent years4x12.45 – it was a recommendation of the Delaware Health3 WEEK Care Commission more than two years 06/18/09 ago – but he hopes that the support of the bipartisan Small Business Caucus will help shepherd it through the General Assembly. “This is the first step for us,” Rep. B. Short said. “There are several other initiatives we will be working on – such as increased regulatory flexibility – to make Delaware the best state for small businesses to grow and thrive.”

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Members of a bipartisan legislative group created to identify and address issues affecting small businesses throughout Delaware renewed their commitment to creating a viable climate for small businesses recently, highlighting the first piece of legislation the panel has sponsored. The Small Business Caucus, a group of House lawmakers who have a small business background, have met regularly throughout the session, meeting with Delaware Economic Development Office, Delaware State Chamber of Commerce, local chambers and small business owners to identify problems facing small businesses and remove those obstacles. The panel was formed by Rep. Bryon H. Short, D-Highland Woods, and House Minority Whip Rep. Daniel B. Short, R-Seaford, both of whom are small business owners. Small businesses, of which there are 72,000 in the state, comprise more than 75 percent of the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce membership. The continued success and growth of small businesses is critical to the revitalization of Delaware’s economy, Rep. B. Short said. “One of the key focuses of the Small Business Caucus is to improve the opportunity to establish and grow a small business in Delaware,” Rep. B. Short said. “As small businesses know, insurance is a critical challenge to their continued success. The members of the Small Business Caucus have listened to business owners and are working to help them succeed and grow.” The first bill sponsored by members of the Small Business Caucus, House Bill 85, was placed on the House agenda last week. The legislation would reform rat-


PAGE 52

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

Laurel Community Snapshots

Felton Lodge #30 I.O.O.F. was chartered on June 14, 1859. They celebrated their 150th year, Saturday, June 13, at a Banquet at the Felton Fire Hall. Pictured are Edward W. Gordon Sr. of Laurel, Grand master of Delaware; Thomas Kates, past grand master and 58-year member, Felton 30; George Sennett, Noble Grand, Felton 30; Deputy Sovereign Grand Master Paul Cumindale and Richard Adams, 40-year member of Felton 30. Photo by Pat Murphy.

It’s Pure oil and gas and an old pump, at that, shown by Eleanor Henry at the old Henry store during the recent Strawberry Festival. Photo by Pat Murphy.

Jay Hill of Laurel gives his presentation of “The Bacon Switch Story” to members of the Laurel Historical Society’s annual meeting, last week. A record 119 members and guests attended. Photo by Pat Murphy.

The Delmar New Century Club held a “Kids Cooking and Books Literacy Program” at the Delmar Library. During this program, children work with an adult to prepare a meal following recipes and are encouraged to prepare the meal at home. The May program celebrated Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. Another session is planned for August. Adult shown is Joan E. Adkins, in the background is Katy Schell and child in front is unidentified.

Glimpse of The Past

David Sully of the Odd Shop cleans out the Alley between his store and the Globe building last week. It was the second time he had cleaned the Alley in three months. Photo by Pat Murphy.

Charles Wheatley with Marvil statue that stood south of Municipal Building at Poplar and Mechanic streets c1945. Statue in honor of Sallie Marvil originally was in the yard of the Marvil Mansion at West and Townsend streets in Laurel Photo courtesy of K. Jones.


PAGE 53

MORNING STAR • JUNE 18 - 24, 2009

A Father’s Day tribute to Doing the Towns Together two special dads in my life LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS

Father’s Day, Sunday, June 21 - A very special day that far too often is forgotten in the busy shuffle of life. For weeks before the observance of Mother’s Day in May, we are bombarded by sales featuring the perfect gift to buy for the “the hand that rocks the cradle and rules the world.” Mother’s Day is well advertised in advance. But then, along comes Father’s Day and the tendency is to just sluff it off as another day in our busy world. Fortunately, my generation is one where the father in the household had a strong influence in the life of the family. In today’s world, far too often that is not the case. My Dad worked long and hard hours at his job as a railroader. For many years he worked odd hours, nights and weekends blending into one. But, he was always a strong, visible force in our family. He could be as fierce as a bull on occasion, actually obstinate in his feelings and opinions on some things. Yet, at the same time, he could be gentle as a lamb, quick to be drawn to tears, filled with compassion. He was a man who loved to laugh, loved my mother and was the only person in the world who could occasionally call her “Babe” and not receive a rebuke. He loved his children, his brothers and sisters, his grandchildren, his home, some of his neighbors and the Pennsylvania Railroad. There were some things he simply would not tolerate, and he wasn’t afraid to voice his opinion on how he felt about a given situation. Dad was not a beachgoer, yet several times each year he and my mother, and my aunt and uncle would pile into their automobile and go over to Wildwood, N.J., for a one-day outing. He wore the same knit wool black bathing suit year after year and was delighted when it finally wore out, never to be replaced. Dad also loved the Wilmington Blue Rocks and going to games when their stadium was located at 30th and Governor Printz Boulevard. He loved Camel cigarettes and strong, boiling-hot, black coffee. He loved rocking his grandchildren and singing to them in a strong bass, caring little that he was usually off-tune and tempo. He raced along the top of moving freight cars on the railroad. He was probably the world’s worst carpenter or handyman, but could grow beautiful tomatoes and peonies. The father of my three children, the man I have been married to for nearly 63 years, is very much like my dad in lots of ways, in other ways there was not the slightest con-

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Moments With Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton nection. The first time I saw Chuck, I knew he was the man that I would marry and within a year of that meeting, I did just that. He was home from World War II, honorably discharged from the United States Marine Corps, had curly, very blonde hair, and loved to laugh. Chuck was not above helping with the children when they were babies. Those were cloth diaper days and he could change the baby in a flash, sterilize bottles if necessary, hang diapers on the clothesline, and like dad, would sit and rock a sick child while singing away at a not always on pitch voice. For many years Chuck worked shiftwork at DuPont, but he could be counted on to be present at special school or church events. He was a Cub Master for quite a few years, helped with Little League whenever his work schedule permitted, spent hours driving what were then quiet back-country roads in our old truck, affectionately called “Martha.” He has built everything from a rabbit cage to a goat house for our two pet goats, covered many miles taking our kids and others to Little League or school athletic events, or trips to the beach - piling the car or truck full of food, blankets, umbrella and other equipment. Here at home he could be counted on to remodel a room, spend hours assembling miles and miles of model trains in our basement, building doll furniture, repairing wagons and bikes. Chuck was a wonderful gardener and taught each of the kids the fine art of working the soil so that a seed or plant would be productive. Through the years he has shown by example. The result is that our offspring have developed into fine young human beings. He has given them a good name. Has he been perfect? No indeed. After all, he is a human being. But, on this Father’s Day and the later years of his life, he can say, with all honesty, “I tried my best to be a good dad.” And that is worth more to his children than all the money in the world.

Sarah Marie TriviTS • 875-3672 I received the following three items recently from a well known lady in this area, whom I’m sure is acquainted with everyone around Laurel, so I will copy as sent: Mrs. Adrian Selby LeBlanc was recently a visitor in the area. Her daughter, Miranda, was awarded a masters degree in special education at Wilmington University on May 17. Roger, her father was unable to attend the graduation service because of his responsibilities as school sessions were near an end. Roger was named the 2009 Alaska Distinguished Principal by the Alaska Association of Elementary School Principals. He has had several significant accomplishments in his career as principal. Roger is a United States Air Force veteran and a current major in the Alaska Air National Guard. The sister, Jayden is honored at her high school for exceptional grades and has been invited to join the National Honor Society. Adrian is a successful teacher at the Creekside Elementary School in Alaska. She had three teaching days left when she returned to Alaska. Adrian is the daughter of Cora Norwood Selby and the late Paul M. Selby, Sr. Some members and friends of the Laurel Senior Center made their annual trip to Smith Island. The rain had stopped and the weather was good for traveling. Everyone had a good time, good luncheon and great fellowship. Mrs. Loretta Kenney was recognized for her 20 years as member and volunteer at the Laurel Senior Center. She was acknowledged at the annual Sussex County Recognition dinner recently held at the Rusty Rudder in Dewey Beach. I want to thank Cora for these items for our column. Catherine Henry entertained houseguests from Columbia, S.C. June 12-17. Those who enjoyed the visit with her and friends in this area were Claude and Mary Jane Unglesbee and son, Alan. The monthly meeting of the Laurel Lioness was held on the evening of June 4. Following a tasty, hot dinner at Georgia House, the business of the club was presented and introduction of officers and board members for the current year, under the direction of the new president, Joan Hart. Joan then presented out-going president, Elaine Lynch, with gifts and thanks for her dedication and untiring efforts for duties performed, with the aid of board and committee members, this past year. Guests were Jenna Allen, and Tony Rubino (Gaven Parker, not present) recipients of scholarships given to them this school year. The young men’s were Lioness’ awards and

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Jenna’s, through this club, was in memory of Jewel Hickman given by her family to a student entering any field of study in the medical category. These lady Lioness will take a summer break after their picnic in July. Ink in June 27 on your calendar as the annual Melson’s ice-cream social will be at the community hall in the Delmar area.

Congratulations and best wishes for much future success to Samantha Layton, just graduated from Del Tech and now is the proud owner of her LPN degree; with love from her family. Two belated birthday wishes, which slipped off the page last week for: Clair Mervine who celebrated a birthday on June 6 and Dottie Mervine on June 9. Late best wishes! Special happy birthday wishes to Melvin Cordrey on June 20 from some of his “partners in crime” from the “old Days” at Phillips Men’s Shop. I was more than delighted to visit Tom Wright last Saturday as he was sitting on his front porch watching the world go by (that would be West Street activities) as he is now home recuperating and enjoying all that’s going on around him in this great weather. The Alumni Banquet meeting, cancelled last week, will be held June 23, at 7:30 p.m., at the home of Carolyn Calio. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Charles M. Truitt.

We continue with prayers for all of our service men and service women and for friends who are ill: Shirley Scott, Joe Messick, John Kolbe, “Bobbi” Shwed, Steve Trivits, Alvin Lutz, Madeline Bethards, Conner Niblett, Robert Truitt, Matthew Littleton, Jean Foskey, Donald Layton, Sr., Harriett MacVeigh, Martha Windsor, Mary Wilson, June Williams, Walt Dorman, Cecile Jones, Patrick Starr, Dot Murphy, Bob Christian, Hattie Puckham, Calvin Hearn, Tom Wright and Joe Messick. Happy June birthday wishes to: Helen Whaley, Ann Lee on June 19; Kathleen Campbell, June 21; David Whaley, June 22; Virginia Dorman, Anna Mohr, Louise Soukup and Betty Sullivan, June 23; Dorothy Hearn and Grayson Kenney, June 24. “Happiness is a stock that doubles in a year.”See you in the stars.

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PAGE 54

MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

Opinion Letters to the Editor

Guest Column DHSS discusses Medicaid

By Rita M. Landgraf

Protecting Delaware’s most-vulnerable citizens and ensuring taxpayer dollars are used effectively and efficiently is the top priority for the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services. This is especially true given the historic budget challenges facing Delaware and the resulting sacrifices required to meet those challenges. That’s why when the Department recently looked critically at our operations to identify savings we felt it was reasonable to ask the pharmacies in our Medicaid program to sacrifice a one percentage point reduction in the amount we pay them for brand name prescription drugs they provide to Medicaid recipients. The reduction still allows pharmacies to make a profit, while saving money for taxpayers. All but one of the pharmacies stepped up. Illinoisbased Walgreens, a company that recently reported record revenues for the second quarter of this year, complained about decreased profits and abruptly announced it is walking away from the Medicaid program. Ironically, Walgreens/Happy Harry’s alone received $18 million from the State’s Medicaid program last year and they accept similar reimbursement rates in other states. Walgreens and its trade association is spending thousands of dollars on an expensive federal lawsuit and ad campaign, in an apparent effort to intimidate the Department into reversing its decision. In so doing, they make claims that require correction. The facts are that Delaware has been very aggressive in containing Medicaid prescription costs. We already require doctors to prescribe generic medications, except when that doctor certifies that it is medically necessary for a name-brand drug to be used or when a rebate renders the name-brand cheaper. Walgreens argues for even greater utilization of generics, probably because they enjoy greater profit margins on generics. But Delaware taxpayers actually receive a better deal on some name-brand drugs, because the medication’s manufacturers give the state a significant rebate. The good news for taxpayers is that we are working hard to ensure that taxpayer dollars spent on the Medicaid program are spent wisely. In the end, thanks to the fact that most of Delaware’s business partners are willing help deal with our tough economic times, I can assure all of our Medicaid patients that they’ll be able to count on the same quality care they’re used to getting. To see a complete list of pharmacies that will continue to honor Medicaid prescriptions, visit dhss.delaware.gov, or call 800-996-9969.

School bus contractor speaks out

I am writing this letter to clarify a few comments made during my conversation with Lynn Parks regarding the proposed budget cuts to school bus contracts. First School Bus Contractors are just that Independent Contractors that the state pays to provide a service. We are not state employees and are not eligible to enroll in the State Employee Health and Dental Insurance Programs. We also do not qualify for the State Retirement Program like state employees do. We are responsible for our own health and dental insurance. Second, the state mandates that we replace our school buses after 12 years service. I had to retire a bus that only had 7400 miles on it, at the start of the 2008-2009 school year. Our buses are safety inspected two times per year. The bus that I replaced cost new $42,500. My new bus cost $72,000. The state mandates that certain safety items be included on any bus in service. With the rising cost of steel and rubber, as well as the Federal Emission Standards in effect on buses in use after 2007 have caused the price to increase even more for this year. It would have made more sense, to me, for the state to go to a 15-year

replacement plan similar to the one used in Wicomico County. This could have eliminated the need to replace shorter-route buses thus saving the state money. Third we have seen a fuel adjustment since December on my 40-mile-per-day route. I am making $450 per month less now than when I started. As Mrs. Falcon said in the article, that this seemed like an appropriate way to ask the bus contractors to share in the pain. We have felt the pain of not having our contracts evaluated yearly like other states have done for years. With the money already taken from our contracts for fuel any decrease in our contracts would surely put a system that is already behind, even further behind. Fourth, recently Nationwide Insurance stopped writing School Bus Insurance Policies. With one less insurance company doing school bus insurance I feel that it is a matter of time before other companies start raising their rates. There are only a few companies even writing School Bus Policies any more, and we need to keep the insurance allotment the same as it is now. Having insurance on the bus and passengers is a requirement of our contract . And finally I have driven the bus for years and the children, the parents and the school I serve, mean a lot to me. But it is a business and like any business you have to attain a profit to stay in business. With the amount of money that we spend to operate and the responsibility we

take daily, as bus contractors, we are under-paid. We are the first adult these kids see in the morning and sometimes the last at night. We don’t expect to get rich with our buses, only earn a decent living. I urge anyone with concerns involving a school bus contract to contact their state senators and representatives and ask them why the state is proposing cuts to our contracts when we are already being cut. Samuel Lee Collins,

Laurel

Library grateful for coverage

Once again, the Laurel Star has helped the Laurel Historical Society to have a successful fundraising event. The coverage you gave to our program on the history of Bacon Switch was excellent especially since it was on such short notice. The program was attended by approximately 125 people and raised over $600 for the society. We had guests from as far away as Norfolk, Va and Washington D.C. On behalf of the board and members of the Laurel Historical Society, I thank you for this specific article but more importantly for all the help your newspaper gives us in publicizing our events. These events and activites help us accomplish our mission of preserving and presenting the history of the Laurel area and we couldn’t get the word out without your help. Norma Jean Fowler

President

Rita M. Landgraf is Secretary of the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services.

Morning Star Publications Inc.

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MORNING STAR • JuNe 18 - 24, 2009

PAGe 55

Final Word Grand Opening

New website features helpful information about assistance By Congressman Mike Castle

While the nation’s economy continues to struggle, the recent closure of yet another auto manufacturing plant, General Motor’s Boxwood Road in Wilmington, reminds us of the challenge here at home. In this environment, assistance for Delawareans who have lost their jobs and helping to create new employment opportunities in our great state, are a top priority. Today, more and more Americans use the Internet to communicate and access information. I have expanded my Congressional website with the hope of providing useful information to families in transition. The new ‘Community Resources and Personal Finance’ page aims to provide easy access to information regarding available state, federal and non-profit resources and assistance. My goal for the new web-page is to provide a “one-stop-shop” for Delawareans seeking information - from housing assistance, education and job training, unemployment insurance and food assistance to a host of other resources aimed to assist Delawareans in this tough economy. My staff and I consulted with community leaders from state agencies and nonprofit organizations throughout Delaware to create what we hope will be a comprehensive list of resources. The page will be maintained regularly in order to provide the best and most up-to-date information as we become aware of programs, organizations and resources that benefit the citizens of our state. I also welcome your feedback and suggestions for improving the web-page. If you are affiliated with or know an agency or organization in Delaware that should be listed as a resource, contact my Wilmington office at 302-428-1902 and speak with Todd Perkins. To view the page, visit my website at www.castle.house.gov and click on the ‘Community Resources and Personal Finance’ box at the bottom of the page. I encourage individuals to browse

through the various sections of the page and contact the listed agencies and organizations. If you do not have access to the Internet, contact my Wilmington office at 302-428-1902 and we will be happy to provide information on available resources over the phone or by mail. We all know of a family member, friend or co-worker who has been affected by the economic downturn. There are resources out there that can be of benefit to individuals and families, but we do not always know what is available or who to contact. Help us spread the word on the ‘Community Resources and Personal Finance’ web-page. The best way to move through these tough economic times is to work together to provide assistance immediately where we can and to work on creating new opportunities in Delaware for the future.

From the Internet

A few sample from “101 WAYS TO ANNOY PEOPLE” • Sing the Batman theme incessantly. • Specify that your drive-through order is “to go.” • Speak only in a “robot” voice. • Leave your turn signal on for fifty miles. • Reply to everything someone says with “that’s what YOU think.” • Forget the punchline to a long joke, but assure the listener it was a “real hoot.” • Follow a few paces behind someone, spraying everything they touch with Lysol. • Practice making fax and modem noises. • Invent nonsense computer jargon in conversations, and see if people play along to avoid the appearance of ignorance. • Erect an elaborate network of ropes in your backyard, and tell the neighbors you are a “spider person.”

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Re/Max Eastern Shore

Nancy Price

CELL

236-3619

302

nancyprice@remax.net

8956 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973

302-628-SOLD(7653)

Come Live at Heritage Shores

A 55+ Golf Community. Enjoy the breath-taking views or the available club house for dinning & bar. Retreat to your 2400 sq. ft. home with exquisite master and designer “cooks” kitchen with granite. Privacy is yours as you sit on the back porch/patio while taking in the serenity. What a great place to retire while still engaging in abundance of activities. Being offered at $339,900. MLS # 564792. Call Nancy for your private showing!

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22350 Sussex Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 just south of Dukes Lumber.

Top Producer for May

Jessica Bradley

302.629.5575 302.628.9000

www.century21tullramey.com

The Gold Standard

Top Producer for May Ed Higgins

REDUCED

567963. $169,000. Motivated Seller!! Great Deal!! Move into this Cape Cod. Tile entry, gas fireplace, master BR on 1st floor, stainless steel appliances, energy efficient heat/cool heat pump. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660.

569000. $330,000. 13.5 acres with 40x64 barn, 400-amp service, electric fenced horse pasture, 2 ponds. Also includes 3 BR, 2 BA new construction home w/ large 2-car garage. Lot available without house for 215,000. Picture is of similar model. Call Ed Higgins’ cell 302-841-0283.

548616. $224,900. No stone was left unturned in the design of this enchanting plan. Though moderate in size, it accounts for great livability and marvelous curb appeal. Note, for instance, the carefully chosen mix of exterior siding materials: stone and lap siding. Custom built by 13” west. Call Jessica Bradley’s cell 302-2457927.

567717. $400,000. Golf course views are yours in this exquisite home! Better than new-dramatic 2story LR w/ custom wrought iron railings, gas f/p & no maint. deck. Granite & stainless steel appl. in kitchen, cathedral in MBR, walk-in tile shower in MB, sep. private office, beautiful hrdwd flrs. No HOA fees! Call Jessica Bradley’s cell 302-245-7927.

RIDGEWOOD

Seaford’s newest wooded community. Homes starting at $189,900 569868. ¾ Acre lots starting at $64,900. Call Jessica Bradley’s cell for more info 302-245-7927.

5 ACRES & REDUCED

565721. $355,000. Beautiful 3BR, 3BA home w/ 2-car garage on the 15th hole over looking the water in Heritage Shores. Watch the burning sky w/ gorgeous sunsets, upgrades everywhere, flooring, kitchen, lighting w/ bay window, 2 master suites & plenty of extra storage. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710.

560355. $299,900. Premier lot on 12th Fairway! Walking distance to the clubhouse. Built new, never lived in. Owner’s suite w/ walk-in closet & bath on 1st floor, guest rm on 1st floor. Master suite w/ sitting rm on 2nd floor. 30x14 unfinished bonus rm, covered patio, sunroom, & gas fireplace. Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710.

565150. $110,000. 3/4 acre lot with 2BR, 1BA home. 2 enclosed porches. Home ready to move in. Estate sale being sold “as-is”. Home is located on rural country road yet close to everything! Call Patti Haney’s cell 302-462-0710.

565717. $65,000. 4BR, 2 BA like new condition. Very nice development. Min. to DE. Beaches. Vaulted ceilings, hardwood flooring in dinning room, kitchen. Split floor plan. 12x20’ shed included w/ acceptable offer on home. On a leased lot. Call Lee Marland’s cell 302-542-0347.

REDUCED

NEW LISTING

569845. $149,900. Fantastic den w/ wet bar & open beams in knotty pine setting. Super clean home in move in condition. Home is 47 ft deep & reflects pleasant comfort. Concrete driveway, ample back yard. Not new but upgraded & well maintained. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289

569288. $163,900. Very young home on large rural lot. Very Attractive. Extra room can be 4th bedroom, den or office. Sep. Laundry. Large shed, sidewalk, stoned drive. Large garden tub in bath. Cool wooded lot. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

568654. $149,900. Adorable home w/ new roof, windows and fresh paint. Arched doorways and hardwood floors. Fixed steps to floored attic. Half basement on a double lot. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302236-2660.

Bridgeville lots

568137. $179,500. Country Living close to town. This quaint rancher is on a 1-acre lot with paved driveway. This home offers a lot for the price. Call Kevin Thawley’s cell 302-258-6455.

551295. $159,900. Great location & ideal for horse lovers wanting pasture land. Includes 100 ft of woods in rear, 48 x 24 pole bldg, 4” dia. well. believed to be sub dividable if side access installed. If desired, owner will remove mobile & allow $5000.00. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

Lots

566650. $160,000. Make this charming house your home. With a fully fenced-in back yard. This home sits on a gorgeous acre lot of land, it features a newly paved driveway with carport and lovely landscaping. There is new carpet in living room and master bedroom. Call Christina Bradham’s cell 302-258-4205

greenwood lots

Lots

(4) Nice country lot w/ minor restrictions. Site evaluation shows LPP. Prices from $69,500 to $74,500. 564841,564837,564840,564844

Country lot, priced to sell! Some minor restrictions apply. LPP Septic. $55,000. 567414

3.89 country lot, suitable for horses. No restrictions. Site evaluation confirms gravity or LPP. $90,000. 566774

(3) Secluded lot with minor restrictions. This lot is right across from State Wildlife area. Farmland protects lot from the rear. $79,900 each. 569133,569135,569165.

seAFord lot

Pristine lot in one of Western Sussex’s most desirable subdivisions. Gravity septic site evaluation. $112,000. 567766

566038, 566040 $97,500 Each (2) 3 acre lots on Dukes Lumber Rd, east of Laurel. Both approved for LPP septic, w/ entrances installed. Perfect for horses or small farmette, no restrictions. Call Kevin Thawley’s cell 302258-6455.

(2) Beautiful country lots w/ acreage. Minor restrictions, horses are welcome. $109,900 each. 568058,568057.

32 acres w/ tremendous potential. 1470 ft. of road frontage, owner will sub divide. Some nice pine timber on property. $650,000. 568043

MillsBoro lots

(2) Peaceful lots just a few hundred yards from Ingram’s Pond. Gravity Septic. $74,500 each. 567418, 567423.

Call Trey Hardesty’s cell 302-236-3344


June 18, 2009_L