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VOL. 10 NO. 49

THURSDAY, JULY 6, 2006

50 cents

NEWS HEADLINES DRUG BUST - Police from throughout the state cooperate in arrests that net more than 300 in the Laurel area. Page 4. NEW FIRE FIGHTING EQUIPMENT Area town invests in new fire fighting trucks. Page 8

Laurel’s Terry Wright prepares to “spit.” See why on page 29.

ALL-STARS The District III Minor League softball and baseball tournaments were in full swing last week. Laurel team photos page 41, results page 44.

PATRIOT GAMES - The Post 6 Sussex West Patriots win three games to improve to 8-5 in American Legion baseball play. Pages 43, 45 Even with the temperature in the 90s, thousands turned out for the annual Laurel July 4th celebration. Above, the crowd heads toward the food vendors and carnival area following the parade. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

RIVERFEST - See inside for complete information about the 12th annual Riverfest, set for July 14 and 15.

Laurel celebrates a hot Fourth of July ■ See more photos on pages 12, 13, 14, 28, 29, 48.

INSIDE THE STAR © Behind Page One . .3 Business . . . . . . . . .6 Bulletin Board . . . .30 Church . . . . . . . . .24 Classifieds . . . . . .32 Entertainment . . . .40 Gourmet . . . . . . . .23 Health . . . . . . . . . .50 Letters . . . . . . . . . .53 Lynn Parks . . . . . .31 Mike Barton . . . . . .49 Mike McClure . . . .45 Movies . . . . . . . . . . .7

Obituaries . . . . . . .26 Opinion . . . . . . . . .54 Pat Murphy . . . . . .47 People . . . . . . . . . .22 Police . . . . . . . . . .10 Ron MacArthur . . .54 Snapshots . . . . . . .48 Sports . . . . . . . . . .41 Todd Crofford . . . .25 Tony Windsor . . . .11 Tides/Weather . . . .55

By Lynn R. Parks Even some fireworks provided by Mother Nature couldn’t deter Laurel’s 12th annual July 4th celebration on Tuesday. Thousands came to the town to watch the parade, visit vendors, enjoy the entertainment and watch the fireworks. Back at his home, two of the several mobile homes that Bill Towers rent out were still under water, victims of last weekend’s floods. Occupants of one mobile home were staying out of state with family members, occupants of the other were in a motel. But on Tuesday, Towers and his wife Mary Jane took time off from the bailout to attend the July 4th festivities in Laurel. “I’d be lost on the Fourth without this festival,” said Seaford native Towers, who was sitting in Laurel’s downtown park, listening to country

and gospel music singer Jerry Jones. “We come here every year, to see the parade. We see a lot of people, and we like seeing the celebrities in the parade.” Towers was among thousands of people who crowded into downtown Laurel Tuesday to watch the annual Red, White and Blue parade, part of the town’s celebration of Independence Day. Festival goers also enjoyed a carnival, car and motorcycle shows, a talent show and entertainment. Charlene Lewis, Laurel, and Kischa Matthews, Delmar, brought their children to the parade and afterward took them down the street to the carnival. Walking back toward the downtown area, Jeremiah Wright, 4, and Jamal Matthews, 5, were sporting red, white and blue paintings on their chests and tummies. “We’ve been painted by a clown!” announced Jeremiah, whose chest sported glittering stars and the letters “USA.” Jamal’s painting was of a U.S. flag.

Their cousin, Charelle Lewis, 8, said that she had enjoyed the parade, especially the horses. “I also liked it when people threw out candy,” she added. Continued to page 15

Emily Pryor of Seaford is dressed for July 4th as she attends festivities in Laurel. Photo by Ronald MacArthur


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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

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Delaware General Assembly passes record budget By Ronald MacArthur In the final hours, the Delaware General Assembly passed the state’s largest-ever operating budget of $3.102 billion for fiscal 2007 - an increase of $224.6 million (7.8 percent) from fiscal year 2006. Among the key areas driving the state’s budget this year included state employee salaries and medial coverage, Medicaid, public education, energy and state pensions. Public education and public health amount to 61 percent of the spending in the budget. Nearly 34 cents of every dollar in the budget goes to education and health and social services accounts for 27 cents of each dollar spent. State lawmakers will get a 5.6 percent increase for a base pay salary of $40,500. The FY 2007 bond bill represents a decrease of

BEHIND PAGE ONE 28 percent from the previous year, mostly in the spending on transportation projects - down from $393 million to $176 million in fiscal 2007. ALL DAY - In the final hours of the Delaware General Assembly, one of the biggest items on Gov. Ruth Ann Minner’s wish list was passed - but not exactly the way she wanted it. The bill mandating all-day kindergarten in all public schools passed but not before it was amended to allow local school district boards the power to choose whether or not to implement it. Sixty percent of kindergartners across the nation attend all-day class. The cost of implementing full-day kindergarten will cost about $52.7 mil-

lion in one-time capital costs and about $31.9 million in annual operating costs statewide. The state would pick up two-thirds of the cost with the local districts paying the remainder - that is unless districts have already implemented full-day kindergarten.

night of the General Assembly that the new Woodland Ferry will be named in her honor. “The Tina Fallon” will ply the waters of the Nanticoke River at Woodland. She served 14 terms (28 years) in the Delaware House of Representatives.

FERRY FOR FALLON - Retiring State Rep. Tina Fallon was surprised to learn on the last

JESSICA’S LAW IN DELAWARE - A bill mandating a sentence of 25 years to life for

LOTS OF ROAD WORK - Below, work progresses on Woodland Road on Friday to repair and resurface a bridge and crossing near Barne’s Woods. DelDOT crews are busy working on roads in the Seaford-Blades area following damage from flooding in the area on June 25. Above, a constant convoy of DelDOT trucks are taking loads of stone and dirt to repair roads in the area. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

anyone convicted of felony sexual assault against a child will soon become law in Delaware. The governor is expected to sign Delaware’s version of “Jessica’s Law,” which is HB 404 modeled after legislation enacted in Florida following the abduction, rape and murder of 9-year-old Jessica Lunsford by a convicted sex offender. Five other states have similar legislation.


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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

More than 300 arrested in Laurel area in drug raid The Delaware State Police Drug Task Force and the Laurel Police Department, with the assistance of 20 other police and state agencies, have completed a sixmonth drug investigation resulting in more than 300 arrests in the Laurel area. The drug sweep started in May and ended the last week in June. “More than 100 direct and controlled buys were conducted, and countless hours of undercover investigation were completed to bring this operation to a successful conclusion,” said Jeffry Oldham, public information officer with the Delaware State Police. According to Oldham, the first phase of this operation began on May 17, when two suspects from Maryland were arrested as they delivered approximately 59 grams of cocaine and 38 ecstasy pills to an undercover officer on Rt. 16 west of Greenwood. Oldham said that during a search officers also located 6.8 grams of crack cocaine, 108 grams of cocaine, 370 grams of marijuana, two loaded handguns, scales, and $433 in cash in their vehicle. During this initial phase of the investigation, the Sussex Drug Task Force provided intelligence information to the Caroline County (Md.) Narcotics Task Force. Oldham said that also on May 17, the Caroline County Task Force executed a search warrant at the suspects’ home in Denton, Md., and seized 9 ounces of cocaine, 250 ecstasy pills, two handguns, and a shotgun. On May 18, the Caroline County Task Force executed another search warrant in Federalsburg, Md., and seized $7,000 cash, 1 gram cocaine and a handgun, he said. Cory J. Aviles, 19, of Federalsburg, and Lisa N. Downs, 21, of Denton, were arrested on 31 narcotics and weapons charges. The second phase of this operation took place on June 2. Members of the state police Drug Task Force, Special Operations Response Team and Laurel Police Department executed three search warrants. The first search warrant was executed at 1803 Carvel Gardens. As a result of the search, officers located crack cocaine, a fully loaded semi-automatic handgun, and $416 in cash, Oldham said. Pierre Bagwell, 22, of Laurel, was charged with possession of cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia, maintaining a dwelling and possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony. The second search warrant was execut-

ed at 1802 Carvel Gardens. As a result of the search, officers located 2 ounces of cocaine and drug paraphernalia, Oldham said. Carlos Rubino, 26, and Sheena D. Smart, 21, were arrested for trafficking in cocaine, possession with intent to deliver cocaine, maintaining a dwelling, conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia. The third search warrant was executed at 607 Holly Brook Apartments, and police located two individuals wanted on outstanding warrants. The third phase of this operation took place on June 27 with the assistance of the following agencies: the state police Special Operations Response Team (SORT), Wilmington Police SORT, Seaford Police SORT, DEA Dover Task Force, Milford Police, Rehoboth Police, Dewey Beach Police, Harrington Police, Milton Police, Georgetown Police, Seaford Police, Bridgeville Police, Ocean View Police, Lewes Police, Dover Police, Fenwick Island Police, the Governor’s Task Force, Probation and Parole, the Department of Correction, DelDOT and the state police communications section. Oldham said that at approximately 6 a.m., officers began executing 12 search warrants in the town limits of Laurel and the surrounding area. During this phase of the operation, 22 people were arrested on 111 criminal charges (64 felony and 47 misdemeanor) and officers seized 51 grams of cocaine, 128.8 grams of marijuana, 4.6 grams of crack cocaine, $5,149 in cash., 11 ecstasy pills and a shotgun, Oldham said. The last phase of this operation took place on the evening of June 28 and involved the apprehension of suspects wanted on Drug Task Force Rule 9 narcotics warrants and local warrants. Probation and Parole also conducted three administrative searches and 70 curfew checks. During this phase of the operation, 59 people were arrested on 125 criminal charges (92 felony and 33 misdemeanor). According to Oldham, during this operation, officers apprehended 88 people, made 282 criminal arrests, executed 17 search warrants, and conducted three administrative searches and 70 curfew checks. They seized 498.6 grams of marijuana, 330 grams of cocaine, 11.8 grams of crack cocaine, six handguns, two shotguns, 299 ecstasy pills, three oxycodone pills and $12,998 in cash. Residences that were searched June 27 were:

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• 209 Little Creek Apartments Laurel. Seized during the search was a 20 gauge shotgun, ammunition, 1.2 grams of cocaine, 47.8 grams of marijuana, $470 in cash and digital scales, Oldham said. Ty A. West, 22, and Ebony S. Patton, 21, were arrested for possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony, possession with intent to deliver marijuana, possession with intent to deliver cocaine, maintaining a dwelling, possession of marijuana within 1000 feet of a school, endangering welfare of a child, and three counts of possession of paraphernalia. West was also charged with possession of firearm by person prohibited. • 1212 Little Creek Apartments Laurel. Seized during the search were 12.08 grams of cocaine, scales and drug paraphernalia, Oldham said. Kendall M Johnson, 25, and Jerry Q. Mann, 32, both of Laurel were arrested for trafficking cocaine, maintaining a dwelling, two counts of endangering the welfare of child, criminal nuisance, three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. • 506 Center St. Laurel. Seized during the search were 2.4 grams of marijuana and scales, Oldham said. Rashema Stancell, 23, and Lakita Bolden, both of Laurel, were arrested for maintaining a dwelling and three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. • 24275 Concords Pond Rd., Laurel. Seized during the search were 37 grams of powder cocaine, .9 grams of marijuana, 11 MDMA (ecstasy) pills, scales, and $3,350. cash, Oldham said.

• A consent search was also obtained for a residence located at 27826 Oak Orchard West, Millsboro. Seized at that location were 3.4 grams of cocaine and 32.5 grams of marijuana, Oldham said. Steven D. Nichols, 30, of Laurel, was arrested for trafficking cocaine, two counts of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, two counts of possession with intent to deliver marijuana, two counts of maintaining a vehicle, maintaining a dwelling, five counts possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. • 45 Moss Lane Scottsdale, Laurel. Seized during the search was marijuana and drug paraphernalia, Oldham said. Jacqueline M Stewart, 18, of Laurel was arrested for possession of hypodermic needle, endangering the welfare of a child and possession of drug paraphernalia. Dawn Denson, 43, of Laurel was arrested for maintaining a dwelling, possession of a hypodermic needle, endangering welfare of a child, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. Jermika Miles, 29, of Laurel was also arrested on the above charges and additional charges of delivery of cocaine, maintaining a dwelling, and possession of drug paraphernalia. • 1103 Daniels St. Carvel Gardens, Laurel. Seized during the search were 1.2 grams of cocaine, 1.3 grams of marijuana, and $429 in cash, Oldham said. Teresa Deshields, 42, of Laurel was arrested for maintaining a dwelling, possession of marContinued on page 5

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 5

Several people arrested in raid on outstanding warrants Continued from page 4

ijuana within 1,000 feet of a school, possession of cocaine, possession of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a school and three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia . • 305 E. 4th St. Laurel. Seized during the search were 42 .6 grams of marijuana which were individually packaged, Oldham said. Lawrence L. Street, 28, of Laurel was arrested for possession with intent to deliver marijuana, maintaining a dwelling, possession of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia. • 1302 Daniels St. Carvel Gardens, Laurel. Seized during the search were .7 grams of marijuana, Oldham said. Sheree Daniels, 24, of Laurel was arrested for maintaining a dwelling, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. The following suspects were arrested on outstanding Rule 9 warrants. • Maria G. James, 40, of Laurel, was arrested for delivery of cocaine, two counts of maintaining a dwelling , maintaining a building, possession with intent to deliver cocaine, possession with intent to deliver MDMA, tampering with physical evidence, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and second-degree conspiracy. During the course of James’ arrest she was found to be possession of the following: $900 in cash, drug paraphernalia, scales, 2.8 grams of marijuana, 3 Oxycodone pills and Acetaminothen pills. • Tamara B. Evans, 18, of E. Atlantic Apts., Rehoboth, was arrested for delivery of cocaine, maintaining a vehicle and possession of drug paraphernalia. • Darnell C. Stokes, 23, of Laurel, was arrested for three counts delivery of cocaine, two counts of maintaining a vehicle, maintaining a dwelling, sex offender resides within 500 feet of a school and possession of drug paraphernalia. • Shamar L. Ross, 18, of Laurel, was arrested for two counts of delivery of cocaine, maintaining a dwelling, possession of drug paraphernalia. • Richard, E. Smith, 81, of Laurel, was arrested for maintaining a dwelling and second-degree conspiracy. • Jermaze L. White, 26, of Laurel, was arrested for two counts of delivery of

cocaine, second-degree conspiracy, two counts of maintaining a dwelling and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. • Michael A. Thompson, 20, of Laurel, was arrested for two counts of delivery of cocaine,

possession with intent to deliver cocaine, two counts of maintaining a dwelling, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. In Phase 4 on June 28, the following were arrested on outstanding warrants:

Richie E. Cannon, 37, Seaford was arrested for delivery of cocaine, second-degree conspiracy and maintaining a dwelling. Keishauna Banks, of 19, Laurel was arrested for two counts of delivery of marijuana, second-de-

gree conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia Katie Dilworth, 17, Laurel, was arrested for delivery of cocaine, second-degree conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia.

DOWNTOWN SEAFORD


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 5

Several people arrested in raid on outstanding warrants Continued from page 4

ijuana within 1,000 feet of a school, possession of cocaine, possession of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a school and three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia . • 305 E. 4th St. Laurel. Seized during the search were 42 .6 grams of marijuana which were individually packaged, Oldham said. Lawrence L. Street, 28, of Laurel was arrested for possession with intent to deliver marijuana, maintaining a dwelling, possession of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia. • 1302 Daniels St. Carvel Gardens, Laurel. Seized during the search were .7 grams of marijuana, Oldham said. Sheree Daniels, 24, of Laurel was arrested for maintaining a dwelling, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. The following suspects were arrested on outstanding Rule 9 warrants. • Maria G. James, 40, of Laurel, was arrested for delivery of cocaine, two counts of maintaining a dwelling , maintaining a building, possession with intent to deliver cocaine, possession with intent to deliver MDMA, tampering with physical evidence, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and second-degree conspiracy. During the course of James’ arrest she was found to be possession of the following: $900 in cash, drug paraphernalia, scales, 2.8 grams of marijuana, 3 Oxycodone pills and Acetaminothen pills. • Tamara B. Evans, 18, of E. Atlantic Apts., Rehoboth, was arrested for delivery of cocaine, maintaining a vehicle and possession of drug paraphernalia. • Darnell C. Stokes, 23, of Laurel, was arrested for three counts delivery of cocaine, two counts of maintaining a vehicle, maintaining a dwelling, sex offender resides within 500 feet of a school and possession of drug paraphernalia. • Shamar L. Ross, 18, of Laurel, was arrested for two counts of delivery of cocaine, maintaining a dwelling, possession of drug paraphernalia. • Richard, E. Smith, 81, of Laurel, was arrested for maintaining a dwelling and second-degree conspiracy. • Jermaze L. White, 26, of Laurel, was arrested for two counts of delivery of

cocaine, second-degree conspiracy, two counts of maintaining a dwelling and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. • Michael A. Thompson, 20, of Laurel, was arrested for two counts of delivery of cocaine,

possession with intent to deliver cocaine, two counts of maintaining a dwelling, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. In Phase 4 on June 28, the following were arrested on outstanding warrants:

Richie E. Cannon, 37, Seaford was arrested for delivery of cocaine, second-degree conspiracy and maintaining a dwelling. Keishauna Banks, of 19, Laurel was arrested for two counts of delivery of marijuana, second-de-

gree conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia Katie Dilworth, 17, Laurel, was arrested for delivery of cocaine, second-degree conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia.

DOWNTOWN SEAFORD


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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Business BUSINESS MIX Sandy Dunker joins Tull/Ramey Sandy Dunker recently joined Tull/Ramey Real Estate as a licensed agent and office manager. Ms. Dunker is licensed in Maryland and has a North Carolina Broker’s license. With over 30 years experience in the real estate field, Sandy Dunker she has earned GRI, CRS, and CRB designations. She has managed real estate offices for Prudential Carolinas Realty and Long and Foster Real Estate, Inc. Ms. Dunker also participated in many Board of Realtors functions, serving on committees and being an officer and direc-

tor. Training and mentoring new agents is another activity she has enjoyed with her real estate career. Ms. Dunker and her husband, Dave, reside in Easton, Md. They chose to relocate to the Eastern Shore to be closer to family, which includes parents, children and grandchildren. They enjoy boating, golfing and rose gardening. Ms. Dunker may be reached at 628-9000.

CFM names top producer for May Kathy Farnell, broker of Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc., recently announced the firm’s top producer for May. Beverly Blades ranked first in listings for the month and she was also the top selling agent for the same period.

Beverly Blades

ATTEND EXPO - Coldwell Banker Broadcreek Realty agents traveled to Washington, D.C. on May 17 to attend the National Association of Realtors Midyear Expo. More than 10,000 real estate professionals attended this year’s Mid-year Meeting and Trade Expo making it the largest NAR Mid-year meeting in history. The Expo focus is on the latest technology and products used by the Real Estate Professional. Those attending were (from the left) Don Clymer, Bea Clymer, Connie Covey, Debi Withers, Barbara Smith, Larry Grantham and Wanda Rash.

RETIREMENT - Fellow employees recently joined in the celebration of the retirement of Lena Smith from Wilmington Trust Company. They are shown gathered on Friday, June 30. From left are Rosalyn Jarmon, Kay Murphy, Brandy Pute, Lena Smith, Nancy Hearn, Patti O’Neal and Nancy Massey.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - JULY 12 , 2006

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Shown is the Delmar Volunteer Fire Department’s 2006 Ford F250 utility vehicle and its decontamination unit trailer which is used in response to incidents involving hazardous materials. Photos by Mike McClure

Delmar Fire Department invests in new equipment By Mike McClure The Delmar Volunteer Fire Department recently purchased a new pumper, command vehicle and utility vehicle to help it respond to fires and other emergencies in its area and to help assist other fire companies and agencies during emergency situations. “We’re very fortunate we’ve got the best equipment money can buy. We’ve got good men” as well as a strong membership, said Jacob Boothe of the Delmar Fire Company. The volunteer fire department now has two tankers which carry 7,000 gallons of water between them. It also has its own paramedics and runs EMS service 24 hours a day. In the future the department would like to have a substation. The current fire station will eventually be expanded to include more parking. The fire company’s primary sources of funds are its annual softball tournament (which is held during the first week of August), casino nights (held twice a year) and grants from both states. One of the new pieces of equipment at Delmar Fire Company is a 2006 Spartan/4 Guys pumper which holds 1,000 gallons of water and 50 gallons of foam. The cost of the fully-equipped pumper was $525,000. According to Jack Morris Jr., the vehicle seats seven people and features a thermal imaging camera and 4.5 air packs. Another new addition to the Delmar Volunteer Fire Department is a 2006 Ford Excursion command vehicle. This vehicle replaces a 1997 command vehicle and has a number of upgraded features, including

a Panasonic tough book computer system, a dual computer system that can do an integrated mapping system with county dispatches. It also has a radio for Delaware and a radio for Maryland allowing the incident commander to monitor both states at the same time. Other features include a built in copier and fax machine and a scanner program for firefighter accountability. According to Brooks Morris, this incident command vehicle can be used for single command or part of a unified command system with DNREC or the state police. The third new vehicle is a 2006 Ford F250 utility vehicle which is used to transport hoses, tools and other things to a scene (it was used to take boats to Seaford during the recent flood). It is also used to tow the decontamination unit trailer in response to spills of hazardous material. The decontamination unit is used as support for first responders and victims who need to be decontaminated. It is supported by a continuous water supply and has a privacy kit which allows firefighters and victims to cover up after their clothes have been stripped off. This equipment was purchased through a federal grant from the state of Maryland. In addition to being used to haul the decontamination unit, the utility vehicle is also used to take volunteers to fire school. The Delmar Volunteer Fire Department recently earned honors for the appearance of its equipment, placing first in the best appearing fire company category at the Ocean City Fireman’s Parade. The company’s new engine also received honorable mention in the best appearing category.

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Above is the Delmar Volunteer Fire Department’s new pumper, a 2006 Spartan/4 guys pumper. The pumper holds 1,000 gallons of water and 50 gallons of foam. Below is the Delmar Fire Company’s new command vehicle, a 2006 Ford Excursion which features a number of upgraded features. The volunteer fire department now has two tankers which carry 7,000 gallons of water between them. It also has its own paramedics and runs EMS service 24 hours a day.


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 9

Library will host zoo program Program for teens to hold movie night On Wednesday, July 12, the Salisbury Zoo will visit the Laurel Public Library with its “Zoo to You! Program” for children. The program will start at 2 p.m. Preschool story time at the library is held each Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. and OK Book Time, a program for elementaryaged children, continues on Tuesdays at 2 p.m. TweenTime, a craft, book discussion and game program for sixth through eighth graders, is held each Thursday from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Signups for the Laurel Public Library

Children’s Summer Reading Program are under way and will continue throughout the summer. More than 60 teenagers have signed up for the library’s Teen Summer Reading Program. The teen program will hold Movie Night on Friday, July 7, from 7-9 p.m. On Monday nights, teens are invited to be part of the library’s Teen Storytellers Club from 7 to 8 p.m. and the AnythingGoes Teen Book Discussion Club from 8 to 9 p.m. For details, call 875-3184 or visit the Web site www.laurel.lib.de.us.

Sierra Spicer (left) poses with Candy and Dr. Ben Carson.

Spicer is Carson Scholar maintaining a 3.75 grade point average and demonstrating humanitarian qualities through community service. The recipients were judged on the quality of their essays that described their unique endeavors, community service projects, personal challenges and solutions to the world’s social problems. The scholarship money is invested on behalf of the students until they attend college, and the students receive a medal and certificate. His or her school receives a trophy inscribed with the winner’s name. Spicer also received this award in 2005. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Brad Spicer.

Sierra Spicer, an eighth-grade student at Laurel Middle School, was recently named a 2006 Carson Scholar by the Carson Scholars Fund Inc., established by Dr. Ben S. and Candy Carson in 1994. The $1,000 scholarship can be earned by students from fourth to 11th grade, and each recipient can win multiple times, if he/she qualifies. Representatives of the fund stated, “Each year the selection process becomes more competitive, and that it is becoming increasingly more difficult to select the highest academic achiever who also gives back to the community through service: we are really honoring the best of the best.” The requirements for the award are:

Senior center plans July activities The Laurel Senior Center has planned the following activities: Thursday, July 6 - 9 a.m., exercise; 10 a.m., bingo; 12:30 p.m., dominos. Friday, July 7 - 9:30 a.m., trip to WalMart; 12:30 p.m., shuffleboard. Monday, July 10 - 9:30 a.m., trip to Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., shuffleboard. Tuesday, July 11 - 9 a.m., exercise; Trip to Suicide Bridge restaurant, luncheon cruise. Wednesday, July 12 - 10 a.m., choir practice; 11 a.m., Bible study; 1 p.m., osteoarthritis seminar with Dr. Choy. Thursday, July 13 - 9 a.m., exercise; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., driving course beginners class. Friday, July 14 - 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., driv-

ing course beginners class; 9:30 a.m., trip to Wal-Mart; 12:30 p.m., bingo. Monday, July 17 - 9 a.m., trip to WalMart; 12:30 p.m., games. Tuesday, July 18 - 9 a.m., exercise, 9 a.m., blood pressure; all-day bingo. Wednesday, July 19 - 10 a.m., choir practice; 10:30 a.m., hymn sing; 11 a.m., Bible study; 12:30 a.m., banana split day. Thursday, July 20 - 9 a.m., exercise; 10 a.m., shuffleboard; 12:30 p.m., social. Friday, July 21 - 9:30 a.m., trip to WalMart; 12:30 p.m., bingo. Monday, July 24 - 9:30 a.m., trip to WalMart; 12:30 p.m., Super Market Sweep. Tuesday, July 25 - 9 a.m., exercise; trip to Target and lunch out at Dayton’s restaurant.

GIFT TO THE LIBRARY - The Laurel Ruritans recently presented a check for $1,000 to the Laurel Library. From left: Tom Wright, Ruritan treasurer, Ruritan member the Rev. John Vantine, librarian Harriet Jarosh, Ruritan president Craig Littleton and library commission president Ed Ralph. Photo by Pat Murphy

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

POLICE JOURNAL Laurel Police officer is charged with rape Delaware State Police have arrested Kevin D. Hovatter, 26, a Laurel Police Department officer, who is accused of raping a 55-year-old female victim while on duty. The alleged rape occurred during the early morning hours of March 25 in the area of U.S. 13A, south of Laurel. According to Cpl. Jeffry C. Oldham, public information officer, on March 25, at approximately 2 p.m., a state police detective responded to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital to interview the victim and investigate the alleged rape. The victim said that on March 25 at approximately 3 a.m., she was raped by a Laurel police officer who was on duty. The victim said that prior to the incident she had called her husband to pick her up at the Goose Pit bar. The victim said that while they were driving out of Laurel on U.S. 13A, an officer followed them. The victim said that the officer followed them almost to Delmar and then pulled them over. The victim told a detective that the officer did not want her husband, he wanted her and told her to get out of the vehicle. When the victim got out of the vehicle. She told her husband to leave and she would call him later. The victim said the officer put her in his back seat and gave her a cigarette. She said he then drove off, made a few turns and stopped on a dark road. The victim told the detective that the officer opened the back door of the car and told her to get out. She said the officer then raped her. After the alleged rape occurred, the officer drove the victim home. The victim said the sexual acts were not consensual, and she complied because of the officer’s position of authority as a uniformed police officer. She also perceived the threat of death or physical injury by the armed police officer if she did not comply, according to Oldham. While being treated at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, a sexual assault kit was completed on the victim and DNA evidence was collected. During the investigation, detectives identified the police officer allegedly involved and interviewed him at approximately 5:30 p.m., the day of the incident. During this interview, the officer acknowledged that he had contact with the victim while he was acting in his official capacity as a Laurel police officer, according to Oldham. The officer reported that he had the victim in his fully marked patrol vehicle and he drove her home. He denied having any sexual contact with the victim. After the interview was complete, a suspect sexual assault kit was completed. “The officer in question, four-year veteran Cpl. Hovatter, was immediately placed on administrative leave with pay pending the outcome of a criminal investigation conducted by investigators from Troop 4,” said Laurel Police Department Chief Michael J. Wilson. Both sexual assault kits were sent to the state medical examiner’s office for DNA comparison. On June 22, state police received the DNA analysis report. The re-

port indicated that the DNA profile collected is consistent with the known DNA profile of the accused officer. Hovatter, of Laurel, was charged with two counts of first degree rape, official misconduct, and acts constituting coercion. Bond information was not immediately available.

Two injured in assault on correctional staff

An inmate at the Delaware Correctional Center (DCC) in Smyrna will face charges after an incident that occurred June 29. At approximately 9:50 p.m. inmate Roderick D. Davis allegedly attacked Correctional Officer Jeffrey Hansen and Sgt. Todd Drace (of Seaford). Other correctional personnel were immediately dispatched to the scene to assist and the offender was subdued without further injury to staff. The offender sustained minor injuries and was seen by medical personnel at the prison. Davis is reported to have attacked the officers as inmates were returning to their cells from a recreation period. Preliminary information suggests that the assault on the officers was unprovoked. Officer Hansen and Sgt. Drace sustained injuries and were treated by medical personnel on scene, then transported to Kent General Hospital for further treatment. Both employees have been treated and released from the hospital. The incident took place in Building 22, a Medium High Security Unit at DCC. The unit was fully staffed at the time of the incident. The specific charges the offender will face in this case will be decided at the conclusion of the investigation. Davis is currently serving a life sentence (effective April 11, 1986) on charges of first degree kidnapping, second degree rape; second degree assault and violation of probation. As a result of the incident Davis has been moved to isolation. Department of Correction investigators are reviewing the matter, as is standard procedure.

Man dies in single-car crash The Delaware State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit is investigating a single-vehicle crash, which took the life of Harrison Todd, 78, of Lincoln. According to Sgt. Melissa Zebley, Delaware State Police public information officer, on Saturday, July 1 at 11:15 p.m., troopers responded to Rt. 594, Webb Farm Road, approximately one-half mile east of Rt. 224 near Milford. Investigators report that a 2000 Ford F150 pick-up truck was traveling westbound on Rt. 594, when the driver attempted to pass the slower moving vehicle in front on him. Upon passing the vehicle, the Ford traveled off the south edge of the road. The driver then overcorrected and traveled off the north edge of the road. Once traveling off the north edge of the road, the Ford overturned onto its roof, and the unrestrained driver was ejected, according to Zebley. Todd was pronounced dead at the scene as a result of his injuries. Both directions of Rt. 594 were closed for approximately three hours while the crash was being investigated.

Passenger dies in crash

Summer HEAT Traffic Advisory

Linnea Houghtling, 42, of Milton, a female passenger riding on a motorcycle, was killed in an accident on Rt. 16, onehalf mile east of Rt. 1 near Milton on Saturday, July 1, around 5:30 p.m. The driver of the motorcycle, Tony Strader, 40, of Silver Spring, Md., was flown by helicopter and admitted to Christiana Emergency Center with a fractured back and leg. Neither rider was wearing a helmet. According to Sgt. Melissa Zebley, a 1988 Chevrolet pick-up truck pulling an empty boat trailer was traveling east bound on Rt. 16 approaching a sharp curve. At the same time a 1994 Harley Davidson motorcycle was traveling westbound on Rt. 16 approaching the same curve in the roadway. Investigators report that the motorcycle driver laid the bike down as it was negotiating the curve in the roadway, and it struck the left front tire of the Chevrolet and slid down the left side of the pick up. The Chevrolet driver attempted to brake and traveled off the south side of the road into a small marsh area. The driver of the Chevrolet, Harold A. Martin Jr., 50, of New Castle, was not injured. Both directions of Rt. 16 were closed for three hours. The accident remains under investigation.

Delaware Office of Highway Safety and law enforcement officials have moved into phase two of their “120 Days of Summer HEAT” initiative by launching their 2006 Checkpoint Strikeforce impaired driving prevention campaign. Checkpoint Strikeforce is a regional sobriety checkpoint campaign aimed at arresting DUI offenders, and using a high visibility enforcement presence to deter those who would otherwise choose to drink and drive. The campaign, now in its fifth year, involves weekly DUI checkpoints statewide. Agent Ron Breitigan of the Division of Alcohol and Tobacco Enforcement said that most establishments are responsible when it comes to alcohol service, but not all. “We often interview people arrested for DUI at the checkpoints and if we find that an establishment’s name keeps coming up among these intoxicated individuals, we put undercover agents in that establishment to determine if over-service of alcohol actually occurs. If we can prove that it is occurring, then we’ll proceed with charges against that establishment.” Establishments and their employees that overserve may be charged administratively and criminally with penalties for a first offense ranging between $250 and $500. Establishments with repeated violations ultimately face the loss of their liquor license.

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✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006 above the ground under the house. I could always tell when Mom was washing dishes because the soapy water would pour out under the house. Dad spent so much time having to thaw the water pipes in the winter that he left the area around the water pipes open for easy access. I would occaThe recent flooding was certainsionally see a spoon, knife or fork roll out ly devastating to many parts of the under the house or even Mom’s dish rag. region, particularly western Sussex ONY INDSOR But, the real excitement came when we and Seaford. My heart goes out to realized that it was going to be “high tide.” all of those who are left to recover We lived across the street I can’t recall that it happened over a long from the tragedy of this natural disfrom Archie Tyler’s store period of time; just seemed to happen all aster. at once. The water would start to rise and and he would take orders However, I could not help but before you knew it, it was up to the porch over the phone and we think back on my childhood as I steps. My brother and I would sit on the would watch as he came watched the flood waters pouring ledge of the porch windows because I canby in a row boat making over the dam at Williams Pond and not recall any time when the screens were flooding the parking lots and yards deliveries. actually in the windows. throughout the Seaford area. Every once in a great while Dad would We called it “high tide,” but the drainage. We didn’t even have a septic take on the arduous task of stapling new results were the same. When I was a system at all. We had running cold water screens into the porch windows, only to young boy in Crisfield, our neighborhood and the water in the sink drained out have one or more of his big-headed, heathen had no public system to help with through a pipe that hung about 10-inches younguns shove something through it and leave a gaping hole with screen hanging. I don’t know why we never used the screen door handle to open the door. We had to push the screen open with our hands and ultimately push the screen out of the door. MORNING STAR

To kids, waters that came with high tide spelled fun T

W

Red Cross needs support after helping flood victims As the Red Cross continues to provide emergency services to communities flooded out in the Seaford-Blades area, Red Cross Board member Lynda Messick launched an appeal for local disaster relief funding. Messick, who is the CEO and president of Community Bank Delaware, requested businesses, organizations and individuals to support their local Red Cross as it stands by its promise to prepare for and provide immediate disaster relief, 24 hours a day, to those devastated by disasters. Messick said, “While attention was drawn to the high-profile tragedies around the nation and abroad, disasters take place in our own backyard everyday. This week, local families’ lives were forever changed by the flooding we have seen, but house fires happen all the time. These families are given shelter, food, comfort, care, and mental health counseling and the services are provided free of charge to them by your Red cross. This thanks to the generosity of the American People. “Most people don’t realize that the Red Cross is not federally funded, but counts on volunteer and monetary support from the public.” Messick thanked Delmarva Power for leading the way by donating $5,000 to this relief effort to help area residents who have had their homes or property damaged

by this week’s rainstorms and flooding. She also encouraged others to follow in Delmarva Power’s footsteps and support the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula as well as this effort. “Being ready to respond is Red Cross’s role everyday — we need the community’s help to ensure we are there when they need us.” All American Red Cross disaster assistance is free, made possible by voluntary donations of time and money from the American people. To help the victims of this and other local disasters, contributions may be made by mail to the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula, P.O. Box 831, Wilmington, DE 198990831 or by calling 1-800-777-6620 during office hours. Internet users can make a secure online contribution by visiting www.redcrossdelmarva.org. Red Cross volunteers have delivered more than 500 meals and beverages a day since the day after the flooding to affected communities. To increase rapid outreach to more than 140 families in Sussex, Dorchester, Caroline and Wicomico counties, the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula partnered with its sister chapter, the American Red Cross, Lower Shore Chapter from Salisbury, Md., and the Salvation Army, to deliver emergency supplies, including clean-up kits.

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PAGE 11 That is why our porch was wide open to mosquitoes and green-head flies. It was awesome to look out in the backyard and see minnows, snakes and crabs floating by. There was even the occasional rat that would float by riding a piece of wood or doggy-paddling in the water. We lived across the street from Archie Tyler’s store and he would take orders over the phone and we would watch as he came by in a row boat making deliveries. Sometimes the water would come right up onto the two levels of the porch and in through the kitchen door. I can still remember Mom shoving bath towels under the door trying to keep the water out. I suppose high tide was not as devastating as what we experienced in Seaford last weekend, because it involved a rising of the tide and not a rushing of water. So, as long as it did not come in over the living room furniture, this was no more than entertainment for us younguns. Eventually, Crisfield installed municipal plumbing and we never saw high tide again. But, I think I am safe to believe that should Crisfield have gotten the rain we received last weekend, high tide would have come back with a vengeance.

Wanted: Good flood photos to publish The Star newspapers will publish a special edition filled with photographs of the June 25 flood. We want your best shots. Send your best two or three photos (digital are preferred) to publisher@seafordstar. com no later than Friday, July 14. Not all photographs will be used. Include your name and a day time contact phone number with all submissions.

Also include information about each photograph (where it was taken, people’s names, etc.). Prints can be dropped off at the Morning Star Publications office on Stein Highway between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. no later than July 14. The same information must be included. No more than than three photographs will be accepted.

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

The Laurel High School band performs in the July 4th parade.

The Laurel Lions mascot is trying to stay cool under an umbrella during the parade. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

The Buffalo Soldiers Motorcyle Club won the Judge’s Award during the parade.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

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Bill Brown of Bargain Bill’s is a parade winner as Best Commercial Entry. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

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PAGE 14

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Laurel celebrates Independence Day with a blast

BIG GLASSES - Savannah Brown gets into the spirit of things with some big glasses during the Laurel July 4th Red, White and Blue Parade. Photo by Ronald MacArthur RED HATS WITH FLAGS - Some Laurel Red Hat Society members take a comfortable seat complete with umbrellas during the Laurel July 4th Parade. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

LAUREL CELEBRATES JULY 4th

DECORATED BIKE - Sam Luffman is decked out during Laurel’s July 4th Parade. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

CAR SHOW - Dozens of car enthusiasts had their antique cars on display during the Laurel Independence Day Celebration on Tuesday near LaurelTowne. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

EASY RIDER - Mike Lubinicki has a mini-cycle decked out during Laurel’s parade. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

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MORNING STAR

Laurel’s July 4th celebration Continued from page 1

Willis Matthews, Delmar, the children’s grandmother, said that despite the heat highs were in the low 90s - she was having a “lovely” time. The family had eaten lunch - funnel cakes, French fries, oyster fritters and lemonade - and were headed to Lewis’ home, where they planned to spend the rest of the day and, from the front porch, watch the evening’s fireworks. Laurel native Lorraine Hitchens also was planning to watch the day’s grand finale from her home. She and several friends and family members had enjoyed the parade and were standing in a small spot of shade in the carnival grounds, discussing what to do next. “I like seeing everybody coming together,” said Hitchens. “I grew up in Laurel and I like seeing the whole town coming together for fun and fellowship.” “Everybody can enjoy this,” added her son-in-law, Kendall Camper, Laurel, who had ridden his motorcycle in the parade. “All creeds, all races; everybody can have a good time.” Janet Lee, one of the festival’s founders and the push behind the Red, White and Blue Parade, agreed. “It’s a good day, to see all the people here, having a good time,” said Lee, sitting in the shade of the Laurel Chamber of Commerce tent on Central Avenue. “I think that having the parade brings a lot of people to the festival. I was one of the original committee members working on the festival and I told them that if you are going to have a celebration, you need a parade. And not just any parade, but a Red, White and Blue Parade. That’s what we have done for 12 years.” Lee, whose son, state Rep. “Biff” Lee was on the other side of the Broad Creek bridge from the chamber booth, was taunting boys who were throwing softballs at a target that, if hit, would dump him in a tank of water. “This is a great thing,” Lee said. “A man just stopped by the booth, and he is renovating a house on 4th Street. He said that he loved the festival. He said it’s just the kind of thing he remembers from his childhood.” For many adults, like that newcomer to Laurel, the day was about reaching back to another time. But to the children in the crowd, it was about having fun and building memories that they will carry with them into adulthood. Carlisha Nichols, 10, and

her cousin Fontane Nichols, 13, were doing just that. They spent much of their day at the food booth set up on Market Street by their church, the God’s House of Deliverance. By 1 in the afternoon, they had visited the carnival and various food booths along the street and were enjoying slices of watermelon, provided by Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips. Phillips, whose booth was next to the God’s House of Deliverance booth, was

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006 serving 25 seeded watermelons that he had grown himself and 35 seedless watermelons that he had bought. It was the slices with seeds that Carlisha and Fontane were interested in; after eating the sweet fruit, they tested their seed-spitting skills on a 36-foot strip of plastic, marked off in tenths of inches, that Phillips had taped to Market Street. “My secret is, I use my tongue to push the seed out,” said Carlisha, Harrington,

PAGE 15 taking a short break from trying to better her cousin. She had managed to spit a seed 21.7 feet. But her best effort was no match for Fontane’s, who had spit a seed 27 feet. “I like a lot of competition,” said Fontane, Greenwood. “If we were in the Olympics, I would be No. 1 and she would be No. 2.” His secret? “It takes a lot of huffing and puffing,” he said.


MORNING STAR

Laurel’s July 4th celebration Continued from page 1

Willis Matthews, Delmar, the children’s grandmother, said that despite the heat highs were in the low 90s - she was having a “lovely” time. The family had eaten lunch - funnel cakes, French fries, oyster fritters and lemonade - and were headed to Lewis’ home, where they planned to spend the rest of the day and, from the front porch, watch the evening’s fireworks. Laurel native Lorraine Hitchens also was planning to watch the day’s grand finale from her home. She and several friends and family members had enjoyed the parade and were standing in a small spot of shade in the carnival grounds, discussing what to do next. “I like seeing everybody coming together,” said Hitchens. “I grew up in Laurel and I like seeing the whole town coming together for fun and fellowship.” “Everybody can enjoy this,” added her son-in-law, Kendall Camper, Laurel, who had ridden his motorcycle in the parade. “All creeds, all races; everybody can have a good time.” Janet Lee, one of the festival’s founders and the push behind the Red, White and Blue parade, agreed. “It’s a good day, to see all the people here, having a good time,” said Lee, sitting in the shade of the Laurel Chamber of Commerce tent on Central Avenue. “I think that having the parade brings a lot of people to the festival. I was one of the original committee members working on the festival and I told them that if you are going to have a celebration, you need a parade. And not just any parade, but a Red, White and Blue parade. That’s what we have done for 12 years.” Lee, whose son, state Rep. “Biff” Lee was on the other side of the Broad Creek bridge from the chamber booth, taunting boys who were throwing softballs at a target that, if hit, would dump him in a tank of water, said that she was concerned that the crowd was not as large as it has been. “There are not as many people here as usual, sorry to say,” she said. She had ridden in the parade and until marchers reached downtown and the judging stand, “there were very few people,” she said. “That’s unusual.” Even so, “this is a great thing,” Lee said. “A man just stopped by the booth, and he is renovating a house on 4th Street. He said that he loved the festival. He said it’s just the kind of thing he remembers from his childhood.” For many adults, like that newcomer to Laurel, the day was about reaching back to another time. But to the children in the crowd, it was

about having fun and building memories that they will carry with them into adulthood. Carlisha Nichols, 10, and her cousin Fontane Nichols, 13, were doing just that. They spent much of their day at the food booth set up on Market Street by their church, the God’s House of Deliverance. By 1 in the afternoon, they had visited the carnival and various food booths along the street and were enjoying slices of watermelon, provided by Sussex County Coun-

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006 cilman Vance Phillips. Phillips, whose booth was next to the God’s House of Deliverance booth, was serving 25 seeded watermelons that he had grown himself and 35 seedless watermelons that he had bought. It was the slices with seeds that Carlisha and Fontane were interested in; after eating the sweet fruit, they tested their seed-spitting skills on a 36-foot strip of plastic, marked off in tenths of inches, that Phillips had taped to Market Street.

PAGE 15 “My secret is, I use my tongue to push the seed out,” said Carlisha, Harrington, taking a short break from trying to better her cousin. She had managed to spit a seed 21.7 feet. But her best effort was no match for Fontane’s, who had spit a seed 27 feet. “I like a lot of competition,” said Fontane, Greenwood. “If we were in the Olympics, I would be No. 1 and she would be No. 2.” His secret? “It takes a lot of huffing and puffing,” he said.


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Messiah Vineyard presents ‘One Nation Under God’

Messiah Vineyard Church, Laurel, presented a cantata, “One Nation Under God,” Sunday, July 2. Far left, Richard Hearn and Shane McCarty, portraying Revolutionary War soldiers, honor the United States. Top, Sgt. Anita Houston, representing the U.S. Army, and Chief Warrant Officer 5 Noble Callaway of the U.S. Marine Corps fold the American flag in a solemn ceremony. Left, Jenna Kirk performs on the clarinet during the program. Photos by Pat Murphy


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Honor Roll Following are the 4th Quarter Honor Roll lists. Our apologies that the lists from Seaford and Woodbridge High Schools do not appear, but the lists were not submitted by the schools.

Laurel High School 9th Grade David Albert, Ashlee Brittingham, Kyle Brown, Sara Burke, Jennifer Byler, Anaika Casimir, Ashley Cheeseman - All A’s, Amanda D’Armi - All A’s, Shelby Davis, Ninja Domond, Cody Grim, Brandon Hearne, Brooks Hearne, Caitlin Herscher All A’s, Aaron Hitchens, Thomas Johnson, Josh Kosiorowski, Quinten Langley, Bryant Lowe, Kenzie Matthews, Twila McCrea, Michael Milligan, Gaven Parker, Brandon Phulesar, Siasquia Pierre, Silvano Rondon, Anthony Rubino, James Ruhl, Shane Walls, Bethany Wathen, Caleb Wilson, Tyler Whitney - All A’s, James Wood, William Yossick. 10th Grade Fred Applegate, Gulsedef Arslan, David Bartee, Elaine Best, Zachery Bonniwell, Cody Bristow, Amanda Brittingham, Rachel Butler ,Tremayne Collick - All A’s, Alex Drown, Steven Dyson - All A’s, Kel-

Morning Star Publications and the businesses on these pages salute the young people from our area who have expended the extra effort to make the honor roll. sy Gordy, Alex Hawes, Kristen Henderson, Aleasha Henry, Ashley Hubble, Keith Koyanagi - All A’s, Amanda Lathbury, Garrett Lutz - All A’s, Joaquin Millan, Natalie Miller, Matthew Parker, Ashley Randall, Christian Rife, Jose Sanchez, Kristina Thompson - All A’s, James Watts, Timothy Wheatley. 11th Grade Matthew Bailey, Tallon Barnes, Jessica Bishop, Ethan Calloway, Caitlin Dolby, Kate Downes - All A’s, Meghan Eudy, Whitney Evans, Kelly Gordy, Amanda Horsey, Melinda Jestice, Steven Johnson, Josh Lewis, Tagewattie Mahadan, Lindsay Morrison, Miranda O’Neal, Samantha Oliphant, Joshua Palmer - All A’s,

Matthew Palmer - All A’s, Trent Passwaters, Autumn Patilla, Josh Pettyjohn, Herman Powell - All A’s, Fallon Rice, Jovana Rondon, Tina Ross - All A’s, Brett Shockley. 12th Grade Chris Archer - All A’s, Ashley Bennett All A’s, Cierra Bolden, Ashlyn Booth, Angie Charles, Katie Cordrey - All A’s, Megan Crockett, Esengul Darilmaz, Christina Defrancisco, Eric Givens, Guerdy Guerrier, Benjamin Hall, Stephanie Hall, Ashley Hill, Dontez Horsey, Jakeysia Horsey, Ryan Hubble, Claudy Joinville, Kyle Jones, Heather Kempf ,Tiffany Lee, Nicole Mann - All A’s, Lauren McCrea, Alison Parrott - All A’s, Robert Reed, Krista Scott - All A’s, Heather Sheridan, Rodney Simmons, Christine Smith, Heather Smith, Jeffrey Taylor, Jason Torlish, Kara Townsend, Holly Tunis, Rachiel Uddin, Blaire Walker, Kim Whaley - All A’s, Alayna Whitney, Charley Wilkerson.

Delmar Middle & Senior High School Merit/Honor Roll — Fourth Quarter Grade 12 Merit Honor Roll - Cordell Ballard, Scott Brittingham, Seth Brittingham, David Cain, Blair Carey, Darren Carey II, Kelly Dorman, Autumn Fischer, Brittany Gillespie, Kristi Hamilton, Laura Hammerer, Erin Keenan, Lauren Lewis, Jennifer Malinger, Aaron Mazur, Ashley Meckley, Benjamin Meney, Alicia Mills, Rebecca Mir, Ashley Mocella, Mark Passwaters, Erika Pusey, Kelly Ralph, Melanie Raum, Keith Rose, Brittney Ruark, Carolyn Schilling, Daniel Schrey, La’Keshia Selby, Samuel Slabaugh, Christopher

PAGE 17 Slavens, Jennifer Spack, Devena Spence, Justin Young. Grade 12 Honor Roll - Robert Alexander, Mohammed Ansari, Shameika Bailey, Jessica Beach, Alison Brumbley, AJ Campbell, Allen Creighton, Lauren Ellis, Jermaine Holland, Charisse Holmes, Randie Hovatter, Abbie Hudson, Paul Hudson, Cierra Jackson, Jesse Jones, Zachary Keenan, Quinton Kilgoe, Konstantin Kovalev, Leslie Lambrose, Elijah Lewis, Kirk Lingle, Layton Littleton, Austin McLain, Erica McWilliams, Diana Penn, Brenen Ralph, Heather Relyea Joshua Russell, Maranda Serman, Leslie Shaver, Jamaal Simmons, Amanda Vickers, Lauren Witzke. Grade 11 Merit Honor Roll - Jamson Brinck, Terri DeBany, Oscar Flores, Adam Gajewski, Amanda Gonzalez, Kevin Johnson, Brent Murrell, Timotheus Reinhart, David Rheinfeld, Mick Tindall, Caitlyn Twilley. Grade 11 Honor Roll - Autumn Austin, Corey Basch, Mackenzie Byers, William Cody, Samantha D’Armi, Stephanie Davis, Daniel Foster, Katlyn Hearn, Danielle Horseman, Jalesa Hull, Jenee Kimble, Jill Klavenwelden, Bethany Kleiser, Jason Lynch, Shontale Moore, Alan Preston, Munnay Sharp, Seth Smith, Melanie Sonnier, Alicia Ward, Andrew Welch, Melinda Wheatley. Grade 10 Merit Honor Roll - Alison Bloodsworth, Kristin Brannock, John Breda, Kasie Causey, Katie Conner, Shane Cronk, Aaron Jones, Lydia Newberry, Megan Reed, Scott Slavens, Kaitlyn Smith, Joshua Vincent, Megan Wilkinson. Grade 10 Honor Roll -Maribeth Beach, Patrick Beale, Jebb Carrier, Paige Cuffee,


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Honor Roll Brooke Hearn, Taylor Hill, Jeremy Layton, Megan Lynch, Marlene MacDonald, Donald Mathis, Russell Taylor, Erin Thomas, Megan Webb, Chun Wong. Grade 9 Merit Honor roll - David Bradshaw, Deborah Breda, Kylie Gress, William Griswold, Amanda Holt, Dylan Layfield, Kelsey Murrell, Aaron Shaver, Megan Spindler, Deneen trader-Johnson, Scott Wroten, Carolyn Zimmerman. Grade 9 Honor Roll - Rachael Adkins, Gabrielle Andrade, Olivia Baker, Sarah Benny, Brandon Breasure, Shawn Briddell, Kelsey Dickerson, John Disharoon, Alycia Hackett, Alexis Hurley, Tia Johnson, James Lehman, Brian Lowe, Tyler Manchin, Estefany Morales, Annika Nichols, Megan Pettingill, Jordan Rowland, Amanda Russo, Sean Scovell, Robert Thompson, Francis VanGessel, Ashlie Walter, Sarah Wilber, Kellie Wyatt. Grade 8 Merit Honor Roll - Megan Beach, Casey Bellamy, Jazmine Brown, Heather Conaway, Gordan Custer, Nicholas Damico, Mallory Elliott, Amanda Fields, Benjamin Gifford, Olivia Hartman, Chelsea Hudson, Joshua, Johnson, Colleen Kershner, Nikkia King, Denay Lucas, Jacob Ludemann, Adam Markiewicz, Kevin Nichols, Ashleigh Pais, Brinkley Rayne,

Taylor Scott, Sara Shaw, Sephanie Smith, Ryan Thomas, Kayla Threlfell, Abigail Tingle, Alison Tingle, Megan Warren, Katlyn Wilkins. Grade 8 Honor Roll - Zachary Adams, Christen Bozman, Amanda Campbell, Ashley Caruso, Keith Cook, Robert Cottman, Jr., Chelsea Covey, Jacob Cox, Corie Elliott, Brooke Evans, Spencer Fothergill, Jessica Frey, Kamisha Green, Zachary Hammerbacher, Kayla Haney, Shanna Hearn, Justin Hickman, Natasha Holland, Kiera Hudson, Aurielle Hatley, Melita Hyland, Kaylee Justice, Daye Kim, Meredith Layfield, Sarah Lyons, Alyssa Martin, Candace McDonald, Heather McGinnis, Joshua Messick, Jade Moore, Jessica Moore, Sean Moore, Mary Niblett, Christina Parsons, Corey Phillis, Amanda Searing, Dylan Shupe, Joshua Smith, Patricia Stevenson, Maurice Stratton, Jr., Dante Tingle, Noah Vincent, Elizabeth Warren, Geoffrey Wells, Monzona Whaley, Leah Wilson. Grade 7 Merit Honor Roll - Abby Atkins, Logan Baxter, Casie Brinck, Nicholas Cooper, Ashley Elliott, Alexander Ellis, Lyndsey Gerstle, Leah Gilmore, Thomas Gray, Alexia Hasbrouck, Tiffani Hughes, Heather Johnson, Cecilia

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Rockell Jackson, Samantha Johnson, Tevin jones, Arelina Juarez-Gonaziez, Brittanie Kelly, Brady Layfield, Danielle LeCates, Christina Lehman, Brittaney Littleton, Chelsea Lyons, Martina Major, Taylor Malcom, Matthew Miller, Raven Neubert, Cody Penrod, Danielle Pettingill, Christopher Raglin, Robert Relyea, Jessica Rickards, Brittany Showell, Shane Smith, Michael Taylor, David Thompson, Macie Tuttle, Bethany Wheatley, Johnathon White, Chelsea Wilson, Rebecca Witzke, Kathrine Zerillo.

Sussex Technical High School BETHEL Grade 11 - Nina Axelsson, Courtney R. O’Neal. BRIDGEVILLE Grade 9 - Tyler C. Faulkner, Alison E. Holloway, Evan C. Lee, Nathan J. Rider, Cassandra E. Stuper, Skylar D. Willey; Grade 10 - Bethany L. Callaway, Joshua D. Dickson, Lacey M. Eckert, Travis N. Milam, Justin R. Rider, Rhonda M. Warrington; Grade 11 - Amber D. Drummond, Emily A. Johnson, Ryan D. Lee, Katherine R. Nennstiehl, Tiffany M. Roles; Grade 12 - Erica C. Chituck, Lauren T. Correll, David M. Demarest, Tashona H. James, Melissa A. Rankin, Renee C. Warrington. GREENWOOD Grade 9 - Tamara L. Hanley, Caitlyn M. Rifenburg; Grade 10 - Derek J. Kitchen, Keri N. Reibsome;

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Grade 12 - Joseph E. Bailey, Janise A. Henderson, Amanda C. Palmer, Grant A. Parker, Candice M. Windsor. LAUREL Grade 9 - Courtney A. Bailey, Dustin M. Hitchens, Keleigh N. Moore, Brittany E. Wheatley, Brandon C. Wilkins, Justin N. Worster; Grade 10 - Heather N. Baker, Megan C. Campbell, Robert E. Chandler, Laura J. Chelariu, Brittany S. Cooper, Jacob R. Crum, Sarah E. Culver, Joshua T. Dunn, Megan A. Eskridge, Kariann R. Flynn, Melissa K. Mahoney, Anthony W. McAllister, Jara M. Pugh, David C. Ricksecker; Grade 11 - Amber N. Brown, Amber E. Dykes, Kristin N. Elliott, Joshua L. Graver, John W. Hitch III, Brittany S. Joseph, Nicole C. Mahoney, Pamela M. Milligan, Ashley N. Stephens, Brittanie L. Truitt, Jared S. Whaley, Donald B. Wilkins; Grade 12 - Bryan T. Blocker, Amanda R. Curtis, Adam R. Dickerson, Patrick D. Dubinski, Bethany A. Short. SEAFORD Grade 9 - Ashley M. Adams, Sara M. Adams, Ashley L. Bice, Sara E. Cramer, Michael J. Cunningham, Lacy E. Ebright, Mark R. Farrow, Brittnae M. Johnson, Natalie M. Justice, Tyler D. Justice, Robert G. Lehman, Rebecca A. McMillin, Kasey M. Moore, Brandon M. Norman, Herbert H. Quick, Gene M. Smith III, Melissa D. Willey; Grade 10 - Kelly A. Conner, Kristen A. Conner, Robyn Dechene, Tanya L. Hart, Christopher F. Kelley, Hannah G. Krieg, Melinda S. Larrimore, Schuyler V.R. Livingston, Maham Mahmood, Alexis L. Massey, Alexis N. Short, Sarah E. Smith,

PAGE 19

Bradley C. Snyder, Kristin M. Stafford, Joy L. Stephenson, Nicole A. Story, Katelin M. Tull, Brandi L. Wright; Grade 11 - Erika D. Conaway, Schyler J. Conaway, Amber L. Cox, Kristen R. Cunningham, Melany C. Dubbs, Victoria L. Fitzgerald, Jessica L. Parker, Brittany M. Rodriquez, Shauntey N. Singletary, Marisa R. Sternberg, Tanya R. Thawley, Jill B. Willey; Grade 12 - Sophia M. Bay, Ryan A. Brown, Barry E. Hastings II, Christopher R. Huskey, Andrea L. Kessel, Harry A. Lehman IV, Thomas C. Mancuso, Hiral R. Patel, Derek K. Rambo, Bryan P. Schieferstein, Jonathan D. Val.

Prepare for the Future!

Epworth Christian School Ernie Adkins, principal of Epworth Christian School has announced the honor roll for this year’s fourth quarter. “A” Honor Roll - High Honors First Grade (Mrs. Bryant) - Heidi Carey, Noah Donohoe, Rae Downes, Zachary Hudson, Noah Hummel, Christopher Jones, Shelby LaPlant, Cody O’Ferrall, Jennie Parsons, Jared Willey. First Grade (Mrs. Hassett) - Kelly Allen, Brandon Bradshaw, Gabrielle Hastings, MacKenzie Hawkins, Moriah Reid, Daisy Tillman, Andrea Timmons, Jacob Truitt, JC White. Second Grade (Mrs. Lowe) - Angela Baker, Christian Bethard, Emily Groton, Alexis Holston, Rimmon Mall, Rachael Scott, Seth Slacum, Kristin Smith, Heather Windels. Second Grade (Mrs. Wynn) - Kyle Atkinson, Austin Gardoski, Andrew Hill, Joseph Phillips, Joshua Smith, Laurie Wroten. Third Grade (Mrs. Harmon) - Matthew

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Honor Roll Dykstra, Robert Hazel, Bailey Kinnikin, McKensie Lewis, Jonathan Mills, Hunter Parsons, Julie Parsons. Third Grade (Mrs. Jones) - Mariann Agapito, Jesse Bennett, Jacob Calloway, Casey Kinnikin, Mackenzie Kinnikin, Jeffrey Munro, Abe Wharton. Fourth Grade (Ms. Drummond) - Jacob Adkins, Matthew Allen, Braiden Johnson, Katyanna Kerr, Catherine Minton, Jordan Ray. Fourth Grade (Mrs. Pusey) - Izaak Donohoe, Victoria George, Sarah Pryor, Rebekah Scott. Fifth Grade (Mrs. Jardine) - Travis Anderson, Jennifer Baker, Megan Gherke, Madelyn Gilbert, Kelsey McMunn, Tyler Smith, Lauryl Spence, Zachary Vaughan. Sixth Grade (Ms. Bird) - Caleb Benton, Kathryn Bethard, Benjamyn Donohoe, Samantha Hudson, Mackenzie King, Kellie Lewis, Caitlyn McDonough, Cole Messick, Claire Redman, Isabel Wharton, Lexie Zebley. Seventh Grade (Mr. Knopf) - Meagan Bourne, Lauren Dickerson, Darius Hopkins, Lucas Johnson, Lauren Mahaffey, Anita Mall, Trevor McMunn, Steven Meade, Matthew Tull, Jacob Vannicola, Tiffany Vaughan, Joshua Willey.

Eighth Grade (Mr. Hargreaves) - Kasey Hummer, Bethany Johnson, Brooke Miller, Emily Pentoney, Jillian Phillips, Bethany Redman, Jessica Zoch.

Laurel Intermediate School 5th Grade Ms. Dolan/Mr. Voss: Austin Suit (All A’s), Ashley Anderson, Patty Bredbenner, Amber Chambers, Katarina Duryea, Derrick Eskridge, Elizabeth Hallahan, Alec Hudson, Kara Melvin, Cathy Smith, Derek Wallace and Ashley Wise. Mr. Mover: Logan Green (All A’s), Caitlin Fraticelli (All A’s), Jessica Thomas (All A’s), Cine Collins, Ashley Hastings, Erin Hastings, C.J. Jester, Haley Layton, Dillon Lewis, Adam White. Mrs. Parker: Amanda Sava (All A’s), Jacob Bradley, Teshree Chandradat, Karly Joseph, Shawn O’Neal, Breanna Rubino, Alyssa Smith, Bryce Wharton. Mrs. Pugh: Bryce Bristow (All A’s), Katie Schieferstein (All A’s), Garrett Whaley (All A’s), Tyler Bradley, Kristen Collins, Brittany Creppon, Alex Hastings, Kyle Hastings, Ryan Koesters, Jasmin Lopez, Tayler Miller, Lakia Oney, Sasha

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Sturgis, Jerron Tull, Seth Whaley. Mrs. Pusey: Samantha Dykes (All A’s), Joseph Yawn (All A’s), Sarah Lynch, Joseph Skerstad, Landis Wilson, Grace Wood. Mrs. Thielemann: Ciera Lewis (All A’s), Habiba Anjum, Alexandra Carreno, Merve Ceylan, Dallas Pruitt, Morgan Slavin, Samuel Wang. Mr. Swain: Caitlin Cook (All A’s), Alexandra Hale (All A’s), Ashley Jump (All A’s), Alex Conway, Tanza Feathers, Bradley Hastings, Katy Henry, Alexis Hudson, Jordan Justice, Chris Kirby, Ashley Luchansky, Josh Munoz, Brandon Scott. 6th Grade Mrs. Bice: Stephanie Dukes (All A’s), Sung Hoon Kang (All A’s), Elizabeth Mancini (All A’s), Kristine Phulesar (All A’s), Alexandra Ash, Kristin Brown, Travis Griffith, Glen Huffman, Katelynn Pruitt, Ravi Vandeyar, Elizabeth Waite. Mrs. Bowden/Ms. Palmer: Haley Clayton-Moyer (All A’s), Corey Cutsail (All A’s), Marissa Graham (All A’s), Kelly Chance, Megan Hayes, Vanessa Hicks, Camie Jennette, Taylor Johnson. Mrs. Davis: Briauna Taylor (All A’s), Tangee Taylor (All A’s), Ashley Marvel, Amanda McGarvey, Meghan Worster. Mr. Hearn: Justin Metz (All A’s), Justin Stevenson, Brooke Faulkner, Aleah Jumarally. Mrs. Spicer: Garrett Anderson (All A’s), Jazmine LeBarron (All A’s), Kaitlyn Richie (All A’s), Lucas Acosta, Traci Butler, Daryan Carr, Carrie Gambrill, Coty Hlinka, Ian Lankford, Staci Layton, Allysa

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Miller, Greg Price, Gavin Short. Ms. Whaley/Mrs. Stickler: Erin Johnson (All A’s), Anthony Taylor (All A’s), Cassidy Taylor (All A’s), Colby Daye, Kelby Grim, Macy Hall, Tia Hunt, Arnell Puckham, Sudesh Singh, Kiasha Smith. 4th Quarter Gold Card 5th Grade Mrs. Dolan: Ashley Anderson, Patty Bredbenner, Amber Chambers, Christopher Dunning, Katrina Duryea, Derrick Eskridge, Elizabeth Hallahan, Alec Hudson, Kara Melvin, Austin Suit, Derek Wallace, Aquarius White, Ashley Wise. Mr. Moyer: Shamiere Cannon, Caine Collins, Logan Green, Ashley Hastings, Erin Hastings, Taylor Hearn, Christopher Jester, Haley Layton, Robert McKamey, Catrina Ogundare, Shannon Pusey, Zachary Quillen, Jessica Thomas, Tywanna West-Horsey, Adam White, Kenneth Willey. Mrs. Parker: Jacob Bradley, Teshree Chandradat, Sierra Harris, Karley Joseph, Elijah Kefauver, Jason Kennedy, Shawn O’Neal, Breanna Rubino, Amanda Sava, Alyssa Smith, Sean Story, Bryce Wharton, Rachel Young. Mrs. Pugh: Tyler Bradley, Kristen Collins, Brittany Creppon, Alex Hastings, Ryan Koesters, Jasmine Lopez, Tayler Miller, Lakia Oney, Katie Schieferstein, Sasha Sturgis, Garrett Whaley. Mrs. Pusey: Kristen Bradley, Kaitlin Dukes, Samantha Dykes, Michael Hitch, Kimberly Landaverde, Sarah Lynch, Kyle McAllister, Aaliyah McCoy, Brittany Milligan, Shay Smith, Emma Torres, Caryn

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MORNING STAR Wilhelm, Landis Wilson, Grace Wood, Joseph Yawn. Mr. Swain: Alex Conway, Caitlyn Cook, Tanza Feathers, Alexandra Hale, Katy Henry, Alexis Hudson, Keymia Jones, Ashley Jump, Jordan Justice, Ashley Luchansky, Bryan Mills, Brandon Scott. Mrs. Thielemann: Habiba Anjum, Briana Camper, Alexandra Carreno, Merve Ceylan, Ashley Graham, Ciera Lewis, Daylin McCausland, Alexus Price, Dallas Pruitt, Ashley Rife, Samantha Schibinger, Morgan Slavin, Kelsey Whaley, Jeremy Wheatley. 4th Quarter Gold Card 6th Grade Mrs. Bice: Alexandra Ash, Stephanie Dukes, Glen Huffman, Sung Hoon Kang, Elizabeth Mancini, Kristine Phulesar, Katelynn Pruitt. Mrs. Bowden/Ms. Palmer: Kimberly Burns, Kelly Chance, Haley Clayton-Moyer, Cory Cutsail, Franchesca Delrosario, Marissa Graham, Jordan Hagadorn, Megan Hayes, Camie Jennette, Taylor Johnson, Tyler Robertson. Mrs. Thompson: George Lecates, Amanda Ryan. Mrs. Davis: Ashley Marvel, Amanda McGarvey, Briauna Taylor, Tangee Taylor, Meghan Worster, Amanda Wyre. Mrs. Goff: Kapree Batson, Walterica Charles, Kreig Davidson, Jermaine Harris, Noelle Rash, Elizabeth Sisk, Jacob Wilson, Bridget Windsor. Mr. Hearn: Mercedez Bell, Mariah Brown, Brooke Faulkner, Aleah Jumarally, Brittney Keffer, Heather Melvin, Justin

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Metz, Ryan Rodriquez, Kaleb Scott, Justin Stevenson, Breanna Wise. Mrs. Spicer: Kara Brockbrader, Traci Butler, Erin Eudy, Alexis Hill, Staci Layton, Jazmine Lebarron, Allysa Miller, Kaitlynn Ritchie. Mrs. Whaley: Christian Binkoski, Colby Daye, Kelby Grim, Macy Hall, Marcus Hastings, Erin Johnson, Arnell Puckham, Sudesh Singh, Anthony Taylor, Cassidy Taylor, Rosanne Thornton.

Woodbridge Elementary School Third Grade Consistent Honor Roll - (Honor Roll All Year) Caroline Breeding, Roy Deleon, David Gray, Corey Green, Sara Hale, Alex Hassman, John Ireland, Kristen Jefferson, Jeshale Johnson, Samantha Kraszewski, Kori Lewandowski, Bradford Nelson, Ryan Parker, Hernan Quezada-Alcantara, Jay Richardson, Emma Rider, Mikaela Smith, Kaitlyn Willin, Karin Wright, Eddie Zagal-Ponce. Distinguished Honor Roll - Jordan Clark, Ashley Cook, Jarrod Elliot, David Gray, Corey Green, Michelle Hill, John Ireland, Kristen Jefferson, Jeshale Johnson, LeJoie Johnson, Terrance Knox, Kori Lewandowski, Rachel Retzlaff, Emma Rider, Logan Wescott, Kaitlyn Willin . Honor Roll - Caroline Breeding, Alonzo Cannon, Roy Deleon, Remington Dewey, Sha’mariah Doakes, Brittany Donovan, Dominique Emory, Gray Garrido, Sara Hale, Alex Hassman, Jared Hopkins, Samantha Kraszewski, Bradford Nelson, Nathaniel Opaliski, Ryan Parker, Darshan Patel, Kary Perez-Galvan, Hernan Quezada-Alcantara, Elexus Reid, Jay

PAGE 21

Richardson, Nicholas Rosado, Shelby Simpson, Mikaela Smith, Russell Smith, Karin Wright, Eddie Zagal-Ponce. Most Improved Shamar Finney, Jaquan James, Candice Kraszewski, Nathaniel Opaliski, Antoniqua Roach, Russell Smith, Logan Wescott. Fourth Grade Consistent Honor Roll - (Honor Roll All Year) Kirsten Blake, Collin Breeding, Willie Davis, Linsey Downing, Logan Hamm, Savannah Harris, Emily Hassman, Gabrielle Johnson, Hannah Krause, Shelby McBroom, Tyler Ramos, Horacio Reyna, Taylor Richey, Tristan Schulties. Distinguished Honor Roll - Two Kirsten Blake, Collin Breeding, Dajah Emory, Savannah Harris, Emily Hassman, Hannah Krause, Shelby McBroom, Philip Petrone, Horacio Reyna, Taylor Richey, Gavin Smith. Honor Roll - Brent Adams, Albert Anderson, Tanaja Beckett, Tylandra Brooks, Donald Burr, Kayla Carlisle, Willie Davis, Linsey Downing, Kalene Garrison, Danielle Glenn, Logan Hamm, Malik Jenkins, Gabrielle Johnson, Castaysha Lewis, Tyler Ramos, Zuleym Rios, Tristan Schulties, Jo’Quon. Most Improved Dajon Emory, Danielle Glenn, Melanie James, Malik Jenkins, Jamie Kennedy, Jason Martino, Haley Short, Gavin Smith, Jo’Quan Smith. Perfect Attendance Kindergarten: Da’Sha Adams, Caleb Anderson, Trent Carey, Emaya Cleveland, Abby Falls, Jacquelin Garrido, Andre Hall, Emily Harrington, Orbby Holder, Nadajah Jenkins, Diego Morones-Castillo, Amanda Moore, Isaac O’Neal, Delaney Van-

Buskirk, Janiya Vessels, Desmond Warren Jr., Robbie Webb Jr. 1st Grade: Cindy Alcantara, Rashim Cannon, Dayar Dennis, Stephanie Dixon, LaMar Johnson, Owen Pleasants, Jack Ryan, Leah Styles, Briseyda VillalobosGutierrez. 2nd Grade: Rachel Driscoll, Patrick Griffin Jr., Aahmad Jackson, Brady Keeler, Nicolino Patone Jr., Dominick Simone Jr., Shymere Vessels. 3rd Grade: Janiqua Brown, Roy Deleon, Remington Dewey, Waniah Hammond, Gary Hernandez, Briannia Hunt, Samantha Kraszewski, Bradford Nelson, Brandon Oliver, Kara Tharp, Alpha Williams. 4th Grade: Katlyn Bailey, Jon Bondie, Dyamond Haynes, Austin Lacy, Skyla LeChel, Miguel Mendoza, Brianna Mosley, Tyler Oliver, James Staton, Megan Taylor . Perfect Attendance All Year Wontrell Hammond (Second Grade Mrs. Nichols/Mrs. Truitt’s class), Andre Hall (Kindergarten - Mrs. P. Brown’s class) and Rachel Driscoll (Second Grade - Mrs. G. Brown’s class).

Worcester Preparatory School Headmaster’s List Grade 6- Alyssa Alicea, Seaford. Grade 7- Matthew Carey, Seaford; Haylea Reiner, Seaford. Grade 8- Joseph Casullo, Seaford; Ashley French, Seaford; Ethan Kahn, Seaford; Lauren Price, Seaford. Grade 11 Brian Carey, Seaford; Jenna Sternberg, Seaford. Honorable Mention Grade 11- Humda Mubarka, Seaford.

Currently Morning Star Publications is placing copies of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers every week in nearly 40 Sussex County classrooms. Teachers welcome the newspaper and use them for classroom assignments. This is one of the largest number of participating schools and requests for newspapers since we started the Newspaper In Educaton programs several years.

HELP SUPPORT N.I. E. I WOULD LIKE TO SUPPORT NEWSPAPERS IN EDUCATION FOR THE 2005-06 SCHOOL YEAR. YOUR NAME______________________________ ADDRESS _______________________________ ______________________________________ PHONE ________________

Answer: The Seaford/Laurel Star Your Hometown Community Newspaper

ENCLOSE YOUR DONATION AND MAIL TO: MORNING STAR PUBLICATIONS, ATTN: JIM MCWILLIAMS, PO BOX 1000 SEAFORD, DE 19973 PH: 302-629-9788

The following individuals and businesses support the Star’s Newspaper In Education program. Local classrooms receive the Seaford and Laurel Stars for classroom use.

American Legion Auxiliary Unit 6 B-Line Printing and Computer Repair Bon Appetit Restaurant Bridgeville Commissioners Bridgeville Kiwanis Coldwell Banker Broadcreek Realty

Cora Selby Delmar Kiwanis French’s Supermarket Friends For Lee Home Team Realty, LLC Integra Administrative Group Johnson Polymer

Laurel Civic Club Laurel Lions Manlove Auto Parts Maria Heyssell Mercantile Peninsula Bank O’Neal’s Antiques Pizza King

Sam Yoder and Son, Inc. Scott’s Furniture Seaford Kiwanis Soil Service Soroptimist Int. of Seaford Southern DE Foot and Ankle Bradley T. Lemon, D.P.M., F.A.C.F.S. Trinity Transport /Trinity Foundation


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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 23

Backyard herbs enliven meals of summer The thought of stepping out my back door and snipping a handful of fresh herbs to use for dinner is one of the things that keep me sane during the long, dark winter months. I delight in all things summer but it is a joy to see my chives, oregano and rosemary coming back to me while I add several fresh annual basil plants to keep them company in the hot summer sun. It’s not too late to pick up a fresh herb or two to plant in a sunny spot near your back door. Don’t fuss over the perennials too much and they’ll reward your benign neglect by appearing again next year. If you only want to go the annual route, by all means put in a couple of fragrant basils. The difference fresh herbs make can’t be understated. Try these summertime winners. Chilled Avocado Soup With Shrimp And Chives Makes 6 first course servings 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small white onion, minced 1 jalapeno chili, seeded, minced 3 garlic cloves, minced 4 ripe avocados, peeled, pitted, chopped 2 cups canned low salt chicken broth 5 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 cups (or more) water 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel 8 ounces cooked bay shrimp 1 cucumber, peeled, seeded, diced 3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives Heat oil in medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add onion and jalapeno; sauté until tender, about 15 minutes. Add garlic; sauté 2 minutes. Season with salt. Remove from heat; cool. Place avocados in blender, Add chicken broth, 4 tablespoons lemon juice and onion mixture. Puree until smooth. Transfer to large bowl. Stir in 2 cups water and lemon peel. Thin soup with more water, if desired. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled, about 3 hours.

The Practical Gourmet Meanwhile, mix shrimp, cucumber, chives and 1 tablespoon lemon juice in medium bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Cover; refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 3 hours. Ladle soup into bowls. Top with shrimp. Bon Appétit Rosemary-Pepper Focaccia Serves 16. This is an amazingly simple bread recipe sure to impress. Add some freshly grated Parmesan cheese for an extra kick.

10 minutes. Roll out dough on lightly floured surface. Transfer to baking sheet. Dimple surface with fingertips. Spread remaining 2 teaspoons oil over. Sprinkle with rosemary and crushed red pepper. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Let rise 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Bake bread until golden, about 20 minutes. Cut hot bread into wedges and serve. Bon Appétit Light and Easy Basil-Arugula Pesto Makes about 1 1/2 cups. This delicious pesto is enough for about 1-1/2 pounds of your favorite pasta, or spread it on slices of Italian bread. 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

I delight in all things summer but it is a joy to see my chives, oregano and rosemary coming back to me while I add several fresh annual basil plants to keep them company in the hot summer sun. 3 cups (loosely packed) fresh basil leaves 1 cup (loosely packed) fresh arugula 1/2 cup grated pecorino Romano cheese 1/3 cup pine nuts 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel 2 tablespoons lukewarm water Place 1/2 cup oil and next 6

ingredients in processor. Process to thick paste. With motor running, add remaining 1/4 cup oil and 2 tablespoons water to processor. Blend until smooth. Season pesto to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Pour thin layer of oil over pesto; cover and chill.) Bon Appétit Flavors of the World

2 cups (or more) bread flour 1 envelope fast-rising dry yeast 1 teaspoon salt 1 and 1/2 teaspoons sugar 3/4 cup hot water (125 degrees to 130 degrees) 1 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons olive oil Cornmeal 2 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary 1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper Blend 2 cups flour, yeast, salt and sugar in processor. Combine hot water and 1 tablespoon oil in glass measuring cup. With machine running, add water mixture through feed tube and process until elastic and uniformly moist dough forms that just cleans inside of work bowl, about 40 seconds. If dough is sticky, add more flour by tablespoons, incorporating each addition before adding next. If dough is dry, add water by tablespoons, incorporating each addition before adding next. Gather dough into ball. Transfer to greased bowl, turning to coat entire surface. Cover with damp towel and let rise 30 minutes Grease 12- to 14-inch pizza pan or baking sheet. Sprinkle with cornmeal. Punch dough down and knead until smooth. Cover and let rest

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

CHURCH BULLETINS Wesley UMC Vacation Bible School SonTreasure Island Vacation Bible School begins Monday, July 31, at Wesley United Methodist Church on Atlanta Road, from 6:15 until 8:30 p.m. The closing program will be on Sunday, Aug. 6. SonTreasure Island creates an island atmosphere where children will sing, watch skits, create crafts and play games. For information, call 628-1615 or 628-0720.

Old Christ Church summer services Old Christ Church near Laurel (built in 1771) will have summer services for the first time since 1918. During July and August Holy Communion and morning prayer will be held at Old Christ Church. The services will begin at 9:30 a.m. each Sunday, Holy Eucharist will be on July 16, 30 and Aug. 13 and 27. Morning prayer will be on July 9 and 23 and Aug. 6 and 20. Light refreshments of cookies and lemonade will be served following the service. All services are casual. Old Christ Church was built in 1771 and served as an active facility until the mid 19th century. Old Christ Church is said to be one of only a dozen churches along the Atlantic Coast to survive unaltered from America’s pre-revolutionary period. The church is known for its pristine interior and the fact that it has never been plumbed, heated, electrified or painted. The churchyard looks to be barely over 200 years old. This is due to markers that could not survive the elements since they were made from wood. Prominent among the surviving markers are those of Nathaniel Mitchell, gover-

nor of Delaware (1805-1811), one of only three Episcopal priests in Delaware at the time. Old Christ Church has been maintained and administered since 1922 by the nonprofit Old Christ Church League. It is today owned by its successor, St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, Laurel.

Bethel UMC hymn sing Hymn sing featuring Joyful Noise and the Bethel Church Praise Team on Sunday, July 9, at 6 p.m. at Bethel United Methodist Church, west of Seaford on North Oak Grove Road. A dessert reception will follow. Phone 629-7117 (Lucy Slacum) for details.

Bethel Vacation Bible School Bethel Worship Center invites children ages 4 through 12 to SonTreasure Island Vacation Bible School from July 10-14, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The closing program and carnival will be on Saturday, July 15, from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Bethel Worship Center is located in Seaford on U.S.13 and Ginger Lane across from Chambers Motors. Call the church office at 628-4240.

Gospel Cafe schedule Centenary United Methodist Church at the corner of Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, is presenting the Gospel Cafe every Saturday from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The Gospel Cafe features the Bruce and Nancy Willey Music Ministry. Come for the music, the fellowship and the refreshments. Special guests will appear on the following dates:

July 8 - Bill and Vera Primrose and J.R. Mayle. July 15 - “Good News” Tour. July 22 - Rob Carroll. July 29 - Traci Worster and “Abundant Joy.” Every week Mary Ann Young signs Gospel favorites. Everyone is invited. Contact the church at 875-3983 between 8 a.m. and noon or call Bruce Willey at 875-5539. “Trading Places” Vacation Bible School and special teen ministry will take place Sunday, July 9, through Friday, July 14, 6:30-8:30 p.m. daily, at Greenwood United Methodist Church, Church and W. Market streets, Greenwood, for ages three through teens. For information call 349-5297 or 349-4222.

work-building games as well as Maraca Munchies. Each of the children will accept a daily challenge to let Jesus’ love grow into their homes, experience electrifying Bible adventures, collect Bible Memory Buddies to remind them of God’s Word, and create Bible Point Crafts they’ll take home and play with all summer long.” “Fiesta is an exciting way for kids to learn more about Jesus’ love,” said Homer. “Each day concludes at Fiesta finale — a celebration that gets everyone involved in living what they’ve learned. It is our hope that Fiesta will lift up Jesus’ love in our community.” Fiesta begins on July 16 and continues through July 20, at Grace Baptist Church, 805 Atlanta Road in Seaford, each night from 6 until 8 p.m. Pre-register at “Taco Day” on Sunday, July 9, from 1 to 3 p.m. For information, call 629-8434.

First Baptist Church Bible School

Atlanta Road Alliance Bible School

Greenwood UMC Bible School

First Baptist Church of Seaford will be having its annual Vacation Bible School, July 10-14, Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m.-to noon. Children ages 4-12 are invited for Bible stories, crafts, game, puppets, snacks and prizes. For further information, call 629-7161 or 629-7299.

Grace Baptist Church Fiesta Grace Baptist Church invites children ages three-years through fifth grade to Fiesta: Where Kids are Fired up about Jesus. “This year our church is jumping with excitement as we have a Fiesta,” said Pastor Homer McKeithan. “Our Fiesta program will provide fun, exciting Biblelearning activities, catchy songs, and team-

“Space Probe” is the theme of this year’s Vacation Bible School to be held July 24, 28 from 9 a.m. to noon each day, at the Atlanta Road Alliance Church in Seaford. Children age 4 through grade 6 completed are invited to attend. Pre-registration is suggested; forms can be obtained from the church foyer, online at www.atlantaroadcma.org, or by calling 629-7693. The Atlanta Road Alliance Church is a Christian and Missionary Alliance Church and is located at 22625 Atlanta Road, 11/2 miles north of the intersection of Stein Highway and Atlanta Road. Send items to Morning Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or email morningstarpub@ddmg.net

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Tina Whaley

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 Web site: http://home.dmv.com/-stjohns/ E-mail: stjohns@dmv.com NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Sunday Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday Night 7 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 11 a.m. • Sun. School 10:00 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Bethel Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., P.O. Box 293 Laurel, DE 19956 ~ (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector Mid Week Eucharist & Healing Service - Wed. @ Noon Holy Eucharist & Church School Sunday @ 9:30 am

“Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771 94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873 “A Place to Belong” SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Family Worship Prayer Team 7:00 p.m. 10:45 a.m. ‘The Table’ Sunday School 9:30 a.m. (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY God’s Big Back Yard Underground 6:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del. Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 25

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

Help me find the ‘Right to Know’ By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Laurel Wesleyan Church

Tell me, which one of the 10 amendments in the Bill of Rights secures United States citizens the “right to know?” I have been listening to this argument all week concerning the Times leak debacle and I am bewildered. I certainly see the first amendment allows for a free press and does not allow government to make a law restricting its power. That’s far from saying that we as a people have the right to know any and every piece of information that can be known in this country. For some, gone are the days of believing that in order to execute a war we are going to need to do some things very well and very quietly. We might as well post a website with our current troop movements if we have the “right to know” everything. Do you ever intentionally limit knowledge for the good of all involved? Of course you do. It happens in all kinds of circumstances. As a pastor, at times I have information about a person or situation that I cannot tell to anyone. Based on that information I make decisions that might not always make sense to an onlooker. But a certain level of trust is established to allow me to operate in my position. The “right to know” people are pushing for a zero trust in our government. That just doesn’t work. Sure, I’m not stupid enough to claim that government deserves unwavering trust for anything and everything, but we must draw the knowledge line at clandestine programs that effectively combat terrorism. I really have neither the “right to know” nor the “need to know” everything my government does. Hundreds in Congress were aware of this program, so there is a sense of accountability for its existence through that channel. You and I knowing brings no additional accountability. It only hampers effectiveness It appears left leaning publications have placed their desire to cast shadows of doubt on the Bush administration over the

The ‘right to know’ people are pushing for a zero trust in our government. interest of keeping a valuable program secret. Ultimately it is not the administration that is hurt, it is our war effort. That type of behavior is selfish and short-sighted. This is the week that we celebrate our liberty and freedom. Our freedom is rightly exercised not through complete libertarianism with no boundaries but through a certain amount of trust placed in authorities to protect our freedom. Your fireman doesn’t have to tell you everything and neither does your local chief of police. Neither does your government. There is no such thing as the constitutional right to know. The Rev. Crofford is Senior Pastor at Laurel Wesleyan Church. His views do not necessarily represent the views of the congregation or Wesleyan Church International. You may email pastortodd@laurelwesleyan.org

543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor MON. Youth Meeting SUNDAY 6:30 - 8 p.m. Sunday School ..... 9:45 a.m. WEDNESDAY Worship...............11:00 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m.

Plans are under way for this year’s rummage sale sponsored by St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. The sale will be on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the St. Luke’s Parish Hall on King and North streets in Seaford. Workers are now on hand at the Parish Hall each Monday from 9 a.m. to noon for those who wish to donate items. The St. Luke’s annual chrysanthemum sale will be at the end of August with pickup of flowers scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 16, at the Jackson Hewitt office in the Nylon Capital Shopping Center in Seaford.

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30-5 p.m.; Sun. 8-8:25 a.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth: Ben Colegrove Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

Laurel, Del.

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE

“Come and Experience JESUS!”

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area

Sunday Morning: Worship 10:00 AM Wednesday: Prayer & Praise 7:00 PM Located in Hickman Commercial Park www.LivingWaterLaurel.org 302-875-7814

YOU ARE INVITED! Come into This Church and Gather in Christ’s Name to Worship Him! Psalm 95:6 Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor, Stacey Johnson

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

“A Growing Church For All Ages”

2 miles N. of Laurel, DE on Alt. 13

302-877-0443 410-957-4696

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-7693 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Ron Mayers • Rev. Andrew Kerr SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School to grade 6) & Divorce Care 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & 7:00 Evening Service Youth Group (grades 7-12)

To Come! Revelation 2 ime 2:1 T The Ark 7 It's Seaford Wesleyan Church

United Methodist Churches

Worship Sun. Sch.

King’s Gordy Rd. .......... 8:50....10:00 St. George’s St. George Rd. .... 10:10..... 9:00 Mt. Pleasant Mt. Pleasant Rd...11:30....10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

River of Life Christian Center 17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Pastor Arthur Smith III Sunday School - 10 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628 parsonage 875-2996

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby, Rector

Sunday School - all ages 9 a.m. Worship 9 a.m., 10:15 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Rainbow Day Care / Pre-School Rt. 13 South, Seaford, DE 302-628-1020

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church

St. Luke’s rummage sales

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

When words are not enough, choose from our elegant selection of floral arrangements.

John’s Four Season’s Flowers & Gifts

Stein Hwy. at Reliance, John Beauchamp 302

629-2644

410-754-5835

Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 & 10:45 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship and Children’s Ministries 6 p.m. Wednesday Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Connecting People with Christ since 1804

CONCORD

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 25322 Church Road, Concord Seaford, DE 19973 Sunday Worship - 9 am Sunday School (all ages) - 10:30 am For More Information call 302-628-8114 Rev. Diane E. Melson, Pastor


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR

OBITUARIES Vantrina Michelle Kellam, 46 Vantrina Michelle Kellam, known fondly as “Porki,” of Laurel departed this life on Sunday, June 25, 2006, at John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. She was born June 10, 1960 in Seaford, the daughter of George and Margaret Rayfield Kellam. She graduated from Laurel Senior High School Class of 1978. She continued her education at Vantrina Kellam Delaware State and Delaware Tech. She touched many lives. She was outgoing and friendly. Over six years ago, she gave her life to the Lord. She would be the first to tell you, look what God has done. Her life and testimony inspired many. After a 17-year crack addiction, she was delivered without rehab. She continued her testimony by helping others with addictions at Kent & Sussex Counseling Services as an addictions counselor. She was a member of Tabernacle House of Prayer II under the leadership of Apostle Elijah Drummond III in Laurel. She was an usher, the appointment secretary, and a mother of the church. Her most important title was Christian. She truly lived the life and was an example of how to live holy, walk upright, and not compromise, nor shame God. She is survived by a son, Jerin T. Kellam of Laurel; a daughter, Nakia L.D. Kellam of Baltimore; two sisters, Karen F. Hopkins and her husband, Melvin Hopkins of Milton, and Zina Y. Kellam-Del Rosario and her husband, Luis Del Rosario of Laurel; a brother, Mermann T. “Buck” Kellam of Smyrna; two aunts, Nellie Topping of Melfa, Va., and Peggy Kellam of Boston, Mass.; an uncle, Robert Kellam of Blades; and a host of nieces, nephews, and great-nieces and nephews. Her funeral service was on July 1, at the Citadel of Hope in Seaford with Apostle Elijah Drummond III officiating. Interment followed in St. Matthew’s Cemetery in Laurel. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Lung Association, 209 E. Market St., Salisbury, MD 21801. Arrangements were by Framptom Funeral Home, P.A. in Federalsburg.

Nora Kuse Shultes, 91 Nora Kuse Shultes of Seaford died on Monday, June 26, 2006, at the Methodist Manor House in Seaford. Nora was born in New York City, the daughter of Hannah Vought and John Bann (Bancerowski). For many years she worked as a salesperson and demonstrator in many New York and Brooklyn stores. She moved to Georgetown, with her first husband Charles Kuss Jr. in 1976 from East Northport, Long Island. After 47 years of marriage, Charles died of throat cancer in 1982. In 1985 she married her pen pal from Albany, N.Y., Franklin Shultes. In 1994 they moved to the Methodist Manor

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches.

House where he died in 1998. While in Georgetown, she joined Church Women of Georgetown, the Thrift Shop, volunteered in the Cancer Society, was a charter member of Milford AARP Chapter and was on their program committee for two terms. Married to Franklin, who was in AARP leadership, she became involved with many of his activities. At the Manor House she joined the dining room committee, Stamp and Poetry clubs and volunteered whenever possible. Her pleasant, helpful personality made many friends over the years and she was an active correspondent to the friends and relatives over the years. She is survived by her “adopted” family, Gladys and Mario Barbosa, their four children, nine grandchildren; a brother, John Bann of Long Island, N.Y.; cousins, Hannah Baker and Anna. Two dear friends, Harriet Saleni and Patti Kuberski. Her funeral services and burial were private. The family suggests donations may be made to the Benevolent Fund of the Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE; or Delaware Hospice Inc., 600 Dupont Hwy, Georgetown, DE 19947. Arrangements by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Robert Cannon, 79 Robert Cannon of Salisbury died Wednesday, June 28, 2006, at Salisbury

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006 Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Salisbury. He was born on March 16, 1927 in Bridgeville, a son of Robert and Cora Mae Cannon. Mr. Cannon proudly served his country in the United States Army during World War II. Following his discharge from the Army, he began his work as a machine operator at the DuPont Company in Seaford and retired in 1984 after 35 years of service. After his retirement from DuPont he worked in maintenance at the Salvation Army and retired in 2000. He was an active member of the Salvation Army Church in Salisbury and a member of the Salvation Army Men’s Club. He was considered a handyman and unselfishly spent his free time fixing things for friends and family members. He loved the outdoors where he enjoyed fishing, metal detecting on the beach and digging and collecting rare bottles. He is survived by his wife, Cathryn Mae Cannon; two daughters, Eleanore E. Duncan and Monica Marguerite Mears, both of Pittsville, Md.; a son, John Joseph Cannon of Orange Park, Fla.; four stepsons, Norman H. Conway, Henry L. Conway, Jerry L. Conway and Larry A. Conway, all of Salisbury; three sisters, Margaret Billings and Elsie Harold, both of Seaford and Georgie Willin of Federalsburg; seven grandchildren, five greatgrandchildren; and eight step-grandchildren and six step-great-grandchildren. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. His funeral service was on July 3, at

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly

TO OUR

FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS Please know that the kindness, help, love and support shown to us during Dad’s recovery made all the difference in his healing. I feel that God acted through everyone of you to enable my father to regain his health. Special appreciation goes out to the skilled emergency workers in Laurel and to Pastor Fred Duncan of Christ United Methodist Church, also in Laurel, for his unwavering concern.

WITH SINCERE GRATITUDE Enoch Schwartz & Karen Schwartz

WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.) “We may not be Dairy Queen but we have Great “Sundays”.

Welcome…

Carolyn Williams, 82 Carolyn Manahan Williams of Laurel died Thursday, June 29, 2006 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury, Md. She was born in Florence, S.C., a daughter of Frank and Stella Butler Manahan formerly of Camden. She was an active member of Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel, where she had taught Sunday School, was a Church Circle leader for 30 years, past president of the United Methodist Women, past chairman of the Antique Show and secretary-treasurer of the board of trustees and member of the administrative council. She attended Caesar Rodney High School in Camden and graduated from Arlington Hall, in Arlington Va., and from the Women’s College of Duke University where she was a member and past president of Zeta Tau Alpha Fraternity. She was a member of the Rehoboth beach Country Club, Seaford Golf & Country Club, Laurel Century Club and the Friends of the Laurel Library. Besides her parents, Mrs. Williams was preceded in death by her husband W. Robert Williams, who died in 1999. She is survived by her son, Harvey D. Williams and his wife Kathryn of Clarks Summit, Pa; a daughter Carol R. Williams of Cincinnati, Ohio; two grandchildren, Katherine Butler Mahon of Cincinnati and Kyle Robert Williams of Clarks Summit,

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Christ Lutheran Church

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

Short Funeral Home, Delmar. Following the service, entombment with military honors was at Springhill Memory Gardens in Hebron.

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

Corner of Shipley & Spruce Sts.

A Family Friendly Church Home for You Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 am Phone: 629-9755 www.ChristLC.net Bible School for the Mentally Challenged Saturday at 10 am

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH

Senior Pastor

Located halfway between Seaford & Bridgeville, turn off Rt. 13 East at Cannon Rd. light, 4th place on left.

Harold Daniels 7046 Seashore Hwy. Bridgeville, DE 19933

1611 KJV, Independent, Fundamental, Soul Winning

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 10:00 Sunday School 7:00 Prayer Service 11:00 Worship Service 6:00 Evening Worship Nursery Provided Rev. William Goslee - Ph. 349-0190

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor Ed Kuhling Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

302-337-3044

Church of God

Fax 302-337-8769

Worship Services: Seeker Service 8:30 am • Sunday School 9:30 Morning Worship 10:45 am • Wed. Night 7 pm

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Pa; and several nieces and nephews. A celebration of life was on July 3 at Centenary United Methodist Church, Laurel with the Rev. John Van Tine officiating. Interment was private in Laurel Hill Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Centenary United Methodist Church c/o Commemorative Endowment Fund, 200 West Market St., Laurel, DE 19956; or Coastal Hospice at the Lake 351 Deershead Road, Salisbury, MD 21801.

Wayne S. Brown, 65 Wayne S. Brown of Chicago, died Sunday, June 25, 2006, of cancer. A native of Bridgeville, he graduated from Bridgeville High School in 1959. Mr. Brown was a character actor in professional and community theater companies in the Chicago area for more than 30 years. In addition, he appeared in television commercials and had had parts in televiWayne Brown sion shows including "Chicago Hope," "The Untouchables" and "Cupid." An obituary that appeared June 28 in the Chicago SunTimes said that Mr. Brown was "a favorite of audiences and players" at several Chicago theaters, including the Chicago Park District Theatre on the Lake and the Gilbert and Sullivan Society of Hyde Park. The obituary quotes Erica Daniels, casting director at the Steppenwolf Theatre Company, Chicago, as saying that he "was a most generous spirit. Simple, honest, truthful. He understood what it meant to be a team player in an ensemble. Nothing was too small for him: readings, workshops - and no overacting." Mr. Brown attended the University of Delaware, where he earned a bachelor of arts degree in French and English. After serving in Europe with the U.S. Army, he attended the University of Chicago, where he earned a master of arts degree in French education. Upon graduation, he went to work for the Encyclopedia Britannica as a copy editor. At the time of his death, he was a freelance copy editor. Mr. Brown is survived by his mother, Mildred Brown, Delmar, a brother, Orlan "Hoot" Brown, Bridgeville, and a niece, Donna Rothman, Winston-Salem, N.C. His father, Jacob Orlan Brown Sr., is deceased. A memorial service is being planned for Chicago.

Mildred Elliott, 91 Mildred May Elliott, a lifetime resident of Delaware, passed away on Saturday, July 1, 2006. Born in Berlin, Md., she was a daughter of Edward A. Mahoney and Jessie L. Mahoney Dykes. Mrs. Elliott was a foster mother for many children for Child Services of Delaware from 1944 to 1960. She loved to garden and grew Mildred Elliott everything from strawberries to tomatoes. She is survived by two daughters,

PAGE 27

WE WANT YOU TO

Joanne Zuchowski of New Castle and Virginia Crow of Wilmington with whom she lived, and a son, Ronald Elliott of Wilmington. Also surviving her are eight grandchildren, Crystal Alderman, Tammy Zuchowski Coverdale, Joseph Zuchowski, Daniel Bacon, Linda Limpren, Tiffany Elliott, Veronica Elliott, Tammy Elliott and 16 great-grandchildren. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Walter Elliott, who passed in 1967, two sons, Charles Elliott and Robert Elliott, and a sister, Evelyn Jenkins. Funeral services will be on Saturday, July 8, at 1 p.m. at the Short Funeral Home, 13 E. Grove St., Delmar, where family and friends may call from noon to 1 p.m. Interment will follow the services at Riverside Cemetery in Powellville, Md.

SAVE

Margaret Daye, 67 Margaret Huffman Daye of Cambridge, Md. and formerly of Federalsburg, Md., died at University Hospital in Baltimore, Md. on Saturday, July 1, 2006. She was born on June 13, 1939 in Point Pleasant, W. Va., the daughter of the Rev. Charles C. Huffman who died Feb. 24, 1996 and Daisy M Higgins Huffman who died Feb. 26, 2004. She was a graduate of Fort Hill High School in Cumberland, Md. She was a homemaker. She is survived by three sons; Charles D. Bell, Jr. and his wife, Yunhe of Incon, Korea, Richard A. Bell and his wife, Sharon of Ridgely, Md., David A. Bell and Tina Thompson of Crumpton, Md and a daughter, Lisa Bell Busick and her husband, Michael of Denton, and seven grandchildren, Donnie Bell, III, Austin Bell, Katie DeMaio, Susan Busick, Lisa Marie Busick, Lindsay Bell, Brandon Bell and a brother, Doug Huffman and his wife Dale of Kent Island, Md. and a nephew, Julian "J.D." Huffman and his wife Shennel. Funeral services will be Friday, July 7, at 1 p.m. at Framptom Funeral Home, P.A. in Federalsburg with the Rev. Dan Walker officiating. Interment will follow in the family plot in Concord Cemetery near Federalsburg. Friends may call at the funeral home on Thursday, July 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. and also on Friday from noon to 1 p.m. For more information, or for letters of condolence, visit www.delmarvaobits.com.

Ronald Van Lankford Jr., 62 Ronald Van Lankford, Jr. of Seaford died Sunday, July 2, 2006 at his residence. Born in Salisbury, Md. the son of Beatrice Marine and Ronald V. Lankford Sr., he was an industrial electrician at the DuPont Company in Seaford, retiring in 1994 after 29 years service. He was a member of Grace Baptist Church in Seaford, Hebron Lodge 14, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Nanticoke Sportsman's Club and the former owner of Lankford's Gun Shop. He is survived by his wife, Kathryn (Kay) Blocker Lankford, a son David (Clark) Lankford, Seaford, two sisters, Pamela L. Good, Seaford and Joyce L. Dayse, Richmond, Va., a grandson, and a great-granddaughter. A graveside service was July 5 in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford, with pastors Homer McKeithan and Ed Kuhling will officiating.

Save $9.00 Off The Newsstand Price. Enjoy the convenience of having The Star delivered to your home each week and Save $9.00 Off The Newsstand Price. For as little as 33¢ A WEEK you’ll keep informed about what’s happening in your community.

Subscribe Please start my subscription right away. My check for $17 is enclosed. Sussex County $17 Kent & New Castle or call 302-629-9788 Counties, Delmar & Federalsburg, MD $22 Out of State $27 with credit card payment Please send

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Mail to: Morning Star Circulation PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973


PAGE 28

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

LEADING THE BAND - U.S. Sen. Tom Carper “leads” the Laurel Middle School Band along the parade route during Laurel’s July 4th Parade on Tuesday. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

LINE OF TRACTORS - Ray Starkey drives his antique tractor in the Laurel July 4th Parade. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Wilgus Associates, Inc.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 29

Full of wind, mayors compete in seed-spitting contest Georgetown Mayor Michael Wyatt bested six other Sussex County Mayors at the annual Mayor’s Cup Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest at Laurel’s Independence Day Celebration on Tuesday. Wyatt finished with a first class hurl of 31.6 feet, a full two feet in front of his closest competitor, 2004 winner Mayor David Ruff of Blades. 2005 champion Mayor John Outten of Delmar finished third with his wa-

termelon seed flying a full 26.6 feet. A shocking moment occurred when Joe Conaway, Bridgeville Commission president, let loose his first attempt only to see a set of dentures flying through the air. Upon retrieval by the judges, the dentures proved to be a gag by the other mayors as Conaway opened wide to displayed a full set of teeth to the audience. Conaway bids farewell to the competi-

tion this year as he has announced his retirement from the Bridgeville Commission. He leaves the contest as the only official to have ever won the contest twice, once in 2001 and again in 2003. Other past winners include former mayors from Laurel Terry Whaley and Blades B.J. Hardin. Others competing in the day’s rivalry were Bethel mayor and watermelon farmer Jeff Hastings, Seaford Mayor Ed Butler

and Laurel’s Terry Wright. Winning Mayor Wyatt will have his name engraved on the prestigious cup that will be displayed in Georgetown Town Hall for the year and he will enjoy a $100 dinner certificate to RJ Riverside Restaurant in Laurel. The event is sponsored by the Laurel Chamber of Commerce and Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips.

Mike Wyatt, left, the 2006 Laurel Independence Day Watermelon Seed Spitting Champion, is presented with the trophy by Kathryn Onken, the Mar-Del Watermelon Queen and Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips. Photos by Cheryl Jones Joe Conaway, dressed in July 4th garb, prepares to spit a seed in the contest. The former two-time champion did not place in the 2006 contest.

See more Laurel Independence Day coverage including a list of parade winners and more photographs in the July 13 edition of the Laurel Star.

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New Seaford Mayor Edward Butler does his best to spit a seed during the contest on July 4th.

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PAGE 30

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BENEFIT EVENTS BENEFIT FOR BOB REED Barbecue fund raiser for Bob Reed, Sussex County sheriff, Saturday, July 15, 4 to 8 p.m., River Road, Oak Orchard, Millsboro; $15 for adultsl $6 for children (4-12 years of age). Call Ron or Suzanne Sams at 945-2586 for more information.

CONCERT FOR BUILDING FUND Gospel concert to benefit the Nanticoke Senior Center building fund, Sunday, July 16, 2 to 4 p.m. Blades Fire Hall. Free-will offering and refreshments. Phone 629-9794 or 629-4236.

BASKET TO BENEFIT LITTLE LEAGUE Nanticoke Little League has a Longaberger Knick Knack Basket for sale. The cost is $55 and contains baseball tacks as well as a blue/yellow stripe around the top of the basket. All proceeds benefit Nanticoke Little League. For more information, contact Heather Byrd at 6295400 or 875-2947.

COURSES DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE Laurel Senior Center AARP defensive driving course for beginners, July 12, 13. Cost $10. Call 875-2536 to sign up.

OSTEO ARTHRITIS TALK “Don’t Let Osteo Arthritis of the Knee Become a Pain.” Dr. Choy will be at the Laurel Senior Center at 1 p.m., Wednesday, July 12, to talk about signs, symptoms, causes and up to date treatment information. Open to the public and free of charge. Light refreshments will be served.

FOOD CHICKEN BARBECUE Chicken barbecue, Saturday, July 8, 11 a.m., American Legion Log Cabin, Front Street, Seaford. Chicken with two sides,

MEETINGS COAST GUARD AUXILIARY Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. This month’s meeting is Thursday, July 13, at 7:30 p.m. Anyone interested in promoting safe boating and would like to work with men and women who do vessel inspections, safety patrols and teach public safety courses, are welcome to join the Flotilla. Boat ownership is not required. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 or Jim Mullican at 732-1163.

DEMOCRATS CLUB PICNIC Monday, July 17, Western Sussex Democrats Club will hold their annual picnic at Dale Dukes recreation & pool building on Sycamore Road, Laurel. Covered dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. Chicken and homemade ice cream will be provided. Candidates, elected officials and all Democrats are invited.

WIDOWED PERSONS MEETING Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service meeting Tuesday, July 18, 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral, U.S. 13, Seaford. The guest speaker will be Jan Ting, a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Submit Bulletin Board items by Friday at noon. E-mail: publisher@seafordstar.com Mail: 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 Items appear in both the Seaford and Laurel Stars. Mail to: Star Newspapers PO Box 1000 Seaford, DE 19973 BEST BETS: ■ Free concert at the Ross Mansion, Saturday, July 8, 5:30 p.m. featuring the Chesapeake Brass Band. Bring a lawn chair or blanket.

SUSSEX LADIES AUXILIARY Sussex County Volunteer Firemen’s Ladies Auxiliaries Association meeting Wednesday, July 19, at the Ellendale firehouse. Dinner will be served at 7 p.m. with the business meeting to follow. Call Crystal J. Chaffinch at 629-6904 for more information.

NEW TOPS GROUP FORMS TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), a non-profit weight loss support group, meets Tuesdays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at Grace Baptist Church, Atlanta Road, Seaford. For more information, contact Jean Davis at 410-883-3407.

REUNIONS SEAFORD HIGH CLASS OF 1971 SHS Class of 1971 reunion on July 29 The Seaford Senior High School, Class of 1971, 35th reunion, Saturday, July 29, at the Elks Club in Seaford. Class members who have not yet received an invitation should contact Melissa Wills (629-8171) or Lynn Lester (745-0115).

CONCERT AT ROSS MANSION

CHAMBER’S SPEED NETWORKING

Chesapeake Brass Band concert, free, Gov. Ross Mansion lawn, Saturday, July 8, 5:30 p.m., sponsored by city of Seaford and Seaford Historical Society. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. In case of rain, the concert will be at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club. There will also be tours of the mansion provided by the historical society until 4:30 p.m. (tours are free to members).

Speed networking, Hampton Inn, U.S. 13, Seaford, Thursday, July 27, 5 to 7 p.m. RSVP to the Greater Seaford Chamber of Commerce at 629-9690 by July 21.

NANTICOKE RIVERFEST 12th annual Nanticoke Riverfest in downtown Seaford, Friday, July 14, and Saturday, July 15. Entertainment, food, carnival, children’s activities, float-in, mayor’s challenge, car and motorcycle shows, vendors and more. Headliner concert on Friday night is the Funsters. Contact the city of Seaford at 629-9173.

FREE PERFORMANCE AT BEAR TRAP Sixth annual free Summer Theatre Festival Festival, July 13, 14, 15, 7:30 p.m., Ocean View, Village at Bear Trap Dunes (free admission). Einstein’s Breakfast featuring film, theatre and radio star Maryellen Owens. Presented by Carl M Freeman Foundation.

AFRAM FESTIVAL UPCOMING Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival, Friday, Aug. 11 (5 to 10 p.m.) and Saturday, Aug. 12 (10 a.m. to 10 p.m.), Nutter Park, Seaford. Food, entertainment, cultural events, parade, vendors, pageant, car show, games, giveaways. Phone 628-1908 for more information.

TRIPS TRIP TO PHILLIES GAMES Christ U.M. Church in Laurel will sponsor a trip to the Phillies-Braves game on Saturday, July 22, at noon. The cost is $45 including the bus and ticket. For more information, phone 8754233.

SENIOR CENTER TRIP Nanticoke Senior Center trip to Three Little Bakers for “The Sound of Music,” Wednesday, Aug. 2, at 9:30 a.m. The cost is $60 for members and $65 for non-members. Call 629-4939.

‘Tugging on the Nanticoke’ theme for 12 annual Riverfest Plans are under way for the 12th annual Nanticoke Riverfest. This year’s theme is “Tugging on the Nanticoke.” Volunteers are needed for a variety of tasks during the event on Friday, July 14, and Saturday, July 15. Anyone interested in volunteering can contact Leigh Ann DePope, volunteer coordinator, at 629-2524. For general information about Riverfest, contact the chairpersons, Amy Walls or Trisha Booth at 629-9173. Vendors and sponsors are needed.

WOODBRIDGE CLASS OF 1986 Woodbridge High School Class of 1986 20-year class reunion at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 12, at the Suicide Bridge Restaurant in Hurlock, Md., on the air-conditioned “Choptank River Queen,” a reproduction of an authentic 80-foot turn-ofthe-century river boat. There will be a sit-down dinner with a menu of shrimp cocktail, crab cakes, and prime rib or stuffed chicken breast. Cocktails by cash bar. Cost will be $60 per person or $120 per couple. Dress is casual. Mail checks no later than July 15 to: Woodbridge High School Class of 1986, c/o Rhonda VanVorst, 1150 Hickman Road, Greenwood, DE, 19950. Call Russ Carlisle (302-228-9145); or Rhonda VanVorst (Green) (302-245-6546).

SPECIAL EVENTS LEWES ANTIQUE SHOW 48th annual Lewes Antique Show and Sale sponsored by Bethel United Methodist Church, 4th and Market streets, Lewes, July 6, 7, and 8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dealers will be selling dolls and jewelry, silver and glassware to furniture. There will be decorator and collector items as well as a curiosity shop. The hall is air conditioned and handicap accessible. Lunch will be available. Admission is $4 per person. Call 6459426.

LUNCH CRUISE Suicide Bridge luncheon cruise, Tuesday, July 11, sponsored by the Laurel Senior Center. Call 875-2536 for more information.

DELMAR VFW POST 8276

Super Bingo Every Tuesday!

CASH PAYOUT $100* Over 60 People $50* Under 60 People

TIMES Doors Open 5:00 p.m. Games 6:45 p.m.

*Based on the number of people No one under the age of 18 allowed to play

TICKETS ON SALE

Tuesday Night Delmar VFW Bingo Bonanza Game 200 W. State St., $1000.00 Jackpot! Delmar, MD Information call: WINNER TAKE ALL

410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379

Super Basket Bingo Saturday, July 15 th Tickets $30 Advance $35 At Door 410-896-3379 or VFW 410-896-3722


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 31

Lecturing is easy, living by those words is more difficult I have heard it said that one’s words should always be sweet, in YNN ARKS case they have to be eaten. I would add to that that one’s words should As so often happens with also always be spoken with conviction, in case one has to live by grand declarations, mine them. was pretty much ignored. I was reminded of this recently, The bug finally let go of after I pontificated about creatures Patrick’s shoelaces and other than humans and their rights the conversation to exist on this earth. Of course moved on. there was an audience — what good is a loud declaration of opinbug. It was evident, when, even in the face ion unless there are others to hear it? of all of that, the bug still clung to the When, a few days later, the inevitable test laces, that it was where it wanted to be. of my belief came, there was no one “Patrick,” I finally said, addressing my watching to make sure I acted according to nephew. (I would have addressed the bug, my words. But I felt the attention — the but I didn’t know its name.) “Why don’t stares — of those who had been listening you just leave it alone?” as strongly as though they were still here. And, because pontification is a favorite It all started at a gathering of family pastime, “You know, you are sitting outand friends in our back yard. Among the side. That bug has as much right to be here guests were my two nephews, the older of as you do.” whom was having trouble with an irritatAs so often happens with grand declaing bug. It refused to let go of the laces on rations, mine was pretty much ignored. my nephew’s sneakers. The bug finally let go of Patrick’s My nephew tried everything he could shoelaces and the conversation moved on. think of to loosen the grip of the bug: Several days later, I walked from the Stomping his foot, fanning his hands over back yard into our back porch and saw, in his shoes, discussion along the lines of the laundry room, half under the dryer and “Will you go away,” even smacking the

L

P

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

HEBRON VOLUNTEER FIREMEN’S CARNIVAL July 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

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half stretched out on the floor, a snake. Even though I couldn’t see its head — it was its thinking end that was under the dryer — I recognized it as a puff snake, one of those harmless snakes that, even though it has no teeth, likes to coil as though it is going to attack. This snake did not coil. It lay perfectly still, using the puff snake’s other defense mechanism, playing dead. I too was perfectly still. “Why didn’t you run and get the hoe and cut it in half?” my mother asked later. “Did you at least yell at it?” No, I quickly and quietly closed the door into the laundry room and stuffed a rug under the door. A snake beneath the dryer is one thing. But a snake making its way through the kitchen, into the living room and, perhaps, upstairs to the bedroom is the stuff of which nightmares are made. Any further action, I decided, would have to be taken by my husband. Trapping, poisoning, chopping — whatever dirty deed was necessary. “As much right to be here...as much right to be here...” Where was that voice coming from? I looked around, fearful that other snakes had slithered inside and were chanting at me. But it was my own voice,

haunting me from the past. “This is a long snake,” I countered. “Sneaky, with scales. And in my house. It has rights?” Arguing with yourself is a lesson in futility. I went upstairs, leaving the snake and the voice from the past behind. That evening, my husband pulled away from the wall the dryer and the washer. There was no sign of snake. “Do you see any snake feces?” I yelled to him from the kitchen. “Maybe,” he yelled back. “Why don’t you come look?” I declined. While the appliances were away from the wall, he filled with spray foam the holes around the various pipes and vents that come up through the floor to supply gas and water. He figured that it was one of those holes that allowed the snake to get into the house and one of those holes through which it left. “Either we sealed the snake outside or” — with a nasty grin in my direction — “we sealed it inside.” “As much right to be here...as much right to be here...” All right, all right, I conceded to my voice from the past. It is, after all, half his house.

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MORNING STAR

PAGE 32

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Classifieds Immediate openings for cosmetologists, spa techs and part-time spa receptionists. Call 855-1128 or fax resume to 855-1135

FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 3 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch ($9.00 minimum)

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.30/inch Legals: $6.30 per inch LOST LOST DOG: Very small female, poodle mix. Blond, short curly hair w/longer hair on tail & face. 6 mi. E of Laurel on Rt. 24. 875-3201. 6/22

GIVE-AWAY KITTENS, to good home, asst. colors, 8 wks old. Phillips Landing area. 8759585. 6/22 WOOD CHILDREN’S PLAY SET, you must remove. 245-2850. 6/22 22’ MURRAY PUSH MOWER. 245-2850. 6/22 CHARCOAL GRILL, Brinkman, needs painting. 2452850. 6/22 FREE CHERRY FIRE WOOD. 875-7323. 6/15

HELP WANTED CREDIT/ COLLECTIONS Large Transportation Company located in Federalsburg, MD looking to add to our growing team. Candidate must have strong computer skills, AR experience, friendly/upbeat personality, & team player. Hours M-F 8 am to 5 pm. $11-$12 p/hr depending on experience. Fax resume attn: HR 410943-8076. 6/29/2tc

National Construction and earthmoving firm seeks heavy equipment operators for project work in Seaford, DE area beginning July 15, 2006. Please fax qualifications and contact info to Human Resources Manager at 303-681-9068. 6/22/4tp

PLUMBING SUB-CONTRACTORS Masters Inc. is currently interviewing & hiring Sub-contractors for all phases of plumbing work throughout DE, Sussex County & Ocean City, MD

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Must meet all licensing and insurance requirements. Please call 240-793-9020 Or Fax resume to 302-629-4169 EOE

LOVE TO DECORATE? Earn $30-$50 per hour for part time fun. Call Debbie at 629-0402. 5/4/4tnc

EMPLOYMENT WANTED

PLUMBER’S Do you want to work for a company that will pay for your abilities, provide you with continued work & great benefits?

LET ME BABYSIT, do odd jobs, clean your house. 629-5192, ask for Tammy. 6/29/2t

If your answer is YES, then call 240-793-9020 Or Fax resume to 302-629-4169

SERVICES

We are currently interviewing & hiring experienced plumbers for work throughout DE Sussex County & Ocean City, MD The company offers: Competitive hourly & piece pay Excellent Health Care Paid Holidays Paid Vacation 401-K & company match $1,000.00 Sign on bonus EOE

MCGINNIS TREE SERVICE & STUMP REMOVAL Licensed & Insured All types of tree work. No job too small. Call 302-846-9791

YES, I DO

FRAMING 40 Years Experience ALL TYPES OF FRAMING & MATTING George Hitchens 29136 Disountland Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-7098

Enjoy The STAR? Subscribe Today!

HELP WANTED Busy optometric practice seeking full time staff member. Optical experience is helpful but not required, we will train the right person. Some traveling between offices is required. Competitive salary with benefits.

Please fax resume to Dr. Adams 1118090

302-856-4970

NOTICE FUNDRAISER Are you looking to raise money for a school, church, sports team, scout troops, clubs, day care centers, civic organizations, Relay for Life, or any other worthy cause? (Ask me more details about worthy causes). I can help you have fun while raising money. Call Debbie at 629-0402. 7/6/4tnc CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that really works! Call today! 302-875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

Tomatoes, Peppers & More Fresh Produce! Now Available At

The Hen House 11465 Sycamore Rd. Laurel, DE (1/2 mile from Rt. 13)

302-875-6922 Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30; Sun. 12-4

‘03 GREEN KAWASAKI Prairie KVF 360 4x4, 3l3c. eng., low hrs & mileage. $4000 OBO. 875-4181. 6/1 ‘91 FORD CROWN VICT., power everything, AC. 116K mi., car very well taken care of. $1500 OBO. 841-5795 or 934-5506. 6/1

YARD SALE

BOATS

YARD SALE, JULY 8, 1 - 5 pm. 17264 Phillips Hill Rd., Laurel (from Rt. 13, east on Rt. 24, go 5 mi., left on 437A, left on E. Trappe Pond, right on Phillips Hill). Furniture, exercise & camping equip., unknown contents of lg. shed & more. 7/6

21;’ FIBERGLASS BOAT, Dixie, walk around cuttie, selling due to health. $10,500 OBO. 875-3115.

AUTOMOTIVE PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc (2) 195-70-14 TIRES, like new, $25 for pair. 875-4358. 6/22 HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR CYCLE, FLHTC, garage kept, $10,500 OBO. 875-3115. 6/8 ‘95 GRAND AM, good cond., 60K mi., needs trans., $1000. 629-4446. ‘92 VAN, good motor, good tires, needs brakes, $250 OBO. 846-2599. 6/8

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SAFETY THE TOWN OF BRIDGEVILLE The Town of Bridgeville will hire a Director of Public Safety for their Police Department. Applicants must have previous experience in the fields of public safety and administration. Salary: $53,000.00, with benefits. The Town of Bridgeville is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Resumes will be accepted through July 24, 2006 at Town Hall, 101 N. Main St., Bridgeville, DE 19933, Attention: Town Manager Bonnie Walls.

12’ JON BOAT, Endura 30 elec. motor (like new) plus extras. $400 OBO. 8754181. 6/1 YAMAHA O/B MOTOR, 115 hp w/oil injecting system. Runs good, $1500. 3377861 for info. 5/25

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS ‘03 25’ TRAVEL TRAILER, Nomad by Skyline. Queen bed, sleeps 6, full bath, used 3 times, tagged til May 07, $10,800 OBO. 629-6159. 6/22 TRAVEL TRAILER ELEC. JACK, 12 volt. 629-7367. ‘95 WINNEBAGO BRAVE, 29’. Chev. Chassis, queen bed, TV, VCR, microwave, generator, awning, outdoor entertainment center, 52K mi., exc. cond., asking $20,500. 877-0231. 6/8

SHERRY LYNN’S JUST FOR KIDS “ A Distinctive Resale Shop ”

Pre-Owned Ralph Lauren, Gap, Gymboree & More Children’s Clothing; Newborn - Junior, Accessories Available.

We only look expensive, but we’re not! Large Selection Of

Spring & Summer Clothes

New & Used - Name Brand 302-846-3037 Rt. 13A Bi-State Blvd., Delmar, DE 19940 Hrs: Wed.-Sat. 10:00 -3:00

FOR SALE BACK YARD PRODUCE: 32814 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Laurel. Tomatoes, White Corn, Cantelopes, & many more vegetables. Call 8753023 to order Shelled Lima Beans, $8/qt. 76 3 OLD CHICKEN COOPS, wooden, $20 for all. 2452378. 7/6 REFRIG. 20.6 cu. ft., almond, $50. 875-5376. 7/6 UPRIGHT FREEZER, $85. 628-4735 after 6 pm. 7/6 PICK YOUR OWN BLACK BERRIES. Bring own container. 875-9383. 6/29 POLYTECH WINDOWS w/ frames - 9 sections, enough for a 12x18 porch. Good cond. Cash & carry. $800. 629-4755. 6/29 LA-Z-BOY ELEC. Luxury Lift power recliner, like new, $750. Craftmatic adjustable single bed, asking $400. 337-3370. 6/22/1t 18 CF REFRIGERATOR, like new, almond, ice maker, $350. 858-1326. 6/22 48’” TOSHIBA PROJECTION TV, $400 OBO. 2452850. 6/22

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

GOLD FISH, nice size, $4 ea. 875-3023. 6/22

ANTIQUE BED, Head & foot board, $40. 875-8505. 6/22

KARAOKE MACHINE, new, 1/2 price, $80. 2 Bikes, $15 & $10. 8752781. 6/22

LONGABERGER BASKETS for sale. 629-7245. 6/15 CAR TAG (License plate) Digits: 39336, $500 OBO. 875-7169 for info. 6/8 ‘70 and ‘71 LAUREL H.S. YEAR BOOKS, $50 ea. Exc. cond. 628-9157. 6/8

RUG 5x8, $45. 2 File cabinets, $15 & $10. Maple wardrobe, $50. Stereo set w/cabinet & speakers, $65. 875-2781. 6/22 MASSAGE CHAIR $140. 3 Massage review publications, $90; gallon massage gel, $30. 875-2781. 6/22


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY ATTORNEYS

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

ALLEN BODY WORKS, INC.

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

FUQUA and YORI, P.A.

413 NORTH CENTRAL AVE. LAUREL, DE 19956

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777

302-875-3208

*Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

FAX 302-875-3229

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Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales 328 N. DuPont Hwy., Millsboro, DE 19966

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

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4676 White Deer Rd., Delmar, DE 19940

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PAGE 34 COUCH, CHAIR & Ottoman, almost new, country blue plaid, $300. 236-2041 after 6 p.m. 6/22 CHERRY ROLL TOP Desk, locks, $250. Computer desk w/storage areas & shelves, $30. Computer student desk, $20. 8758505. 6/22 COFFEE TABLE w/drawer, $20. (2) Round wood side tables, $30 ea. Antique treadle sewing machine (refinished), $60. Bamboo sofa, chair & ottoman w/cushions, $35. 8758505. 6/22 3.5 HP LAWN CUTTER, used under 30 hrs., asking $30. Comm. Bench Grinder, 3/4 HP elec., 10” wheels, asking $20. 8754358. 6/22 GE DISHWASHER, under counter, almond, energy saver, pot scrubber, good cond., remodeling kit. $35. 629-6159. 6/22

MORNING STAR PORCH FURNITURE, fan & storm door. 629-8324. 6/1

TRACTOR: 284 Int’l. Diesel w/975 operating hrs. 59” belly mower, 6’ scraper blade & 2 wheel utility trailer. $7000. 629-2111. 6/1

ANIMALS, ETC. Get Hook, Round & Tapeworms. Rotate Happy Jack tapeworm tablets and LiquiVict® (tag). JAY DAVIS LAWN & GARDEN 8755943. www.e-stitch.com 6/15/4tc DOG HOUSE, $45. 8753023. 6/8 PUPPY, BICHON FRIES, male, $475. 628-3373. 6/8

LAND FOR SALE

7500 BTU AIR COND., used 1 yr. 875-4760. 6/15

LOT FOR SALE Waterfront lot, Old Meadow Rd., 3/4 acre, soil work complete. $279,000 Call Harry Wooding RE/MAX Coast & Country 302-684-3065

TOMATO CAGES (20), 75¢ ea. 875-1862. 6/8 TABLE SAW, 10” w/2 hp motor, $100. 875-8677. 6/8 PRESSURE WASHER, Honda 9 hp, 2400 psi, $300. 875-8677. 6/8

Office: 684-4800

BED FRAME, heavy duty, fits double to king size bed, $25. 628-0617. 6/8

CHILD’S ROCKER, wooden, $5. Desk & chair, $10. 875-3744. 6/8

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring people specializing in matching birth mothers with families nationwide. EXPENSES PAID. Toll free 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6292 Auctions Office building, rear parking lot. 3 offices, 1 bathroom, basement. 319 Fulford Ave, Bel Air, MD. Auction: July 7, 11:15am. Hopkins & Associates - 888-563-8248 hopkinsauctions.com Business Opportunity ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 30 machines and candy. All for $9,995. 888753-3452 Career / Training

3 JACK RUSSELL TERRIERS, $175 ea. 875-4181.

CRAFTSMAN WEED Trimmer. 629-7367. 6/15

A&J GERMAN HAMMER Drill w/SDS bits, 1/4 - 1 1/4 in. $100. 628-0617. 6/8

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SWIMMING POOL, diving board, Hayward pool pump & filter, 6’ high slide, & stainless ladder. Best offer. 875-7495. 6/1

WANTED TO RENT SENIOR LADY seeking to rent home or mobile home, in the country. On SS income. Can pay $400-$450 mo. Have ref., no pets, no children. Wants long term. Need by end of July. 8462599. 7/6

HOME INSPECTION 5-day hands-on basic, advanced and continuing education for core and renewal credit. Also Mold Inspection course. Building Specs, nationally recognized HI company. 800-217-7979 www..buildingspecs.com Employment Housing Consultant for communities in Southern Delaware. Duties include new home sales and contractor supervision. Weekend coverage required. We offer a competitive benefit package. Please fax resume in confidence to (302) 659-0300 EEOC Employment Information NOW HIRING FOR 2006 POSTAL JOBS. $18/hour Starting, Avg Pay $57K/ year. Federal Benefits, Paid Training & Vacations. DISCLAIMER: be aware that Morning Star Publications has no control over the Regional ads. Some employment ads and business opportunity ads may not be what they seem to be.

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✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

LEGALS PUBLIC NOTICE Laurel School District FY ‘07 Budget Hearings July 17, 2006 - 7:00 p.m. July 18, 2006 - 2:00 p.m. District Office 1160 S. Central Ave. Laurel, DE 19956 7/6/2tc

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 9575 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV and XXV, Subsection 115-25 and 115-182, Item C and A of said ordinance of DAVID AND ANNE ALLEN who are seeking a variance from the front yard and side yard setback requirements, to be located northwest of

CITY OF SEAFORD RESOLUTION On the 17th day of July, 2006, at the City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, between the hours of two o’clock p.m., prevailing time, and six o’clock p.m., prevailing time, there will be held a Special Election to determine whether the City of Seaford shall annex lands located contiguous to the present corporate limits of the City of Seaford being more particularly described in “Exhibit A” attached hereto and incorporated herein. Particulars concerning the Special Election are contained in a Resolution of the City Council of the City of Seaford which was passed at a meeting held on June 13, 2006, a copy of which is as follows: Whereas, pursuant to a Resolution adopted by the City Council of the City of Seaford, a committee appointed by the Mayor of the City of Seaford according to the requirements of Section 2 of the Charter of the City of Seaford, as amended, recommend in its report that certain territory located contiguous to the present corporate limits of the City of Seaford be annexed. Whereas, after notice duly published according to the requirements of Section 2 of the Charter of the City of Seaford, as amended, a public hearing was held on the 23rd day of May 2006, upon the proposal of the City Council of the City of Seaford to annex certain territory located and contiguous to the present corporate limits of the City of Seaford. Whereas, in the opinion and judgment of the individual members of the City Council, no cause has been shown why the territory located and contiguous to the present corporate limits of the City of Seaford should not be annexed and it positively appearing that said territory should be annexed in the event that a majority of the duly qualified electors in the City of Seaford and in the territory proposed to be annexed shall approve for. Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved, by the City Council of the City of Seaford, that a special election shall be held on the 17th day of July 2006, at the City Hall, 414 High Street, Sussex County, Seaford, Delaware between the hours of two o’clock p.m., prevailing time and six o’clock p.m., prevailing time, at which Special Election the duly qualified voters both in the City of Seaford and in the territory proposed to be annexed shall vote for or against the annexation to the City of Seaford or territory located contiguous to the present corporate limits of the City of Seaford, said territory being more particularly described in “Exhibit A” attached hereto and incorporated herein. And Be It Further Resolved, that the City Manager of the City of Seaford is hereby authorized and directed to cause a notice which shall consist of a true copy of this Resolution to be printed in a newspaper published in the City of Seaford and having a general circulation both in the City of Seaford and in the territory proposed to be annexed in its issues published within thirty (30) days immediately preceding the date of Special Election; And Be It Further Resolved, that at the Special Election, every resident and property owner, whether individual, a partnership, or a corporation in the City of Seaford and in the territory proposed to be annexed shall have one (1) vote; provided, however, that a person who owns property both in the City of Seaford and in the territory proposed to be annexed and resides in either place may vote only where he resides; and provided further that a person who owns property both in the City of Seaford and in the territory proposed to be annexed, but does not reside in either place may vote only in the City of Seaford and not in the territory proposed to be annexed.

PAGE 35 Road 535, 54 feet east of Brown Street, being Lots 2, 3, and 4 within Charles G. Friedel Subdivision. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, AUGUST 7, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 7/6/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING

And Be It Further Resolved, that an individual owning a duly executed Power of Attorney of another person or if a firm or corporation specifically authorizing the said individual to vote at the said Special Election, a duly authenticated copy of which has been filed in the Office of the City Manager of the City of Seaford, shall be entitled to cast the vote of said person, firm or corporation; And Be It Further Resolved, that the City Manager of the City of Seaford be and she is hereby authorized and directed to cause to be printed at least five (5) days prior to the date of said Special Election a sufficient number of ballot, the form of said ballot as follows: OFFICIAL BALLOT - THE CITY OF SEAFORD THIS BALLOT CASTS ONE (1) VOTE CHECK ONE: ( ) FOR THE PROPOSED ANNEXATION ( ) AGAINST THE PROPOSED ANNEXATION And Be It Further Resolved, that the purpose of legally conducting this said Special Election on the 17th day of July 2006, providing two (2) ballots, one for those persons, firms or corporations who are authorized to vote as residents and property owners of the City of Seaford and one for those persons, firms, or corporations who are authorized to vote as residents and property owners of the territory proposed to be annexed, determined who is and who is not lawfully qualified to vote there at, taking reasonable steps to see that the law pertaining to said Special Election receives compliance, and for the purpose of counting the votes and certifying the results of said Special Election to the City Council of the City of Seaford, Ernest Makowski is hereby appointed as the presiding officer of the Board of Special Elections, Charles Butler and Donald Tull is hereby appointed as the resident and property owner residing in the City of Seaford, and Fred W. Hertrich III is hereby appointed as the resident or property owner in the territory(s) proposed to be annexed. I, Dolores J. Slatcher, City Manager of the City of Seaford, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution was passed by the City Council of the City of Seaford at its meeting held on the 13th day of June, 2006, at which a quorum was present and voting throughout and that the same is still in full force and effect. Dolores, J. Slatcher, City Manager Dated: June 14, 2006 Exhibit “A” - Hertrich, Fred W. III Tax Map & Parcel 5-31-10.00 210

Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 9584 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XI, Subsection 11580, Item C of said ordinance of DELAWARE EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER who are seeking a special use exception for a child care center, to be located west of U.S. Route 13, 327 feet south of Road 481. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, AUGUST 7, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 7/6/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 9587 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XXIV, Subsection 115-172, Item G(7) of said ordinance of

ROBIN ADKINS, JR. AND STEPHANIE EWELL who are seeking a variance from the side yard setback requirement and a variance from the separation requirement between units in a mobile home park, to be located west of U.S. Route 13, south of Pine Ridge Drive, being Lot 16 within Pine Ridge Mobile Home Park. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, AUGUST 7, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 7/6/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Northwest Fork Hundred Case No. 9589 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-25, Item C of said ordinance of EDGAR WROTEN, JR. AND CHRISTINE WILLIAMS who are seeking a variance from the rear yard setback requirement, to be located south of Road 566A, 1,515 feet east of Road 562. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, AUGUST 7, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 7/6/1tc See LEGALS—page 36

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PAGE 36

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LEGALS - from Page 35

LEGAL NOTICE Delmar Liquors, Inc., trading as Wine Beer & Liquor, has on June 23, 2006, applied with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner for a package store liquor license for the sale of alcoholic beverages for a premises located at 38627 Benro Drive, Suites 6 & 7, Delmar Commons, Delmar, Delaware (19940), not for consumption on the premises where sold. Persons who are against this application should provide written notice of their objections to the Commissioner. For the Commissioner to be required to hold a hearing to consider additional input from persons against this application, the Commissioner must receive one or more documents containing a total of at least 10 signatures of residents or property owners located within 1 mile of the premises or in any incorporated areas located within 1 mile of the premises. The protest(s) must be filed with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commissioner at the 3rd Floor, Carvel State Office Building, 820 North French Street, Wilmington, DE 19801. The protest(s) must be received by the Commissioner’s office on or be-

fore July 24, 2006. Failure to file such a protest may result in the Commissioner considering the application without further notice, input or hearing. If you have any questions regarding this matter please contact the Commissioner’s Office. 6/29/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Ann E. Staples, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Ann E. Staples who departed this life on the 25th day of May, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Thomas D. Jones on the 15th day of June, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 25th day of January, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Thomas D. Jones 240 N. Shores Court Seaford, DE 19973 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 6/29/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Doris F. Stewart, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Doris F. Stewart who departed this life on the 26th day of May, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto George F. Stewart, Sally Stewart on the 8th day of June, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 26th day of January, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: George F. Stewart 710 Cypress St. Seaford, DE 19973 Sally Stewart 900 N. Atlanta Circle Seaford, DE 19973 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 6/22/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on:

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE IN A ND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY 1 THE CIRCLE, GEORGETOWN, DE 19947 WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff v. TERRY MACHINE & FABRICATION, INC. WILLIAM N. TERRY and CAROL A. TERRY, Defendents.

: : : : : : :

C.A. 06J-05-001 Docket JD 2006A Page 213 Confession of Judgment (Publication)

NOTICE OF ENTRY OF JUDGMENT TO:

Terry Machine & Fabrication, Inc. William N. Terry and Carol A. Terry 7526 Gum Beach Road, Seaford, DE 19973

1. Plantiff, Wilmington Trust Company intends to obtain a court judgment against you in the Superior Court of the State of Delaware bassed on the note and guaranties for the principal amount of $10,753.18, accrued interest of $664.84, late charges of $201.39, attorney’s fes of $2,283.60 and costs of $501.08, together with per diem interest from Aprl 4, 2006, in the amount of $2.09089. 2. Plaintiff alleges you have waived your rights to notice and hearig prior to the entry of judgment against you. 3. The entry of such a court judgment will result in a lien against all your real estate and the means, in default payment, whereby the sheriff can levy aginst your personal property and real estate and ultimately sell atpublic auction your personal property and real estate for credit against the debt. 4. In default of payment in appropriate cases, the sheriff may seize some portion of your wages for credit against the debt. 5. You may appear in Superior Court, SUSSEX COUNTY COURT HOUSE, THE CIRCLE, GEORGETOWN, DELAWARE, FRIDAY, JULY 21, 2006 AT 11:00 a.m. at which time you may object to the entry of judgment and a hearing will be scheduled by the Court. At that hearing, plaintiff will be required to prove that you have effectively waived your rights to notice and a hearing prior to entry of judgment. 6. You are not required to appear, but if you fail to do so, judgment will be entered by default. 7. If you have any questions about these matters, you should consult a lawyer immediately. Very truly yours, /s/ Joyuce Collins Prothonotary

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006 Tuesday, July 18, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, lying on the northeasterly side of Sussex County Road 600, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument on the northeasterly right of way line of Sussex County Road 600, a corner for the original tract and lands now or late of Charles K. Elliott; thence by and with the northeasterly right of way line of Sussex County Road 600 (50 feet wide) North 23 degrees 05 minutes 38 seconds West 800 feet to a point; thence North 65 degrees 44 minutes 19 seconds East 654.00 feet to a point; thence South 23 degrees 05 minutes 38 seconds East 800.00 feet to a point; thence South 65 degrees 44 minutes 19 seconds West 654.0 feet to a point, the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Richard F. Bradley, Jr. and Teresa Bradley by deed of Anna L. Green, dated January 5, 1996 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware at deed book 2104, page 163. Tax Parcel: 4-30-8.008.19 Property Address: 14525 St. Johnstown Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 7, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 11, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax,

3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TERESA M. & RICHARD F. BRADLEY, JR. and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 7/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 18, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the Easterly side of U.S. Route 13 and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a point along the Easterly right of way line of U.S. Route 13, a corner for these lands and other lands of T.S. Smith & Sons, Inc., said point of beginning being 443.0 from the intersection of County Road 40; thence from said point of Beginning and running along and with the line of U.S. Route 13, North 05 degrees 06 minutes 51 seconds West 246.29 feet to a point, a corner for these lands and other lands of T.S. Smith & Sons, Inc.; thence turning and running with the line of other lands of T.S. Smith & Sons, Inc.; the three (3) following courses and distances: (1) North 84 degrees 53 minutes 09 seconds East 139.03 feet to a point; thence (2) South 05 degrees 06 minutes 51 seconds East 223.68 feet to a point; thence (3) South 75 degrees 38 minutes 50 seconds West 140.86 feet to the point and place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same

lands and premises conveyed unto Charles W. Smith, III by deed of T.S. Smith & Sons, Inc., dated September 17, 2001 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2637, Page 24. Tax Parcel: 1-31-11.003.01 Property Address: 16675 Sussex Highway, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 7, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 11, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHARLES W. SMITH, III and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 7/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 18, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain tract, See LEGALS—page 37


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36

SHERIFF SALE

piece or parcel of land, lying and being situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, lying on the easterly side of Route 461 being designated as Lot No. 32, SANDY RIDGE Subdivision, as shown on a plot of record in Plot Book 55, Page 288, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, and revised thereto will more fully and at large appear. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Mark J. Feathers and Brenda M. Feathers by deed of M.D. Enterprises, Inc., dated April 30, 2001 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2590, Page 18. Tax Parcel: 3-32-2.00168.00 Property Address: 32 Sandy Ridge, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 7, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 11, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARK J. & BRENDA M. FEATHERS and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 7/6/2tc

By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 18, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, known and designated as Lot No. Thirteen (13), as shown on the new plot of BROADACRES, as prepared by Atlantic Engineers Inc., R.A. Haber, Surveyor, dated May 1988, said new plot being of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 8, Page 118. Being the same lands and premises which Clinton D. Dunn did grant and convey unto Dorareno F. Savage by deed dated May 17, 2002 and recorded on May 17, 2002 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2798 Page 145. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00171.00 Property Address: 25403 Haven Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 7, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 11, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's

Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DORARENO F. SAVAGE and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 7/6/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 18, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, and lying on the Northeastern right of way of Route No. 20, being more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob, said iron stob located on the aforementioned Northeastern right of way of Route No. 20, said iron stob also being located at a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Sandra L. Elliott; thence turning and running by and along the Northeastern right of way of Route No. 20, South 80 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds West 152.77 feet to an iron stob; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Alvin P. Lyons, etux, North 10 degrees 30 minutes 45 seconds East 265.64 feet to an iron stob; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Lynn C. Baynum, etux, North 80 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds East 127.66 feet to an iron stob; thence turning an running by and along common boundary line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Sandra L. Elliott, South 05 degrees 15 minutes 32 seconds West 258.24 feet, home to the place of beginning, and said to contain 35,054 square feet of land, be the same more or less, with all improvements thereon, as surveyed, by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., Registered

âœł JULY 6 - 12, 2006 Surveyor, dated January 28, 2000. Being the same lands and premises which Between Ruark, Inc., A Delaware Corporation did grant and convey unto Daniel Scott and Sonya L. Scott, as tenants by the entirety by deed dated February 11, 2000 and recorded on February 15, 2000 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02461 page 193. Tax Parcel: 5-31-11.0011.01 Property Address: RT 3, Box 328A, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 7, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 11, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DANIEL & SONYA SCOTT and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 7/6/2tc

PAGE 37 vard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: BEGINNING for the same at a point on the southerly side of Cooper Street, a common corner with lot #1, and running thence for lands being herein described, as follows, to wit: 1. North 72 degrees, 35 minutes, 00 seconds East 25.00 feet along the southerly side of Cooper Street to a point, thence; 2. South 81 degrees, 46 minutes, 34 second East 24.42 feet to a point, thence; 3. South 15 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 140.00 feet to a point on the northeasterly side of a 15 feet wide alley; being a common corner with lot #1, thence: 4. North 06 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds West 131.15 feet to the point and place of beginning. CONTAINING within these metes and bounds 3500.00 s.f. of land, more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Raymond Daigle and Gina Daigle did grant and convey unto Gina Daigle by deed dated November 23, 2004 and recorded on January 7, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed book 03085 Page 211. Tax Parcel: 3-32-1.07248.01 Property Address: 506 Cooper Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check

payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 7, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 11, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of GINA DAIGLE and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 7/6/2tc

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale.

Call 629-9788

Town of Bethel, Delaware Bethel Town Office Main Street, P.O. Box 310 Bethel, Delaware 19931 PUBLIC NOTICE SCHEDULED MEETINGS OF THE TOWN OF BETHEL PLANNING COMMISSION The Town of Bethel has appointed a Town of Bethel Planning commission in accordance with Delaware state law. The Planning Commission will guide the preparation and later the implementation of the Town of Bethel Comprehensive Plan. It will also advise the Town Council on planning and zoning matters, oversee an update of the Town’s Zoning Ordinance once the Comprehensive Plan has been completed and be responsible for reviewing conservation, building and development activity. The Planning Commission will meet on the fourth Wednesday of each month at 7:30 PM in the Town of Bethel Community Center on Main Street. It will meet on the following dates:

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 18, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boule-

April 26, 2006 June 28, 2006 August 23, 2006 October 25, 2006 December 27, 2006

May 24, 2006 July 26, 2006 September 27, 2006 November 22, 2006

The public is invited to attend all meetings of the Planning Commission.


PAGE 38

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Changes are in effect in state’s dog control program Changes are taking place to to Delaware’s dog control program. The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control has awarded a new contract to the Kent County SPCA for a statewide dog control program (exclusive

of the City of Wilmington, which is responsible for dog control within city limits) effective July 1. A toll-free telephone number, 888-3527722, has been established for use in all three counties to facilitate the transition

for dog control to Kent County SPCA with a minimum of inconvenience to Delaware citizens. After June 30, the Delaware SPCA campus at Stanton in New Castle County and the Georgetown location in Sussex County will no longer be responsi-

DOWN TO WORK - A DelDOT employee works on the crossing at Chapel Branch on Rt. 20 in Seaford - one of the three key crossings marked as a priority for repair in the area. The repairs could take up to three months. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

ble for dog control issues. “This is a new era and an opportunity for improving dog control services in Delaware,” said Lynn Herman, environmental program manager, who has administered the dog control program under DNREC’s Division of Fish and Wildlife for two years. “We’ll continue to work closely with the Kent County SPCA to ensure that Delaware’s dog control program is meeting the needs of Delaware’s citizens.” Responsibilities for dog control under the contract include: picking up stray dogs; answering dog complaints such as dogs running at large; responding to dangerous dog issues; and inspecting dog kennels. Dog licenses are still available at dog license agents throughout the state, at DNREC’s front desk licensing service in the lobby of the Richardson and Robbins Building, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, or online. To obtain a list of agents or a license online, go to: www.fw.delaware.gov/services/Licenses. To report dog control problems, including the location of shelters to receive stray dogs, call the toll-free number, 888-3527722, or the Kent County SPCA Shelter at (302) 698-3006. If you have lost a dog, check the Kent County SPCA’s website lost or found page at www.kentcountyspca.com.

Reschedule Date from Friday June 23rd Personal Property Auction The Real Estate sold but the personal property was postponed due to inclement weather.

Thursday July 6th, 2006 at 5 PM -10596 Georgetown Rd., Laurel, DE Directions: At the Intersection of Rt. 9 (Georgetown Rd) & Rt. 13 in Laurel DE travel West on Georgetown Rd. for 0.3 miles to home on the left. Signs Posted.

FORCE OF WATER - The force of a 10-foot wall of water caused the east wall, above, of the Don-Lee Margin warehouse to buckle and the foundation to shift and, below, paper to wrap around fence and gate at the business located on Rt. 20 at Chapel Branch in Seaford. The business, along with two others nearby, suffered extensive damage from flooding on June 25. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

Contents of Home to include: Hastings & Co. Delmar, Delaware incised blue & grey stoneware crock, round oak table, 6 oak chairs, oak server, oak server w/display, Boston rocker, nice Broyhill matching upholstered sofa & loveseat, Broyhill floral chair, upholstered platform rocker, alabaster floor lamp, leatherette sofa & chair, smoking stand, console TV, nice upholstered sofa & matching loveseat, floral upholstered chair, platform rocker, pine coffee table & matching end tables, floor lamps, table lamps, arched window mirror, stainless steel Frigidaire Refrigerator, colored glassware, spoon rack & spoon, statues, McCoy ewers, German Coo coo clock, concrete jockey, Farm bell, hog pots one with tripod, colored glassware, claw foot bathtub, flamingo statues, Christmas decorations and more. Terms Personal Property: Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 3% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold “As Is” with no warranties of any kind. 2 Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Personal Property Preview: 2 Hours prior to the Auction!

View Our Website for Additional Information, Descriptions, Terms, Directions & Pictures!

Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers Phone: 888-986-SOLD(7653) Auction Site: 443-614-4340 www.marshallauctions.com


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 39

ENTERTAINMENT 12TH ANNUAL NANTICOKE RIVERFEST

Funsters are coming back to Riverfest on Friday night ■ 12th annual Nanticoke Riverfest, July 14 and 15, downtown Seaford. Events start at 5 p.m. on Friday night and continue all day Saturday. Website: www.nanticokeriverfest.com or call 629-9173.

There is plenty to do during the 12th annual Nanticoke Riverfest on Friday, July 14, and Saturday, July 15. The headline entertainment on Friday night is The Funsters at 9 p.m. and Altimate Choice on Saturday at 9 p.m. Both street dances are free and take place in the Mt. Olivet parking lot on High Street- the location of most of the entertainment during Riverfest. The Funsters, one of the most popular bands in the area, have been together for 13 years (with the same band members). The lead signer, Sherman Ward, grew up in Seaford, played in local bands and graduated from Seaford High School. Altimate Choice is making its Riverfest debut on Saturday night. Many of the members are former members of another Riverfest favorite band, Mike Hines and The Look. RAY OWEN PERFORMS Ray Owen, who performed at last year’s Riverfest, will return with his family-based entertainment and perform “The Song Imaginer” at 5 and 8 p.m. on Saturday. The Pennsylvania Songwriter of the Year performs at fairs and festivals throughout the United States and his latest album received a Grammy nomination. THE SWING CITY BAND On Saturday at 4 p.m., the Big Band sound will return to the streets of Seaford when the Swing City Band performs on the Main Stage. HERITAGE STAGE - New this year to Riverfest is a heritage

stage offering cultural performances at the Seaford Museum. The events are being organized by the Heritage Committee comprised from the city of Seaford, Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club, Seaford District Library and Harley-Davidson of Seaford. The schedule is as follows: 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. - Nanticoke Indian Dancers Noon - 1 p.m. - Arabian Lights Dance Co. 1:30 - 2:30 p.m. - Nanticoke Indian Dancers 3 - 4 p.m. - Kateri (music from the Andes) 4 - 5 p.m. - Pura Cepa (Puerto Rican dance ensemble) AMERICAN IDOL - Heather Ward, who was a contestant on the popular American Idol show, will perform on the Main Stage on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. just before the start of The Gong Show at 2 p.m. THE GONG SHOW - Do you remember “The Unknown Comic” from last year’s Riverfest (above)? Then you remember The Gong Show. This year’s third annual Froggy 99.9 Gong Show will take place on the Main Stage at 2 p.m. on Saturday in the Mt. Olivet parking lot. Cash prizes will be awarded for first ($150), second ($100) and third ($75) as well as other prizes for those who demonstrate their talents in singing, joke telling, juggling, dancing, etc. Entry forms (the deadline is July 13) are available at the Froggy studio or by phoning 410-572-6781. Check out www.froggy99.com/pages/gong.ht ml. GET HEALTHY - Nanticoke Health Services will have its popular Health Fair in the lot east of Gateway Park from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. The first 75 Continued to page 40

The Funsters will be the headline entertainment during Nanticoke Riverfest on Friday night with a street dance at 9 p.m. in the Mt. Olivet U.M. Church parking lot. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

PNC Bank is the #1 Small Business Lender and #1 SBA Lender. We lent more dollars to small businesses in Delaware than any other bank.* With credit decisions on PNC Bank business loans in one business day or less1 and a wide range of loan solutions, including SBA loans, PNC Bank makes it possible for you to get the capital you need. Having the #1 bank for small business lending serve your business. Easy as PNC.∑ Milford Dana Bijj VP Business Banking 119 South Walnut Street 302-422-1008

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All loans are subject to credit approval. *PNC’s Small Business Lending Rankings are based on fiscal year 2004 according to the most recently released government statistics for 2004 for small business loans of $100,000 or less. Rankings based on CRA small business data for Delaware and as obtained from the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) web site (www.FFIEC.gov). PNC’s SBA rankings are based on dollar volume reported by the SBA for the Delaware District for the period from 10/1/04 to 09/30/05. 1 Credit decisions in one business day or less on loan requests of $100,000 or less. PNC Bank, Delaware. PNC Bank, National Association. Member FDIC. ©2006 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 40

Seaford hosting Chesapeake Brass Band Saturday The city of Seaford will host the Chesapeake Brass Band in a concert at the Gov. Ross Mansion in Seaford, on Saturday, July 8 at 5:30 p.m. Formed in 1996, the Chesapeake Silver Cornet Brass Band is comprised of amateur and professional musicians from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware. The band performs a varied repertoire of contemporary and traditional brass band music throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. The public is invited to view this free performance on the lawn of the Gov. Ross Mansion. Chairs will not be provided and visitors are encouraged to bring blankets or lawn chairs for casual seating. The event is sponsored by the city of Seaford and the Seaford Historical Society. In the event of rain, the concert will be moved to the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club. Call Amy Walls at 629-9173.

Flash: Library hosting ‘Knighty Knews’ on July 13 The 2006 Seaford District Library’s Summer Reading Program will host the Rehoboth Summer Children’s Theatre, performing a show about a medieval tale, entitled “Knightly Knews.” This is an original story from the pen of playwright Steve Seyfried. An unhappy young lady-in-waiting dreams of becoming a reporter for the Medieval Times. A knight-in-training would rather be a farmer. A mysterious Orange Dragon is storming about the countryside. When these three find themselves thrown together, they all find a way for their dreams to come true. The show will start at 2 p.m. on Thursday, July 13. For more information contact Cindi Smith at 629-2524. This program is free and open to the public.

Free Theater presentation taking place at Bear Trap Film and theatre actress Maryellen Owens will be flying in from Los Angeles to star in the new musical “Einstein’s Breakfast,” at the 6th annual free Summer Theatre Festival in Ocean View sponsored by The Carl M. Freeman Foundation. Owens recently appeared in a cameo role with Liam Neeson and Timothy Hutton in the film, “Kinsey,” where she played an assistant professor. She also co-wrote and starred in the short-film “Beaux & D’aria” which won the Audience Choice Award at L.A.’s 48 Hour Film Festival, along with commendations for outstanding writing and performances. Owens is also a musician whose original song “Oh God in Heaven” accompanies the credits of “Beaux & D’aria.” Her original characters and comedy have been seen on stages and heard on radio stations where she has hosted drive time radio shows in Dallas and St. Louis. Owens’s theatre credits include playing Eliza in “My Fair Lady,” Anna in “The King and I,” and Alais in “The Lion In Winter.” Harold Schmidt, the author of “Einstein’s Breakfast” is delighted to have an actor of this caliber among the cast. “I’m very excited that Maryellen has accepted the role. I’m impressed with both the quality and diversity of her talent, and look forward to working with her on this project.” Free Theatre will be held at the Village at Bear Trap Dunes in Ocean View. Families should bring blankets, lawn chairs and picnics for the July 13, 14, or 15 shows at 7:30 p.m.

Riverfest is July 14, 15 Continued from page 39

families who visit and complete a heath survey will receive a bicycle helmet and all attendees will receive a NHS fanny pack while supplies last. Activities during the busy day include: Forensic nurse/ domestic violence information booth; Choking Charlie demonstrations; free blood pressure screenings; “Maintain Your Brain” teasers in conjunction with the Alzheimer’s Assoc., allergy information, skin analyzer (view the damage to your skin as a result of the sun); health screening voucher for testing offered July 29 (tests include prostate screening - blood test - cholesterol screening and glucose monitoring - fees do not apply. Nemours Health and Prevention Services will be promoting their 5-2-1 Almost None program offering fruit cups and washable tattoos. Follow the yellow webbed duck feet to the tent full of healthy and fun things to do. THE OPENING - The opening ceremonies at 10 a.m. will include a welcome from Mayor Edward H. Butler, followed by a presentation to Laurie and Malcolm VanSciver for the naming of the Children’s area to be the “VanSciver Children’s Area” in honor of Ben and Bethany, as Ben was behind starting that area for kids. Next the committee will present recognition awards to those sponsors who have been with the event for over five years. Following that the Greater Seaford Ministirium Association will do a service of prayer and praise in support of the military, community and nation.

ADULT PEDAL TRACTOR PULL AT RIVERFEST - Ron Breeding, left, and Alan Quillen of Seaford square off on toy tractors as they prepare for the first Hoober’s Adult Pedal Tractor Pull to take place at 2:30 p.m. on during the 12th annual Nanticoke Riverfest on Saturday, July 15, in front of Seaford City Hall. Special lawn-size pedal tractors will be provided for adults in three categories - under 18, 19 to 39 and 40 and over. Registration is $4 before the event at Hoobers on Stein Highway in Seaford and $5 the day of the event. Woodbridge FFA is coordinating the event. There is also a youth Pedal Tractor Pull at 2 p.m. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

Gospel music concert will benefit Nanticoke Center There will be a gospel music concert to benefit the Nanticoke Senior Center building fund on Sunday, July 16, at the Blades Fire Hall from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free; a free-willing offering will be taken. Groups scheduled to perform include Lights of Home, Precious Moments Band and Sounds of Joy. Refreshments will be available for sale during the break. For more information, contact Frances Fisher at 629-9794 or Doris Whaley at 629-4236.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 41

Laurel Star Sports

Children take part in a defensive drill during last year’s Delmarva Skill and Drill football camp in Laurel. This year’s camp will take place at the high school later this month. Photo by Mike McClure

Shown (l to r) is the Laurel Minor League all-star softball team: front- Marisa Lowe, Alyssa Givens, Nicole Ullman, Whitney Toadvine, Sara Jo Whaley, Allison Pusey; back- Leigh Ann Pusey, Gaby Culver, Kristen Collins, Sara Ellis, Alexis Hudson, Emily Pusey; manager Dean Culver and coach Glen Givens. Photo by Mike McClure

Shown (l to r) is the Laurel Minor League all-star baseball team: front- Bobby Townley, Leon West, Corey Mitchell, Wade Townley, Tyrone Jenkins, Colby Cambron; second row- Jacob Carney, Eric Wharton, Caine Collins, Kodi Brown, Jacob Adkins, Shai Mears, Austin Tanner; Coaches- Steve Cambron, Bert Collins, Neal Wharton, and Steve Adkins. See page 44 for results and photos. Photo by Mike McClure

Maryland District 8 All-Star schedules for Delmar (subject to change) 9-10 baseball- 7/6- Princess Anne at Delmar 6 p.m.; 7/8- Crisfield at Delmar 5 p.m.; 7/10- Pocomoke at Delmar 6 p.m.; 7/12- Delmar at Berlin 6 p.m.; 7/16- semifinals; 7/17- finals Major softball- 7/5- Delmar at Princess Anne 6 p.m.; 7/7- Delmar-Princess Anne winner at Crisfield 6 p.m.; 7/9- loser’s bracket 6 p.m. at TBA; 7/11- championship 6 p.m. at TBA; 7/13- second championship (if necessary) 6 p.m. at TBA Major baseball- 7/5- West Salisbury at Delmar 6 p.m.; 7/9- Princess Anne at Delmar 5 p.m.; 7/11- Delmar at East Wicomico (Winterplace Park) 6 p.m.; 7/13Delmar at Pocomoke 6 p.m.; 7/15- semifinals; 7/16 championship Junior baseball- 7/7- Delmar-Fruitland winner vs. Princess Anne at TBA; 7/9Delmar-Friutland loser vs. TBA 5 p.m. at TBA; 7/15- championship 3 p.m. at TBA; 7/17- championship game two (if necessary) 6 p.m. Senior baseball- 7/6- Delmar at East Wicomico 6 p.m.; 7/10- Delmar/East Wicomico winner vs. Fruitland 6 p.m. at TBA; 7/12- 6 p.m. at TBA; 7/14- 6 p.m. at TBA; 7/16- semifinals 5 p.m. at TBA; 7/18- championship 6 p.m. at TBA; 7/19- championship game two (if necessary) 6 p.m. at TBA

Delmarva Skill and Drill Football Camp starts July 24 By Mike McClure The Delmarva Skill and Drill Football Camp will take place Monday, July 24 through Thursday, July 27 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Laurel High School. Camp director Ed Manlove, Laurel High varsity football head coach, is looking forward to the non-contact camp which is open to ages eight through high school age. “I’m excited for this year. I really enjoy doing it (the camp),” said Manlove. “We have a lot of high school coaches helping.” The coaches include former Laurel assistant Nick Brennan (now at Milford) and Delmar assistant coach Mark Quillin. Laurel graduate Eston Ennis (Wesley) and Delmar grads Jon Ellis and Gabe Ellis (Frostburg) are also helping out at the camp. “It’s kind of neat to have those kids that we competed against come back and help out,” Manlove added. The purpose of the Skill and Drill football camp is to provide quality instruction in all phases of the game, regardless of the campers’ football experience. Campers will be divided into offensive and defensive positions based on age groups. “The purpose of this camp is to teach all kids, not just Laurel kids, how to play football and be competitive,” said Manlove. Brochures for the camp are available at all Laurel School District school offices. Registration forms can be mailed in with a $25 non-refundable deposit or payment in full ($90). Checks should be made payable to Ed Manlove and mailed to: Football Camp, 26 Elm Terrace, Dover, DE 19901. On-site registration is also available from 8-9 a.m. on July 24 at a cost of $100 per camper. Contact coach Manlove at 302-6780567 or e-mail coachmanlove@comcast.net with any questions or for brochures. Campers should arrive dressed to par-

Laurel’s Josh Kosiorowski keeps his eye on the ball during the Delmarva Skill and Drill football camp last year. Photo by Mike McClure

ticipate in a tee shirt, shorts, and football cleats or sneakers. Bring sneakers everyday in case bad weather forces the camp inside. Awards will be given to top performers in each positional group at the end of the week: offense- quarterback, running back, offensive lineman, receiver; defensedefensive linemen, linebacker, defensive back. Transportation and lunch are the responsibility of each camper. Cold water and Gatorade will be provided by the camp. Each camper will also receive a free t-shirt. The camp is done as a fundraiser for the Laurel High football program. Over 50 kids have been in attendance in each of the first two years. Manlove is hoping that number will double this year.


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Woodbridge’s Anthony Jefferson looks home as he motors to second base during a District III Minor League baseball game last week. Photo by Mike McClure

HERE’S YOUR SIGN- Laurel pitcher Tyrone Jenkins looks in for the sign during a Minor League baseball game last week in Georgetown. Photo by Mike McClure

MEETING ON THE MOUND- The Woodbridge infield meets on the mound during a break in the action last Thursday in Millsboro. Photo by Mike McClure

Soccer Sessions Soccer Camp to take place July 17-21 in Seaford The 15th Annual Soccer Sessions Campwill be held at Seaford High July 17-21. This exciting and fun experience is for players ages 6-14 and runs from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. he camp directors, Tim Lee (Seaford High varsity coach) and Gerry DiBartolo (Salisbury University men’s coach) will be assisted by current college players. For more information visit www.soccersessionscamps.com or call 302-629-5465.

Delmarva Skill and Drill Football Camp is July 24-27 in Laurel The third annual Delmarva Skill and Drill Football Camp will take place Monday, July 24 through Thursday, July 27 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Laurel High School. The camp is open to ages eight through high school. The cost is $90 in advance and $100 onsite (8-9 a.m. on July 24). For more information, call camp director Ed Manlove (Laurel High head football coach) at 302-678-0567.

Always Caring, Always A Cut Above Whether you are seeking a new home, acreage for a business or your dream retirement haven, placing in the hands of www.rayadkins.net your needs a creative, caring and knowledgeable native of the area will certainly place you in a prime place for success.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 43

Post 6 Sussex West Patriots win three games, move to 8-5

Sussex West’s Marcus Bounds rounds third base and heads home during last Thursday’s win. Also shown is Sussex West third base coach/manager Gary Waller. The team won three games last week. Photo by Mike McClure

All Sports Camp is back for another fun summer in Salisbury Does your child love to run, jump, kick, throw, and play? Whether your child is a sports enthusiast or new to the playing field, this summer All Sports Camp, offered by the US Sports Institute and the Wicomico County Department of Recreation, is the place to be. This one-week camp will be held July 31 through August 4 at Winterplace Park in Salisbury, and will teach participants more than 15 different sports from around the world, including bocce, flag football, baseball, lacrosse, rugby, tennis, soccer, cricket, badminton, polo and more. The camp is open to children ages 3-14. Camp times and fees will vary by age. All players will receive a free t-shirt and certificate. The All Sports camp is sponsored by the Wicomico Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism. For more information or to register visit www.wicomicorecandparks.org, stop by the Wicomico Civic Center Box Office, or call 410.548.4900 ext. 105.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to publisher@seafordstar.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Strictly Soccer Academy starts July 24 in Salisbury One of the Shore’s longest running soccer camps will return to Salisbury next month for the 15th consecutive summer. The Strictly Soccer Academy, for boys and girls ages 3-12, will be held July 24-28 at Winterplace Park. During the camp, the region’s top youth coaches will use their passion for the game to demonstrate and teach proper soccer techniques to participants. Participants will be divided into camps based upon age. 3 and 4 year olds will participate in the Mini Munchkins program, designed to teach youngsters the basics of soccer in a special session from 9:3010:20 a.m. each day of camp. Registration for this program is $85 and includes a camp t-shirt. Children ages 5-7 will participate in the Soccer Munchkin program, which is the perfect fit for first timers and soccer siblings. The camp is designed to teach participants the fundamentals of soccer in a fun, cooperative environment. The Camp will be held daily from 9-11 AM. Registration is $115 and includes a camp t-shirt and soccer ball. Children ages 7-12 will participate in the Cup Stars program, designed to teach participants proper soccer skills that will enable them to play at a competitive level. Day camp activities include World Cup Tournaments, Shooting Contests, Daily Soccer Matches, and passing, dribbling, shooting, heading and volley instruction. The registration fee of $135 includes a camp t-shirt and soccer ball. Camp hours are 9 AM-12 PM. Register now at the Wicomico Civic Center Box Office or online at www.WicomicoRecAndParks.org. For more information call 410.548.4900 ext. 105 or e-mail lsteffey@wicomicocounty.org.

laurelstar.com

The Post 6 Sussex West Patriots moved to 8-5 with three wins last week along with three wins by forfeit. On Saturday, Sussex West topped Elsmere/Oak Grove, 10-5 and 9-2 in a doubleheader. In game one, the Patriots scored five runs in the second inning. Blake Little doubled in Danny Hamilton and Wade Eskridge and Marcus Bounds hit a three-run home run. Kyle Hearn knocked in B.J. Jenkins with a two-run homer in the sixth to seal the Sussex West win. Ryan Messick went 3-for-3 with a run and an RBI; Bounds batted 2-for-4 with two runs and three RBIs; Hearn had two hits, a run, and two RBIs; and Jenkins had a hit and two runs. Wade Eskridge (1-0) got the win in relief of Jenkins, pitching four and twothirds innings of shutout ball with four strikeouts and three walks. In game two, Sussex West scored six runs in the second inning to extend its lead to 7-0. Bounds doubled in a pair while Elsmere committed three errors in the inning. Bounds scored three runs; Blake Little had two hits; and Kyle Hearn and Chuckie Jefferson each had a hit and two RBIs. Little earned the win in relief of Eskridge, allowing one hit and striking out four in four shutout innings. On Thursday, Sussex West earned a 40 win over Fox Post 2 (Dover). Little (21) allowed three hits and struck out five in six shutout innings.

Sussex West’s Matt Dodson is on the move as he attempts to steal third base during a game last Thursday in Seaford. Photo by Mike McClure

Jefferson caught a pair of would be base stealers in the top of the first. Bounds hit a leadoff triple and scored on an error in the bottom of the inning. Sussex West followed with two runs in the third and one in the fifth. Bounds went 2-for-4 with a double and a triple; Matt Terry and Jefferson each went 1-for-2 with a run; Hearn hit 1-for-2 with an RBI; and Jenkins added one RBI. Terry, Jenkins, Matt Dodson, and Hamilton each had one steal. See page 45 for more on the Patriots.

Laurel Pop Warner League plans to celebrate 25th anniversary Laurel Pop Warner, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, will hold a homecoming on Oct. 14. The league’s three football teams will play the Wicomico Panthers during the day and a dance will be held that night. The league is hoping to have players from each year present at the event. Former players, cheerleaders, and coaches with team pictures, rosters or records are asked to call league president Steve Gordy at 443-880-8266.


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

District III Minor League baseball tournament results The following District III Minor League baseball results were submitted to the Star: Laurel 12, Milton 1- Laurel bounced back from an opening round loss with a 12-1 win over Milton last Thursday in Georgetown. Caine Collins slugged a grand slam and Eric Wharton picked up the complete game win. Scoreboard- Winner’s bracket- first round- Millsboro 14, Laurel 2; Rehoboth 11, Milton 1; Woodbridge 10, Lewes 3; Lower Sussex 6, Nanticoke 2; Millsboro 13, Georgetown 0

The Laurel Minor League all-star softball team warms up prior to a District III tournament game last week. Photo by Mike McClure

District III Minor League softball tournament results

Laurel first baseman Eric Wharton prepares to make a play in the field during a Minor League all-star game last week in Georgetown. Wharton earned a complete game victory in a win over Milton earlier in the week. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel’s Corey Mitchell scampers to first bat in hand after drawing a walk during Friday’s loss to Lewes during District III Minor League baseball tournament play. Photo by Mike McClure

Winner’s bracket second round- Rehoboth 9, Woodbridge 8; Millsboro 5, Lower Sussex 4 Winner’s bracket finals- Millsboro 12, Rehoboth 10 Loser’s bracket- Georgetown 9, Nanticoke 6; Lewes beat Laurel (no score reported); Georgetown 16, Woodbridge 7

Laurel’s Jacob Adkins prepares to take a cut during his team’s Minor League baseball game last week in Georgetown. Adkins reached base in the at-bat and stole second. Photo by Mike McClure

The following District III Minor League softball results were submitted to the Star: Scoreboard-Winner’s bracket- First round- Laurel 21, Lewes 3; Millsboro 14, Milton 2; Nanticoke 5, Rehoboth 4 Second round- Laurel 10, Millsboro 7 Winner’s bracket finals- Laurel 8, Nanticoke 2 Loser’s bracket in Greenwood- Lewes 13, Milton 9- Brie Pavlik had 15 strikeouts and two hits at the plate for Lewes. Sasha Libkey and Tina Talbot also had two hits apiece in the win. Kelly Bossert had a pair of hits for Milton. Millsboro 9, Woodbridge 2 Schedule- Wednesday, July 5- Laurel vs. Nanticoke-Millsboro in championship game 6 p.m. in Millsboro Thursday, July 6- second championship game (if necessary) 6 p.m. in Millsboro Coaches- If you want to see your results in the paper, please send them to publisher@laurelstar.com or 302-629-9243 (f).

Delaware District III Little League all-star baseball, softball schedules The following are the Delaware District III Little League all-star schedules for Western Sussex teams (subject to change): Major League softball- 7/5- Lewes vs. Millsboro 6 p.m. at Nanticoke, Nanticoke vs. Lower Sussex 8 p.m. at Nanticoke, Woodbridge vs. Milton 6 p.m. at Rehoboth, Laurel vs. Rehoboth 8 p.m. at Rehoboth; 7/6- Lewes-Millsboro winner vs. NanticokeLower Sussex winner 6 p.m. at Nanticoke, Woodbridge-Milton winner vs. Laurel-Rehoboth winner 8 p.m. at Nanticoke, loser’s bracket games 6 and 8 p.m. at Rehoboth; 7/7- loser’s bracket games 6 and 8 p.m. at Rehoboth; 7/8- winner’s bracket game 6 p.m. at Nanticoke, loser’s bracket game 6 p.m. at Rehoboth; 7/10- loser’s bracket game 6 p.m.; 7/11- championship 6 p.m. at Nanticoke; 7/12- second championship (if necessary) 6 p.m. at Nanticoke Major League baseball- 7/12- Nanticoke vs. Millsboro 6 p.m. at Georgetown; 7/13- Woodbridge vs. Nanticoke-Millsboro winner 8 p.m. at Laurel, Laurel vs. Milton 6 p.m. at Laurel; 7/14- loser’s bracket game 6 p.m. at Laurel; 7/15- winner’s bracket games 6 p.m. at Georgetown, loser’s bracket games 6 and 8 p.m. at Laurel; 7/17- loser’s bracket games 6 and 8 p.m. at Laurel; 7/18- winner’s bracket game 6 p.m. at Georgetown, loser’s bracket game 6 p.m. at Laurel; 7/19- loser’s bracket finals 6 p.m. at Laurel; 7/20- championship game 6 p.m. at Georgetown; 7/21- championship game two (if necessary) 6 p.m. at Georgetown Junior League baseball- Winner’s bracket in Millsboro- 7/17- Nanticoke-Lower Sussex 6 p.m., Woodbridge-Laurel 8 p.m.; 7/18- Millsboro vs. Lower Sussex-Nanticoke winner 6 p.m., Cape vs. Woodbridge-Laurel winner 8 p.m.; 7/20- winner’s bracket finals 6 p.m.; 7/22-23- championship game; loser’s bracket at Nanticoke Junior League softball- Winner’s bracket in Rehoboth- 7/15- Laurel-Millsboro 8 p.m.; 7/16- Woodbridge vs. Cape-Lower Sussex Winner 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. LaurelMillsboro winner 8 p.m.; 7/18- winner’s bracket finals; 7/20-21- championship games; loser’s bracket at Milton. Senior League softball- Winner’s bracket at Lower Sussex- 7/15- Laurel-Cape 6 p.m.; 7/17- Lower Sussex-Nanticoke 6 p.m., Laurel-Cape winner vs. Millsboro 8 p.m.; 7/19- winner’s bracket finals 6 p.m.; 7/21-22- championship games 6 p.m.; loser’s bracket at Cape-Lewes Senior League baseball- Winner’s bracket in Laurel- 7/15- Woodbridge-Millsboro 6 p.m., Laurel-Lower Sussex 8 p.m.; 7/17- Woodbridge-Millsboro winner vs. Cape 6 p.m., Laurel-Lower Sussex winner vs. Nanticoke 8 p.m.; 7/19- winner’s bracket finals 6 p.m.; 7/21-22 chanpionship games 6 p.m.; loser’s bracket at Lower Sussex States- Major League baseball- 7/18-22 at District 1; Major League softball- 7/1822 at Nanticoke; Junior League softball- 7/26-30 at District II; Junior League baseball7/17-23 at Millsboro; Senior League softball- 8/6-12 World Series at Lower Sussex; Senior League baseball- 7/27-31 at District II; Big League softball- 7/27-31 at District I; Big League baseball- 7/15-16 at Dover


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 45

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor

Patriot third baseman Kyle Hearn waits to tag out a runner after receiving a throw from catcher Chuckie Jefferson during a game last week in Seaford. Hearn hit a tworun home run in his one of his team’s two wins last Saturday. Photo by Mike McClure

Post 6 Patriots fall to 3-5 with losses to Georgetown By Mike McClure The Post 6 Sussex West Patriots advanced to 3-3 with a 9-4 win over Milford on Tuesday, June 20. The Patriots fell to Georgetown Post 8 in a pair of games on Tuesday, June 27. In the win, Post 6 went 10-for-31 with seven steals including two steals of home in the win. Blake Little (1-1) struck out 11 and allowed three earned runs and 10 hits in seven innings of work. Milford scored two in the first and two in the second before Post 6 came back with one in the second. Sussex West added three in the fourth, four in the fifth, and one in the sixth before Milford scored one run in the seventh inning to make the final score 9-4. For Sussex West, Marcus Bounds went 2-for-4 with an RBI and two steals; Matt Dodson batted 2-for-3 with two runs and three steals; Chuckie Jefferson was 1-for4 with a run and an RBI; and Matt Terry went 2-for-2 with three runs, a double, and a steal. Taylor Jones also batted 2-for4 with a double, two runs, and two RBIs; Justin Bailey went 1-for-3 with a run, an RBI, and a steal; and Ryan Messick had one RBI.

Thursday’s home game against Sussex East was postponed and will be made up this month. On Tuesday, the Post 8 Georgetown Steevers came from behind to top the Post 6, 15-13, in a game that was completed Tuesday night after being stopped due to darkness earlier in June. Georgetown took a 2-0 lead and scored three runs in the fifth to win the second game, 5-1. In game one, Post 6 held an 11-5 lead through four innings but Georgetown scored six in the fifth, two in the sixth, and two in the seventh for the win. B.J. Jenkins went 2-for-3 with a home run, three runs, and an RBI; Marcus Bounds scored three runs; and Chuckie Jefferson doubled and drove in two. In game two, Danny Hamilton collected a pair of hits; Matt Terry had two hits (including a double) and a run; and Kyle Hearn doubled and drove in a run. Marcus Bounds also stole a pair of bases and Hamilton and Matt Terry had one steal apiece. Matt Dodson allowed five runs on five hits and struck out four and walked four in five innings. Trent Passwaters pitched one shutout inning of relief.

Hi, my name is Mike and I am a baseball addict. I know, in the grand scheme of things this is not a bad problem to have. Somehow, through two or three strikes/work stoppages, steroid allegations, unneeded expansion, juiced baseballs, and Bud Selig, my allegiance to America’s pastime has been unwavering. Sure, it was rough in 1981 when I was told that they were on strike and would not play baseball that season (or at least part of it), after all I was only eight years old. It was almost even more difficult to deal with the cancellation of the World Series in 1994, especially since I went to San Francisco that summer to see Barry Bonds and the Giants (I was even scheduled to meet Matt Williams). To this day I’m involved in at least one fantasy baseball league every season. Every once in a while, in my rare off time, I play APBA, the statically based board game I played as kid (except it’s computerized now). One year I spent Spring Break in Cooperstown, New York with some equally devoted baseball fans. That’s right, we went north where there was snow on the ground rather than heading south to the beaches. When I take vacation time nowadays I always work a baseball game or two into the mix. I have a yearly tradition of going to a Pirates game with my uncle and cousin who I see about once a year. If I get married I’ll probably want to do so on a baseball field, though I have yet to meet the heavenly angel who would allow that to happen. I guess naming my kids, should I be fortunate enough to have kids, Eddie and Cal may also be out of the question. When I was a kid I named my childhood dog Tug after the late Tug McGraw. After all the Phillies had just won the

World Series, what was I going to name him? I do have other interests. Occasionally I’ll catch something other than sports on TV and every once in a great while I’ll go see a movie if it looks like something other than the same old same old. But even on the big screen I can’t resist a good baseball movie (Field of Dreams and The Natural are two of my favorites). Sure, I like other sports. College and pro football are great, when there isn’t a baseball game on. College basketball is fun to watch, especially during March Madness. I can’t say I have as much love for the NBA as I did back when Magic, Bird, and Dr. J were roaming the hardwoods. I even worked in baseball for a year when I was an announcer for the Lynchburg Hillcats in Lynchburg, Virginia. The experience was one of the best and worst times of my life if that makes any sense. I loved being at the ball park and doing the play-by-play at the games but the long hours and lack of pay was too much to bear for even the most diehard of baseball fans. Sadly, the 2006 baseball season is already half over. The all-star game takes place next week in Pittsburgh and before you know it, gulp, it will be football season. Here’s hoping the second half of the season is kind to the Orioles and Phillies and not so kind to the dreaded Yankees. Quick hits- Speaking of baseball (and softball) season, the Delaware little league all-star tournaments got into full swing last week (once the fields dried out). I appreciate the phones calls and messages from coaches and officials giving me a heads up about the amended schedule. In the words of the late great Rex Barney, the Orioles’ former PA announcer, “thank y-o-u-u-u.”

Delaware South softball team falls in first round of Carpenter Cup The Delaware South softball team was eliminated from the Carpenter Cup Classic with an 11-2 loss to Lehigh Valley in the opening round last Tuesday. The tournament, which was played in Philadelphia, was reduced to single elimination due to the weather. Last year Delaware South won the inaugural tournament.

WWE’s ECW Live Events Tour comes to Salisbury on August 14 World Wrestling Entertainment’s ECW Live Events Summer Tour hits Salisbury on Monday, August 14. The lineup will include the ECW title match of RVD vs. Kurt Angle and the falls count anywhere match of Tommy Dreamer vs. Big Show. Other matches include Sabu vs. Test, Balls Mahoney vs. Mike Knoxx, FBI vs. Steven Richards and Justin Credible, and Sandman vs. CW Anderson. Tickets for the 7 p.m. show are on sale now at the Civic Center Box Office and online at www.wicomicociviccenter.org. To charge by phone call 410-548-4911. All tickets cost $25 plus fees. For more information visit www.ecw.com.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to publisher@seafordstar.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

laurelstar.com

LITTLE PITCH- Sussex West’s Blake Little comes home with a pitch during his team’s home win last week. Little earned a win in relief in one of the Patriots’ two wins last Saturday. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR

Seaford Bowling Lanes Tuesday Nascar High games and series Gary Smith 297 Michael Berg 842 Nicole Jennings 251, 706

Summer Senior Express High games and series Margie Tingler 267 Joyce Linton 742 Earl Radding 303, 809

Weds. Summer Adult/Youth High games and series Brooke Blackwelder 268, 774 Nathan Katzaman 280, 789 Mimi Blackwelder 264, 739 Lee Bibb 279 Bill Graver 279, 779

Thursday Summer Mixed High games and series Rhonda Messick 278 Christy Lewis 708 Ray Hill 302

Sylvester Hopkins 741

Bold N Beautiful B&B Team Tiffany Morgan Mania Chilly’s

Weds. No-Tap High games and series Mac MacKenzie 323, 1,167 Sherri Smart 340, 1,109

Wednesday NoTap

Star Weekly Lg. Spotlight Tuesday Nascar Just Us 25-3 Smart Construction16-12 What Ever 15-13 Just Do It 14-14 Nascar Fanatics 13-15 Jesse N Friends 13-15 Strikers 10-18 We’re Still Looking 0-28

Whatever 20-4 Fantastic Four 17-7 Gopher Four 17-7 Look Out 15-9 Unknowns 13.5-10.5 Fear the Handicap 13-11 Heavy Hitters 12-12 Nuttin But Family 11.5-12.5 Azz Kickers 11-13 The Young & the Restless 10-14 Slow Boats 8-16 Late Comers 8-16 Chicks R Us 5-19

19-9 19-9 17-11 10-18 10-18 9-19

Weds. Summer Adult/Youth Bibb Brigade Seven Ten Split High Dreamers The Mustangs

Smart Construction 26-14 Lane Rangers 25-15 Get R Done 22-18 Seaford Lanes 20.5-19.5 Double Trouble 18.5-21.5 Angel Eyes 17-23 I Don’t Know 17-23 The Muffins 14-26

Thurs. Summer Mixed

Summer Senior Express Silver Lining Guys R Us Strong Possibility Imports Seaford Lanes We 3

13-15 11.5-16.5 11-17 10.5-17.5 10-18

21-7 21-7 19-9 13-15

Peterson Point Joe Messick

14,142

Kenny Thomas Eddie Wilson Chris Walker Bo Bennett Garrett Sammons Mike Fletcher Andrew Motyka Chris Patchett Bob Motyka Jesse Evaristo Doug Wearn

14,004 13,904 13,590 13,108 12,922 12,634 12,514 12,482 11,702 11,466 11,268

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Star Sports Calendar July- 7/15- Riverfest Run- The third annual Riverfest 5K Cross Country race will take place during the annual Nanticoke Riverfest on Saturday, July 15, starting at 8:30 a.m. at the Chapel Branch Nature Trail on Woodland Road. The cost is $12 and registration is on race-day only from 7:30 to 8:15 a.m. The first 100 who register will receive a custom-designed Nanticoke Riverfest T-shirt. Medals will be awarded to the top three finishers in the men’s and women’s division and trophies will be awarded to the men’s and women’s champions. For more information, contact Vince Morris, the race director, at 628-0688 (after 6 p.m.). Race forms are available at the Seaford Star office and city hall. 7/18-20- Football camp- The Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club will sponsor a football conditioning skills camp for youth ages 6 to 18 on July 18, 19 and 20 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the club at 310 Virginia Ave. The cost is $50 which includes a T-shirt. Pre-registration is required and can be made by contacting Karen Schreiber at 629-8740. 7/28-31- Referee camp- A referee camp for new and experienced basketball officials is scheduled for July 28 through 31 at Wesley College in Dover. The camp is sponsored by the International Association of Approved Basketball Officials (IAABO) Board #129. The camp fee is $25. Room accommodations and meals are available at an additional cost. Meals are $10 all day, while rooms will cost $20 per night. Interested individuals can obtain an application by contacting IAABO Board #129 via email at iaabo129@comcast.net or write to P.O. Box 101, Milford DE 19963, or call 302-644-7757. 7/31-8/3- Field hockey camp- The Delaware Stingers field hockey club wants to help you build for the future. Over the past four years the DSFHC has grown to over 120 members from all over Sussex County, playing indoor and outdoor field hockey. The camp will focus on individual skills and team play. Players will learn the basics of field hockey: driving, dribbling, passing, shooting, etc. The Stingers are committed to making you a better, stronger player and to helping you develop your self confidence in the game. Camp will take place in the Woodbridge area. Campers must have a stick, shin guards, and a mouth guard. Camp will be coached and staffed by members of the DSFHC, many of who are all-state and all-conference players with lots of field hockey experience. Camp will run from 9 a.m. until noon daily. The cost is $75 and space is limited. Week one is July 31 through August 3 (grades 3-8), 9 a.m. to noon. You can download a camp application and find out more about the Stingers by visiting the club’s website at www.lloydlee.com/DelawareStingersFieldHockey.htm.

Kids’ summer activities at Delaware Tech offer options

CELEBRATION- The Nanticoke Minor League all-star softball team runs to the dugout after a win last week in Millsboro. Photo by Mike McClure

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If you’re looking for activities to keep your children occupied this summer, check out the camps and courses offered in July and August at Delaware Technical and Community College, Owens Campus. Openings are still available in team and individual sports camps including basketball for boys and girls, baton and cheerleading skills, baseball, golf, martial arts, soccer, and tennis. Academic and personal enrichment camps include math, science, reading/writing, history, Spanish, photography, high tech art, and computer technology. Swimmers of all ages can sign up for Red Cross-certified swim courses to enhance their water skills, stroke proficiency, and safety knowledge. New morning and evening weekday sessions are scheduled for July 10-21 and July 24-August 4; Saturday classes are offered July 29-August 26. For complete information on course dates, times, and fees, contact Corporate and Community Programs by calling 302-854-6966.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 47

Laurel fared better than neighboring Seaford in recent rains Last weekend’s rains (plus or minus 13 inches) were real bad, but I guess not bad enough for a name. I guess we can just call the weather disaster the Great June Flood of 2006. As much rain as Laurel got, it appears that Seaford got more and certainly more damage. Having the Nanticoke River near the city did not help any, I am sure. Delmar came out fine but Laurel had many roads completely flooded and fields, basements and many yards were completely under 6 inches of water and more. Seaford damage is another story and it has been covered in great detail in The Star. Laurel Police Chief Jamie Wilson said, “We were very lucky, we were expecting the worst.” It seems like the heaviest rains started at about Hearn’s Crossroads and for the most part stayed east of U.S. 13, although Todd Fleetwood would disagree with that as he lost 48,000 fourand one-half-week-old chickens. How many heating systems were ruined due to water damage only time will tell, but I know of many myself. I have heard all kinds of stories, “It is a 500-year phenomenon,” “It’s a 100-year rain,” and on it goes. But 94year-old Bethel resident Isabell Bell says the only thing she has seen to compare with it was the flood of 1933. Kendal Jones, our local historian, documented this Aug. 23, 24 event for us in an August 1998 article for the Star. I even started to get the pictures of this great flood out to run again, but maybe you have seen enough of this for now. According to Kendal’s story, Laurel was cut off from everyone when the Central Avenue draw-

bridge was raised and there AT URPHY was serious flooding all the It seems like the heaviest way to Easter rains stayed east of U.S. Hill north of 13, although Todd FleetLaurel. There was 17 recorded wood would disagree with inches of rain in that as he lost 48,000 less than 3 days four- and one-half-weekduring this time old chickens. and I do not believe there were graduate Carlton “Stretch” Elliott many ditches around like today in Garland, Texas. Carlton passed to carry the water to the river. away quite some time ago, but it Rossakatum Run behind 6th Street was the first indication of a was unknown by many in Laurel. I do think we should tell our chilmajor flood when it broke 6th Street apart and carried water to a dren and grandchildren a little height of 25 feet, yes it was quite about him, as he was probably one of the top five athletes ever a storm. to come out of Laurel High Well, I was looking to see the School. About a year and a half farmers back in the fields but I ago I called Carlton hoping to get know it’s going to be a while. a story on his life for the Star, but You may want to put a few piche was not very talkative and I tures of this one away for your put the information on file for fugrandchildren to reminisce about 50 years from now.

P

M

By the time you read this the annual watermelon seed spitting contest will be history. Well, maybe not history as I’m not sure anything this silly should make the history books. I have these seeds on my back desk that I confiscated from Seaford Mayor Dan Short last year. I guess I should throw them away, but I don’t think they would have done him any good anyway. This year’s Seaford Mayor Ed Butler should be able to get a seed to fly after a long career as a local umpire as he is still sputtering. I think I saw it in Sarah Marie’s column, but Bob Horsey got me to thinking about the passing of class of 1945 Laurel

ture use. The future never came and now he has died. Carlton spent 1946 at Temple University, 1947-1948 in the Army, 1951 at Virginia and in 1952, the gentle giant, at 6-feet 5 inches, joined the professional football Green Bay Packers. He spent four years in limited duty with the Packers and Rams. He was a three-sport athlete at Laurel. After football he got into the insurance business and he and wife Zel raised five children in Oklahoma and then Texas. He kept in contact through the years with Laurel, but in my conversation with him, he said, “I doubt if I will ever go back there.” I am told he was not well at that time. On Coach George Schollenberger, he said, “A great football coach, quite a person off the field.” Coach Schollenberger produced two professional football players — Ronnie Waller, of course, and the late Carlton

“Stretch” Elliott. And that’s in the record books! The Laurel Auction Block is set to open at 9 a.m. on July 11. It is the 66th year for the produce outlet for local farmers. Again this year, Tom Wright is the manager. Laurel has to fight to get good publicity, it seems. Now I am sure we have all heard about the Laurel policeman being arrested and there has been much talk of the 200-officer task force that was in Laurel on Wednesday and Thursday, June 28 and 29. Police officers were making arrests on a number of charges and there were a lot of “I told you so” going on in Laurel. My question for us all is, “What ever happened to ‘Father Knows Best’?” I leave you with that for the week.

Specializing In Glaucoma Treatment & Cataract Surgery Dr. Ortiz is a graduate of Swarthmore College and earned his medical degree from New York Medical College. He completed a one year residency in pathology at Yale University which was followed by a National Institute of Health fellowship in ocular pathology at the Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Ortiz completed his Ophthamology residency at the Scheie Eye Institute. This was followed by a glaucoma fellowship at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, England. He completed a concurrent fellowship in ocular immune disease at Moorfield’s Eye Hospital in London. Dr. Ortiz is a diplomat of the American Board of Ophthalmology and a member of the American Glaucoma Society. He has been practicing ophthalmology since 1983 specializing in glaucoma management and combined cataract-glaucoma surgery.

(302) 678-1700

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT - Laurel School Board vice president Jerry White, right, receives his Delaware School Board Association certificate off merit from school board president Calvin Musser during a recent board meeting. Board member Harvey Hyland (not pictured) also earned a certificate of merit. Photo by Mike McClure

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS.


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR

âœł JULY 6 - 12, 2006

July 4th Talent Contest

Griffin Dunn, first place in the 12 years and under category.

Alexis Hudson, second place in the 12 years and under category.

Katie Zerillo

Courtney Russum

Merci Lyons Cox, first place in the 13 to 20 years old category.

Chelsea Betts, second place in the 13 to 20 years old category.

Nicole Prettyman, third place in the 13 to 20 years old category.

April Stevenson

Audrey Ratcliffe

Brooke Carey

Courtney Hastings

Kelsey Dickerson

Mike McCrea, first place in the 21 and older category.

Half Link, second place in the 21 and older category.

Billy Propes


MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Littleton.

Laurel

Sarah Marie Trivits 875-3672 Watch it, get out of the way, because here comes July. June just sneaked hurriedly around the corner to make room for a new one: July; with picnic lunch in hand Comes hopping through the burning sand. She spreads her beach umbrella wide To keep her hide from getting fried. The Lunch Bunch Red Hat Society ladies have a busy July lined up for them starting with the Fourth’s parade appearance. On July 8 they will meet for their monthly breakfast at the Dutch Inn. On July 13, Denice Hill will be their hostess for all you can eat crabs at the Red Roost in Maryland. Then on July 20 they will attend the Red Hat Gala and fashion show at the CHEER Center in Georgetown. Their birthday celebrant for this month is Faye

Meantime, the Bonnets and Boas of the Red Hat Society participated with a float in the July 4 parade and on July 11 they will lunch at Suicide Bridge with hostess Flaudine Otwell. Well. I’ve been peeping around corners and listening at keyholes again and have learned that David Elliott, M.L.’s middle son and world-traveler, left London earlier this year, went to Copenhagen, Denmark, and is visiting a friend whom he met in his past travels. He is taking a vacation with his friend and family this summer. Also, M.L. tells me that her son Joe, in Flanders, N.J., will celebrate a birthday on July 10. (No numbers revealed.) Congratulations to Philip and Amanda Lowe whose nuptials were performed on Saturday, June 24, at Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel, followed by a reception at the fire hall. Best wishes are extended to them from Mom-mom Arveline and Pop-pop Jim. Flaudine Otwell recently entertained Louise Massey Rossiter and daughter,

Ann, from Buckston, N.C. While here Louise attended a get-together of the Laurel class of ’47 at the Delmar Diner. John and Kim Trivits, on a rainy Sunday recently, entertained Barbara, Randy, Kyle and Ryan Cartright of Hoopers Island. The occasion was a surf and turf dinner, the turf provided by the Trivits and the surf (some of the most delicious crabs I’ve had in a long time) compliments of Randy who caught and brought them. Even the sun obliged and shone most of the afternoon to make it a great feast day. One of my former classmates, Peg Johnson Dashiell, now in Salisbury, underwent back surgery at P.R.M.C. on June 29. Due to the fact that I have a very early deadline for the holiday, I’m writing this on that date and have no update on her condition. We all wish her well and a speedy recovery. Happy birthday to Hanna Lynn Moore with much love and many prayers on July 10 — from Mom-mom Moore, Aunt Betsy and Lee. A belated happy birthday to Yankee

PAGE 49 Doodle Richard Stone on July 4th - hope it was a sparkler. Very special wishes to a wonderful grandson, Matthew Trivits, on July 6, for a wondrous 12 years — from guess who? Me. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Carolyn Williams. We continue with prayers for those who are ill: Wilbert Adams, Terry Layton, Ralph Baker, Jane Foskey, Richard Cordrey, Enoch Schwartz and Hattie Puckham. Happy July birthday greetings to Clara Whaley and Howard Elliott, on July 5; Mary Boyce and Anne Lewis, July 6; LeRoy Neilson, July 8; Audrey Holloway, July 10; Paul Jones and Eleanor Brown, July 11; Minnie Jackson, Ruth Whaley and Irene Scott, July 12; and Laura Hudson, July 13. “Even if you’re on the right track, you’re in danger if you just sit there.” See you in the Stars.

Television commercials not what they used to be Is it just me, or do you find that so very many of the television commercials anymore are confusing? The more technical our world becomes, it seems the more confusing some things become. There was a time when we enjoyed the commercials on television. We found them interesting and entertaining. But, that time has gone from the television screen. Who among us can forget the commercial that brought laughter to many of us when the somber-faced husband of the household commented on the lumpy gravy made by his wife? That commercial struck home in lots of American homes, since many cooks have never mastered the art of smooth gravy. Speaking of gravy, have you ever thought about the varieties of gravy the average person has encountered during a lifetime? Give it a thought. As an example, my mother was a basically good cook. With four young children growing up in our home during the years of the Great Depression, she joined thousands of other young homemakers in being a creative cook. In those days, being a creative cook meant making something edible and tasty out of what was your average plain food. We never went hungry and she became

Moments with Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton a good creative cook. But, she preferred what we called runny gravy, while my dad preferred a thicker type. Sounds like a rather simple food to even discuss, but, good, moderately thick gravy as opposed to runny gravy can provoke a rather lengthy discussion. The key is that there be no lumps. Most of us housewives have faced lumpy gravy at times, and so we could sympathize with the man on the gravy commercial as he faced yet another bowl of lumpy gravy. We also enjoyed a good laugh at his plight. Another of my all-time favorite television commercials is the rather pudgy man who awakens early before dawn as he gets up to face another day, muttering, “Time to make the donuts.” Let’s face it, not every day is a day of sunshine and roses. Recently, it seems to me, the commer-

cials, for the most part, are pointless. The sound blares out so loudly that you must quickly reach for the volume control and the salesperson involved in the commercial rattles away so quickly that it is sometimes difficult to even know what in the world he or she is talking about and trying to sell. Thinking about those enjoyable commercials, I am reminded of the joys of shopping in some of the stores in what was once the downtown section of Laurel. As I think back in time, I cannot remember a single high-pressure salesperson in a single one of the shops that lined Market Street. The ladies in Miss Birdie Wheatley’s shop were all pleasant, soft-spoken friends who would be only too happy to help you go through the piles of undergarments that were down the middle of the store, stacked by sizes on those sturdy wooden cabinets. They never rushed you as you decided just what to purchase, and fining a saleslady to assist you was never a problem. Over at Ed Connor’s Pharmacy, one could sit up at the soda fountain or at the little metal round tables and enjoy a delicious concoction of ice cream. No one rushed you as you sat and enjoyed the dreamy treat, and chocolate ice cream bonbons were at the top of the ice cream spe-

ciality list. The ladies who worked in the store, when not busy, would even come over and sit and chat with you as you enjoyed every single calorie. At Charlie Heath’s drug store, prescription drugs were dispensed just as they were at Ed Connor’s. But the main event at Heath’s was the coffee enjoyed by locals every morning and the afternoon ice cream concoctions. Charlie Heath’s also had another specialty. More than one very pregnant resident of our community was sent to Heath’s Drug Store by her attending physician, with a slip of paper that called for the house “pregnancy special.” This was a root beer milk shake with special ingredients added and was dispensed with great care and only upon special orders from the physician. In short order, the patient was usually in the hospital delivering a son or daughter, the attending physician at her side. Television was still in its infancy, and Laurel’s shops used newspaper advertising or word of mouth, but times change. Heath’s has been gone for years, along with the milk shake “special” recipe. But the memories linger on. Sometimes the gravy is still a bit lumpy, but we move along with our lives. Lumps and all, it is a good life.

State parks offer things to do during long, hot summer With summer’s kickoff Memorial Day weekend past and the kids out of school, are you watching your gas gauge and wondering what to do with those three warm, wonderful months? How about a destination less than a tank away that offers swimming, boating, camping and a host of other activities, whether just for an afternoon, a weekend or longer? Sound good? With more than a dozen scattered through all three counties, there’s most likely a Delaware state park near you — and each one has its own amenities and scenery to offer. From the rolling wooded trails of White Clay Creek State Park in

New Castle County to the living military history of Fort Delaware to homey waterfront cabins at Killens Pond in Felton to the sunny shores and fishing lures of the First State’s four beach parks in Sussex County, you can pick and choose what you and your family would most enjoy. The cost for many activities at most sites will be a daily entrance fee of $3 a day for inland parks and $4 a day for ocean parks for vehicles with Delaware registration, payable at the gate or by drop box. (Out-of-state vehicles pay $6 and $8.) Season passes are also available. Most park areas are open from 8 a.m. to sunset.

For more information, visit the Web site www.destateparks.com. Sussex County • Cape Henlopen State Park, 42 Cape Henlopen Dr., Lewes — Activities include fishing pier, beaches, nature center, disc golf course and the Fort Miles historical area featuring World War II observation towers and the newly restored 184,000pound artillery “Big Gun.” • Delaware Seashore State Park, 130 Coastal Highway, Rehoboth Beach - Six miles of beaches bounded by Rehoboth and Indian River bays and the Atlantic Ocean, plus boating and fishing via the In-

dian River Marina. • Holts Landing State Park, on the south shore of Indian River Bay near Millville — Offers bay shore beach, grassy fields and forest; plus crabbing pier, picnic areas and wildlife watching. • Fenwick Island State Park, off Rt. 1 between Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island - “The quiet beach” offers swimming, surfing, sunbathing and boat rentals. • Trap Pond State Park, 33587 Baldcypress Lane, Laurel - Includes the northernmost stand of baldcypress in the United States, with birdwatching, camping, boating and fishing.


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Health Lyme disease not as frequent, hard to treat, as reported By Dr. Anthony Policastro Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Medical director

A few weeks ago I wrote about Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. It is caused by the dog tick. A question came in about Lyme disease, which is also a tick-caused illness. It is caused by the deer tick. Lyme disease has received a lot of attention in the media. It has been blamed for all sorts of problems. Much of that has been overblown. It is one of the diseases that does not really live up to the hype. The deer tick is very small — about the size of the head of a pin. Therefore, bites are not always that obvious. Most cases occur in New England and the Middle Atlantic states. It was discovered near Lyme, Conn. That is where it received its name. Even in that area it only occurs in 1 in 100 people. In other areas the chances drop to between 1 in 1,000 to 1 in 5,000. We would therefore expect fewer than 10 cases per year in our area. Less than 50 percent of the ticks carry the disease. Therefore, just having a deer tick bite means a less than 50/50 chance that the tick even carries the disease. The tick must feed for at least 36 to 72 hours to transmit the disease. Therefore, frequent tick checks can decrease the likelihood even more. There are various types of Lyme disease symptoms. One is the early local disease. This is a rash at the site of the bite. It usually occurs 7 to 14 days after the bite. It may occur as early as 3 days later. It may occur as late as 30 days later. The rash is in the form of a ring. The ring tends to increase in size over time. It may be associated with symptoms like fever, muscle aches, headaches and tiredness. It usually lasts for 1 to 2 weeks. The second set of symptoms are the early generalized ones. These are in the

form of multiple other skin lesions. About one in five patients with the first rash will develop these other lesions. They are smaller in size than the initial lesion. They are more likely to be associated with other symptoms. These symptoms include fever, muscle aches, headaches and tiredness. They also may include red eyes and swollen glands. The patient might also have a variety of neurological symptoms. The most common of these is paralysis of the facial nerve. That results in a condition called Bell’s palsy. Lyme disease is one of the less common causes of Bell’s palsy. Later symptoms are the ones that have gotten the most attention from the media. They involve primarily arthritis. Joints become swollen and tender. The knee is the joint that is usually affected. Unfortunately, some people have confused arthritis with arthralgia. Arthralgia means pain in the joints without swelling. Lyme disease does not usually cause arthralgia alone. This stage is also less likely to cause the fever, muscle aches, headaches and tiredness that the other stages do. Some patients think that if their joints and muscles ache and they are tired, that it must be Lyme disease. That is not very likely. The diagnosis is easy when there is a tick bite followed by a ring-like expanding skin lesion. No further testing is necessary. In those individuals with a less obvious set of symptoms, it becomes harder. The blood tests that suggest Lyme disease have problems with them. They are sometimes positive for other reasons. For example, one of the tests can be positive if you have had chickenpox. Once a person become positive for a test, that person tends to stay positive forever. That is true for any disease that we recover from. Thus, you cannot look at a blood test to see if the levels are changing. Once there, they are always there.

If someone has had a case of Lyme disease a long time ago, that person will still have a positive test. That means there is no way to know if their symptoms are due to

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 51

Walk along golf course will benefit state MS Society Imagine enjoying an early evening stroll across the cool and beautiful countryside near Rehoboth Beach. If you can put yourself in this picture, then register now for the AIG MS Twilight Walk at Baywood Greens. Presented by Pot-Nets Communities, this early evening walk begins at the Baywood Greens Clubhouse in Sussex County at 6 p.m. on Friday, July 21. With a recommended minimum pledge of $25, walkers will be raising money for the Delaware Chapter

of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Registration on the day of the walk begins at 5 p.m.. However, advance registration is recommended either by going online at www.msdelaware.org, or by calling (302) 655-5610. All of the proceeds generated by walkers at the event will fund MS research, programs and services for more than 1,250 Delawareans with MS and their families. As a chronic disease of the central nervous system, multi-

Policastro: Treatment for disease is effective Continued from page 52

really helpful when you suspect that someone really has Lyme disease. For people with vague symptoms and no history of tick bite, the tests have little value. Treatment is very effective. Once the diagnosis is made, it can be easily cured. Again the media has suggested otherwise. The reason for that is that people with vague symptoms often have false positive blood tests. When they do not get better, the thought

is that the treatment has failed. In reality it is just the fact that they did not have Lyme disease to begin with. That is why the treatment did not get them better. There was a vaccine for a few years. However, the side effects were so high that it was taken off the market. The best approach is to use tick repellent and do tick checks. Then you do not have to worry about all the misinformation that exists on Lyme disease.

ple sclerosis is unpredictable and disabling. MS is marked by the frequent recurrence of symptoms, which can range from numbness and tingling in the limbs to paralysis and blindness. MS also pro-

duces emotional repercussions because of the disease’s gradual deterioration of physical functioning in the prime of life. Although the progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS cannot

be predicted, advances in research are hopeful. The mission of the National MS Society is to end the devastating effects of multiple sclerosis.

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PAGE 52

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

State Division of Health offers tips for flood victims Delaware’s Division of Public Health (DPH) Environmental Health teams stopped door-to-door last week at Hastings Estate Mobile Home Park, Holly View Park and Mobile Gardens in the Seaford area, taking drinking water samples, providing water test kits and sharing information on food safety and mold. Residents should boil water used for drinking and food preparation if their well has been submerged or their water supply has been without power recently. Water test results will be made known to residents as soon as possible. Tetanus/diphtheria shots were given last Friday and Monday, at the Anna C. Shipley State Service Center, in Seaford. DPH provides the following guidance to help residents stay safe in the aftermath of recent floods. Safe Drinking Water If you are advised to boil your drinking water, heat water at highest possible temperature so that it bubbles constantly (a rolling boil). Continue to boil water for one minute, then let it cool. Store in clean, covered containers. Residents can also disinfect water using household bleach. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before using it. Store disinfected water in clean, covered containers. Bottled water is another safe alternative. Food Safety Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water. Food containers that are not waterproof include those with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops, and crimped caps. Also, discard cardboard juice/milk/baby formula boxes and home

canned foods if they have come in contact with flood water. Discard canned foods with swelling, leakage, punctures, holes, fractures, extensive deep rusting, or dents that prevent normal stacking or opening. If the freezer thermometer reads 40 degrees F or below, the food is safe and may be refrozen. Do not rely on appearance or odor. If the food still contains ice crystals or is 40°F or below, it is safe to refreeze or cook. Perishable food such as meat, poultry, seafood, milk, and eggs not kept adequately refrigerated or frozen may cause illness, even when thoroughly cooked. Keeping refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed. Discard any perishable food (such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs or leftovers) that has been above 40°F for two hours or more. Buy dry or block ice to keep the refrigerator as cold as possible if the power is going to be out for a prolonged period of time. Fifty pounds of dry ice should hold an 18-cubic foot fullystocked freezer cold for two days. If you plan to eat refrigerated or frozen meat, poultry, fish or eggs, cook the food thoroughly to the proper temperature to kill bacteria. Wash fruits and vegetables with water from a safe source before eating. For bottle feeding infants, use prepared, canned baby formula that requires no added water. When using concentrated or powdered formulas, prepare with bottled water if the local water source is potentially contaminated.

Seminars on malpractice insurance set Wilmington Trust is sponsoring seminars on captive insurance, a way to address skyrocketing medical malpractice insurance costs. The seminars will be held in Philadelphia on July 14 and in Baltimore on July 21. Wilmington Trust offers management services to captive insurance companies, or captives, through its corporate client services business. The rising cost of medical malpractice insurance is a widely reported problem affecting access to and the quality of health care services in the United States. One government study showed that premium rates for this insurance increased by 71 percent from 1991 to 2003. The trend has led to a number of unwelcome outcomes that observers say imperil health care delivery, including higher costs to patients and employee benefit providers, the premature retirement of physicians, the relocation of physicians’ practices to less litigious areas, the practice of medicine with inadequate insurance coverage, and the reduced availability or elimination of innovative medical procedures. According to the American Medical Association (AMA), the medical malpractice insurance situation has reached a crisis point in at least 20 states covering all regions of the country, with more crises looming. Specialty areas such as anesthesiology, cardiology, neurosurgery, and most notably obstetrics and gynecology, are under threat. “Rising malpractice insurance costs are inflicting real pain on everyone involved in

the health care system, from doctors and nurses to facility administrators and patients,” said Patrick Theriault, vice president and director of client services with Wilmington Trust’s Captive Management Services. “Captive insurance is becoming an increasingly viable alternative for practitioners and institutions that enjoy a favorable insurance profile and wish to take control of the claims management and loss prevention process. By banding together to insure themselves through a captive, their premiums can better reflect their true experience and not the market as a whole.” To register, call (302) 651-1970 or email jsmith@wilmingtontrust.com.

URGENT CARE H. PAUL AGUILLON, MD Sussex Medical Center

Clean Up Floodwaters can dislodge tanks, drums, pipes and equipment which may contain hazardous materials such as pesticides or propane. Do not attempt to move unidentified dislodged containers without first contacting the local fire department or hazardous materials team. Wash skin that may have been exposed to pesticides and other hazardous chemicals frequently and thoroughly. Call the poison control center for additional instructions. Wear protective gear and clothing, such as heavy shoes or boots, work gloves and safety glasses or goggles to help avoid accidental puncture wounds, cuts, abrasions, eye injuries and chemical exposure. Wear a hard hat when working under structures and trees. Select cool clothing that is cotton and tightly knit; long-sleeved shirts and full-length pant are recommended. Assure proper ventilation when using fuel-burning equipment. Use great caution. Fuel-burning devices in closed areas pose a great risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide cannot be seen or smelled, and can be life threatening. Provide plenty of ventilation when using a gas-powered pump for flooded basements or a gas-powered generator for electricity. Install and maintain carbon monoxide detectors. Turn off the main gas valve at the meter if you smell leaking gas. Do not turn on lights or use torches or lanterns since they can ignite the gas. Leave the premises immediately and notify the gas company or

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the fire department. Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of water. Allow to air dry. Mold Flooding is a leading cause of mold growth in homes. DPH offers the following recommendations to head off this growing problem: Open doors and windows or use blowers to force fresh air in. Run dehumidifiers and empty the water pan frequently. After water has been pumped from the basement, shovel out the mud and debris while it is still moist. Hose down walls to remove as much silt as possible before it dries. Floors and walls may need sanitizing, particularly if sewage has entered the basement. Scrub walls and floors with a 10 percent bleach solution or other comparable commercially available disinfectant. Oil stains in basements caused by overturned or damaged oil tanks may be a problem following flooding. Call a professional to remove oil residue. Dealing with garbage and sewage can be challenging. If toilets aren’t working use portable units. Beware that sewage can backflow through floor drains into basements. Clean with a disinfectant. Never mix ammonia and chlorine bleach, which produces poisonous chloramine gas. After coming into contact with sewage or floodwater, wash your hands well and use a brush to clean under fingernails.

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MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

PAGE 53

Letters Thanks all who aided Because all too often acts of kindness go unnoticed, I want to publicly thank everyone at the Seaford Mission for your help and assistance when my car became disabled on the hottest day of the year. It was deeply appreciated. It is my hope that this kindness will be returned to all of you a hundredfold. Jeanne A. Dredge Delmar

Open letter to Robert Stickels This letter is in response to a letter sent by William S. Topping, Georgetown Chief of Police, to Sussex County Administrator Bob Stickels and read into record at the June 13 Sussex County Council meeting. Chief Topping made the statement, “He (the sheriff) and his deputies are not trained as police officers and should not act as police officers.” Chief Topping’s quote is completely false. The sheriff and his deputies are well qualified and trained. Here are the facts regarding the deputies’ training and experience: Sheriff Robert L. Reed: Sheriff Reed retired from the U.S. Air Force. He is a graduate of the Delaware Police Academy and also the Maritime Law Enforcement School in Yorktown. He is a 14-year police veteran from DNREC and the Georgetown Po-

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net lice Department with Chief Topping as one of his supervisors. Sheriff Reed is the first and only Delaware Sheriff to ever attend the National Sheriff’s Institute training for Sheriffs. He has served as the Sussex County Sheriff since 1998. Lt. Jeff Christopher: Lt. Christopher is a 24-year veteran from the State of Maryland where he currently maintains his police certification and was a former chief of police. He attended the Eastern Shore Criminal Justice Academy, the Maryland Police Cadet Academy and the Maryland Natural Resources Police Academy. His training has included extensive police schools and seminars that include supervisor, administrative and field training. He is currently the president of the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 2, Sussex County.

Cpl. Kirk Pope: Cpl. Kirk Pope has more than 20 years military/law-enforcement experience and training. Retired from the U.S. Army, Military Police School. While in the Special Forces, Cpl. Pope was a member of a forward deployed (outside the continental U.S.) counter-terrorist force. His training has included various training schools and seminars to include Eastern Shore Criminal Justice Academy’s (Wor-Wic) Field Training Officers (FTO) and Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) Firearms Instructor Training Program. Deputy Pat Smith: Deputy P. Smith is a 20-year retired patrol veteran from Baltimore County Police Department. She earned an associate’s degree in arts in law enforcement and a bachelor’s of science in criminal justice. She graduated from the Baltimore County Police Training Academy. She was a member of the special response team (riot squad) as well as a K-9 search and rescue dog handler. She was certified as a field training officer for Baltimore County Police Department. Deputy Heather Massey: Deputy Massey is a 15-year police veteran from Capitol Police, Camden/Wyoming Police and Blades Police Department. She has a degree in criminal justice from Del-Tech and is a graduate of the Wilmington Police Academy and remains Delaware certified. Her training includes exten-

sive schools and various police training courses including field training officers certification. Her rifle range instructor was Chief Topping himself. Deputy Massey has received several awards for her police performance including two “Life Saving Awards.” Chief Topping’s untruthful statements could possibly put these deputies in danger while performing their duties. Some of the deputies’ duties include evictions, transporting prisoners, service of criminal subpoenas and protection from abuse orders. While doing so, a deputy sheriff needs and deserves respect from the people they are serving. Their life may depend on it. In neighboring states, deputy sheriffs have been injured and killed while serving court documents. As far as liability in any jurisdiction, who will be liable if one of these armed and trained deputy sheriffs, while performing their duties within a town’s limits, happen upon a felony in progress against a citizen of Sussex County? Should the deputy sheriff ignore the situation (as implied by Chief Topping’s letter) or should he or she act to prevent a crime or even possibly save a life? It is amazing how certain groups wish to diminish the office of an elected sheriff who is responsible to all citizens of Sussex County. Should we not con-

sider the life of a deputy sheriff the same as the life of any other police officer; or is deputy sheriff’s life worth less because he works for the Sussex County sheriff’s office? I challenge anyone to give one good reason why these experienced and trained deputies should not have their certification recognized. I would expect the Sussex County Council to have this letter read into record as they did Chief Topping’s letter. Sheriff Robert L. Reed Georgetown

Keeps Seaford in prayers I was staying at the Beyers home on Woodpecker Road last weekend and when I woke up (always the first to do) and looked out the door and saw a river running down the driveway. It was something I will never forget. I just wanted to give my condolences to all who suffered so much damage to their homes. I visit Seaford often to escape the grind of big city living and have fallen in love with your great way of life. I will be back in time for the State Fair in July. Until then Seaford take care and we will keep you in our prayers. Jack, Judy, Jack Jr. and Danielle Matoske New York

Thanks to all who helped with eighth grade party Thanks to the hard work and caring of Seaford Middle School’s eighth-grade parents, and the generosity of our business community, the annual eighth grade party held on June 7 was a great success. We would like to thank Central Elementary School for the use of their cafeteria and courtyard, as our building was being renovated. The students danced to the music of DJ Charles Michel and had pictures taken by Matt Atlas. We would like to thank all of the following businesses for their giving and hope that our community will support them. Avon- Kathy Porter, Dr. Susan Betts, Burton Brothers, C.K.F. Inc., Callaway, Farnell & Moore, Inc., Clark’s Pools, Cranberry Hill, Creative Carpentry, Cut ’N Up Family Salon, Dairy Queen, Davmar Developers, Dominos, Dover Pools, Duke’s Lumber Company, Dunkin’ Donuts, Farnall Mgmt., Inc., Food Lion, Fran’s Dairy Market, Frito Lay, Golden Corral, Grottos, Hair Studio, Hair Werkes, Happy Harry’s, Heritage Jewelers, Hertrich Family of Auto Dealers, High Strung Bead Studio, Home Team Realty, Karpet Korner, Lo-Mar Office, M.R. Hare Plumbing, Inc., Medicine Shop, Natalie’s Hair & Nails, Paradise Produce, Peebles, Pepsi Cola, Phyllis Parker, Realtor, Pizza King, Quality me-

chanical, Re/MAX Eastern Shore, Judy Rhodes, Realtor, Rita’s, Rite-Aid, Rose’s, Seaford Bike Shop, Seaford Bowling Lanes, Seaford Ice, Seaford Parks and Recreation, Serenityville, Solo Cup, Sussex Printing, Taco Bell, Tammy’s Nails, The Athlete, TNT Trenz, Towers Signs, Trinity Transport, Truitt’s Sub Shop, Tunes, WC Clothing Outlet and Wilkins Construction. A special thanks to the parents who took on leadership roles — Kathy Farnell and Terry Wilkins for door prizes, Jenny Werner and Melissa Wills for food and drinks, Chris Jones, Missy Lowe and Colleen DeMott for decorations, Tracy Wootten and Debbie Quillen for games and committee members John Torkelson, Susan Michel, Pam Van Vleck, Connie Halter and Kathy Ferber. We are grateful for the assistance of the Seaford Middle School PTO and the support of the SMS administration — Stephanie Smith, Kim Simmons, and David Grantz, and teachers who came out to help chaperone. Mrs. Simmons went above and beyond her normal busy schedule to make this a special event for our students. Good luck to the Class of 2010. Susan Hickey Eighth grade party committee

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PAGE 54

MORNING STAR

✳ JULY 6 - 12, 2006

Opinion The loss will be many millions

VIEWPOINT Storm water management issues are in need of serious discussion The terrible losses of property in the recent flooding in the Seaford-Blades area point to serious problems in storm water management that need immediate addressing. The problems are twofold: 1. Issues dealing with dams and ponds; 2. Issues dealing with storm water run off. With better coordinaAlthough many peo- tion and an action plan ple in the area have when bad weather is in been talking about the the forecast, the damproblems with the dams age and property loss in ponds in the area, it can be held to a miniappears the right people mum. are certainly not listening. And if they have been listening, they have chosen not to take action. We have to agree with those who spoke up during the public meeting on Thursday at the Seaford Fire Hall, the three groups who are in control of the dams and ponds are not communicating. Currently, dams are controlled privately, by DelDOT and also by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC). And there is no agency or set of guidelines or regulations that is over the three entities. When that happens, serious problems like what occurred last Sunday can take place. On Sunday, there was no coordination between the releasing of water at four key ponds - Hearns, Williams, Fleetwood and Concord. Because of that some damage was done that could have been averted. Officials were slow to react to opening the gates at Hearns Pond (at least two hours after calls were made) as well at Williams Pond. Although the gates were pulled quickly at Fleetwood Pond (privately owned), the same response did not come at Concord Pond. Granted, during an event with 10 or more inches of rain, there is going to be major flooding with damage. But with better coordination and an action plan when bad weather is in the forecast, the damage and property loss can be held to a minimum. According to Robert Stickels, the Sussex County administrator, there is legislation pending that will address some of the issues dealing with the dam problems in Sussex County. We urge our local elected officials to get busy and address this issue. With the loss of forests and wetlands and the growth in the area, it seems prudent for local, county and state officials to sit down and map out a storm water management plan. Obviously, the one on the books currently does not work. The excessive flooding in the area of Wal-Mart and other businesses along the U.S. 13 corridor is proof of that. And with more development coming in the very near future along the highway, it is imperative that officials get serious about finding solutions to storm water management issues.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) morningstarpub@ddmg.net Subscriptions - $17 a year in-county, $22 a year in Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, Sharptown and Delmar, Md.; $27 elsewhere out of state.

What was the number one question last week? Is your basement pumped out? Anyone in the Seaford area who did not have some sort of sump pump or french drain system to get rid of water around their basement had a problem following the terrible rain storm on June 25. And even some sump pumps could not keep up with the influx of water pouring in. My basement is usually dry (as long as I keep my gutters cleaned out), but I was flooded out with about eight inches of water on Sunday afternoon. Just about everyone I have spoken with who has a basement or low-lying crawl space had water. Then as the water seeped in, and more rain fell on Tuesday, there was a little more to vacuum up on Wednesday and then pump out with my fancy rigged up system. Like many other people I was up into the wee hours on Monday pumping out my basement. Some people had serious problems with collapsed basement walls and many others had water-damaged heating and air conditioning equipment. The personal losses from this storm will be in the tens of millions when it’s all totaled up. Plumbers were busy Sunday, Monday and Tuesday going from house to house pumping out basements non-stop into the late night. Ron Marvel and Doug Butler from the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department said that were inundated with phone calls from people wanting the fire department to come by and pump out their basements. They are not in the business of pumping out basements. Ron told me that some people were having a difficult time understanding that. People who lived anywhere near a stream, culvert or ditch had water problems - and that’s a lot of people in the western Sussex area. It’s hard to even get a handle on the extent of the damage because it’s so widespread. An assessment team of state and county officials has been working all week to come up with a report of the damage. VICTIMS HAVE THEIR SAY I was not shocked at the turnout of people during the information meeting last Thursday at the Seaford Fire President Bryant Richardson Vice President Pat Murphy Secretary Tina Reaser

Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson Executive Editor Ronald MacArthur

Managing Editor Mike McClure Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Kay Wennberg Cindy Lyons Taylor Circulation Karen Cherrix

Hall. It was also not shocking that there ONALD AC RTHUR were some upset people who have some People who lived anyquestions that no one where near a stream, culseems to have answers vert or ditch had water for at this point. problems - and that’s a Many of the toughlot of people in the westest questions seem to be coming from people ern Sussex area. who live in the area of Brickyard Road east of Blades in the three mobile home parks. They and going. are fed up with water problems they The good news is that if a federal have dealt with over the years. This disaster is declared, homeowners latest storm is the worst in a series will be eligible for funds to replace of problems according to many peosome of their losses. Let’s keep our ple who spoke during the meeting. fingers crossed that this occurs Many other people, who live quickly. In the meantime, keep along the shorelines of ponds such records of everything you spend and as Williams and Concord, were uptake photographs. set about the coordination of allowing water through dams. The dam WHY IT HAPPENED - So why was opened at Fleetwood Pond did it happen? Well, the obvious an(which eventually empties into Conswer is that when it rains over five cord Pond) but not at Concord Pond or six inches in a short period of (or at least not soon enough) and the time, bad things usually happen. same thing happened between When it rains over 10 inches, really Hearns Pond and Williams Pond. bad things happen. Officials admitted, including We live in a watershed where Sussex County Administrator Bob water from a large area empties into Stickels, that there is a problem of the Nanticoke River. The Seafordcoordination between agencies Blades-Woodland area is the dropwhen it comes to dams. Some are off point for the water as it makes privately controlled (such as its trip to the Nanticoke. Williams and Fleetwood) while othThe watershed includes the area ers are state maintained. north to Greenwood and Milford, Insurance was another major east to Georgetown, west to the point of debate. The bad news for Maryland line and south to Delmar. most people is that homeowners inBut, I think there is more to the surance does not cover flood damstory. The growth and development age. I guess the insurance industry in the area has to be a contributing determines that heavy rain is autofactor. We are cutting down forests matically classified as a flood. One and doing away with wetlands man stood up and said that his inwhich are the natural filters for wasurance agent told him that his damter. age was not from a flood and his More and more land is paved and flood insurance would not cover it. developed so that water is routed to Many people also complained to retention ponds and central areas the insurance department officials and not spread over wide areas. present at the meeting that they had I think the problems with Hearns tried to buy flood insurance over the and William’s ponds are directly reyears and were turned down. Aclated to development issues. cording to the insurance department, Obviously, 10-13 inches of rain everyone is eligible for flood insuris going to have a dramatic impact ance regardless where they live. And here is a tidbit that I was not on an area. Experts are calling the storm without an official name a aware of. Flood insurance does not 100-year-plus storm. What piece decover basements unless items (such velopment plays in the impact is a as hot water heaters, etc.) are atmatter of opinion from where you tached to the walls. It appears the sit on the issue. insurance industry has you coming

R

Sales George Beauchamp Barbara Conn Rick Cullen Carole Kauffman Jimmy McWilliams Debbie Bell Composition Rita Brex Catherine Doyle

Laurel Star Advisory Board Dale Boyce Sandy Davis Toni Gootee H. Robert Hickman Jane Hudson Linda Justice Albert Jones Kendal Jones Mike Lambert

M

Janet Lee Don Phillips Cora Selby Richard Small Debbie Waller Seaford Star Advisory Board Shirley Baynum Beverly Blades Tommy Cooper

A

Edward Cranston Mike Hall Nancy Harper John Hollis Karen Johnston Jan Lundquist Ron Marvel John Rittenhouse Bill Royal Steve Theis Layton Wheeler

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR

âœł JULY 5 - 12, 2006

PAGE 55

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Variable clouds, a thunderstorm

Partly sunny and pleasant

Partly sunny

Mostly sunny

Humid with plenty of sunshine

Clouds yielding to sun

Humid with some sun

81/60

83/61

86/64

89/68

89/69

89/70

87/65

Almanac Statistics through Tuesday July 4 at Georgetown, Delaware

Temperatures

Precipitation

High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average temperature . . . . . . . .

. 92° . 63° . 85° . 63° 78.0°

Total for the week . . . . . . . . . . 1.50� Total for the month . . . . . . . . . . 0.13� Normal for the month . . . . . . . . 0.30� Total for the year . . . . . . . . . . 23.52�

Smyrna 80/63 Dover 80/63

Time 1:36 p.m. 9:03 a.m. 2:29 p.m. 9:24 p.m.

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Date September 7 September 22 October 6 October 19

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .5:44 a.m. .5:45 a.m. .5:45 a.m. .5:46 a.m. .5:47 a.m. .5:47 a.m. .5:48 a.m.

Full July 10

Harrington 81/63

Time 11:08 p.m. 1:22 a.m. 10:08 a.m. 5:36 a.m.

Milford 80/63 Greenwood 80/62

Lewes 78/63

Bridgeville 80/60

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

Set .8:30 p.m. .8:30 p.m. .8:29 p.m. .8:29 p.m. .8:29 p.m. .8:28 p.m. .8:28 p.m.

Last July 17

High Low High Low 10:31 a 5:23 a 11:08 p 5:05 p 11:29 a 6:16 a —- 5:57 p 12:01 a 7:07 a 12:25 p 6:50 p 12:54 a 7:56 a 1:18 p 7:43 p 1:45 a 8:44 a 2:10 p 8:35 p 2:35 a 9:31 a 3:00 p 9:27 p 3:24 a 10:19 a 3:50 p 10:20 p High 1:50 p 2:48 p 3:44 p 4:37 p 5:29 p 6:19 p 7:09 p

Low 7:58 p 8:50 p 9:43 p 10:36 p 11:28 p —1:12 p

High 1:12 p 2:10 p 3:06 p 3:59 p 4:51 p 5:41 p 6:31 p

Low 7:20 p 8:12 p 9:05 p 9:58 p 10:50 p 11:42 p —-

Vienna, MD

The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Date July 13 July 29 August 10 August 25

Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursday’s weather. High Low Temperatures are Thursday’s highs Day and Thursday night’s lows. Thurs. 1:35 a 8:16 a Fri. 2:27 a 9:09 a Sat. 3:20 a 10:00 a Sun. 4:13 a 10:49 a Mon. 5:04 a 11:37 a Tues. 5:54 a 12:24 p Wed. 6:43 a 12:20 a

Apogee and Perigee

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

Moon Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

Rise . . .4:25 p.m. . . .5:34 p.m. . . .6:42 p.m. . . .7:46 p.m. . . .8:42 p.m. . . .9:29 p.m. . .10:06 p.m.

New July 25

. . . . . . .

Set .1:38 a.m. .2:10 a.m. .2:50 a.m. .3:40 a.m. .4:43 a.m. .5:55 a.m. .7:13 a.m.

First Aug 2

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0DNHODVWLQJPHPRULHVZLWK WKHRQHV\RXORYHDWWKH 9LOODJH $Q$GXOW0DLQWHQDQFH)UHH &RPPXQLW\MXVWPLQXWHVIURPWKH %HDXWLIXO'HODZDUH6HDVKRUH 2QO\XQLWVUHPDLQLQ3KDVH% VWDUWLQJDW &DOOIRUPRUH LQIRUPDWLRQRUYLVLWXVRQWKHZHEDW ZZZFLQGHUEHUU\FRP

Rehoboth Beach 79/62

SEAFORD 81/60 Blades 81/60

Georgetown 80/62 Concord 82/60 Laurel 81/59 Delmar 81/59

Millsboro 79/62

Bethany Beach 79/63 Fenwick Island 79/62

Day High Low Thurs. 12:57 a 7:38 a Fri. 1:49 a 8:31 a Sat. 2:42 a 9:22 a Sun. 3:35 a 10:11 a Mon. 4:26 a 10:59 a Tues. 5:16 a 11:46 a Wed. 6:05 a 12:34 p

Rehoboth Beach Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High Low 3:13 a 9:07 a 4:06 a 9:58 a 4:57 a 10:50 a 5:47 a 11:42 a 6:38 a 12:47 a 7:29 a 1:35 a 8:20 a 2:22 a

High 3:51 p 4:41 p 5:31 p 6:21 p 7:11 p 8:01 p 8:50 p

Low 10:10 p 11:06 p 11:58 p —12:33 p 1:23 p 2:14 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š2006

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GEMCRAFT HOMES - ES Pub Ins: 7/3

PROOF # 2 Date: 6/30


July 6, 2006