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VOL. 14 NO. 50

THURSDAY, JULY 15, 2010

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News POLITICS - State Rep. Biff Lee (R-Laurel) has filed for re-election. Page 3 HOUSING - Sussex County Habitat for Humanity is looking to partner with families in Laurel. Page 3 CRIME - Summertime brings heat and increased criminal activities. Page 4 HEROES - Childhood tales sparked Kendal Jones’ desire to preserve Laurel’s history. Page 8 GOSPEL MUSIC - Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival announces gospel entertainers. Page 11 POLITICS - State Representative Danny Short to run for re-election. Page 21 POLICE - Police are searching for three men for home invasion and sexual assault. Page 34 SERVICES - Funeral services Friday for soldier who was ‘swept away’ during mission. Page 45

Sports LITTLE LEaGUE - Coverage of the Little League all-star and Pat Knight tournaments begin on page 24. Coaches are asked to send game results to the Star at sports@mspublications.com or 302-6299243 (f). CaMP BaRNES - The annual Camp Barnes race took place at the Delaware International Speedway last weekend. See results on page 29. TUESday GaMES - The Laurel Major League all-star softball team was slated to face Lewes in the District III championship on Tuesday. Page 31

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Bulletin Board 14 kcherrix@mspublications.com ChurCh 18 C lassifieds 39-45 Laurel Star News f inal W ord 47 editor@mspublications.com Gas lines 17 Laurel Star Sports Gourmet 38 sports@mspublications.com health 32 letters 46 Advertising sales@mspublications.com lynn Parks 13 mike Barton 21 Business Report movies 7 businessreport@mspublications.com oBituaries 19 Business Journal oPen houses 10 brichardson@mspublications.com PeoPle 12 PoliCe 34 Puzzles 31 snaPshots 22 soCials 21 sPorts 24-31 tides 27 tony Windsor 23

POP WaRNER HELPS RaISE MONEy - Representatives of Laurel Pop Warner recently worked during the Laurel July Fourth community event to raise money to support the town’s fireworks campaign. The group solicited from the people in attendance during the evening of the event and were able to raise more than $600. Pictured here, Jamie Smith, Laurel Operations manager, accepts the Laurel Pop Warner contribution from Jeff Gordy (right), Laurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee football coach; Marie Gordy (left), Laurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee Cheerleader coach; and Courtney Gordy, student demonstrator for Junior Pee Wee Cheerleaders. Photo by Tony Windsor

Laurel took leap of faith and it paid off with annual celebration By Tony E. Windsor The sluggish economy has created a financial situation warranting cutback in areas of operating budgets in communities throughout the country. Such is the case for the Town of Laurel. But, Laurel’s Mayor made a decision back in March that regardless of the economic picture there would be a Laurel Independence Day celebration.

In late December, 2009, the Laurel Mayor and Council received the news that the Laurel Chamber of Commerce would no longer be able to coordinate the annual event. After 15 years the Chamber felt a need to place more of a focus on its relationship with area business. The work to put on the annual 4th of July event was very time consuming.

WHAT’S HAPPENING.... Turn to our Bulletin Board every Thursday to see what’s happening this weekend.

Though this would put the town in the position of starting extremely late in planning for an event, it was decided that the event should continue. Mayor John Shwed immediately began calling on members of the community to step up and share in the coordination and operation of the 2010 event. The Laurel Volunteer Fire Department Continued on page 5

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MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 3

Biff Lee files for re-election State Rep. Biff Lee (R-Laurel) has filed with the Department of Elections to retain his 40th District seat. During 2010, Rep. Lee was a co-sponsor of a package of nine new laws motivated by the victimization of more than 100 children by accused pedofile and former pediatrician Earl Bradley. Lee also co-sponsored a new law designed to curtail the rash of copper thefts in Delaware. The statute requires scrap dealers to photograph every seller and report every transaction involving the purchase of copper and some other metals. Citing rising spending and taxes, Rep. Lee has voted against each of the state’s last two operating budgets. In 2009, Rep. Lee said the state enacted a tax and fee package totaling more than $200 million and this year state spending increased by more than $200 million. Lee wants to return to office to continue representing his constituents and acting as a voice of dissent for actions he says are taking Delaware in the wrong direction. Lee was first elected to office in 1990. If successful in the Nov. 2 contest, he’ll become the most tenured member of the House of Representatives’ Sussex County delegation and the House Republican Caucus. A full-time state representative, Lee is a retired Delaware State Police veteran. During a 20-year career, Lee rose through the ranks from trooper to sargeant. Lee has also served the community as an active volunteer with the Laurel Fire Co. During more than three decades, he has held many positions with the organization, including company president.

Kiwanis anniversary - Shown (l to r) are the Delmar Kiwanis Club’s past Lieutenant Governors who were honored during the club’s 60th anniversary dinner on Monday: Bob Boody, Gary Horseman Sr., Wayne Bradley and Tommy Young. The club received its charter in July 1950. “This club has spirit and that’s a big thing in holding an organization together,” said District Foundation representative Ralph Chinn. See additional photos on page 22. Photo by Mike McClure

Habitat seeks families in Laurel Sussex County Habitat for Humanity (SCHFH) is looking to partner with several families who have a need for simple, decent and affordable housing in Laurel. To qualify, a family must live or work in Sussex County; have a gross income of between $17,100 and $38,700 annually (depending on family size) and be willing to provide “sweat equity” by working on a Habitat home. Habitat for Humanity offers a no-

profit, no-interest mortgage and seeks to serve families who may be in living conditions that are substandard, overcrowded or life-threatening. The three or four bedroom Habitat townhomes offer two baths and a first floor bedroom. Six twin townhomes are scheduled to be built in partnership with qualified buyers in the next 18 months. Monthly mortgage payments on the Habitat twin

townhomes average between $400 and $450. Habitat for Humanity works closely with its partner families. Future homeowners will receive: classes to prepare for home ownership; training on construction and home maintenance; and a sponsor to help them through the process and tools to use when building their home. To apply, call SCHFH at 8551153, ext. 204.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

Summertime brings heat and increased criminal activities By Tony E. Windsor

It is summer time and for many that means family gatherings and outdoor community celebrations. But, for the Laurel Police Department it can mean enhanced criminal activities. In the span of three days the police department investigated crimes including: • A burglary on Tuesday, July 5, at Combined Formula Entertainment on West 7th Street, where $3,000 in clothing and jewelry was taken. • A robbery at about 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 5, that occurred in the parking lot of the Ram Deli on North Central Avenue. According to police, a man was sitting in his car counting money when an unidentified black male approached him and grabbed his money and a cell phone. The man, according to the victim, fled on foot running toward the Carvel Garden Apartment complex. He was unable to give any further description of the suspect. • A robbery in progress at Carvel Gardens Apartment Complex at about 12:35 p.m., Wednesday, July 6. According to police, when they arrived the victim of the robbery said he was working in the area of the 2100 building and was approached by two black men. One of the men grabbed the man and forced him into the basement area of the building. The assailant then took an undisclosed amount of cash and fled. Police were able to use description information from the victim of one of the two suspects. A short time later a K-9 officer located the man walking in the area of Hollybrook Farms Apartments. When the officer approached the man he ran. The officer deployed his K-9 who apprehended the suspect. Police said as the dog caught up with the suspect the man struck the dog twice with a closed fist to the head. He then ran toward the Carvel Gardens complex. In order to assure the safety of the bystanders who had by this time gathered in the area he recalled the K-9. The victim of the robbery flagged down another officer who was responding to the scene and told him he saw the man run into the stairwell of the 700 building. Officers checked that location and found the suspect hiding under the steps and arrested him. The suspect is identified as Dontrez Archer, 21, of Delmar, Md. He was charged with second-degree robbery, resisting arrest and second-degree assault on a law officer (K-9). He was committed to Sussex Correctional Institute on 11,000 secured bond. • A second robbery at Carvel Gardens Apartment Complex occurring at about 2:36 p.m. on Wednesday, July 6. Police said they found the victim bleeding from his face. He told police that he was walking across the complex when he was attacked by two black

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is published weekly by Morning Star Seaford Publications Inc., 951 Norman Esk ridge 302 629.9788 Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Pick Up Subscriptions are $21 a year in county; $26 A FREEa year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharpcopy town,of and Federalsburg, Maryland; $31 the S tars’ Postmaster: Send address elsewhere. changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, RIDAL LANNER Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

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men. He said the men tried to take money from his pockets. However, police said the man would not cooperate with police, so they have no further information about the crime. • A stabbing at Carvel Gardens Apartment Complex, Thursday, July 8, at about 7 p.m. police were notified about a stabbing victim who was being treated at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, in Seaford. Officers went to the hospital and met with the victim of the stabbing who said he had been in an argument with his girlfriend at their apartment in the Carvel Gardens Apartment Complex in Laurel. He said as he was leaving the apartment his girlfriend cut him with a knife on his hands and back. Police said the injuries were not life threatening, but did require medical attention. Police have warrants for the arrest of Alexius Smith, 20, of Laurel in connection with the knife attack. • A report of an attempted prescription fraud at the Rite Aid Drugstore on South Central Avenue. Police said at about 4 p.m., Wednesday, July 7, officers responded to the drug store and spoke to a pharmacist who told them that he found a prescription to be suspicious in nature, so he called to verify. He learned that the prescription had been altered from 50 Percocet pills to 150 pills. Police arrested Sara Adkins, 46, of Laurel and charged her with second-degree forgery and obtaining a controlled dangerous substance by fraud. She was released on bond. Laurel Police Chief Jamie Wilson said on Monday afternoon that the investigations represented by the incidents occurring between July 5 and 8, are not unusual for the town, and especially given it is summer. He said people are more active and out during the warmer months and Laurel, like other communities tends to have an influx of people that come in from other areas. Recent concerns about Laurel’s financial picture and the inability to afford a full complement of police officers has led to citizens and business owners expressing their concerns publically about lack of police presence consistently throughout the community. Recently, the Laurel Police Department lost three officers, all who left to take employment with other police agencies. Those positions have not, and are not being considered for being filled. The most recent officer to leave the force was the Laurel School District Resource Officer, Andy Will who has taken a job with the Fruitland Police Department. Will worked at the Laurel High School and his salary was paid through a contract with the Laurel School District. However, it has not been determined whether the school district will be able to hire a Laurel Police Officer. The district must see if there will be funds available and

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951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $21 a year in county; $26 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $31 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

some of those involve federal monies that are not decided on until the fall. If the school is not able to fund the school resource officer position there is danger that one other police officer position may need to be cut. Wilson said he understands the financial position the town is in and works to be “creative” in how he coordinates the duties of his staff. Currently, there are nine officers patrolling the streets of Laurel. A tenth officer is on the payroll but currently on long term medical leave. With four major apartment complexes (Carvel Gardens, Hollybrook Farms, Little Creek and Wexler Village) along with the normal patrols on the east, west and central business district of the town, it can be challenging. Simply patrolling the streets of the town is only one component of the job. Each time an officer responds to a complaint there is a risk that he could be tied up for as much as several hours. This leaves one officer on patrol. In the instance of serious, sometimes violent complaints, both officers must respond and there are no officers patrolling. “We can’t be everywhere,” Wilson said. “But that is the case with any law enforcement agency. Sometimes we have nights when it seems the streets roll up and there are no problems at all; everything is quiet. Other nights we have so many incidents that we could use all nine officers. Unfortunately, we have fewer quiet nights.” Wilson said he has heard from other law enforcement agencies who have expressed awe at the criminal complaint log handled by the Laurel Police Department. “I have had officers from other agencies ask me how we are able to deal with the compliant load we have,” he said. “But, this is all I have ever known. I came to Laurel fresh out of

the academy and this is the only community where I have been a police officer. We will try to do whatever we have to meet the challenges and be as creative as possible about taking care of the community.” In the month of June the Laurel Police Department handled 788 complaints, an increase of 117 over June 2009. Wilson is quick to point out that while 329 of the complaints were called into police, the lion’s share, 459 complaints came from individual proactive police work. Police made 158 arrests in June, 33 of those arrests were drug related. Wilson hopes that the Laurel School District is able to contract for a school resource officer. “That is kind of a doubleedged sword,” he said. Wilson explained that the school officer is not out patrolling the streets, but helps to provide security and develop relationships with the kids at the school. The presence of the school resource officer also helps minimize the need for other road officers to respond to possible school-related complaints. The Laurel Police Department also has an application in for funding through the federal COPS (Community Oriented Policing Services). Laurel had employed two officers through this grant, but was not funded last year when the grant ran out. This created a serious void in the police budget and was a catalyst for the town’s inability to maintain a full complement of officers. The police department waits for word on possible funding, but in the meantime, Wilson continues to work with his officers to strategize and meet the needs of community law enforcement utilizing available resources as best he can.


MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 5

Laurel able to raise enough to cover Fourth of July fireworks Continued from page 1

immediately agreed to continue its role of planning the opening parade. This left concerns about the reality of having a fireworks display as part of the event. At a cost of about $15,000, the question became a matter of financial discretion. The financial picture in Laurel, even as early as January, was not optimistic. But, Mayor Shwed could not accept the loss of the annual Independence Day celebration. “This celebration is important to the people of this town,” he said. “It is even more important given the downturn in the economy. It provides a great source of pride in community and helps people feel really good about their community,” he said. So, not only did Shwed support the town taking over the coordination of the annual event, he also felt the town needed to show a good faith effort in assuring there were fireworks. “I had heard from many people as I was out and about in the community and a lot of them were asking if we were going to have a Fourth of July event and were we going to be able to have fireworks,” he said. “I told them if the people in the community and the civic and faith-based groups came together we could have a celebration. I believed it could be done.” So, during a council meeting in March, Shwed asked the town council to join him taking a leap of faith and provide the funds needed to secure a contract for the July Fourth fireworks display. At a time when the town was looking at certain cut backs to meet the upcoming budget, Shwed said, “I stuck my neck out.”

He said that in order for the fireworks to move forward a contract would be needed and a guarantee of at least $15,000 to be on hand. During the March, 2009 meeting Shwed asked to earmark up to $15,000 in budget reserves for the purchase of the fireworks display. Believing that the community would support the project Shwed felt the town would ultimately not have to foot the bill for the fireworks but would instead raise enough funds through contributions to pay the necessary costs. He was right and now after two weeks Laurel Operations Manager Jamie Smith is still counting the money, but is sure all costs relating to the fireworks has been covered. “I am still counting change, but we have already reached our goal of $15, 000,” Smith said. She said plastic canisters put in businesses throughout Laurel alone raised about $3,000. She credits John Theofiles, a local businessman and former Laurel Chamber president, with taking the lead and helping to make the fireworks a success, both aesthetically and financially. “John has been doing the fireworks coordination for the July 4th event for several years and agreed to help us this year,” she said. “He knows everything there is to know about the fireworks display and works well with the group that we contracted for this year’s event,” she said. In addition to coordinating the fireworks display, Smith said Theofiles also helped solicit support from businesses and individuals who had traditionally supported the Laurel Fourth of July event in the past.

Mayor Shwed said the recent Laurel Independence Day celebration reflects true community spirit. “The people value the Independence Day celebration and rallied together,” he said. “They understand the financial hardship facing the town, but look forward to the celebration. The people did it. They came together and we had a nice team effort from citizens, businesses civic organizations and faith-based groups. This was a community event in

every sense of the word.” Smith said it is difficult to estimate the number of people who attended Laurel’s Independence Day event but felt comfortable that there were between 6,000 and 8,000 people. “Everything went really smoothly and we had no problems,” she said. Shwed and Smith both said they are already planning next year’s event. And yes, they said they plan to have fireworks.

A RIDE WITH POP-POP - Alyssa Brittingham enjoys a ride with her Pop-Pop Craig Brittingham during last week’s fourth of July parade in Laurel.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

Rain heightens interest in Riverfest 2011 By Lynn R. Parks

This past weekend, Carolyn Farley traveled more than 100 miles, from Springfield, Va., a suburb of Washington, D.C., to Seaford and its annual Riverfest. She and her husband, Rick, set up their funnel cake stand, Carol’s Concessions, on High Street just west of city hall. But by 4 p.m. Saturday, about six hours after the city, which sponsors the festival, canceled all outdoor activities due to rain and threatening thunderstorms, the stand’s slow trickle of customers dwindled to none. The Farleys packed up shop and headed home, about six hours earlier than they had intended. “The weather kind of put a damper on things,” Carolyn Farley said as she fried up what would turn out to be the last funnel cake of the day. “But that’s OK—I’m already looking forward to next year.” And there will be a next year, said Trisha Newcomer, the city’s economic development and information and technology manager. Riverfest 2011 is set for July 7, 8 and 9. “Riverfest will go on again,” Newcomer said. “We will not let this year’s rain deter us from another festival next year.” Newcomer said that this was the first wash-out in the 16-year history of Riverfest. “We’ve been extremely fortunate up until now,” she added. “And I think that this year’s rain will make people even more eager for next year.” Jason and Darlene Hudson, Seaford, agree. With their 4-year-old daughter, Kalith, they wandered down High Street Saturday afternoon. “We just walked down the street and now we’re walking back and heading home,” said Jason. “There’s not much here. But we’re not disappointed. And we’ll be back next year. I won’t not come back because it rained today.” Riverfest opened on Thursday with a carnival, sponsored by the Nanticoke Rotary Club. On Friday, after a shower moved through town at around lunchtime, vendors set up along High Street. The city opted to move all Friday-night entertainment scheduled for the festival’s main stage into the Seaford Fire Hall, to prevent sound equipment from being damaged by rain. Friday-evening activities, including

opening ceremonies and the Mayor’s Invitational Egg Toss, got off without problem. “Competitors got a little rained on during the egg toss, but they went ahead,” Newcomer said. State Rep. Danny Short was the winner. On Saturday, vendors arrived on High Street and started setting up their booths. “We had quite a few vendors downtown and people were showing up for the car show,” Newcomer said. Then at around 9:30, “the bottom dropped out.” City staff turned to the internet to check the forecast for the day. “There was not an hour that had anything less than a 50-percent chance of rain,” Newcomer said. All outdoor activities, including entertainment set for the Rotary Stage behind city hall and for Gateway Park, were canceled. The festival keystone event, the Nanticoke River float-in, was also canceled because of threatening thunderstorms. As it had been Friday, entertainment that was scheduled for the main bandstand was moved inside. Vendors were allowed to stay if they wanted. Many left, but a few, like the Farleys, stayed until mid-afternoon. “It was very disheartening,” Newcomer said. “We had a committee that worked so hard for months to bring together a wonderful festival for the community, and Mother Nature didn’t want to cooperate.” She praised the nearly 20 volunteers, including city employees, city council members and members of the Riverfest committee, for pitching in and helping to take down tents and clean up trash after the activities were canceled. “They worked in the pouring rain and were drenched,” she said. “But we had everything cleaned up by around 2 p.m.” Late Saturday afternoon, friends Maggie Durig, 15, and Ashley Bean 16, both from Seaford, sat in Gateway Park, eating a snack from the nearby Royal Farms convenience store. They normally participate in the float-in, Maggie said. “There’s not much here to do,” said Maggie. “But it’s still kind of nice to be here, walking around.” “I wish that more people were here,” added Ashley. “And that more vendors had stayed.” Bruce Bradt, from Georgetown, and Tom Collins, Seaford, didn’t let the fact

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Riverfest’s keystone event, the Nanticoke River float-in, was among activities that were canceled due to rain. This sign was posted at the city’s canoe launch, where float-in participants would have landed. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

that the float-in and the kayak race, both of which they planned to participate in, were cancelled deter them from enjoying the Nanticoke. Late Saturday afternoon, they were taking turns rowing a kayak along the river. “We got soaked earlier today when we

were waiting for the races,” Collins said. “But that’s OK — the river is beautiful now.” Collins also echoed the sentiments of many whose Riverfest plans were changed by the rain. “I’ll be back again next year,” he said.

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MORNING STAR • JuLY 15 - 21, 2010

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The Sorcerer’s Apprentice . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:20 am, 1:00, 2:00, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:40, 4:50, 6:50, 7:40, 9:30, 10:25 Despicable Me . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . 12:30, 1:30, 2:55, 3:50, 5:20, 6:15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:50, 8:40, 10:10 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:10, 10:40 The Last Airbender. . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . .3D 10:50 am, 1:20, 4:15, 7:15, 9:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standard 2:25, 5:05, 8:05, 10:30 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:10am, 12:40, 1:10, 1:40, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:10, 3:35, 4:05, 4:35, 4:55, 6:30, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 10:50 Grown Ups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:20, 5:00, 10:15 Knight and Day. . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:50, 4:20, 7:10, 10:05 Toy Story 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G. . . . . . . . . . . . 11:35am, 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:00 Toy Story 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G. . . . . . . . . . 3D 10:25am, 1:15, 4:00, 6:40, 9:15 The Karate Kid . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:00, 3:25, 6:35, 9:40 The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 7/16 TO THURS. 7/22 Inception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:40, 6:35, Cyrus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:10, 5:15, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:15, 3:50, Despicable Me . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3D 1:00, 3:05, 5:10, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standard 1:30, 4:20, Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:05, 4:40, The Last Airbender. . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D 1:40, 4:05, The Twilight Saga: Eclipse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . 1:10, 1:35, 3:45, 4:10, 6:15, 6:45, Grown Ups . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:50, 4:25, Knight & Day . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:20, 4:00, Toy Story 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D: 1:05, 3:25, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standard: 1:45, The Karate Kid . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00, 3:50,

8:45, 7:25, 6:40, 7:15, 6:50, 7:20, 6:20,

9:30 9:45 9:05 9:20 9:00 9:40 8:40

8:45, 7:05, 6:45, 6:10, 4:15, 6:35,

9:20 9:35 9:15 8:30 6:30 9:20

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 7/16TO THURS. 7/22 The Sorcerer’s Apprentice . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri., Mon., Wed., &Thurs. 7:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sat. 4:30 & 7:30, Sun. 1:30, 4:30 & 7:30

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Newspapers broaden horizons by introducing students to new people, places and ideas. By encouraging our youth to read the newspaper, you’ll encourage a lifelong habit of learning. For the 13th year Morning Star Publications is placing copies of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers in our local schools. Thanks to the generosity of civic minded citizens, businesses and organizations, we are able to place newspapers in local classrooms. By supporting Newspapers in Education, you can help today’s youth develop a lifelong habit of staying informed about the world around them.

To help provide newspapers to area classrooms, please contact Karen Cherrix today at 302-629-9788 or fill out the form below and send your donation to Morning Star publications, Attn: NIE, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 Your Name/Business: ____________________________________ ____________________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________________ Enclosed is my donation $_________

ANY SIZE DONATION IS GREATLY APPRECIATED


PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

Childhood tales sparked Kendal Jones’ desire to preserve Laurel’s history By James Diehl

W

hen an 11-year-old Kendal Jones moved into the home of his recently-widowed great aunt in the late 1930s, it was like experiencing heaven on earth. Running water, electricity, even oriental rugs were a welcome addition from the rural farmhouse he grew up in near Lowe’s Crossroads. But a funny thing happened while moving into the thriving town of Laurel – young Kendal became interested in history and in his family’s role during the formative years of western Sussex County. Hanging out with adults much older than he – his mother was 40 when he was born – only helped fuel those interests, which continue today at the age of 83. “Since I was around older people a lot when I was young, I would just sit and listen to their stories,” says Jones, who later became a core community activist in his hometown. “Spending that time with my great aunt and listening to her stories just got me interested in the history of Laurel.” And what a history it is – Jones can trace his family tree back to William Penn, whose family bestowed a 45-acre land grant to Jones’ ancestors in 1776. Much of that land, between Lowe’s Crossroads and Gumboro, remains with the Jones family today. But it wasn’t until moving in with Florence Jones, the widow of Dr. W. T. Jones, that his family’s role in history began to interest him. Spending many of his formative years in the home on Market Street piqued an interest that has remained with him throughout his lifetime, one that has been filled with all sorts of community service endeavors. “A lot of people helped me growing up, and I just always felt that when I grew up I would try to pay some of that back,” says Jones, who was named Laurel’s 1989 Citizen of the Year by the Laurel Chamber of Commerce. And pay it back he has – Jones is a charter member of the Laurel Historical

Heroes series

If you know of someone who has dedicated his or her life to service to others, suggest their names for this series. Contact James Diehl at 302-222-2685 or email Bryant richardson, brichardson@ mspublications.com Society, serving as its president on two separate occasions, a former town council member, the developer of the Laurel Museum, a former board member of the Laurel Chamber of Commerce and for 50 years has been a member of the Old Christ Church League. Laurel is his town, and he’s committed to preserving as much of its history as possible. “There’s just so much history here in Laurel that we need to preserve,” says the veteran of World War II and long-time accountant. “And, through the Western Sussex [Scenic and Historic] Byway, we’re trying our best to get people off of Route 13 to appreciate the natural beauty that we have here in western Sussex County, beauty that we often take for granted.” Born to Edgar and Esthella Jones just outside of Laurel, Jones attended the oneroom schoolhouse at Lowe’s Crossroads for a year before beginning his daily commute to Laurel as a second grader. As luck would have it, there was an empty seat on the school bus at the time and his parents could pay $2 a month for their son to have the privilege of riding to school. Graduating with the class of 1944, Jones was drafted into the United States Navy during World War II, serving his country at a base in California. He attained his degree in Accounting and Business Administration in 1947 from what is today Goldey-Beacom College and worked for the next 49 years in various positions, including 20 years as the business manager of the Seaford School District. He

Kendal T. Jones, pictured here near the original Native American “wading place” along Broad Creek, has lived nearly his entire life in the Laurel community. One of his main missions today is keeping the history of Laurel alive through his roles with the historical society, the Old Christ Church League, the Western Sussex Scenic and Historic Byway, and other organizations.

retired in 1996 and has worked to preserve the history of western Sussex County ever since. During his working years, and while raising two teenagers in the ‘60s and ‘70s, Jones was also heavily involved in the American Field Service program. He hosted two foreign students through the program – a young lady from Costa Rica and a male student from Switzerland. “That was a good program and I really enjoyed that,” says Jones, who also served as president of the Laurel chapter of American Field Service for many years. “The boy came back from Switzerland in the late ‘80s and told me that the experience changed his life. That really makes you feel pretty good.” Jones’ family ties to the area date back more than 200 years – his parents and grandparents attended a one-room schoolhouse that was built in 1840 and attended

church services in a now-demolished structure. Both buildings carried the Jones family name as their official titles – Jones School still stands today as a farm building, while Jones Church has long since been committed to the history books. In 1977, a year after the country celebrated its bicentennial, Jones helped form the Laurel Historical Society. It’s a group that has become a very important part of his life, and one he is very proud of. A main issue moving forward, however, is piquing young people’s interest in the history of what used to be one of the state’s most affluent and important towns, a town that boasts natural waterways, a historic railroad stop and a handful of influential former governors. Jones’ answer is simple – “You just have to talk about it.” And he’s done just that over the years, Continued to page 37

‘World War II Heroes of Southern Delaware’ and ‘Remembering Sussex County’

302-856-7773

Clifford D. Short, Independent Agent

606 E. Market St. • Georgetown, DE 19947 SINCE 1983

CLIFFORD SHOR T

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PAGE 9

7

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Applies to patio furniture marked with yellow clearance labels. Price reflects discount. While supplies last. Selection may vary by store. Offer starts 6/30/10.

Pick up job-lot quantities for your home or business in one stop. Details on our policies and services: Prices may vary after 7/19/10 if there are market variations. “Was” prices in this advertisement were in effect on 7/8/10 and may vary based on Lowe’s Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. While Lowe’s strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error. Prices and promotions apply to US locations only, and are available while supplies last. ✖Ask for 10% off your first single-receipt in-store purchase charged to your new Lowe’s® Accounts Receivable or Lowe’s® Business Account or Lowe’s Business Rewards Card from American Express when you open your new account in any Lowe’s store and make your first purchase between 7/15/10 and 7/19/10. Cannot be combined with other credit related promotional offers. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase and cannot be used in conjunction with any other coupon or discount. If you request this promotion, your purchase will not be eligible for any other credit related promotional offers. This coupon is good for a single-receipt purchase of any in-stock or Special Order merchandise only up to $5,000. The maximum discount with the coupon is $500. Coupon is not redeemable for cash, is non-transferable and cannot be replaced if lost or stolen. Void if altered, copied, transferred, or sold through any online auction. Limit one coupon per business. Not valid on sales via Lowes.com, previous sales, purchase of services or Gift Cards. Offer must be requested, and coupon presented, at the time of purchase. Coupon valid for one time use only. Offer is subject to credit approval. Offer is not valid for accounts opened prior to 7/15/10. Excludes Lowe’s® Consumer Credit Card Accounts, Lowe’s® Project CardSM Accounts, Lowe’s® VISA® Accounts and all Lowe’s® Canada Credit accounts. © 2010 by Lowe’s®. All rights reserved. Lowe’s and the gable design are registered trademarks of LF,LLC. (100791)

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

now $ 85


Make Plans To View These

Open Houses

Sunday, July 18

th

22281 callaWaY dR, SeafoRd – New home with great floor plan! 3 BRs, 2 BAs, cathedral ceilings in LR & MBR, and ¼-acre lot just a 2-minute walk from kayaking or some of the best bass fishing on Hearns Pond. $179,900 (#564437) hoSteSS: Terry Scott located in Lakeshores (turn off Rt. 13A, north of Seaford, onto Shore Dr, Callaway Ave. is on the R)

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

14001 e. Jana ciRcle, SeafoRd – 3-BR, 2-BA ranch in good cond. on larger corner lot. LR, DR, KIT, laundry/mud room, rear deck, large shed, & extras included! Only $179,900 (#579452) hoSteSS: Bev Blades diRectionS: From Concord Rd (Rt 20E) turn onto Baker Mill Rd 483, proceed thru intersection with Fleetwood Pond Rd 484, enter Fleetwood Estates & turn R, prop on L.

8786 GaRden lane, SeafoRd - Brand new stick-built home w/ 3 BR & 2 BA. HW & tile floors and 16x16’ deck are just a few of the upgrades in this lovely home priced at only $149,900 – Great for 1st-time buyers or retirees! (#570744) hoSteSS: Tina Moore diRectionS: From Rt 13A north of Seaford, turn onto Garden Lane, 1st new house on L

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

23 RiVeRS end, SeafoRd - Freshly painted w/new hdw. flooring are some of the features in this lovely 4 BR, 2 1/2 bath colonial home in Rivers End. Sitting on the back porch affords a lovely view of beautiful landscaping. $338,900 diRectionS: From Rt 13 east on Middleford Rd. to stop sign. Turn right, take next right onto Old Meadow Rd., turn left into Rivers End. Bear to right, home is on right.

2 pm - 4 pm

26459 SeafoRd Rd, SeafoRd - Here’s that 10.95-acre parcel you’ve requested— horses, garden, farmland . . . you decide! Includes a 3-BR Cape Cod plus 2-car garage & numerous outbldgs. near Seaford. $259,900 (#575216) hoSteSS: Dee Cross. LOCATED on Route 13A south of Blades.

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

New ListiNg

lot #66, Belle aYRe dRiVe, SeafoRd Cooper Realty Associates is proud to introduce the community of Belle Ayre with three affordable, newly constructed homes starting at $159,900. Design yourself with color, flooring, kitchen selections, lighting and more. Some features include, 1,220 sq. ft. and up of living space, vaulted ceilings, Master BR with Super Bath-walk-incloset, 2 car garage with storage above, landscaped & seeded yards and much more. Come be a part of Seaford’s newest affordable community! (MLS#578852) directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, go West on Rt. 20 (at McDonalds) to Right on Atlanta Rd. Sign at Belle Ayre Entrance 1/2 mile down on Right Look for Flags. Your hostess: Mary Harding

2 haRlequin looP, heRitaGe ShoReS, BRidGeVille This model Home located in the community of Heritage Shores has hardly been lived in. Owners need to relocate! Home includes 13K in new furniture (all rooms) furnishings and upgrades. Granite kitchen counter tops, SS appliances, tiled bath and kitchen floors, appointed master BR suite, customized buildouts in the garage and plenty of amenities for an active, relaxed lifestyle. Just bring your clothes and move right in! $269,900 (MLS#579411) directions: From Rt. 13 in Bridgeville enter Heritage Shores Community. Go past Club House to Heritage Cr., and continue to Left on Harlequin Loop. First home on Right. Your host: John Allen

GleNN SIZemoRe RealToRS • 629-3066

CooPeR RealTy • 629-6693

23754 Shufelt Road, SeafoRd - Beautifully well maintained rancher is ready to move in. 3 BR, 2 bath home features a retractable awning over deck, electric in shed & new hot water heater in 2009. You must see this home today! $290,000 MLS# 578507 diRectionS: West on Rt. 20 (Stein Highway) go through town, over rr tracks, turn right onto Shufelt Rd., go over rr tracks, house on left, look for sign. hoSteSS: Carol Crouse cell 302-236-4648

28557 fiRe toWeR Road, lauRel - Beautiful country setting for this well maintained rancher. 30x48 pole shed almost completed. Many recent updates including new water conditioner, new well, new HWH, 2-year old range & microwave, new dryer. Recently remodeled bath. Shed w/ electric. Beautiful open beam sunroom w/ skylights. diRectionS: From North 13 in Laurel, turn East onto Rt. 9, then left on Fire Tower Rd. Home on right. hoSteSS: Wanda Rash. $197,000. MLS#576816

12126 GuMBRanch couRt, BRidGeVille, 4 BR, 4 full Baths, clean as a whistle, new hardwood & carpet. This home has many possibilities. Expanded family or in-law suite. Lovely manicured irrigated lot. Priced to sell. diRectionS: Rt.13 to Redden Road, to Sunny side Rd. Left, Right into Bridgeville Chase, Right onto Gumbranch Ct., Home is on the right. hoSteSS: Dana Caplan $264,900. MLS#578841

504 linden St., WilMaR VillaGe, SeafoRd - 3 BR, 2 bath ranch with oak floors, large LR w/fireplace, kit. with eating area & all appliances, utility area & storage shed. Great location! $127,500 MLS#570024 YouR hoSteSS: Eleanor Hickey

RoBINSoN Real eSTaTe • 629-4574

CeNTURy 21 Ramey Real eSTaTe • 629-5575

527 nYlon BlVd., SeafoRd Immaculate & charming 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath, all brick ranch home featuring LR w/FP, DR, lovely kit. w/all appl’s., hdw. floors, basement, sunroom, screen porch, central air, plus 1 car garage & irrigation system. $199,000 MLS#567004 YouR hoSteSS: Gerry Thomas

RoBINSoN Real eSTaTe • 629-4574

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

Bell Ayre - New CONstRUCtiON

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

Home Team RealTy • 629-7711

312 Plantation dR, SeafoRd Upgrades Galore in this lovely 3-BR, 2-BA home! Top-of-the-line appliances, tile entry, screened porch, double-car garage & other features! $259,000 (#575994) hoSteSS: Phyllis Parker diRectionS: From Atlanta Rd turn into Governor’s Grant, take 1st R, home on R past the curve

CeNTURy 21 Ramey Real eSTaTe • 629-5575

CooPeR RealTy • 629-6693

Are you ready to make the the move?

A Real estate Agent can help you find the right home at the right price. Call An Agent today!


MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 11

Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival gospel entertainers Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival, Inc. announces its gospel entertainment schedule for this year’s AFRAM Festival, held in Nutter Park, Seaford, Aug. 12-14. This year’s theme is derived from the principle of “Umoja” (Unity). The Sunday’s Best@AFRAM - Gospel Hour begins at 3 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 14. Featured artists are Minister Juanita Contee, Charles Smith Jr., Tim Palmer, Jason Hall, Da’ FLOCK, Moves of Praise, and Pamela Johnson. Minister Juanita Contee’s preaching, singing and teaching ability is cutting edge and puts her in Juanita Contee a different league from others in today’s gospel arena. Her God given talent has allowed her to grace the stage with some of gospel’s greatest. Juanita is a mentor to teens all over the world, including Nigeria and Ghana. Charles Smith Jr. is a talented songwriter, producer, singer and musician who began his music career opening for major acts around Baltimore City. By age

17 he had already performed at the Apollo Theatre in New York City. Growing up in the church, he was heavily influenced by gospel music but found the urban sounds of Hip Hop Charles Smith Jr. and R&B irresistible. Charles got his first placement with 4 PM’s, “A Light in the Dark,” in 1997. While continuing to write and place songs, he signed a publishing deal, which landed him in Los Angeles. Since then, Charles has worked with an array of artists, writers and producers. Tony Smith is an accomplished saxophonist with over 30 years of experience. Tony won Best New Gospel Jazz Artist in 2003 at The American Gospel Music Awards. In 2004 and 2005, Tony Smith

he was nominated at the Urban Gospel Industry Awards for Best Gospel Jazz Album and Best Gospel Jazz Male Artist. This talented artist hosts his own gospel jazz radio show on WFDU 89.1 FM in Teaneck, N.J. Da’ FLOCK (For Love Of Christ’s Kingdom), is an Urban Gospel Praise group. This ministry was formed to touch the

10CSDB_06ADV_6x10_0429

young woman must: be between the ages of 17 (and a high school senior) and 24; a citizen of the United States; never been married; and meet residency requirements for the state of Delaware, or be a full-time student in a Delaware college or university, or have full-time employment within the state of Delaware. For more information, visit www.MissDE.org, and click on the link, “Become A Contestant.” Or contact Dulcena Kemmerlin at Kemmer32@hotmail.com or 3931483, or Sandy Soucek at SES36@ aol.com or 745-1619.

DSWA is GREEN! Here is one of the ways... Recycle Your Electronic Goods Some electronic devices may contain small amounts of lead, silver, barium, cadmium, and mercury, which are bad for the environment. Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) has 24 dropoff locations for residents to dispose of their old electronics for FREE! Last year DSWA recycled 1,814 tons of For more information please call

electronic goods!.

1-800-404-7080 Are you GREEN? or visit www.dswa.com

6”w X 10”H

visit AFRAM’s website, www. easternshoreafram.org or call 628-1908. The Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival is headed by Seaford City Councilwoman and Eastern Shore AFRAM Executive Director Pat A. Jones. Eastern Shore AFRAM is the largest AfricanAmerican heritage festival in Sussex County.

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needs of today’s hip-hop cultured generation. Da’ FLOCK presents a truthful, loving, honest ministry that will encourage and inspire new life in Jesus Christ. Pamela Johnson is a gospel song stylist. Look for her debut project (released this month), “Introducing Pamela Johnson.” For more information including an entertainment schedule,

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MRNGSTR_00510


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

People Captain Chip Simpson selected for Torch Run in Lincoln, Nebraska

Captain Chip Simpson, Delaware State Police, was selected for the 2010 Law Enforcement Torch Run (LETR) Final Leg, preceding the Special Olympics USA National Games held in Lincoln, Neb., July 18-23. The Final Leg Team, a total of 110 members, is comprised of law enforcement runners, Special Olympics athletes and Support Team members. The Flame Lighting Ceremony, marking the beginning of the Final Leg, was held Sunday, July 11, at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, the site of the last USA National Games in 2006. Chip, who resides in Lewes, has been a member of the Delaware State Police for 30 years and is the commander of Troop 4 in Georgetown. He is a member of the Delaware Law Enforcement for Special Olympics Executive Committee, serving as the volunteer chairperson. For the past 15 years, Chip and his family have participated in the Special Olympics Delaware Lewes Polar Bear Plunge. The Final Leg Team will visit more than 70 cities and towns throughout Nebraska before arriving at the USA National Games Opening Ceremonies in Lincoln on July 18.

Paige Riley Blaine

Blaine family welcomes girl

Michael and Sara Blaine, Seaford, announce the birth of their third child, Paige Riley Blaine. She was welcomed home by her brother, Will and her sister, Sadie. Paige was born on June 25, 2010, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, Md. She weighed 8 pounds, 7 ounces and was 19 ½ inches long. Paige is the granddaughter of John and Mary Ann Kramer of Hurlock, Md. and Matthew and Dona Blaine of Laurel. Her aunts are Karin and Jessica Kramer and her uncle is David Kramer. Her greatgrandmother is Peggy Foulk of Melbourne, Fla.

65th wedding anniveRsaRy - Norma and Mary Lee LeCates of Laurel celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary with family, enjoying two nights of fireworks and cookouts. They were married July 4, 1945.

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MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 13

If I’m not honest about my age, I may miss out Today is my birthday. While I’m not going to divulge my ynn arks age here for all to read, I’m sure that no one would be surprised to learn that I’m approaching middle age — at least ...we’re expanding according to my way of thinking. I say the Look Who Made that 70 is the new middle-aged, my children tell me that they and the rest a Mistake Game to of the world, including AARP, which insists on sending me invitations to include other memjoin, disagree. No matter. Middle-aged is a state of bers of the family. mind, and I’m simply not there yet. But there are some things about the she wrote to him when he pointed out her state of my mind that concern me. For error. example: About two weeks ago I embarked In fact, now that we’re expanding the on an internet search to find out when a local Look Who Made a Mistake Game to include blueberry farm would be open for picking. I other members of the family, let me tell you typed in what I thought was the name of the farm, Google came up with a suggested web- about my husband, who as a college student showed up for psychology class one day and site and I clicked on it. walked into an empty classroom. Neither the “Summer 2010!” the site’s home page professor nor any of the other nearly 200 sturead. “Welcome!” dents was there. Strange, he thought, but he, There was discussion of a summer blueever confident, knew that the others would berry festival and a brief history of the farm. soon realize their mistake. And anyway, And then, an announcement that the farm’s the unexpected free time would give him a u-pick operation would open in mid-July. chance to study for a big engineering test That’s pretty late, I thought. Always bethat was coming up the next day. fore, we have picked blueberries in late June He sat in the otherwise empty lecture and early July. Obviously, the farmers had ripped out all their bushes and planted a new hall and waited for his classmates and the professor to arrive. Five minutes went by, variety of berry that ripens later. then 10 minutes, and still he waited. After 15 It did not occur to me to consider what minutes, he started to wonder if perhaps the turned out to be the truth, that I was looking lecture had been switched to another room. at a website for a different blueberry farm. When he wandered into the hallway and In Michigan, where all things ripen later started a search, he found students not from than they do here. This despite the fact that his psychology class but from his engineerthe site’s home page also announced that ing class, rushing into a lecture hall with that the farm would have Michigan sweet corn “I’ve got a test, don’t bother me,” look. Not for sale. “Hmm,” I remember thinking. “The only had he mistaken the day and what class farmers must have expanded their operation he should be in, but he had to take an exam to include corn” — ripping out even more for which he had thought he had another 24 bushes, by the way. “Wonder why they call hours to study. it Michigan sweet corn, and not Delaware A blueberry farm with a whole new seasweet corn?” son, a wilderness area with radically differWhen my daughter discovered my misent weather, a whole classroom of confused take — she was with me when I found the students and one confused professor. All actual website for our local blueberry farm unlikely scenarios and in the end, all utterly and realized that I had in fact missed its uwithout foundation except in our misguided pick season; otherwise the situation would thinking. have remained my little secret — she was I’m pretty sure that there’s no misguided merciless in her teasing. To make me feel thinking involved in the formation of my better, my husband told me that earlier this definition of middle age and my assertion year, when he had wanted weather informathat I’m just now entering on a long runway tion about a West Virginia campsite he and toward it. I certainly hope that I’m right. she were planning to visit, our daughter I would hate for a whole chunk of my life had sent him data that she had gathered that turned out to be about a similarly named wil- to turn out to be like this year’s blueberry uderness area, but located in Utah. “Utah!?!?” pick season, and I miss it.

L

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Re/Max Eastern Shore ncy ce Nancy Price, Realtor a N 628-7653 (Office) Pri 302

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Water vieWs With private access for canoeing! 2700 sq. ft. - 3 Full floors - completely remodeled - new everything! 5 BRs, 2 1/2 Baths, granite counters, all hardwood floors, eat-in kitchen with bar & cozy sitting area with fireplace. Interior decorated with exquisite taste to welcome your family home. Perfect for the large family or just for those who love to entertain family and friends! MLs# 556968 Reduced 45K. Now being offered at $297,900 Owners must move. FHA available.

Heart Healthy Recipe Contest

“Produce-ing” a Healthier You!

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital & the Western Sussex Farmers’ Market are looking for your heart healthy recipes that use local seasonal produce! Recipes Will Be Evaluated On Originality, Use of Seasonal Produce, Being “Heart Healthy”, Texture, Visual Appearance & Taste

On Saturday, August 21st at 10 am Three Lucky Entries Will be PREPARED & SHARED at the Western Sussex Farmers’ Market and Will Win Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Gift Baskets (Located at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club)

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: July 31, 2010!

For Complete Contest Rules: Email to ostroskir@nanticoke.org Visit www.Nanticoke.org/Recipe Call 302-629-6611, extension 8948

HEALTH SERVICES Always Caring. Always Here.

There’s a reason homeownership is the foundation of the American Dream. Over time, owning your home has proved to be a good decision. And while lately the economy has presented some challenges, it has also helped us focus on what matters most. It’s reminded us that home is where we make memories, build our future and feel comfortable and secure. When you’re ready, a REALTOR®, a member of the National Association of REALTORS®, can help you find the home that’s right for you. REALTORS® are prepared—to answer your questions, show you options and guide you home. Every market’s different, call a REALTOR® today.

©2010 National Association of REALTORS®.

HouseLogic.com/buyandsell

Sussex County Association of REALTORS® Georgetown, DE 302-855-2300 www.scaor.com


MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 14

Community Bulletin Board Pancake Breakfast at Applebees

The Friends of the Seaford Library will host a pancake breakfast at Applebees in Seaford from 8 to 10 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 7. Tickets are $6 each and include pancakes, sausage, coffee, tea or milk. All proceeds benefit the new Seaford Library and Cultural Center. Tickets may be purchased at the circulation desk of the Seaford Library or by contacting Connie Halter at 628-0554.

Blades and Delmarva Antiques, Rt. 13, Laurel. For more information, go to www. homelesscathelpers.petfinder.org.

or Chairman, Jack Wilson at 629-8986 for more information. Scout, church or sports groups may contact Sandy Blackwell at 629-7038 to make group arrangements.

Foundation Golf Tournament

Seaford Library

The 7th Annual Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, Aug. 28, at Heritage Shores Golf Club in Bridgeville. This is a community fundraiser and all proceeds will benefit the Trinity Foundation’s 2010 areas of charitable focus which include community development, the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association. If you are interested in playing with a team of 4 at $100 per player, visit www. ttifoundation.org or email foundation@ trinitytransport.com.

Join the Alzheimer’s Memory Walk Eat at IHOP to help the library

The Kent-Sussex Memory Walk Committee is planning the Alzheimer’s Memory Walk, the only annual fundraiser held in Sussex County, on Saturday, Oct. 2. The walk begins at Grove Park in Rehoboth Beach, travels around Silver Lake, continues the length of the boardwalk and returns to the park via Columbia Avenue – a distance of 3.8 miles. Participants are needed. Register online at http://memorywalk2010.kintera.org/Rehoboth. For more information, call Jamie Magee at 854-9788 or 1-800-272-3900. Team Captain kits are available online at www.alz.org/desjsepa. In addition, you can support the Alzheimer’s Association by purchasing a paper forget-me-not at one of Hocker’s Stores in Ocean View and Millville for $1 through July.

Support Homeless Cat Helpers

Homeless Cat Helpers, Inc. is having a special event on Monday, Aug. 9, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Georgia House in Laurel. It will be an all-you-can eat southernstyle BBQ buffet dinner with beef, pork, hot dogs, etc. There will be door prizes, silent auction items and a raffle. Tickets should be purchased in advance. The $12 tickets are available at the following supporting businesses: Seaford Abbey Carpet and Phillips Signs, both on Rt. 13, Seaford; Seaford Florist, Rt. 13A,

Cooper Realty Associates

615 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE

John W. Allen

629-6693 office 302-245-5612 cell john@cooperealty.com

Enjoy a meal any time at the IHOP restaurant in Seaford and support the Greenwood Library. Simply fill out a comment card after eating and give it to the cashier as you pay. You will be given a special receipt which you then take to the Greenwood Library on your next visit.

Raffle benefits SPCA

The Georgetown Shelter - Delaware SPCA is holding a special “Bethany Beach Getaway” raffle to raise money for the shelter and its homeless pets. The package, valued at over $950, includes a two night stay at the Addy Sea Bed & Breakfast; gift certificates to Studio 26 Salon & Spa, DiFebo’s Restaurant, Bethany Blues Restaurant, Harpoon Hanna’s Restaurant, The Cafe on 26 Bistro and The Pottery Place; two prints from Carolina Street; and an ocean kayaking adventure. The Delaware SPCA is a private nonprofit organization that does not receive state or county funding and is not a state run facility. The services provided by the Delaware SPCA are only possible with the charitable support of the community. Tickets for the raffle are $10 each and the drawing will take place on Oct. 10. For more information, or to purchase raffle tickets, call 541-4478.

Your family, horses (and your farm animals) will fall in love with this totally remodeled 3BR/2 bath farmhouse situated on 5 peaceful country acres. This property features 4 acres of fenced pasture, vaulted ceiling with exposed beams, brick hearth with wood stove, brand new furnace, hardwood floors beneath new carpets, and enough road frontage to sub divide building lots in the future. All this and more with the conveniences of Salisbury, Delmar & Laurel close by. Priced to sell at $249,900. MLS#572841

Free fishing derby, picnic

The Annual Kids Fishing Derby, sponsored by the Nanticoke River Yacht Club and local businesses, will be held on Saturday, Aug. 7, from 9 a.m. to noon. This free event is open to all kids, ages 5 to 16. Kids must bring a parent or guardian with them in order to participate. Kids participating with a supervised scout, sports or church group may participate under the supervision of their group leaders. Participants must register at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in the Blades Marina prior to the Derby. Participants will then proceed, as a group, to the Seaford River Walk for the Fishing Derby and Casting Contest. A generous awards ceremony and picnic will follow the Derby back at the Yacht Club at noon. Each child must provide his or her own fishing pole and tackle. Bait will be provided. The event will be a catch, register and release derby. However, if a child wishes to keep their legal catch, they must bring their own cooler and ice. Contact Bernie Warshow at 629-4204

• The Teen Summer Reading Program, “Make Waves @ Your Library” presents “Text Race 2010” with Tony Varrato on Thursday, July 22, at 4 p.m. This is a speed texting competition. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www. seaford.lib.de.us. • Friday, July 23, is the last day to register for the Children’s Summer Reading Program. For more information, call 6292524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • The Children’s Summer Reading Program presents “Movie Monday” on July 26, at 1 p.m. (rated G) and Aug. 2 (rated PG). For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • The Children’s Summer Reading Program presents “Pirate Sails and Mermaid Tails” by Micheal Forresterie on Tuesday, July 27, at 6:30 p.m. Kids will be spellbound by Micheal’s tails of pirates, mermaids and adventures in the sea. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www. seaford.lib.de.us. • There will be a Seaford Library and Cultural Center Board meeting on Tuesday, July 27, at 6 p.m. • On Wednesday, July 28, the Chil-

Western Sussex

FARMERS’ MARKET Plants Vegetables Herbs Flowers Baked Goods Dog Treats Eggs & More

SATuRdAyS 8:30 - 12 NOON (July 3 to August 28, 2010)

at WEstERN sUssEx bOYs & GiRLs CLUb Virginia Ave., (Next to seaford Police Dept)

Boy Scouts & Cub Scouts Promote Scouting from 8:30 am - noon Also -- Lemonade

Fund Raiser

Cool Off With A Gelato

WN O R G Y L L A C LO CED U D O R P D N A

s’ farmer T marKe

WesSusFarmMkt@verizon.net


PAGE 15

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010 dren’s Summer Reading Program presents “Undersea Adventures” with naturalist Bonnie Jones at 1:30 p.m. See marine treasures, live undersea animals and enjoy an activity. For more information, call 6292524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • Thursday, July 29, is the Teen Summer Reading Program Grand Finale Beach party at the library at 4 p.m. This program is open to all teens who have completed the Teen Summer Reading Program. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • The “ Science and Religion” Book discussion group will meet at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center on Monday, July 19 and Monday, Aug. 2, at 6 p.m. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • On Tuesday, Aug. 3, as part of the Children’s Summer Reading Program, local artist Karen Owens will present “Water Color Painting” at 6:30 p.m. Karen will explain how water is used for art and help the kids create their very own water color creations. For more information, call 6292524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • “Lights Camera Action!” The Seaford Library and Cultural Center hosts “Movie Night” on Thursday, Aug. 5, at 5:30 p.m. We provide the refreshments, you take a seat and enjoy the show. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • All reading logs for the Children’s Summer Reading Program are due Friday, Aug. 6. For more information, call 6292524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us. • The Children’s Summer Reading Program will have its “Finale Splish, Splash Liquid Cream Party” on Wednesday, Aug. 11, at 1:30 p.m. Prizes will be awarded. For more information, call 629-2524 or visit www.seaford.lib.de.us.

participants who live at or below the poverty level. There is a small administrative fee for adults who sign up. For more information, call Paul Dorey at 628-3789.

AFRAM pageant, health clinic, job fair and children’s events. For more information, visit www.EasternShoreAFRAM.org or call 628-1908.

SPCA event

Laurel Library summer programs

Saturday, July 17 - SPCA Talk-Traveling with Pets, Tall Pines Campground, Lewes. For more information, call 6840300.

Western Sussex Farmers’ Market

Western Sussex Farmers’ Market will be open Saturday mornings (8:30 a.m. noon) through Aug. 28. The Market will be located on the Boys and Girls Club property at 310 Virginia Ave., Seaford. In addition to fresh local produce, there will be educational, fun activities each week. Find the market on Facebook. For more information, call 629-2686 or email wessusfarmmkt@verizon.net.

Hymn Sing at Concord UMC

Student artwork display

Laurel Public Library is exhibiting artwork completed this year by students attending Laurel Intermediate/Middle School. Demonstrating the young artists’ skill in two dimensional media, this colorful show is on display on the stairway and second floor of the library throughout the summer.

A Hymn Sing will be held at 2 p.m. on Sunday, July 18, at Concord United Methodist Church near Seaford. The public is invited to hear the music of Jack Andrews and The Sounds of Joy. The church is located at 25322 Church Road. All are welcome. For more information, call 628-8114.

Trip to Suicide Bridge

Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival

All You Can Eat Beef & Beer

The annual Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival will be held on Aug. 13-14, at Nutter Park, Collins Ave., Seaford. There will be two extraordinary days of cultural entertainment, Afrocentric displays, ethnic food vendors, a parade,

Laurel Senior Center is sponsoring a trip to Suicide Bridge on Tuesday, July 27. Cost of the trip is $35, which covers transportation to the luncheon and a ride on the Paddle Boat. For more information, or to sign up for the trip, call the center at 875-2536. Sponsored by Laurel Fire Department and Auxiliary, Saturday, July 17, 6 to 9 p.m. Menu includes beef & beer, fried chicken, corn on cob, coleslaw, baked beans

Seaford High School Class of 1990 will hold their 20 year reunion on Saturday, Oct. 9, from 5 to 10 p.m., in the Ball Room at Heritage Shores Club House in Bridgeville. Checks must be mailed to: Sandy Whitten Stinson, 31521 Miller Road, Cordova, MD 21625. Checks should be made payable to: SHS Class of 1990. The cost is $45 per person. This fee is non-refundable. For more information, visit the Facebook page, “Seaford Senior High Class of 1990.”

to Benefit Dave Akers “Kicks for Kids” Non-profit Organization in memory of 9 Year Old, Joshua Dickerson, an Eagles fan!!

Saturday, July 17 Open 5 pm - Starts 6:30 pm

Delmar VFW, State St., Delmar, MD Cost $20 in advance - $25 at door

Zumba for kids and seniors

A professional dancer and Zumba instructor will be coming to teach Atomic Zumba for kids and Aqua Zumba for seniors this summer. This program is free to

Dutch country Market 875-1678

302

(Beside Johnny Janosiks)

Hrs: Thurs. - Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5

Pennsylvania Dutch FooDs

RotisseRie BBQ (HealtHy CHoiCe) FResH Meats - Deli salaDs - Bulk FooDs - CanDy JaMs BakeD GooDs inCluDinG suGaR FRee Pies

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DUTCH COUNTRY HEIRLOOM FURNITURE Located Next to Dutch Country Market

Free Delivery & Set Up of our Play Sets up to 25 mi.

Perennials for Sale $2.50 & Up

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The Laurel Public Library will hold the following programs this summer. Thursday, July 15, 2 p.m. - Kids Create Club, grades K-6 Monday, July 19, 8-9 p.m. - Teen Book Club with refreshments Tuesday, July 20, 10:30 a.m. - Preschool Story Time Wedneday, July 21, 2 p.m. - Movie@ the Library - “The Lightning Thief,” rated PG Thursday, July 22, 2 p.m. - Kids Create Club, grades K-6 Friday, July 23, 7-9 p.m. - NightLife@ the Library, an after-hours, teens-only program with games, movies and pizza Monday, July 26, 8-9 p.m. - Teen Book Club, with refreshments Tuesday, July 27, 10:30 a.m. - Preschool StoryTime Wednesday, July 28, 2 p.m. - Michael Forestieri presents Pirate Sails and Mermaid Tales Thursday, July 29, 2 p.m. - Kids Create Club, grades K-6 Monday, Aug. 2, 8-9 p.m. - Teen Book Club, with refreshments Tuesday, Aug. 3, 10:30 a.m. - Preschool Story Time Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2 p.m. - Rehoboth Summer Children’s Theater at the Library Thursday, Aug. 5, 2 p.m. - Kids Create Club, grades K-6

Annual Basket-n-Bags Bingo

SHS 20 year reunion

11233 Trussum Pond Rd.

and more with a DJ until 11 p.m. Tickets $20 per person or $35 couple. 50/50 drawing, silent auction and door prizes. Doors open at 5 p.m. Tickets available at the door.

When words are not enough, choose from our elegant selection of floral arrangements.

John’s Four Season’s Flowers & Gifts

Stein Hwy. at Reliance, John Beauchamp 302

629-2644

410-754-5835

20 Games of Bingo • 5 Special Games Raffles/Large Chinese Auction King Tutt Games/Rip Offs

Featuring Longaberger® Baskets & Vera Bradley® Handbags

Call in advance to save your spot and be included in a special drawing.

David Akers Kicks for Kids is a charity organization that provides assistance to the children and families being cared for at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. David’s desire to give back to the community, as well as to help young people and families in need, motivated him to establish the David Akers’ Kicks for Kids organization in the fall of 2001.

For more information and/or tickets contact Dawn Turner at 410-726-2184, Pam Price at 302-249-2546, Sandy Dickerson at 302-846-9761 or Nancy at 443-235-4463.

r Supe

EVERY TUESDAY

DOORS OPEN 5 PM - GAMES 6:45 PM

Deal or No Deal BiNgo - TuesDay, July 27


PAGE 16 Friday, Aug. 6, 7-9 p.m. - Limo Ride Drawing for the Teen Summer Reading Program Saturday, Aug. 7 – All day, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Last day to add books to your Reading Logs for the Children’s Summer Reading Program Wednesday, Aug. 11 - 2 p.m. - End of the Summer Reading Program Party, with performances by our Acting Club, plus refreshments.

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010 ed in a special drawing. ‘Kicks for Kids’ provides assistance to the children and families being cared for at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. For more information and tickets, call Dawn Turner at 410-726-2184, Pam Price at 249-2546, Sandy Dickerson at 846-9761 or Nancy at 443-235-4463.

Historical Society summer events

Sundays through October - Open House at the Cook House, 1-4 p.m. Free. Come browse through life from an easier time. Tuesday, Aug. 24 - Basket Bingo with free delicious desserts.

Delmar Public Library events

On Thursday, July 15 at 6:30 p.m., see “Puppets Talking Science,” which features two short puppet plays, one about a Galapagos Island tortoise and the other about frogs and camouflage. This event is sponsored by the Delaware Museum of Natural History. The Delmar Public Library and the “Make a Splash at Your Library” Summer Reading Program will host “Under The Sea: A Look at the Underwater Food Chain from Sunlight to Shark,” at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 22. On Wednesday, July 28 at 10 a.m., Kathleen Jacobs presents inventive puppetry, wacky theatrics and comic storytelling for children and adults. At 6:30 p.m., Ray Owens, a talented musician who delights audiences of all ages, will perform. These events are free and open to the public.

‘Kicks for Kids’ benefit

A ‘Kicks for Kids’ benefit in memory of 9-year-old Joshua Dickerson, an Eagles fan, will be held on Saturday, July 17, at the Delmar VFW in Delmar, Md. The event, which features Longaberger baskets and Vera Bradley handbags, includes 20 games of bingo, five special games, raffles, a large Chinese Auction and King Tutt games/rip offs. Doors open at 5 p.m. and bingo begins at 6:30 p.m. Cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Call to save your spot and be includ-

Summer events at the library

The Bridgeville Library announces its summer schedule of events. Join Ms. Kathy for Lap Sit on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for ages 3 months to 2 years. This is an interactive story time for very young children to introduce regular library visits. Family Nights are held each month on the third Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Games, fun, entertainment and light refreshments are anticipated. Movie Mania continues through the summer with Bring Your Own Lunch Movie Classics on the first Monday of each month. Enjoy a classic film from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. with intermission. Teen Movie Night for ages 13-17 is the first Friday of each month from 5 to 7:30 p.m. The Educational/Documentary movie event is on the second Thursday of each month from 1-3 p.m.; this is for ages 8-15. Summer Saturday Matinees will run until Aug. 14, from 2-4 p.m. A complete movie list is available at the library. Make a Splash-READ Summer Reading Programs are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11 a.m. Join us for a summer full of reading, crafts, fun and entertainment. A complete schedule is available at the library. The Teen Reading Program is on the first and third Friday nights from 5 to 7 p.m. The Genealogy Discussion Group meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 10:30 a.m. All programs are free and open to the public. The new library is located at 600 S. Cannon St. in Bridgeville. Hours are Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. For sign ups and more information, call the library at 337-7401.

Women in the Outdoors event

The Delaware chapters of the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) will host a Women in the Outdoors event on Saturday, July 17, at Owens Station Shooting Preserve in Greenwood. Women in the Outdoors events provide hands-on outdoor classes in a non-threatening environment. Cost is $30, lunch is provided. Classes include Archery, Trap Shooting, 22 Rifle, Self Defense, Delaware Wildlife Heritage, Pistol, Bird House Making, Living in Balance and Outdoor Cooking. Pre-registration is required by July 9. For more information and a registration form, contact Nancy Moore at 65yards@ comcast.net or 629-5527. You may also visit www.womenintheoutdoors.org for more information about the program.

Framed print fundraiser

The Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 in Greenwood has acquired a framed, signed photograph by Kevin Fleming of the famous Greenwood Chicken BBQ which is for sale via sealed bids. The photograph, which features two Greenwood Volunteer firefighters cooking BBQ chicken halves, can be viewed in Discover Bank in Greenwood. Only sealed bids will be considered. Bids should be mailed to: President Durene Jones, Greenwood Memorial VFWL Auxiliary, P.O. Box 900, Greenwood, DE 19950. The highest bidder will be revealed at the Chicken BBQ in Greenwood, on Aug. 6. A certified check or cash only will be accepted in payment for this memorable piece of regional artwork. For more information, contact Sec. Michaele Russell at 349-4220.

Kiss a Goat fundraiser

Cast your vote in the Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial Post 7478 of Greenwood’s summer fundraiser, “Kiss a Goat.” The contest will be held now through Greenwood’s “Night Out” event on Aug. 10, from 6 to 8 p.m. on Governor’s Avenue. Contestants include Town Council members, Mayor Willard Russell and Council members Brenda Tallent,

Donald Donovan, Willie Pierce and Alan Pongratz, along with Chief of Police Mark Anderson. The one whose container collects the most money will “Kiss the Goat” at the end of Greenwood’s “Night Out.” Containers for voting with donations will be available at three local businesses: Yoder’s Country Store on East Market Street in Greenwood, L&M Insurance Agency on the Greenwood Town Plaza and Some-Like-It-Hot/Greenwood Building Supply on the corner of Route 13 South and Greenwood Road. Voting will be tabulated regularly and continue at Post 7478 from 6 to 8 p.m. on Aug. 10. Votes may also be mailed. Checks should be made payable to: VFWL Aux. Post 7478 and mailed to: Pres. Durene Jones, Ladies Auxiliary Post 7478, P.O. Box 900, Greenwood, DE 19950. The public is invited to attend “Night Out” in Greenwood and support this fundraiser for our veterans. For more information, call Secretary Michaele Russell at 349-4220.

Greenwood CHEER events

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center, located at 41 Schulze Rd. in Greenwood, is hosting the following events and trips: Artwork Exhibit - Thursday, July 15 and Friday, July 16, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The exhibit includes oil paintings, quilts and photography. There will be free table space for those who want to exhibit, but you must call the center to register at 349-5237. Christmas In July Auction - Thursday, July 22, 10 a.m. - There will be a variety of items for sale. Lunch will be served at noon for a donation of $3 per person over age 60. For more information or to donate gift items, call Susan Welch at 349-5237. Motor Coach Trip - See “Psalms of David” at Sight & Sound Living Waters Theater in Lancaster, Pa., on Tuesday, Aug. 10. Cost is $80 per person for members or $90 for non-members and includes transportation, show ticket and smorgasbord dinner at Hershey Farm Restaurant. Deadline for payment is July 6. The bus departs Greenwood CHEER Activity Center at 10:30 a.m. and returns at 8:30 p.m. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237. Register of Wills program - Tuesday, July 13, 12:30 p.m. - This information program, presented by the Register of Wills office with Greg Fuller at the center, will help you learn the duties of the Register of Wills Office and the laws regarding probate plus have your questions answered. For more information, call the center at

LetTony TonyWindsor Windsor perform perform for Let foryour yourevent event! Tony Windsor

Guaranteed affordable! Portions of proceeds will benefit the Newspapers in Education program.

Tony TonyWindsor Windsorisisaccepting accepting bookings for entertaining any bookings for entertaining size from the living anyevent, size event, from the room to the great outdoors! living room to the great outdoors! Singing classic Singing classic country and country and rock, with rock, with special 50s, 60s special 50s, 60s and 70s and 70s hits! hits! Also, gospel and Also, gospel and holiday music holiday music available. available. Booking now for Christmas parties and beyond. Call: Booking now for 2010. 302-236-9886 forfor info. Call 302-236-9886 info.


PAGE 17

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010 349-5237. Summer Fiesta Dinner - A Summer Fiesta Dinner will be held at the center on Wednesday, July 21, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $6 per member and $8 non-members. There will be musical entertainment by Bruce Willey followed by piñata fun. For more information, call the center at 349-5237.

Seaford AARP trips

Oct. 25-29- Smoky Mts. Tenn.-Visit the Titanic Pigeon Forge Museum and board an actual life boat, touch an iceberg and experience the chill of the 28 degree water. The museum will display hundreds of artifacts in 20 galleries on two decks. Enjoy a catered lunch & a show from a Blast From The Past at Smiths Restaurant. Admission to Dollywood for a day before your stop at the Smith Family Dinner Theatre with live entertainment. Then off to the Magic Beyond Belief show. Enjoy a box lunch while having a guided tour of the Smoky Mountains, looking for black bear and that evening have dinner at the Black Bear Jamboree. Have dinner before enjoying a night of dancing and humor at the Country Tonite theatre. Hotel, 4 breakfasts, 4 dinners, 2 lunches. Restaurants and bus driver tip included. Cost: $595.00 per person, doubles. Single - $725.00. For more information, contact Rose at 302-629-7180. December 6-8th - Wheeling Festival Of Lights in Virginia. Lodging at Wheeling Island Casino hotel. Two meals per day, including a dinner show. Festival of Lights Tour, Glass Museum, Oglebay’s Mansion Museum and more. Cost: $355.00 per person/doubles. For more information on this trip, contact Rose - 629-7180

Living Waters Theater trip

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center is offering a motor coach trip to see “Psalms of David” at Sight & Sound Living Waters Theater in Lancaster, Pa., on Tuesday, Aug. 10. Cost is $80 per person for member or $90 non-member and includes transportation, show ticket and smorgasboard dinner at Hershey Farm Restaurant. Deadline for payment of the trip is July 6. The bus departs Greenwood CHEER Activity Center at 10:30

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302

875-9118

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The session will offer information about sliding scale cost spay/neuter clinics and no-kill kitten adoptions.

a.m. and returns at 8:30 p.m. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

WPS Fall Trip

Enjoy a motorcoach trip to Hudson Valley, N.Y., on Oct. 20-22, 2010. The trip includes two nights lodging, two breakfasts, lunches at the Culinary Institute, one dinner, tour of the Culinary Institute, Hudson River Cruise, US. Military Academy tour, FDR Home & Library, Vanderbilt Mansion, Purple Heart Hall of Honor, baggage handling, all taxes and gratuities. Cost per person, double occupancy is $410. For information, contact Frances Horner at 629-4416.

Laurel Senior Center Trips

The Laurel Senior Center is offering the following trip: Tennessee Sampler, Oct 4-9, cost $739 per person, includes 5 nights hotel accommodations, 5 breakfasts, 3 dinners, 1 luncheon, cruise, 3 shows, Graceland & Dollyland. For more information, call 875-2536.

Trip to Louisville

AARP #915 presents a trip to Louisville, Ky., on Oct. 24-29. Trip is six days and five nights and includes five breakfasts and five full dinners. Sights include the Derby Dinner Playhouse, Belle of Louisville Riverboat, Churchill Downs & Kentucky Derby Musesum, “My Old Kentucky Home” Place, Heaven’s Hill Distillery, Louisville Slugger Museum and much, much more. Cost is $775 per person/double occupancy. Single occupancy is slightly higher. For information or reservations, call 410-754-8189 or 410-754-8588.

GET READY SEAFORD

and surrounding areas!

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Sussex County Marines

Marine Corps League Detachment #780, Devil Dog Detachment, meets the first Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at American Legion Post #6, “the log cabin,” in Seaford. All former and retired Marines from all generations are welcome.

Monthly SARA meeting

The regular monthly meeting of the Sussex Amateur Radio Association (SARA) is Wednesday, July 21, at the Marvel Museum in Georgetown. FCC license testing for all levels begins at 6:30 p.m. An informal social starts at 7 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 7:30. This meeting is open to anyone with an interest in amateur radio. For more information, visit www.sussexamateurradio.com.

USPS monthly meeting

United States Power Squadron (USPS) meets at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. If you are interested in boating education and safety, and enjoy boating, sailing or canoeing, join us and participate in our classes and outings. For more information, contact C.M. Kohlenberg at 629-0687 or Rob Hutton at 628-0312.

USCG Auxiliary

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary meets the second Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club. For more information, contact Cindi Chaimowitz at 302-398-0309.

Reunion

Colonel Richardson High School, Class of 1985, is planning a 25th high school reunion for this fall. The committee is updating classmate addresses. For more information, contact Debbie (Feyl) Brohawn at 410-754-8910 or crhs1985@gmail.com.

Seaford Widowed Persons meet

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, July 20, at 12:15 p.m. at the Georgia House in Laurel. The planned guest speaker will be Ron Quillen. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Weekly ‘Feline Rescue’ session

Homeless Cat Helpers will hold a question and answer session on “Feline Rescue Resources” at the Seaford Library on Monday mornings from 10 to 11 a.m.

Gas Lines

The national average price for regular grade gasoline was $2.71 a gallon Friday – a decrease of 4 cents on the week, 13 cents higher than year ago prices, but still $1.40 less than the record of $4.11 set two years ago this week. This marks the eighth consecutive week gas prices have remained below $2.90 a gallon. Crude Oil Prices After falling below $72 a barrel on Tuesday, crude oil rallied above $75 a barrel Friday, a gain of more than 5% (its biggest percentage gain since late May and 4th biggest weekly gain of the year) from the start of the holidayshortened week. Crude oil prices continue to follow the direction of the stock market indices. Last week better-than-expected

Submit Bulletin Board items by noon Thursday, at least one week before. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email to editor@mspublications.com. U.S. jobless data, a weaker U.S. dollar, a positive euro and European stocks, and U.S. inventory data showing a large decline in crude stocks were all contributing factors to oil’s gains. Crude closed the week at $76.09 a barrel Friday. A look ahead “Barring any unforeseen natural or economic event, the Energy Information Administration forecast gas prices will average $2.80 a gallon this summer,” said Jana L. Tidwell, acting manager of Public and Government Affairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic. Local pricing On Tuesday gas stations from Delmar to Greenwood were selling regular gasoline in a range from $2.549 to $2.659 a gallon. The high is six cents less than a week ago, the low is two cents less.

Regular Unleaded Gasoline & Crude Oil prices National

Delaware

Oil Barrel

7/11/10

Week Ago

Year Ago

$2.71

$2.74

$2.55

$2.65

$2.67

$2.47

7/9/10

Week Ago

Year Ago

$76.09

$72.95

$59.00


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

Church Bulletins Free soup and sandwiches

New Zion United Methodist Church in Laurel offers free soup and sandwiches every Wednesday from noon to 2 p.m. For more information, contact Pastor Timothy Duffield Sr. at 8750727.

Old Christ Church’s schedule

Old Christ Church, an historic church in Laurel, will meet the first Sunday of each month for the summer at 10 a.m. Services will be held on Aug. 1 and Sept. 5. Services are open to anyone of any denomination and will include refreshments and tours of the church after each service. The traditional “Blessing of Animals” will be held on Oct. 3 at 3 p.m. A collection will be taken for local animal shelters. November features a Thanksgiving Day Eucharist at 10:30 a.m. followed by Advent lessons and carols with guest concert artists in December. For more information, call 875-3644 or email RevBackus@gmail.com and OldChristChurchLeague@gmail.com.

St. Luke’s newsletter

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church offers its newsletter, “Luke’s Letter” online and also via email. The newsletter is published approximately once a month and is available online at www.stlukesseaford. org. Join our email list by sending a request to StLukesEpis@comcast.net. St. Luke’s services are Sunday, Holy Eucharist at 9 a.m., and Thursday evenings, Holy Eucharist and Healing at 6 p.m. The Rev. Jeanne Kirby-Coladonato is the rector.

Creation Station Bible School

Trinity UMC in Laurel, near Trap Pond, announces its annual Vacation Bible School, “Creation Station,” July 1923, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. During the week, we will explore all the wonderful things God has created. Each night features a guest speaker who will teach about the world we live in. A NASA scientist will speak about space, Native American storytellers will talk about God’s creation of human beings, the Salisbury Zoo will bring animals, and more. The week will also include crafts, music and snacks. To register, call 875-4741. VBS is open to all children ages 3-12. Come and joins us for a week of fun!

Take My Hand Benefit Concert

A Benefit Concert for Take My Hand Ministry and its program, the Mary & Martha Tea Room, will be held at 7 p.m. on Saturday, July 24, at Seaford Wesleyan Church, “The Ark,” on Rt. 13 south, Seaford. The Southern Gospel Concert will feature Jerry and Jeannie Jones, Thom and Deb Slaughter, Amanda Jones and Will Reynolds. Take My Hand Ministry primarily works with women and low income families and is a nonprofit organization with a 501(c)(3) status. The ministry is supported solely by freewill donations. The public is invited to attend this special evening of gospel music and worship. For more information, call Dr. Michaele Russell at 349-4220 or Jeannie Jones, concert organizer, at 228-4813.

Weekly Bible Study

Women’s Tea Room to be held

Free Community Luncheon

Christ Lutheran hosts Concert

A weekly Bible study is being held every Wednesday night from 7:15-8:15 p.m. at the Days Inn, Rt. 13 South, Seaford (next to KFC). Family oriented Bible lessons for all ages. Sunday worship service is at 12 noon in the same location. Elder Cornell Johnson of Jesus The Christ Apostolic Ministries is Pastor. Call 628-0349 or 302-344-9672 for more information. Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (fried chicken, corn-on-the-cob, potato salad, etc.) on Saturday, July 17, noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Blvd. (west side of Rt. 13A, approx. 2 miles south of town).Any questions, call Shirley at 875-2314.

Annual Gospel Music Festival

On Saturday, July 17, St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Laurel will hold its 3rd annual Gospel Music Festival featuring the Lights of Home, Reunion Quartet, Sounds of Joy, Joe Dawson, and, for the first time, the “Shouters.” This is an outside event so bring your lawn chair. Hot dogs, hamburgers and homemade ice cream will be for sale. All proceeds benefit St. Paul’s youth program. The program begins at 5 p.m. and rain date is July 24.

Union UMC hosts No Name Band

The No Name Band will be at Union United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall, Laws Street, Bridgeville, on Friday, July 16, at 7:30 p.m. For further information, contact Everett Warrington at 337-7198.

Take My Hand Women’s Ministry will host Mary and Martha’s Tea Room on Wednesday, July 21, at 2 p.m. at 102 Maryland Avenue, Greenwood. This Christian event is open and free to all women. The speaker is Reverend Carol Hopkins. Light refreshments will be served, and a free-will offering will be taken. A Summer Concert will be held at Christ Lutheran Church on July 24 at 6 p.m., featuring Linda Tiff and Sounds of Joy. The church is located on Shipley Street, Seaford. For further information, call 629-2495.

Gospel Music Festival

On Saturday, July 17, St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Laurel, will hold its 3rd annual Gospel Music Festival at 5 p.m. This is an outside event so bring your lawn chair. This year’s event features the Lights of Home, Reunion Quartet, Sounds of Joy, Joe Dawson, and, for the first time, the “Shouters.” All proceeds benefit the St. Paul’s youth program. Rain date is July 24.

14th anniversary celebration

Join us for our 14th Year Anniversary Celebration at Christ the Cornerstone Community Church (located at the corner of Bethel and Seaford Road) on Sunday, July 25, from 1 to 3 p.m. Jim and Patti Jeannette and family will bless us with their songs of praise and worship. The celebration includes food, fun and fellowship.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010S . Central Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Centenary UMC

www.laurelcentenaryumc.org

875-3983

200 W. Market Street, Laurel, Del. Contemporary Worship, 8:45 a.m. Traditional Worship, 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, for ALL Ages, 9:45 a.m. Wednesdays: Bible Study 1 p.m.; & Youth Ministry 6:45 p.m.

The Gift of His Love Let others know where you are and when you meet. To advertise in this directory, call

629-9788

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Seaford

C H R IST IA N C H U R C H of

22581 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship 10:30 (Nursery & Jr. Church)

Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Service 7:00 p.m.

Know, Grow, Show & Go in our Walk with Jesus Christ

Centrally located at

14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org Pastor Timothy Dukes, Senior Pastor Pastor John Lanzone, Youth/Family Pastor

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: Bible Study 7 PM


MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 19

543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Obituaries Albert M. Carey, 55

Albert Michael Carey of Delmar, died Sunday, July 4, 2010, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. Born in Salisbury, he was the son of the late Albert James Carey and Gladys Marie Collins Carey. Mike worked as a custodian for Trinity United Methodist Church in Salisbury before working at Trigg County Hospital in Cadiz, Ky., until last November due to health reasons. In Kentucky, he received Employee of the Year in 2009. He attended Emmanuel Wesleyan Church in Salisbury and Carey Christ Evangelistic Church in Laurel. He loved going to Civil War reenactments and dressing up as different characters, such as Santa Claus at Christmas and for charities. He loved to travel and go to yard sales and thrift stores. He was the life of the party and entertained his family and friends with his humor. He is survived by two sons, Kevin Carey of Delmar and Kevin Vetra of Missouri; four daughters, Heather Hudson of Gumboro, Christina Paul of Missouri, Faye Brobst of Salisbury and Tammy Paul of Parsonsburg, Md.; 11 grandchildren; four sisters, Becky Dyson & her husband, John of Delmar, Debbie White & her husband Charles of Laurel, Sheila Faye Phillips & her husband, Gary of Seaford and Betty Jo Butler & her husband, James of Harbeson; three brothers, Stephen W. Carey Sr. & his wife, Terry of Eden, Md., Art Carey & his wife, Dawn of Hebron, Md. and Keith Carey & his girlfriend, Debbie Curtis of Delmar; and special friends, Rita & Leonard Jewell of Cadiz, Ky. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his longtime companion, Rae Ellen Scott. The funeral service was held on Friday, July 9, at Holloway Funeral Home in Salisbury. Interment followed at Line Community Cemetery. The Rev. William Kniceley officiated. Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, PA. To send condolences to the family, visit www.hollowayfh.com.

Welcome…

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Edward D. Dubinski, 76

Edward “Dub” Donald Dubinski of Laurel, passed away on Monday, July 5, 2010, at his home after a long illness. He was born in Oshkosh, Wis., on Sept. 10, 1933, the son of John Edward and Bertha Hunt Dubinski. Ed retired in 1992 from the DuPont Company in Seaford, after 35 years of service. He was a devoted family man, an avid golfer and a competitive bowler. He had an unwavering faith in God and was an active member of Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel where he taught the sixth grade Sunday Dubinski School Class for 12 years and enjoyed singing in the choir. He was a member of the American Legion Post #19, the Laurel Alumni Association and the Odd Fellows. Mr. Dubinski dedicated much of his life to the children of Laurel, serving as a Cub Master, a Little League coach and the founding advisor for the Junior Achievement Program in Laurel in the 1980s. Ed’s parents both died while he was a teenager, and he was raised by his sister, Eleanor Frank, of Oshkosh. After graduation from Oshkosh High School, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy. While stationed in Chincoteague, Va., he met his wife of the past 55 years, Norma Charlene Wootten. He is survived by his loving wife, Charlene. They have three children, Dawn and her husband, Michael S. Cherrix, Donald and his wife, Maryrose Dubinski and Lori Grady. They also have nine grandchildren, Frank and his wife Alison Dubinski, Patrick Dubinski, Jacob Dubinski, Bridget Grady, Erin Grady, Megan Grady, Brendan Grady, Michael D. Cherrix and Haley Cherrix. Their first great-grandchild, Leah Rose Dubinski, was just born on June 26, 2010. Mr. Dubinski is also survived by his sister, Eleanor Frank, of Oshkosh; one brother-in-law, Edwin Roland of Tavares, Fla. and Valders, Wis.; two sisters-in-law, Margaret and Joan Dubinski, both of Oshkosh; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents and

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC 22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. 6:45 Catalyst Youth (gr. 7-12), Worship, Nursery, Classes DivorceCare, KidStuf 103 (K-6 kids & their parents, 1st & 3rd for Kids & Adults Wednesday) 7:00 Intercessory 7:00 p.m. Prayer, Men’s Group Evening Service

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE

(302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburyworship.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s

Episcopal Church Front & King St., Seaford, DE

629-7979

Holy Eucharist: Sunday, 9:00 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Union

United Methodist Church

743E . Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Pastor

2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church

GETHSEMANE

MOUNT PLEASANT

Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Pastor - O. Kenneth Scheller 302-875-0140

A Safe Sanctuary & Stephen’s Ministry Church Rev. E. S. Mallozzi

Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

26295 Sussex Highway (south on 13), Seaford, DE

All are welcome to worship here every Sabbath.

WORSHIP TIMES:

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Contemporary Services ... 8:45 & 10:30 a.m. Nursery Care & Children’s Church Provided Corner of Woodland Ferry Rd. & Stein Hwy., 4 miles West of Seaford • 629-2862 Jeans Expected! No Halos Required!

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Dale Evans

Contemporary Service............9:30 a.m. Sunday School.............10:15 a.m. Traditional Service. .11:30 a.m. Mount Pleasant Road, Laurel (Just off Rt. 24 west, on Rd. 493A)

875-1045


PAGE 20 eight siblings, brothers, Harold, Leonard, Robert, Norbert, and John Dubinski (all of Oshkosh) and sisters, Dorothy Maurer of Chicago, Lorraine Thompson of Kaukauna, Wis., and Lila Roland of Tavares and Valders. Services were held on Saturday, July 10, at Centenary United Methodist Church in Laurel. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made in his memory to Centenary United Methodist Church, 200 W. Market St., Laurel, DE 19956; Laurel Alumni Association, PO Box 382, Laurel, DE 19956; or Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963. Arrangements are in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

Dianna L. Ellis Halpen, 62

Dianna Lynn Ellis Halpen of Seaford, died Wednesday, July 7, 2010, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford. Born in Milford, the daughter of the late Elizabeth D. Wainright and A’Delbert E. Ellis, she was a school teacher in the Woodbridge School District for 35 years at Greenwood Elementary School. Dianna was a member of Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church in Seaford, the Ladies Auxiliary, Virgil Wilson Post 4961 Veterans of Foreign Wars, Seaford Lanes Bowling League and the National Education Association. She is survived by her husband, Albert L. Halpen; a brother, James J. Ellis and wife Sue Ann of Seaford; two half-brothers, Johnny Ellis and Joseph Ellis; a half-sister, A’Della Hebert; two aunts, June Van Vorst and Frances Wainright; a sister-in-law, Linda Cooper of Westover, Md.; nieces and nephews; and several great-nieces and nephews. Services were held on Sunday, July 11, at Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions to the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department Ambulance Squad, PO Box 87, Seaford, DE 19973.

Della Windsor Hastings, 93

Della Windsor Hastings of Seaford, died peacefully at the Guest Wing of the Hospice House in Easton, Md., on Sunday, July 4, 2010, after a brief illness. Mrs. Hastings was born on Aug. 21, 1916, in Laurel, the only child of Clayton G. and Mary W. Elliott. She graduated from Laurel High School in 1934. After high school, she attended what is now Goldey-Beacom College, then in downtown Wilmington. She was married to James B. Windsor for seven years until their divorce in 1943. Mrs. Hastings worked at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital from 1952 to 1973, rising to the position of Comptroller. In 1944, she married Paul B. Hastings and they operated a grain and dairy farm near Middleford. After retiring from the hospital, she worked for Windsor’s Flowers in Rehoboth Beach for several years. Mrs. Hastings was married to Paul B. Hastings for 64 years before his death in 2008. She is survived by her daughter, Nancy H. Klein and her husband Michael J. Klein; and her sons, James C. Windsor and his wife Janet H. Windsor, P. Gary Hastings and Steven E. Hastings and his wife Jeanne Walter-Hastings. She is also survived by her grandchildren, Jill Rice, Jenifer Caudill, James H. Windsor, Amy Billy, Timothy Hastings, Christopher Hastings, Scott Walter, Hannah Hastings and Rebecca Hastings; and eight greatgrandchildren. A graveside service for the family was held at Odd Fellows Cemetery in Laurel, on Friday, July 9.

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010 The family requests donations in Mrs. Hastings’ name to Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963 or Talbot Hospice Foundation, 586 Cynwood Dr., Easton, MD 21601.

Roslyn M. Defelice Hensley, 83

Roslyn Marie DeFelice Hensley of Laurel, died Wednesday, July 7, 2010, at her home in Laurel. Born in Laurel, she was a daughter of the late Paul and Laure DeFelice. She is survived by three sons, Charles Douglas Hensley of Maryland, Lawrence Hensley of Delaware and Robert T. Hensley and his wife, Lori Hill of Laurel; a brother, Paul DeFelice of Laurel; and six grandchildren. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Charles Richard Hensley, who passed in 1989, three brothers and four sisters. A private graveside service was held at St. Stephen’s Cemetery Park in Delmar. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Joseph House, 812 Boundary St., Salisbury, MD 21801. Arrangements are in the care of Short Funeral Home in Delmar. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Betty Ewell Hill

Betty Ewell Hill of Seaford, died Wednesday, July 7, 2010, at the Harrison House in Georgetown. Mrs. Hill was predeceased by her husband of 29 years, Cecil T. Hill; her mother, Elsie Walker Ewell; her brother, Robert L. Ewell; her sister, Marguerite Hill; and a great-nephew, Scott B. Ewell. She is survived by a nephew, Shelly B. Ewell and his wife Mary Lou of Georgetown; a great-niece, Michele R. Evans of Glenside, Pa.; a great-great-niece; and great-great-nephew. Mrs. Hill was a lifelong member of Blades United Methodist Church before moving to Seaford. When she could no longer drive, she attended Atlanta Road Alliance Church with her loyal friend and neighbor, Pam Wilson. Graveside services were held on Saturday, July 10, at Blades Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations to the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department, PO Box 87, Seaford, DE 19973. Arrangements are in the care of Cranston Funeral Home.

William E. R. Marsh, 89

William E. R. Marsh of Seaford, passed away on Wednesday, July 7, 2010, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital after a lengthy illness. Born Feb. 19, 1921, Mr. Marsh was the son of Pearl A. Suthards and Roland J. S. Marsh of Lewes. He graduated from Lewes High School. As class president, he organized many memorable class reunions. Bill was a Master Mason and was active in their Tall Cedars of Lebanon Band. His DuPont career began when the DuPont Nylon Plant opened in Seaford in 1939, and he retired after 40 years of service. During World War II he saw action in the African theater while serving in the United States Coast Guard out of Groton, Conn. As Musician First Class, he thoroughly enjoyed his experience as a member of the Coast Guard Band under famed American jazz saxophonist and bandleader, Dick Stabile. Bill was an accomplished musician and played with the Lou Startt Orchestra for over 25 years. In addition to his love of music, especially Count Basie, he was an avid golfer and a member of the Seaford Golf and Country Club for more than 60 years.

Bill was predeceased by his first wife, Betty, in 2001 after 57 years of marriage. Bill leaves behind his wife, Nancy; two daughters, Sue Stenborg of Wilmington and Wendee Kramen (Stephen) of Richmond, Va.; three grandchildren, Eric Stenborg (Catherine), Betsy Kramen and Caroline Kramen; one great-grandson, Joshua; Nancy’s children, David, Linda and Meg.; and a brother, Phillip K. Marsh of Lewes. A memorial service was held on Monday, July 12, at Mt. Olivet Methodist Church in Seaford, where Bill was a member for over 60 years. Burial was on Saturday, July 10, in Bethel Cemetery, Lewes. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to any veterans organization of their choice or Mt. Olivet Methodist Church. Arrangements are in the care of Cranston Funeral Home.

Layton W. Smith, 94

Layton Workman Smith of Bridgeville, passed away peacefully on Sunday, July 4, 2010, at Delaware Hospice Center, Milford. Mr. Smith was born May 18, 1916, in Georgetown, son of the late Cleatus Arthur and Margaret May (Workman) Smith. In his early years, Layton worked on the family farm cultivating fields using horses and plows. In 1950, he began working for H.P. Cannon in Bridgeville and retired from there in 1978 as the Warehouse Foreman. Layton was a very loving, devoted father who raised his daughter after he lost his wife in 1979. He enjoyed the outdoors, especially walking, gardening and farming. He was a trustworthy friend who was always ready to lend a helping hand. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife Betty A. Smith. Layton is survived by his loving daughter, Kelly Smith Yoder and her husband John of Bridgeville; a brother, Irvin W. Smith of Georgetown; a brother-in-law, Earl W. Everline of Harrington; a special caregiver, Violet Moore and her husband Ralph of Seaford; and many friends. Funeral services were held on Thursday, July 8, at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel, Bridgeville. Clinton Yoder officiated. Interment was in Blades Cemetery, Seaford. Please sign the online guestbook at www.parsellfuneralhomes.com.

Vernon J. Nicholson, 55

Vernon James Nicholson of Laurel, died Sunday, June 27, 2010, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center. Born in Riverdale, Md., he was the son of Betty Dunston Breasure and the late Ernest Lee Nicholson Jr. Vernon was a United States Navy veteran serving in the Vietnam Conflict where he received the National Defense Service Medal. In addition to his mother, he is survived by four children, Vernon James Nicholson Jr., Chastity Nicholson, Nicholson April Nicholson and Charles Nicholson; his wife, Karen Nicholson; two brothers; three sisters; several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews; and his best friend, his dog, Dozer. The funeral service was held on Friday, July 2, at Bounds Funeral Home in Salisbury, Md. The Rev. Paul Klaverweiden officiated. Interment followed in Maryland Veterans Cemetery Eastern Shore in Hur-

lock, Md. Contributions may be made in memory of Vernon to New England Fellowship, 18907 Marantha Way, Bridgeville, DE 19933. Visit www.boundsfuneralhome. com to send letters of condolence.

Corbet L. Scarborough, 45

Corbet L. Scarborough of Laurel, passed away while visiting his brother in North Carolina. He was born in Seaford, a son of the late Leroy Scarborough who passed in 2008 and Betty Scarborough who passed in 2007. Mr. Scarborough owned and operated his own business, Scarborough Home Improvements, where he excelled in construction, welding and roofing. Cherished family memories include his love of fishing and spending the day at work. Corbet had a giving heart and would donate his time, skills and supplies to build and restore numerous buildings around Laurel. He is survived by his son, Roy Scarborough of Lewes, a daughter, Breann Scarborough of Laurel; his brother, Ed Scarborough of Tarboro, N.C.; and sisters, Brenda Whealton and husband John of Georgetown and Faith Ann Hartman and husband Mark of Laurel. He is also survived by a niece, Sandy Whealton; his nephews, Rich Whealton and Phillip Hartman; and a close friend, “Carlos.” A funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. on Friday, July 16, at Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel, where a viewing will be held one hour before the service. Pastor Tim Dukes will officiate. Interment will follow in Odd Fellows Cemetery.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 21

‘Dog days’ brings memories Doing the Towns Together of our pets through the years LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS Sarah Marie TriviTS • 875-3672

Dog.” So, Dog became the last Barton pet. He was a warm and friendly mutt, loved to eat a bowl of ice cream, took over evening residency of the large hassock we had in the family room, and would persistently nudge the feet of anyone off of the hassock so that he could settle in for the evening. One rabbit season he disappeared. We roamed the town looking for Dog, to no avail. Whoever took Dog were in for a big mistake. He was a beautiful dog, loved to race about, but would never chase a rabbit. Our dogs had dog houses Chuck built and primarily lived outside the house. They ate table scraps, sometimes tasty morsels, and dog food. Nothing really special. They had shelter in the summer and winter, and during very cold weather would sleep in the basement at night — or the kids bedrooms. They also had a garden shed for protection in nasty weather, had plenty of water and food daily. Each had a collar with identification. They were well fed, well loved and well known. They were family members. Our generation of dogs would not make it in today’s dog world. They never knew the luxury of granola bones, nylabones or muscle chews, pig ears or pig snooters. They had the luxury of an old ham bone that they would gnaw on for hours and hours. Our dogs had a warm bed at night, usually an old pillow or bed of used blankets. They never experienced a pet booster seat, but took control of the back seat of any of our vehicles. Inside they took over the hassock, or occasionally would be brave (or foolish) enough to jump on the middle of the bedspread. We all loved each pet and each of these dogs, with their individual personality, was a member of the Barton household. They were lovable, well-adjusted animals and would add a wonderful dimension to our life. None were neurotic, but each had a lovely personality. Each one was very special and just as with a small child, each pet knew he or she was loved.

Thank You The Family of

Wm. Dale Brubaker

would like to thank everyone for your kind support during our time of loss. Thanks for the many cards, phone calls, visits, food, flowers, prayers and also for donations to the Laurel and Delmar Fire Depts. Diane Brubaker and Family

The Western Sussex Democratic Club held their summer picnic on Monday evening at Dale Dukes’ recreation center.

This week was a time for parties. Monday, July 5, Charlene and Darrell Meade hosted one for out-of-towners. Guest Mao Co, a friend of their son, Ethan, was here from Seoul, Korea, and visiting other relatives in the states. They also had as guests for a week, cousins, Erik and Sue Kridle, with children, Olivia, Elizabeth and Jacob, from Southern California. It was a great dinner party and getting acquainted all around with other family members and friends. Irene Hastings of Evergreen Drive has recently returned from a week’s vacation in North Carolina. Her son, Dallas, and his wife, Susan, came first to Laurel; then all three traveled to Wilmington and took the “A” train ( Amtrack) to Fayetteville, N.C. Irene loves traveling by train but they were speeding along so fast (125 m.p.h.) that the scenic beauties became scenic blurring. She made up for that loss as, in Fayetteville and areas around, she visited museums and Civil War battle grounds and enjoyed some great dining. Now back home, she brought fond memories of a wonderful summer vacation.

Leah Snyder, who was a runner in the 5K race on July 4, brought home a very nice third place trophy for her mantelpiece (and she does have a mantelpiece in her home!). Ralph Gootee is wished a speedy recovery and home soon, from all his friends, following his recent surgery.

There are parties and there are parties and a real “barn burner” was held (in the much decorated barn) last Saturday night at the

Trivits’ place to celebrate Matthew’s 16th birthday. The party, given by his parents, John and Kim, featured crabs, corn on the cob, fried chicken, home made ice cream and a variety of other goodies. Weekend guests were Randy, Barbara and Ryan Cartright from Hoopers Island (hence those wonderful crabs). Needless to say all guest left “full” and happy. Incidentally, happy belated birthday, Matt. I have just learned that Mary Jane Phillips of Delmar, who has been on our prayer list for a few weeks, was returned to P.R.M.C. for emergency surgery last Saturday. At this writing she remains hospitalized there. We all wish her a speedy and complete recovery.

I wish a very special happy birthday, with love, to my dear daughter-in-law, Kim, on July 19. Have many more, Kimmie! We have some Delmar birthdays wishes to send: A belated wish to Tommy Lane, who celebrated his on July 1. And more of the same wishes go to David Charles Smith, who will be 21 on July 22, and to Sarah Mae Elizabeth Smith, with lots of love from “Mom,” celebrating 18 years on July 22. Special birthday wishes to Donald Farrelly on July 15, and to Susie Oakes on July 19. Best wishes to Frank and Peggy Vinder, as they celebrate a wedding anniversary on July 21, from all their friends.

We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Sgt. Andrew J. Creighton, Della Windsor Hastings, Edward Dubinski and Doris Parker Moore.

We continue with prayers for our service men and women and our friends who are ill: Ralph Gootee, Mary Jane Phillips, Susan Levredge, Walt Dorman, Dot Murphy, Jean Henry, Ida Lee Coulbourne, Conner Niblett, Robert Truitt, Calvin Hearn, Janet Lee, Al Bozman, Rita Brex, Sandy Jones Lee, Theodosia Gordy, Byrd Whaley, Hazel Brumbley, Fred Sullivan, Betty Chandler, June Benson Powell, Rita Baker, Jean Foskey and Debbie Carter. Happy July birthday wishes to: Rosalyn Crone, Betty Elliott (17); Henry Jones (18); Janice Hyland, Pauline Hyland, Morris Lewis (21); and Bonita Bulota (22). Don’t forget, “Always open your mind before you open your mouth.” See you in the stars.

CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS TODAY. DON’T HESITATE! OLD Address

Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton

Last Thursday night, July 8, a “yard party” was held at the home of Glen and Sally Bradshaw, hosted by the families of Jesse and Luke Styres, observing the birthdays of the two young men. It was also a welcome back celebration for the visit here of Luke Styres and family; wife, Melissa and two dear little girls, Allyson and Kaela from Rienzi, Miss. The music was fast forwarded by D.J. Conrad Styres and the “grill master” was Mark Hastings. Luke’s mother, Lora, was more than happy to entertain them for a week at her Laurel home. Luke and family have now returned to Mississippi.

Name: _________________________________________ Old Address: ____________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

NEW Address

Moments With Mike

Well, I survived three heat waves and one minor summer storm, so guess I’ll pen another column this week.

MOVING?

What a wild and wooley summer this has been so far. The so-called “dog days” which normally do not descend upon us until midAugust, are already here in this horrible heat wave we had on the Eastern shore, and the east coast in general. The crazy weather has given food for thought to lots of us. Hearing “dog days” referred to several times brought memories of the various dogs we’ve had as family pets through the years. In the case of our household, it all began when our first dog, Butch, a lovely beagle, became a part of the family. He was a big old, scruffy ball of energy, much loved and spoiled, of course. Next in line we had Beauty, a collie that was definitely Bonnie’s dog. Beauty was a collie with the softest coat in the world. She was loving and frisky, devoted to Bonnie. Her one fault was that she loved to chase chickens and that was definitely a “No, No.” At the time of Beauty’s arrival to our family fold, Mr. Jim Cordrey had a large chicken house across the branch and up the hill beyond the woods of our home. Beauty always managed to get away from our house and go up to Mr. Jim’s house and set the chickens in a fit, barking and yappin’ and upsetting the chickens in general. Bonnie walked her all over town, using a little harness that Chuck had made to keep her under control. Her passion for chickens, unfortunately, brought her life to an early demise. Next in our family life came Skipper, a lovable old lumbering dog Chuck brought home one day as a baby in a box. Skipper was well-known around our end of town and would take a neighborhood walk each morning and night, going from door to door to extend his daily greetings and check out the food supply from well-intentioned neighbors. Some in our area referred to him as “Hamburg,” since several widows actually cooked him hamburg and kept him well fed. Coupled with the food he ate at home, he was a bit of a chubby beagle. Skipper was always known as Johns dog. We could look outside and always know where John was playing, because Skipper would be standing guard close by. We had a strong sense of security with Skipper and our brood, knowing he was always protective. Skipper marched in nearly every little league parade during the course of his life as a Barton household member. He slept well at night, too, since he was usually smuggled into John’s bed. Both dog and son thought Chuck and I didn’t know that the unusually large lump in the middle of John’s bed was Skipper. He suffered from arthritis early in life all due to a love of chasing cars and being struck more than once. It was a habit we could not break and resulted in his demise later on. Dog was a dog that adopted Chuck and became the last dog in the Barton family life. One day Chuck was at Ed Layton’s service station on Fourth Street, when he looked out at his pick-up and perched up on the front seat, paws on dashboard, looking over the scenery was this cute little Beagle. Chuck and Edward Lee tried their best to get the dog out of the vehicle but he was determined to stay. He had wandered into Edward Lee’s station, had no tags or identification. We advertised finding him in the newspapers, but no one ever claimed him, so he became a Barton. Trying to decide just what name we would give him, son, Philip, calmly said, “He’s a dog. Just call him

Name: _________________________________________ New Address: ___________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

Mail to the Seaford/Laurel Star Circulation, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE or call Karen direct at 752-4454


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • juNLY 15 - 21, 2010

Community Snapshots

Steve Goff of the Laurel American Legion Post 19 is shown with fishing tournament winner Logan Black. Submitted photo

Laurel American Legion fishing tournament winner Coyte Searcey is shown with Kim Littleton of A and K Tackle. Tournament organizers thanked the town of Laurel, A and K Tackle, Pepsi, the family of Dick Banks, the family of John Frank Benson, and all of the participants for their support of the organization’s annual youth fishing tournament. Submitted photo

Mrs. Dick Banks, left, and grandson David Banks congratulate Laurel American Legion Post 19 fishing tournament winner Sydney Collins. Submitted photo Magician/ventriloquist “Gil” is shown entertaining members of the Delmar Kiwanis Club and their guests, during the 60th Anniversary dinner, which took place on Monday at the Fountains in Salisbury. Photo by Mike McClure

The 2010-11 Laurel Lions officers are shown (l to r): front row: Galen Queen, third vice president; Ron Scott, second V.P.; Patty Littleton, first V.P.; King Lion David Hare; back row: Joy Spicer, secretary; Mark Rubino, treasurer; Jim Littleton, Judy Sheridan, Bob Murphy, directors; IPP Bob Martin; Pat Disharoon, tail twister; Joan Orr Best, asst. lion tamer. Not pictured: Brad Spicer, director; Norm Prothe, asst. tail twister, and Mike McCrea, lion tamer. Disharoon was presented with the Laurel Lion of the Year plaque by V.D. Governor Mike Hlavac and Martin. Submitted photo

Delmar Kiwanis Club member Tommy Young, right, shakes hands with fellow member Wayne Bradley during the club’s 60th Anniversary celebration. Young has been a member of the club for 45 years while Bradley has been a member for 43 years. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 23

Entertainment was different as a child There it was. I could hardly believe it. Lying half covered in the dirt was a shiny round object. Closer inspection confirmed my greatest expectations; it was a quarter. A quarter may not sound like too much, but when you are nine years old in 1966, it was like finding a brick of gold. Before I even managed to pick it up I started imagining where and how I would spend it. I had it spent by the time I got it in hand. When you received money, whether the 10 cents our barber Ira Lowe always gave us after a haircut, or the 25 cents my grandmother would give me for helping her during the week, there was a certain criteria to follow. If it was less than a dollar, you would go to Archie Tyler’s or Bryan Hall’s stores to spend it. If it was a dollar or more, it was off to McCrory’s (The 10cent store). Once I had the quarter in my pocket I tore off for town like Grant through Richmond. Mr. Archie’s store was my family’s “Food Lion.” If I was craving candy or Oatmeal cakes, or maybe those chocolate cupcakes with white cream inside, that is where I would go. However, if had my mind on a toy, then it was off to Bryan Hall’s store. Walking into Bryan Hall’s store I would scan the rows of candy neatly stacked against the front counter and then look at the spinning metal rack that contained all kinds of gimmicks and gadgets. I had gotten every item at one time or another. There was the stink bomb. That was a riot. It was a small ball with a fuse that once lit would eventually emit a smoke cloud of gaseous sulfur. Why was that legal? Even more importantly, what possible use could there be for anyone other than a juvenile delinquent? There was the small buzzer that you could use to shake hands with somebody and deliver a buzzing vibratration in the palm of their hand. Now, this seemed like such a clever and humorous practical joke. But given the fact that I can recall maybe once in my childhood that I shook hands with someone it was hard to set up the joke. I would walk up to one of my friends with hand stretched out and say, “Hey, shake hands.” There was hardly an element of surprise. I would have been more successful if I had been wearing a sandwich board sign proclaiming I had just been to Bryan Hall’s and bought a handshake buzzer. Of course I could always buy paper caps. They were normally reserved for the cap pistol I would get each year for Christmas. However, by summertime I was lucky if there was a trigger or barrel left to the gun. But, I would still buy paper caps. There would be anywhere from three to six rolls of paper caps depending on the price. I would take the caps home and sit down on the back porch steps with a brick and a hammer. If I didn’t have access to a hammer, another brick would do. I would take a roll of paper caps and slam a brick down on top of it and hear the loud crack of the miniature explosion and watch the smoke

Tony Windsor

W e Fill Yo u I n

Once I had the quarter in my pocket I tore off for town like Grant through Richmond. and gunpowder shoot out from the target. This would last between two and four minutes, depending on whether I had three or six rolls of paper caps. Looking back on this exercise in futility it is easy to see I was certainly no ball of creative energy. More often than not, I would wind up buying the little Army man that was attached to a parachute. He was green, dressed in fatigues and holding a rifle. The plastic parachute was with him, folded strategically inside the cellophane package. The outside of the bag stated, “Hours of fun. Watch this military hero float down for action anywhere you choose.” What action? He was a hollow soft plastic replica of a soft plastic hollow soldier. But, I would buy it and run home to play with it. The first thing I had to do was untangle the six to eight threads that attached the parachute. I would then throw the soldier as high in the air and watch him float down. I would then pick him up, untangle the six to eight threads and throw him again. It was probably six times in the air before the threads would either break one at a time or get so tangled I would grow impatient trying to straighten them out. Eventually the parachute would only open about half way because the strings were tangled and the soldier would fall like a soft rock. It would be 30 minutes into my play with the parachuting soldier that I would usually send him on his last mission: to parachute into the burning barrel of trash my dad would have set a few minutes earlier. Well, including the time it took to get to the store, pick out the toy, run back home and play with the soldier, that quarter I found had given me an hour of entertainment. Now, I would just need to figure out what to do with the other eight or nine hours.

Sussex Tech receives award

Sussex Technical High School has been designated a “High Schools That Work (HSTW) Pacesetter School.” It is one of only 30 high schools and technology centers in the HSTW/TCTW networks that will receive this designation this year. HSTW Pacesetter Schools will be recommended as models to other schools interested in seeing the HSTW design in action. Sussex Tech will hold this recognition for two years, 2010-2012, and will be eligible to renew the designation based on results from the 2012 HSTW Assessment. High Schools That Work is the nation’s largest school improvement initiative for high school leaders and teachers.

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PAGE 24

      MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

LAUREL ALL-STARS- Laurel’s Rachel Davis delivers a pitch during last Wednesday’s Major League softball all-star game in Laurel. Davis and Regan Green combined to pitch a no-hitter in their team’s 13-0 win over Woodbridge in four innings. Above, Jacob Adkins of Laurel awaits the pitch during his team’s Junior League baseball game against Georgetown-Millsboro last Sunday. Photos by Mike McClure

BUNT SINGLE- Laurel Minor League baseball player Perez Nichols puts down a bunt single during last Thursday’s game in Millsboro. Nichols had a pair of hits in the 3-2 win. Photo by Mike McClure

SAFE AT THE PLATE- Delmar’s Ethan Ellis slides home safely during last week’s Junior League baseball game against West Salisbury. Photo by Mike McClure

NO HITS- Laurel Minor League pitcher Mitchell Moyer struck out eight and allowed no hits in four and two-thirds innings of shutout ball last Thursday in Millsboro. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

Delmar Major League baseball team notches win over Pocomoke By Mike McClure

The Delmar Major League all-star baseball team struck early and often in a 7-1 home win over Pocomoke in Maryland District 8 play last Wednesday. In the bottom of the first, Ryan Spadin walked and scored on a wild pitch and Dylan Brumbley reached on an error and scored on an error for a 2-0 Delmar lead. In the bottom of the third Devin Palmer reached first on error and pinch runner Aaron Holland scored on a fielder’s choice; Kavon Trader reached on an infield single and scored on a single by Logan Thomas; and Brandon Walton hit a three-run home run but was ruled out because he didn’t touch third (6-0). Spadin hit a two-out double and scored on a single by Trader in the bottom of the fourth to cap the scoring for Delmar. Pocomoke scored a run on an error in the sixth, but Delmar held on for the win. Zac Baynum recorded five strikeouts and no walks in five one-hit innings. Spadin doubled, Trader collected two hits, and Brandon Walton had two hits including a home run. Berlin 12, Delmar 2- Trader had a double and two RBIs and Spadin recorded five strikeouts in Friday’s loss. Delmar 11, Princess Anne 1- Trader collected three hits including a double, Shemar Watts had two hits, Baynum added one hit and got the win on the mound, and Brumbley chipped in with a hit on Sunday.

Zac Baynum comes home with the pitch during his team’s win over Pocomoke last Wednesday in Delmar. Baynum recorded a pair of wins last week to help lead the Delmar Major League baseball team. Photo by Mike McClure

PAGE 25

Delmar Junior League baseball team comes up short in rally By Mike McClure The Delmar Junior League all-star baseball team rallied from a six-run deficit before last Friday’s game was stopped due to darkness. Delmar tied the game at 12-12, but West Salisbury scored a run on Saturday to win, 13-12. The game started on Friday in Delmar with Delmar, the visiting team officially, jumping out to a 4-0 lead. West Salisbury scored five runs on five hits and four errors to take a 5-4 lead in the bottom of the third. Delmar prevented further damage in the bottom of the fourth inning. West Salisbury’s Brandon Hawley, who started the third inning rally with a leadoff double, walked and stole third in the fourth but was doubled up following a fly out. Robert Turner walked and stole third before being thrown out at third by catcher Michael Delmar pitcher Caleb Hunter comes Meuller. home with a pitch during last Friday’s Junior League action in Delmar. Photo Delmar reclaimed the lead in the top of the fifth as Matt Sooy reached on an infield by Mike McClure single and scored on an RBI double by Mila Simon. Cody Shupe added a sacrifice fly to make the score 6-5. West Salisbury answered with six runs in the bottom of the inning, starting with a two-run single by Troy Grove for another lead change. Delmar went back to work in the sixth inning when Meuller led off with a double and scored on an error and Ethan Ellis walked and scored on a single by Simon (12-8). With darkness setting in, Delmar completed the rally in the top of the seventh inning. Chase Harding was hit by a pitch with the bases loaded to force in a run, Nate Smith hit a two-run double, and the tying run came home on a passed ball. Delmar had a runner on third and one out when the game was stopped. Play resumed on Saturday, but the game was moved to West Salisbury. Delmar was unable to score the go ahead run and West Salisbury put a run on the board for the 13-12 win. Delmar 10, East Wicomico 0- Delmar bounced back with a win over East Wicomico on Sunday as Dustin Wolfgang, Sooy, and Cody Shupe each had one hit, Meuller collected two hits including a double, and Harding earned the win.

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PAGE 26

Sussex West American Legion baseball team drops a pair TOP THREE- Shown (l to r) are the top three finishers in the Riverfest 5K female division: Megan Torbert of Seaford, third; Leigh Nelson of Seattle (formerly of Seaford), second; and Bethany Killmon of Bridgeville, first. Photo by Karen Cherrix

The Sussex West American Legion baseball team lost a pair of games to Milford last Thursday. The Patriots lost game one, 14-9, in a continuation of a game started June 22. Jordan Stanley went 1-3 with a run and two RBIs; Chad Sturgeon was 2-3 with a run and an RBI; and Adam Troyer was 2-2 with an RBI in the loss. In game two, Sussex West fell to Milford by the score of 8-3. Hunter Absher had a hit and an RBI and Tyler Troyer added a hit and a run.

Derrik Gibson’s 2010 Greenville Drive statistics (as of 7/4) The following are Seaford grad Derrik Gibson’s 2010 statistics with the Greenville Drive, the Class A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox: 77G, 74-315, .235, 15 2B, 2 3B, 2 HR, 43 R, 28 RBI, 20 SB, 5 CS

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Don’t miss out on the grandkids you love.

FIRST PLACE- Derek Kitchen of Greenwood placed first in the Riverfest 5K male division. The race, which took place on Saturday, was sponsored by Seaford Subway and Hungry Howies Pizza. Photo by Karen Cherrix

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THIRD- Jon Erik Gulliksen of New Jersey placed third in the Riverfest 5K male division. Photo by Karen Cherrix

life you’ve planned.


MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 27

Laurel Star District III Junior League baseball scoreboard

Cape 9, Woodbridge 5 (Sunday)- Tim Petrone had two hits including an RBI double and Ryan Parker doubled in a run for Woodbridge. Georgetown/Millsboro 13, Laurel 6 (Sunday); Georgetown-Millsboro 9, Nanticoke 8 (Monday)- No results were submitted from this game.

Laurel catcher Noah Waldridge follows through on his swing during last week’s District III Minor League all-star baseball game. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Minor League all-star baseball team wins a pair of District III games

By Mike McClure

The Laurel Minor League all-star baseball team opened the District III tournament with a pair of wins last week. Laurel topped Millsboro, 3-2, in the opener last Thursday in Millsboro after taking a 3-0 lead in the third inning. Laurel went ahead, 1-0, in the bottom of the second inning when Mike Covey hit a leadoff single and Jake White reached first and second on an error. Covey scored on a single by Corey Evans, but White was ruled out at the plate. After Mitchell Moyer worked a 1-2-3 top of the third inning, the Laurel bats went to work in the bottom of the inning. Austin Venables hit a one-out single, Moyer doubled, and Noah Waldridge singled them in. Moyer sent Millsboro down in order in the top of the fourth, recording a pair of strikeouts in the inning. He recorded two more strikeouts (eight) before leaving the game in the top of the eighth. Covey is-

sue a two-out walk, but Waldridge threw the runner out at second on a stolen base attempt. Millsboro threatened in the top of the sixth, scoring two runs on two hits, two errors, and a wild pitch. With a runner on third and two outs, Covey recorded a game ending strike out to preserve the 3-2 win. Perez Nichols went 2-3, Waldridge was 1-3 with a pair of RBIs, Moyer doubled and scored a run, Venables and Covey each went 1-3 with a run, and Evans was 1-2 with an RBI. Moyer gave up no runs and no hits and struck out eight in four and two-thirds innings. Covey gave up no runs and two hits and struck out three in one and a third innings. Milton 8, Nanticoke 1 (Wednesday); Woodbridge 22, Milton 0 (Thursday); Millsboro 12, Nanticoke 1 (Friday); Laurel 8, Lewes 5 (Sunday); Lower Sussex 9, Woodbridge 2 (Sunday); Woodbridge 9, Millsboro 8 (Monday)- No results were submitted for these games.

Laurel pitcher Devin Burke, left, prepares to deliver pitch during last Sunday’s Junior League baseball game. Laurel third baseman Les Riggleman throws to first during last weekend’s game in Roxana. Photos by Mike McClure

Laurel Rookie League all-stars place fourth in Delmar

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Laurel Pop Warner to hold Texas Hold’em fundraisers

The Laurel Pop Warner will be having a Texas Hold’em fundraiser on the following dates: Monday, Aug. 9; and Thursday, Sept. 30 at the State Line Plaza in Delmar. It is a $30 buy in with buy backs available. All proceed go to Laurel Pop Warner.

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Austin Venables of Laurel slides into third base during his team’s 3-2 win over Millsboro during the opening game of the Delaware District III Minor League all-star baseball tournament. Photo by Mike McClure

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

The Laurel Rookie 7 and 8 year-old boys’ all-star team traveled to Delmar this past weekend to participate in their annual machine pitch tournament. Laurel won their first two games by outscoring their opponents by a score of 22-2. They then lost a tough game to Fruitland,16-12. Laurel bounced back with another win and finished the weekend with a 3-2 record and a fourth place finish. The team was led by Trace Hitchens with three home runs and an inside the park home run and Andrew Bowden with two home runs. Team members include: Mitchell Harris, Dalton Perdue, Samuel O’Neal, Carter Whaley, Andrew Bowden, Trace Hitchens, Vance Joseph, Anthony Sullivan, Caleb Reid, Holden Deihm, Chase Phippin, and Donnie Baker. The team is coached by B.J. Hitchens, Mike Ellingsworth, Warren Reid and managed by Andy O’Neal. Laurel will be hosting its own tournament this Saturday, July 17 and Sunday, July 18.


PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

STEALING THIRD- Delmar’s Matt Sooy steals third base during last week’s Junior League baseball game in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Star Maryland District 8 Little League scoreboard

Senior League- Delmar 7, West Salisbury 0- Nick Cooper struck out six in the win, Brady Scott had three hits including a home run, Brandon Parsons went 2-3, and Gus Shockley homered in Delmar’s win last Thursday. 10-11 baseball- Delmar 10, Berlin 8- Austin Rhodes picked up the win in relief, Jimmy Adkins had two hits, Hunter Frey added two hits and two RBIs, and Tim Ward collected two hits including a triple and three RBIs in last Thursday’s victory. Delmar 12, Fruitland 9- Dylan Barlow had a triple and two RBIs, Taylor Cox went 2-2 with two RBIs, and Adkins recorded four strikeouts and the win. 9-10 baseball- Delmar 7, Willards 3- Delmar’s Trey Parsons, Noah Ellis, Elijah Ellis, and Luke Figgs collected one hit apiece and Drew Owens doubled and picked up the win in Sunday’s contest.

Laurel’s Regan Green looks to make contact with a pitch during her team’s win over Woodbridge last week in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Major League softball team advances to championship game

By Mike McClure

The Laurel Major League all-star softball team advanced to the District III championship game by outscoring its opponents, 40-1. The championship game was scheduled to take place on Tuesday (see page 31) with a second championship game slated for Wednesday if Laurel loses on Tuesday. Laurel opened the tournament with a 13-0 win over Woodbridge in four innings last Wednesday in Laurel. Rachel Davis went 3-3 with a triple, three runs, and an RBI; Kortney Lee was 2-4 with two runs and two RBIs; Regan Green had one hit and two RBIs; Morgan Joseph batted 1-3 with a run and an RBI; Sara James went 1-2 with a walk and a run; and Destinee

Banks added one hit and one run. Green started the game and allowed no runs and no hits while striking out six in two innings. Davis also gave up no hits or runs in two innings and struck out four in the no-hitter. Laurel 16, Georgetown-Millsboro 0 (Thursday), Laurel 11, Lewes 1 (Sunday)- No results were submitted from these games. Woodbridge 19, Milton 4- Megan Joseph doubled and Laurie Beth Wroten earned the win in last Thursday’s game which was played in Seaford. Lower Sussex 15, Woodbridge 5 (Friday), Lewes 10, Nanticoke 0 (Wednesday), Nanticoke 23, Rehoboth 13 (Thursday), Georgetown/Millsboro 18, Nanticoke 3 (Friday)- No results were submitted from these games.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

August 2-6, 2010 9 a.m.—12 noon

TAKING A CUT- Kavon Trader of Delmar takes a swing during last week’s game in Delmar. Trader had a pair of hits to help lead his team to a 7-1 win over Pocomoke. Photo by Mike McClure

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MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

Rick Laubach, Kenny Pettyjohn win big in Camp Barnes benefit By Charlie Brown

Rick Laubach of Quakertown, Pa. won the Shootout at last year’s Camp Barnes Benefit. This year Lauback returned for the 38 Annual event this time driving the Benton Electric and Elevator/Teo and once again it paid off big. Laubach won his head and started on the pole in the 25lap Big Block Modified feature, leading every lap and collecting $3,600 for his efforts. Kenny Pettyjohn of Millsboro won his second big payday of the season at DIS in the Super Late Model 25-lap main. Pettyjohn took the lead on lap 14 and led the rest of the distance to earn $3,275. Other winners on the night included Jon Callaway of Harrington, in the AC Delco Modifieds, Nick Davis of Gumboro in the Crate Models, Tim White of Salisbury in the Mod Lites and Bill Brittingham of Felton in the Little Lincoln Vintage cars. Private First Class Randall Allen, home on two weeks leave from Afghanistan, was the honorary starter for the night. Laubach took control at the start of the 25-lap Big Block Modified feature with Kenny Brightbill slipping into second and Jimmy Horton running third. Chad James charged into fourth and took third from Horton on lap 12. One lap later, James moved by Brightbill into second. His drive would end on lap 19 when he slowed to a stop bringing out the yellow. Laubach had no problems with the restarts and pulled away each time. Billy Pauch was running third with five to go and took second from Horton with two laps to go. Laubach went on to the win with Pauch second and Horton third. Fourth went ot Brightbill and Matt Jester rounded out the top five. Heats were won by Laubach and Jamie Mills. “I do like coming down here,” said Laubach. “It was easy for us because it doesn’t hurt to draw a good number. I know our laps times were fast so if they had went by that like last year we still would have been decent.” Donald Lingo, Jr. took off in the lead in the Super Late Model feature. Ricky Elliott chased from second with Kenny Pettyjohn running in third. Devin Friese was on the move and took third on lap three. Friese had just worked by Elliott for second on lap ten when Elliott slowed bringing out the yellow. Lingo controlled the restart but he too slowed in the second turn bringing out the yellow and turning the lead over to Friese. Friese led through the halfway sign before Pettyjohn moved on top. David Hill

followed into second. Hill made a final attempt for the win with one to go but came up short and Pettyjohn picked up his second big win of the season. Ross Robinson came on strong in the closing laps to finish in third with Friese fourth and Rob Schirmer fifth. Heats were won by Lingo and Elliott. “These were the two nights to win,” Pettyjohn said of his two victories this season. “This was a tough one and that’s one tough race car I was riding in.” Davis almost led wire to wire in the 15-lap Crate Model feature. Matt Hill gave chase early on before Sparky White worked into second. Joe Warren took the second spot at the halfway sign and edged out front for lap 13. Davis was back out front for the white flag and went on to his second win of the season. Chris Hitchens took second from Warren on the final lap. Fourth went to Mike Wharton and Clint Chalabala rounded out the top five. Davis set fast time in qualifying. Callaway collected all the lap money in the 15-lap AC Delco Modified feature. Shawn Ward took second from Brandon Perdue on lap two and challenged Callaway the remainder of the distance. Ward got along side of Callaway with one to go but Callaway held him off to record his second win of the season and his first Camp Barnes victory. Ward finished in second with Justin Griffith third. Fourth went to Greg Taylor, Jr. and Mike White rounded out the top five. Fast time in qualifying was set by Callaway. Drivers from five states made up the 24 car Mod Lite starting field. Ty Short led the first seven laps with White taking charge at the halfway sign. At that point he was followed by Short, Kevin McKinney, James Hill and Brandon Dennis in the top five. White drove his Floyd Carey owned mount to his second win of the season. Short crossed the line in second but failed the post race inspection. Finishing in second through fifth were Kerry King, Jr., Dennis, McKinney and western Pennsylvania’s Lynn Knepper. Fast time in qualifying was set by Short. In the 12-lap Little Lincoln feature, John Stevenson led the first two laps before Brittingham nosed in front for lap three. Stevenson regained the lead a lap later and held the top spot until lap eight when Brittingham went back out front to stay. Stevenson would chase him the rest of the distance but it was Brittingham taking the win. Stevenson finished in second with Mel Joseph, Jr. coming from the rear to finish in third. Fourth went to Brian Brasure and Emory West rounded out the top five.

Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame seeking nominations Members of the Board of Directors of the Eastern Shore Baseball Foundation are asking the public to nominate former players, coaches, managers, and sponsors for the Hall of Fame. “We are always looking for individuals who participated in baseball throughout the Eastern Shore to recognize in our Hall of Fame,” explained ESBF president Kenny Green. “These people should stand out for their contributions.” The ESBF’s vision to to promote the rich heritage of baseball in the Eastern Shore states of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. Those nominated should have been retired from baseball for at least five years. New members of the Hall of Fame will be inducted during the ESBF annual banquet in November. Individuals seeking a nomination form may contact Green at (410) 742-6096 or visit the ESBF Hall of Fame at the Salisbury’s Perdue Stadium, home of the Delmarva Shorebirds, during any home game. The deadline for nominations is August 31.

PAGE 29

Post 6 Patriots lose doubleheader to Post 10 Newark

The Sussex West Post 6 Patriots lost to Post 10 Newark in a pair of games last Sunday. In game one, Post 10 led all the way and held on for the 8-4 win. For the Patriots, Tyler Troyer went 2-4 with a run, Adam Troyer was 2-3 with a run, Justin Allen had a hit and two RBIs, and Chad Sturgeon and Jamil Moore each added a hit and a run. Post 10 won the second game of the twin bill by the score of 8-6. For Sussex West, Tyler Troyer was 2-4 with two doubles and two runs; Paul Elliott went 2-4 with two runs and an RBI; Adam Troyer collected two hits and drove in a run; Jordan Stanley had a pair of hits; Allen doubled in a run; and Dylan Shockley contributed a hit and two RBIs.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL THE BEST BUY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.

In today’s world, fifty cents doesn’t buy a heck of a lot — except of course, when it comes to your newspaper. For less than the cost of a bus ride, you can get word from across town or across the nation. For less than the price of a cup of coffee, you can get your fill of food, politics, or whatever else News is your cup of Seaford school News referendum tea. From passes 475-222 cover to cover, Sports Laurel School Board plans to hold your newspaper public meetings on referendum is still the most Sports “streetwise” buy Inside in town! VOL. 14 NO. 37

hEROES - Desire to help youth excel in life is John’s goal. Page 8

COUNCIL RACE - Seaford City Council election Saturday. Page 5

at RISK - DOE’s Business in Education program may be cut next year. Page 5

HEROES - Desire to help youth excel in life is John’s goal. Page 8

By Lynn R. Parks

BRIDGE - Public invited to ‘open house’ of Indian River Bridge project. Page 11

SCAMS - IRS says to be aware of these latest tax scams. Page 14 ENFORCEMENT - OHS and State Police partner on speed enforcement initiative. Page 15

GREEN - Del Tech’s first Energy House to be built on Georgetown campus. Page 28

FINAL WORD - What is your share of the national debt? The answer may shock you. Page 51

BRIDGEVILLE CELEBRATES - Fire company member Doug Jones drives the Bridgeville volunteer Fire Company’s 1936 REO Speedwagon fire engine in the Bridgeville volunteer Fire Company’s 100th anniversary parade. Story and related photos about Saturday’s celebration on page 47. Photo by Lynn Parks

BURGESS INvITATIONAL - The Seaford, Woodbridge, and Sussex Tech track and field teams take part in the Keith S. Burgess Invitational. Page 39

BACK IN ACTION - The local high school teams return to action this week. See page 42 for results from Mondays and Tuesdays games.

STARS - A baseball player and a track and field athlete are this week’s Seaford Stars of the Week. Page 41

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Bulletin Board Business ChurCh Classifieds eduCation final Word Gas lines Gourmet health letters lynn Parks movies oBituaries oPen houses PoliCe Puzzles sPorts tides tony Windsor

BRIDgE - Public invited to ‘open house’ of Indian River Bridge project. Page 11

The Seaford School District got an OK says to be aware of these latest SCaMS - IRS taxhike scams. Page from its residents for a tax to pay for14 gOIn’ WEStERn - The Laurel Lions show band practices for their 49th annual variety show, “Lets Go Western,” which will new roofs and elevators. Tuesday’s referbe held April 22 - 24 at 7:30 p.m. at the high school. From left are Jim Littleton on drums, Linda Premo on piano, Bob Murphy on guitar and Cheryl Jones on keyboard. Jeff Premo on saxophone is not pictured. Tickets are $6 for adults and $5 for youngins endum won with 68 percent of the vote. (under 12). Nearly 700 people voted in the referendum, according to unofficial results posted laDy BullDOgS - The Laurel varsity softball by the Sussex County Department of Electeam hosted Caravel last Thursday in a non-confertions. Of those, 475 voted for battle. the measure ence Page 39 and 222 voted against. BaCK aCtIOn - The local high school teams “We won!!!” said an e-mail sentInout by returned to action this week following spring break. district spokeswoman Bonnie Johnson. See page 43 for results from Monday and Tuesday’s games.in the disFor the average homeowner trict, approval of the referendum will StaRS OFmean thE WEEK- A Laurel varsity softball By Mike McClure meaning Laurel would have to start the trict’s current facilities. That study was an additional $10 a year.player Property andowners a Laurel track and field athlete are this process of requesting state funding all commissioned by the Laurel School The Laurel School Board met last week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 41 pay school taxes based on county assessover again at the end of the year. District and was conducted by Studio Thursday afternoon to discuss the Discussion of the current plan and JAED, a third party architect and engiments. Average property assessment in the major capital improvement plan which the scheduling of a new referendum neering firm. failed, 1444-1241, in a vote on March district is about $16,000. each died for lack of a motion during According to Marinucci, if the cost 31 and to act on a possible second refContact The additional revenue will helpus pay INSIDE of renovating a school is 50 percent of erendum. In the end, the board chose to Thursday’s meeting. The district plans for new roofs for Central Elementary, Seato hold a pair of public hearings in the the cost to build a new one or more, get more input from the public before Subscriptions Bulletin Board 16 future. the state asks districts to build new ford Middle and West Seaford Elementary setting a second and final vote. kcherrix@mspublications.com Business 6 “If the majority wants us to come facilities (unless the structure has hisschools, as well as a new roof for the gym The Laurel School District had the back with the same thing (plan) we toric, cultural, or architectural signifiChurCh 21 option of sending the proposed plan, LaurelItStar at the Seaford Middle School. will News also will. I’m not saying we will do that,” cance). The district planned to retain which included the construction of a Classifieds 30 pay to replace elevatorseditor@mspublications.com in Seaford Middle said Laurel School Board President the 1920’s/30’s section of the middle middle school/high school complex eduCation 36 Jerry White. “We will not be shooting school and build four new schools with School and Seaford High School. and elementary school complex, back Laurel Star Sports final Word 51 for a May 20 referendum.” the middle school and high school and The state will pay 73sports@mspublications.com percent of the to the public in mid May. A successful John Marinucci, Education the two elementary schools each sharGas lines 36 referendum could have meant funding cost of the roof replacement and elevator Associate for Facility Planning ing a complex. Gourmet 38 in the FY 2011 state budget, but an Advertising projects. and Management with the state “The cost to renovate in some cases unsuccessful one would have sent the sales@mspublications.com health 24 Department of Education (DOE), was The district will also build a wing on were actually above the cost of a new board back to the drawing board. l etters 50 on hand to explain the process and to school,” Marinucci said. “Going from Central Elementary School to accommoSchool districts can only send an Business Report answer residents’ questions. Marinucci lynn Parks 29 four buildings to three buildings would issue to referendum twice in a 12 date elementary studentsbusinessreport@mspublications.com who are orthopediscussed the study that was used to save money.” mike Barton 49 month period and the district’s cerdically handicapped. Those students curdetermine the need to build new buildBusiness Journal tificates of necessity run out Oct. 31, movies 7 Continued on page 4 rently meet in four classrooms in Frederick ings rather than renovating the disbrichardson@mspublications.com oBituaries 22 Douglass Elementary School. The state oPen houses 10 will pay 100 percent of the cost of that PoliCe 12 construction. Puzzles 20 Screenings and Total project cost will be about $6.6 soCials 49 Health Symposium Activities for the million. Of that, the district will pay 9am - 2pm s Ports 39-45 $1.172 million and the state the balance. ENTIRE family. tides 44 Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford, DE tony Windsor 37 FREE Snack Bag - Information Booths - Door Prizes

16-19 6 21-22 30-35 36 51 SEAFORD CELEBRATES - State Rep. Danny Short presents the Seaford 36 volunteer Fire Department’s Ladies Auxiliary with a proclamation from the House of Representatives in recognition of their 75th anniversary. The presenta38 tion was made during SvFD’s annual banquet. Receiving the proclamation are 24-27 Ginny Tice (left), vice president, and Donna Bennett, president of the auxiliary. 50 More photos from the banquet on pages 46 and 48. Photo by Chuck Snyder 29 7 22 10 Screenings 12 Health Symposium 20 9am - 2pm 39-45 44Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford, DE 37FREE Snack Bag - Information Booths - Door Prizes

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KIDS FIRSt - Children’s health is the focus of two weekend events. Page 3

KIDS FIRST - Children’s health is the focus of two weekend events. Page 3

CLASS PLAY - Seaford Middle School students presenting Beauty and the Beast Jr. musical. Page 49

THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 2010

ItalIan nIght - The Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary hold their first Italian Night on April 17. 50 will cents The buffet will be at the fire hall on 205 W. Tenth Street, from 5 - 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. Children 10 and under are free. For tickets contact Ann at 875-4789 or Sandy at 875-2164.

THURSDAY, ApRil 15, 2010

vol. 14 No. 51

businessreport@mspublications.com

Business Journal

brichardson@mspublications.com

“A Healthy Family Affair” MAY 1, 2010

“A Healthy Family Affair” MAY 1, 2010

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PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

Seaford Bowling Lanes Keith Mayers scores first Super Pro win of season at U.S. 13

Wednesday A.M. No Tap

Diamond Girls 26-10 Nine Pins 21-15 The Cougars 21-15 Del-Tech Duo 20-16 Cowboys 20-16 The Jets 19-17 The Breadwinners 17-19 Team X 16-20 Seaford Lanes 15-21 R and M 14-22

Getter Dun 14-22 Us Two 13-23 High games and series Tim Beers 342 Randy Heath 966 Terry Fromal 358, 984

Summer Adult/ Youth

The Young and Restless 23-13 Road Runners 21-15 Pin Bombers 20-16

Fatal Four 19-17 Four for Fun 19-17 Lucky Strikes 16-20 Brads and Dads 14-22 High games and series Phillip Childress 276 Phil Bennington 743 Mary Jane Schwartz 266 Dawn Carey 711 Jeremy Metz 293, 802 Kayla Arnett 246 Dallas Slavin 725

Tuesday Nascar

Yankee Haters 22-14 J.R.’s Crew 20-16 Lost 19-17 Ain’t Nobody Home 18-18 Vacationers 17-19 It Doesn’t Matter 12-24 High games and series Dale Burgess 284 James Staton, Jr. 730 Jean Kriner 294 Linda Taylor 777

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This week in Star sports history

10 YEARS AGO- The Woodbridge Minor League baseball team took the District III title with a 16-5 win over Nanticoke. Madison Warfel struck out eight in relief and Kerry King collected three hits. The Laurel Minor League softball team topped Lower Sussex, 18-13, to win the District III championship. Amanda Riggins recorded 16 strikeouts in the win. FIVE YEARS AGO- The Delmar Major League softball team defeated Crisfield, 14-0, to win the Maryland District 8 championship. Carlee Budd struck out nine in four innings and allowed no hits. The Nanticoke Major League softball team scored nine unanswered runs in the bottom of the fifth for a 17-8 victory over Laurel in the District III championship. ONE YEAR AGO- The Laurel Major League softball team won the District III championship with a 16-0 win over Rehoboth. Regan Green recorded eight strikeouts and allowed no runs and one hit in four innings.

Delaware Tech-Owens to offer sports, enrichment camps

Children ages six and up will enjoy participating in fun activities and playing sports during week-long camps offered at Delaware Technical and Community College- Owens campus. Students can attend half-day camps or take advantage of a mix and match schedule to attend camp for a whole day with morning camps from 9 a.m. to noon, afternoon camps from 1 to 4 p.m. and lunch from noon to 1 p.m.; before and after care is available from 8 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m. Children will have fun while exercising in fitness camps such as baseball, baseball pitching, basketball for boys, basketball for girls, cheerleading, football, “Get Fit,” soccer and tennis. Baseball- Children ages 7-12 can participate in a camp focusing on the principles of pitching from 8:30 a.m. to noon, July 26 to 30. Basketball- Boys and girls ages 7-10 and 11-14 will be taught basketball skills including defensive play, rebounding, passing, shooting, dribbling and movement in a week-long camp beginning on July 19 for boys ages 7-10 and July 26 for girls ages 7-10. Football- Football players can improve their skills and increase their knowledge from 9 a.m. to noon beginning July 19 and 26. Camp will focus on stance, starts, passing formations, huddles and the fundamentals of snapping and punting. Scholarships are available for camps on a first-come, first-served basis; art and academic camps also are offered in July. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs (CCP) at 302-854-6966 or visit the CCP Web site at www.dtcc.edu/owens/ccp/youth.

Seaford Department of Recreation holds fall league signups

Adult Fall Leagues- Men’s Flag Football, Men’s Slo-Pitch Softball, Co-Ed and Women’s Volleyball- All leagues start in September, so if you are interested in entering team call the office at 629-6809 early to reserve a spot. Youth Fall Programs- Girls’ Field Hockey for ages 7-12- This is an instructional league on Saturday mornings starting Sept.11. The cost is $25 which includes a shirt. Girls Cheerleading ages 7-14- The girls cheer for the SDR tackle football program and games are usually on Saturday mornings. Practices will start in September and the cost is $40. A uniform is provided and turned back in following the season. Tackle Football for ages 7-10 and 10-13 (10 yr olds play up if they weigh more than 90 lbs)- The cost is $40 and practices will start in September. All equipment is provided and turned back in following the season. Youth NFL Flag Football for ages 6-8 and 9-11- The cost is $30 and includes a jersey that you keep. Practices start in August, so register early.

Covering all the local sports, the Seaford/Laurel Star.

By Charlie Brown

Keith Mayers of Fruitland, driving his big block Chevy powered Porsche captured his first Super Pro win of the season Friday night at the U.S. 13 Dragway. It was win number two in Pro for Parsonsonburg’s Phillip Truitt and Ron Fensick, II of Bridgeville rode to his fourth win in Pro Bike. Other winners on the day included: Crystal Hudson of Millsboro in Street; Todd Cooper of Bristol, Va. in Import; Jayson Donze in Bike Trophy; T.J. Williams of Fruitland in Jr. Dragster 1 and Mark Benston of Delmar, Md. in Jr. Dragster 2. Mayers met Thomas Stulir of Felton in the Super Pro final. Mayers threw up the challenge at the start with a .005 reaction light and went on to win with a 9.241/144.53 on a 9.22 dial. Stulir was solid with a .012 light and an 8.289/158.33 on an 8.27 dial-in. Semifinalist was Bobby Insley of Crisfield who lost to Stulir. The Pro final matched Truitt and John Parks of Denton. Truitt had the far better reaction and drove to his second win with a 10.249/118.35 on a 10.15 dial. Parks ran an 11.069/121.95 on an 11.05 dial. Semifinalist was Ryan Groton of Salisbury who lost to Parks. Fensick, on his ’98 Buell, rode to his fourth win of the year over Brent English of Bloxom, Va. Fensick was dead on his dial-in with a 10.810/120.53 on a 10.81 dial. English was almost dead on with a 9.442/135.15 on a 9.44 dial. Semi-finalist was Will Jensen of Millsboro who lost to Fensick. Hudson continued to pull away in the Street Eliminator points taking her sixth

win of the season. Hudson defeated Henry Osowiecki of Salisbury in the battle of the Chevy S-10 pickups. Hudson ran an 11.644/113.30 on an 11.64 dial while Osowiecki left early and fouled. Cooper made a solo pass to win Import in his ’07 Subaru at 17.475/77.63 on a 17.35 dial. Donze picked up his second win in Bike Trophy over Kinte’ Smith of Seaford, Del. Smith had a red light foul and Donze took the win with an 11.393/117.46 on an 11.45 dial. Williams picked up his first win of the season over Amanda Clem of Hurlock in the Jr. Dragster 1 final. Clem left too early and fouled and Williams ran an 8.972/71.73 on a 9.00 dial for the win. In Jr. Dragster 2, Benston celebrated his 18th birthday with his first win of the year over last week’s winner, Jerel Davis of Fruitland. Benston ran an 8.207/78.47 on an 8.20 dial for the win. Davis left too early and had a red light foul.

Sports at the Beach hosts Old School Challenge tournament The Sports at the Beach complex hosted the Old School Challenge July 9-11. The following are the championship results: 10 year-olds- Mason-Dixon Ruffnecks (Pa.) 4, Reisterstown Express (Md.) 0; 11 year-olds- Beaver Valley Black (Pa.) 3, Chambersburg Renegades (Pa.) 0; 12 yearolds- Sussex Warriors (Seaford) 11, Long Island Astros 3; 15/16 year-olds- Virginia Force 9, Maryland Sting 3

Delmarva Drillers 12U baseball tryouts to be held August 8, 15 The Delmarva Drillers 12U baseball tryouts will take place Aug. 8 at 9 a.m. and Aug. 15 at 5 p.m. at the Laurel Middle School softball field. The Drillers are coached by Shawn Phillips, a three-year starter at Delaware State University who holds nine records at the school. The Laurel alum was drafted in the 20th round by the Texas Rangers in 2004 and has five years of pro ball experience. For more information, contact Phillips at Delmarvadrillers@yahoo.com.

Seaford Recreation Department selling tickets for Orioles-Yankees

The Seaford Recreation Department is now selling tickets for the organization’s annual Orioles/Yankees trip. The game is on Friday, September 17 at 7 p.m.. The cost of the trip is $65 per ticket and includes great seats to the game and transportation on a charter bus. Call 629-6809 for more information or to reserve your seat.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243. You can also call 302262-9134 and leave a detailed message. Please include the score, the name of the teams, and highlights from the game with first and last names.


MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 31

The Laurel Major League softball team takes a lap with the District III banner following a 12-0 win over Lewes in the championship. See next week’s Laurel Star for more photos. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Major League all-star softball team wins District III title By Mike McClure The Laurel Major League all-star softball team won the District III title with a 12-0 win over Lewes on Tuesday night in Laurel. The team, led by manager Brad Lee, will look to win its second straight state title when it traverls to Milford for the state tournament next week. Laurel scored five runs in the first inning thanks to a two-run triple by Rachel Davis, an RBI single by Savannah Brown, a sacrifice fly by Tristin West, and Morgan Joseph’s RBI double. Lewes collected its only hit of the game off Regan Green in the bottom of the first, but Green stranded the runner with her third strikeout of the inning. Laurel added a run in the second inning when Davis reached first on an error, moved to second on a single by Brown, stole third, and scored on a fielder’s choice. In the top of the fourth, Sabrina Savage walked and scored on an error, Shelby Murphy walked and came home on a single by Davis, Kortney Lee singled and scored on a base hit by Green, Davis came home on a single by Brooke Jones, and Jones and Alex Joseph scored on an error (12-0). Green recorded a pair of strikeouts in the bottom of the fourth to seal the Laurel win. Green struck out 10 in four innings and collected two hits, Davis had two hits and three RBIs, and Brown added two hits and an RBI. The defending state champions, with six or seven players back from last year’s team, will take on the District II (New Castle) champions next Wednesday in Milford. “We expect to do well in states. Definitely our goal is the state tournament year in and year out,” said Laurel manager Brad Lee. “We saw some teams that not only did they have good players but they were deep (at regionals in Albany, N.Y. last year.”

Woodbridge Minor League softball team advances to championship By Lynn Schofer The Woodbridge Minor League all-star softball team has played in some excitingly tight games in the 2010 tournament. On Monday evening in Georgetown, the Woodbridge team took on Milton. It would take eight innings to give Woodbridge the 3-2 victory in the game and send them to the District III championship game. Woodbridge’s Mya Maddox pitched seven strong innings and scored the winning run in the top of the eighth to give Woodbridge the win. Woodbridge took an early lead in the first inning on a bunt single by Maddox followed by sacrifice by Kayla Hastings and a single by Lisa Eck. Milton showed some early nerves in the first inning scoring two errors in the first inning but settled in and held Woodbridge scoreless until the eighth inning. Maddox opened with three straight strikeouts but in the bottom of the second inning Milton would strike back and score two runs. In the third inning, Maddox walked the first batter who would steal second and third base, but Maddox turned on the heat to strike out the next three hitters that ended the threat. In the fourth inning Woodbridge loaded the bases with base hits by Mackenzie Masten, Hailey Slater and Maddox but were not able to add to their score. In the fifth Woodbridge would once again put hitters on base with Eckís single followed by sacrifices by Taylor Bassord and Delaney VanBuskirk. Tana Rafair took a ball in the back to put two runners in scoring position. Milton would hold strong and score the final out, stranding the two runners. In the sixth inning, Maddox hit a ball to deep right field and as she rounded first base was interfered on by the defense but it went unnoticed by the umpire. The play continued and when Maddox attempted to score she was thrown out at home. Milton was able to hold Woodbridge for the rest of the inning. The excitement continued into the bottom of the inning when Milton’s lead off batter sent a ball to the outfield and attempted to stretch it into a double but was thrown out by a well-thrown ball by Nadine Tinsman. Maddox would strike out the next two batters to take the game into the seventh inning. The game remained tied at 2-2 after seven innings and Maddox and catcher Corrin Farris switched positions. In the top of the eighth, Maddox punched a ball through the left side for a two-out single. Maddox stole second and went to third on an over thrown ball. She reacted when the infielder missed the ball and took off for home. This time her feet got under the tag and she scored the go ahead run. In the bottom of the inning, Farris struck out the first two batters and walked the next two. After a visit to the mound by her coach and mom Patty Farris, she settled in and finished the game with a strikeout. Maddox pitched seven innings and had 17 strikeouts. Farris pitched one inning with three strikeouts. Sports editor’s note: See next week’s Seaford Star for photos from this game.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 27


PAGE 32

MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

Health Nanticoke among top hospitals

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital has been recognized with a 2009-2010 Hospital Value Index™: Best in Value™ Award, from Press Ganey Associates. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital ranked among the top tier of all hospitals nationwide, achieving high marks in quality, affordability and efficiency, and patient satisfaction. The Hospital Value Index™ is the first and only performance indicator to focus on the value hospitals provide to their community and utilizes the latest publicly available data, including Hospital Compare from July 2009, to recognize these accomplishments. The Hospital Value Index™ pulled data from approximately 4,500 general acutecare hospitals, serving approximately 30 million consumers. The full study and list of findings can be found at www. HospitalValueIndex.com.

Family caregiver training

The Alzheimer’s Association, Delaware Valley Chapter, sponsors The Family Caregiver Education Series four times a year in each of Delaware’s three counties. Cadbury of Lewes, at 17028 Cadbury Circle in Lewes, will host the training on Wednesday, July 28, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. This training for family caregivers is free and lunch will be provided by Cadbury of Lewes, therefore pre-registration is required by July 21. For more information or to register, call Jamie Magee,

branch office coordinator, at 854-9788 or 1-800-272-3900.

Healthy recipes contest

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and the Western Sussex Farmers Market are looking for your heart healthy recipes that use local seasonal produce. Submit your heart healthy recipes for a chance to win. On Saturday, Aug. 21 at 10 a.m., three entries will be prepared and shared at the Western Sussex Farmers Market (located at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club) and will win a Nanticoke Memorial Hospital gift basket. Each recipe must: 1. Be your own original creation and not based on any other published recipe. 2. Include a list of all required ingredients including measured amounts (teaspoons, tablespoons, cups, etc.) 3. Include preparation and cooking instructions including cooking times and temperatures. 4. Include the number of servings per recipe. 5. Include at least one selection of local fresh seasonal produce. 6. Be a recipe easily reproducible by others. All recipes will be evaluated on originality, use of seasonal produce, being “heart healthy,” texture, visual appearance and taste. Submission deadline is July 31. For

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Cancer support group at Nanticoke

The Wellness Community-Delaware offers a General Cancer support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The support group meets in the second floor conference room of the Cancer Care center on the third Monday of each month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. The next meeting is July 19. The Wellness Community is dedicated to helping people affected by cancer enhance their health and well-being through participation in a professional program of emotional support and hope. Facilitators are trained mental health professionals with a master’s degree or more. For more information or to register, call 645-9150. All support groups are free of charge. This program is made possible by the support of the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. For more information, visit www. wellnessdelaware.org.

Bereavement support group

Compassionate Care Hospice, The Wellness Community-DE and Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will collaborate to present a monthly bereavement group, The Next Step. The group focuses on issues of loss that continue beyond the early stages of grief. Mary Van House, bereavement co-

ordinator, will facilitate the group at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month, at the Nanticoke Cancer Care Center, second floor conference room. To register, call Lisa at 629-6611, ext. 2378.

Breast cancer support group

Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition, Inc. (DBCC) has expanded its Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey, a program for women newly-diagnosed with breast cancer, by partnering with Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center in Seaford. The free, monthly program is offered at the Cancer Center located at 801 Middleford Road, Seaford, the third Thursday of each month from 3 to 4 p.m. The program is facilitated by Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center professional staff - Terri A. Clifton, MS, NCC, Cancer Care coordinator; Mary Brown, RN, DSN, manager Cancer Care Center; and Wendy Polk, nutritionist – with assistance from Lois Wilkinson, DBCC special projects manager, who helps facilitate the program at Bayhealth. Of particular value to newly-diagnosed women is DBCC’s Peer Mentor Program through which they are paired with a long-term survivor for one-on-one support. To learn more about Beginning Your Pink Ribbon Journey at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital Cancer Center, call Lois Wilkinson at 672-6435. Registration is required and light refreshments and small gifts are provided.


MORNING STAR • JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 33

Speech delays in children do not necessarily mean autism By Dr. Anthony Policastro I frequently see patients who come in with a complaint about speech delay. In most cases, the child is about two years of age. When they arrive, the complaint is usually that they are only saying a few words. While the complaint may be the same, there are several different types of delays. The first are the children who begin saying words late. Instead of starting at 12 months, they started at 18 months. Between 18 and 24 months their vocabulary has gradually increased. These children have a delay in starting speech but then follow a normal pattern. They will usually do fine and just need to be observed. The second are the children who started saying words at 12 months. They continued learning new words until about 18 months. Progression stopped and they need to be evaluated. They need a hearing test done because they might have fluid behind their eardrum interfering with hearing.

They also need to be evaluated by a speech therapist. The third are the children who started saying words at 12 months. By 24 months they have only learned a few words. They too need to have the same evaluation as those who stopped learning new words. The fourth are the children who began saying words at 12 months. However, at some point they no longer learned new words. They then began forgetting words that they already knew. This is very rare. It usually suggests the need for a full pediatric evaluation to make sure that there are not other areas that have regressed as well. In addition to the questions about speech itself, there are other important questions at this age. Many of them involve asking about symptoms of autism. While there is speech delay in autism, that is only one symptom. For that reason, speech delay does not usually mean autism. Speech delay is not the only speech problem exhibited by autistic children. They may say things that they hear over

and over and use words or phrases repeatedly. This overuse will be so severe that it bothers others around them. There are two other groups of symptoms that must be present to make the diagnosis of autism. One of those is a problem with social behavior. These children do not like to play with other children and they do not interact well with family members. They are not affectionate. Many other social related symptoms can be present. The other group of symptoms is called stereotypic behavior. These children have rituals that they follow. They may line their toys up in a certain way and they don’t like it if someone interferes. They may open and close doors for hours at a time and turn light switches on and off for extended periods of time. I will have parents come see me with a child who has none of these other symptoms. However, the parents are concerned about autism simply because of the speech delay. I sometimes will not see children with

speech difficulties until they are three years of age. By three years of age children should be talking in sentences. The first part of the evaluation is the same as for those seen at age two years of age. We need to know if there is normal progression or not. We need to know if speech stopped at some point and if it has regressed. The big difference when they hit age three is related to the evaluation. Before age three the State program, Child Development Watch, does the evaluation and they will refer the child to a speech therapist if necessary. After age three, the local school district does the evaluation and any necessary speech therapy. Most parents do not realize that they can get help from the schools at this point because they don’t think their child is old enough. While many children seem to have speech delays, there are a lot of different aspects to these delays. How we handle the delay depends on the story and other factors.

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Neal Friesen is biking across the U.S. to raise awareness of disaster relief efforts with Cycle MDS.

Cyclist makes stop in Greenwood In a continuing campaign to raise awareness of disaster relief efforts, Neal Friesen has embarked upon Cycle MDS, a 10,000-mile solo tour of the continental United States, including a brief jaunt into Canada. Cycle MDS aims to highlight and promote such efforts undertaken by Mennonite Disaster Service and the Disaster Management program at Hesston College in Hesston, Kan. The trip began in New Iberia, La. and is scheduled to take approximately six months, with Friesen returning to Louisiana in November. Friesen will carry all 80 pounds of his equipment, including a portable camp stove and a small one-man tent, in a pack strapped to his bike. He plans to cover about 400 miles per week, entering each of the contiguous 48 states at least once on his journey. Mennonite Disaster Service, a disasterrelief agency comprised of Anabaptist churches in the United States and Canada, organizes volunteers to assist in disasterstricken areas in both countries, including areas now being contaminated by the Gulf oil spill.

Visit the ride’s website at www.cyclemds.org for ride updates, to learn more about the organizations, and to make a donation to support the MDS program, or follow Friesen’s blog at www.cycleMDS. blogspot.com.

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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

Police Journal Invasion and sexual assault

Delaware State Police is investigating an early morning home invasion/sexual assault which occurred on Dove Road in Seaford, on Sunday, July 11, at 3:40 a.m. Three black male suspects entered the residence through an unsecured window. Once inside, the suspects entered the victim’s room. The 46-year-old female victim woke to one of the suspects assaulting her husband. The 49-year-old victim was struck on the head with a handgun and had a gun pointed at his head as one of the suspects sexually assaulted his wife. The suspects then walked the victims throughout their house looking for money. They ransacked the victim’s residence then led them outside and removed money, cell phones, jewelry, liquor and a laptop from the victim’s cars. After rummaging through the vehicles, the suspects fled on foot southbound on Dove Road. The male victim chased the suspects but lost sight of them. Delaware State Police K-9 officers responded to the scene and conducted a track for the suspects. The K-9 officer was able to locate an item of clothing belonging to one of the suspects but attempts to locate the suspects were unsuccessful. Delaware State Police are seeking the public’s assistance in locating 3 black males - 5’6”, 5’8” and 6’ tall, dark complexions, wearing masks and dressed in all black clothing. The suspects had either Haitian or Jamaican accents. Anyone with information is asked to call investigators at 8565850, ext. 224 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

Two arrested for robbery

On July 10 at 10:19 p.m., Seaford police officers responded to a call of subjects entering resident’s vehicles on Pond View Road in the Mears Field development off Herring Run Road, Seaford. As officers were arriving, they observed the two defendants, Garland G. Church, 22, of Seaford and Christopher M. Britt, 25, of Seaford, walking eastbound on Herring Run Road and throwing items on the ground. Officers were able to stop the defendants and recover items taken from two vehicles in the Pond View Drive area, along with a knife and nine oxycodone related tablets. The defendants, who were identified by the victims, were processed and taken to the Justice of the Peace Court #3 in Georgetown. Church was charged with possession of a deadly weapon dur-

ing commission of a felony, third degree burglary, tampering with physical evidence, carrying a concealed deadly weapon, second degree conspiracy, theft (under $1,500), possession of a narcotic schedule II (oxycodone), possession of drug paraphernalia, two counts of second degree trespassing and three pedestrian traffic charges. Church was committed to the Department of Corrections in lieu of $14,800 secured bond. Christopher M. Britt, 25, of Seaford was charged with third degree burglary, tampering with physical evidence, second degree conspiracy, theft (under $1,500), possession of a narcotic schedule II (oxycodone), possession of drug paraphernalia, two counts of second degree criminal trespassing and three pedestrian traffic charges. Britt was committed to the Department of Corrections in lieu of $4,300 secured bond. Both defendants are pending a preliminary hearing at a later date.

Search for missing person

The Seaford Police Department is asking the public’s assistance in locating Edward F. Huntington, Huntington a white male, age 61, who was last seen in the Delaware National Bank in Laurel, on July 1, at 9:24 a.m. Police believe Huntington left the bank and went to the Travelers Motel on Route 13 in the Delmar, Md. area, checked in and checked out on July 2. He is known to frequent the Delmar and Salisbury, Md. areas frequently. Huntington, who is on several medications, resides in Seaford with his mother on a part-time basis. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Seaford Police Department at 629-6648. Huntington is listed in the NCIC (National Crime Information Center) and the Delaware Justice Information Center as a missing person. Foul play is not suspected at this time, however, with any missing person it is always a concern.

Reckless endangering

On Thursday, July 8 at 11 p.m., Delaware State Police responded to the Laurel area to investigate a domestic dispute between a 22-year-old female victim from Seaford and her 19-year-old boyfriend, Kyle L. Newman of Laurel.

The victim went to Newman’s residence on the 32000 block of Horsey and Everett Road, Laurel, to discuss personal issues. During the argument, Newman became agitated with the victim and removed a long gun or rifle from his vehicle. He then pointed the gun at the victim ordering her off the property. The victim immediately left and contacted authorities. State Police have not been able to locate Newman who is wanted for one count of possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony and one count of first degree reckless endangering. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call investigators at 302-3371090, ext. 0 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

Arrested for robbery

On Friday, July 2, Delaware State Police investigated a robbery in the parking lot of the Oasis Travel Plaza, Laurel. The robbery occurred at 12:46 p.m. when Dontrez L. Archer, 21, of Delmar, approached a 63-yearold male victim from Laurel. The victim was seated in the passenger side of his friend’s truck who was inside the travel plaza. Archer asked the victim, who was counting money when he approached, if he could use his cell phone. As the victim placed his money under his leg, Archer reached inside the vehicle and grabbed the victim’s money. Archer fled the scene to an unknown destination. The victim was not injured. Delaware State Police Evidence Detection Unit responded

to the scene and was able to lift several latent prints from the side of the vehicle which belonged to Archer. Archer was arrested for first degree robbery on Friday, July 9. He was remanded to Sussex Correctional Institute in lieu of $10,000 secured bond.

Woman dies in crash

On Sunday, July 11 at 7:45 a.m., Delaware State Police investigated a traffic crash which occurred on Seashore Highway east of Coverdale Crossroads. A 2000 Nissan Altima driven by Melissa Marie Mohl, 24, of Baltimore, Md., was eastbound on Seashore Highway. A second vehicle driven by 61-year-old Charles Cave Sr. of Georgetown was westbound on Seashore Highway east of Bridgeville.


MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010 Initial indications revealed that Mohl crossed into the westbound lane of travel and collided with Cave’s 1998 Chevrolet S-10 truck. The crash left both operators trapped in their vehicles. Mohl sustained severe head trauma and was transported to Nanticoke Hospital in Seaford where she was pronounced dead. Mohl’s infant son, Nikolas Mohl, who is just over 1-yearsold, was flown to A. I. DuPont hospital for precautionary reasons, however was conscious and alert at the crash site. The infant was properly restrained. Charles Cave Sr. was transported for a fracture to his ankle. His passenger, 12-year-old Demetrius Price, was transported to Nanticoke Hospital and treated for minor injuries. Delaware State Police are continuing their investigation and a State Police preliminary investigation suggests drugs may have played a factor in this crash.

Foster parent sentenced

The Delaware Child Predator Task Force has announced that Steven Hughes, 52, of Newark was sentenced by Superior Court Judge Richard R. Cooch to 20 years in prison on child exploitation charges. Hughes is a former foster parent who operated a photography studio specializing in the photography of young children and also billed himself as a “Santa Claus” who would conduct home visits.

Hughes was arrested in Millsboro on Oct. 22, 2009 and was indicted on Nov. 9, 2009, on multiple counts of sexual exploitation of a child and dealing in child pornography. The indictment alleges that Hughes possessed 18 images of a 6-year-old female exposing her genitalia in sexually explicit poses and numerous other images of toddler-age females forced into sex acts with adult men. Hughes was charged with distributing these images by publishing them online to any interested party, including undercover law enforcement agents involved in the investigation. In total, the ongoing investigation revealed that Hughes maintained more than 15,000 images of child exploitation, hundreds of which he created himself. He pled guilty to five counts of sexual exploitation of a child on April 15.

Caretaker faces charges

On Monday, June 28, Delaware State Police investigated an abuse complaint at the Falcon Crest Group Home located on Falcon Crest Drive, Harbeson. State Police investigators learned that the two victims suffer from autism and mental retardation. In the first incident, the 26-year-old victim was eating dinner and did not want to sit while eating. The defendant, 46-year-old Bonnie Cornish of Seaford, the caretaker on duty, walked the victim to her room. Shortly thereafter, the

26-year-old victim returned to the eating area which apparently angered Cornish. Cornish took out a belt and struck the victim an undetermined amount of times while in the victim’s room. Moments later, the 26-year-old victim returned to the kitchen a second time and was again struck with a belt. Cornish walked the victim down the hallway to her room allegedly striking her along the way. The victim sustained injuries to her thigh and back areas. This same evening, a second incident occurred involving Cornish and another patient. Cornish was transporting the previous 26-year-old victim and a 27-yearold female victim to an appointment in Georgetown. Cornish was driving a State of Delaware transportation van at the time of the second incident. The 27-yearold victim has difficulty adjusting to traveling in vehicles and, on this occasion, began to cry. Cornish stopped the van on Zoar Road, Georgetown and confronted the 27-year-old victim. Cornish slapped the victim across the face inflicting two scratches, swelling and redness under her left eye. State Police arrested Cornish and she was charged with two counts of abuse, mistreatment or neglect a patient or resident of facility. She was released on $2,000 unsecured bond and given a no contact order with the victims along with their place of residence.

PAGE 35

Injured in fight

On July 8 at 11:10 p.m., Seaford Police responded to Coyotes Bar in the Nylon Capital Shopping Center, for a reported fight. Officers located the victim, a 29-year-old male from Seaford, outside the bar. The victim appeared intoxicated with swelling and bleeding to his face. Officers determined that the victim had been acting in a loud manner and was involved in a verbal altercation with the defendant, Daniel L. Jackson, 30, of Seaford. At one point, the victim stumbled to the ground where Jackson struck the victim in the face several times with his fist. The victim, who was transported to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital by Seaford Fire Department Ambulance personnel and later transported to Christiana Hospital, was treated and released for his injuries. Warrants were obtained for Jackson who was arrested by Seaford Police on July 10. Charges include second degree assault and disorderly conduct. He was arraigned at Justice of the Peace Court 3 in Georgetown and released after posting a $5,500 bond pending a hearing in the Court of Common Pleas.

Caught in the act

On Monday, July 5, Delaware State Police investigated a suspicious person’s complaint in the 3800 block of Arthursville Road, Hartly.

State Police received information from a 68-year-old man who advised that a white male knocked on his door around 9 p.m. and advised him his garage was open. The suspect, Kyle Teeter, 21, also of Arthursville Road, was observed by the victim walking over to his neighbor’s residence. The victim was aware that his neighbors were not home so he notified the police. When State Police arrived, they observed an open door at the rear of the neighboring residence and Teeter walking inside. Teeter was observed carrying items from the residence and placing them on the deck. State Police confronted Teeter and took him into custody. A review of the property taken by Teeter from the 41-year-old victim’s residence included: Echo weedeater, Canon Powershot digital camera, jewelry, 32 inch flat screen television, Dell Dimension computer and accessories and an undisclosed amount of cash. State Police discovered that Teeter kicked open a garage door and the door at the rear of the residence in order to gain access causing approximately $500 damage. The estimated value of the items stolen and recovered totaled approximately $3,100. Teeter was charged with second degree burglary, theft, criminal mischief and third degree trespassing. He was remanded to the James T. Vaughn Correction Center in lieu of $3,850 secured bond.

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PAGE 36

MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

Nanticoke Riverfest Snapshots

Danny Short gets a little egg on him during the Mayor’s Challenge. Photo by S.D. Smith

Ashley Bean and Maggie Durig enjoyed Riverfest even though many of the festival’s activities were cancelled. Photo by L. Parks

Nanticoke Indian Dancers. Photos by S. D. Smith

Jay Romoser, an employee with Shaw and Sons, breaks down one of the rides in the Riverfest carnival. The carnival shut down early because of rain. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Susan Shwed, Laurel, participated in the Seaford Mayor’s Challenge - Egg Toss, which was held Friday night during Riverfest. Photo by S.D. Smith

Carolyn Farley lifts a funnel cake from the fryer for one of the few customers she had Saturday. Farley and her husband, Rick, run Carol’s Concessions. Farley rolls up a sign advertising funnel cakes. Most of the Riverfest vendors were gone by 4 p.m. Saturday. Photos by Lynn R. Parks

The Little Miss and Junior Miss Riverfest Pageant was held Friday evening in the Seaford Fire Hall. Photo by S.D. Smith

Bruce Bradt, Georgetown, in the kayak, and Tom Collins, Seaford, didn’t let the rain stop them from enjoying a little time on the Nanticoke River. Photo by Lynn R. Parks


MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 37

Master Gardeners Open House Saturday includes plant sale Sussex County Master Gardeners, of Delaware Cooperative Extension for both Delaware State University and University of Delaware, invite you to an Open House on Saturday, July 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Sussex County Extension Office in Georgetown. Admission is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring a nonperishable food item and join Master Gardeners in supporting the Delaware Does More Program - growing food and funds for neighbors in need. Door Prizes will be awarded to visitors. No rain date is set for this event. Bring a brown bag lunch and eat in the shaded picnic grove. A Day in the Garden • Accessible Gardening - Tour the gardens to get ideas for quick & easy ways

to make gardening enjoyable for all. See tools and gardening aids, raised beds, containers and much more. Receive tips from a visiting physical therapist for staying fit and working in the garden at any age. • New for 2010 -��Plant Sale!   • Children’s Garden - Enjoy story time  in Peter Rabbit’s Garden. New for 2010  - Meet Mr. McGregor and Peter at 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Go on a scavenger hunt or enjoy our butterflies, frogs and goldfish. Bring your camera for great photo opportunities. Come enjoy all our children’s activities  – from learning about insects, to potting your own plant and more. • New to Vegetable Gardening? Learn  from years of Master Gardener experience and tour our vegetable garden. Learn about 

Early tales influence Jones Continued from page eight

organizing presentations, slide shows and anything else that may light a spark in the eyes of a young person. History not withstanding, Jones realizes modernday Laurel has it’s challenges – long gone are the  days when the town was one of the wealthiest and most influential towns in the First State. But it’s still  a nice place to live, he maintains, and he doesn’t  plan on leaving anytime soon – if ever. “I think we have just as much to offer, but it’s not  like it was. In the 1940s, I knew everyone in town, or  at least everyone on my street,” he remembers. “We have drawn away from that, but it’s still a pleasant  place to live. It’s just a way of life that I’ve known  for so long, and I think it’s the best.” Kendal T. Jones has served his country during  World War II, held many positions of authority in his  hometown, raised two grown children and worked in the local job market for nearly a half a century. He also sang tenor for many years in the choir at Centenary Church and in the long defunct Seaford Symphonic Choir, a 1950s group made up mostly of  employees from Seaford’s DuPont nylon plant. “That was a lot of fun because I just enjoyed the  singing and the sharing,” he says. “If you enjoy that,  it’s nice to be around others who enjoy that too.” These days, one of Jones’ favorite things is to just  sit and contemplate life at the picturesque Phillip’s  Landing, just west of Laurel. Taking a walk through  the woods or watching the water and the wildlife helps the man of 83 relax and appreciate life – he  is where he wants to be, and he wouldn’t change a  thing. He says matter-of-factly: “I’ve had a pretty good  life and I can’t complain.”

CHEER wins national award

CHEER Inc, a private non-profit provider of services for senior citizens throughout Sussex County, has been selected for a national award for their recent Mayors with Meals program. CHEER is the only organization in Delaware to receive this honor and one of only 150 agencies nationwide to be recognized. CHEER’s homebound meals for seniors program  provided more than 116,938 meals last year to more  than 815 different individuals. Volunteers deliver  hundreds of meals to front doors each day all over Sussex County. Using a combination of state funds, money from the non-profit Meals on Wheels Delaware organization and private donations, CHEER is able to provide nutritionally balanced meals each day to many who might not otherwise have anything to eat. CHEER is also one of 17 organizations in contention for a national award recognizing a husband and wife volunteer team that delivers meals in the Long  Neck area.

the “Plant A Row Program” to help those in need enjoy fresh produce. • Rain barrels are great ways to catch  rainwater for use in the garden, learn how to make your own. • Love trains? Love gardening? Enjoy  watching our train in the garden. Learn  how to add interest and greater enjoyment with both hobbies. • Master Gardeners will be on hand to  answer your gardening questions. Visit our native plant, herb, shade, bog, annual, perennial, pond, butterfly and children’s  gardens. Get ideas for gardening with limited space using raised beds and containers. What varieties grow well in Sussex County? Tour azalea, hydrangea and annual trial  gardens to find out.

• Have a plant problem? Bring it to the  Plant Clinic for identification and recommendations. • What’s wrong with my plants? – A  garden walk focusing on pests will immediately follow the Open House event. This  free workshop runs from 2 to 4 p.m. and requires pre-registration. Learn about the  most common landscape pests in Sussex County. Learn how to use IPM (Integrated  Pest Management) to spray less and save money. Learn how to identify beneficial  insects that help keep the “bad” insects in check. What makes your garden attractive to beneficial insects. For more information, visit www.rec. udel.edu, or contact Tracy Wootten at 8562585, ext. 538, wootten@udel.edu or Karen Adams at ext. 540, adams@udel.edu.


PAGE 38

MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

Tomatoes, a backyard garden favorite, are a treat

For a backyard gardener, picking that first ripe tomato from the oretta norr vine can be a religious experience. A tree in our yard fell victim to the ravages of winter which was unfortunate but its demise provided us with a small patch of continuous sun and a perfect spot for a small raised bed in which to grow a few tomato plants. It was all I could do not to snatch the first fruit as it turned from green to a pale orange. Finally, after eyeing it greedily for what seemed like eons, I could 1/2 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing stand it no longer. A just picked a tomato, 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper sprinkled with a bit of salt - heaven on Fresh basil leaves (optional) earth! 1. Unfold the piecrust according to Like the blueberry, the tomato is truly package directions. Line a 9-inch tart pan an American native. The Aztecs and Incas with pastry (it’s easier to remove the baked cultivated it way before it was introduced tart if pan has a removable bottom). Press to Europe by explorers in the 16th century. the pastry into the fluted sides of the tart We eat about 18 pounds each per year in pan and trim the edges. Don’t prick. Parthis country, reaping the advantages of tially bake in a 450 degree oven for 5 to 7 Vitamins A and C as well as lycopene, a minutes or until pastry is slightly dry. cancer and anti-aging agent. 2. Remove from oven. Sprinkle with The Consortium of Florida Tomato 1/2 cup of the mozzarella cheese. Cool in Growers offers these helpful facts: pan on a wire rack. Reduce oven temperaTwo to three large tomatoes will equal ture to 375 degrees. one pound. One medium, seeded equals ¾ 3. Meanwhile, cut the tomatoes into cup chopped; 1 large, seeded equals 1 cup, wedges; drain the wedges on paper towchopped; and one pound equals 2 ½ cups, els. Arrange the tomato wedges over the chopped or 2 cups, pureed. Always store at melted cheese in a baked crust. room temperature. 4. In a food processor bowl, combine These yummy recipes are courtesy of basil and garlic; cover and process with Midwest Magazine. on-off turns until coarsely chopped. Or snip the basil and mince the garlic. Fresh Tomato Pie 5. In a medium mixing bowl, combine 8 appetizer or 4 main-dish servings the basil-garlic mixture, the remaining Bake: 25 minutes shredded mozzarella cheese, the mayon1 refrigerated unbaked pie crust naise, the grated Parmesan cheese, and 1-1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese pepper. Spread the mixture evenly over (6 ounces) tomato wedges. 4 roma or small regular tomatoes 6. Bake in a 375 degree oven for about 3/4 cup loosely packed fresh basil 25 minutes or until cheese is golden. Let leaves stand 5 minutes before cutting into wedg4 cloves garlic es. Serve warm. If you like, garnish with 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese additional basil leaves.

L

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Eastern Shore

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August 12-14 Nutter Park, seaford

Bacon Lettuce Tomato Salad 8 oz. hickory-smoked bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 4 cups torn romaine lettuce Homemade Croutons (recipe below) 1 cup grape or cherry tomatoes, halved 1/2 cup bottled ranch salad dressing 1/2 to 1 tsp. Kansas City-style or Montreal steak seasoning or dry rib or pork rub

1. In a 10-inch skillet, cook bacon until almost crisp. Remove bacon from skillet; discard fat. Drain bacon on paper towels. Set aside. 2. In a large salad bowl, combine romaine, Homemade Croutons and tomatoes. In a small bowl, combine ranch salad dressing and steak seasoning. Drizzle dressing over salad; gently toss to coat. Serve immediately. Makes 4 to 6 side-dish servings. Homemade Croutons: Spread 2 cups cubed sourdough, Italian or French bread in a single layer in a shallow baking dish. Stir together 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper and 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt; pour over bread cubes, tossing to coat. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 10 minutes. Stir; bake for 8 to 10 minutes more or until crisp and brown. Makes 2 cups. Make-Ahead Tip: Store cooled croutons in airtight container in refrigerator up to 3 days. Zucchini-Tomato Cups Makes about 24 appetizers 3 small zucchini, trimmed and cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices (1 to 1 1/4 pounds) 1/4 cup crumbled Blue cheese (1 ounce) 8 cherry tomatoes, each cut into 3 or 4 slices (about 3/4 cup) 1/4 cup finely shredded or grated Parmesan cheese Ground black or white pepper 24 small fresh basil leaves

1. Line a large baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. Scoop out some of the flesh from the center of each zucchini slice with a melon baller, creating a shell that resembles a bowl. Place slices, bowl sides up, on prepared baking sheet. 2. Fill each shell with a crumble or two of the blue cheese. Top each with 1 tomato slice. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and pepper.

3. Bake at 350 degrees for 5 to 7 minutes or until cheese melts. (Watch carefully so they do not brown.) Arrange on a serving tray. Garnish each with a fresh basil leaf. Chunky Fresh Tomato Salsa Makes about 2 cups 2 fresh serrano chile peppers or 1 fresh jalapeño chile pepper, stemmed and halved 1 clove garlic, peeled 2 large fresh tomatoes (about 1 pound) 1/3 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves 1 green onion, thinly sliced 1 Tbsp. lime juice or vinegar Salt 1. In a food processor, combine chile pieces and garlic. Cover; process with on/ off turns until finely chopped, stopping and scraping down sides as needed. Cut 1 of the tomatoes into quarters. Add tomato quarters and cilantro to food processor. Pulse 4 to 6 times or until you have a coarse puree. Transfer tomato mixture to a medium bowl. 2. Cut remaining tomato into 1/4-inch pieces. Add tomato, green onion and lime juice to the bowl. Season to taste with salt, usually 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon. This salsa is best if eaten within an hour or two, but it will keep for a number of hours in the refrigerator.


MORNING STAR

• JULY 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 39

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Make the switch to Perdue Farms, recognized as one of the best companies in the nation. We value each and every employee, and show it by providing you with the things you really want. Like a leadership team with a strong record of stability and growth…the respect you deserve…a warm and friendly workplace…competitive pay…and a benefits package with a variety of medical plans, paid vacations and holiday, even an onsite Wellness Center. See the Perdue difference when you join our Milford, DE processing facility as:

MAINTENANCE MECHANIC/ ELECTRONIC TECH

DRIVERS Applicants must have a Class A CDL with a Hazmat endorsement, a clean driving record and two years of experience.

We’re looking for a detail-focused, technically adept individual to maintain, repair and replace weighing and labeling equipment in a fast-paced environment. Scale accuracy and 3-5 years’ experience in a food processing setting required. Professional certifi cations, vocational training, PLC background and/or electrical/electronic experience highly desirable.

We offer a competitive starting wage and excellent benefits package that includes medical, dental, vision, 401(k), tuition reimbursement and paid time off.

Perdue offers competitive pay; medical, dental and vision; life and disability insurance; 401(k) with company-paid match; and paid vacation and holiday time.

Our business involves delivering medical supplies to home patients, hospitals and clinics.

Apply in person: 255 N. Rehoboth Boulevard, Milford, DE Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm Or phone: 302-424-2607 Contact: Karol Crews

Send resumes to: Drew Barner: Fresenius Medical Care, NA 15 Ritter Way Lebanon, PA 17042 Fax: 717-274-5383

Perdue is an Equal Opportunity Employer

All applicants must pass pre-employment drug test and background check. EOE

Hiring Experienced Administrative Assistant Our company is looking for a hard working, energetic, and organized individual to provide general administrative support to our team. Successful candidate must have a strong work ethic, exceptional customer service and communication skills, enjoy interacting with people and have a working knowledge of MS Office suite. The ideal candidate will have a high school degree, a minimum of two years of administrative support experience and must have the ability to perform under pressure and manage multiple tasks simultaneously. What We Offer Competitive compensation, health/prescription/dental benefits, paid holidays, PTO, direct deposit, and a strong team environment. We’re Always Looking for Great People! Submit applications in person to: Atlantic Aluminum Products 12144 Sussex Hwy. Greenwood, DE 19950 302-349-9091 Atlantic Aluminum Products is an Equal Opportunity Employer

www.perdue.com

© 2010 NAS (Media: delete copyright notice)

Hiring Seaford Star 3” x 5” Commercial B&W Sales Representative Our company is looking for a motivated, assertive, hard working, and results driven professional who enjoys B2B sales in a construction environment who has a strong work ethic, and can travel and work long hours. The ideal candidate will have a high school degree, a minimum of two years of successful commercial sales experience and must have the ability to perform under pressure and manage multiple tasks simultaneously. This is an excellent opportunity to develop a great career in sales with an industry leader! What We Offer Competitive compensation (Base + Commission), health/dental benefits, paid holidays, marketing support, company cell phone and vehicle, and a strong team environment. We’re Always Looking for Great People!

Submit applications in person to: Atlantic Aluminum Products 12144 Sussex Hwy. Greenwood, DE 19950 302-349-9091 Atlantic Aluminum Products is an Equal Opportunity Employer


ATTORNEYS

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You�Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

FUQUA, YORI and WILLARD, P.A. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777 *Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

CONCRETE

• DRIVEWAYS • GARAGES • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS

MR. CONCRETE 410-742-0134

Mark Donophan

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

ENERGY

ELECTRIC CONSERVATION CONSULTING LLC Give us the opportunity to do an

Electric Energy Audit of Your Business

& Show You How Easy It Is To

Save Money & Conserve Energy.

BUSINESS & SERVICE BUS DIRECTORY PAGE DIRECTORY

BARBER/BEAUTY

Healthy Hair Clinique

Healthy Hair with a Healthy Glow Men - Women - Children

Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

302-629-4281 Seaford, Delaware

LAWN CARE

Landscape Design & Installation Landscape Maintenance • Irrigation Paver Patios, Walkways & Fire Pits

ELECTRICIAN

Ken’s Electrical Service All Residential Wiring

629-3795

Millstone River Lawn Care LLC

OWNER OPERATED ~ LAUREL, DEL.

Lawn Mowing, Pruning, Spring & Fall Clean Up, Bed Renovations, Garden Rototilling

302-245-1493 302-875-3099

jayreaser@gmail.com

40 Years of “Handy Man” Experience. Our Rates Are Great! Call us to compare!

PHOTO COPIES Self Service

SEAFOOD

TAX SERVICE

WATER TREATMENT

302

629-0444

800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Fax: 302-628-0798 - www.jacksonhewitt.com

Independently Owned & Operated 320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2 31A Creamery Lane Millsboro, DE 19966 Easton, MD 21601

302-934-9450

410-819-6990

629-9788

REAL ESTATE

LAUREL REALTY

302-875-3000 800-887-3001

302-260-2679

302-629-4548

Call The Star To ADVERTISE!

“Making A Difference”

Licensed & Insured

302-337-8202

20478 Atlanta Rd., Bridgeville, DE

Remind People You Are Here For Them!

Photo Copies 10¢ per pg

Morning Star Publications 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Behind County Bank 302-629-9788

Delmarva’s #1 Water Treatment Dealer

Also Offering Premium Spring Water

410.742.3333 800.439.3853 sharpwater.com

1128 S. Central Ave. Laurel, Delaware

Directly Across from the Laurel Senior High School

Stop By The Star Office Pick Up A FREE copy of the Stars’

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford

6299788

B RIDAL P LANNER

To Advertise In This Directory Call

302-629-9788

Only $10.00 Per Week (3 Month Minimum)

IRRIGATION R & L Irrigation Services Finish Site Work Complete Irrigation Systems Sod Laying & Seeding Exterior Lighting Ponds, Mulching, Concrete Pavers

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS

302-530-3376

SALES Increase Your Sales Only $10/Week (3 Month Minimum)

Call The Star To ADVERTISE!

629-9788

WEDDINGS

Getting Married?

EMPLOYMENT

302-934-9450

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Your ad could be here!

302.934.9113

Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales

Cell 228-5435

C. Jay Reaser

Weddings, Anniversaries, Birthdays, Character, Adult & Party Cakes Debbie Daisey

320 W. DuPont Hwy. Ste. 2, Millsboro, DE 19966

Leave a Message!

EXTRA HANDS

Cakes by Dee

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

20 Years Experience

HANDYMAN

BRIDAL

302-628-0767

No Job Too Small!

628-6980/6982 fax Cell 302-462-1528

LANDSCAPING

239 E. Market Street Laurel, DE 19956

875-2498

22367 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

Call for an appointment!

Call for an appointment

Specialty Products & Insulation Co.

M-F 7:30-6; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

Donna Brown & Mary Hearn

9025 Sharptown Road, Laurel, DE

CALL CHRIS

FARM & HOME

BEAUTY/BARBER

Just Outside of Town, before the airport, on right

1/2” 4’x8’ - $5.44 ea. 5/8” 4’x8’ - $6.08 ea.

U.S. 13 N., Seaford 302-629-9645 • 800-564-5050

Owner Operated • 15 Years Experience

Sandy’s Hair Styling

CONTRACTORS: DRYWALL FOR SALE

302-629-8790

Superior Service at Reasonable Rates

BEAUTY/BARBER

WEIGHT LOSS

Are you ready to commit to a Lifestyle change?

Why Weight?

Make the Transitions Today! You owe it to yourself to check out this program! Call 302-875-3099 for Info HealthierYou.TransitionsLifestyle.com


MORNING STAR RIVERFEST SPECIAL: 8’ C Sea Eagle-5, inflatable w/ oars $85. 628-5300. 6/17

PULL-BEHIND MOWER, John Deere, PTO driven, $300 OBO. 381-4656. 7/8

12’ ALUM. BOAT w/trailer, tagged & inspec. 2010, 6 hp Wayama motor. Runs good, $600 OBO. Call John, 6280617. 6/10

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, blk. w/silver, asking $100. 536-2457 after 10 pm.

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES STAR WARS & STAR TREK items, large collection. 8752781. 7/15 LOST IN SPACE Lg. Robbie The Robot, talking robot w/alien, in orig. box, $20. 628-1880. 6/24 ‘71 LAUREL YEARBOOK, no markings, exc. cond., $65. ‘71 Laurel H.S. Graduation photo, framed, $35. 841-9274. 6/17 DELMAR YEAR BOOKS: Brand new, 1966, 68, 73, 75, 79, 80, 83, 85, 87, 88 & 91. 302-236-8133. 6/10

FOR SALE AMERICAN GIRL SIZE doll clothes. Large selection. Call 877-0340. 7/15 OAK CURIO CABINET, $75. Marlble top coffee table $200. 877-0340. 7/15 RIDING MOWER – Troy Bilt, 20 hp, 46” deck w/bagger. 3 new spindles. Needs trans. assembly. $250. Call Bill at 628-4151. 7/15 TWIN SLEEPER LOVE SEAT, solid blue, rarely used, like new, asking $250. 875-1407. 7/15 2 VANITY LAMPS, Shell base & pink shades, $5 ea., 410-641-5260. 7/15 52K BTU A/C w/remote control, $50. 10’ Fiberglass Step Ladder, $100. 875-8677. FULL SIZE BED w/headboard, complete, good cond., $100. 629-6504. 7/15 LG CHEST - 3 large bottom drawers & 6 sm. top drawers, good cond., $50. 6296504. 7/15 BOOKS: AUTOGRAPHED, coffee table books, variety of sports books, NY Yankees, & Chicken Soup Series. 875-2781. 7/15 6 PC. PEARL DRUM SET, with a high hat, 4 cymbals and stool. Good cond. Asking 500. 875-0826. 7/15 3 Tower Stand, Lt wood, $10; 2 matching end tables, $10 pr.; dk. cherry 3-shelf book case, $20; Small 3-shelf bookcase, $20; 8x10 area rug, marron w/cream flowers, with long & short matching runners, $20. 6296504. 7/15

LG. SOFA, 3 cushions, Indian colors, very clean, no tears, asking $75. 6296504. 7/8 SM. KIT. TABLE & 2 chairs, roses color cushions, very pretty, askig $30. 629-6504. 2 TALL LAMPS, matching, yellow stone base w/ shades, asking $30 ea. 6296504. 7/8 HARLEY-DAVIDSON FXRG Riding Jacket w/ body armor; new, black; size XL. H.D. Riding Jacket, like new, 2-tone gray leather; size L. Make offer for one or both. 855-2308. 7/1 OLD OUTSIDE WATER PUMP, handle style, best offer. 337-8536. 7/1 COUNTRY SOFA, full size, by Broyhill. Blue background w/tan floral print & 4 matching throw pillows & 3 matching window valances. Like new, $300. 410-8832541. 7/1 PROTECTOR/FIRE SAFE, tested to temps up to 1550°, 13x7x6.5”, $25. 875-0747. 7/1 SOFA BED, Treated Microsuede, like new, 6 mos. old, from Janosik’s, $325 OBO. 280-5845. 6/24 TABLE & 4 CHAIRS, great quality, $250 negotiable. For info call 628-1626. 6/24 WOODEN KIT. TABLE, 4 Chairs & leaf, $100. Console Singer Sewing Machine, $100. 410-883-3462. SHARK VACUUM CLEANER, bagless w/Hepa filter, $10. 628-1880. 6/24 LADIES’ SCHWINN BIKE, 21-spd., 26”, $50. Hand Truck, $25. 20 gal. Fish Tank, all access., $50. 2-Antique Lamps, from ‘30s, rewired, $30 for both. 6280502. 6/24 4 AFGHANS, all sizes & colors; look great on bed, must take all, $45. 8750747. 6/17

BANDSAW, Wards Power Kraft 9” bandsaw w/Craftsman 1/3 HP motor. Mounted on plywood base for benchtop use. Runs fine. First $20 takes it. 629-4658. 6/17 NEW HARDWARE for Garage door. Bought for repairs but I replaced the door instead. All new & unused: 1 - 150 lb spring; 3 rollers; 16’ door seal; several new wires. $10 for all. 629-4658. 6/17 TAPED VHS MOVIES, over 2000, $150. 628-1880. 6/17 CORDLESS AIR COMPRESSOR, can also be used as 12V power supply. Easy AC- or DC-charging, indicator lights, exc. cond., $35. 875-0747. 6/17 FACTORY SVCE MANUAL for ‘00 Dodge Dakota, exc. cond., $35. 875-9775. 6/10 PERENNIALS, $3 - $12. Flocks, Lavendar, Peony, Hot Pink, Red Raspberries, etc. 443-359-0507. 6/10 SWIMMING POOL, 16’ round, alum., above ground, w/filter & liner. Used 1 season, exc cond., $180 OBO. 875-1778. 6/10 2 SHARP 5K BTU A/C Window Units, 19.5” remotes, barely used, $95 ea. Top of the line industrial grade. Real bargains! 410-9242483. 6/10 CRAFTSMAN GUIDED MEASURING TOOL w/laser track, displays temp., accurate to 165’, length, width, height, sq. ft. & cu. ft., and volume. Great for RE agent or contractor, pd $170, asking $75. 236-8133. 6/10 18,500 BTU WINDOW A/C, Kenmore, 220 hook-up, $75. 877-0476. 6/10

ANIMALS, ETC. BORDER COLLIE Puppy for sale, female, 13 wks. old, pure breed, ABC reg. $450. 875-5164. 7/15 BABY RABBITS: Lions Head Breed. Ducklings: Indian Runners & Muscovys. 875-5543 before 8 pm. 6/10

APTS. FOR RENT

MARKET STREET APTS. BRIDGEVILLE, DE

Accepting applications for 1 & 2 BR apts for elderly and/or disabled. Must meet federal income limits and other eligibility requirements. C/A in all units, elevator available. Apply at 310 Market St., Bridgeville, DE Mon.-Fri. 9 to 3. Call 302-337-3144 for application and info. Wheelchair Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer.

• JULY 15 - 21, 2010

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE

NONDISCRIMINATION ON BASIS OF SEX, RACE, RELIGION, NATIONAL ORIGIN, AGE, DISABILITY, MARITAL STATUS, OR SEXUAL ORIENTATION Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which became effective July 21, 1975, prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs, activities, and employment practices. The purpose of this notice is twofold: First, it is an official notice that the Seaford School District has and will continue to take all necessary measures to fully implement the intent of Title IX; and, second, it provides the names, addresses, and office telephone numbers of those individuals who have primary responsibility for effecting compliance with these federal policies and regulations. Dr. Russell H. Knorr, Superintendent of Schools: The Superintendent of Schools has overall responsibility for coordination of efforts to comply with and carry out this regulation. He will also serve as the person to whom all grievances relating to discrimination based on sex should be directed. Dr. Shelley Holt, Director of Secondary Education: The Director of Secondary Education shall have specific responsibility for ensuring that no person shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefit, or be subjected to discrimination in any academic or extra-curricular program operated by the district. This will include but not be limited to course offerings, activities, athletic programs, and to counseling and placement services. Mrs. Bonnie Johnson, Director of Human Resources and Public Information: The Director of Human Resources and Public Information shall have specific responsibility for ensuring that no person shall, on the basis of sex, be discriminated against in hiring and employment criteria, including, but not limited to health and insurance benefits and services. Communication to the appropriate administrator should be directed to: Seaford School District, 390 North Market Street Ext., Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-4587 7/15/1tc

PAGE 41 PUBLIC NOTICE

You are hereby notified the below application will be before: The City of Seaford Board of Adjustment and Appeals for their determination on Wednesday, August 4, 2010 at 12:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: Case No. V-09-10: TLT Property Management, Inc., property owners of 620-624 Stein Highway, on behalf of a Immanuel House of Praise Church, operating in 624 Stein Highway, is seeking to expand their existing variance granted as per the Zoning Ordinance, Sec. 15-40 Uses by Right/ Sec. 15-29 Uses by Right to establish a church in a commercial district with limited times of operation. The Church is now seeking permission: • To conduct meetings/ counseling of approximately twelve members on Mondays and/or Tuesdays; and, • To conduct special services on Friday and/or Saturday evenings after 7:00 p.m. Case No. V- 10-10: Maria Matos, property owner of 535 E. Poplar Street, is seeking a special exception on behalf of Gloria Matos, in order to operate a small day care with no more than four (4) children, as required by the Municipal Code, Ch. 15 Zoning Ordinance, Section 15-20 Uses by Special Exception which refers to Sec. 15-20 Uses by Special Exception. If these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 15th day of July 2010 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 7/15/1tc THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR THE STATE OF DELAWARE IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY In Re Change of Name of: Roosevelt Moses, Petitioner, to Roosevelt Sessoms Jr. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Roosevelt Moses of Bridgeville, Del., intends to present a Petition to the Court of Common Pleas for the State of Delaware in and for Sussex County to change his name to Roosevelt Sessoms Jr. Roosevelt Sessoms Jr., Petitioner 7/8/3tc

LEGAL NOTICE

ON JULY 27, 2010 at 11:00 a.m., Laurel Storage Center, Road 468, Laurel, DE will conduct a sale pursuant to Title 25, DEL. C. ANN. 4904-4905. The contents of the following bins will be sold: Bin(s): #1 Woodrow Larrimore; #5 Kenneth Trice; #36 Joan King; #56 Blenda Lawson; #90 Theodore Johnson; #108 Timothy Morris; #146 Tyreil Beckett; #153 Larry Faist; #185 Falisha Willis; #192 Bonnie Boyce; #199 Gloria Adkins; #223 Beverly H. Ellis. BIDDERS: Call office on day of sale to confirm, (302) 875-5931. 7/8/2tc

BID NOTICE

Sealed Bids, in duplication, will be received by the Town of Bridgeville, 101 North Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware 19933, for the Handicap Ramp and Catch Basin Repair Project #10-P-PROG-41. Bids will be accepted by the Town of Bridgeville until 3:30 p.m. on July 30, 2010, at which time they will be opened publicly and read aloud. Handicap Ramp work includes repair and/or replacement. ADA compliance is required. Catch Basin work includes new installation and repairs. This project is being funded by the Delaware Department of Transportation and is subject to Delaware Prevailing Wage Rates. These regulations may be obtained at the Delaware Department of Labor. Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be obtained at the Bridgeville Town Office. The right is reserved as the interest of the Town of Bridgeville may appear, to reject any and all bids, to waive any informality or irregularity in bids received, and to accept or reject any items of any bid. Bonnie Walls, Town Manager 7/8/2tc See LEGALS—page 42

Counseling for Individuals, Couples, & Families

Natalie A. Cherrix, LCSW Specializing in Trauma & Abuse Recovery Insurance accepted 314 Stein Hwy. Seaford, de 19973

(302) 682-9025

www.nataliecherrix.com


PAGE 42

LEGALS - from Page 41

NOTICE

Estate of William Clayton Calloway, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamen­ tary upon the estate of Wil­ liam Clayton Calloway who departed this life on the 4th day of February, A.D. 2010 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Anne Dicker­ son Calloway on the 25th day of June, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix with­ out delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 4th day of October, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Anne Dickerson Calloway 707 E. Jewell St. Delmar, DE 19940 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 7/8/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Celia C. Bates, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administra­ tion upon the estate of Celia C. Bates who departed this life on the 29th day of May, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Len Fedullo on the 17th day of June, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons hav­ ing demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 29th day of Jan­ uary, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Len Fedullo 125 Myrtle Ave. Pitman, NJ 08071 Attorney: Michele Procino Wells Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 7/1/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Leslie H. Hughes (Jr.), Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamen­ tary upon the estate of Leslie H. Hughes (Jr.) who departed this life on the 29th day of May, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Regi­ nal H. Hughes on the 21st day of June, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are

required to make payments to the said Executor with­ out delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 29th day of January, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Reginal H. Hughes 2 N. Cummings Dr. Middletown, DE 19709 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 7/1/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Elizabeth D. Berridge, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Adminis­ tration upon the estate of Elizabeth D. Berridge who departed this life on the 7th day of June, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Elsie D. Rohlich on the 21st day of June, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons hav­ ing demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 7th day of Febru­ ary, A.D. 2011 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Elsie D. Rohlich 543 Nylon Blvd. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 7/1/3tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Le­ vari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com­ plex, 22215 DuPont Bou­ levard, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, Georgetown Hun­ dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, lying on the north side of Samuel Hill Rd (Rd 437) and being more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Law­ rence R. Long, Registered Surveyor, dated December, 1997, as follows, to­wit: BEGINNING at a rebar set on the north side of Samuel Hill Rd (Rd 437) at a comer for this lot and for other lands now or formerly of David A. and Emelita

MORNING STAR

A. Taylor, said rebar situ­ ate North 84 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds West 150.00 feet from a rebar set; then, from this point of beginning running with the right of way line of road Samuel Hill rd (rd 437), North 83 degrees 29 minutes 22 seconds West 100.02 feet to a plastic pipe found; then, turning and running with other land of Mary J. Willing, North 05 degrees 30 minutes 00 sec­ onds East 340.10 feet to a plastic pipe found; thence, turning and running with the line of other lands now or formerly of David A. and Emelita A. Taylor, the next two courses and distances: 1) South 84 degrees 40 minutes 59 seconds East 100.00 feet to a rebar set, and 2) south 05 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds west 342.18 feet to the rebar set at the point and place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may, to­ gether with any improve­ ments located thereon. BEING the same land and premises that Mary 1. Willing, by Deed dated March 27, 2005 and re­ corded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3122, Page 268, did grant and convey unto Thomas E. Enger 2nd and Kimberly A. Enger, in fee. Tax Parcel: 2­32­20.00­ 20.13 Property Address: 32519 SAMUEL HILL ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sus­ sex County) and valid driv­ er’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Reg­ istration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 per­ cent to be paid by the Pur­ chaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the respon­ sibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be re­ quired to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is pre­

• JULY 15 - 21, 2010 sented to the Sheriff’s Of­ fice within Forty­Five days of confirmation. If the Pur­ chaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of KIMBERLY A. & THOMAS E. ENGER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Le­ vari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com­ plex, 22215 DuPont Bou­ levard, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, Georgetown Hun­ dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THOSE CERTAIN lots, pieces and parcels of land situated in North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, known as LOTS NO.7, 8, and PART OF 9, SECTION A, as laid out on a plot of lots of the Wessex Farm Labor Association, which is of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Dela­ ware in Plot Book 2, page 11, being more particularly described as follows, to­ wit: BEGINNING at a con­ crete monument, said con­ crete monument located on the Southeastern right of way of the North bound lane of U.S. Rt. 13, said concrete monument also being located on a corner for this lot and lands of Ralph Lee, said concrete monument also being locat­ ed 611.8 feet from County Road 532; thence turning and running by and along the common boundary line between these lands and the aforementioned Ralph Lee lands and lands now or formerly of Albert Hopkins, South 80 degrees 09’ East through a concrete monu­ ment 170.67 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Charles J. Fountain, South 08 degrees 02’ West 115.40 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running North 76 degrees 22’ West 9.04 feet to an ex­ isting concrete monument; thence continuing North 78 degrees 26’ East 143.37 feet to a point; thence turn­ ing and running South 11 degrees 48’ East 60.66 feet to a point; thence turning

and running North 76 de­ grees 45’ West 24 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and along the Southeastern right of way of the North bound lane of U.S. Rt. 13 North 11 degrees 48’ East a chord distance if 109.70 feet home to the place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may, with all improvements thereon, and shown as par­ cel #1 on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., Registered Surveyor, on July 24, 1986. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Doretha M. Ames n/k/a Doretha M. Williams by deed dated April 14, 2008 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Del­ aware in Deed Book 3568, Page 117 did grant and convey unto DORETHA M. WILLIAMS. Tax Parcel: 1­31­19.00­ 48.00 Property Address: 20289 SUSSEX HIGHWAY, BRID­ GEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sus­ sex County) and valid driv­ er’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Reg­ istration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 per­ cent to be paid by the Pur­ chaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the respon­ sibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be re­ quired to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is present­ ed to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty­Five days of confirmation. If the Pur­ chaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DORETHA M. WILLIAMS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Le­ vari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com­ plex, 22215 DuPont Bou­ levard, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, Georgetown Hun­ dred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain piece, parcel and tract of land, lying and being situate in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, known as Lot NO.5 of “Wheatley Farms”, subdivision, being de­ scribed more particularly as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe (found) on the West­ erly right­of­way line of Sussex County Road #562 (50’RIW); said pipe being situate Northerly a distance of 1,901 feet, more or less, from Sussex County Road #31; thence with Lot No.6, North 70 degrees 55 min­ utes 43 seconds West a distance of 221.48 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with the line lands of Wheat­ ley Farms, Inc., now or for­ merly, North 18 degrees 34 minutes 16 seconds East a distance of 150.01 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with Lot NO.4 South 70 degrees 55 minutes 43 seconds East a distance of 222.79 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with Sussex County Road #562 South 19 degrees 04 minutes 17 seconds West a distance of 150.00 feet home to a point and place of begin­ ning, said to contain 33,320 square feet of land, be the same more or less. BEING the same lands conveyed to James Olson by Deed from Alphonso Jackson, Secretary of Housing and Urban Devel­ opment, dated August 22, 2006, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 3351, Page 331. BEING the same lands conveyed to Glen V. Breed­ ing, Jr., by Deed from James Olson, dated January 19, 2007, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 3411, Page 27. Tax Parcel: 1­31­5.00­ 57.00 Property Address: 16364 PROGRESS SCHOOL ROAD, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sus­ sex County) and valid driv­ See LEGALS—page 43


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 42

er’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of GLENN V. BREEDING, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a R.R. Spike found lying on the Westerly edge of Arch Street, and at the Northerly side of East Ninth Street; thence by and with aforesaid right-of-way of Arch Street North 89 degrees 54 minutes 00 seconds West 91.04 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and for lands

now or formerly of Randall S. Pentoney, etux. North 00 degrees 29 minutes 05 seconds West 74.07 feet to a pipe found; thence continuing on North 00 degrees 16 minutes 05 seconds West 39.70 feet to a nail found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of John B. Rigby, etux. South 87 degrees 21 minutes 46 seconds East 15.20 feet to a pipe found; thence continuing on North 87 degrees 44 minutes 49 seconds East 68.20 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and running by and with the Northerly right-of-way line of Arch Street South 04 degrees 12 minutes 11 seconds East 116.22 home to the place of beginning said to contain 9,978 square feet of land more or less with improvements thereon as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. dated December 13, 2002. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING the same land and premises which by Deed dated June 24, 1994, and recorded among the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware, in Book 1988, Page 45, was granted and conveyed by Michael A. Crockett unto Susan L. Cox, the Grantor herein. BEING the same land and premises which by Deed dated December 20, 2002, and recorded, among the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware, in Book 2786, Page 36, was granted and conveyed by Susan L. Cox unto John R. French, III. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.15175.00 Property Address: 18 EAST 9TH STREET, BLADES Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent

to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN R. FRENCH, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL That certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, fronting on the Northerly right-of-way line of County Road 589, adjoining lands now or formerly of Ellwood Watson and other lands of Nanticoke Homes, Inc., and being more particularly described according to a survey by Charles D. Murphy. Jr., as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe on the Northerly rightof-way line of County Road 589, 35 feet from the centerline thereof, said pipe being the Southeasterly corner for lands now or formerly of Ellwood Watson; thence proceeding with said lands now or formerly of Watson, North 10 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds East 141.126 feet to an iron rod; thence turning and continuing with said lands now or formerly of Watson, North 79 degrees 38 minutes 27 seconds East 182.041 feet to a notched cedar post marking a corner for this lot and other lands now or formerly of Nanticoke Homes, Inc.; thence turning and running along lands now or formerly of Nanti-

PAGE 43

• JULY 15 - 21, 2010 coke Homes, Inc., South 16 degrees 15 minutes 52 seconds West 230.532 feet to an iron pipe on the aforementioned Northerly right-of-way line of County Road 589; thence running with said right-of-way line of County Road 589, North 70 degrees 30 minutes 55 seconds West 150.00 feet to the place of Beginning; containing .6709 acres of land, be the same more or less, with all improvements thereon erected. BEING part of the same lands and premises heretofore conveyed unto Nanticoke Homes, Inc., by Deed of Ralph P. Barwick, dated October 29, 1987, and now of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1527, Page 282. BEING the same premises which Nanticoke Homes, Inc., by Deed dated December 23, 1992 and recorded December 31, 1992 in the Office for the Recorder of Deeds in and for the County of Sussex, and State of Delaware in Deed Book Volume 1889, Page 150, granted and conveyed unto Bruce D. Jenkins and Carol J. Jenkins. Tax Parcel: 5-30-9.0076.00 Property Address: 12266 JENKINSVILLE LANE, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the per-

centum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BRUCE JENKINS A/K/A BRUCE D. JENKINS & CAROL JENKINS A/K/A CAROL J. JENKINS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate lying and being in Seaford Hundred. Sussex County and State of Delaware, being designated an LOT FORTY FOUR (44) of GREEN ACRES SUBDIVISION as shown On a plot of record in Deed Book 310, Page 540, Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Delaware, more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Brad A. Temple, dated February 6, 1996, as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found On the northerly right of way line of Garden Lane, marking a common corner for this lot and Lot 43; thence, by and with the northerly right of way line of Garden Lane, North67 degrees 28 minutes 16 seconds West, 50.00 feet to an iron pipe found marking a common corner for this lot and Lot No. 45; thence. by and with Lot 45, North 22 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds East, 150.00 feet to an iron pipe found marking a common corner forthis lot and Lot 45, and on line of Lands of Ray S .. Mears and Sons, Inc.; thence, by and with Lands of Ray S. Mears And Sons, Inc., South 67 degrees 28 minutes 16 seconds East, 50.00 feet to an iron pipe found marking a common corner for this lot and Lot 43; thence, by and with Lot 43, South 22 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds West, 150.00 feet, home to the point and place of Beginning. Containing 7,500 square feet of land, more or less, with all improvements located thereon. BEING the same lands conveyed unto Robert R. Nowlin and Mable L. Nowlin, his wife, dated February

8, 1994, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1968, Page 300. THEREAFTER, the said Robert R. Nowlin departed this life on or about December 20, 1995, leaving his wife Mabel L. Nowlin, as the surviving joint tenant in the abovementioned property. BEING the same lands conveyed unto Billy D. Parsons, by Deed of Mable L. Nowlin, dated February 16, 1996, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 21 07, Page 249. Tax Parcel: 3-31-3.00218.00 Property Address: 8601 GARDEN LANE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BILLY D. PARSONS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc See LEGALS—page 44

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PAGE 44 LEGALS - from Page 43

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with improvements thereon situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a stake set in a ditch on the Northerly aide of Delaware Road No. 488; thence along Delaware Road No. 488 South 57 degrees 52 minutes West 266.1 feet more or less to a stake, corner for this land and lands of Reuben Ockels; thence along Ockels land North 18 degrees 30 minutes West 213 feet to a stake; thence still along land of Reuben Ockels the following courses and distances: North 66 degrees 53 minutes East 59 feet to a stake; thence South 72 degrees 28 minutes East 67.8 feet to a stake; thence North 72 degrees 47 minutes East 158 feet to a pipe set in the ditch; thence with the ditch 114 feet more or less back to the point and place of beginning, said to contain 0.93 acres of land, be the same more or less. Excepting there from a conveyance of 12,500 square feet of land conveyed to Dennis H. Dinneen and Joan A. Dinneen by deed of Jerome Siavinskas and Dorothy Siavinskas dated November 10, 1983, filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1223 at Page 318. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Del aware. BEING the same land and premises which by Deed dated June 1,2003, and recorded October 8, 2003, among the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware, in Book 2893, Page 338, was granted and conveyed be Joan A. Dinneen, Executrix unto Jennifer Ann Dinneen, the Grantor, herein. BEING the same premises which Jennifer Ann

MORNING STAR Dinneeen, by Deed dated December 23,2003 and recorded October 8, 2003 in the Office for the Recorder of Deeds in and for the County of Sussex, and State of Delaware in Deed Book Volume 2928, Page 276, granted and conveyed unto Patricia A. Taylor and Heather C. Manlove. Tax Parcel: 1 - 3 2 7.00-2.00 Property Address: 9027 OCKELS DRIVE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PATRICIA A. TAYLOR & HEATHER C. MANLOVE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit:

ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware lying on the westerly side of Delaware Road No. 481 and being known and designated as Lot No. Five (5) as more particularly shown upon a plot of the subdivision plan lands of Max Dubin, which plot Is of record In the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Plot Book 39 at Page 152 and being more particularly bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a pipe In the southwesterly rightof-way line of County Road 481, which pipe 18 1,393 feet, more or less, from U.S. Route 13 right-of-way; thence from said point of beginning by and with the eouthweal8rty right-ofway- line of County Road 481 South 32 degrees 53 minutes 38 seconds East 100.00 feet to a pipe at a corner for these lands and Lot No.6; thence along a line between these lands and Lot No.6 South 57 degrees 06 minutes 22 seconds West 220.00 feel to a pipe at another corner for these lands and lot No.6; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Two E’s North 32 degrees 53 minutes 38 seconds West 100.00 feet to a pipe at a corner tor these lands and Lot No.4: thence along a line between these lands and Lot No.4 North 57 degrees 06 minutes 22 seconds East 220.00 feet to the point and place of beginning, containing 22,000 square feet of land, more or less. This description is derived from a survey prepared by Theodore B. Simpler dated July 20, 1982. Being the same lands and premises which Estate of Pauline W. Arnett, by Lee Major Arnett, Surviving heir of Pauline W. Arnett, did grant and convey unto Lee Major Arnett, by deed dated May 7, 1998 and recorded on May 7, 1998 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2285 at Page 341. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00272.05 Property Address: 9330 BRICKYARD ROAD, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited

• JULY 15 - 21, 2010 to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LEE MAJOR ARNETT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Sussex County and State of Delaware, on the east side of Market Street, and being more particularly described according to a survey prepared by McCann, Inc., dated February 4, 1997, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a railroad spike found, situate on the Easterly right-of-way of Market Street (U.S. Route 13A), said spike being a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Christopher M. Maddox, and being 115 feet, more or less, Southerly of the centerline of Second Street; thence running with the lands now or formerly of Maddox, North 86 degrees 09 minutes East, 120.00 feet to an iron pipe found, said iron pipe being a corner for this lot and the lands

now or formerly of Maddox and a point on line of lands now or formerly of Mildred H. Handley; thence turning and running with the lands now or formerly of Handley, South 00 degrees 02 minutes 23 seconds West, 61.83 feet to an iron pipe found, said iron pipe being a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of First Haitian Church of God, and a point on line of the lands now or formerly of Handley; thence turning and running with the lands now or formerly of First Haitian Church of God, South 89 degrees 27 minutes 48 seconds West, 116.0 feet to a railroad spike found, said spike being situate on the aforesaid Easterly rightof-way of Market Street; thence turning and running along Market Street, North 03 degrees 51 minutes West, 55.0 feet home to the point and place of beginning, said to contain 6,885 square feet of land, more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Alfredo Salinas and Blanca A. Salinas did grant and convey unto Louzena Jefferson by deed dated September 20, 2005 and recorded on September 22, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3205 Page 206. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.11122.00 Property Address: 108 SOUTH MARKET STREET, BLADES Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be

refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LOUZENA JEFFERSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known as the Residue of lands on M. Alan and Norma Jean Hudson, containing 1.8507 acres of land, more or less, as will more fully and clearly appear upon that certain plot prepared by TempleSellers, Inc., Registered Surveyors, entitled “Resubdivision Lands of M. Alan & Norma Jean Hudson”, dated December 7,2001, and file for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 73, Page 210, as reference thereunto being had will more fully and at large appear. Being the same lands and premises which Norma Jean Hudson, did convey unto Henry Magan, by deed dated December 29, 2006 and recorded on January 3, 2007 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3401 at Page 198. Tax Parcel: 2-32-22.003.01 Property Address: 15125 TRAP POND ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder RegSee LEGALS—page 45


MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 45

AmVets Post #1694 has election of officers Each year the American Veterans Association, AmVets Post #1694, has election of officers for their 77 members and 23 sons of veterans. While awaiting finances for their own post location, they are presently meeting at the American Legion hall (Post #6) in Seaford. The post changes are as follows: Commander, from Barry Sauers to Bill King; 1st Vice Commander Al Weir stays in position and Chaplain Bill Miller stays post adjutant. Barry Sauers moves from commander to post 2nd vice commander. Antoinette “Tony” Bergfelder is elected post treasurer. Marty Wormer stays as post provost. No photos were available of Al Weir or Marty Wormer. AmVets was established by an act of congress back in 1947. They are “veterans helping veterans.” Any man or woman who has honorably served in any branch of the service at any time is eligible to join and is invited to do so. Contact Al Weir at 629-4141 for more information. LEGALS - from Page 44 istration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of HENRY MAGAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com-

From left are William Miller, post adjutant, Bill King, new post commander and Antoinette “Tony” Bergfelder, the new post treasurer.

plex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being In the Town of Seaford, Sussex County and State of Delaware, bounded and described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at the Street line (Intersecting) as the North East Corner of Front and Second Streets, thence running Northward with the said Front Street a distance of Sixty (60) feet to a concrete monument; thence Easterly a distance of One Hundred Thirty-One (131) feet to a concrete monument on line of lands now or formerly of Washington Marvel; thence Southerly with said line now or formerly of Washington Marvel a distance of Sixty (60) feet to the aforesaid Second Street; thence Westerly with said Second Street a distance of One Hundred Thirty-One (131) feet to the place of beginning, containing Seven Thousand Eight Hundred Sixty (7,860) square feet of land, more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Washington Mutual Bank, did grant and convey unto James A. Welu, by deed dated September 22,2003 and recorded on October 2, 2003 the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2891 at Page 329. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.0099.00 Property Address: 225 NORTH FRONT STREET, SEAFORD

Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 16, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 20, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMES A. WELU and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/8/2tc

Bob Sauers, left, post commander 2009-10 congratulates this year’s new Post Commander Bill King.

Funeral services Friday for soldier who was ‘swept FREE away’ during mission By Lynn R. Parks

with his unit. She also said that he had told CLASSIFIEDS her that the mission he was on would be

Sale. Funeral services are plannedPersonal for tomor-Itemshisfor last in Afghanistan. row for Andrew J. Creighton, a former Creighton, known as “A.J.,” moved to No Vendors Please. resident of Laurel and a 2003 graduate Laurel after his freshman year in Cuero Call 629-9788, of Sussex Tech who died July 4 in AfHigh School. At Sussex Tech, he was on or send to P.O. Box 1000, ghanistan. Creighton, who was 23, was the wrestling team and was in the band, DEwhere 19973.he played baritone, tuba and truma sergeant with the U.S. Army andSeaford, was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 1st Special pet. He was also a member of the All-State Forces Group from Joint Base LewisBand. He enlisted in the Army following McChord in Washington. graduation and studied to be a translator According to a statement released by and interrogator. He was a signal intellithe Department of Defense, Creighton was gence specialist with his unit. serving in Oruzgan province when he died. He had a number of medals and was He sustained injuries on July 1, the stateawarded the Bronze Star and Meritorious ment says, and died July 4. Service Medal after his death. Creighton’s mother, Rebecca Wolter, Creighton will be buried in Houston lives in Cuero, Texas, and his father, National Cemetery in Houston, Texas. His Timothy, formerly of Laurel, is a resident funeral will be held at the American Heriof Benson, North Carolina. tage Funeral Home, also in Houston. Wolter, who held a press conference at In addition to his parents, he is surthe Red Cross office in Victoria, Texas, vived by a brother, Spc. Allen Creighton to announce her son’s death, said that prestationed at Schofield Barracks in Hawaii, liminary reports indicate that her son was and a sister, Alexandria Creighton of “swept away” while trying to cross a river Texas.

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PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

Thanks to all who helped make Laurel’s 16th annual Independence Day Celebration a great event for families and kids of all ages.

Independence Day was a great event and worth the risk On behalf of Laurel Mayor and Council I want to thank everyone for believing that it was important to celebrate our nation’s birthday. Because you believed, we achieved. Thanks to all who helped make Laurel’s 16th annual Independence Day Celebration a great event for families and kids of all ages. At the top of the thank you list is Laurel Operations Manager Jamie Smith who did a magnificent job coordinating the many tasks. Public Works Director Woody Vickers and his team did a great job getting the Town in shape for the big event. Police Chief Michael Wilson and his officers deserve a round of applause for directing traffic and assisting people as needed. Carol Warrington deserves a pat on the back for seeking advice from the Bridgeville Apple Scrapple Committee and then coordinating the recruitment of the various vendors. Another unsung hero is Brent Boyce who for years has been the guy who figures out how to get electric to the vendor locations and entertainment venues. Brian Cass, Laurel High School Band director, donated 12 hours of his time to run the sound for the various entertainers. Chief Brittingham and the members of the Laurel Fire Company are to be commended for sponsoring a great, patriotic parade. Pastor Tim Dukes and his fellow clergy in the Laurel Ministerial Association got the day started off in proper fashion with an inspirational prayer breakfast at Laurel’s Georgia house restaurant. Thanks also to the entertainers who thrilled the crowd with a variety of musical selections. The Bo Dickerson Band and W.D. Whaley with their “Charlie Daniels fiddlin’ style” did a great job closing out the event. John Theofiles coordinated another outstanding fireworks display.

Letters to the Editor

Stars’ Letters Policy

All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or you may email editor@mspublications.com

Bryant Richardson and his team at Morning Star Publications published another excellent promotional booklet for the event. Finally to you, our citizens and visitors, thanks for coming. We hope you all had a good time. Thanks also to those individuals, businesses, churches and organizations who donated towards the cost of the fireworks. I am pleased to report you raised the full amount and no tax money was used to pay for the fireworks. As we close the curtain on this year’s event, I’d like your ideas on how we make 2011 bigger and better. Please send your ideas to the Town’s website or to Town of Laurel, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, DE 19956. We already have a volunteer who plans to coordinate a car show next year. What else would you like to see or do? Believe it, and working together, we can achieve it. John J. Shwed

Mayor, Town of Laurel

Couple fears that cuts in police force increases risk to officers

We have hesitated writing this letter for months. The reason? Our son is the Laurel detective and there are those who will say we have a conflict of interest. To those I say, of course we do. We worry about his safety, but we have also been lifelong residents of this community: our parents live here, our children grew up here and as they grew, we worried about their safety in this town. So our concern for our safety and the safety of our neighbors goes back

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 • 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com Serving the Delmarva Peninsula since 1996

Subscriptions - $21 a year in Sussex County $26 in Kent and New Castle Counties, Del., and Federalsburg, Sharptown and Delmar, Md.; $31 elsewhere.

further than his time on this police force. The recent budget cuts to the police force are so appalling when we have so much crime. This little town in the recent months has had a murder and an attempted murder, numerous robberies, rapes and child abuse in one form or another. All of these take time to investigate after they have happened, but what about preventing at least some of them from happening? That cannot happen when there are not enough police to cover our town. Contrary to Frank Calio’s opinion that we need only 5 to 6 police officers, we need more police officers, not fewer. Get your head out of the sand, Frank, and anybody else who thinks we live in Mayberry. In the past, the first words out of the Mayor’s mouth and his answer to any financial problem has been to get rid of police officers and now he has finally done it. The Mayor stated that he was not firing anyone, that the officers are already gone. They are gone because they knew there were going to be cuts, so they found other employment. Already the Mayor eliminated one officer position prior to the new budget when an officer left, so we are down three officers and now they have one officer who is out sick. A fifth officer has now found other employment and I would venture to say it will not be filled either. Overtime, overtime, overtime does not save money. How much money does this town save if something horrible happens to one of our police officers? We finally have a police chief who truly cares about this town. Chief Wilson is not here to collect his second or third pension as we have had in the previous chiefs. He has turned the police department into a respectful organization, one that this town should be proud of and he should be rewarded for his accomplishments. Instead he is constantly given a hard time by the Mayor and he makes far less than our public works supervisor or other chiefs in Sussex County. What happened to charging land/slum lords for the overuse of the police? In most cases the landlords live in another town and expect the police to take care of their problems. There was a plan, maybe not the best plan, but a plan to charge these landlords for the excessive use of our police. It boiled down to making the land owner responsible for who they rent to, therefore making our town safer and richer. The choice would ultimately fall on the landlord’s shoulders. In the last year, we have asked at least two council people a question about why the bills are not being paid in a timely fashion. As with any unpaid bill, late fees

are added and coming out of our pockets. This situation has been going on for several years. In fact, some vendors will no longer take PO’s. They must be paid cash at the time of the sale. We have also asked why does all the money received, whether it is grant money or taxes or water and sewer, goes into the same pot? We are still waiting for an answer. Another big issue is the water, sewer and trash. We were told by the previous town manager that the increase in these utilities were to take care of other bills, not just for the utilities. He in fact told the council that they could no longer do this. Our Mayor and Council members were increasing the utilities to keep from raising taxes, but look now, not only are our utilities going up another $12, but our taxes are going up 9%. The City of Milford just raised their utilities to $1.50. The fireworks and the Fourth of July celebration cost Laurel more than $35,000, according to WBOC. Is this good use of our money or are we just entitled to spend that money because we want it and it makes us feel good? Companies have been forced to cut back. Individuals have been forced to cut back. This town should cut every way it can, including traditions. That money would have kept one police officer for a year. Our Mayor chose to spend it in one day for tradition and not for the safety of this town. Our Mayor and Council members purchased, in the last few years, laptop computers so they would not have to go to the town office for council business. With a town this size and with financial problems, was that good use of our tax dollars? Raising taxes and utilities and eliminating police officers is just too easy. Our Mayor and Council are not looking out for our best interests. They have failed to bring businesses here while Delmar and Seaford continue to grow. They have, without caring what business owners or homeowners have to say about the reduction in our police force, done as they wanted and just made our town more unsafe. It is time for a change. It is time to organize a group to take back our town. If any of you care about the plight of this town, please call us at 875-7561. For those who care but cannot get involved, please remember the next election. Please make sure you are registered to vote. Then vote the mayor and council out of office. It is time we have a mayor and council who will listen to what we have to say. Mike and Cathy Calloway

Laurel

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Composition Cassie Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Circulation Karen Cherrix

Secretary Tina Reaser Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Carol Kinsley Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg

Sales Brandon Miller Joyce Birch Rick Cullen Debra Daisey

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To create a business atmosphere where the ideas and efforts of creative people are encouraged and rewarded. To benefit our advertisers, readers and communities by producing quality publications. To work with others to help improve the quality of life for everyone.

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • July 15 - 21, 2010

Final Word

PAGE 47

Financial Regulation Bill lacks real reform, will create problems By Tom Donohue

President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Our elected officials in Washington have struck again. Just months after passing a tax-raising, job-killing health care bill, Congress is about to approve financial regulatory reform legislation that, ironically, lacks actual reform. Proponents of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act will undoubtedly hail it as a triumph of Main Street over Wall Street, but they have it backward. It will be small businesses and families shouldering the brunt of this legislation through higher fees, less choice and fewer opportunities to responsibly access credit. So what does the Dodd-Frank Act do? For one thing, it calls for more than 350 regulatory rulemakings, 47 studies, 74 reports and counting. This tsunami of new rules and studies will cause tremendous uncertainty, making it harder for businesses to raise capital, make investments and create jobs. To put this effort into context, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act required 16 rulemakings and 6 studies, which took more than two years to complete. In the meantime, businesses must contend with a bill of which Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-CT), one of its chief architects, remarked, “No one will know until this is actually in place how it works.” If that’s not a recipe for confusion, uncertainty, and litigation, I don’t know what is! The complications don’t end there. The Chamber believes that you can’t have real reform without reforming the regulators. So it comes as a disappointment that the Dodd-Frank Act creates even more regulatory agencies on top of a fundamentally flawed, outdated system, instead of fixing the system itself. These new bodies include the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a sprawling new bureaucracy with unchecked and far-reaching powers that could potentially regulate hundreds of thousands of nonfinancial businesses. The Dodd-Frank Act will also put American financial firms at a disadvantage by imposing rules and regulations that haven’t been or won’t be adopted globally. In a world where capital can move easily, it will go to where it is welcome, safe and can generate a decent return. This new legislation is the equivalent of a “keep out” sign on the front lawn, forcing legitimate business activity to foreign markets that are hungry for additional capital. This will increase the cost of capital here at home, and could further put the squeeze on small businesses. While the passage of the Dodd-Frank Act marks a sad day for the U.S. economy, jobs and the future of our capital markets, the fight is far from over. The Chamber

will continue to work vigorously through all available avenues — regulatory, legislative and legal — to guarantee appropriate implementation of the bill and to ensure that we have the most efficient, transparent and well-regulated capital markets in the world.

Vital Stats

Federal Debt as of July 13, 2010 at 12:16 a.m. $13,207,202,503,198 Population of United States 308,730,558 Each citizen’s share of debt $42,779 The average citizen’s share of debt increased $27 the past seven days. The debt increased by almost $10 billion and the population increased by 40,076. Source: brillig.com/debt_clock

New Listing

New Listing

570880 New Listing! 3 BR, 2 BR Rancher with pool. 578898 New Listing! 3 BR, 2 BA home with horse stable and race track! Call for showing. $215,000 Located in Laurel DE.Call for showing. $172,900

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Points to Ponder

When somebody tells you nothing is impossible, ask him to dribble a football. ~ Author Unknown

Last Laugh

The $2.99 special A couple went to breakfast at a restaurant where the seniors’ special was two eggs, bacon, hash browns and toast for $2.99. “Sounds good,” the wife says. “But I don’t want the eggs.” “Then, I’ll have to charge you three dollars and forty-nine cents because you’re ordering a la carte,” the waitress warns. “You mean I’d have to pay for not taking the eggs?” the wife asks. “Yes,” states the waitress. “I’ll take the special then,” she replies. “How do you want your eggs?” the waitress asks. “Raw and in the shell.” She takes the eggs home and bakes a cake.

Send us your Final Words

We encourage readers to submit items for the Final Word. If you have a pet peeve or word of encouragement you can express in a few words, email the item to us at editor@mspublications.com or mail it to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Include your name, hometown and a daytime phone number.

574416 2 BR 1 BA. Ready to move in! Call for showing! Reduced to $139,000

Brand New Homes on 1/2 Acre Lot. $149,000

Just Reduced

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571347 Reduced! Lovely 4 BR, 2 Bath Rancher, move-in ready, in Seaford school district. Features whirlpool tub, country kitchen, breakfast bar, ceiling fans, appliances, mudroom, work shop, 2 car garage. Call to see! $139,900.

New Construction!

570941 Beautiful 1,757 Sf, 3 BR, 2 BA home with Great Rm, Formal DR, eat-in kit. w/B’fast Bar, Gas Fp, Vaulted Ceilings, Corian counters,and so much more. Call For Showing. $239,000

574225 4 BR, 4BA Rancher on .37 acres. 3228 SF with formal dining room, hardwood floors and eat-in kitchen. Appointment only. Please call for showing. $269,900

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558552 Colonial Home In Laurel has it all. 6 BR, 3 1⁄2 BA. In-Law Suite, Decks, Walk-In Closets, Vaulted Ceilings and more. Located on 3.1 rolling acres adjacent to Tussock Pond. Appointment only. Please call for showing. $450,000

“We Like It SOLD” Contact

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09 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 09 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 1009 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT CHEVY STK#EQUINOX 6217P

06 NISSAN ALTIMA 07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LTZ 09 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 1006 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT NISSAN ALTIMA 2010 PONTIAC G6 08 MERCURY SABLE PREMIER 08 FORD ESCAPE HYBRID XLT STK# 6130Q

PONTIAC TORRENT 06 NISSAN ALTIMA 2010 PONTIAC G6 09 PONTIAC G3 0809 HARLEY DAVIDSON ROAD KING 09 CHEVY STK# 102392AEQUINOX

$8,988 $29,995 $10,995 STK# 6185P 6217P 6189P

Automatic, Power Brakes, Steering, Windows, Seats & Locks, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry

V6, Automatic, 4x4, Power Locks & Windows, Automatic, Power Brakes, Automatic, Power Seats &Steering, Windows, Cruise, Seats &Tilt, Locks, Cruise, Keyless Cruise, Keyless Entry, Third RowEntry Seat, Tilt, Keyless entry, CDTilt, Player/Changer CD Player/Changer

$22,988 $19,988 $13,894 08 FORD ESCAPE HYBRID XLT

STK# 6179P STK# 102332A 102392A STK# 6217P

$15,998 $8,988 $29,995 $7,995 $22,995 $9,995 $13,894 STK# STK#6179P 6217P STK# 6189P STK# 6130Q 6231P 6130Q STK# 90387C

Automatic, AC, Power Locks & Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer

Automatic, Power Brakes, Steering, Windows, V6, Automatic, 4x4, Power Locks & Windows, Automatic, Power Brakes, Steering, Automatic, AC, Power Locks & Windows, Automatic, AC, Security System, Power Locks, Automatic, 4x4, AC, Security System, Power Seats, V6, Automatic, Power Seats, Locks &Windows, Windows, Seats Locks, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry Seats && Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Third Row Seat, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer Windows & Seats, Cruise, Tilt, Leather Interior, Locks &Locks, Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, AC, Security System, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer Third Row Seats, Rear Seat DVD, Power Sunroof CD Player/Changer Leather Interior, CD Player/Changer

$1,000 Down + T&T $13,894 $22,988 $10,995 $15,998 $19,988 $16,988 298x60 at 3.9% $29,995 09 CHEVY EQUINOX

STK#102387A 6130Q STK#

STK# STK#102387A 6130Q STK# 6186P STK# 102392A

STK# 102332A STK# STK#6186P 6130Q

$19,988 $8,988 $22,995 $7,995 $10,995 $21,988

$19,988 $8,988 $21,988 $9,995

09 PONTIAC G3

10 Chrysler T &ROAD C LXKING 09 DAVIDSON PONTIAC G3 08 08HARLEY MERCURY SABLE PREMIER

102332A 6130Q STK# 6231P STK# 102392A STK# 6188Q STK# 6185P

STK# 6186P STK# 6188Q STK#102392A 6130Q

Manual, PB, PS, AM/FM Stereo, Mint Condition

Manual, PB, PS,System, AM/FM Stereo,Locks & 1,000 Black V6, Power V6,Automatic, Automatic,Security PowerMiles, Seats, Locks & Windows, Mint Condition Windows, Keyless Entry,Tilt, Cruise, Tilt,Entry, AC, Security System, Cruise, Keyless CD Player/Changer, Mint Condition Leather Interior, CD Player/Changer

Automatic, AC, Power Locks &Seats, Windows, Manual, PB,System, PS, AM/FM Stereo, Power Brakes, Steering, Windows, 1,000 Miles, Black V6,Automatic, 4x4, AC, Security Power Locks & Automatic, Power Seats & Windows, Cruise, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CDKeyless Player/Changer Mint Condition Seats & Locks, Cruise, Windows, Tilt, Keyless Entry, LeatherEntry Interior, Tilt,Cruise, Keyless entry, CDTilt, Player/Changer CD Player/Changer, Sunroof, OnStar

$9,995 $14,767 $19,988 $21,988

$1,000 Down + T&T $10,995 $14,767 $9,995 $19,988 $16,988 298x60 at 3.9% $22,995 08 MERCURY SABLE PREMIER

• www.igburton.com 302-629-5514302-629-5514 • www.igburton.com STK# 90387C

08 FORD ESCAPETORRENT HYBRID XLT 09 PONTIAC STK#102332A 90387C STK#

STK# 6185P

08CHEVY FORD ESCAPE 09 CHEVY EQUINOX SUBURBAN LTZ 10 Chrysler THYBRID & C SPORT LXXLT 1007 JEEP COMMANDER STK# 90387C STK# 6185P STK#6189P 6179P 6186P STK#

STK# 6130Q

09 CHEVY EQUINOX 0809 MERCURY SABLE PREMIER PONTIAC TORRENT 2010 PONTIAC G6 STK#6130Q 6185P STK# STK# 102332A 6231P

469033

Z

STK# STK#102387A 90387C STK# 102417A STK# 6185P

04 SILHOUETTE 0706 CHEVY SUBURBAN LTZ NISSAN ALTIMA STK# 102417A STK# 6130Q 6179P STK#

s,

V6, Automatic, Power Seats, Locks & Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Power Brakes & Steering Manual, PB, PS, AM/FM Stereo, Mint Condition

Automatic, Power Brakes, Steering, Windows, Seats & Locks, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry

STK# 6222P STK# 90387C

s,

Automatic, Power Brakes, Power Steering, Power Locks & Windows Automatic, Locks Stereo, & Windows, Manual,AC, PB,Power PS, AM/FM Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer Mint Condition

08HARLEY MERCURY SABLE PREMIER 10 Chrysler T &ROAD C LXKING 08 DAVIDSON STK# 6186P 6130Q STK# STK# 6188Q

469033

81,000 Miles, Leather, Extra Clean

PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY ONLY. NOTSOME RESPONSIBLE ERRORS. DUEALL TO PUBLICATION VEHICLES PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TOPURPOSES PUBLICATION DATE VEHICLESFOR MAYTYPOGRAPHICAL BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. PRICES GOODDATE FOR SOME PUBLISHED DATEMAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRILDEALERS PREFERRED LENDERONLY IN STOCK MODELS ONLY PRIOR DEALSTHRILDEALERS EXCLUDED TAXES AND TAGSLENDER EXTRA CERTAIN DEALER FOR DETAILS. ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT PREFERRED IN STOCKRESTRICTIONS MODELS ONLYAPPLY. PRIORSEE DEALS EXCLUDED TAXES AND TAGS EXTRA CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.

Automatic, 4x4, AC, Security System, Power Seats, Locks & Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer

of

Automatic, Power Seats & Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless entry, CD Player/Changer

V6, Automatic, Power Seats, Locks & Windows, AC, Security System, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Leather Interior, CD Player/Changer

302-629-5514 • www.igburton.com

Automatic, AC, Security Power Seats,& Power Seats Windows, Cruise, V6,Automatic, Automatic,Security Power Seats, Locks & Windows, Automatic,4x4, AC, Security System, Power Locks, V6, 4x4, AC, Security Power Seats, Locks & V6, System, Power Locks & V6, Automatic, Security System, Power Locks Automatic, Power Seats & System, Windows, Cruise, V6,Automatic, Automatic, PowerSystem, Seats,& Locks & Windows, V6, Windows Automatic, 4x4, Power Locks & Windows, Automatic, Power Brakes, Windows, 1,000 Miles, Black Locks & &Windows, Cruise, Tilt,Cruise, Keyless Entry, Tilt, Keyless entry, CDSteering, Player/Changer AC, Security System, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Seats, Cruise, Tilt, Leather Interior, Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Leather Interior, Windows, Keyless Entry, Cruise, Tilt,Entry, Windows, Keyless Entry, Tilt, Tilt, Keyless entry, CD Player/Changer AC, Security System, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Seats & Player/Changer, Locks, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Third Row Seat, CDRear Player/Changer Leather Interior, CD Player/Changer ThirdCD Row Seats, SeatMint DVD,Condition Power Sunroof CD Sunroof, OnStar CD Player/Changer, Mint Condition Player/Changer, Leather Interior, CD Player/Changer Player/Changer PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR CD TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE V6,Automatic, 4x4, AC, 4x4, Security System,System, Power Seats, Locks & AC, Security Power Seats, Windows, Tilt, Keyless Entry, Leather Interior, LocksCruise, & Windows, Cruise, Tilt, Keyless Entry, CD Player/Changer, Sunroof, OnStar CD Player/Changer

$15,998 $22,995

$15,998 $29,995 $19,988 $21,988 $22,988

G6LTZ 07 2010 CHEVYPONTIAC SUBURBAN

07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LTZ 10 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT 08 HARLEY DAVIDSON ROAD KING 09 PONTIAC TORRENT

$19,988 $22,995 $19,988 $16,988

$19,988 $21,988 $14,767

07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LTZ 09 PONTIAC TORRENT 10 Chrysler T & C LX Down + T&T ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES $1,000 AND TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. STK# 6179P STK# 102332A STK# 6186P 298x60 at 3.9%

T

302-629-5514 302-629-5514 •www.igburton.com www.igburton.com 302-629-5514 • www.igburton.com 09 2010 PONTIAC G6 10PONTIAC Chrysler TTORRENT & C LX

10 Chrysler T &ROAD C LXKING 08 HARLEY DAVIDSON

PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRILDEALERS PREFERRED LENDER IN STOCK MODELS ONLY PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED TAXES AND TAGS EXTRA CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. TAXES AND TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. Automatic, AC, Security System, Power Locks,

V6, 4x4, AC, Security System, Power Seats, Locks &

V6, Automatic, Security System, Power Locks &

469033

6179P STK# 6186P STK# 6189P STK#102332A 6231P STK# 6188Q STK# 6231P STK# 6188Q 6179P STK# 102332A STK# 6186P PICTURES ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES GOOD FOR PUBLISHED DATE ONLY ON TIER ONE APPROVED CREDIT THRU DEALERS PICTURES PREFERRED LENDER. IN STOCK MODELS ONLY. PRIOR DEALS EXCLUDED. AND TAGS EXTRA. CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS APPLY - SEE GOOD DEALER FOR DETAILS. ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. DUE TAXES TO PUBLICATION DATE SOME VEHICLES MAY BE SOLD AND NOT AVAILABLE. ALL PRICES FOR PUBLISHED DATE


July 15 2010 L