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VOL. 13 NO. 4

THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2008

NEWS HEADLINES BORROW PIT - Residents want the county council to wait on a decision on a request to put in a borrow pit until after release of state report. Page 2 TRAFFIC ALERT - Traveling around might be a little difficult this week, as a major artery over the Nanticoke River is closed. Page 3 HOUSING DEVELOPMENT - The planning and zoning commission hears plans for three phases of a community that could bring more than 2,000 homes to the area, as well as 500,000 square feet of shopping. Page 4 REMEMBERING WORLD WAR II - Area veteran recalls the Battle of the Bulge, as well as time spent in Wales and England. Page 8. ENERGY SERIES - This week, the Laurel Star takes a look at the cost of heating a home. Page 10 RICH IN HISTORY - Area church has roots that reach back to before the American Revolution. Page 52. POP WARNER - The Laurel Pop Warner football teams continued to practice this week in preparation for the upcoming season. See page 41 for the teams’ schedules. SOFTBALL PHOTOS - The Laurel Star wraps up its Senior Softball World Series coverage with game photos of each of the Laurel players. Page 41 FALL SPORTS - The local high school sports teams began practicing last week. See Fall sports photos starting on page 44 and check out next week’s Star for the Fall sports special section.

INSIDE THE STAR BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT FINAL WORD FRANK CALIO GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS LYNN PARKS MIKE BARTON MIKE MCCLURE

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16 22 34 49 28 55 50 26 32 30 27 53 44

MOVIES OBITUARIES OPINION PAT MURPHY PEOPLE POLICE JOURNAL PUZZLES SOCIALS SPORTS TIDES TODD CROFFORD TONY WINDSOR VETERANS OF WWII

7 24 54 21 48 34 20 53 41 7 31 50 8

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After classes, youngster knows what he wants to do with his life By Lynn R. Parks After nearly three weeks at a program sponsored by the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, John Persinger, 12, has decided on his future. “I want to be an oncologist,” said John, who will enter the eighth grade next week at Delmar Junior High School. “A lot of really smart people could come up with a cure for cancer, or a way to detect it earlier to save lives. I want to be that person to come up with a solution.” More than 10,000 students, in the second grade through the 12th grade, attended programs through Hopkins’ Center for Talented Youth this summer. Classes were held throughout the United States and in China, Mexico and Spain. Students qualify for the programs by getting certain scores on standardized tests. John’s session was held July 20 through Aug. 8 at Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pa. He was able to take one of a number of offered courses in humanities, math, writing and science. Of the four science courses offered at Moravian College, zoology, biotechnology, principles of engineering design and pharmacology and toxicology, he elected to take the biotechnology course. “We studied ethics, the rights and wrongs of biotechnology,” John said. That included a debate in which each student was assigned a topic and a position on that topic. John argued against stem cell research, and in the course of researching the subject came to the conclusion that the research is indeed not ethically defensible. “I learned how bad it is,” he said. “I learned that it kills the embryos of the children that they take stem cells from.” The biotechnology course also included studies of cancer research, genetics and genetic disorders. As part of the genetics disorders study, John presented to his class a paper on Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by the presence of tics. Even so, it was the study of cancer and research to find a cure for the disease that grabbed John’s imagination.

John Persinger, Delmar, Del., proudly holds the certificate he received after attending the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth program this summer. Photo by Daniel Richardson

“It really made a difference in my life,” he said. “I know a lot of people, family and friends, who have had cancer.” John hopes to attend Linsly School, a college preparatory boarding school in Wheeling, W.Va., for high school, and then go to University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Ind. “They have a rich academic history there,” he said. “And I’m part Irish.” John is the son of Melissa Sturgis, Delmar. He lives with his grandparents, Kathleen and Randy Persinger, Delmar, Del.

In school, he was a member of the soccer team in sixth grade and of the wrestling team in seventh grade. This year, he hopes to be on the football, wrestling and golf teams, he said. In elementary school, he attended summer programs through the Maryland Talented and Gifted Program. He attends the First Baptist Church, Delmar. “I am just grateful to God that John will have a chance to make a difference in the world,” said his grandmother.


PAGE 2

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Hardscrabble residents want delay in borrow pit decision By Ronald MacArthur Some residents in the Hardscrabble area want Sussex County officials to delay a decision on a conditional-use request for nearly 200 acres of land that will contain a large borrow pit near their homes. Spokeswoman Stephanie Smith, who lives across the road from the proposed David G. Horsey & Sons Inc. borrow pit, said residents are requesting county council wait to make a decision until after a General Assembly task force report on borrow pits is released in January. The task force was formed during the past legislative session thanks to the efforts of Hardscrabble residents. Smith said the task force will review all rules and regulations governing borrow pits. She feels that information could be important to help the council make a better decision. “Plus, the new council will be in office then. There are obviously some concerns and there is not a rush,” Smith said. “We want the council to slow down and wait.” Three sitting councilmen are stepping down and will be replaced – Dale Dukes, Finley Jones and Lynn Rogers. County planning and zoning voted 5-0 to forward the application to county council with a favorable recommendation during its May 8 meeting – the same night as the public hearing. No one spoke in favor or opposition to the conditional-use request. That was because residents were not aware of the public hearing, Smith said.

That was not the case during a June 3 county council public hearing. Several residents opposed the borrow pit with complaints about truck traffic and noise, but most concerns centered around possible contamination and draw down on groundwater and the water table in the area. The residents also said there are too many borrow pits in a confined area around Hardscrabble. The proposed pit would bring the number to five in the area. That is why reviews were requested by council from two state agencies. Smith said opponents of the pit are in the process of hiring an attorney to respond to a 12-page Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) review of the proposed project. The report was put on the record and presented to Sussex County Council Tuesday, Aug. 12. The residents, as well as the applicant, have 30 days to respond. Smith said many concerns about the impact on groundwater and the water table expressed by residents during the public hearing were addressed in the DNREC report. “A lot of the comments in the report are based on the premise that the pit is well regulated and we know that hasn’t been the case in the past,” Smith said. The report found that the greatest concern that active borrow pit operations pose to ground-water resources is contamination of the aquifer from accidental spills of contaminants.

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Smith said they were expecting a second report during the county council meeting – from the Delaware Department of Agriculture – on the spread of disease from a possible influx of waterfowl, in particular geese, in an area with several poultry houses. Lawrence Lank, director of county planning and zoning, said the report was requested, but not turned in by the deadline. “You have no comments from the Department of Agriculture and you are OK with that?” Smith asked the council. “We can only ask; we can’t make them,” Council President Finley Jones replied. “They just dismissed that. Is it right for them to ask for something from an agency and for them just to not turn it in?” Smith asked after the meeting.

Delaware Solid Waste Authority landfill; and a third on Route 9 west of the site. About 170 trucks per day are expected to enter and leave the site – the same number that used the site under reclamation. Conditions placed on the project by the planning and zoning commission include the following: • A 200-foot buffer along Route 20 and Route 446. Existing vegetation within the buffer area can’t be disturbed. • A 100-foot vegetated buffer along all other property lines. • Two wells must be installed to monitor ground water quality. • A reclamation plan must be in place. • Planning and zoning staff will perform an inspection of the site every five years. • No trucks will be permitted on Route 446 – Asbury Road.

Proposed borrow pit would cover 135 acres

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The proposed borrow pit, one of five in the area, would cover about 135 acres of the 199.5-acre site. If approved, the pit would be dug in three phases of 45 acres each. The sand plant, which processes the dirt dredged from the pit, would take up about seven acres on the site. The dredge would be permitted to operate 24 hours a day, but the hours of operation of the actual pit would be limited to daytime hours. The Horseys operate three other borrow pits in the area – one across the road from the proposed site that is undergoing reclamation; another on Route 20 next to the

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Page 3

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 21 - 27, 2008

Bridgeville annexes three new properties By Lynn R. Parks

The town of Bridgeville has three new commercial properties. Voters Saturday approved the annexation of three parcels, all along U.S. 13. The votes were overwhelmingly in favor of the annexations. “We are tickled to death,” said town manager Bonnie Walls. “This will mean more jobs for Bridgeville, and more places to shop. Instead of having to go to Seaford, Salisbury or Dover for our shopping, we will be able to go to stores right in Bridgeville.”

Walls said that no final development plans have been submitted for any of the properties. But she added that the owners of two of the properties are hoping to construct a professional building and a retail center. Citizens voted 104 to 3 in favor of annexation of 47 acres owned by the Bariglio Corporation. The property is just south of the Delaware State Police Troop 5 building on the northbound lane of U.S. 13 and is connected to the Food Lion shopping center property to the east.

Just south of the Bariglio property is the Highway One property, consisting of 90 acres. Citizens voted 101 to 6 in favor of annexation of that property. It is on these two contiguous properties that developers hope to put a professional center and retail center. The third property, owned by Barbara M. Sylvia, is on the southbound lane of

U.S. 13. Citizens voted 103 to 3 to approve the Sylvia property annexation. Walls said that Sylvia has not discussed with the town any plans for her property, which is 1.7 acres. Now, the property is home to a small motel that has been closed for years. Walls said that plans for construction on any of the properties will have to be OK’d by the town commission.

Bridge in Blades closes

By Lynn R. Parks

Travelers, beware. Of the three Nanticoke River crossings at Seaford, two are closed. Only the U.S. 13 crossing is open. The Woodland Ferry crossing has been closed for months, while a new ferry and ferry docks are built. The new boat, to be christened the Tina Fallon in honor of the retired state representative, is set to be back in service in November. This week, the drawbridge that connects Seaford to Blades is closed for maintenance. Tina Shockley, spokeswoman for the Delaware Department of Transportation, said last week that work on the bridge, which started Monday morning, will take about a week. She

said that if all goes as planned, the bridge will reopen to traffic Saturday at 6 p.m. Workers with contractor Mumford and Miller, Middletown, are adjusting the north side of the bridge, where the metal work of the deck meets the road. “The bridge is not aligned with the road correctly,” Shockley said. Shockley said that work on the bridge was scheduled so that it would not be taking place the same time as work on U.S. 13. The U.S. 13 repaving project is completed, she said. But adding to traffic confusion this week is the Stein Highway repaving project. That work is expected to be finished by Aug. 25, Shockley said.

Seaford Dance Center

GROTTO DONATION - Grotto Pizza recently presented DE Boots On the Ground with a check for $3,000 recently at the Bethany Beach training site during DE National Guard Youth Camp. The donation is the result of a two day Community Pizza Night held during the "Support DE Military and Their Family" fundraising event. Accepting the donation were committee Chairperson Dr. Jill Biden; Co-President Kathy Greenwell; and several committee members. MG Francis Vavala and Camp Colwell Director Erine Colwell were also on hand for the presentation.

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Hrs: Monday thru Thursday 11:30 - 9 | Friday and Saturday 11:30 - 10

Alzheimers Association Fund Raiser - Tuesday Aug. 26 th , 11:30 - 9

A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Memory Walk to be held September 27 th at the Grove Park in Rehoboth.

1 Month of Home Delivery for FREE! Use this form or order by phone at 302-629-9788.

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Laurel Star

Seaford Star

To:_______________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________ __________________________________________________ City__________________ State_______Zip ______________ Phone _________________ Enclose Check & Mail To: The Star Circulation, 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 or call 302-629-9788 with credit card payment


MORNING STAR • AuGuST 21 - 27, 2008

Page 3

Bridgeville annexes three new properties By Lynn R. Parks

The town of Bridgeville has three new commercial properties. Voters Saturday approved the annexation of three parcels, all along U.S. 13. The votes were overwhelmingly in favor of the annexations. “We are tickled to death,” said town manager Bonnie Walls. “This will mean more jobs for Bridgeville, and more places to shop. Instead of having to go the Seaford, Salisbury or Dover for our shopping, we will be able to go to stores right in Bridgeville.”

Walls said that no final development plans have been submitted for any of the properties. But she added that the owners of two of the properties are hoping to construct a professional building and a retail center. Citizens voted 104 to 3 in favor of annexation of 47 acres owned by the Bariglio Corporation. The property is just south of the Delaware State Police Troop 5 building on the northbound lane of U.S. 13 and is connected to the Food Lion shopping center property to the east.

Just south of the Bariglio property is the Highway One property, consisting of 90 acres. Citizens voted 101 to 6 in favor of annexation of that property. It is on these two contiguous properties that developers hope to put a professional center and retail center. The third property, owned by Barbara M. Sylvia, is on the southbound lane of

U.S. 13. Citizens voted 103 to 3 to approve the Sylvia property annexation. Walls said that Sylvia has not discussed with the town any plans for her property, which is 1.7 acres. Now, the property is home to a small motel that has been closed for years. Walls said that plans for construction on any of the properties will have to be OK’d by the town commission.

Bridge in Blades closes

By Lynn R. Parks

Travelers, beware. Of the three Nanticoke River crossings at Seaford, two are closed. Only the U.S. 13 crossing is open. The Woodland Ferry crossing has been closed for months, while a new ferry and ferry docks are built. The new boat, to be christened the Tina Fallon in honor of the retired state representative, is set to be back in service in November. This week, the drawbridge that connects Seaford to Blades is closed for maintenance. Tina Shockley, spokeswoman for the Delaware Department of Transportation, said last week that work on the bridge, which started Monday morning, will take about a week. She

said that if all goes as planned, the bridge will reopen to traffic Saturday at 6 p.m. Workers with contractor Mumford and Miller, Middletown, are adjusting the north side of the bridge, where the metal work of the deck meets the road. “The bridge is not aligned with the road correctly,” Shockley said. Shockley said that work on the bridge was scheduled so that it would not be taking place the same time as work on U.S. 13. The U.S. 13 repaving project is completed, she said. But adding to traffic confusion this week is the Stein Highway repaving project. That work is expected to be finished by Aug. 25, Shockley said.

Seaford Dance Center

GROTTO DONATION - Grotto Pizza presented DE Boots On the Ground with a check for $3,000 recently at the Bethany Beach training site during DE National Guard Youth Camp. The donation is the result of a two day Community Pizza Night held during the "Support DE Military and Their Family" fundraising event. Accepting the donation were committee Chairperson Dr. Jill Biden; Co-President Kathy Greenwell; and several committee members. MG Francis Vavala and Camp Colwell Director Erine Colwell were also on hand for the presentation.

A FETCHING OFFER Too busy to be bothered to go buy your community newspaper, WE’LL DELIVER IT!

312A High St., Seaford • 302-629-2193 Located Above Bon Appetit

Fall Classes Begin Mon., Sept. 8 Registration at Studio

Subscribe Now and Enjoy

Sat., Aug. 23 rd 9 am - 11:30 am

Tap • Ballet • Jazz • Lyrical

Introduction to Dance for age 3 yrs.

Maubra Jane Randolph, Director

226 Main Street, Downtown Millsboro 302-934-5160

Specials z

Monday | Prime Rib for 14.95, topped with crab imperial for 19.95 Tuesday | we offer several entree items for $14.95, including our Fresh Fish Wednesday | half price bottles of wine Thursday | $14.95 crab cakes and $19.95 all you can eat steamed or fried shrimp Friday | Lobster Night, Whole lobsters for $24.95 & half lobsters stuffed with crab imperial for $19.95 Saturday | Martini Madness - all rail martinis for $4 & fantastic blackboard specials $

$

Hrs: Monday thru Thursday 11:30 - 9 | Friday and Saturday 11:30 - 10

Alzheimers Association Fund Raiser - Tuesday Aug. 26 th , 11:30 - 9

A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Memory Walk to be held September 27 th at the Grove Park in Rehoboth.

1 Month of Home Delivery for FREE! Use this form or order by phone at 302-629-9788.

Send A One Year Subscription Plus 1 Month FREE for Only $19* *Out-of-County Rate: $24 Out-of-State Rate: $29

Laurel Star

Seaford Star

To:_______________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________ __________________________________________________ City__________________ State_______Zip ______________ Phone _________________ Enclose Check & Mail To: The Star Circulation, 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 or call 302-629-9788 with credit card payment


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Proposed development could mean more than 2,000 new homes Active adult community would also have lake beaches, 500,000 square feet of shopping space By Tony E. Windsor Due to a scheduling error, a public hearing scheduled in Laurel Town Hall last week had to be cancelled. Instead, the meeting became a preliminary site plan presentation for the town’s planning and zoning committee. On Wednesday, Aug. 13, citizens gathered at Laurel Town Hall to given comments about an active adult community being developed by Samanda Properties of Pennsylvania. Before the start of the discussion about Village Brooke, Laurel Code Enforcement Officer Paul Frick made an announcement. Frick, who runs the meetings with planning and zoning committee chairman Brent Boyce, explained that the public hearing advertised for the evening would be cancelled. In reviewing the project, he had realized that a preliminary site plan presentation had not been made before planning and zoning. “All that has been presented before planning and zoning is a concept,” he said. “We want to make sure we go by the book. There must be a preliminary site plan presented before there can be a public hearing, so that is why we will cancel the public hearing.” Frick said that Samanda Properties representative Jeff Clark of Land-Tech was contacted about the hearing cancellation, but it was too late to cancel the meeting. “This strictly falls on the town staff and is not the developer’s fault or that of Mr. Clark or Planning and Zoning,” Frick said. “We welcome everyone to stay and listen to the presentation and, like any planning and zoning meeting, we will allow comments from the audience.” With that, Frick introduced Clark, who presented plans for a three-phase development. In addition to Village Brooke East and West projects, Samanda Properties has added Village Brooke North, which is proposed to be located along US 13, north of Discount Land Road. Samanda Properties has purchased property around the former Sussex West Drive-In Theater, behind the Utz Potato Chip warehouse operation. This property was part of the parcel that had been proposed for the now defunct Discovery proj-

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ect. As described by Clark, Village Brooke West, located off Discount Land Road, west of US 13 will include: • 369 homes (146 single family homes and 223 one-story villas) • Bicycle paths located along “numerous” ponds • A 20,000 square-foot community center, or town square, with an aquatics and fitness center. The center will include an indoor pool and hot tub, locker rooms, saunas, weight rooms and separate studios for aerobics and yoga classes. • A club house, featuring a living room with fireplace, a lending library, billiards room and a horticultural center with a club garden. • A bistro with dining café and outdoor seating • A movie theater with stadium seating • An outdoor pool with kitchen • Putting green • Tennis courts Village Brooke East, located just off Discount Land Road to the east of US 13, will include: • 284 homes (188 single-family and 96 one-story villas) • A community center • An outdoor aquatics center overlooking two lakes, with canoeing and kayaking, fishing, horseshoes, putting green, sandy beaches, swimming and tennis. Village Brooke North is proposed to include: • 500,000 square-feet of retail space with box retail stores, “intimate retail shops,” boutiques and restaurants, all located along a “main street” area • 40,000 square-feet community center • 1,400-plus homes (single family and duplex residences) • A continuing-care center • Several swimming pools and social halls Clark said there are two main challenges facing Samanda Properties in developing the three residential properties. These are the decline in the housing market and the credit crunch, which has made it more difficult for home buyers to obtain traditional financing. He said, however, that Samanda has a plan for overcoming the challenges. In in-

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

formation released by Samanda, the developer says in order for the three projects to be successful, there needs to be “quality product in the right location and at a reasonable price.” Samanda Properties says there are advantages to locating these developments in Delaware. Delaware has been named “the most tax-friendly state for retirees,” by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine. The state has no estate tax, no sales tax, it is ranked the 17th best state to live in and is ranked seven out of 51 in the percentage of homes that are owner occupied. In addition, the developer said, there are advantages in locating the developments in Laurel. Laurel is within four hours of major cities along the eastern seaboard, including Baltimore, New York, and Washington, D.C. It is located directly between the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean and only 45 minutes from major recreational destinations. It is within 15 minutes of significant shopping opportunities and within 30 minutes of multiple golf courses. And it is along U.S. 13, the major Sussex County north/south artery. Samanda Properties also said that singlefamily homes priced under $300,000 make up a small percentage of the overall housing inventory and therefore sell quickly. “Samanda Properties will overcome the current challenges by building a superior home, in the state of Delaware, specifically in the town of Laurel, and offer these homes starting in the high $100,000

range,” the firm said. Laurel town manager Bill Fasano said the developer of the three Village Brooke residential complexes hopes to take the advantage of Laurel’s special tax district zoning. He said the town will use its engineers to determine an estimate of how much it will cost to provide the necessary infrastructure in the three developments, as well as additional wells, if necessary. Once the figure is reached, the developer will use Laurel’s bonding powers to secure funding to pay for the work. This will be paid back through special taxes charged to those people buying properties in the three developments. A special flat rate tax will be billed annually to the property owners. This will be a tax over and above the traditional Laurel property taxes that will also be assessed. “We will collect this annual fee just as we do our property taxes, but this money will be passed on to the group who is providing the up front finances for the infrastructure needs of the Village Brooke developments,” Fasano said. He said that neither the town nor the developer will be held liable should the projects not fare as well as anticipated. “This funding will be insured and if a development does not sell as well as hoped, the town will not be held responsible for paying back the bond loan,” he said. Fasano said it will most likely be sometime in October when the public hearing on the projects is held.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 5

Laurel schools set to open Aug. 27 Schools in the Laurel School District open on Wednesday, Aug. 27. All schools will be closed Friday, Aug. 29. Information concerning students’ classroom assignments, schedules, kindergarten visitation day and open house will be mailed to each family. In addition, North Laurel Elementary School, Laurel Intermediate School, Laurel Middle Schools and Laurel High School will post classroom assignments on the main entrance doors of the schools after 4:30 p.m. Friday. Students’ school lunch prices have increased 15 cents. Schedules are: Pre-K at Paul L. Dunbar Morning session, 8:35 a.m. to 11:25 a.m. Afternoon session, 12:50 to 3:35 p.m. Paul L. Dunbar Elementary School 8:35 a.m. to 3:35 p.m. Open house will

be Aug. 26 at 1:30 p.m. North Laurel Elementary School 8:35 a.m. to 3:35 p.m. Open house will be Aug. 26 at 2 p.m. Laurel Intermediate School 7:50 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. Fifth-grade orientation will be Aug. 25, 1 to 3 p.m. Laurel Middle School 7:50 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. Open house and barbecue will be Aug. 25, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Laurel High School 7:40 a.m. to 2:44 p.m. New student orientation will be Aug. 25, 1 to 3 p.m. Western Sussex Academy 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Parents will be contacted by bus drivers with the location of their bus stop and the time that the bus will pick up the children. Arrangements for day care must be updated each school year with the district’s Transportation Office (875-6155).

Golf tourney to benefit Boys and Girls Club The annual Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament to be held at Heritage Shores Golf Course, Bridgeville, Thursday, Sept. 18, will benefit the Laurel site of the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club. The tournament will also remember Frank Gerardi Jr., who died earlier this year. Gerardi’s father, Frank Gerardi, is former Johnny Janosik World of Furniture Galleries CEO. In honor of Frank Gerardi Jr., the Laurel Boys and Girls Club will hand out an annual scholarship in his name. The scholarship will be given to the Youth of

the Year candidate from the Laurel club. The Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament will feature a four-player scramble. The cost per player is $150 and $600 for a four-member team. Following the breakfast and 8 a.m. registration there will be a 9 a.m. shotgun start. There will be a box lunch on the course and refreshments, awards and an auction will follow play. Entertainment will be provided by comedian Joe Conklin. For details, call John Evans at 302-3981018 or visit the Web site www.johnnyjanosikcharitygolf.com.

BIBLE SCHOOL - The Bethel United Methodist Charge sponsored vacation Bible school at Mt. Zion Church the week of Aug. 4-8. The theme was God’s Big Back Yard. Betty Jo Grimes organized the event. Above, in attendance were more than 60 children. Michael Forestieri with the Storytellers Guild shared many Bible stories relating to serving friends, community and neighbors with the children. Below, shown with Forestieri, are Mallery Galaska, Brendyn Vanderslice, Jasmine Ros, Alissa Thomas, Austin Ruark, Ian Clarke and Trent Bates.


Page 6

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 21 - 27, 2008

Business Business programs accredited

The Business Administration and Office Administration departments at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus have been awarded reaffirmation of accreditation from the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) Associate Degree Board of Commissioners. “The accreditation affirms that our programs prepare students for successful employment and transfer to bachelor’s degree programs,” said Dr. June Turansky, dean of instruction. Delaware Tech’s Business Administration department offers associate degrees in accounting, general business, business management, marketing, and management information systems. The Office Administration department offers degrees in paralegal, office software specialist, and office administration. Attainment of accreditation certifies that the teaching and learning processes at Delaware Tech meet the rigorous educational standards established by the ACBSP. The ratification of accreditation by ACBSP covers a 10-year period during which time Delaware Tech must continually reaffirm its standards through quality assurance programs. For more information about business administration programs, contact Department Chair Dr. Karen Smith at 302855-5930. For information about office administration, contact Department Chair Suenell Steele at 302-855-1677.

DDA unveils new website

The Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA) marketing team announces a new website, www.delawarefresh.com, that will provide Delawareans with the most accurate and up-to-date information about where to find fresh fruits and vegetables, pick-your-own farms, a calendar of events, information about Commodity Boards and Associations and more. For over two years, the marketing team has been working to enhance the economic viability and growth of agriculture in Delaware by advertising through local, regional, national and international

A "steAk" in seAford - The Texas Roadhouse held its grand opening ribbon cutting on Monday, August 18. The new restaurant, which is located in the Seaford Commons shopping center next to Lowes, has brought 185 new jobs to the area. The Texas Roadhouse held a pre-opening the weekend before to help train their staff. Proceeds from the Friday and Saturday pre-opening were donated to the Seaford Mission and the Seaford House. Keith Schaffer, managing partner with the Texas Roadhouse, estimated that the organizations received $2000 each. From left are Patrick Erhardt, Seaford Chamber, Ed Heath, Seaford Chamber, Paula Gunson, Seaford Chamber, County Councilman Dale Dukes, State Representative Danny Short, Collins Batchelor, East Coast Property Management, Jenna Beard, Little Miss Seaford, Seaford Councilwoman Grace Peterson, Seaford City Manager Dolores Slatcher, Trisha Booth, City of Seaford, Keith Schaffer, managing partner, Shay Middleton, assistant manager, Jeff Mullen, service manager, Chuck Shaw, kitchen manager and Bunky Griffith, Seaford Chamber.

accounts, trade shows, cooperatives, wholesalers, retailers, distributors, processors, manufacturers, state institutions and other partnerships. The new website offers farmers a way to contact terminal markets; a fun kids page with monthly activities; a way to check availability of produce with a printable chart; and a feature where you type in a zip code to find locations of agri-tourism destinations. To list an event or if you have suggestions or ideas about the site, contact DDA Marketing Specialist Lisa Falconetti at 302-698-4554. The website will be updated regularly.

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PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • AUGUST - 21-27, 2008

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

MO V I E S

81st Annual

Sharptown Fireman’s Carnival

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 8/22 & SAT. 8/23 CLOSED SUNDAY 8/24 FRIDAY: Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:15 Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:10 SATURDAY: Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:15 Kabluey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:10 Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:40

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 8/22 THRU TUESDAY 8/26 The Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 Mamma Mia! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00 Bottle Shock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:45, 7:00, 9:20 The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:35, 7:05, 9:30 The Longshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 6:35, 8:50 The Rocker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:05 Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:00, 7:10, 9:30 Death Race . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:50, 7:25, 9:45 The House Bunny . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 9:35 Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:30, 6:15, 8:35 Step Brothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:15, 9:40 Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants II . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:10, 6:45, 9:10 Pineapple Express . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 9:40 Brideshead Revisited . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:35 all shows subject to change and availability

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July 31 - Aug. 23 Open 7 p.m. - Closed Sundays Rt. 313 & Main Street in Sharptown

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 8/22 THRU TUESDAY, 8/26 Death Race . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00) 7:00, 8:00, 9:40, 10:30 House Bunny . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00) 7:00, 8:00, 9:40, 10:30 The Longshots . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (12:25, 2:45, 5:15) 7:45, 10:15 The Rocker . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (2:15, 4:45) 7:30, 10:30 Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:30, 2:30, 4:15, 5:15) 6:45, 7:45, 9:30, 10:10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15, 8:15, 9:50, 10:40 Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:45, 4:45) 8:00, 10:35 Tropic Thunder* . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Sun (1:15, 2:15, 4:00, 5:00) 7:15, 8:15, 9:50, 10:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mon-Tue (1:15, 2:15, 4:00, 5:00) 7:15, 8:15, 9:50, 10:45 Pineapple Express . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:15, 4:15) 7:15, 10:20 Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants II . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Mon (12:45, 3:45) 6:45, 9:30 Tue (12:45) 6:45 The Mummy: Tomb of Dragon Emperor . .PG13 . . . .Fri(3:30) 6:30, 9:15 Sat (12:45) 6:30, 9:15, Sun (3:30) 6:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mon (3:30) 9:15, Tue (12:45, 3:30) 6:30, 9:15 Step Brothers . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (4:30) 7:30, 10:00 Mama Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:00, 3:30) 6:30, 9:15 The Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (12:30, 3:45) 7:00, 10:15 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:45) Advance Tickets on Sale : Fireproof* (PG) Babylon Ad* (PG13) * Pass Restrictions Apply Discounted Show Times in Parenthesis ()

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Veteran feels as though he was part of something great By James Diehl For years, Thelma Monroe listened to the tall tales of how her husband supposedly built a log cabin in the forests of Western Europe during World War II. They just couldn’t be true — after all, Walter L. “Leroy” Monroe, in her words, “couldn’t hang a picture on our wall.” Then, a photograph of the cabin appeared and suddenly the only woman who’s ever served as mayor of the town of Millsboro was forced to consider the possibility. Could it be that her husband helped construct this makeshift home more than 60 years ago? It turns out Walter Monroe did just that — when faced with the fear of freezing to death thousands of miles from home, a man can sometimes do things he never thought he could. “I didn’t know how to do any carpentry work, but I was able to help these other three boys build the cabin,” says Monroe, who continues to live in the very home in Millsboro where he was born more than 87 years ago. “We put blankets on all the walls to keep the cold out and we slept in there. But we were only there for a week before we moved somewhere else.” Constructing his temporary home was a precursor to the famed Battle of the Bulge, which came just a few weeks later. But Monroe’s service history dates back to a much earlier time, to when he received his draft notice in the mail in the summer of 1942. “When I got it in the mail, I just knew I was going to go into the service,” remembers Monroe, who says he was more than willing to go and fight for his country. “I really had no preference; I was just going to do what they asked me to do.” But first things first. Thanks to a family friend who served on the draft board for Sussex County, Monroe was able to defer his enlistment and finish the last few months of his education at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Va. Then, in September 1942, it was off to basic training at Camp Davis in Holly Ridge, N.C.

Attention Readers

We welcome suggestions for interviews of veterans who served during World War II. Contact Bryant Richardson at 629-9788.

“We went down to this camp for basic training and they were just finishing the barracks,” remembers Monroe. “We even had to help put the windows in the barracks and put up the bunks.” Constantly fighting swarms of mosquitoes, the first few days of basic training were anything but enjoyable for the young Sussex County native. But, though they were in different batteries, he did encounter a fellow soldier from southern Delaware. That man was Fritz Booth, the father of current state representative and former Georgetown mayor Joe Booth. After several weeks, basic training ended and Monroe prepared to head overseas and fight Nazi Germany. There was but one problem — facilities in Europe weren’t ready yet. The solution developed by the United States Army — put the boys through a second basic training while they wait. “We certainly didn’t want to go through two basic trainings, but we didn’t have any choice,” says Monroe. “They just weren’t ready for us in Europe yet…But at least I wasn’t getting shot at.” Finally, in February 1943, Monroe headed overseas aboard the SS Louis Pasteur, a French civilian liner that had been captured by the Allies and turned into a troop transport ship. “There were 5,000 troops on that ship and we zigzagged across the Atlantic so submarines couldn’t attack us,” Monroe remembers. “We heard all these rumors that submarines were out there, but I don’t think that was true. At least they never got us.” Spending seven days on the Atlantic in February was anything but pleasurable for Monroe and his fellow soldiers. Still, despite the tales of military men getting sick by the hundreds while en route to Europe, Monroe wasn’t concerned. “We had a cottage in Oak Orchard and I was on the water all the time growing up,” he says. “When we got on that boat to go over, I just knew I wasn’t going to get seasick. I had been around water all my life.” Turns out, he could not have been more wrong. As the large French liner moved up and down in the rough waters of the North Atlantic, Monroe found himself turning just as green as many of his fellow G.I.s. “It was only the second day out when I got just as sick as anybody else,” he recalls. “We all had a helmet and we’d [vomit] in that helmet and then throw it overboard. It was a rough trip.”

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More than a little queasy and very hungry, troops aboard the Louis Pasteur arrived in Wales in late February 1943. Monroe, assigned to the 445th anti-aircraft battalion, settled in and before long met a young lady. “We didn’t want to just stay in the barracks all the time. We heard there were some civilians having a party in the village and we wanted to go and see if there were any girls over there,” says Monroe. “So we went over there and they were having a dance. We met some girls and I actually went home with one of them and had dinner with her and her family.” Then it was on to jolly old England for the men of the 445th — Monroe and a handful of others from the battalion went out first to scope out a location for their camp. After staying a few nights at the former estate of Sir Walter Raleigh, a suitable location was found and camp was set up. “All we had at that time were pup tents and blankets,” remembers Monroe. “It rained all the time and we got real muddy. We didn’t like it down there a bit, but they didn’t have barracks for us anymore in Wales.” Moving further south in England, the men of the battalion set up guns on the cliffs and began shooting at German planes that were coming over to bomb targets in Great Britain. Monroe’s job at the time was one of instruction — specifically, teaching men of the 445th how to identify and target German bombers.

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Millsboro resident Walter L. ‘Leroy’ Monroe served during World War II with the 445th anti-aircraft battalion in the European Theater of Operations (ETO). He survived the Battle of the Bulge and was awarded five battle stars for his service during the war.

“I went to a school and was taught how to identify German planes and that’s what I did in a little shed there,” says Monroe. “Some of the boys in the battery would come in and I would teach them. When you look at the German planes, you’d look at the wings and at the fuselage and that’s how you would identify them — by the 1023 W. Stein Hwy. Nylon Capital Shopping Center, Seaford, DE 302

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008 shape of the planes.” As in Wales, Monroe met a girl while spending time in Great Britain — a young lady who he spent a great deal of time with touring the British countryside. “She worked right down the street with a children’s group, but she also worked on a farm,” Monroe recalls. “She wore these corduroy knickers, long heavy green socks and heavy shoes. But she was a pretty girl. She just walked by, I whistled and she came over to talk to me. I got interested and she took me all these places in England.” While stationed at this private residence in England, the men of the 445th tried, with no success, to shoot down German planes. It was essentially a time away from combat, a safe distance from the action — but business was about to pick up. “While we were at this house, I was on guard duty one night and I saw this big blast. Then we heard battleships firing rounds; we could see the blasts from the ships out in the water,” Monroe remembers. “It lit up the whole sky and we knew something was going on.” That something was “D-Day,” the American offensive into mainland France on June 6, 1944. Twenty-seven days later, the 445th anti-aircraft battalion made landfall on Omaha Beach. Their mission was to defend a group of 155 millimeter guns. It was a temporary mission that turned into a much longer assignment. “We did so well defending those guns that the colonel of the outfit sent a message to a general that he wanted us to stay with him and defend him,” Monroe says. “So we did.” As Monroe and his unit moved further into France toward the border with Germany, things became more intense. Just three days after landing on Omaha Beach, there were several close calls as the unit came under heavy fire from German forces. “We were in a wooded area and there was what looked like gas [fumes] all over the ground. Our captain was in a big tent by the side of the road and I was right outside the tent next to a medic in a foxhole,” Monroe remembers. “We had a shelter halfway across us and the Germans shot so many shells in there that the shrapnel fell on our shelter and burned clear through.” Fearing the fumes would intensify under heavy shelling by the Germans, Monroe made a dash for a nearby truck to find his gas mask. It wasn’t there. “I couldn’t find it so I went back to the foxhole and told the captain that I was going to run down the side road, but he said I couldn’t do that because I’d be killed,” Monroe remembers. “So I asked him what I should do.” When he heard the answer, he was sorry he asked. “He said to pee in my handker-

chief and hold it up to my nose, so I did what the captain said and I stayed right there,” Monroe says. “I asked him later where he learned that and he said that it was in the manual and, if I had read it, I would have seen it too.” After surviving a night of heavy shelling, Monroe climbed aboard a Jeep the next morning and made a harrowing trip to battalion headquarters. “That was really bad,” he remembers. “As we were in the Jeep and driving across this open space, the Germans were firing at us the whole damn time. They were everywhere we went. “The captain said to me later that if it was like that all the way to Berlin, we would never have made it there.” What made the insurgence into northern France and, eventually, Germany even more difficult was the weather — some of the coldest and most unforgiving weather ever seen in Western Europe. After building their log cabin and then moving on, Monroe and a handful of fellow soldiers were forced to find other ways to stay warm. “We had this area with sandbags all around it covered with half of a shelter,” Monroe says. “We built a fire and we had a large can and then small cans going up from it as a chimney. The lieutenant came over and told us that if the Germans didn’t know where we were before, they sure knew then [because of the smoke]. But it was just to keep warm.” The lieutenant’s prediction appeared to come true the following day when a German fighter plane came over top of the 445th and began keeping an eye of them. “I remember there was a chaplain who came over and was having a service for us,” Monroe recalls. “He put a cross and a red blanket on the hood of his Jeep. He was saying a prayer to us and that German plane came over and was looking at us. He was an elderly man but he moved out of there real fast.” Soon after came the Battle of Bulge, which began in December 1944. Monroe’s responsibility during the battle, besides “killing as many Germans as we could,” was to operate the unit’s radio. “I was supposed to broadcast to the batteries of the 445th and tell them where the German planes were,” says Monroe. “I was using spy glasses, but it was dumb because it never worked. By the time I told them where they were, the German planes had gone way off.” According to military records, the United States suffered nearly 81,000 casualties in the Battle of the Bulge, which was officially named the Battle of the Ardennes by the U.S. Army. Most of the American casualties occurred within the first three days of battle. The Battle of the Bulge was also the bloodiest battle for the

United States during World War II, with around 19,000 American soldiers losing their lives during the fighting. But Monroe survived and eventually crossed the Elbe River. There, the men of the 445th met up with Russian troops in the town of Schwerin in northern Germany. After the Germans surrendered, the Russians felt like partying — and they invited the Americans to join in. “The Russians put on a show for us; it was a lot of their dancing,” remembers Monroe.

PAGE 9

“We never saw anything like that, the way the men were dancing on the floors and on the tables. It was just wild; they were really wild people.” After returning to the States and being discharged in Boston, Monroe returned to Millsboro and eventually went into his family’s clothing business. “I’m proud of what I did; I was lucky enough to come out of the Battle of the Bulge,” he says. “We went over there to try and save the country and that’s what we did. I felt like I was a part of that.”

With a degree in business administration from Washington & Lee, Monroe and his wife ran Monroe’s Apparel in downtown Millsboro until closing the business in 1994. He served 15 years on the Millsboro Town Council, including one year as president. For his time in Europe, Monroe was awarded five battle stars by the United States government. The Monroes have two sons and two daughters and will celebrate their 61st wedding anniversary on Aug. 31.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Gearing up for the high cost of heating your home By Donna Dukes-Huston One in a series It may seem a bit premature to be thinking about heating our homes this winter while we are still enjoying such beautiful summer weather. Now is the time, however, to begin taking measures to decrease home heating costs we will soon incur in the continuing battle against high fuel prices. John Willey and his team at Peninsula Oil have put together some tips for their customers to get the most bang for their heating buck this winter. They have included some of this information in the company’s quarterly newsletters and will send out a more detailed letter next month, Willey said. “We wanted to come up with a comprehensive list that offered solutions for all budgets, not just a list of the services we provide,” he added. The first area of savings involves conservation of fuel. First, consumers could install more fuel-efficient equipment which can be rather costly. Peninsula Oil also offers a more economical suggestion. “We recommend an annual tune-up which could save customers up to 10 % on their fuel bill, according to the Department of Energy,” Willey said. “Ten percent means a lot more with today’s prices than it did in the past.” During the tune-up the technician will clean the system, if necessary; prevent small problems from becoming big ones; and adjust the system to run at peak efficiency. Willey said that Peninsula Oil will be extending its $99 pre-season tune-up special through the end of September.

Willey’s team also suggests customers install a programmable thermostat which would allow them to lower the temperature during certain times of the day when no one is home. This usually costs from $200-$300, he said. Another energy conservation method is weatherizing your house. This includes using weather stripping around doors and windows and expandable foam which can be sprayed in cracks and crevices around windows. These products can be purchased at any hardware store for a nominal fee. The Delaware Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) installs energy efficiency improvements in the homes of lowincome persons and households to reduce their energy burden, lower their energy costs and improve their health and safety in the home. Weatherization assistance is provided at no cost to families whose incomes are at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level. Willey said that the state of Delaware also offers payment assistance through its standard energy assistance program. This service is also provided to those homeowners and renters who meet the above income criteria. “Many people assume they are not eligible for assistance when they really are,” Willey said. “People on social security can be approved, too.” Willey advises those who think they may be eligible to begin that process now. Peninsula Oil offers its own budget plan to customers which includes a twelve-month payment schedule rather than paying only at the time of delivery.

Fuel Prices impact Postal Service The United States Postal Service operates the largest civilian fleet of vehicles in the country with 215,000 motor vehicles, according to Associated Press. These vehicles consume 123 million gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel. So how has the increase in fuel prices affected this major operation? Every time the price of gasoline goes up one penny, it costs the USPS $8 million. Last year highway transportation of mail cost the post office $3.1 billion, an increase of 5.8 percent from the year before. The cost of air transportation of mail was up 7.9 percent to $3 billion. These increases are at least partly due to rising fuel costs, according to AP. How can the post office offset these increases? The price of a postage stamp went up one cent last year and is due to increase again next May. But will this increase be enough? Deputy Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe said that the post office is trying to find ways to operate more efficiently in light of the surge in fuel prices. One way they plan to do this is to introduce a global positioning system technology to streamline delivery routes, he said. They are also considering moving to hydrogen fueled vehicles. The post office may have go back to basics in some areas. For instance, more carriers may be asked to walk their routes rather than drive, and, in warm-weather areas, consideration is being given to implementing bicycle routes, Donahoe said.

Peninsula Oil will be extending its $99 pre-season tune-up special through the end of September.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008 “If the average delivery will be $800 next winter, why not make twelve $200 payments,” he said. He added that customers can still sign up for this plan through the end of September. Peninsula Oil has also made it easier for customers to pay by credit card. They can pay on the website or have automatic billing to their credit cards and will not even receive a bill from the company. “We go to great lengths to give our customers options for paying,” Willey said.

How do fuel prices impact school buses?

The roads will soon be filled with a familiar sight-big yellow school buses. Has the increase in fuel prices hurt the drivers of our most precious cargo? School Transportation Specialists say no. School bus contractors operate under contract with the state, not the local districts, for transporting the children to and from school each day. Initial fuel rates are based on the state contract bid price as of June 1 of the preceding fiscal year. The state reviews this price in December of that year, according to Susan Messick, Transportation Specialist for the Seaford School District. Additional reviews are then conducted each month until April. If the price of fuel goes up significantly, then the state offers fuel adjustments to the contractors. “The state follows a formula for our pay,” said Jim Horn, a bus contractor who now owns 16 buses. “If diesel goes up a nickel, they will increase our fuel adjustment one cent per mile in addition to the formula.” Messick said that their fuel allowance was adjusted up in December, February, and May this past school year. The allowance can also be adjusted down if fuel prices decrease significantly. Horn feels that this adjustment is fair. “We fought for this adjustment over the past several years with our lobbyists,” Horn said. “It’s been working pretty good.” Horn said that contractors will receive a one percent increase in operating costs this year, but that will not cover other expenses besides fuel. “We’re going to be behind the eight ball again if they don’t keep up with the cost of living,” Horn said.

This service does come at a higher cost to Peninsula Oil through the fees they incur from the credit card companies. Willey said it also costs the company more now to borrow money to pay accounts receivable and to fill up their own trucks with fuel. “We don’t make any more money when the price of oil goes up,” he said. To offset these costs, the company has added more efficiency to its routing during the off season, Willey said.

“Instead of running our trucks three to five days a week in the off season, we try to compress deliveries into one or two days and keep the trucks parked the rest of the time.” Willey said that the biggest expense to the company is the cost of buying inventory which is up 40 % over last year. “We try to keep over one million gallons of inventory,” he said. “It’s very important to us to provide a reliable source of supply in the winter.”

PAGE 11 For Weatherization Assistance: Call 302-856-6310 in Sussex County www.dhss.delaware.gov/dssc/weatheriz.html www.dhr.state.md.us/county.htm For Energy Assistance: Call Local State Agencies Seaford State Service Center 628-2000 Bridgeville State Service Center 337-8261 Laurel State Service Center 875-2289 Georgetown State Service Center 8565574


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Fines are raised at state parks Under new legislation signed into law by Gov. Ruth Ann Minner, Delaware State Parks Enforcement officers will be assessing higher fines for violations of state park rules and regulations. The new fines have increased from a $25 minimum for a first offense to a $50 minimum, and from a $50 second offense minimum fine to a $100 minimum. Maximum fines remain the same, $250 for a first offense and $500 for a second offense. If an offense involves the failure to acquire a surf fishing vehicle permit or failure to pay an entrance fee, the law now allows officers to assess violators for the cost of the permit or fee. That means a Delaware resident caught as a first time offender without a valid surf permit could be fined $50 plus the $65 price of an annual surf permit, while nonresidents would face the same fine plus the $130 cost of a non-resident surf permit. Offenders pay the fee but do not receive a permit. “Before these changes, in many cases the cost of violating the law was cheaper than paying the proper fee for the activity. That didn’t serve as much of a deterrent

for some people,” said Chief Wayne Kline of Delaware State Parks Enforcement. Other common violations with new higher fines include not paying daily park entrance fees, which are in effect from March to November, as well as violations such as entering a protected bird nesting area and having an unleashed dog. Dogs must be leashed year-round in all of Delaware’s State Parks. The Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation is heavily supported by fees collected for park activities, including surf fishing, camping, entrance fees and annual passes. These fees go back into the Parks to help pay for staff, maintenance and improvements. In addition to the changes under the new legislation, the Division also reviewed its parking fines, and DNREC Secretary John A. Hughes recently approved an increase from $10 to $20 for vehicles parked illegally on State Parks property. “Our parking fines are now consistent with those of neighboring municipalities,” Kline said. For more information on Delaware State Parks, visit www.destateparks.com.

Law toughens stalking penalties A person who is convicted of stalking could face up to a year in prison under a major revision to the state’s 1993 stalking and harassment law. At a signing ceremony for a trio of bills aimed at combating domestic violence, Gov. Ruth Ann Minner said she thinks the package will make Delawareans safer. “This will protect our residents from harassment and intimidation,” Minner said. “There’s no excuse now for anyone to say: ‘You can’t be prosecuted.’ They can prosecute anyone for these offenses now.” The three-bill package was sponsored by Senate Majority Whip Patricia Blevins, D-Elsmere, and Rep. Deborah Hudson, RFairthorne. Blevins said the package couldn’t have made it through the General Assembly without strong backing from anti-domestic violence groups, including the council that advises the governor on

domestic violence issues, and help from the Attorney General’s office. The bills: • Add sexual assault and sexual abuse to crimes covered by the state’s victims compensation laws. • Add a $15 fee to certified copies of marriage licenses with the money going to help pay for programs that help and advocate for victims of domestic violence to help offset loss of federal dollars provided by the Violence Against Women Act. • Overhaul the state’s 1993 stalking and harassment laws to make it easier for people to bring harassment charges. The changes also update the law to cover electronic harassment on Internet sites. That law takes effect in mid-October.

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

Members of the Troop 5 (Bridgeville) Explorers recently attended a National Law Enforcement Exploring Conference. From left: Cpl. Jennifer Struck, Megan Milligan, Adam Cartwright, Phillip Moore, Ethan Stoeckel and Trooper First Class Gregory Cartwright. Struck and Cartwright oversee the group.

Police Explorers attend conference The Delaware State Police Law Enforcement Explorers from Troop 5 in Bridgeville joined more than 3,000 other Explorers, adult leaders and staff throughout the nation at the 16th biennial National Law Enforcement Exploring Conference from July 21 to July 26 at Colorado State University. Four Explorers, Megan Milligan, Adam Cartwright, Phillip Moore and Ethan Stoeckel, attended from Troop 5 in Bridgeville. Corporal Jennifer Struck and Trooper First Class Gregory Cartwright oversee the Troop 5 Post’s Explorers program. Explorers from other areas in Delaware also attended the conference. The conference provides a training experience for Law Enforcement Explorers

and contributes to the development of skills required in law enforcement. Through the Explorers program, young people aged 14 through 20 have an opportunity to learn about special interests and vocational choices. At the national conference the Explorers have the opportunity to compete in both team and individual competitions. In addition to activities at the conference, the Delaware State Police Explorers enjoyed the tourist attractions of Colorado. Each of the Exploring Posts welcomes individuals between the age of 14 and 20 who are presently enrolled in school fulltime, maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 and have no criminal history. For information, contact any Delaware State Police Troop.

New state hunting guide is available Hunters can pick up a copy of the new Delaware Hunting & Trapping Guide for 2008-2009 at the DNREC licensing desk in the Richardson & Robbins Building, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, or at any of Delaware’s hunting license dealers. The 64-page guide has been redesigned in a magazine-sized format with larger print. Included is information on licensing and permits, deer, small game, migratory bird and wild turkey hunting, hunting or trapping on public lands and the Delaware Hunter Education Program.

Topics range from methods of take, firearms requirements, deer checking and state and federal regulations to rules for hunting state and federal wildlife areas, maps and educational opportunities including boating safety, hunter education and the Delaware Master Hunter Program. Also included are applications for hunting licenses, the public lands hunting lottery and education courses. For more information, call the Wildlife Section at 302-739-9912.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 13

Bridgeville breaks ground for $2.3 million library By Lynn R. Parks After months of planning, workers and volunteers with the Bridgeville Public Library broke ground last week for a new facility. The new 13,500-square foot library, expected to cost about $2.3 million, is being built on South Cannon Street, where the old town and the new Heritage Shores golf community meet. “We are all so excited,” said Cathi Hochstedler, publicity chairwoman for the Friends of the Bridgeville Library. “We have been working so long toward this.” Construction will be done by Regional Builders, Seaford. Hochstedler was unable to say when the project will be completed. It is still awaiting final approval from the town of Bridgeville, as well as from the state fire marshal’s office and from the state, which has to approve the storm water retention pond. In addition, fund-raising for the project is not complete. The library recently received a $1 million matching grant from the state, as well as a $30,000 grant from the Marmot Foundation. The library’s next big fund-raiser will be a Kiss the Pig contest, in which people in the community will vote with their dollars for the local celebrity they would most like to see kiss a pig. Contestants are town commission president Joseph Conaway, Woodbridge School District superintendent Kevin Carson and Bridgeville police chief Alan Parsons. Collection boxes will be set up around town. The grand finale kiss will take place during the October Apple-Scrapple Festival, on the center stage. Hochstedler said that the friends group is also planning a late-winter fundraiser, similar to the art auction it sponsored in April.

Bridgeville Library dignitaries and elected officials break ground for the new library. From left : Cathi Hochstedler, library board member; Randolph Jones, library board member; town commission president Joe Conaway; state Sen. Thurman Adams; Ruth Gilefski, library board secretary/treasurer; and Jeanine Scott, board member. Photo by Daniel Richardson

Del Tech computer courses to start in fall

NEW POLICE OFFICER - Mayor John Shwed, right, administers the oath of office to new Laurel Police officer Chad Spicer during a recent meeting of the Laurel Town Council. Holding the Bible for Hitchens is his father, Norman Spicer. Looking on is Spicer’s mother, Ruth Ann, who is holding his daughter, Aubrey. Photo by Tony Windsor

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Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, is offering computer courses this fall. First steps courses are designed for those with little or no computer experience to be able to understand computers, e-mail, Internet and Microsoft Word. Specialized courses teach the basics of Microsoft Office 2003 and 2007, eBay, file management, Internet, e-mail, AutoCAD, Photoshop CS3, Windows XP and QuickBooks Pro. The donations and receipts for nonprofits course enables nonprofit organizations to satisfy current IRS requirements. Throughout the fall, several six- to seven-hour courses covering almost every aspect of Microsoft Office 2007 will be of-

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Seaford High senior is a true renaissance man By Donna Dukes-Huston “An individual can win a game, but it takes a team to win a championship.” This is the motto that has shaped Marcus Wright throughout his high school career. Wright has not only been a member of many sports teams, he is also an integral part of many clubs and church activities. As he enters his senior year at Seaford High, he plans to use this attitude to motivate his classmates in his role as class president. One of his main goals is to shift the focus of his classmates and the rest of the school toward promoting school spirit. “First I want to liven up the pep rallies and make them really fun like they used to be,” Wright said. He also hopes to promote school spirit by building upon an event which he first organized last year. Each class formed a powder puff football team and competed against each other. He would like to do that again this fall, but in the spring expand this to include competitions with other schools. Dara Laws, Wright’s Student Government Association advisor, is impressed with Wright’s plans for this year. “Since the end of last year and over the summer, Marcus has really developed a rejuvenating spirit,” Laws said. “He wants to introduce new activities to bring back the old school spirit to Seaford High.” Wright also recognizes the importance of a focus on academics and continues to fill his schedule with Honors classes. His goal for his classmates is to have his entire senior class graduate this year. He hopes to organize tutoring sessions for struggling students in order to make this possible.

Gigi Dickerson, senior class advisor, looks forward to working with Wright in his new role this year. He has been a class officer for the past three years. “Marcus has a lot of great ideas about how to raise money and how to organize things,” she said. “He’s just an all around great kid.” Wright also decided to join the Key Club this year when he was approached by the club’s advisor, Harry Brake. “Mr. Brake said, ‘I think it would be really good for you and really good for us,’” Wright said. “Key Club does a lot of community service so I’m really looking forward to that.” Wright has already been reaching out to his church community and enjoying a leadership role in that setting. He has served as president of the Young People’s Department (YPD), the youth group at Mt. Calvary AME Church, for the past few years. As president it was his responsibility to run the group’s meetings, organize fundraisers and put together an annual YPD day. “I had to organize the entire church service and the activities afterward,” Wright said. “One year I even got to be the preacher that day.” With so many other things on his plate this year, Wright stepped down as president and assumed the role of parliamentarian. The YPD also attends conventions where they spend time with other such groups from their district. There they attend workshops where they discuss ideas for fun group activities and also spend time in spiritual sessions. In addition, Wright is a member of Mt. Calvary’s choir and travels with them to

Marcus Wright, a senior at Seaford High School, will use his positive attitude to motivate fellow classmates this year as class president and a member of the Key Club and football, wrestling and track teams. Wright is also involved with his church, Mt. Calvary AME.

perform in other churches. “I really enjoy it,” he said. “Singing is my favorite way to praise the Lord.” Wright feels that his many volunteer experiences have taught him valuable lessons. He said he has learned how to talk to people and how to compromise. “I feel like I was a born leader, but I’ve learned that sometimes I’m not always right,” he said. “Someone else has better ideas sometimes.” Teachers and coaches who have worked with Wright appreciate his leadership skills. “He is able to get other kids involved in his vision,” Laws said. Wright believes he does this best when he is involved in sports. He is a member of

the football, wrestling and track teams. Wright said he considered dropping track last year because he felt that it was not really his strength, but his coach, Art Doakes, convinced him to stay. “My coach said, ‘If you quit, morale would go down. Now go do what you’re best at, encourage somebody.’” Wright plans to make athletics a permanent part of his life. After graduation he would like to attend Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va. He is still trying to decide between pursuing a major in physical education or sports management. “Whatever I do, I want to be involved in athletics,” he said. “The most joy in my life comes from sports because every sport is like a big family.”

New legislation raises minimum fine for illegal dumping in Delaware DNREC’s Environmental Crimes Unit have released statistics on its investigations into violations of Delaware’s air, waste and water pollution laws for the first six months of 2008. Enforcement officers handled a total of 1,958 complaints statewide with illegal dumping complaints up 11 percent over the same period last year. 451 complaints were from Sussex County. “Dumping garbage and waste is illegal everywhere in Delaware except in a permitted landfill,” said Chief William (Chip) AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

McDaniel, DNREC Enforcement. “Illegal dumping poses significant hazards to public health and the environment and creates an eyesore that detracts from our state’s natural beauty.” The new legislation, Senate Bill 309, which was signed into law by Governor Minner on June 21, raises the minimum fine for a first offense for illegal dumping to $500 and provides landowners with a cause of action for damages from solid waste illegally dumped on their properties. In addition to increased fines for illegal

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complaint with 326 calls to the 24-hour complaint line. Open burning is banned statewide during ozone season to protect public health, because during spring and summer months, high temperatures and sunlight combine with pollution to form ground-level ozone. DNREC’s Environmental Enforcement Officers receive complaints through the toll-free, 24-hours Environmental Complaint Line at 1-800-6628802. For more information, contact Chief William McDaniel at 302-739-9401.

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554124 4 BR, 2 BA Victorian in Delmar has original moldings, oak flooring, servant’s stairs, transom windows, wrap-around porch & garage. Call Lee Marland’s cell 302-542-0347. (Reduced $10,000)

556853 2 BR, 2 BA Like New Mobile at Briarwood Manor Tr Pk has central air, cathedral ceilings, shed & oak cabinetry. Call Lee Marland’s cell 302-542-0347.

555116 $215,900 3 BR, 2 BA like new rancher outside Laurel has attached & detached garages, fenced rear yard on corner lot. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

562496 $235,000 3 BR, 2 BA Dutch Colonial is spacious w/irrigation, 3-season room, attached & detached garages & shed w/elec. Call Barabara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

557998 $199,000 3 BR, 1 BA well maintained Rancher outside Laurel has enclosed breezeway, hardwood floors & a garage. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-745-6489.

557507 $109,900 3 BR, 1 BA in-town Laurel home has been updated with windows, electric, plumbing & flooring. Seller is a licensed realtor. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

553349 4 BR, 1 1/2 BA Colonial w/wrap-around porch, rear deck, shed, new furnace, new carpet & fresh paint in Laurel. Seller is a licensed realtor. Call Barbara Smith’s cell 302-7456489. (Reduced)

548712 $239,900 3 BR, 3 BA One-of-a-kind Townhome in Laurel on Records Pond. Vaulted ceilings, 3-season porch & new heating system. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302-559-2333.

541831 $449,900 4 BR, 3 1/2 BA New Contemporary at Rivers End has granite counters, game room, bonus room, 2x6 walls, hardwood. Call Scott Venables’ cell 302559-2333.

560794 $130,000 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA Colonial in Seaford is newly painted & has all new windows on 2nd floor & garage. Motivated seller. Call Melissa Citro’s cell 302-448-1930.

558331 $244,900 4 BR, 1 1/2 BA Rancher outside Georgetown is quiet country living. 21 x 18 detached unit is finished for in-law suite, etc. Call Melissa Citro’s cell 302-448-1930.

560890 $499,000 4 BR, 3 1/2 BA Colonial on beautiful fenced lot in Atlanta Estates is a must see! 4-car garage, 2 master suites, sunroom & more. Call Melissa Citro’s cell 302-4481930.

547494 $169,900 4 BR, 2 BA in-town Laurel New Contemporary has 1st floor BR, architectural shingles, landscaping & open floor plan. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Community Bulletin Board Seaford library IHOP fundraiser

Seaford’s Farmers & Artisans Market

Come out between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and noon on Saturdays to enjoy the Seaford Farmers & Artisans market at Kiwanis Park. Enjoy a vast selection of locally grown produce while strolling the park with your friends and family. Take home delicious tomatoes, squash, peppers, and melons. Select unique, handmade jewelry, glassware, and paintings for yourself or those on your gift lists. Most importantly, come out to the park and share the spirit of community. We’re ‘Going Green’ in Seaford, and invite you to be a part of this one-of-a-kind market during August. Aug. 23: Give-away Day – doorprizes to be given away to shoppers Aug. 30: Musician Tony Windsor from 10 a.m. to noon and ‘feedback day’ – stop at registration table to jot down your comments on the market so that we can plan for the 2009 season. For additional information, contact any committee member: Jeannie Conner, Beverly Hutton, Erroll Mattox, Faith Robinson, Lynne Betts or Sonja Mehaffey. Messages may be left at 629-3949.

The Seaford District Library is pleased to announce that we have joined with IHOP in an effort to raise money for the library. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations on any day with any meal and return the receipts along with a comment card to the Seaford District Library. We must have the comment cards and the receipts in order to receive the reimbursement.

Seaford District Library events

• “Vines and Vessels” Christian Writers Group will meet at the Seaford District Library’s meeting room on Saturday, Aug. 23, starting at 9 a.m. • The Celiac support group will meet in the Seaford District Library’s meeting room on Monday, August 25, 2008 starting at 5:30 p.m. • The Seaford District Library Board Meeting will be on Tuesday, Aug. 26, starting at 5 p.m. • “Lights Camera Action!” The Seaford District Library is having “Movie Night” on Thursday, Aug. 28, starting at 5:30 p.m. • Do you have health concerns? Confusing lab reports? Questions you should ask your doctor? Visit the Seaford District Library the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet with Linda Leonard, Consumer Health Librarian for

EST.

1978

Sussex County. • The Seaford District Library is currently looking for people who are interested in representing a foreign country for our “Annual International Festival” to be held on Tuesday, Oct. 21. Sign up at the Seaford Library front desk before Oct. 14. For more information contact Amber Motta at 629-2524.

Art Show at the Seaford Library

The Seaford District Library is proud to announce it will be hosting it’s 2nd annual art show on Sept. 5 & 6 from 12-4 p.m. This will be a multi-medium art show with many different forms of art, from oils to wood. Come and show your support for your local artist and enjoy the beauty that they create. Refreshments will be provided. For more information contact Amber Motta at 629-2524.

Annual Power Picnic

Employees, retirees, friends, and their families are invited to join in for a get-together of old friends from the Power House, Power Service, and Waste Treatment on Sunday, Aug. 24 from 1 to 5 p.m., at Soroptomist Park, Seaford (across from the Methodist Manor House on Middleford Road). Cost is $5 per adult; $2 per child (4 years to 12 years). Hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken and sodas will be available. Bring your favorite

629-6003

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There will be an all-you-can-eat breakfast, at the Blades Fire Hall, located at the corner of Cannon and Fifth streets in Blades, Sept. 7, from 8 till 11 a.m. Cost is adults $7, children $3. Sponsored by the Auxiliary and Firemen of the Fire Company. For more information call Jewell Chaffinch at 629-6904 or Crystal French at 629-4481.

Yard sale

Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades will hold a yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 13, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tables are $10 each. Rain date is Sept. 20. Call 875-7143.

Seaford class of ‘88 reunion

The Seaford High School class of ‘88 20th year reunion will be held Saturday, Nov. 29, at the banquet center next to Jimmy’s Grill Restaurant in Bridgeville. The reunion will be held from 6-10 p.m., with a cocktail hour from 6-7 p.m., and dinner will be served at 7. The cost for the event is $75 a couple and $37.50 for a single ticket; this includes dinner and entertainment. Contact Cathy Hastings (Maas) at dcat5186@hotmail.com, Lexie Ketterman (Kingree) at lexketterman@gmail.com or Angie Zebley

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008 (Mitchell) at angie@tullramey.com with contact information. If you have any information about any other classmates, provide that as well. Anyone interested in helping please let us know.

PAGE 17

The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, approximately two miles south of town. For any further information, call Shirley at 875-2314.

LHS Class of ‘63 plans reunion

The 25-year dinner for DuPont employees will be held Friday, Sept. 5, at the Laurel Fire Department. Anyone who has not received a letter and who wishes to attend, call Ray Whaley at 537-6113, or Connie Keene at 6293377.

Laurel High School’s Class of ‘63, 45th reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Lakeside Community Center in Long Neck. We are in need of upto-date addresses. If you have not received your letter contact Janet Lynch LeCates 875-3955, or Sandra Kellam Russell 875-5985, or e-mail russellsk@dmv.com.

Church seeks craft vendors

LHS Class of ‘78 plans reunion

DuPont 25-year dinner

Christ Lutheran Church need craft vendors for its Christmas bazaar to be held on Sept. 27, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. - $20 per space. Contact Joan at 628-3601. The church is located at 315 N. Shipley St., Seaford.

Breakfast cafe

VFW 4961 breakfast cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

LHS Class of ‘78, 30-year-class-reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Beach House “Tiki Bar” at Bargain Bill’s in Laurel. Light finger food will be served, cash bar $15 per person from 7 p.m. until 11 p.m. DJ will be provided. Dress is casual. For more information contact Jan Conaway Allen at 443-6140338, Gale Hall Daugherty at 410-6263214, Tammy Hastings Whaley at 302228-7267, Tammy Myers Wharton at 302258-7371 or Sue Pressley at 302-8753968. Send checks to Jan Allen, 110 Tracey Circle, Laurel, DE 19956.

LHS Class of ‘87 reunion

Biff Lee Pig Pickin’

40th District Rep. Clifford “Biff” Lee will be holding his 21st annual “PigPickin” at the Laurel Fire Hall on Saturday, Sept. 13. The event is from 4 until 7 p.m. Plenty to eat and a good time for all with door prizes. Tickets are $15 in advance by calling 875-5448, or at Small Insurance, South Central Avenue. They are also available at the door.

Annual Youth Fishing Tournament

American Legion Post 19 in Laurel will be holding their annual Youth Fishing Tournament on Saturday, Aug. 23. The hours are 9 a.m. through noon and you provide your own tackle. Registration is at A & K Enterprises on Central Avenue. Age groups are 4-7 years, 8-11 years and 12 to 15 years. There is no entry fee and it is a catch and release program. Parents join your children for a day’s fun on Records Pond and Broad Creek.

LHS former grads dinner

The annual fall get-together of former athletes, band members and interested Laurel High School graduates is on Sept. 12 at the Georgia House with a 4 p.m. social hour and dinner, followed by the Laurel football game. Remember the stories from previous years and bring some new ones. Tickets call Craig Littleton at 302875-7445 or 302-462-7450.

Ruritan Club holds BBQ

The Laurel Ruritan Club will have a chicken barbecue on Saturday, Aug. 30, at O’Neal’s Antiques & Estate Jewelry on Rt. 13 in Laurel. The barbecue will be from 10 a.m. till 2 p.m. and the cost is $6 per dinner. Proceeds will benefit local charities.

Free community luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (chicken / dumplings), on Sept. 20, noon to 2 p.m.

The LHS Class of ‘87 will hold a class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 30, at Georgia House restaurant in Laurel at 6 p.m. Invitations have been mailed to those classmates who have been located. If any classmate did not receive information contact Michele Procino-Wells at mpw@seafordlaw.com or call 628-4140.

LHS Class of ‘88 plans reunion

LHS Class of ‘88 twenty year class reunion dinner is set for Saturday, Sept. 20, starting at 5 p.m. at the Beach House in Laurel. We are also planning other events around that weekend. We need your help. Contact the committee with your address information at Reunioninfo2008@yahoo.com, call the reunion hotline 302280-6655, or register on classmates.com to help us connect to everyone.

LHS Class of ‘93 reunion planned

Laurel High School’s class of ‘93 is scheduled to celebrate their 15th reunion. The reunion will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30, at 2 p.m. It will be held at Trap Pond State Park’s screened pavilion. We are in need of contact information for the following classmates: Gary Anderson, Eric Bailey, Jennifer Belong, Greg Bernal, Shawn Crites, Dangelle Dixon, Allery Elder, Brandy Gilchrist, Michael Greene, Sam Hastings, Gail Hearn, Michelle Hindt, Nick Horsey, Jeff Howard, Patrick Johnson, Robyn Justice, Aaron Kellam, Kenneth LeCates, Martin LeCates, Tracy Matthews, Misty McKinstry, Carlos Mitchell, Christina Morris, Bodny Olivince, Jason Pfeilmeier, Traymane Savage, Karen Short Townsend, Twana Stanley, John Stevens, Sean Vincent, Mark Walsh, Chris Walston, Nikki Webb, Antonio West, Albert Wooters, Jason Young and Ami Zimmerman. If you have contact information for any of these classmates, contact Michelle Rogers Moyer at 875-2563 or mmoyer19956@yahoo.com.

LHS class of ‘98 reunion planned

Laurel High School class of ‘98 is planning a class reunion. Contact Megan

And WesternS ussex BOYS & GIRLS CLUB LaurelS ite

Presents

Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament I N M EMORY OF F RANK G ERARDI J R . At The Heritage Shores Golf Club

THURSDAY, SEPT. 18, 2008 For Registration, Sponsorships, Payment, contact: John Evans, PO Box 157, Harrington, DE 19952

302-398-1018 4 Player Scramble: Cost $150 per player Start Time 8 a.m. for Breakfast & Registration FREE Carry On Golf Bag for ALL Golf Participants!

Please Help Us Provide A “Positive Place for Kids” The Day’s Events Include: • Hole-in-One Prizes: $50,000 cash, new cars, Bose Music System, set of Nike Irons, $500 Visa Gift Card & More! • Silent Auction: Autographed sports memorabilia by Jimmy Rollins, Chase Utley, Cole Hamels, Steve Carlton, Derek Jeter, A-Rod, Brian Westbrook, Brian Dawkins, Bobby Clarke, Bernie Parent, Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier & More! • Entertainment: Joe Conklin, “Man of a Thousand Voices”

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PAGE 18 Jones by email megj22@comcast.net or phone 302-841-5835 with your contact information.

Laurel Library Reading Program

The Laurel Public Library’s Teen Summer Reading Program has come to a close. Twelve teens were selected in the grand prize drawing to receive a limo ride to Barnes and Noble in Salisbury to spend a $35 gift certificate. Of the 54 teens that signed up for the program, 39 teens completed the Teen Summer Reading Program by reading at least five books over the summer. Teens in the Summer Reading Program read over 700 books. The Friends of the Laurel Public Library generously fund the Laurel Public Library’s Teen Summer Reading Program.

Basket bingo fundraiser

The annual basket bingo fundraiser for the Laurel Historical Society will be held on Tuesday, Aug 26, at the Laurel Fire Hall. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the games start at 7 p.m. The $20 ticket will give players “double” bingo cards and one ticket for the raffle of a large, Longerberger storage basket. A 2008 Holiday Hostess Basket will also be won by another lucky raffle winner. The traditional 50-50 will also be offered along with free desserts, drinks and snacks. Hot dogs will be available at $1 each. The Laurel Historical Society members donate delicious homemade treats for this event each year. Tickets can be bought at the door, but for advanced ticket reservations call 8759427 or 875-4217 and leave a message. Profits from the event will be used to maintain the society’s properties and collections. Efforts are now being made to raise funds to repaint the society’s headquarters, the Cook House, which is open for public visits each Sunday from 1-4 p.m. For more information call 875-2820 or email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008 continental breakfast. A shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. Lunch will be served and prizes awarded at 12:30 p.m. The $100 entry fee per golfer includes the continental breakfast, golf, lunch and prizes. The non-refundable deadline for entries is Sept. 12. Sponsorships by businesses, individuals and churches are available in Gold, Ace, Eagle and Birdie categories. Sponsorships are tax deductible and need to be registered by Sept. 5. Come out and enjoy a great day of golf, fun and fellowship! For more information and to register for the tournament contact Dwayne Landis at 302-236-6822. Entries and payment can be mailed to: GMS Golf Tournament, Attn: Dwayne Landis, P.O. Box 309, Greenwood, DE 19950. Celebrating 80 years of Christian education, Greenwood Mennonite School is an inter-denominational Christian school serving students in grades Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12. For more information visit our web site at www.gms-flames.org or contact our school office at 302-349-4131.

Big Saturday yard ‘n’ flea sale

The Town of Greenwood is having their annual Big Saturday yard ‘n’ flea sale and are offering 10x20 vendor spaces for $10 to whomever would like to set up tables and participate with residents. The date is Sept. 6 (rain date Sept. 13) from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tables must be set up by 8 a.m. Call 410-227-1621 to reserve your space or for more information. So plan to set up or visit Greenwood on Sept. 6 to do some treasure shopping and bargain hunting at the Big Saturday yard ‘n’ flea sale, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year, they will be hosting a “Strut Your Stuff” pet fashion show. If you would like to participate, call 443-6143420 for more info. It’s free and all pets are welcome. Registration for the pet show starts at 11 a.m. and event is at 1 p.m.

by the employees of Trinity Transport, Inc. In 2007 the tournament succeeded in raising over $20,000.

Searching for ancestors

Are you searching for your ancestors? Do you need guidance to begin your family tree? Are you stuck or do you need help organizing your research? The Bridgeville Public Library will provide genealogy consultations facilitated by Alice duBois Min on the last Saturday of each month — Aug. 30, Sept. 27 and Oct. 25 — from 10 a.m. to noon. Sign-up is required. Call the library at 337-7401, or e-mail Alice at famgen88@comcast.net. For special needs contact Karen Johnson 302-337-740

Golf Tournament

St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church in Delmar is excited to announce our very first annual golf tournament, to be held on Monday, Sept. 8, at the scenic River Marsh Golf Club, located at the Chesapeake Bay Hyatt in Cambridge, Md. Start time is 8:30 a.m., with registration from 7:45 to 8:15 a.m. The cost is $100 per single player or $400 per team. For local businesses, $100 silver sponsor includes a professionally printed 18 x 24 tee sign or $450 gold sponsor will register a foursome of golfers in addition to a tee sign. All fees include a buffet lunch with awards ceremony to follow. There will be many great prizes for 1st through 3rd place men’s and women’s teams, as well as great prizes for longest drive and closest the pin. Visit www.ststephensumc.com, or call Jamee Elliott at 302-846-9501, or Tom Jewell at 302-846-2525 for tournament sponsorship or registration information. Registration deadline is Monday, Aug. 25.

Longaberger sale Historical Society’s Museum Adult Summer Reading Club

The Greenwood Public Library’s adult summer reading club, “Basking in Books,” continues through Aug. 25. It is open to all 18 years and older or those who have graduated from high school.To participate, please register at the Greenwood Library and start reading or listening to your favorite books. Entry slips are filled out for each book enjoyed; these entry slips enter you in weekly drawings for prizes as well as for a grand prize to be awarded on Aug. 25. For further information, contact the Greenwood Library at 349-5309. The Greenwood Public Library is located at 100 Mill St., just east of the railroad tracks, in Greenwood.

Golf Tournament

Greenwood Mennonite School announces their 6th annual benefit golf tournament to be held on Friday, Sept. 26, at the Heritage Shores Golf Club in Bridgeville. This is a scramble tournament open to groups and individuals. Registration is from 7-8 a.m. with a

The Bridgeville Historical Society Museum will be open to the public on the first Sunday of each month from June to October from 1 p.m - 4 p.m. The museum is located at 102 William Street, Bridgeville.

IHOP Family Night every night

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library have another delicious fundraiser to promote. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Take and fill out the comment card; staple your receipt to the comment card and drop it off at the Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or the Providence Sales Cottage in Heritage Shores. For more information, call Pat McDonald at 337-7192.

Trinity Golf Tournament

The 5th annual Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament will be held Sept. 6 at Heritage Shores Golf Club in Bridgeville. The tournament is a charity event to raise money for the Trinity Foundation, a non-profit organization founded in 2005

The Delmar Lions Club is holding a Longaberger basket sale with all proceeds from the sale going to the local community and the visually impaired. Baskets, with blue and orange trim and Wildcat paws, cost $49 apiece. The price of the lid, with a Delmar and Wildcat logo, is $30. Liners and dividers are available upon request. For more information or to order a basket please contact King Lion Mildred Riley at 846-3846 or kragera@verizon.net.

Delmar church sandwich sale

A sandwich sale will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30 at 9 a.m. at the Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, Rt. 13 North and Dorothy Road (3 miles north of MD/DE state line). It will feature: oyster, crab cake, soft crab, chicken salad sandwiches, cheese steak subs, hamburgers, hot dogs. Baked goods and yard sale will also be available.

Delmar Happenings

There will be a BBQ chicken dinner on Saturday, Sept. 6, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Church, 101 E. State Street, Delmar. Includes: 1/2 chicken, with baked beans, cole slaw, roll & dessert for $7. Benefit Relay for Life. Advanced tickets only. Call church office at 846-9501.

Spaghetti and meatball dinner

An “all-you-can-eat” spaghetti and meatball dinner with salad, beverage, bread and dessert, will be held Saturday, Sept. 13, at Bethel Community House, Oak Grove, 4-6 p.m. Donation $8. Eat in or carry out. Call 629-7117 or 337-8836 for tickets or information.

Embroiders’ Guild open house

The public is invited to attend an open house sponsored by the Sussex Chapter of The Embroiders’ Guild of America, Inc. The Open House will be held on Monday, Oct. 13 from 12:30 util 2:30 p.m. at the CHEER Community Center at 20520 Sand Hill Road, Georgetown. Refreshments will be served and there will be demonstrations of various forms of needlework. Those attending will also be able to work on a project to take home and view the needlework on display. The Sussex Chapter welcomes new members and meets the second Monday of each month. September through June at 10 a.m. at the CHEER Center. Come and learn, have fun, and share the good companionship with other stitchers. All levels of stitchers are welcome. For information contact, Carolyn at 302-9471949.

Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral

For 23 years, the “Friends of Summer” have mourned the passing of the summer tourist season at Bethany Beach. The 2008 Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral is celebrated on Labor Day Monday, Sept. 1, beginning about 5:30 p.m. at the north end of the boardwalk. In addition there is the Jazz Funeral Silent Auction held on Friday, Aug. 29, 3-5 p.m. at Bethany Blues Restaurant to support the American Cancer Society and Relay for Life program.

Amish Country Bike Tour

Come out and join us for the 22nd annual Amish Country Bike Tour that will take place Saturday, Sept. 6, at 8 a.m. Cyclists from near and far will enjoy Kent County’s rural Amish countryside with four food stops and your choice of 15, 25, 50, 62 or 100-mile loops. The Amish Schoolhouse food stop is the most famous for the Amish-made pies and pastries….always a favorite among the riders. All routes begin and end on Legislative Mall in historic downtown Dover. A catered lunch and free entertainment are included in the registration fee. Proceeds from the ride benefit the Central Delaware YMCA Youth Programs and the Amish School House. Registration is now open. Participants can pre-register online at www.visitdover.com/events; or by contacting the Kent County Tourism Office at 800-233-5368. The deadline for the early bird registration is Aug. 22. Participants should take advantage of the reduced rate and no lines at check-in. For more information on the Bike Tour, contact Kent County Tourism at 800-233-5368.

TOPS looking for new members

TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is a non-profit weight loss group whose mission is “To support their members as they take off pounds sensibly.” They feature


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008 exceptional fellowship, weight loss and healthy living for a nominal fee of $24 per year. It is a program that is non-profit and extremely affordable. They are non-commercial and there is no food to buy and no sales to be made. Why not do yourself a good deed and join us? Call 629-8216 for further information.

Georgetown Public Library events

• The Georgetown Public Library will hold Story Time at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday morning with Miss Sherri. • The Friends of the Georgetown Public Library will hold its monthly book discussion on Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 10 a.m. This month discussion will be on “The Language of the Threads” by Gail Tsukiyama. • The Georgetown Public Library is having a movie matinee at 2 p.m. on Fridays until Aug. 22. • “Do You Know What to Do If a Disaster Strikes” will be presented by the Sussex County Citizen Corp on Sept. 9 at 6 p.m. This informative program will address how to prepare yourself and your family on what to do if a natural or terrorist-related disaster happens. Preregistration is required to attend. • The Delaware Dept of Agriculture (DDA) is having an egg decorating contest. In preparation for the contest DDA will be holding an information session and egg decorating workshop at the Georgetown Public Library on Sept. 3, from 6 – 7:30 p.m. All participants must register for the contest by Sept. 15 and all eggs must be submitted for judging Oct. 15. Judging will occur in the State during the last two weeks of October. The winning egg from each country will be submitted to the American Egg Board to be judged against other participants from across the United States. The top egg for the State of Delaware will be featured in the White House Decorated Egg display in the spring. For more information call the library at 856-7958 of the DDA at 302-698-4500.

Grandparents United hold Pizza Night

The Sussex County Chapters of Grandparents United DE is holding a pizza night and meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 27 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. The meeting is being held in the Child Development Center at Delaware Technical and Community College in Georgetown, which is located in back of the College. A limited number of back to school backpacks, other school supplies and winter coats will also be given out. In order to receive these items, you must be a relative caregiver of a child. There will be a door prize given out as well. Bring your grandchildren as we will have childcare available. For more information, please call Deb Fales or Joanne Hammond at 302-628-6892, or Maureen Leary at 855-5855.

Labor Day Gospel Concert

A Labor Day Gospel Concert will be held on Monday, Sept. 1, at 6 p.m., at the Federalsburg Marina Park Pavilion in Federalsburg, Md. Featured artists will include The King’s Ambassadors, Two Mile Road, Jimmy Passwaters and Judy Laramore. Bring a chair and a friend. Concessions will be available and a love offering will be received

Rotary Collecting School Supplies

The Harrington-Greenwood-Felton Centennial Rotary Club will set up a booth

to collect school supplies at Greenwood’s upcoming “Big Saturday” celebration on Sept. 6. The club will also have a flea market sale at the booth with proceeds to be donated to the elementary school. Items needed include pencils, pens, paper, notebooks, rulers, crayons, markers and backpacks. Cash donations will also be accepted to be used toward the purchase of uniforms required the Woodbridge School District. People may bring their donations to the Rotary tent at the event or drop them off at Chick’s, U.S. 13, Harrington, where supplies are also being collected for Lake Forest students. The Harrington-Greenwood-Felton Rotary Club meets every Thursday morning from 7:45 to 8:45 a.m. at Peoples Too Restaurant in Harrington. For more information, call 398-3898.

Lewes High School class of 1958

The Lewes High School class of 1958 will hold its 50th year reunion on Oct. 18, 2008 at the Virden center, Pilottown Road, Lewes. A letter of information on the reunion will be mailed in early spring but addresses are needed for the following classmates: Peggy Haire Kreer, Charles Robertson, James Carter, Larry Dennis and Bill Price. If you were a member of the Lewes High School class of 1958, but did not graduate and are interested in attending the reunion, or if you have information for any of the above, call the reunion committee at 645-2387.

ESPF looking for sponsors

Jeff Fields is looking for a few good men. More specifically, he is seeking those who would like to play the role of a sponsor at the Eastern Shore Baseball Foundation’s 6th annual Maurice L. Fields, Sr. Memorial Golf Tournament. The Friday, Oct. 17, shotgun start fete is slated to begin at noon at the Green Hill Yacht and Country Club in Quantico, Md. Fields runs the tourney in honor of his father, one of the original co-founders of the ESBF, an organization dedicated to preserving the rich history of professional and amateur baseball on the Eastern Shore. The tournament has thus far raised more than $20,000 for college scholarships for area baseball players and golfers. Sponsors are rewarded with a plethora of incentives including recognition at the awards banquet and listing in the tournament program and ESBF website link. For more information, contact Fields at 443-783-4920 or at esbf@comcast.net.

Organist in concert

The Southern Delaware Chapter of the American Guild of Organists will present Gail Archer, international concert organist, lecturer, and recording artist in concert Sunday, Aug. 31, 4 p.m., St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Lewes. She will also conduct a master class on Monday, Sept. 1, 10 a.m., at St. Peter’s. The public is welcome to the concert and the master class. Donations will be accepted. Archer has performed this summer in the U.S., Switzerland, Italy, Germany, and Belgium. She performs regularly at festivals worldwide, including the Spoleto Festival in South Carolina and the Bach Festival at Rollins College in Florida.

Chamber’s Arts Festival

The Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce’s (BFACC) award-winning 30th Annual Bethany Beach Boardwalk

PAGE 19

Arts Festival is Saturday, Sept. 6, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The festival features jewelry, art glass, pottery, sculpture, watercolor and oil painting, basketry, woodworking, and much more. The event is bigger and better than ever this year. The BFACC is excited that this year’s show will showcase more artists than ever before. Thanks to a larger pool of applicants, and strong support from the Town of Bethany Beach, the show will be expanded to include three street festival areas, with entertainment, at Second Street, Garfield Parkway and Parkwood Street. Artists will stretch the entire length of the boardwalk. For more information contact the BFACC at 302-539-2100.

‘Touch-A-Truck’ event

The MOMS Club of Rehoboth Beach Area will be hosting a Touch-A-Truck event to benefit the March of Dimes on Saturday, Aug. 23 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will be held at the Big K (Kmart) parking lot in Rehoboth Beach rain or shine. Kids of all ages will love to visit the trucks set up for their exploration, such as a fire engine, dump truck, crane, ice cream truck, police vehicle, tractor, and so many more. Admission will be $5 for ages 2-12; everyone else is free. Children will not be admitted without a responsible adult. Touch-A-Truck will also feature mini-train rides, face painting, raffles, and refreshments. Free goody bags will be given to the first 500 children to arrive. To receive more information about the MOMS Club of Rehoboth Beach Area, e-mail momsclubde@gmail.com.

Trap Pond Partners meets

Trap Pond Partners (a volunteer nonprofit organization) meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bald Cypress Nature Center at Trap Pond State Park, Laurel. We are always looking for new members and ideas to improve our state park. To learn more, visit www.trappondpartners.com.

SHS Alumni meeting

The SHS Alumni Association will resume their monthly meetings on Thursday, Sept 4. The meetings are held at the downtown Seaford Museum and begin at 7 p.m. Call Donna Angell with any questions at 6298077.

SCWDC meeting

The Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Sept. 18, at Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown. The guest speaker will be Richard S. Cordrey, Secretary of Finance. Members are asked to bring a friend and newcomers are always welcome. Dinner will cost $13 per person. For details and reservations, call Catherine King 628-4812.

DELMAR VFW POST 8276 SUPER BINGO EVERY TUESDAY Starting Monday, August 11th

NER W IN LL A TA K E G ame nza B o n a 0 0. 0 0 $10 o t ! p Jac k Watch Out for

Double Session Basket Bingo Sat., Oct.25th

Dinner Served Bet ween Sessions

Serving Breakfast from 6-10 a.m., Mon. - Fri. at “The Round Table”

Tickets On Sale Tuesday Night

Delmar VFW Bingo

200 West State Street, Delmar, MD CASH PAYOUT

$100* Over 60 People $50* Under 60 People No one under the age of 18 allowed to play *Based on the number of people.

Doors open 5 p.m. • Games 6:45 p.m. CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION

410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Knitting Guild meets

Georgetown. On Aug. 27, view the soaring musical “Phantom” based on Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel “The Phantom of the Opera” at the Candlelight Dinner Theater in Ardentown. • Watch “Young Frankenstein,” Mel Brook’s wickedly funny twist on Mary Shelley’s classic story, on Broadway on Aug. 27. • On Sept. 18, attend a onenight-only concert event with American folk singer Arlo Guthrie and the NSO Pops as part of the Kennedy Center’s “Arts Across America” celebration. • On Sept. 25, enjoy Judy Garland’s captivating and timeless songs performed by Broadway veteran Linda Eder with the NSO Pops led by Principal Pops Conductor Marvin Hamlisch. • Tickets are now available for trips to two National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) Pops shows at the Kennedy Center in September, sponsored by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College. • Take a cruise from Crisfield, Md. to charming and historic Tangier Island on Aug. 30. For more information about these or other trips, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-856-5618.

All Knitters: The “Sea Purls” Chapter of The Knitting Guild Association meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The CHEER Center in Georgetown on the corner of Rt. 9 and Sand Hill Road. For more details: Call Joyce Smirk, secretary, 302-732-6495. Lunch available.

Marine Corps meeting

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Bridgeville meeting change The Bridgeville Commissioners’ regular meeting at Town Hall in Bridgeville has been changed. Please note, the meeting was first changed to September 22, however, it became necessary to reschedule the meeting to September 16, at 7 p.m. The public is invited.

Cancer support group

The Wellness CommunityDelaware is offering a support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The group meets at the Cancer Care Center on the second Monday of the month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. For more information call Kaye or Lori at 645-9150.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 6296337 for details.

Longaberger bus trip

Longaberger collectors will want to step aboard a bus trip to Boyd’s Bear Country in Gettysburg, Pa., for the Boyd’s Bear Country Basket Fest. Join collectors at the World’s Most Humongous Teddy Bear Store for a funfilled event that takes place Aug. 23. The bus will leave from the Seaford Village Shopping Center at 6 a.m. and return at 8 p.m. Longaberger Basket giveaways will take place every hour! Cost is $59 per person (includes motor coach transportation, snack filled Longaberger Tote and door prizes). For more information call Renee Morris at 245-8842 or email at RGMorris93@comcast.net.

Bus trip to Nashville Senior Center trips

Nanticoke Senior Center’s Nashville and Memphis trip will take place on Sunday, Sept. 14 to Saturday Sept. 20. Cost is $850 double occupancy. Some of the sights you will see are Graceland, Grand Olé Opry, and Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum. For information call 6294939. Trip includes motor coach transportation, tip for bus driver, snacks from center and dinner theatre.

Travel with Delaware Tech Make friends and have fun traveling with trips offered by Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus,

Seaford will host a trip to Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 13-17. Cost of $799 per person/double occupancy includes lodging at the Opryland Hotel, performance of Radio City’s “Christmas Spectacular” featuring world-famous Rockettes, Fantasy in Ice, holiday dinner show featuring Louise Mandrell, most meals, motorcoach transportation and much more. For more information call Frances Horner at 629-4416.

Bus Trip to N.Y. City

Bus trip to N.Y. City, Saturday, Oct 25, to the American Museum of Natural History to visit “The Horse” exhibit. Fee is $65/person includes bus fare and admission to the Exhibit. Reservations must be paid and

received by Monday, Sept 1. Bus will board approx 7 a.m. in the Sears parking lot at the Dover Mall. Call Mary Everhart 302-6590460, or Paula Barto 629-5233, or visit website www.delawarequinecouncil.org

Seaford AARP trips

Money has to be paid in time to make reservations for all trips. • Oct. 13-16 - New Hampshire White Mountains for 4 days. Stay in Laconia, N.H. at the Margate Resort Hotel with seven meals included. Cost is $650 per person, double occupancy. Visit Franconia Notch State Park, Chutter’s Store, Sugar Hill Sampler, Harman’s Cheese & Country Store, Hampton Pewter, and more. Have a five course dinner served aboard the Café Lafayette Dinner Train during your two hour ride! Then ride the Lake Winnipesaukee Scenic Railroad before taking a cruise on a 230’ ship across Lake Winnipesaukee. • Nov. 19 - Rainbow Dinner Theater in Pennsylvania to see the comedy: “Deck The Halls And Clean The Kitchen.” Cost: $65. Bus leaves Seaford Peebles parking lot at 7:30 a.m. • Dec. 5 - The American Music Theater to see “Christmas Show.” Cost is $65. Enjoy holiday songs and comedy sketches. Also an appearance of Santa. We will also have time to Christmas shop at the Rockvale Outlets and have lunch on your own before going to the theater. Must sign up now. Contact Rose Wheaton at 6297180 for more information on these trips.

AARP Chapter #915 trips

• Branson, Mo - Sept. 13-20, cost is $875 per person. Call 410-822-2314. • New England/Vermont, NH, Boston and Salem, Oct. 13-19, cost is $1085 double, and $1335 single. Call 410-673-7856. • Myrtle Beach - Nov. 10-13, cost $430 per person. Call 410754-8588.

Trip to Radio City

Seaford Recreation’s 17th annual Radio City Christmas Spectacular is set for Sunday, Dec. 7, and is now taking registrations. The cost is $145 and the seats are in the orchestra section. The cost includes a charter bus and there will be a few hours after the show to shop and tour NYC. Call 629-6809 for more information or to sign up. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications - PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

SUDOKU

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle! Answers on Page 51


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 21

‘School days, school days, dear old golden rule days’ Here we are, another summer almost gone and school will be AT URPHY starting very soon, except for those students in Seaford who attend the year-around school program. Those Laurel is starting with a new superintendent this students started classes in mid-August. I am amazed at the huge fall, Dr. John McCoy. He is backpacks the kids of today have going to be a great ento have, and they are full of a little courager. I see great bit of everything. things in the future for School for my generation tradiLaurel School. tionally started right after Labor Day. After many years of thinking about it, I have come to realize Bata Shoes and many more businesses what an earlier generation told me, that were featured in the ads on these historic our school days are “some of the best days school pieces of memorabilia. of our lives.” One final thought on this that seems to Let your mind drift back now: be a great memory for us all. Do we realRemember when Mom and Dad took ize how big a role our teachers played in you for a new pair of school shoes and our lives? Those then and now, who take maybe a couple of pairs of pants and a few the time to offer encouragement and make shirts? Gosh, we were the “cat’s meow” something of all their students, make a difthat first day of school. Sadly, everyone ference and history has shown that those did not get something new and it was part who receive encouragement in life do of the social ladder we started climbing at much better. I challenge all the local teachan early age. ers to continue to give their time to all In a meeting the other day, Daniel those who especially need their help. Richardson had one of those old 5-cent Laurel is starting with a new superinerasers. Haven’t seen one in years but I tendent this fall, Dr. John McCoy. He is can envision the various makers of them going to be a great encourager. I see great clearly, can’t you? things in the future for Laurel School. Ah, a three-ring notebook, a tablet, several pencils and off to school we went. The Laurel Chamber of Commerce is First few days we spent putting those old now open in its new office on East Market book covers on our books to preserve Street. Hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday them for next year’s students. Holsum or through Friday. The chamber has some Sweetheart bread, Sussex Trust, Carey’s, things planned for the fall, including a

P

M

possible business seminar and the Business Person and Citizen of the Year celebrations.

scouting, says it would take more of a project than that for a scout to get his Eagle designation.

The start of football season for the high schools is only a couple of weeks away. For the Bulldogs, I’m going to give you a couple of reasons to come out and see them. If he gets some help from his blockers, I look for senior fullback Tyler West to gain a lot of yardage, as well as receiver David Albert, who made some tremendous catches last year. As for me, for the first time in 10 years I will not be doing full sports stories. That means I won’t be walking the sidelines with Johnny Rogers, Blair Boyce, Kay Baynum and of course our funny man Jeff Shields. I really had fun with this but I made up my mind after last season that it was time to move on. Oh yeah, I’ll be around. Good luck to all the local sports teams and especially to my favorite, the Bulldogs, and thanks to some great coaches, who helped me with my stories with their cooperation, even though they had better things to do than talk to me.

Got a little repair job for your vehicle? Call Al “Stickem” Bozman of Delmar. It seems that Al broke his headlight switch off the other night. “All right, I’ll fix you big boy,” he said as he pulled out the Super Glue and glued the switch so his headlights stayed on. Friday morning, Al was seen seeking advice from the round table on how to get his headlights turned off. Needless to say he didn’t get much help from that group.

They finally got the roadwork completed at Five Points in Laurel. Now if we can only get DelDOT to cut the grass on the island that was created at the end of Brooklyn Avenue and Central Avenue. Someone suggested to me that someone could put wildflowers in there and maybe a potential Eagle Scout would see it as a project. Jim Bradley, a well-known man in

Art Linkletter said, “Kids say the funniest things, but Yankee fans do the funniest things,” or something like that. Now we turn to the packing shed at the Laurel Auction Market, where some of the shining stars of Laurel have been found during July and August of each year. My understanding is that the late Painter Phillips worked there many years ago and then Alton Baker worked there for more than 30 years. In the last few years, the arms of that old restful recliner that sits in the shed have been worn out by Gary Ward, Dick and Bob Whaley, too. Olan Matthews, or “Matty,” as they call him in Delmar, is now one of the legendary hard workers at the packing shed and he fell into that chair, I mean job, very easily. A packing shed with a recliner — now that’s job benefits. Have a good week, everyone.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Church Bulletins St. John’s multicultural services

Siempre Verde, a multicultural, bilingual service is being led by Pastor Luis Almandoz on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall at St. John’s United Methodist Church at Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford. Praise music, powerful preaching and a small meal unite this fellowship of persons of both Hispanic and Anglo origins. Alberto Mendez leads worship on the keyboard.

Ladies’ bible study

There is a ladies’ bible study, held every Tuesday starting at 10 a.m., at Laurel Baptist Church, Bi-State Boulevard in Laurel. This bible study is a non-denominational study, only God’s word is studied, making us to be more like Christ. Should you have any questions regarding the study, feel free to call Gertrude R. Smith at 875-5300.

The Lighthouse

Rising gas prices, wars and rumors of wars, rising food prices, it’s all so frightening. Come join Rebecca Jones as she presents “God’s Deliverance and Provision,” Wednesdays at 7 p.m., at The Lighthouse Church, 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel. Find out how the Bible can show you how to live and face hardships today. Pastor Timothy Jones provides kid’s church for grades K-6, and a nursery is available. Call 875-7814.

Celebrate Recovery

Celebrate Recovery, a step program which claims Jesus Christ as its higher

power, is meeting at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar streets, on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 p.m. This program is open to persons who wish to turn over their hurts, habits, and hang-ups to God such that they may be healed. For more information, call Rev. Constance Hastings, 629-9466, or Robert Spadaccini, 841-1720.

Seaford Wesleyan hosts youth rally

“Freedom, Fire, Love Youth Rally” will be held Friday, Aug. 22, from 5:30 to 10 p.m., at Seaford Wesleyan Church. Cost is $3. The speaker is a former U.F.C. wrestler named J.J. and we will also have live music from the Ben Spear band.

Bethel Worship Center VBS

Bethel Worship Center would like to welcome children ages 3 to 12 to join us for The Incredible Race on Saturday, Aug. 23, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. at 28604 Deer Lane (Woodland Ferry Road), Seaford, (home of Phyllis & Byard Layton). They will prepare for the all-important race of life, fill their tanks with God’s word, tune up their engines, sing trackside praises, enjoy pit-stop snacks, see real race cars, tour race haulers and swim in the pool! Reserve you racers’ position today. Call Paula Holston at 875-8191, or Tammy LeCates @ (302) 542-2520 to pre-register by Aug. 20.

Church hosts dinner and a movie Church of God & Saints of Christ presents dinner and a movie, at 10016

Concord Road, Seaford, on Aug. 24. Doors open at 3 and movie starts at 3:30 p.m. The movie title is “The Great Debaters,” starring Denzel Washington. Donation is $10. For more information call Robert Brown, 628-3903 or Phyllis Grice 629-2124.

Delmar Church of God sale

A sandwich sale will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30, from 9 a.m. until…, at the Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, Rt. 13 North and Dorothy Road (3 miles north of MD/DE state line). It will feature: oyster, crab cake, soft crab, chicken salad sandwiches, cheese steak subs, hamburgers, hot dogs. Baked goods and yard sale will also be available.

Old Christ Church schedule

Sept. 7 - 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist Sept. 14, 21, 28 - 9:30 a.m., morning prayer Oct. 7 - 10 a.m., blessing of the animals, morning prayer

No Name Band at Union UMC

The No Name Band will be at Union United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall, Laws Street, Bridgeville, on Friday, Aug. 22, at 7:30 p.m. For further information, contact Everett Warrington at 337-7198.

Dinner fundraiser

On Saturday, Aug. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Booker Street Church of God will be selling chicken, fish or ribs dinners at

the House of Ruth, 19422 County Seat Highway, Georgetown, to benefit its building fund. Dinners are $7 for chicken and $7.50 for fish or ribs and comes with two side vegetables, yams and a roll. Side orders of dumplings, cakes and pies are also available at extra cost. For more information or to order, call 684-4542, 249-3138, 856-3530 or 8563404.

A night of gospel music

“Victory Junction,” where God and music meet, Joe Dawson Music Ministry will host a night of gospel music, Aug. 23, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Millsboro VFW, across from Car City, next to Arbys in Millsboro. Guests are: Shelly Erskine, Jimmy Holston and “Pink Grass.” Speaker will be Mark Erskine. For more information call 934-6995.

Mt. Olivet Church Preschool

There is still time to register your child for Mt. Olivet Church Preschool. Classes for three and four-year-olds start Tuesday, Aug. 26 and continue Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 9-11:30 a.m. Call the church office at 629-4458 or Linda Stephenson at 629-2786. New this year is our fundraising effort in cooperation with Schwan’s Frozen Foods. Their truck will be in the Mt. Olivet Church parking lot on Saturday, Sept. 13 from 7:30 a.m. A portion of the sales will benefit the Preschool. Stop by the church for a catalog at 315 High St., Seaford.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, D el. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church

Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net

NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary) Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S .C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker WorshipS ervices: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Pastor www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road6 8, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Ninety & Nine meets

The Ninety & Nine extends an invitation to all women to join them for their quarterly dinner meeting at The Cannon Mennonite Church in Bridgeville, on Monday evening, Sept. 8, at 6:30 p.m. The Ninety & Nine is a ministry, which was formed in 1984 by a group of women who care about the needs of others. If you would like a night out full of fun, food, fellowship and lots of encouragement, then The Ninety & Nine is the place for you. There are no membership dues to pay. We welcome your presence. Special speaker for the evening The special speaker for the evening is Diana Weber. Diana, her husband, Andrew, and their three children live in Clarksville. She graduated with a B.S. in communication and public relations from James Madison University and received her masters in education in Counseling from Virginia Tech. She has worked in the field of public relations and advertising, provided crisis counseling to teens as a therapist, worked as a middle school guidance counselor, and has held an adjunct faculty member position, having taught behavioral research at DT&CC. She will be sharing her testimony of freedom through deliverance from fear, and insights from the book of Revelation to encourage our audience to be on fire for Jesus. All are welcome. Register now to hear Diana’s inspiring message. Singer for the evening Judy Laramore, and her husband, Donald, live in Denton, Md. She began singing as a very young child and started singing in other churches when she was 11 years old. She formed a singing group, “Hearts Afire,” when she was 22 and for 10 years traveled the entire coast, east of the Mississippi River, from Canada to Florida. She recently released her 16th recording project, which includes songs she has written. Her home church is Faith Fellowship in Preston, Md., where she is a Sunday School teacher, worship leader, and soloist. Come, bring a friend and plan to be blessed! Reservations are necessary. Deadline is Sept. 2. For details or more information call: Joyce Thomas at 302-629-2248, Michele Thompson at 302-877-0797, or

PAGE 23

Arvalene Moore at 302-875-4387. Don’t forget that we are now meeting at the Cannon Mennonite Church. Our first meeting there in June proved to be very successful as the ladies at the church were very accommodating, and the meal served was delicious. Directions: The Cannon Mennonite Church is located on Route 18 West. Going north on Rt. 13, go to the next stop light past Wal-Mart in Seaford, which is only a few miles. Turn left at I.G. Burton (formerly Chambers Motors) and Cannon Mennonite Church is located on the left approximately one mile. Enter church by side door.

Gospel music at Georgetown Circle Jerry and Jeannie Jones invite you to join them at the Circle in Georgetown, on Friday, Sept. 5, at 7:30 p.m., for an evening of Gospel Music in the Circle. There will be no charge or love offering for this concert. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy the evening. For further info call 302-2284813.

Free community luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a FREE Community Luncheon (chicken / dumplings), on Sept. 20, noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, approximately 2 miles south of town. For any further information, call Shirley at 875-2314.

Delaware Right to Life banquet

Delaware Right to Life annual banquet will be held on Thursday, Sept. 25, and will feature Operation Rescue founder, Randall Terry. Randall is a dynamic speaker and has devoted his life to the pro-life cause. He has been arrested over 40 times for his peaceful, pro-life activities. In 2003, he founded the Society for Truth and Justice and he conducted a program called Operation Witness. Most recently Randall published the book, “A Humble Plea,” written primarily to Catholic bishops and clergy on how to end the abortion holocaust. The banquet will take place at the Christiana Hilton in Newark. Tickets are $50 per person. Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., dinner begins at 7 p.m., followed by the keynote speaker. Contact prolifedela-ware@juno.com or call 302-478-5469 for tickets.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Tony Windsor’s brand new Gospel CD compilation is on sale now. Tony sings songs of faith and inspiration including “The Angels Cried,” “Everlasting Arms,” “I Saw the Light” and much more. Get your copy at the Star office for only $6.00 [includes $1.00 donation to NIE (Newspapers in Education) program].

Call: 302-236-9886

Besid e the StillW aters

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Church School -All Ages - 9:15 a.m. Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Rev. Rick Elzey Wings of Prayer - Tues. 7:00 p.m. Come Join Our Family

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church

22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward J. Laremore, Sr. Pastor David A. Krilov, Associate Pastor

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755 Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:30 AM • Sunday School 9:30 AM • Traditional Worship 11 AM

ROCK CHURCH

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

30320 Seaford Road, Laurel, Del. Ph: 875-7275 • Pastor Bill Konkel Sunday School: 9a .m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. & 1st & 3rd Sunday Evening: 5 p.m. Thurs Evening Prayer: 7p .m.

COKESBURY CHURCH

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

T on y W in d sor

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302- 875-4646

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

Mount Olivet

New Gospel CD: ‘Beside the Still Waters’

Messiah’sV ineyard Church

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Thurs.W KID, The Zone Children’s Ministries6:30 Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’sP astor:M arilyn Searcey

629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Obituaries

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

Richard S. Parsons, Sr., 74 Richard S. “Dick” Parsons, Sr. of Seaford died Thursday, Aug 14, 2008, at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford. He was born July 26, 1934 in Salisbury, a son of Herman Mitchell Parsons and Virginia Irene Taylor Parsons, who preRichard Parsons deceased him. Mr. Parsons proudly served his country in the U.S. Navy during the Korean Conflict. He enjoyed working for 42 years as a master electrician for Service Today, where he considered his supervisors and co-workers his second family. When not working, he stayed busy fixing things for his family and friends, and traveling with his wife, Sam. He is survived by his beloved wife of 43 years, Sam Parsons; a son, Richard S. Parsons, Jr. and his children, Crystal Lynn and Michelle; a daughter, Linda S. Roberts and her children, Kristin and Scott; a daughter, Nita Naugle and her daughter Jennifer; a daughter Debbie Taylor and her children, Elaine and Dennis; a daughter, Ellen Jo Moore and her children, David, Shannon and Kevin; a daughter, Yvonne Davison and her children, Jerry Lee and ‘Lil Roy; a son, Tony Enfield and his wife Sherry, and their children, Monique, Brittany and David; a son, Thomas W. Parsons and his wife Lisa, and their children, Brittany, Caroline, Andrew and Ethan; a daughter, Tammy Bowman and her husband, Tom and their children, Dale, Rikki, TJ, Jamie and Samantha; and a son, Billy Parsons and his wife, Heather, and their children, Barry and Nash. He is also survived by 23 great-grandchildren.

He is also survived by a sister, Eva Dickerson; special friends, Ed and Judy Collier, Dale Dean, and many nieces and nephews. A graveside memorial service with military honors was held on Monday, Aug. 18, at Springhill Memory Gardens near Hebron. Mr. Ed Collier officiated. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to: Delaware Hospice, 20167 Office Circle, Georgetown, DE 19947. Arrangements were handled by Short Funeral Home, Delmar.

Winnie M. Holden, 71 Winnie M. Holden died on Sunday, Aug. 10, 2008 in Virginia. She was born on Aug. 13, 1936, the daughter of Eva Taylor. She was a sales clerk for many years at J.C. Penny Department Store in Queens, N.Y. She is survived by her husband, Fred Whittington of Norfolk, Va., three cousins, Robert Williams, of Sanford, Fla., Lorraine Howard of Norfolk, Va. and Juanita Camper of Wilmington, and a host of other cousins, nieces and nephews. A graveside service is Thursday, Aug. 21, at 1 p.m., at Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Laurel. The Rev. Keith Wongus will officiate. To share memories with the family visit www.framptom.com. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Steven J. Murphy, and Kenneth Murphy and a sister, Gail Myers. Memorial Services were on Monday, Aug. 18, at the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford where friends called prior to the services.

Norman C. Webb, age 83 Norman C. Webb of Seaford passed away on Aug. 14, 2008, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. He was born and raised in Whitesville, a son of Ryon C. and Ethel Baker Webb, who predeceased him. Norman retired as a poultry farmer. He loved listening to country music and was a blue grass guitarist with his many friends. He is survived by his wife of 28 years, Annabelle Taylor Webb of Seaford; his stepson, James Littleton and his wife Janice of Laurel; his brother, Robert T. Webb and his wife Shirley of Whitesville. Also surviving are his granddaughter, Carrie Steelman of Seaford; a nephew, Jeff Webb, and a niece, Jan Otwell, both of Laurel. A funeral service was held at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel on Monday, Aug. 18, where friends and family called prior to the service. Interment followed in Line Cemetery in Delmar. The Rev. Donald Murray officiated.

George Wayne Haass, Sr., 69 George “Wayne” Haass, Sr., of Greenwood passed away on Aug. 15, 2008, at his home in Greenwood. He was born in Milford, a son of George and Irene Haass, who predeceased him.

Paul M. Murphy, 52 Paul M. Murphy of Seaford died on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2008, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Paul was the son of Betty Joines and the late John Ray Murphy. He is also survived by his wife Susan McElroy Murphy, a son Zachary Paul Murphy, a daughter Tara Lynn Murphy, three brothers, John R. Murphy Jr,

The Circle Will Be Mended In Heaven. We Miss You Baby Girl Love, Mommy & Daddy, Mom-Mom Jackie & Pop-Pop Chuck, G Mom-Mom Anne & G Pop-Pop John, GG Mom-Mom Peggy & GG Pop-Pop Lee, GG Pop-Pop Arthur “And the dead in Christ will rise first. Then we who are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And thus we shall always be with the Lord.” 1 Thess 4:16-17

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 HandicapF riendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

In addition to his parents he is also preceded in death by a great grandson. George, or Wayne as he was known as a young man, proudly served his country in the U.S. Navy and for most of his life, worked in sales. His family will remember him for his enjoyment of saltwater fishing, taking photographs and sitting at Spencer’s Bazaar. He was an avid Philadelphia Eagles fan. He dearly loved his family, life, and made every day count. He is survived by his wife Pamela J. Haass of Greenwood; his stepmother, Barbara Haass of Annapolis; his sons: Richard Haass of Camden, Ron Haass of Dover, Carl Haass of Union Bridge, Md. and George W. Haass, Jr. of Smyrna. His daughters: Donna Nicodemus of Boonsboro, Md. and Irene Bienick of Pennsylvania; a brother, Ron Haass of Newark; his sisters: Barbara Spruill of Camden, Cyndi Haass of Tennessee, and a stepsister, Julie of Annapolis. His grandchildren: Jennifer, Meg, Sara, Victoria, Patty, Christina, Amber, Stephanie, Kimberly, Sarah, Vincent, Richard, Gage, and Patrick. Three great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews also survive him as well as his special girls, Goldie, Sadie, and Ginger. A funeral service was held at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel, Aug. 19, where friends and family called prior to the service. The Rev. Wayne Musgrove officiated. Interment was in Delaware Memorial Veterans Cemetery in Millsboro, where he received Full Military Honors. Online condolences can be made by visiting www.delmarvaobits.com.

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701B ridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 25

CHURCH SCHOOL STORE - Laurel Baptist Church and Grace Baptist Church of Seaford, in collaboration with Baptist Families & Children’s Ministry held a “School store,” Aug. 2, to benefit needy families with backpacks filled with the necessary supplies for the return to school. Each child brought a canned item or $1 to receive his/her backpack. Case manager, Kathy Maloney, said that 69 book-bags with supplies were distributed. Pictured are Marcella Snyder, the Rev. Steve Booth, Gertrude Smith, Kathy Maloney.

In the back row from left are Breanna Burkett, Khadijha Robinson, Ajee Robins, Siane Cannon, Veronte Kenney, Janay Robins, Breona Kellam, Y’esa McCray and April Hayes. In the front row are Dae’shjah Everett, Shai Kenney, Kenya Wynder, Shekevia Everett and Y’nez McCray.

Kids enjoy Salvation Army camp Thirteen young people recently returned from The Salvation Army’s Camp Ladore in Waymart, Pa. after a week of musicamp on July 11-19 with Envoys Chas and Debbie Engel of Seaford. Four of the young people received awards. April Hayes, 15, of Federalsburg, Md., received top award in voice class; Khadijha Robinson, 11, of Seaford, received top award in Ladore Learners Band; Y’nez McCray, 9, of Seaford, received top award in Music Makers percussion; and Dae’shjah Everett, 8, of Bridgeville, received top award in Music Makers voice. Veronte Kenney, 12 of Seaford, won the first annual Wanda Dochtermann Camp Scholarship. The late Mrs. Dochtermann was a Seaford resident who

cared deeply about The Salvation Army. Many of these young people began private group music lessons at The Salvation Army in Seaford to continue their music and arts instruction received at camp. Breanna Burkett, 15, of Seaford, returned from Camp Ladore with the rest of the group after four weeks of attending both teen camp and being part of D.A.R.T. (Discipleship and Responsibility Training). Breanna enjoyed her first work experience on kitchen staff at Camp Ladore and the leadership/discipleship training she received. For more information about The Salvation Army of Sussex County, located next to Food Lion on North Dual Highway, call Envoys Chas and Debbie Engel at 302-628-2020.

Food Closet seeks donations The Seaford Community Food Closet, which is housed at St. John's United Methodist Church, is in critical need of donations. Historically, donations are high during the fall and winter months. However, this summer there have been an unusually high number of requests due to a strained economy. All donations of canned and packaged food are needed as long as the food is not near nor has passed its expiration date. Monetary donations are also welcome. Donations may be dropped off at St. John's Church office, located on Pine Street, Seaford, from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The Seaford Community Food Closet serves persons who are referred through social agencies such as the Shipley State Service Center. Volunteers distribute food to clients who have been screened for elegibility by

the agency. To volunteer or for more information, call St. John's at 629-9466.

InL oving Memory Of John (Tom) Murphy who passed away August 24th, 1998. Ten years have passed and we miss you more every day. Sadly missed by wife Dot Murphy, Sons and Family Pat, Kay, Jerry, Marsha Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren

Pictured are Ashlley Tomblin, Bonnie Von Thenen, Marcella Snyder, Shirley Manning, Angela, (child in front, Tiffany), Laureen Ashbridge, Marcheta Bradham, Mary Swanson, Kathy Maloney, Shawn Reyes (hidden), Gertrude Smith, Crystal Messick, Donna O’Neal, Ruth Partin, Kathy Everline, Lucy Webster.

Tommy Jones and his family wish to express their sincere gratitude to all of those who have supported them during his recent illness. We are so touched by all the people that have helped us in so many ways through this difficult time. Your visits, donations, food, phone calls, prayers, cards, and most of all LOVE have given us the strength to carry on. We would like to extend a special thank you to the members of the Greenwood Volunteer Fire Company and Ladies Auxiliary,G reenwood VFW Ladies Auxiliary, Eagle 97.7 Del-A-Wish, the persons responsible for orchestrating the Basket Bingo, and all those that supported the fund raisers in any way. Your kindness and support will always be remembered. With love and appreciation to all… TOMMY & ROBIN JONES ANDF AMILY


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Homely, sometimes bitter, the eggplant can be quite delicious The Practical Gourmet

Oncology symposium planned for Rehoboth The sixth annual Seaside Oncology Symposium will take place Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Boardwalk Plaza Hotel in Rehoboth Beach. The Tunnell Cancer Center and the Medical Society of Delaware sponsor this annual, half-day symposium to update participants on the diagnosis and management of cancer. It is designed for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The conference, which begins at 7:30 a.m. and ends with lunch at 1 p.m., is

planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint-sponsorship of the Medical Society of Delaware and Beebe Medical Center. The Seaside Oncology Symposium is supported by unrestricted educational grants from various pharmaceutical companies and programs. Hotel reservations may be made directly with the Boardwalk Plaza at 800-3323224.

Volunteers needed to help with bike ride The Delaware chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society needs volunteers to help organize and run the 2008 Bike MS: NRG Energy Indian River Power Plant Bike to the Bay. Participants cycle 45 miles, 75 or 150 miles from Dover to Rehoboth and back over two days to raise money for multiple sclerosis. Taking place on Sept. 27 and 28, the annual fundraiser attracts more than 1,600 cyclists who ride across Kent and Sussex counties. More than 200 volunteers are needed to

register cyclists; set up rest stops and man them throughout the ride weekend; monitor the route; clean up; hand out rider numbers, t-shirts, goodies and information packets; load and unload the equipment truck; prepare and serve breakfast, lunch and dinner; distribute information packets; direct traffic; and provide logistical and clerical support. To volunteer, contact Volunteer Coordinator Jenna Wagner at 302-655-5610, or email her at jenna.wagner@MS delaware.org.

FLOWER Never Underestimate

POWER The Power of Flowers

For any reason, flowers say E T A R much. We’re the area’s leading CELEB ER sofull-service flower and gift shop. M SUM Sprays • Bouquets • Special Arrangements Sympathy Arrangements • Plants

JOHN’S FOUR SEASON’S Flowers & Gifts Stein Hwy. at Reliance, 302

629-2644

John Beauchamp

410

754-5835

WE DELIVER

Eggplant, La Tavernetta Style Serves 2 to 4 2 pounds eggplant of any variety, the smallest you can find 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil Salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, slivered 12 good cherry tomatoes, halved, or a couple plum or medium-size regular tomatoes, cored and chopped 1 cup roughly chopped basil leaves Cut eggplant into pieces about an inch or two long and no more than a half-inch wide; each piece should have a bit of skin and a bit of flesh. (If eggplant is small, cut them first in long strips, then cut them crosswise. If large, you may end up discarding or reserving the fleshy, seedy center.) Put 1/3 cup oil in a skillet over medium heat; a minute later add eggplant. Cook, stirring occasionally, and seasoning with salt and pepper until very soft, about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, put remaining oil in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Add garlic and cook until it colors slightly. Add tomatoes and about 2/3 of the basil, raise heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture is saucy, about 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. When both sauce and eggplant are done, combine them. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature, or over pasta, garnished with remaining basil. Cold Eggplant Salad with Sesame Dressing Serves 4 4 to 6 small to medium eggplants, or 1 large one, about 1 1/2 pounds Salt 1 tablespoon sesame seeds 2 tablespoons soy sauce, or to taste 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon sugar Trim eggplant and cut into cubes of 1/2 to 1 inch. If using large eggplant, sprinkle with salt, put in a colander, and let sit at least 30 minutes, preferably an hour.

Rinse. Boil large pot of water. Blanch eggplant in boiling water 2 minutes, no more. It will become just tender. Drain in colander as you would pasta. Toast sesame seeds in small dry skillet over medium heat, shaking frequently until they color slightly. Dry eggplant with paper towels. Combine remaining ingredients and toss with eggplant and sesame seeds in bowl. Serve at room temperature, or refrigerate until ready to serve. Covered well, the salad will remain flavorful for a day. Fish Steamed over Vegetables and Fresh Herbs Serves 4 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 large onion, chopped 1 red bell pepper, cored and slices 2 medium zucchini, in 1-inch chunks 2 small eggplants, in 1-inch chunks Salt and pepper 2 medium tomatoes, cored and roughly chopped, with liquid 1 teaspoon fresh thyme or marjoram 1/2 cup good black olives, optional 1 and 1/2 pounds skinned fillets of red snapper, striped bass or other firm-fleshed fish 1/2 cup roughly chopped basil leaves Put 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet that can later be covered and turn heat to medium-high. Add garlic and, when it sizzles, onions and red bell pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Add zucchini, eggplant, salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until eggplant is fairly soft, 10 to 15 minutes. Add tomatoes, thyme or marjoram, and olives if you are using them and cook, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes begin to break up, 5 minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning. Sprinkle fish with salt and pepper and lay it on top of vegetables. Adjust heat so mixture simmers and cover. Cook 8 to 12 minutes, or until a thin-bladed knife inserted into fish at its thickest point meets little resistance. Remove fish to a plate, then stir basil into vegetables and spoon them around fish; drizzle with remaining oil (use a little more if you like) and serve.

CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS TODAY. DONʼT HESITATE! OLD Address

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Name: _________________________________________ Old Address: ____________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

NEW Address

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fabulous main dish. Food writer and author of the Minimalist cookbooks, Mark Bittman, offers opportunities for you to give it a fair chance.

MOVING?

If eggplant were a contestant on a reality show, I doubt it would be ORETTA NORR crowned “last veggie standing.” Its uninviting name and homely appearance alone might stop it in its tracks to stardom, but it’s more likely that because most of us have had the experience of biting into a mushy glob with a bitter taste, we’ve given it thumbs down. It’s really too bad because the humble fruit is so versatile and can be quite delicious if purchased fresh and given a good home. Newer varieties can be easier on the And yes, the eggplant, in the nightshade eggplant novice’s palate. They’re a lot less family and related to the tomato, is actual- bitter and can be used in recipes calling ly a fruit — a berry, to be exact! Eggfor their larger relations. The very narrow plants range in color from deep purple to Japanese or Asian eggplant is either solid white and in size from 2 to 12 inches. purple or a combination of light and dark We’re most familiar with the large pearshades and is tender and sweet; the Italian shaped variety with deep purple skin. With or baby eggplant looks like a miniature these, smaller and younger means less bitversion of the common variety, but has a ter. Salting eggplant slices and weighting more delicate, edible skin and flesh; the them down for 20 minutes or so before white eggplant has a tough skin, but a rinsing can revive an older specimen and firm, smooth flesh. reduce this bitter taste. Eggplant can be a wonderful side or a

Name: _________________________________________ New Address: ___________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

Mail to the Seaford/Laurel Star Circulation, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE or call Karen at 302-629-9788


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 27

Tearing apart the old structure to make way for the new Several weeks ago, I wrote that the only thing holding our old back YNN ARKS porch up was a memory. Well, that memory is fading, as the project to What my husband tore replace the enclosed porch with a out this weekend was not more substantial structure proceeds. even really a foundation. Slowly, methodically, we have Rather, it was a fake, a been taking the old porch down. system of bricks and conThat destruction process is finally crete slapped in to give coming to an end, as the only the impression of a founthings left of the original room are the framing and the siding. dation. Some time ago, my husband, with the help of our brother-in-law, series of brick pillars, and those original ripped out the ceiling and the floor. So that pillars are all that is left between it and the we could continue to walk through the earth. porch, my husband replaced the floor with With the sunlight pouring in, it is easy several pieces of plywood, fitted together to see that there is not much separating our like a jigsaw puzzle. I could see through living quarters from the great outdoors. the cracks of the plywood, but since the Virtually any animal, excluding perhaps an porch foundation was still in place there elephant or a hippopotamus, none of was not a lot of light in the crawlspace: which lives around here anyway, could What I could see was mostly darkness. crawl underneath what’s left of the back Now, the foundation is gone. Actually, porch. And if that animal was of a mind, it what my husband tore out this weekend could put shoulder to plywood and with was not even really a foundation. Rather, it one good heave-ho, have full access to the was a fake, a system of bricks and coninside. I open the kitchen door that leads crete slapped in to give the impression of a to the back porch very carefully now. foundation. The porch is really sitting on a

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While my husband was tearing out the faux foundation, I, given a crowbar for the task, was in charge of removing horizontal boards that, in lieu of plaster, made up the interior walls. I don’t know when these boards were put in, but they were secured to the studs by old-fashioned square nails. After I got the boards down and carried them outside, it was also my job to pound out the nails so that both board and nail can be used another day, a task I accomplished with little difficulty and no injury. Well, there was the time that my husband knelt down to show me how to handle a nail whose head was broken off and put his knee square on the sharp point of another nail. As there was no blood, I don’t feel the need to include that incident in my report. I reserved out of the collection bucket one nail, actually more like a spike, 3 inches long and a half inch thick at the top, as testament to my triumph. It is now propped up in the kitchen window, its working days over. This weekend, if all goes as planned, the whole porch structure, framing, siding and all, will come down. Then the reconstruction will begin, starting with a real concrete block foundation. Our goal is to

have the room nearly complete by the time our daughter and her husband make a planned visit in October, and finished, including the hanging of a painting of sunflowers they gave us last Christmas, when our son and his wife visit in December. I’m thinking about painting the walls mustard, or, in the parlance of Laura Ashley, cowslip. Bovines, beware! The floor, as I envision it, will be brown, the color of chocolate milk, and I hope to find just the right rug, with mustard and chocolate and with hints of the olive and sand that are on the kitchen walls. Throw in some tomato red and replace the sand with bologna, and I could be building a sandwich with a candy bar on the side. Which, Sunday morning by 11, I was ready for. Pulling off boards and pounding out nails is hard work and the sandwich I finally got, with cheese instead of bologna, was delicious. I’m guessing that the actual construction will be even more calorie burning. I’ve heard of people being so hungry they could eat nails. Well, I know where there’s a whole bucket full.

See a wild animal in your yard? It is probably best to leave it alone If you see a wild animal in your yard or neighborhood, what should you do? First and foremost, says the Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, don’t panic. Second, watch its behavior before determining if — or whom — you might need to call for assistance. “If you see a raccoon, skunk, fox or another wild animal in your yard, observe it quietly from a safe distance, preferably indoors, and keep children and pets away,” said Greg Moore, Wildlife Section administrator. “But do not, under any circumstances, attempt to touch, pet, handle or catch it. Wildlife is just that, wild, and we need to leave it to its natural state.” With Moore’s precautions in mind, people should understand that seeing wild animals in a suburban setting is not unusual. “Many neighborhoods, especially newer developments, are former wildlife habitat or border on natural areas,” Moore said. “Rabbits and squirrels are very common backyard visitors, but fox, skunk, raccoon, possum, groundhogs and even deer might also make an appearance in some areas. In most cases, animals will leave on their own.” To make your yard less appealing to

wild animals, trash, especially if it contains food waste, should be placed in tightly closed trash cans or kept indoors until close to pickup time. Don’t feed your pets or leave food for them outdoors, and don’t feed or encourage strays. Livestock feed and even birdfeeders can also attract some types of wildlife. Concerns about rabies should factor into dealing with wild animals. All warm-blooded mammals, including humans, are susceptible to rabies. Possible rabies symptoms to watch for fall into two categories: furious, in which the animal may be very aggressive, biting at the air and attacking without provocation; and dumb, in which the animal may appear withdrawn and sluggish. Animals with rabies may also be thin, sickly or have poor coats, although these symptoms can also be indicative of diseases other than rabies. An animal that may appear to be behaving strangely is not necessarily rabid. For example, not all animals are only out at dusk or during the night. Raccoons are typically most active in late twilight and early morning, but they may also be seen during the day, while red foxes are normally daytime feeders.

On average, the enforcement section of the Division of Fish and Wildlife receives about five to 10 animal nuisance complaints a day. Most are unfounded, Moore said, noting his agency does not respond to private property for removing, trapping or putting down wild animals. Unless a human has been bitten by an animal, Fish and Wildlife Enforcement provides callers with phone numbers of commercial pest control operators in their area. “If you have a raccoon nesting under your porch and you want it removed, you need to call a pest control company,” said James Graybeal, chief enforcement officer. He noted that these private sector operators are licensed by the Division of Fish and Wildlife and will charge for their services. In emergency situations in which the public’s safety is threatened, police agencies will respond to put down a dangerous animal. City, town or other municipal police have the authority to respond in their jurisdictions; in unincorporated areas, Delaware State Police or Fish and Wildlife Enforcement agents may be the responders. “We do not encourage private citizens to shoot animals, except in an emer-

gency situation where the animal aggressively poses a threat and there is no other help available,” said Graybeal. Also, shooting at animals in public areas is against the law and is best left to professionals, he added. If a human has been bitten by any wild animal, report the incident to the Division of Public Health’s rabies program. The program initiates an investigation and dispatches animal control officers to the scene when applicable. Statewide animal control officers will respond, and will put down or trap the animal. Anyone picking up a dead animal is advised to wear heavy gloves and wrap the animal securely in plastic for disposal or rabies testing purposes. To report a wild animal bite to the Department of Public Health, call the DPH rabies hotline at 302-744-4545. To contact Fish and Wildlife Enforcement, call 302-739-9913 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For natural resource-related complaints on nights and weekends, call 800-523-3336, toll-free. For general information on wildlife, call the DNREC Wildlife Section at 302739-9912.

Secondhand smoke contains at least 250 toxic chemicals—50 that can cause cancer. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Entertainment Broadkill River Canoe & Kayak Race returns to Milton Aug. 23 The popular Broadkill River Canoe & Kayak Race returns for its 9th year on Saturday, Aug. 23. The competition has become a staple event for the historic Town of Milton and one of the most enjoyable races in the MidAtlantic region. The competition benefits the Milton Theatre. While there are many contenders who want to score the fastest times and vie for the trophies and cash prizes, most participants come for a day of healthy exercise and friendly sport along the scenic Broadkill River. Official sign-in and registration begins at 8:30 a.m. at Oyster Rocks Road landing outside of Lewes. Racing begins at 10 a.m. Entry fees are $20 for a single canoe or kayak and $35 for a 2person canoe or kayak. There is

a women’s division in the single canoe and single kayak categories only. The 10-mile course follows the Broadkill River northwest to Milton’s Memorial Park, where food and craft vendors at the Town’s Bargain’s on the Broadkill will be set-up to greet and refresh paddlers. Every registered racer receives an official ’08 tee shirt. Paddlers must supply their own kayak or canoe; however, rentals can be pre-arranged by calling Quest Fitness at 302-644-7020. Van transportation from the finish point in Milton back to Oyster Rocks Road landing will be available at the end of the race and trophy ceremony. For more information or to pre-register for the race, call 302-684-3400 or visit www.miltontheatre.org.

Hispanic festival planned

mariachi band, traditional Mexican dances, music from the Andes and a Puerto Rican dance group. There will be a designated children’s area, coordinated by the Maranatha Church of God of Seaford, with information and activities for the whole family. The area includes a moonbounce, piùatas, games and information tables about social service agencies in Sussex County which target Hispanic families. To promote your business, inform the community of your services and reach thousands of Hispanic residents, visit www.elcentrocultural.org, email festivalhispano@hotmail.com or call 302-745-6828.

El Centro Cultural invites the public to attend Festival Hispano on Sunday, Aug. 24 in Millsboro from noon to 6 p.m. The free event will be held at the Little League Complex on State Street in Millsboro. Formed in 1995 to provide more artistic, cultural and social programs, El Centro Cultural plays an important role in discovering and promoting local Hispanic artists. Festival Hispano is a cultural celebration for Hispanic immigrants who have come to live and work in Sussex County. This year’s program features a marimba band,

The popular Broadkill River Canoe & Kayak Race, which benefits the Milton Theatre group, returns for its 9th year on Saturday, Aug. 23.

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Nanticoke Indians plan powwow The Nanticoke Indian Tribe has been hard at work to make sure that their 31st annual powwow is the best yet. The tribal chief, tribal council, program directors, committee chairpersons and volunteers invite everyone to the powwow where they will learn about the last 400 years of Nanticoke history and culture. The celebration will be held on Saturday, Sept. 6 and Sunday, Sept. 7, in the Longneck/Millsboro area with ample parking for visitors including school and tour buses and motorcycles. Tribal trams will be used to transport visitors from the parking area to the powwow site. About 40 tribal American Indian vendors will be on site with a variety of items for sale such as arts and crafts, clothing, jewelry, paintings, pottery, videos, DVDs, CDs, and much more. Food vendors will provide chicken, hotdogs, fries, fish, hamburgers, succotash, Indian tacos, Indian frybread and Pepsi products to drink. All day parking including the cost of admission is $8 per car; walk-in admission is $2 for adults and $1 for children; $5 for motorcycles; and $25 for buses plus $2 per person on the bus. Highway signs on Route 24, John J.

Williams Highway, between Route 1 in Rehoboth Beach and Route 113 in Millsboro will guide you to the parking area/powwow site. Attendees who are wheelchair bound or have motorized wheelchairs will enter the powwow grounds on Mount Joy Road and will be directed to the identified parking area where unloading and access to seating is convenient. Special seating for handicapped individuals will be available and monitored by powwow staff. The Grand Entry of flag bearers and American Indian dancers is Saturday at noon followed by a second dance session at 4 p.m. Sunday begins with an outdoor Worship Service at 10 a.m. and Grand Entry and dancing at 1:30 p.m. Except during Sunday Worship Service, seating is provided for powwow participants, dancers and handicapped individuals only. Bring your lawn chair and a friend. This event is family oriented so bring the children to enjoy native face painting and storytelling. For more information, call the Nanticoke Indian Center at 302-945-3400, the Nanticoke Museum at 302-945-7022, or email nanticok@verizon.net.

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One of the most important parts of the Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral on Labor Day is the Jazz Funeral Silent Auction, according to Jim McGinniss, associate chairman of the Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral. The Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral Silent Auction is Friday, Aug. 29 from 3 to 5 p.m. The auction benefits the American Cancer Society and their Relay for Life program. The 23rd annual Jazz Funeral is scheduled for Labor Day beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the north end of the Bethany Beach Boardwalk. At the Jazz Funeral, spectators join in a funeral procession of mourners, along with three Dixieland jazz bands, that carry a casket with a mannequin representing the “Summer of 2008” to its final resting place at the Boardwalk Bandstand. Entertainment for the Jazz Funeral and Silent Auction is provided by the Dixie Cats, the Downtown Dixieland Band, and the Jazz Funeral Irregulars, all known as New Orleans-style Dixieland Bands. Local businesses are encouraged to participate. “The number one most favored item for our silent auction is a gift certificate for goods or services,” McGinniss said. For more information, leave a message at 302-537-1585.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Letters to the Editor Global warming data questioned

The phrase “JDLR” is used by scientific (and police) investigators. It means it “Just Don’t Look Right.” When I first saw the global warming hysteria I decided to look at the data. It turned out to be one data curve published by the “IPPC,” the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The UN (with mostly US tax dollars) funded a university to produce some of the dumbest data I have ever seen, called the “Hockey Stick Curve.” The original curve, with the latest error revisions, is shown as chart A. It raises some serious questions: 1. The first problem with the data is that it is plotted on the “average global temperature” for the past 1,000 years, but the IPCC data is labeled as “Northern Hemisphere” data. How can you predict global climate change from only northern hemisphere information? JDLR. 2. The IPCC data follows a somewhat straight line average cooling for 900 years. Then the curve suddenly turns up like the blade of a hockey stick in the last 100 years, showing warming of 0.35, not quite back to the average global temperature. I superimposed the image of a real hockey stick on chart A to iullustrate. Most people have heard of “global warming,” but have never seen the data. How can temperatures starting below the global 1,000-year average, and never reaching that 1,000 year average, be called warming? JDLR. 3. Why would the temperature that starts out 0.2OO C below the global average, and drops for 900 years, suddenly climb back towards the average? One clue is printed on the IPCC chart: “1998 instrumental value.” So the Northern Hemisphere cooling is shown for the earth, but the instrumental value (thermometer readings) are taken in the cities, known “heat islands.” How can you interpret the rise of city heat islands as global warming? JDLR. 4. The average global temperature for 1,000 years, the basis for the UN IPCC

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net hockey stick curve in chart A, is actually the average of well-documented, historic temperatures shown in chart B, including the “Medieval Warm Period” (MWP) and the “Little Ice Age” (LIA. The area under the MWP and the recent thermometer readings, plus the area under the LIA curve produces the average global temperature used for the IPCC data. Why doesn’t the IPCC data include the MWP and LIA, the largest and best-documented climate changes in recorded history? JDLR. 5. The hockey stick data of chart A is superimposed on the historic data of chart B. Also shown on chart B is the industrial revolution, when manufacturing began to dominate the economy. With James Watt’s

invention of the steam engine the world moved from a 90% rural basis to 90% urban. He patented the steam locomotive in 1784. By 1814 locomotives hauled coal from mines, and in 1825 the first public railway was built. Factories surrounded cities, and the heat islands became hotter. Why didn’t the temperature data rise with the population and industrial growth? The answer is that few people had thermometers, and there was no way to collect temperature data. 6. The first significant temperature data increase began after 1920, when aviation grew, creating the need for airports. It was important to have airport weather information so airmail and passenger flights could check destination weather. Why does the temperature data rise rapidly between 1920 and 2000? The answer is that every airport had a weather station to record the temperature at the hot city heat island. Note that both the IPCC and the historic temperature curves on chart B rise rapidly when the FAA started supplying AWOS (Automated Weather Observing Systems) to airports. Thus thermometers faithfully recorded the temperatures of ever-growing airport traffic, with jet 2-foot-diameter tail pipe exhausts at 18000f as if airport temperatures covered the entire world! Another warming data factor is the closure of 125 U.S. and Russian arctic weather stations that were too expensive to staff and maintain. Obviously, if you remove the coldest information from the data base, the average temperature will increase. 7. Why do the temperature curves flatten in the 1970s? Answer: because satellites replaced ground thermometers. According to the National Center for Public Policy Research, “precise satellite readings have shown no warming since readings were begun 20 years ago. We have seen no sign of man-induced global warming at all.” 8. Yeah, but what about those starving Polar Bears on shrinking polar ice? Both Alaska and Canada have reported increasing Polar Bear populations. And according to a Geophysical Research study, “Mean ice thickness has remained on a near-constant level around the North Pole from 1986 to 1997.” Further, “Six different submarine cruises under the Arctic sea ice showed little variability, and a slight increasing trend.” Also, according to the American Meteorological Society’s Journal of Climate, “18 years of satellite data indicate the mean Antarctic (South Polar) sea ice edge has expanded by 0.011 degrees lattitude (about 3/4 of a mile) towards the equator each year.” JDLR. Conclusion: There always will be climate changes on the earth. The existence of huge pools of oil under the earth’s crust from pole to pole proves that most of the earth was once a tropical rain forest. Geological data shows the earth goes through complex 11,000-year cycles caused by our elliptical (non-circular) path around the sun, wobbling of the tilted earth’s axis, gravitation of both the sun and the moon, and changes in the sun’s heat emission during sunspot activity. All these factors far beyond any influence by man. Thus the global warming panic is a hoax being perpetrated by: A: Politicians with a hockey puck brain B: Greedy thieves trying to profit by scaring people

C: Foreign enemies trying to damage the American economy D: All of the above Jack Miller Seaford

Miller holds 136 US patents, 62 related to energy conservation. He studied meteorology and worked in the global weather and climatology forecasting center of the U.S. Strategic Air Command. As Supervisor of the Guidance and Control Design Group at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, he worked on everything from the first missile guidance systems to the first US satellites. And as Engineering Department Manager at Xerox Electro-Optical Systems, was responsible for the development and launching of 27 rocket payloads that measured radiation from the last hydrogen bomb tests in the ionosphere over the South Pacific. Miller invented the first energy-saving screw-in compact fluorescent lamps 30 years ago, and has the patents to prove it. Miller’s company, NoUVIR Research Co. in Seaford, has developed and manufactured energy-saving lighting systems for over 15 years, that have been certified as saving 50% to 70% of electrical energy.

Stickles supports John Carney

During the next four years local and county governments will have to deal with issues involving economic development, public safety, and land use. John Carney's recent involvement with the Bluewater Wind project is an example of the type of employment that will be created under his administration. John has always supported local fire and police departments. He recognizes that many volunteer firemen are first responders, supporting our professional police and paramedics. John Carney believes that land use decisions are best made at a local level, maintained with the proper infrastructure. During my 18 years as Sussex County Administrator, I worked with John on all of these issues. I truly believe that John is the candidate for governor with the most experience. Please vote for John Carney on September 9, 2008. Delaware will prosper under John Carney's leadership. Robert L. Stickels

Georgetown

Allens support Jack Markell

My wife and I support Jack Markell and his vision for a better Delaware, especially his goals for environmental and energy conservation. Jack sees the linkage between these issues and the other challenges that face our state and its long-term prosperity. He realizes that they all have to be addressed equally. There is no one solution. Surviving the challenges of the 21st Century requires that the next administration be proactive on all fronts. Our primary concerns involve environmental issues. Delaware is on track to meet its goal in 2019 of having 20% of our energy needs coming from renewable resources. Renewable energy is only one step in making Delaware sure it can reduce its carbon output. Mr. Markell wants to make sure that appliances used in the state are more efficient, building codes are updated to maximize energy efficiency,


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008 and standards are created for Delaware’s businesses and industries to reduce energy consumption. He would have the state partner with other sustainable and renewable energy firms to train contractors and maintenance workers in solar, wind, geothermal, and energy efficiency systems. There is no reason that Delaware homes must depend solely on oil or natural gas for winter heating and electricity production. Jack also intends to apply these renewable energy guidelines to all state-owned buildings hence reducing pollution and saving our state, and its taxpayers, money. Jack Markell declared his support of the Bluewater Wind offshore wind farm early-on. He realizes that this project is only a start but all long journeys start with the first step. This project is indicative of the dividends that all endeavors like this would bring to our state. It will produce renewable, clean energy, create jobs, preserve open space, and put Delaware, our “Small Wonder,” on-track to become a leader in this eco-friendly industry. In his “Blueprint For A Better Delaware” Jack makes several mentions of his love of the diversity of our state and its citizens. He wants to preserve and enhance what we Delawareans have for present and future generations from the farmlands of Sussex County, to the financial powerhouses in the hills of New Castle and all that lies in between. We believe that under Jack Markel’s administration Delaware would set a course to re-confirm its status as The First State, a “Small Wonder” that would be a place that we will all be proud to call home and the a state that would be seen as a progressive leader in meeting the challenges that face our magnificent country. Don & Linda Allen Seaford

Laurel should have done more

Laurel’s Town Council recently voted not to allow private water wells for lawn irrigation because of possible polution to the town’s drinking water supply. Georgetown, which allows private water wells, was just recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for Region 3. The town received the Source Water Protection Award. The winner was se-

lected from nominees from Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvnia, Virginia and West Virginia. The secret that Laurel overlooked: Georgetown adopted the state’s wellhead protection ordinance to protect sources of drinking water. The Sussex Country Council recently adopted the same ordinance. This ordinance mandates restrictions when putting in wells and eliminates potential contamination. Laurel should have put their effort into research instead of worrying how much revenue 500 new homes will be bringing into their coffers. Frank B. Calio

Laurel

Markell has defined his goals

It is not unordinary for candidates to offer new ideas when running for political office. In fact, a candidate would most likely become labeled as a “long shot,” if they did not present new goals as part of their platform. However, I believe a candidate should have far more than goals and ideas in order to be a successful leader. As a young voter, I am excited to cast my vote for someone who will lead our state in a new and exciting direction. Jack Markell is the only candidate in Delaware’s race for Governor who has more than just vague goals and predictable ideas. Markell offers solid plans for change, and step-by-step initiatives on how to take Delaware to the top. By releasing his policy book, Blueprint for a Better Delaware, Markell separates himself from the other gubernatorial candidates. He details bold proposals that will improve Delaware’s economy, education, and healthcare system. I believe Jack Markell is the best choice to lead Delaware; and I know he will serve all Delawareans to the best of his ability by focusing on what is most important—the critical issues that face our future. On September 9, 2008, I will be voting for the only candidate who truly has the set initiatives to improve our state. I will be voting for Jack Markell, and for Delaware’s sake, I hope you will join me. Billy Leonard

Harrington

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PAGE 31

Nation’s spirit reborn in the USS New York It seems the tone of most of today’s news is gloomy. How will EV ODD ROFFORD we get out of recession? Can we ever overcome racism? Why does The steel was melted our government seem so ineffectudown in a foundry in al and wasteful? Probing questions like these can Amite, LA, where even leave us both pessimistic and disthe burly metal-workers couraged. Maybe it’s time to rediscover the “can do” spirit of treated it with utter revAmerica — the optimistic belief erence. that if we put our minds to it, we can overcome anything. Someone sent me an email last 7.5 tons of steel extracted from the week that illustrated this spirit so well I corpse of the World Trade Center was made it the opening assignment of my used to create her bow, a symbol of Amerteenage daughter’s school year to write an ica’s strength and ability to not only suressay about the USS New York. The revive, but to thrive – her power to take mainder of this article is the essay of my something that the enemy would have la14-year-old daughter, Gabrielle. I hope it beled as ashes and turn it into something inspires you like it did me. revolutionary, something that will fight back. On September 12, 2009 the USS New Even the construction of the ship was York will be commissioned into military ceremonious. The steel was melted down service with the US Navy in New York in a foundry in Amite, LA, where even the City. She was constructed in honor of the burly metal-workers treated it with utter 8th anniversary of the fall of the Twin reverence. I think that the administrator of Towers in New York, a day that impacted the USS New York’s website (www.ussthe history of our country forever. Despite newyork.com) summed it up poetically the treacherous loss of life and the dewhen he said – “When you take metal struction of two of our country’s most from the World Trade Center and put in on amazing buildings, America has bonded a ship named New York, you are recycling like never before to heal the wounds inmore than steel – you are recycling emoflicted by those who would wish to terrortion. You take our worst day and turn it ize us. into our greatest warship.” The USS Arlington was named in honThe purpose as well as the motto of or of the men and women that lost their this amazing vessel is “Never Forget.” lives at the Pentagon, and incorporates Next September 12th, Americans from all part of its steel frame. The USS Somerset over the nation will gather in New York recognizes the brave passengers of Flight for the commissioning ceremony, where 93, who realized the “suicide mission” they will be invited to walk the decks of and successfully kept their aircraft from the USS New York, and together rememcrashing into another heavily populated ber the men and women whose lives were area and causing even more death. The lost at 9-11. It is true that when anyone’s drag-line from the field where they eyes happen to fall upon the bow of this crashed is used in the Somerset’s hull. But mighty ship, they will be reminded to even more amazing than these is what “never forget.” composes the USS New York.

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MORNING STAR • AuGuST 21 - 27, 2008

Health Your health plays a role in retirement planning This year the baby boomers will start turning 62. They will be looking at many factors to determine the right time to retire. Most of those factors will be financial in nature. However, their overall

health might be more important than they realize. Recently Frank Calio wrote a column for the Star about medical issues in retirement. That column pointed out the fact that health and health care are two items that have to be looked at.

Wilmington Trust Representatives Bob Siek (left) and Mike Gast (right), join Tom Brown (second from left), Nanticoke's Corporate Development vice president, and Mr. Mark Rappaport (second from right), Nanticoke's president and CEO, in preparation for Nanticoke Health Services' upcoming golf tournament.

Nanticoke plans golf tournament The twenty-second annual Nanticoke Health Services Golf Tournament is Friday, Sept. 5 at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. The day will consist of practice, lunch, 18-holes of golf, dinner and door prizes. A full field of participants is expected with a 12pm shotgun start and scramble format. Teams of four players will compete for various prizes that have been donated. During the course of the day, golfers will have chances to test their skills by competing in contests for Longest Drive, Closest-To-The-Pin, Hit-TheGreen and a Hole-In-One.

All participants will have the opportunity to putt through a three-step qualifying round. After dinner, three people will be putting for $2,500 each. Entry fees are $150 per player and $600 for a foursome. Sponsorships packages are available. Presenting sponsor is Wilmington Trust. Nanticoke Health Services hopes to raise over $35,000 from the tournament to help the hospital's charity endowment prescription fund, a special indigent fund for patients in need of assistance with the cost of their prescriptions. For reservations or sponsorship opportunities, contact the Nanticoke Health Services Development office at 302-6296611, ext. 2404.

There are two issues that need to two important considerations for that. be addressed. The first of those is the The first is that it is expensive. You will actual health of the individual and his/ need to budget for that as part of your her spouse. retirement planning. If both individuals are healthy, an The second is that it can only be early retirement will be a more enjoyused for three years maximum. Thereable one. fore, if one spouse works and the other If one of the two is does not, it would not very healthy, then really depend on both If both individuals are the type of lifestyle spouses’ ages. that is planned for reFor example, my tirement needs to take healthy, an early retirement wife will turn 62 five that into account. months after I do. If I will be a more enjoyable For example, if retire at 62, then she someone is going to be would only be able one. on dialysis three days to be insured until 5 a week, long vacations months before her 65th are not very likely. birthday. If someone is in congestive heart Someone whose spouse was several failure, monitoring diet becomes very years younger would have a longer important. Things like cruises would be period to worry about. difficult to do. The bottom line is that overall health, The second issue has to do with and insurance to provide for that health, health insurance. Medicare is not availneed to be almost as important as the able until age 65. If someone is in poor pure financial decision to retire. health, it might be important to work Like many things there are many facuntil Medicare age. tors to consider. Your nest egg is only If the plan is to use COBRA insurone of them. ance after retiring from a job, there are


MORNING STAR • AuGuST 21 - 27, 2008

Page 33

Health Briefs Bayhealth offers aging clinics

Bayhealth Medical Center will offer the Steps to Healthy Aging Clinics as an opportunity for you to meet one-on-one with a registered nurse from Bayhealth’s Education Department to confidentially monitor your blood pressure, pulse and weight, and to discuss any health topic of concern to you. Clinics will be held in Milford every Thursday from 9 to 11 a.m. in Room 206 on the second floor of the Grier Building adjacent to Milford Memorial Hospital. For more information, call Bayhealth’s Education Department at 302-744-7135 or toll-free at 1-877-453-7107.

Free cholesterol screenings

Bayhealth Medical Center offers free cholesterol screenings at the following locations: • First and fourth Tuesday of every month from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. at La Red Health Care at 505 W. Market St., Suite A, Georgetown • Third Wednesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. in Room 206 of the Grier Building at Milford Memorial Hospital • Second Wednesday of every month from 9 a.m. to noon at the Laurel State Service Center at 440 N. Poplar St. in Laurel Participants must register in advance, be uninsured or underinsured and answer some questions to see if they qualify. Appointments are required at some locations. Pre-registration is required. To learn if you qualify and to schedule appointments, contact Bayhealth’s Education Department at 302-744-7135 or toll-free at 1-877-453-7107.

DSAAPD offers free directory

Delaware Health and Social Services’ Division of Services for Aging and Adults with Physical Disabilities (DSAAPD) announces the availability of an updated edition of its Guide to Services for Persons with Disabilities in Delaware. The contents of the free, 168-page publication include a broad range of organizations and services for persons with disabilities - assistive technology and mobility, advocacy organizations, interpreters for the deaf, support groups, emergency response systems, insurance and health care programs, disability rights laws and more. In addition to English and Spanish editions, the publication is available on the state’s website, www.dhss.delaware. gov/dsaapd. Copies of the guide are available at the Milford State Service Center, 18 North Walnut Street, Milford. For more information, call 800-223-9074.

Low-cost mammograms

Bayhealth Medical Center offers lowcost mammograms every month. The low-cost mammograms are offered on the third Wednesday from 1 to 3 p.m. Local screenings are held at Bayhealth Women’s Center at Milford Memorial, 200 Kings Hwy., Suite 3, Milford. These screenings are made possible in part by the 2007 “Go Pink!” t-shirt fundraising campaign through the Bayhealth

Foundation. Pre-registration is required. For appointments and more information, contact Breast Care Coordinator Trisha Bentley at 302-744-6773.

Osteoporosis screenings offered

Bayhealth Medical Center offers free osteoporosis screenings. Osteoporosis is a disease causing bones to become fragile and more likely to break. Patients place their heel in a bone density scanner that checks the bone for early stages of osteoporosis. Screenings are offered from 9 to 11 a.m. on the third Wednesday of January, May and September at Milford Memorial Hospital Women’s Wellness Center. Pre-registration is required. To register, call Bayhealth’s Education Department at 302-744-7135 or toll-free at 1-877-453-7101.

Krause joins father’s practice

Dr. Jerry Krause announces that his son, Dr. Mark C. Krause, has joined Krause Pediatric & Orthodontic Dental Care. For over 30 years, Dr. Jerry Krause has been a leader in pediatric and orthodontic dental care in Salisbury, Md. Dr. Mark received his D.D.S. degree from Howard University College of Dentistry in 2006 and recently completed a twoyear residency program Krause at Eastman Dental Center, University of Rochester, New York. Dr. Mark’s residency program emphasized pediatric dental care and hospital dentistry. Dr. Mark is also taking additional training in orthodontics for the growing child. Dr. Mark grew up in the Salisbury area attending St. Francis de Sales School, Worcester Preparatory School, and received his B.S. in Biology from Salisbury University. Mark’s wife, Kara Williams Krause, is a graduate of Seaford Senior High School and a North Carolina State University alumnus. Krause Pediatric & Orthodontic Dental Care is welcoming new patients ages one to twenty-one. For more information, visit www.krausesmiles.com.

Hospice hosts first conference

Delaware Hospice, in partnership with the Delaware End-of-Life Coalition, the ARC of Delaware, and other community partners, is hosting the first comprehensive educational conference in Delaware that will address a broad spectrum of issues surrounding dying, death, and bereavement care for individuals with developmental disabilities, their caregivers and advocates. The conference will be held from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the Chase Center on the Riverfront, 800 S. Madison St., Wilmington. Early registration fee by Sept. 6 is $50; and $75 from Sept. 7. Registration for persons with disabilities and their caregivers is $25 by Sept. 6 and $35 from Sept. 7. The conference is designed for social workers, psychologists, nurses, bereavement counselors, hospice staff, nursing home staff, home health care providers, educators, volunteers, persons with disabilities and their families. For more

information and to register, visit www. aim2register.com or call 302-645-1490.

Caregiver support group

Join our monthly support group at the Cheer Community Center, the second Monday of each month at 11 a.m., 8549500.

This support group is for you, whether you are a new caregiver or have been taking care of a loved one for years. We are turning the “Fearless caregiver” book into a guide for our support group. Each month a chapter will be discussed, concerns shared and support given.

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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Police Journal Teen charged in two burglaries

A teenager was arrested recently after police reportedly caught him with items that were taken in two burglaries of area stores. Seaford Police received a call on Aug. 15 at approximately 1:45 p.m. informing them that the teen, a 15-year-old with a Blades address, was riding a stolen bike in the area of U.S. 13. Officers in the area spotted the teen on Chandler Street and attempted to get him to stop. The teen allegedly dropped the bike and fled on foot. He was apprehended after a brief foot pursuit by officers. Police said that the bike the teen was riding was stolen during a burglary of the Seaford Cycle shop on July 22. The teen also had with him property that was taken from the Athlete Shoe Store during a burglary on July 23, police said. After investigation by the Seaford Police Department Criminal Investigations Division, the teen was arrested and charged with two counts of third-degree burglary, two counts of possession of burglar tools, two counts of theft, two counts of criminal mischief and resisting arrest. He was taken to Justice of the Peace Court #4, where he was committed to the Department of Corrections Stevenson House in Milford in lieu of $6,500 secured bond, pending arraignment in Family Court at a later date.

Drug bust results in 16 arrests

On Friday, Aug. 15, Troop 4 Sussex Drug Unit concluded a two-month narcotics investigation into open air drug sales along Polly Branch Road in Selbyville. The investigation concluded with the execution of five search warrants at residences on Lincoln Avenue, two residences on Washington Avenue and two residences on Polly Branch Road. The operation consisted of two targeted initiatives: to seek out and apprehend subjects who were wanted on active narcotics warrants from this specific investigation and locate and apprehend subjects wanted on capiases and warrants not related specifically to this investigation. The drug unit was assisted by the Sussex Governors Task Force, the Troop 4 Property Squad, the Dewey Beach Police Department, Troop 7 patrol officers, Troop 5 patrol officers, the Kent County Drug Unit, the Troop 3 Governors Task Force, Probation and Parole, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Georgetown Police Department and Selbyville Police Department. During the execution of the search warrants, eight subjects were arrested on delivery of cocaine warrants. Five suspects are still at large. Also, during the warrant sweep, an additional seven defendants were apprehended and found to be in possession of marijuana, cocaine, drug paraphernalia or weapons, police said. These defendants were arrested on 16 narcotics and criminal charges. Probation and Parole, assisted by the Sussex Governors Task Force, executed two administrative searches during which time Bryant Giddens, who was wanted on a delivery of cocaine warrant, was appre-

hended. During an administrative search of Jeremie Handy’s residence, a shotgun and rifle were seized, police said. Probation and Parole conducted four curfew checks in the Selbyville area. The following were seized during this initiative: crack cocaine, marijuana, a 12 gauge shotgun, a .22 Marlin rifle, and $3,566 in suspected drug money. The following individuals were arrested and charged: Deborah D. Phillips, 55, of Fawn Drive in Selbyville - delivery of a narcotic schedule II controlled substance; second degree conspiracy (both felonies) Monty S. Hall, 33, no address - delivery of a narcotic schedule II controlled substance, second degree conspiracy (both felonies) Jose P. Turlington, 45, of DuPont Highway in Georgetown - delivery of narcotic schedule II controlled substance (felony) Bryant L. Giddens, 39, of Mitchell Street in Millsboro - two counts of delivery of narcotic schedule II controlled substance (felony) Dionny M. Handy, 21, of Polly Branch Road in Selbyville - two counts of delivery of narcotic schedule II controlled substance (felony) Renaldo Handy, 22, of Pepperidge Mobile Home Park in Frankford - four counts of felony delivery of a schedule II narcotic controlled substance, felony second degree conspiracy, and misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia Jeremiah Handy, 23, of Holly Brook Apartments in Laurel - felony possession with the intent to deliver cocaine, felony tampering with evidence, misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia, misdemeanor resisting arrest, and misdemeanor hindering Prosecution. Jeremie Handy, 20, of Polly Branch Road in Selbyville - delivery of cocaine, second degree conspiracy, two counts of possession of firearm by person prohibited and possession of ammunition by person prohibited (all felonies) Anthony Harmon, 47, of Lincoln Avenue in Selbyville - felony possession with the intent to deliver cocaine, felony maintaining a dwelling for keeping narcotics, misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia, and misdemeanor endangering the welfare of a child Quentin E. Thomas, 43, of Amber Drive in Millsboro - felony possession of deadly weapon by person prohibited Timmy Morris, 25, of Polly Branch Road in Selbyville - possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting arrest (both misdemeanors) Evans Mumford, 37, of Polly Branch Road in Selbyville - felony possession of crack cocaine, misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia, misdemeanor resisting arrest, and misdemeanor criminal impersonation Janie Handy, 19, of Washington Avenue in Selbyville - possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia (both misdemeanors) Shannon Handy, 29, of Polly Branch Road in Selbyville - possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia (both misdemeanors) Terrus Chandler, 41, of Washington Avenue in Selbyville - misdemeanor resisting

arrest Phillip Smith, 20, of Gumtree Road in Frankford was apprehended on Sunday, Aug. 17. He was formally charged with four counts of felony delivery of cocaine and two counts of second-degree conspiracy. Smith was picked up after a Laurel police officer stopped him for a traffic violation. A computer check revealed he was wanted by the Delaware State Police. Bail was set at over $45,000 and Smith was committed to the Sussex Correctional Institute. The following suspects are wanted on outstanding felony delivery of cocaine warrants: Brad Fosque, 30, of Shipley Road in Seaford; Edward Collick, 19, of McCabe Street in Selbyville; McKineo Jennings, 41, of Careys Drive, Millsboro; and James Toppin, 40, of Knox Street in Millsboro. Anyone with information pertaining to these subjects’ whereabouts can call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or Troop 4 at 302-856-5851.

Millsboro man dead after crash

A 43-year-old Millsboro man was killed when the 1997 Blazer he was driving hit a car that police said pulled in front of him. Oral R. Donovan was traveling north on DuPont Boulevard in Georgetown on Saturday, Aug. 16, at 3 p.m. Police said that a 2006 Kia Sportage that was traveling east on Krueger Road, approaching DuPont Boulevard, crossed the southbound lanes of DuPont Boulevard and continued toward the northbound lanes. The Kia entered the northbound lanes of travel and struck the Blazer, causing the Blazer to overturn multiple times. Donovan was pronounced dead at the scene. His front seat passenger, Anna R. Knauer, 50, of Millsboro, was flown to Christiana Hospital and was last listed in critical condition. Both were wearing seat belts. The Kia was operated by Benjamin T. Parker, 65, of Port Deposit, Md. The front seat passenger was Cheryl Parker, 50, of Georgetown. The rear seat passenger was Danielle Ruark, 2, of Milford. None of these subjects was injured. They were all wearing seat belts. The crash remains under investigation. No charges have been filed. Alcohol is not a factor in this crash.

Police to set up rural checkpoints

This weekend, Aug. 22 to 24, the Delaware Office of Highway Safety and Delaware law enforcement are joining their counterparts in the region for a DUI Crackdown on Country Roads. In addition to conducting sobriety checkpoints and DUI saturation patrols in urban areas, law enforcement is placing a special emphasis on secondary roads. Delaware law enforcement officers are scheduled to conduct two sobriety checkpoints and 77 DUI saturation patrols this weekend as part of the Checkpoint Strikeforce campaign. On Friday night, Aug. 22, the New Castle County DUI Task Force will conduct a sobriety checkpoint in Wilmington and on Saturday night, Aug. 23, the Seaford and Laurel Police Departments will conduct a joint checkpoint in the Seaford area.

Last weekend, Aug. 15 to 17, Delaware law enforcement officers arrested 45 individuals for Driving Under the Influence (DUI) of alcohol during the first weekend of the national impaired driving crackdown, "Drunk Driving. Over the Limit. Under Arrest." Fourteen of the DUI arrests were made by officers from state and municipal police agencies who were conducting dozens of DUI saturation patrols. At the checkpoints, in addition to the 31 DUI arrests, officers issued one citation for an underage drinking violation, apprehended nine wanted individuals, made 23 drug arrests and 13 felony arrests, and issued 13 seat belt and 7 child restraint citations as well as 106 citations for various other traffic violations.

Three arrested in home invasion

Detectives from the Delaware State Police have arrested three men in connection with a home invasion robbery that occurred on July 17 at 1 a.m. Julius Cannon, 23, Colonial Lane in Milford, Theodore Singletary, 23, of Forest Avenue in Dover and Keith Jones, 22, of Colonial Lane in Milford were each charged with second degree conspiracy, possession of a deadly weapon by a person prohibited, theft of a firearm, wearing a disguise during the commission of a felony, second-degree rape, first-degree burglary, possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony and three counts of robbery. These are all felony level Cannon crimes. According to police, the three men entered a home on Pleasant Pine Circle in Harrington armed with guns. They robbed the husband (age 48), wife (age 47) and son (age 18) at gun point and demanded that the husband open the home’s safe, police said. When the husband was apparently taking too long to open the safe, Jones one of the subjects reportedly touched the wife inappropriately with a handgun, coercing the husband to move faster. After approximately 30 minutes, the thieves left with guns, electronics and even items from the freezer, police said. Injuries sustained by the victims were minor and only the wife was examined at the hospital. On Aug. 3, at Singletary


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008 noon, troopers were called to Colonial Lane in the Colony West Apartment Complex in Milford in reference to a trespassing complaint. During this investigation, police found a handgun with an obliterated serial number. Evidence technicians from Troop 3 uncovered the serial number, which linked the stolen weapon to the July robbery. Cannon was committed to James Vaughn Correctional Center in lieu of $181,000 bail. Singletary was committed to Howard Young Correctional Institute in lieu of $167,000 bail. Jones was committed to Sussex Correctional Institute in lieu of $181,000 bail.

LifeCare employee arrested

An employee at LifeCare at Lofland Park nursing home, Seaford, was arrested recently after he allegedly put a pillow over a patient’s face to quiet the patient. Jesse Bodey, 28, of Seaford, was charged with endangering the welfare of an incompetent person, second degree reckless endangering and two counts of offensive touching. On Aug. 18 at approximately 12:14 p.m. Seaford Police Department officers responded to the nursing home after being called by supervisors. Police said that earlier that morning, Bodey was inside the room of an 85-yearold man, giving personal care, when the man began screaming and yelling. In an effort to quiet the victim, Bodey twice placed a pillow over the victim's face, police said. Other staff members saw him do this, police added. The victim was checked by staff and appeared to suffer no respiratory distress from the incident. Bodey was taken to the Justice of the Peace Court #3 where he was released on $2,500 unsecured bond pending a later court date.

Motorcyclist killed near Glasgow

Keith Jackson, 36, Delmar was killed Sunday, Aug. 17, when the motorcycle he was driving ran off the road and overturned several times. The accident occurred at approximately 3 a.m. on Delaware 896, just north of Porter Road, in Glasgow. Police said that Jackson’s 2006 Honda motorcycle was traveling north on 896, north of Porter Road, when Jackson lost control. His bike went off the west side of the roadway and traveled onto the grass median where it overturned several times. Jackson was thrown from the bike and landed on the southbound lanes of Route 896, police said. A 1995 Ford Bronco that was traveling south on Route 896 struck Jackson, who was lying in the roadway. A second vehicle, a 2005 Ford E350, came along and also struck the motorcyclist. It is possible that Jackson was struck by another unidentified vehicle that did not remain at the collision scene. Jackson, who was wearing a helmet but suffered severe bodily injuries from being run over multiple times, was pronounced dead at the scene. High speed and alcohol may be factors in this crash, police said. The Ford Bronco was operated by Mark Hirbshman, 38, of Delta, Pa. He was wearing his seatbelt and he was not injured. The Ford E350 was operated by Mark Christopher, 57, of Centerville, Md. He was wearing his seatbelt and he was not injured. The investigation is ongoing.

Teen missing after crash

The Delaware State Police are investigating a serious crash that injured a 15year-old boy. The accident occurred on Saw Mill Road south of Pine Road near Ellendale at approximately 4:30 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 17. When troopers arrived at the scene, they discovered a severely damaged Ford Escort off the west side of the roadway alongside a tree. Police said that the Escort was traveling south on Saw Mill Road when it entered a sharp left curve and failed to negotiate the turn. It left the west edge of the road and struck a tree. Two of the three occupants, the operator, Irvin Hernandez, 17, of Georgetown, and a passenger, Isac Gutierrez, 15, of Laurel, were transported to Milford Memorial Hospital by family members before police arrived. Gutierrez suffered severe injuries and was later flown to Christiana Hospital where he was admitted. A third passenger, Jose L. Roblero, 18, of Georgetown, was also injured in the crash. Police said that when family members arrived to take the other two to the hospital, Roblero, who had a laceration on his head, refused to go to the hospital and walked away from the scene. As of Tuesday, Roblero had not returned home since the crash. Police listed him as a missing person after checking the area of the crash with dogs, troopers and a police helicopter. Roblero is 5 feet 7 inches tall, 140 pounds, with a medium skin tone, brown eyes and black hair. He was last seen wearing tan blue jeans, a white hooded sweatshirt and orange and white Nike sneakers. Hernandez was arrested for second degree vehicular assault, driving without a license and other traffic offenses. He was released on a $250 unsecured bond and turned over to his parents. Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Jose L. Roblero is asked to call investigators at Troop 7 at 644-5020 or Crime Stoppers at 800-TIP-3333.

PAGE 35

Traffic fatalities drop in Delaware Delaware had the fourth largest percentage decrease in overall traffic fatalities of any state in the nation in 2007, according to national figures released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Delaware’s traffic deaths dropped by 20 percent last year, from 147 in 2006 to 118 in 2007. Only South Dakota and Vermont (both down by 24 percent) and Wyoming (down by 23 percent) had greater percentage drops. Nationally, the number of people who died on the nation’s roads dropped again last year, reaching historically low levels. In 2007, the overall number of traffic fatalities fell to 41,059, the lowest number since 1994. Last year, Delaware saw decreases in occupant (driver and passenger) deaths, bicycle deaths and pedestrian deaths as well as a decrease in those not wearing seat belts in fatal crashes. There were increases in alcohol-related deaths, motorcycle deaths and aggressive driving related fatal crashes. Delaware’s new official statewide seat belt use rate has climbed to an all time high of 91 percent. The seat belt use rate was determined by observational seat belt surveys conducted statewide after the con-

clusion of the 2008 Click It or Ticket campaign. Seat belt use has consistently increased from 67 percent in 2001, the year before Click It or Ticket began. Currently in 2008, overall traffic deaths are down slightly from this time last year (77 in 2007 to 73 in 2008). Alcohol-related deaths are also down from 44 percent at this time last year, to 34 percent of total fatalities currently. Areas of concern are aggressive driving-related fatal crashes, particularly those involving speed; pedestrian deaths, which have increased; and motorcycle deaths, which are down only slightly. OHS is in the final weeks of its 120 Days of Summer HEAT initiative, a summer time crack down on traffic violators. The Summer HEAT initiative includes enforcement conducted as part of the Click It or Ticket, Checkpoint Strikeforce and Stop Aggressive Driving Campaigns. Since early May officers working under the initiative have made 138 DUI arrests, 74 drug arrests, issued 2,503 seat belt citations and 840 speeding citations, apprehended 82 wanted individuals, issued 22 underage drinking citations, made 53 felony and criminal arrests and recovered two stolen vehicles as well as six weapons.

Jet ski operator killed

Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Agents are investigating a fatal boating accident which occurred at approximately 4 p.m. Monday, Aug. 18, when a Sea-Doo XP 2001 jet ski collided with a 25-foot Sea Fox fishing boat in Indian River, about 500 yards south of the public boat ramp at Masseys Landing. The jet ski was headed out into Indian River Bay when it collided with the inbound fishing boat, according to Sgt. Gregory Rhodes of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement. Enforcement Agent Nate Evans was first on the scene and was assisted by the U.S. Coast Guard, Sussex County EMS and the Indian River Fire Company. The jet ski operator, Dennis Dugan, 42, of 1033 South Dupont Highway, Milford, was pronounced dead at the scene. A passenger on the jet ski, Stacey A. Flanigan, 39, of 200 Long Neck Circle, Millsboro, was airlifted by the Delaware State Police Aviation Unit to Christiana Hospital with injuries to her head, back and leg. Three adults and three teens aboard the fishing boat were not injured, including the operator of the fishing boat, Thomas S. Sholly, 41, of 125 Bradley Road, Annville, Pa. Both vessels were seized as part of the ongoing investigation. Speed on the part of the jet ski might have been a factor in the accident, Rhodes said.

The Wake Up Delaware program, a public awareness initiative dedicated to educating residents about fire safety and smoke detectors, recently received $362,500 from federal funding sources. From left, at the Delaware Fire School in Dover: Sen. Tom Carper, Warren Jones, Elsmere, who developed the plan for Wake Up Delaware, Ron Marvel with the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department and Congressman Mike Castle.

Fire education program expands Members of Delaware’s Congressional delegation have teamed up to provide thousands of residents with smoke detectors and fire prevention information during the next year. Senators Thomas R. Carper Jr. and Joseph R. Biden, along with Congressman Michael N. Castle, recently announced that $362,500 will be given to Wake Up Delaware, a public awareness and preparedness program headed by the Delaware Volunteer Fireman’s Association with the assistance of the Delaware State Fire Commission, Delaware State Fire School and Delaware State Fire Marshal’s office. The money, from federal funding sources, continues a program that originated as an idea in 2001 and has helped tens of thousands of Delaware residents by providing smoke detectors and public education and saved numerous families from

serious injury or death because of fire. What began in 2003 with the distribution of 4,500 smoke detectors in Wilmington has expanded to a program that’s given out more than 80,000 free smoke detectors and 50,000 free replacement batteries. The program has been so successful it was expanded to include instructional DVDs, school programs and intensive public awareness campaigns to help protect Delaware residents from the dangers of fire. In addition, students in 1,197 classrooms in 59 schools throughout the state have gotten training in fire protection and escape measures via a DVD featuring cartoon-like characters like Safe-T-Bear, Detecta and Squirt. The grant will be used to include DVDs in Spanish, expanded handouts in bilingual text and other areas.


PAGE 36

MORNING STAR

• AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com FOUND

LEER 700 TONNEAU COVER for Ford Ranger P/U, dk. green, $300 OBO. 262-0516. 7/17 ‘96 GM BOX TRUCK Pwr tailgate, rebiult eng., $3500. 629-7920. 7/10 LEER TRUCK CAP, 8’, fits Ford or Dodge, $600. 2586553. 7/10

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS 23’ SHASTA TRAVEL TRAILER, sleeps 4, $1000. 875-4485. 8/21

PERFECT ATTENDANCE PATCH, at Laurel LL Park. 875-4604. 8/14

JAMES LAWN CARE, ‘A Cut Above The Rest.’ Family owned & operated. For free estimates, leave message at 875-0402.

GIVE-AWAY

YARD SALE

BOATS

YARD SALE, Sat., 8/23, 8 am - 1 pm, No early birds! 505 So. Central Ave., Laurel. Retail displays & supplies, Longaberger, Byer’s Choice dolls, books, household items, clothes, printers.

‘95 17' PRO-LINE SPORT 17C, center console, garage kept w/‘02 Mercury 90 hp & Load Rite trailer. Boat has bimini top, rod holders, anchor, all Coast guard equip., depth finder, more. Merc. less than 75 hrs. Trailer w/power winch. Used little, well maintained & serviced. $7900 OBO. Cruises at 25 - 35 mph on not a lot of gas. 628-5479. 8/14

WHEELCHAIR RAMP, 1 step high (8”), 32” w x 4.5’ long, strong. Free. 6293537, ask for Dom. 8/21 FREE WOOD from lg. maple tree. Sm. & lg. pcs., u-haul. 875-2657. 8/21 FREE to a good home. 7 yr. old Welsh Springer Spaniel, purebread, 50 lbs, spayed, housebroken, current on all shots, healthy! We love her but she needs a home where she can receive more love and attention than we can give her. Call 628-5479. Near Seaford.

NANTICOKE YACHT CLUB Yard Sale, Sat., 9/13, 8 am 1 pm. Tables $10 ea. Call 875-7143 or 629-0687 to reserve or for info. Rain date Sept. 20. 8/21

FREE 4-YR. OLD CAT, snow white, great for older person or people. 6283509. 8/14

WOODEN KNEE HOLE OFFICE DESK w/pull out drawers on right side & left side having drawer opening w/pull out & up shelf for typewriter. 875-5086. 8/14

FREE CONSOLE TV, Radio & Record Player, all in one cabinet, tube set. 628-3509. FREE KITTENS to good home. 3 black, 1 gray & white. 875-4604. 8/14

HELP WANTED

SEAFORD DISTRICT LIBRARY

has an immediate opening for a High School student for part-time work. Job duties include shelving books, assisting at the circulation desk and general library work. Must be able to work evenings until 8 and Saturdays until 5. Student applications are available at the front desk. Application deadline September 4.

SERVICES ART CLASSES: Children/ Adults, day & evening classes. 629-4356 for info.

WANTED

AUTOMOTIVE

‘89 TRAVEL TRAILER, 26’, sleeps 6, awking, AC, rear bath, like new inside, $3450. 629-6448. 8/14

LIVE WELL PORTABLE, includes pump, $85. 3377359, 559-8061 cell. 7/24

WASHER $120; DRYER $120. 628-1320. 11/29/tnc BIKE - NEXT ALUMINUM, Tiara DS24. 21 spd. Shimano, new cond., $85. 536-1884. 8/21 LADDER - 40’ ALUM. EXT. Werner, 1A - EX. HD industrial, new cond., $450. 5361884. 8/21 LEAD SAILORS, COWBOYS & AMISH Figurines. $35 for set. Asst. Del. advertisements. Craftsman miter saw. 398-0309. 8/21 GE Washer/Dryer, good cond., $100 ea. 877-0519. TVs: 19” Mont. Ward set, $20. 27” RCA, good cond., $30. 877-0519. 8/21 COUCH & Oversized Recliner, camel color, microfiber, exc. cond., $500. 8753463. 8/21 BEDROOM SET: Full size headboard, dresser & mirror, $85. 2 maple end tables, $20 ea. Glider rocker, $35. TV tray set, $15. 6298745. 8/21 OIL DRUM, 250 gal., on legs, good cond., $50. Cast Iron Drag, good cond., $50. Storm Door w/glass & screen, $20. 875-4485. TREADMILL, like new, Cadance 70E. 875-3084. 8/21

12’ BASS BOAT w/Trailer, elec. motor, fish finder, ready to go, $850. 6284159. 7/3

2 WOOD SPLITTING MAULS, 16” 5 lb.; 32” 10 lb., rubberized handles, both for $10. 628-5388.

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

IONIC PRO Air Purifier, 28” high, woks perfectly, new was $100, asking $45. 6285388. 8/21

‘86 CHEV. 350 MOTOR, just rebuilt, 30 over w/new carburator. 875-7281. 8/14

AMERICAN GIRL DOLL, Molly, with 6 outfits, exc. cond., $150. 536-7287.

EAGLE TALON Tsiawd rear bumper & tail lights. Honda S 2000 short eng. block. 629-8022. 8/7

2 LIONEL TOY TRAIN SETS, standard gauge. Black 400E locomotive (restored) and six freight cars (unrestored); two-tone 408E elec. locomotive w/ State Set (orig. cond. w/3 cars 7 boxes) $3500. 6293794. 7/10

‘04 F150 XLT Super Cab PU. 5.4L engine, low miles, $16,000 OBO. 629-3794.

FOR SALE

EXPRESS-IT Beach Chair, Folding, fits carrying case 27” x 7” x 4”, $10. Hedge Trimmer, antique, 2 handle type, $10. 628-5388. 8/21 WOMEN’S 10 SPD. BIKE, Vintage Fuji, 20.5”, super conditon, updated parts, $60. 629-3628. 8/21 FREEZER, Welbuilt, $70. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14

FREE TRAVEL SHOW

AL A SK A CRUISE / TOUR

REFRESHMENTS GIVEAWAYS

Wed., Aug. 27 - 2 pm & 7 pm - Crown Plaza,Timonium, MD Thursday, Oct. 16 - 7 pm - Bulle Rock, Havre de Grace, MD Saturday, Oct. 18 - 2 pm - Holiday Inn, Towson, MD

R.S.V.P.

410-296-8330 toll free: 800-848-3273 info@accentontravel.us

Accént On Travel

CANON EOS CAMERA 35mm Model 3000 (body only, no lens) w/instructions, $50. Minalta 35mm camera, 3000 I w/35-70 AF lens, $75. Minalta 35mm camera 550 SI w/AF35-70 lens, $50. 875-1877. 8/14 4-WHL. FUNNEL WAGON, exc., $750. Seed Rye, $13.50/bushel. 349-4874. LADIES’ WHIRLWIND 10 spd. Bike; 1 Exercise Bike. Make offer. 875-5396 before 9:30 pm. 8/14 REFRIGERATOR: Amana, side-by-side, icemaker & water dispenser, cream w/blk. trim 25 cu. ft., $275. 875-2115. 8/14 MATTHEWS LEGACY 28” BOW, 70 lb. pull, hard case, arrows, release, all equipped, ready to hunt, $500. 875-4009. 8/14 LITTLE TYKES KITCHEN SET with access., $60. 877-0644 Eves. after 7 pm. TOOLS: Craftsman CompuCarve Computer-Controlled Compact Woodworking Machine, new in box, $1500 (pd. $1900). HomeLite Ranger Chain Saw in case 33cc $100. Craftsman router table mount, $130. Delta Shopmaster miter saw on 10" Black & Decker bench, $120. 2 Craftsman 11 1/2” w. roller support stands w/ edge guides, $40. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14 BIKES – 2 Roadmaster 18 speed sport SX 26L brand new with tags $60 each. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14 TOOLS: Dremel 16" 2-spd scroll saw $165. RotoZip in case $100. Detail Biscuit Joiner 3.5 amp motor 19,000 BTM $65. 2 plastic sawhorses, $35. Sears routers, belt sanders, planer, $50. 632-1980, lv. msg. PIER 1 ‘PAPASAN’ RATTAN Chair w/green cushion, exc. cond., $80. 629-3628. LEATHER WHITE CHAIR & Ottoman, $100. 875-8677. 8/7

LAWNMOWERS: Craftsman 22”, 3 spd., self propelled, elec. start, w/bagger, $50. Lawnboy 2 cycle, 21”, self-propelled w/bagger, $50. 628-0102. 8/7 NOMAD GOLF CLUBS & bags. 1 man’s, 1 woman’s. 13 clubs ea. set, like new, must see, $400 ea. set. 628-5388. 7/31 LOWERY PIANO & Bench, exc. cond., needs tuning. heavy, you move. 2’ deep, 3’ 4” high, 4’10” long. $600. 628-5388. 7/31 LIFESTYLE 1000 TREADMILL, $100. 875-8677. 7/31 PLANTS FOR HANGING BASKETS, very reasonable. Petunias, English ivy, vinca, 4 o’clocks, summer hyacinth, lilacs, day lilies, sm. holly trees & flowering purple basil & more. $2 & up. 875-5217, ac. from Trap Pond St. Park. 7/31 AIR CONDITIONER: Whirlpool, 10,20 BTU window unit, exc. cond., $99. 302519-1568. 7/31 DISHWASHER: Whirlpool 24” portable, exc. cond., $249. 302-519-1568. 7/31 CATNIPPER LIFT CHAIR, good cond., $400. Hugo Walker w/seat, $50. 3379647. 7/24 UPRIGHT FREEZER, exc. cond., white, $125. 5361216. 7/24 BAND SAW, Black & Decker, 12”, variable speeds, incl. extra blades, $65. Delta Scroll Saw, 16”, variable speed, $85. 337-7359 or 559-8061. 7/24 WURLITZER PIANO, good cond. & a collection of sheet music, $325 OBO. Cell 2369688. 7/24 TOTAL GYM XL EQUIPMENT, new, never used, assembled, w/extra access., Pd. $1600. 410-896-3857. JENNY-LYNN CRIB, converts to youth bed and Pack N Play, $150 for both, or will separate. 875-0964 7/24

Digitek (Heart Drug) Recall ®

The FDA has issued a recall on Digitek® tablets, which may contain twice the approved level of digoxin. Digitek®(digoxin) tablets are used to treat heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms. The existence of double-strength pills pose a risk of digitalis toxicity. The result can lead to nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, cardiac instability, bradycardia and even death.

Contact the Allen Law Firm today. For a Free Digitek® Case Evaluation call 1-800-916-5LAW(5529) or visit www.allenfirm.net Highland Park Place | 4514 Cole Avenue Suite 705 | Dallas, Texas 75025


MORNING STAR DRY FIREWOOD, already cut, you pick up. $50 a PU load. 875-9383. 7/17

MURRAY LAWN MOWER, 11 hp, 36” cut, runs good, new batter. 381-4656. 7/17

FREEZER, Sears Cold Spot, 19.5 cf, frostless, $100. 629-9558. 7/17

BROYHILL SOFA, blue/ cream plaid, $100. Broyhill Ent. Center, solid wood, pd. $1500, $500. 258-3589.

MAYTAG FREEZER, upright, white, 21 cf, $175. 629-8734. 7/17 EVENFLO EXERSAUCER, Fisher Price baby swing, both like new, $50 ea. 2583589. 7/17

• AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

ANIMALS, ETC. 2 LEATHER SADDLES, brown, great shape, 15” & 16”, $150 ea. 875-8620. 8/14

GULBRANSEN PIANO, $600. You must move. 6292083. 7/17

4 BROWN EGG LAYERS, 4 mo. old hens, Austrolorps. Vaccinated & tested for pollurum, $10 ea. 875-8620. 8/14

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PAGE 37

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PAGE 38 Owner Operators You must possess a Clean MVR, Clear Criminal Background Pass DOT Physical & Drug Test Call John 800-2215127 Ext 186 General Merchandise ABSOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU!!! ALL BRAND NEW POWER WHEELCHAIRS, HOSPITAL BEDS AND SCOOTERS. IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-9984111 TO QUALIFY. Help Wanted Need a career???? Become a Nationally Certified Heating/AC Tech. 3.5wk Nationally Accredited program. Get EPA/OSHA/ NCCER Certified. Local Job Placement. Financing Available 1-877-994-9904. Driver - $5K SIGN-ON BONUS for Experienced Teams: Dry Van & Temp Control available. O/Os & CDL-A Grads welcome. Call Convenant (866) 684-2519. EOE. Homes for Sale New Single-Family Homes in active adult (55 plus) community in historic Smryna, Delaware, near Beach and Bays. From $99,900. 302-659-5800 or see www.bonayrehomes.com Lots & Acreage 3 STATE VIEWS Private Riverfront Park 20.2 Ac ONLY $134,900! Flat Mtn. top setting with open meadows and large hardwoods. Very private w/ excellent access. Utilities available. Easy terms. Won’t last at this price! Call Now! 1-800-888-1262. Mountain Property MOUNTAIN LOG CABIN & 20+ ACRES just $149,900. Sale- Saturday 9/6. Beautifully wooded mountain setting with spectacular new 1800’ log cabin kit. Enjoy private access to Potomac River & C&O Canal. Close to town. Perfect for vacation/ retirement. SAVE $10,000 Guaranteed! Ask how to pay NO closing costs. Low rate financing. Call now 1-800-888-1262. NEW CEDAR CHALET. BUILT & READY FOR FINISHING TOUCHES! ON 20 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP W/ STREAM FRONTAGE & LAKE ACCESS. ONLY $159,900 BONUS: FREE BOAT! Close to historic town. Only one- must see to appreciate! Low rate financing. Call Now 1-800-8881262. Real Estate CASH FOR TRASH We love ugly, dirty, run down, smelly houses. We pay cash for houses in need of repairs. Call Keri 301-919-9501.

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• AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

LEGALS NOTICE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that Glenda Miller of Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 8/21/1tp

NOTICE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that Douglas R. Miller of Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 8/21/1tp

PUBLIC NOTICE The Mayor and Council of the Town of Laurel, Delaware will sit as Court of Appeal for hearing of appeals from assessment list for FY2009. The hearing will be held in the Mayor and Council Chambers of the Laurel Town Hall, 201 Mechanic Street, on Tuesday, September 2, 2008, beginning at 7:00 p.m. or as soon as possible thereafter. MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF LAUREL 8/21/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 10245 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article VI, Subsection 11540, Item C of said ordinance of CAROL A. CALLAWAY who is seeking a special use exception to retain a manufactured home on a medical hardship basis, to be located west of Brickyard Road (Road 481), 1 mile east of U.S. Route 13. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties

should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 8/21/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 10248 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XXV, Subsection 115-185, Item F of said ordinance of ESTATE OF DON LOUIS LEESER who are seeking a variance from the side yard setback requirement, to be located west of Route 13A, south of Garden Lane, being Lot 83 within Green Acres development. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 8/21/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 10249 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XXVII, Subsection 115-210, Item A(1) of said ordinance of SANDRA MILLS who is seeking a special use exception to place a manufactured home on a medical hardship basis, to be located northeast of Road 541, 1,800 feet northwest of ORad 536. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on

Monday evening, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 8/21/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Little Creek Hundred Case No. 10255 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception and a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-20 and 115-25, Item A(1)(h) and C of said ordinance of PHILLIPS FARMS, LLC who are seeking a special use exception to retain a manufactured home on less than five (5) acres and a variance from the front yard setback requirement, to be located east of Road 497 and north of Road 494. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 8/21/1tc

LEGAL NOTICE ON SEPTEMBER 23, 2008 at 11:00 a.m., Laurel Storage Center, Road 468, Laurel, DE will conduct a sale pursuant to Title 25, DEL. C. ANN. 4904-4905. The contents of the following bins will be sold: Bin #(s): 37 Brittany Williams; #88 Arthur Stunk; $107 Edwina Taylor; #109 Lavonne C Bland; #153 Larry Faist; #192 Bonnie Boyce. BIDDERS: Call office on day of sale to confirm, (302) 875-5931. 8/14/2tc

NOTICE Estate of Pauline V. Williams, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Pauline V. Williams who departed this life on the 26th day of May, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Diana E. Mims on the 8th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 26th day of January, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Diane E. Mims 2127 Harbour Dr. Palmyra, NJ 08065 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of S. Layton Ayers, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of S. Layton Ayers who departed this life on the 15th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Elizabeth Star Ayers, Mark G. Ayers on the 11th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 15th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Elizabeth Star Ayers 6263 Boyce Road Seaford, DE 19973 Mark G. Ayers 9844 Nanticoke Circle Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Stephen P. Ellis, Esq. Ellis & Szabo LLP P.O. Box 574 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Pearl H. Reynolds, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Pearl H. Reynolds who departed this life on the 30th day of July, A.D. 2008 late See LEGALS—page 40


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PAGE 40

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Renters may be able to buy ground A new state law allows residents of manufactured housing communities in Delaware to purchase the communities in which they live should they be offered for sale. In many manufactured housing communities, the tenants own the homes but lease the ground on which those homes are located, creating potential problems when the landowner wishes to sell the property. The new law (House Bill 504) addresses that possibility by giving homeowners the ability to collectively purchase the land. The legislation provides home-

owners with a “right of first offer” and establishes a method for a homeowners’ association to make an offer to purchase a community. If the owner declines, he cannot sell the property during the year that follows for anything less than the price initially offered by the residents. Certain exemptions are built into the law to allow community owners to sell or transfer their land to close family members. The legislation also contains language to cover the possibility the community could be sold at auction.

4H Foundation holds donor brunch At a ceremonial bill signing in Tatnall Hall in Dover, Governor Minner inks a copy of House Bill 504 (July 29). Approximately three dozen people attended the ceremony, including prime sponsors State Sen. George Bunting, D-Bethany Beach (left) and State Rep. Bob Valihura, R-Delaware North. LEGALS - from Page 38 of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Linford L. Reynolds on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 30th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Linford L. Reynolds 16790 Hardscrabble Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of George N. Walston, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of George N. Walston who departed this life on the 2nd day of August, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Dennis Walston on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 2nd day of April, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Dennis Walston 28825 Cannon Drive Seaford, DE 19973

David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of George W. Sparrow, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of George W. Sparrow, Jr. who departed this life on the 3rd day of May, A.D. 2008 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Beverly S. Michelsen, Beth R. Wilson on the 5th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executrices on or before the 3rd day of January, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executrices: Beverly S. Michelsen 38131 St. George Road Delmar, DE 19940 Beth R. Wilson P.O. Box 294 Fruitland, MD 21826 Attorney: David W. Baker, Esq. David W. Baker, Esq. PO. Box 551 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/14/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Gina Smith, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Gina Smith who departed this life on the 21st day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE

were duly granted unto Rosemary Martin on the 4th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 21st day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Rosemary Martin 8651 Garden Lane Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/14/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Charles L. Miller, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Charles L. Miller who departed this life on the 12th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Charles Craig Miller on the 29th day of July, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 12th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Charles Craig Miller 7 Brant Ct. Middletown, DE 19709 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/7/3tc

The Delaware 4-H Foundation held its annual donor appreciation brunch on July 20 at the 4-H building at The Delaware State Fair. The event recognized those who made significant contributions to the Foundation in 2007. Honorees received plaques and awards for their generous support. Among the honorees were the Foundation’s 2008 scholarship winners Emily Eskridge, Jacob Berninger, Joshua Vincent and Justin Rider, who each received $500. The Delaware 4-H Foundation also announced the newest endowments. These include the following: Passwaters Family Endowment created by Coulter and Charlotte Passwaters of

Bridgeville, which was established to support sending a Delaware 4-Her enrolled in Livestock or Animal Science projects to 4H Congress each year; 4-H Spirit Endowments, also created by Coulter and Charlotte Passwaters, in honor of their children Sarah, Benjamin, John, Will and Emily, to celebrate the lives and contributions of those who generously gave of their time to the 4-H program; and the Charles L. Busker endowment, which will be invested with the Foundation’s other endowment funds and produce income to provide support for the Delaware 4-H Cow Camp that began as a daylong dairy workshop on the Busker Farm.

PUBLIC AUCTION

VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2008 • 1:00 PM Location: 30942 Manchester Lane, Laurel, Delaware: Traveling on US-13 South in Laurel, Delaware, turn left onto Sycamore Road. Proceed 1/10 mile and turn first right onto Chipman’s Pond Road. Continue approximately 1 mile and turn left into Manchester Manor. Signs will be posted. Sussex County Tax Map Parcel # 2-32-13-198: This attractive lot is approximately 95’ x 262’ and contains .57 acres +/- of land. It is improved with an attractive Cape Cod/Salt Box home containing approximately 1895 sq. ft. of living space with 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths, Living room, Dining room, Kitchen w/breakfast nook, Utility room, Covered Front Porch and an attached 2 Car Garage. Amenities include stainless steel appliances, carpet, tile & hardwood floors, walk in closets and ceiling fans. Less than 2 years new, this home is equipped with a heat pump, central air, electric hot water heater, vinyl siding, asphalt shingle roof, 4” well w/submersible pump and an LPP septic system. Call our office today for more information or to schedule your private showing. Real Estate Terms: Purchaser shall pay $35,000 down payment day of sale with cash or certified check made payable to Wilson’s Auction Sales, the balance to be paid within 60 days. Purchaser to pay all cost of examination, preparing and transferring deed. Purchaser shall pay the Delaware 1 1/2% State Realty Transfer Tax and the 1 1/2% Sussex County Realty Transfer Tax. Purchaser shall pay any and all other property tax, transfer tax and fees. If the above terms are not complied with, the down payment shall be forfeited. Seller reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids, but it is their intent to sell the property. This property is being sold “as is and where is” with no expressed or implied warranty. Announcements made the day of sale take precedence over any previous statements or advertisements. Auctioneer’s Note: Visit our web site for a complete deed description. This is an excellent opportunity you do not want to miss.

We Don’t Talk Service... We Give It. Dave Wilson, Auctioneer & Sales Manager K. Wade Wilson, Auctioneer & Customer Service Representative (302) 422-3454 Fax (302) 422-0462 www.wilsonsauction.com


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Melissa Trout- Outfield District III Senior Softball

Kelsey Oliphant- Catcher District III Senior Softball

Alexis Oliphant- Outfield District III Senior Softball

Alyssa Martin- Outfield District III Senior Softball

PAGE 41

LITTLE DOGS- Laurel Pop Warner coach Glenn Phillips, Sr. talks to his team during a recent practice. The Mitey Mite, Jr. Pee Wee, Pee Wee, and Midget teams began practicing last week. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Pop Warner Mitey Mite schedule

Laurel Pop Warner Jr. Pee Wee schedule

8/31- Laurel vs. Cape 2 Sharks in Lewes, 9 a.m. 9/7- Laurel vs. Milford at Laurel Middle School, 9 a.m. 9/13- Laurel vs. Seaford at Seaford Boys and Girls Club, 9 a.m. 9/20- Laurel vs. Dover at Laurel Middle School, 9 a.m. 9/27- Laurel vs. Woodbridge in Bridgeville, 9 a.m. 10/4- Laurel vs. Berlin in Berlin, 9 a.m. 10/11- Laurel vs. Cape 1 Sharks at Laurel Middle School, 9 a.m. 10/18- Laurel vs. Wicomico at Laurel Middle School. 9 a.m. 11/1- Laurel vs. Smyrna in Smyrna, 9 a.m.

9/7- Laurel vs. Milford at Laurel Middle School, 11 a.m. 9/13- Laurel vs. Wicomico at Seaford Boys and Girls Club, TBA 9/20- Laurel vs. Cape at Laurel Middle School, 11 a.m. 9/27- Laurel vs. Woodbridge in Bridgeville, 11 a.m. 10/4- Laurel vs. Berlin in Berlin, 11 a.m. 10/11- Laurel vs. Cape at Laurel Middle School, 11 a.m. 10/18- Laurel vs. Wicomico at Laurel Middle School, 11 a.m. 11/1- Laurel vs. Smyrna in Smyrna, 11 a.m.

Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee football schedule

Laurel Pop Warner 2008 Midget football schedule

9/7- Laurel vs. Milford at Laurel Middle School, 3 p.m. 9/13- Laurel vs. Seaford at Seaford Boys and Girls Club, 3 p.m. 9/20- Laurel vs. Dover at Laurel Middle School, 3 p.m. 9/27- Laurel vs. Woodbridge in Bridgeville, 3 p.m. 10/4- Laurel vs. Berlin in Berlin, 3 p.m. 10/11- Laurel vs. Cape at Laurel Middle School, 3 p.m. 10/18- Laurel vs. Wicomico at Laurel Middle School, 3 p.m. 11/1- Laurel vs. Smyrna in Smyrna, 3 p.m.

9/7- Laurel vs. Milford at Laurel Middle School, 1 p.m. 9/13- Laurel vs. Wicomico at Seaford Boys and Girls Club, TBA 9/20- Laurel vs. Dover at Laurel Middle School, 1 p.m. 9/27- Laurel vs. Woodbridge in Bridgeville, 1 p.m. 10/4- Laurel vs. Berlin in Berlin, 1 p.m. 10/11- Laurel vs. Cape at Laurel Middle School, 1 p.m. 10/18- Laurel vs. Wicomico at Laurel Middle School. 1 p.m. 11/1- Laurel vs. Smyrna in Smyrna, 1 p.m.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Brittney Brittingham- IF District III Senior Softball

Jenna Allen- IF/Pitcher District III Senior Softball

laurelstar.com


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Shown are participants in the inaugural Heritages Shores Ladies’ Member/Guest golf tournament which took place on Aug. 2 at the club.

Heritage Shores holds Ladies’ Member/Guest Tournament Despite a short rain delay which gave way to sunny skies, 36 ladies teed off on Saturday, August 2 for Heritage Shores’ inaugural Ladies’ Member/Guest Tournament. The event consisted of a practice round on Friday followed by a cocktail reception held on the Clubhouse patio which overlooked the scenic golf course. The tournament’s winners are: First Place, Flight 1: Barbara Jarkovsky and Judy Slack; First Place, Flight 2: Joanie VanOostrom-Phipps and Nadine Andrew; First Place, Flight 3: Judi Fallon and Susan Thaxton (mother/daughter team); Second Place, Flight 1: Kay Mooney and Cinda Allison; Second Place, Flight 2: Vicky Gray and Betty Jean Ennis The contest winners are: Closest to the Line: Cynthia McDevitt (Member) and Cinda Allison (Guest); Closest to the Pin: Tina Hill (Member) and Cinda Allison (Guest); Most Missed Fairways: Jean Lynch (Member) and Cathy Connor (Guest); Most Putts: Nancy Schmidt (Member) and Andi Flanagan (Guest); Most Bunker Shots: Ann Sieger (9-Hole Competition) and Betty Jean Ennis (18-Hole Competition); Most Water Shots: Judi Fallon (9-Hole Competition) and Barbara Allen (18-Hole Competition)

BACK TO SCHOOL - NEED CASH!!! NYSA SOCCER- Kyra Showell, left, and Lydia Thomas each dribble a ball during an NYSA soccer camp last week. Photo by Lynn Schofer

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FREE! SGCC GATORS- Shown (l to r) is the Seaford Golf and Country Club swim team: sitting on diving board- MacKenzie Wooters, Hailey Parks, Annie Perdue, Emma O’Donnel, Erika Smith, Shannon Bradley, and Abby Adams; back row standing- Chelsey Procino, Lindsey Banning, Jacob Procino, Zach Parks, Lauren Price, Alexis Carey, Zach Collins, and Gabriella Alicea; second row from back- Kendall Butterworth, Nathan Bradley, Christian Handy, Tanner Hollis, Josh Bredbenner, Sebastian Buenano, Collin Handy, and Alvarado Buenano; kneeling- Claudia Carey, Jenna Procino, Hailey Merritt, Sydney Beard, Kelley Allen, and Dominic Longo; sitting front row- Hannah Merritt, Paige Butler, Jenna Beard, Victoria Carey, Hannah Henderson, and Christopher Smith; missing from photoAriella Anthony, Dominic Anthony, Sambina Anthony, Catherine Mackler, Andrew Mackler, Jason Cook, Tony Guinta, Alexis Herman, Chase Wells, Spencer Noel, Drew Crouse, Adam Crouse, Paige Crouse, and Coach Robin Verdery.

SGCC Gator swim team ends 2008 summer swim season The Seaford Golf and Country Club Gator swim team ended another summer swim season with several swimmers qualifying and competing in the DSA championships. The 8U girls’ medley relay team finished the season undefeated. If you would like more information regarding the SGCC swim team, call the SGCC at 629- 9064. Sign ups for next summer will be held in the spring.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Ashlee Brittingham- OF District III Senior Softball

Stephanie Wheatley- P/1B District III Senior Softball

Mariah Dickerson- 1B District III Senior Softball

PAGE 43

Courtney Evans- Pitcher District III Senior Softball

Over 400 high school field hockey players will be in Seaford Twenty four high school field hockey teams from all over Delmarva will converge on Seaford High School on Saturday to compete in the fifth annual Seaford play day. Games will begin at 8 a.m. and will conclude at 3 p.m. at the Seaford High School athletic complex on Virginia Avenue. The day long event will feature 72 games on six different adjacent fields all within walking distance. Each team will face six different opponents. Admission to the games is free to all spectators and concessions will be available. This year’s event includes five upstate Delaware teams: A. I. duPont, Brandywine, Mt. Pleasant, Newark, and Caesar Rodney. There are eight Maryland teams: Cambridge-South Dorchester, Easton, Kent County, Kent Island, North Caroline, Queen Anne Co., Stephen Decatur and Springbrook High School. From Southern Delaware 11 teams are entered: Cape Henlopen, Dover, Indian River, Lake Forest, Laurel, Sussex Central, Sussex Tech, Woodbridge, Delmarva Christian, and Seaford varsity 1 and 2.

L au r e l Am e r i c anL e g i o nPo s t #1 9 pr e s e n t s Taylor Oliphant- Outfield District III Senior Softball

Meagan Colston- Outfield District III Senior Softball

Y o u t hF i s h i n gT o u r n am e n t S at u r d ay,Au g u s t 23 rd Re g i s t e rat A & KT ac k l e Fishing Areas: Records Pond & Broadcreek to the R/R Bridge PRIZES AWARDED 4 to 7 years 8 to 11 years 12 to 15 years

Brooke Evans- Shortstop District III Senior Softball

Laurel manager Jeff Evans throws a frisbee to some of his players prior to the start of their Senior League World Series game against Canada. Evans was assisted by Rodney Hearne and Robert Trout. This was the second straight year Laurel represented District III in the tourney. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Star Minor League baseball update: Derrik Gibson The following are the Gulf Coast League stats (as of Aug. 17) for Seaford grad Derrik Gibson who is playing for the Gulf Coast League Red Sox: 26 G, 28 for 90 (.311), 15 R, 6 2B, 1 3B, 9 RBIs, 13 for 13 SB.

Any child under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

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T OU R NA MENT H OU R S9 am - 1 2 pm NoT ac k l eP r o v i d e d American Legion and A&K Tackle are not responsible for any accidents.


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor Ballpark characters- There’s nothing like going to a professional ball game, especially a baseball game. Even if you aren’t a sports fan, the atmosphere, food, and the crazy things people do in public makes it well worth the price of admission. Last week I made a trip to Cleveland’s ball park Progressive Field (the ball park formerly known as Jacobs Field). I still call it Jacobs Field because I hate it when teams change their stadium names or their own names just to make a couple more bucks. The stadium was nice, but I’m not sure why it was compared to Camden Yards when it was built. It’s good, but it’s not that good. The area around the baseball and basketball stadiums is pretty hopping, but the city itself is nothing to brag about. The Indians played host to the Anaheim (Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, are you kidding me with that name?) Angels. This hasn’t been a great year for the Indians, or the Tribe as they are affectionately called by the locals, but they did win the game behind Cy Young favorite Cliff Lee. But the most entertaining part of the night, aside from the post game fireworks, had to be the people watching. The lady next to me kept saying something in a thick Edie McClurg-like accent every five minutes, but I couldn’t make it out at first. It sounded like she said “good try”. What she was actually saying was “go

Tribe”. Every ballpark has at least one vendor who is a character. In Pittsburgh it’s a guy who looks like a chicken and yells “Peanuts!” as the veins bulge from his neck as he frantically makes his way up and down the aisle. In Philadelphia it’s a beer guy who yells “Co-ol-ld beer!” as he acts like he is shivering because the beer is so cold. In Cleveland, it’s the hot dog guy or the “dawg guy” as he calls himself. As he first made his way down our aisle he yelled the standard “Hot dogs here!” then added “Don’t you want a nice, big hot dog?” Not one taker as he went all the way to the back stop. “Come on folks, I’m not the pizza guy, I’m not the nacho guy, I’m the dawg guy,” he proclaimed as he made his way back up the steps. “Everybody loves a hot dog.” Eventually, he sold some hot dogs. I already had a hot dog, but to hear him talking with a Jimmy Stewart-like accent as he made his sales pitch was priceless. Quick hits- Fall sports season is here, with high school practices starting last week. Pop Warner games start at the end of the month. High school coaches, don’t forget to fill out and submit your preview forms ASAP so we can get started with the preview stories on your teams. Next week we’ll have our annual Fall sports edition with varsity schedules, practice and scrimmage photos, and hopefully some preview stories.

FOOTBALL TIME- Above, the Laurel running backs take part in a drill during a recent practice. Below, Assistant Coach Mark Quillin demonstrates a drill to his linebackers. See next week’s Laurel Star for more Fall sports photos as well as regular season schedules and previews. Photos by Mike McClure

Yasmin Davis- Outfield District III Senior Softball

Jenna Cahall- 1B/3B District III Senior Softball POP WARNERThe Laurel Pop Warner football teams work out during a practice earlier this week. All four teams will be in action in the home opener on Sept. 7. The league added a Junior Pee Wee team this year. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 45

SOCCER SEASON- Laurel varsity boys’ soccer coach Tony Matthews, left, watches over a recent practice. Above, Delmar boys’ soccer coach Greg Cathell talks to his team following an intra-squad scrimmage. Local high school teams began practicing last week. See the Star’s Fall sports special in next week’s edition for exclusive Fall sports practice photos, schedules, and previews. Photos by Mike McClure

LAUREL SUMMER SCRAPBOOK- Shown (clockwise from top left) are scenes from the summer sports season: Laurel’s Tim Kelley slides home safely during his team’s win over Millsboro in the District III Minor League baseball championship; Delmar’s Kavon Trader goes to third on a triple during a District 8 Minor League baseball game; Delmar pitcher Isaac Austin delivers a pitch during a District 8 9-10 year-old baseball game; and Post 6 pitcher Zach Adkins prepares to come home with a pitch during an American Legion baseball game. Photos by Mike McClure


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Seaford Bowling Lanes Wednesday AM No Tap High games and series Charlie Chaffinch 334

Mark Benson Brandi Lewis 1,224

1,222 376,

Summer Senior Express High games and series Boyce Clayton 284, 791 Marcia Regan 281, 823

Summer Adult

Youth High games and series Frank Dubinski 298, 795 Theresa Richey 290, 844 Michael Cherrix 286 C.J. Redd 792 Brittany Hastings 286, 790

Thurs. Summer Mixed High games and series

Nick Wheatley Garrett Sammons Joyce Banks Jessica Todd

305 818 283 717

Tuesday Nascar High games and series Burnie Stokes 273, 786 Todd James 273 Erik Mulford 273 Tami Littleton 267, 750

Seaford Department of Recreation to hold fall sports signups

STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK-Shown (l to r) is the Delaware Blue Hens 10U team which recently placed first in the Sussex County Sports Foundation’s August Heat II which took place in Laurel: top row- Billy Murray, Jake Hudson, TJ Reynolds, Eddie Hogan and Jack Dixon; middle row- Ben Pettyjohn, Quintin Ivy, Brody Grove, DJ Doherty, and Mike Clavier; and front- Jacob Swift. The team’s coaches are: Coach Doug Hudson, Coach Ed Grove, Coach Robbie Murray and Coach Dave Doherty.

Send your team photo to the Seaford/Laurel Star at sports@mspublications.com to be a Star team of the week.

Star Sports Calendar August- Thunder Dawgs to hold travel baseball tryouts- The Thunder Dawgs will hold tryouts on Aug. 24 and Aug. 31 at 11 a.m. at the Laurel Little League park. Visit www.leaguelineup.com/thunderdawgbaseball for more information. Fall- Upward Soccer League Fall signups- Sign up now for the Upward Soccer Sept.-Oct. 2008 season. The league, is open to boys and girls ages 6-11, and allows every child to play, learn, and be a winner. The cost for early registration (by Aug. 5) is $50 with family discounts available. Players receive the following: Upward reversible jersey, Upward water bottle, Upward soccer socks, and end of season award and celebration, and equal playing time every game. Forms can be picked up at the Laurel Wesleyan church office at 30186 Seaford Road in Laurel Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sunday mornings. All practices and games will be at Laurel Wesleyan church. For more info call 302-875-5380.

Delaware Lightning 14U select baseball team to hold tryouts The Delaware Lightning 14U select baseball team will be holding tryouts on August 24 from 2-4 p.m. and August 30 from 9-11 a.m. Tryouts will be held at the Georgetown Junior League Field (behind High’s in Georgetown). For questions call Ed at (302) 381-6607.

Diamond State Swoop to hold fast pitch softball tryouts

The Seaford Department of Recreation is holding signups for the following leagues: Youth Tackle Football- Ages 7-13. The cost is $30 and includes a physical and all equipment. Tryouts are September 6, so sign up early. Youth Cheerleading- Ages 7-14. The cost is $40 and includes a uniform that you can keep. Practice starts in September and the girls cheer for the tackle football league on Saturdays. Youth field hockey- Ages 7-12. The cost is $20 and includes a shirt. This is an instructional league that runs on Saturday mornings and starts Sept. 6. SDR is looking for teams for its adult leagues. Contact the department of recreation if you’d like to enter a team into the men’s flag football, men’s slow pitch softball, coed volleyball, or women’s volleyball leagues (629-6809).

Sussex Tech receives DIAA champions in sportsmanship award The Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association (DIAA) Sportsmanship Committee has selected eight schools as recipients of the 2007-2008 “State Champions in Sportsmanship” award. This is the highest honor for sportsmanship that can be bestowed on any of the 93 member schools of DIAA. Sussex Technical High School received the award for the second consecutive year. The other schools are: William Penn, Hodgson Vo-Tech, A.I. DuPont, Tower Hill, Concord, Wilmington Christian, and Caesar Rodney. “The practice of good sportsmanship is one of the core objectives of education based athletics,” said Kevin Charles, executive director for DIAA. “Winning this prestigious award means sportsmanship has been embedded into the culture of these eight schools.” All 54 member middle schools and high schools compete against a rigorous 10point standard, not against other schools. Therefore, it is possible that there could be 54 winners annually. Requirements for consideration include: a written board of education policy on sportsmanship, ethics, and integrity in interscholastic athletics; a sportsmanship, ethics and integrity committee to coordinate the planning and implementation of a sportsmanship, ethics and integrity program; presentations during the school year to coaches, athletes, parents, fans and support groups emphasizing the school’s philosophy on sportsmanship, ethics and integrity; a procedure for receiving, investigating, and resolving complaints dealing with sportsmanship, ethics and integrity; a plan for dealing with special situations such as heated rivalries, overflow crowds and unruly spectators; and a program for acknowledging/rewarding positive examples of sportsmanship, ethics and integrity.

Seaford Department of Parks tackle football holds signups The Seaford Department of Parks is holding tackle football signups prior to the tryouts and draft on September 6. The league is looking for kids ages 7-13 as well as a few more coaches in the junior league.

The Diamond State Swoop fast pitch softball organization will be holding tryouts for the upcoming 2008-09 season on the following dates: 10U- Saturday, Aug. 23 at 10 a.m.; 12U- Saturday, Aug. 23 at noon; 14U- Saturday, Aug. 23 at 2 p.m.; 16U- Sunday, Aug. 24 at 2 p.m. Tryouts will be held at the team’s O’Neal Farms practice facility in Laurel. This past season the Swoop’s 10U team won the NSA B World Series, its 12U team won USSSA and NSA state championships and was a top 20 team out of 74 in the NSA A World Series, and the 13U team finished in the top 10 at the 13U USSSA World Series. This is a great opportunity to join a winning and growing organization that always puts the girls first. For more information and for directions to the practice facility, call Dean Culver at 302-381-0282, Jay Davis at 302-258-5057, Jay Covey at 410-8292635, or Mike Riggleman (16U) at 302-841-7676. Please plan to arrive 15 minutes early to complete registration forms.

Lady Tigers 18U college showcase team to hold tryouts The Lady Tigers 18U college showcase team has expanded into Delaware and is looking for young ladies 15 to 18 years old who are looking to play softball at the college level. Tryouts will be Aug. 23 at 3 p.m. at the Diamond Dremas facility in Delmar, Md. Call Mike Wallace at 302-228-5285 with any questions.

Seaford/Laurel Star sports section has its own e-mail address Got sports? Send your sports scores, photos, and press releases to the Star’s sports e-mail address: sports@mspublications.com.Call sports editor Mike McClure at 302629-9788 with any questions.

LAUREL POP WARNER- The Laurel Pop Warner coaches talk things over with their team during a recent practice. Photo by Mike McClure

See next week’s Star for the high school Fall sports section.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Jamie Mills remains strong in Delaware Modifieds, earns win By Charlie Brown Since moving from his own car to the NAPA Big Block Modified of Keith Coulbourne in 2008, Jamie Mills has been solid, very solid at Delaware International Speedway. On Saturday night, Mills grabbed the lead from Tim Millman with four laps to go and extended his point lead in the division with his fifth win of the season. Jeff Brown started on the pole and was strong in the early stages of the race. Millman ran in the second spot with Howard O’Neal in third. Hard contact between Robert Dutton and Matt Jester on lap five brought out the yellow and ended the night for both. Mills was on the climb and up to fourth from his ninth starting spot by lap seven. Millman moved by Brown for the lead just as the yellow flew as Judd Mills flipped end over end down the front straight. Mills quickly exited the car to the relief of the crowd. On the restart, Jamie Mills got by Brown for second. At the halfway sign the top five were Millman, Mills, Brown, H.J. Bunting and O’Neal. The high groove was the fast way around but Mills was able to get a good run off the bottom of the second turn with five to go. Mills slid up and slammed the door on Millman going into the third turn. Millman gave him a shot in the back bumper but that was as close as he would get the rest of the distance. Mills, in the Coulbourne Farms/Bicknell, pulled away to the comfortable win. Millman finished in the second spot with Brown turning in a personal best in third. Bunting stayed in the point chase with a fourth place finish and Jordan Watson rounded out the top five. Heats were won by Jamie Mills and Bunting. Tim Trimble took advantage of his outside second row starting spot shoot past

John Curtis and pole-sitter, Adam Jarrell to lead at the start of the 15-lap AC Delco Modified feature. With Trimble in control a great battle between Brad Trice, Joseph Tracy, Jarrell and Curtis raged in the top five. Tracy and Trice swapped the second spot several times with Tracy actually getting by Trimble and leading by a bumper with two laps to go. Trimble, in the Courtland Manor/Covey’s Car Care/Troyer moved back on top on the back straight and proceeded to drive to his third victory of the season. Tracy held off Trice to finish in second. Curtis finished in the fourth spot and Michael White rounded out the top five. Fast time in qualifying was set by Tracy. Cody Belote led the first two laps of the Mod Lite 10-lap feature before the yellow was out for Shawn Weber who went hard off the first turn. On the restart, Tim White grabbed the top spot and would lead the rest of the distance. Curt Miles, Jr. held second until Kevin McKinney took the spot with three laps to go. Brandon Dennis made a hard charge on the outside from eighth but ran out of time. At the checkered, it was White posting his second consecutive win and his third overall in the Floyd Carey/CLC Cabling/Lightning. McKinney finished in the second spot with Dennis third. Rick Wheatley finished in the fourth spot and Miles, Jr. rounded out the top five. Fast time in qualifying was set by Wheatley. In a recent addition to the schedule the United Racing Club will join the five weekly divisions this Saturday night. It will also be Milford. Fan Appreciation Night with Milford residents admitted free to the spectator side with a picture I.D. that includes a Milford, Del. address. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. with hot laps at 7 p.m.

Rain washes out Friday, action moves to Sunday this week Rain forced the cancellation of last Friday night’s action at the U.S. 13 Dragway. This Wednesday night there will be a Tune and Test with gates opening at 5 p.m. and testing from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. Then weekly action switches back to Sunday’s starting with the 45th Anniversary William J. Cathell Memorial Super Chevy Sunday on August 24. The event will feature a show, shine and drags. The Chevy Show will be hosted by the Mason/Dixon Classic Chevy Club and will offer 45 first place, 45 second place and 45 third place awards with three “Best in Show” awards and no classes. Show vehicles must be Chevy powered. Dash plaques will be awarded to the first 200 entries. The drag racing portion of the show will feature the National Dragster Challenge with Wally trophies to Super Pro, Pro, Pro Bike, and Hot Rod Trophy. The drag races are open to all makes and models with action also in Jr. Dragster 1, Jr. Dragster 2, Import and Bike Trophy. Gates open at 9 a.m. with show registration until noon. Time trials will begin at 10 a.m. with eliminations following the show awards. For show information call (410) 641-3184. For race information contact the dragway office at (302) 875-1911. The rain date for the event is Sunday, August 31.

25th anniversary Make-A-Wish Triathlon to take place Registration is open for the 25th Anniversary Make-A-Wish Triathlon at Sea Colony in Bethany Beach. The event, featuring a 1.5K ocean swim, 40K bike and 10K run, will benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of the Mid-Atlantic and will take place Sept. 20. For additional information and to register, visit midatlantic.wish.org or call 301962-9474.

PAGE 47

Ricky ‘the Rocket’ Elliott lives up to nickname in late models By Charlie Brown Ricky Elliott may spend most of his time on the road racing up and down the East Coast in the Super Late Model division but he still enjoys racing at his home track at Delaware International on Saturday nights. After about a month’s absence, Elliott returned “home” on Saturday night and walked away the $1,250 25-lap Super Late Model feature. Rookie Staci Warrington continues to impress as she took control of the feature at the drop of the green. Defending point champion, Donald Lingo, Jr. was running hard in the second spot with Elliott catapulting from eight to third on lap one. A hard tangle between Rick Whaley and Norman Short brought out the yellow on lap five with both cars taken to the pits on the wrecker. The restart produced a three-car battle for the lead between Warrington, Lingo, Jr. and Elliott. Elliott took second on lap seven and one lap later powered by Warrington off turn two for the lead. Jon Callaway was on the move coming from his 11th starting spot to take third just before the halfway sign. Callaway grabbed second from Warrington at the crossed flags with Lingo, Jr. holding on to fourth and Kerry King running in the fifth spot. King’s drive ended with a flat tire on lap 22 and erased a big lead that Elliott had developed. On the restart, Elliott bolted away from the rest of the field and drove to his fourth win in the Charles Jarvis/Seaside Builders/Rocket. Rookie Jon Callaway stayed in the point chase with a strong second and Warrington turned in another stellar performance in third. Lingo, Jr. finished in fourth. Point leader Ray Davis, Jr. crossed the finish in fifth but had a tire fail post race inspection and was disqualified. Fifth was credited to Richard Jarvis, Jr. Heats were won by Warrington and Elliott. Kelly Putz edged ahead of Mike Wharton to lead the first lap of the 15-lap Late Model feature. Defending point champion, Jack Mullins, Jr. returned to action after a two month absence and took second while point leader Herb Tunis battled from third. At the halfway sign the top five were Putz, Mullins, Tunis, Joe Warren and Chris Hitchens. The race would stay green and the order would not change the rest of the distance. It was the second win of the year for Putz in the Brown’s Service & Repair No. 59. Twenty-three cars took the green for the Slide for Five finale. Dylan Betts built up a strong head of steam on the first lap and drove to his second consecutive win. Wayne White, Jr. came from the back row to finish in second with Tyler White third, Shane Phillips fourth and Greg Nailor, Jr. fifth.

OFF TO COLLEGE!!

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PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

People Willey family gathers for 23rd reunion On June 21, 37 descendants of Ella Watson Willey convened at Killen Pond State Park, Felton, for their 23rd reunion. The reunion is named the Willey Family Reunion after Ella’s husband, Edwin Sharp Willey. Both her family and his have a rich history in lower Delaware and Sussex County, before, during and since the Revolutionary War. Ella was born in the Selbyville area on July 7, 1879; her parents were Medford Watson and Basha McCabe Watson. She married Edwin Sharp Willey and they had seven children, six of whom survived until adulthood. Their children, Annie, Hattie, Ruth, Frank, Elizabeth, Pauline and Arintha, loved going to the beach and down through the years their descendants have since convened at the beach each summer. Members of the family remember huge gatherings at the shore as far back as World War II. Now the Willey Family Reunion is official and is held on a semi-annual schedule. Members gather at a state facility, either Trap Pond, Killen’s Pond or Fenwick Island. Arintha Heller, 88, is the oldest surviving child and is the matriarch of this event. She lives in Seaford and has two sons and four grandchildren.

Although she bemoans the passing years she remains active with her friends and family and has a part-time job. She eats like a horse, has a delightful sense of humor and knows where every penny she’s earned for the past 88 years has gone (most likely in the bank or a savings bond). She’s earned the right to head up a family that has a reputation for hard work and for making contributions to community and country. There is even a Willey Family Flag: A large red “W” sits on a background of red and white gingham with white trimming around the edges. A very practical material, with a touch of the whimsy. Joan H. Pepper created this banner around 1990. The weather was just right for the June reunion, which was held at an enclosed pavilion at Killen’s Pond State Park. There were 37 people at the affair and the person who came the farthest was James F. Hughes, a great-grandson who arrived that same morning from Auckland, New Zealand, after a trek of close to 12,000 miles, maybe more. James is the grandson of Elizabeth W. Hughes and son of Edwin E. Hughes Jr.

ELECT BOB RICKER

COMMUNITY SERVICE RECORD

Seaford poet recognized for her writing Eva Maddox, Seaford, recently won the contest for poetry in the published division of the 2008 Greater Philadelphia Christian Writers Conference. The conference draws writers, agents and editors from all over the country and offers clinics, workshops and one-on-one appointments. Marlene Bagnull, author, publisher

and speaker, is the director. Maddox is a member of the Delmarva Christian Writers Fellowship that meets monthly in Georgetown and is directed by Candy Abbott. She has had a number of articles, poems, stories and devotionals published.

FRIENDS TO ELECT

DANNY SHORT for Delaware State House of Representatives

Get Your PASSPORT TO PARADISE Now!

• 2 Term Mayor of the Town of Georgetown •3 Years on the Georgetown Planning Commission • Committee member of Georgetown Building Design Standards • Past President, Sussex County Assoc. of Towns • 23 Year Owner/Operator Baker’s True Value Hardware, Millsboro • 6 Years on the Delaware State Fire Commission • 33 Years in Georgetown Volunteer Fire Company • Serving As Chief and many AdministrativeO ffices • Fireman of the Year 2001 • Past President, Sussex County Fire Chief’s Assoc. • 2002 Recipient Governors Fire Safety Award

Come to the luau and support Danny Short’s 2008 Fundraiser

MUSIC

When: Saturday, August 23, 2008 Where: Nanticoke River Yacht Club

Proven Leadership, Lifetime of Experience

“I promise I will work diligently for the citizens of the 2nd Councilmatic District to maintain the quality of life we enjoy in Sussex County.”

Attending the Willey Family Reunion are, front: Christopher Bruccoleri, Tara McCauley, Collin McCauley, Kayla McCauley, Sara Hughes, Hannah Henderson, Jamie Hughes and Connor Bramhall. Second row: Darryl McCauley, Lisa Hughes, Joan Pepper, Gail Henderson, Arintha Heller (matriarch), Judy Tillotson and Donna Huston. Back row: Rob Henderson, Heather Henderson, Steve Huston, Donna Huston, Dan Henderson, Karen McCauley, Karen Henderson, Dale McCauley, Liz Bruccoleri, Joel Hughes, James Hughes, Cecil Pepper, Jeff Hughes, Ed Hughes, Jim Bob Huston, Bob Henderson, Jann Turner, Tammy Dean, Tom Dean and Homer Turner.

COUNTY COUNCIL 2ND DISTRICT Paid for by the Friends to Elect Bob Ricker

Time: 5 pm to 8 pm Tickets: $40.00

Silent & Live Auction

Pulled Pork - Hawaiian Bread - Seafood

For tickets contact Danny’s campaign line at 628-5222. Paid for by Friends to Elect Danny Short


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 49

Education Upward Bound high school students attend career fair On July 29, approximately 60 students participating in the six-week summer Classic Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math and Science programs at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, explored eight career fields at the 2008 TRIO Career Fair. The keynote address was delivered by Sonja Aguilar, director of Workforce Development for the Delaware Office of Economic Development, who spoke about the importance of continuing education. “Today it is more important than ever to stay in school; earnings increase with every year (of education) completed,” said Aguilar. Students went on to explore aviation enforcement with the Delaware State Police; airway science at Delaware State University; and several Delaware Tech programs of study, including airframe maintenance; refrigeration, heating and air conditioning; engineering technology; electronics and computer engineering; environmental; and automotive. For some students such as Adam Bennet, the career fair was an eye-opening event. “I was just introduced to aviation

mechanics,” he said. “I had never heard of that before.” Hiral Patel, a 2006 graduate of the Upward Bound Math and Science program, credits the program with much of her success. “I feel like the financial aid nights and career fairs helped me get more money for college and have a broad understanding of careers out there for me,” she said. Patel is a junior in medical technology at the University of Delaware and an instructional tutor for the Upward Bound program. Upward Bound programs are federallyfunded TRIO programs that offer assistance to under-prepared, low-income, and first-generation college students as well as those with disabilities in order to help them reach their higher education goals. The mission of the Upward Bound program is to encourage and assist high school students who are traditionally under-represented in post-secondary education due to income or family educational background in preparation for, entry to, and completion of a post-secondary education.

From left: Charles Mitchell, former Sussex Tech board member, his replacement, Dr. Mark Isaacs, new board member Annelle O’Neal and Randall O’Neal who recently resigned and whose term will be finished by Annelle O’Neal.

Sussex Tech board has two new members Gov. Ruth Ann Minner recently appointed two new members to the Sussex Technical School District Board of Education. Dr. Mark Isaacs of Georgetown will replace Charles H. Mitchell of Millsboro, who left the board after 20 years of service. Annelle O’Neal of Laurel will finish the term of Randall O’Neal, who recently resigned to accept a position on the board of the Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association. Isaacs is director of the University of Delaware Research and Education Center in Georgetown. He received his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree from Clemson University and earned his doctorate from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His responsibilities at the Research Center include directing agronomic and

vegetable research and extension projects, as well as overseeing the facility budget and fiscal matters. Isaacs has served Sussex Tech as a member of its environmental advisory council and has also helped coach several sports teams. He and his wife, Cindy, have two children. Annelle O’Neal is an alumnus of Sussex Tech, having graduated from the former Sussex Vocational-Technical Center with a concentration in dental hygiene. She was active in the Laurel ParentTeacher Association and the Sussex Tech Football Boosters Association when her two sons were in high school. She and her husband, Joseph, own and operate O’Neal Auction Center in Laurel where she is the office manager. They have four grandchildren.

Upward Bound Students stand with Carmen Strollo, business liaison for Tech Prep Delaware. Back, from left: Keyshawn Purnell, Seaford; Jose Cortez, Seaford; Lemitrius Horsey, Laurel; Roosevelt Joinvil, Laurel; Dylan Windsor, Laurel; and Carmen Strollo, Tech Prep Delaware. Front: Franklin Garcia-Velasquez, Bridgeville; Krysten Toomey, Bridgeville; Marco Hernandez, Laurel; Jessica Portillo, Millsboro; and Ashley Cheeseman, Laurel.


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

When politicians stray, we know all about it I’m pretty certain former presidential contender John Edwards is RANK ALIO not standing by his phone awaiting a call from Barack Obama asking I just don’t understand to be his running mate, not after admitting to having an affair during how someone in the his run for the number one spot. Edwards joins a list of high pro- position of public trust file political leaders to fall from would risk it all for a grace because they forgot they were married or felt they could pull cheap fling. off an affair without getting caught. Gone are the days when the press did not report the affairs of past pres- it all — lousy speeches and lousy decisions, and staffers, lobbyists and friends idents such as FDR, Lyndon Johnson and who couldn’t wait to tell them how great JFK. Back then, the media believed their the speeches and decisions were when personal life was their own. Today, the they knew that they had screwed up. media holds nothing sacred. I was never one of them. If I didn’t Political leaders are expected to set an example while the rest of the country is al- know them very well I said nothing unless I was asked. If I knew them then I’d tell lowed to practice adultery. In a perfect them what I thought. world being faithful to your spouse would Not always a popular choice and cerbe the ideal way to live. tainly not one that gave promise for a proPoliticians are most vulnerable to afmotion especially when they were used to fairs. Edwards admitted he started to behaving their egos fed. Sometimes it took lieve that he was special and became inyears before they came back and admitted creasingly egocentric and narcissistic. Most elected officials who stray think they I was right. Political people just don’t like to admit are the next thing to God because their their mistakes because they think it’s a staffers (who want to keep their jobs) are sign of weakness. I think admitting to a suck-ups. These staffers want to be in the inner circle so they keep telling their boss- mistake is a sign of strength, courage and intelligence. This admission shows that es how great they are. In my 50 plus years in politics I’ve seen they are willing to listen and learn from

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their mistakes. I believe voters would like to think of them as human, that they are not perfect. That’s why they make erasers on pencils. I liked Edwards when he ran for president the first time, but I fell out of favor with him when his wife Elizabeth announced that her cancer had reappeared and she would require intense treatment. He stayed in the race and I thought he should be home with her. She was first diagnosed in 2004 and again last year with breast cancer and possibly a spot in her lung. Of course, like a true wife, she gave him her blessings for the run for president, but in my opinion he made a poor decision to continue the race. I believe that decision cost him the female vote and eventually sent his campaign down the tubes. Mrs. Edwards raised their four children (one child was killed in an vehicle accident). She has a degree in English, was an attorney until the death of her son and now oversees a foundation named after their son. The other woman, Rielle Hunter, who is probably seeking offers from book publishers, produced videos for Edward’s campaign and followed him for six months, including traveling with him to Africa. All this during the time when Mrs. Edwards was taking treatments making her

weak and unable to travel. He forgot his morals and succumbed to his physical needs. Edwards claims his friends made payments to Ms. Hunter for housing and helping with relocation expenses, payments he knew nothing about. These payments tell me that Ms. Hunter was seeking more than love. She had a child during that time. Edwards says it’s not his. She won’t submit to a paternity test but he says he will. You be the judge. I just don’t understand how someone in the position of public trust would risk it all for a cheap fling. They have power but that isn’t enough. Conquering the opposite sex begets more power. And it’s easy attracting women because they also love to be in a position of power. Being close to a power broker gives them access and power as “the other woman.” Apparently some people in office didn’t receive the same advice that I received on my first job in Dover back in the ‘70’s. At that time cheating was almost a lifestyle there but things have since quieted down. Kidding my new bride about the “activity” there she said, “If you do stray she better have a good job, because I don’t plan to work and I am going to live the lifestyle I am now accustomed to.” With five kids to support you better believe my eyes may have strayed but not my brain.

I need comfort rather than worrying about being a boardwalk freak We have had to bear some very warm temperatures over the past ONY INDSOR couple of months. I guess that is what we should expect from sum...it seems to me that mer. I performed music at the recent Saturday morning Seaford when some men grow Farmers and Artisan’s Market and older they develop an someone walking by asked why I attitude that dictates did not wear shorts. I am not sure if it is a mental defect, but for comfort over social some reason I am resistant to wear- acceptance. ing shorts. As a child I found it to be somewhat less than macho to be caught wearing that way. Take my mother for instance. She goes to the beach for two reasons: “short-pants,” as we affectionately called first to eat Thrasher’s french fries and secthem. However, also as a child I had no ond to eat Thrasher french fries while sitchoice but wear them. I guess in reality I ting on a bench making fun of people who had a choice, but running around naked walk by. did not seem like an adequate option. This is a regular sport to my mother. Of course as a young boy, I was less inShe gets the biggest kick out of finding hibited and could be often found running anyone who she feels looks worse in a about in my underwear or “under pants,” bathing suit than she does. She loves to as we called them, and “drawer-tale” as point out the man with the hairiest back, my grandmother used to say. the woman with the hairiest back, and so But, nonetheless, the older I got the on. more determined I became to avoid wearI guess I have always felt sorry for ing shorts. I can recall many times going those poor creatures who garnered my to the beach in Ocean City, Md. There mother’s boardwalk attention. My wearing would be my friends in the warm sand shorts may very well have created another dressed in bikini’s and swimming shorts, human oddity that could be made fun of lying on a beach towel. from the safety of a boardwalk bench. I would be lying somewhere nearby, Perhaps my hatred for shorts may also also with a towel. But the towel would be covering my face. I would be fully clothed stem back to a certain defense mechanism I needed when I was young. in a tank top and a pair of black, fullWearing shorts made you an easy target length jeans. It was “Johnny Cash goes to for an irate mother who was running tothe beach.” I have tried to figure out my aversion to ward you with a switch after you had just thrown your little brother headfirst into a wearing shorts. Maybe it is because I am pile of dog manure. It was the legs that ashamed of my legs. Perhaps I am afraid people will make fun of me. People can be were the target for the dreaded switch.

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There was no way to hide. I think my arms grew six inches trying to cover the bare flesh on my shins and ankles. Michael Jackson has nothing on us when it comes to creating moves. I know I must have looked like the original Lord of the Riverdance while Mom was wearing the bark off that switch. I think, however, that the older I get, the less I am able to deal with the hot, humid summer sun. Perhaps like many older men I know, I will suddenly care less and less about my attire. I mean it seems to me that when some men grow older they develop an attitude that dictates comfort over social acceptance. That’s why some men can be found wearing white gym socks and sandals. Then there are the fellows who wear yel-

low, striped slacks that are pulled up and belted somewhere between the navel and their neck. My favorites are those men who wear Bermuda shorts with dress shoes. I don’t know. I guess wearing shorts is not all that bad. Maybe this could be the summer that I finally overcome my fear and start taking comfort into consideration when picking out my clothing. I should not allow childhood fears to cause me to have a heat stroke. I guess I could practice by wearing shorts around the house at first. Then I may ask my mother to visit. I will make shorts a part of my regular summer wear if she doesn’t take one look at me and suddenly develop a craving for Thrasher’s french fries.

Gas Lines Lowest prices of the summer

Good news continued at the pump last week as the national gas average continued to fall to its lowest price since the start of the summer, beginning the week at $3.81 and ending the week at $3.77 a gallon. This week marks the fifth consecutive week that the cost of a gallon of regular gasoline has fallen. Since peaking shortly after the Fourth of July, the price of gas has dropped 8.3 percent or 34 cents (as of Friday). Crude oil continued its decline for the third straight week, trading at $114 on Friday, down $1 a barrel from Monday. The U.S. dollar continued to strengthen against the euro for a fifth consecutive week, as the European economy began to show signs of a slowdown for the first time since the introduction of the euro almost ten years ago.


MORNING STAR • AuGuST 21 - 27, 2008

BesTemps signs big contract

Robert A. Leone, president of BesTemps, announces that their affiliate office BesTemps of Georgetown, has signed contracts with a Sussex County division of a fortune 300 company. “Our temporary agency will be supplying plant level and lab level people as well as some warehouse and clerical helpers. BesTemps has worked with this client before, but has never had the chance to be the prime supplier of workers,” states Leone. BesTemps of Georgetown, a division of Lion Staffing Inc. which is owned and operated by Michael J. Leone, has been in operation since 2006.

Moyer receives top award

Michelle Moyer of Laurel, an independent director with The Pampered Chef, has received Top Performance Cluster in Personal Sales at the company's national conference in Chicago. To receive TPC in Personal Sales, consultants must sell $55,000 in commissionable sales in one year. Consultants were honored in front of thousands during the company's national conference in July. Conference attendees also received training where they learned to apply business fundamentals to maximize the success of their independent businesses. For more information about The Pampered Chef, call 302-875-2563 or visit www.pamperedchef.com.

County to host free seminar

The Sussex County Building Code office will host a half-day training session in September on the installation of vapor barriers, part of on-going series to educate the building industry on new construction technologies and the latest in building techniques. The morning session will be held at 9 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 4, in the County Council chambers, located inside the County Administrative Offices building, 2 The Circle, in Georgetown. The two-hour class will focus on DuPont Co. products, such as Tyvek brand building wraps and their proper installation. The class is free and pre-registration is not required. For more information, contact Andy Wright in the Sussex County Building Code office at 855-7860.

County Bank welcomes Sharrock

County Bank announces that Leisa Sharrock has joined the Lewes branch as assistant vice president and branch manager. A Delaware native and graduate of the

American Bankers Association National Compliance School at Oklahoma University, Sharrock’s professional background includes training at the Delaware Bankers Association Regulatory Compliance School and compliance conferences of the Maryland Bankers Association and American Sharrock Bankers National. Her financial background includes 15 years with Discover Bank performing operational compliance and risk assessments, coordinating disaster recovery/business continuity plans and facilitating cross-training of employees in compliance and bank operations. In addition to managing the Lewes branch and working with personal banking clients, Sharrock will also partner with John M. Floyd and Linda Smith, County Bank’s business development officers, to work with businesses in the Lewes area.

Consultant attends conference

Local independent Longaberger Branch Leader/Home Consultant Lois Obermire of Seaford recently joined nearly 8,000 other home consultants from across the country at the Longaberger Bee, The Longaberger Company’s annual national sales conference in Columbus, Ohio. The three-day event gave consultants the opportunity to learn about new products, gain business-building skills, recognize and celebrate their achievements and hear motivating presentations from company leaders and sales field peers. The company also unveiled new products. Founded in 1973, The Longaberger Company (www.longaberger.com) is America’s premier maker of handcrafted baskets and offers a variety of other home and lifestyle products.

new facility this fall that is triple the size of their current location.

Bank announces new vice president

Community Bank Delaware has announced the addition of Ronda L. Myers to its staff as a senior vice president. Ms. Myers has over 20-years experience in banking in Sussex County, the last 10 as a commercial lender in eastern Sussex County. Community Bank EVP and Senior Lender Jack Riddle says, “Ronda is one of the best commercial lenders I’ve ever worked with — she has a good understanding of our market and has experience in working with all types of clients.” Myers will be working out of the Bank’s main office in Lewes where she will focus on development of the Bank’s commercial banking base throughout Sussex County. She has a great amount of experience working with physicians and other medical professionals. “It’s the part of the business that I like the most,” says Myers. “I really enjoy working with physicians and having a role in developing specialized products to meet the needs of Sussex County business people.” “Lending to medical professionals is a special niche in the banking industry,” says Community Bank president Lynda Messick. “It requires speed, efficiency, attention to detail, a high level of customer service skills and a depth of knowledge about the medical profession. Ronda has years of lending to medical professionals and those in supporting businesses. I worked with her for more than 10 years, so, I know just how good

she is. We are fortunate to have someone of her caliber on our team and so is the Beebe & Nanticoke medical community.” Myers has lived in Sussex County all her life and is very active in community and charitable endeavors. She is a member of the Sunrise Rotary Club in Rehoboth and is the Chair elect for Delaware Hospice, Inc. Community Bank Delaware is a FDIC insured locally owned, independent community bank, which opened two years ago. They have two full service offices in the Lewes-Rehoboth area and can be reached at 302-226-3333.

Tull Ramey announces new agents

Gordon A. Ramey, Jr., Broker of Record for Century 21 Tull Ramey Real Estate is very pleased to announce the addition of two new agents to the North Seaford office. Tina Rix has had her license for several years, but has recently transferred to Century 21. Tina Rix She, her husband and daughters reside in Laurel. Brandt Garner is a recent graduate of the Real Estate course, a native of Sussex County, and is very familiar with the area. Both agents are ready to assist you with all your real estate needs and concerns. Century 21 Tull Ramey Real Estate has two offices; one Brandt Garner downtown Seaford, and one north of Seaford on Sussex Highway.

Hertrich Toyota receives award

Hertrich Toyota of Milford is the recipient of the 2007 Toyota Motor Sales President’s Award. This annual award was presented to a select group of dealerships across the country and is the fifth consecutive year that Hertrich Toyota received the award. Toyota Motor Sales gives this honor to dealerships that have demonstrated a commitment to maintaining Toyota’s high standards for customer satisfaction. Hertrich Toyota has also been recognized for ongoing community support with the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Milford. The dealership is a longtime supporter of the club which will open in a brand

MIKE VINCENT

for

Sussex County Council

A NATIONAL LEADER

Serves on the National Fire Protection Assoc. Emergency Services Committee

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Continued from page 6

Page 51

 A LOCAL LEADER

Serves on the Seaford Planning and Zoning Committee. Seaford City Councilman

 A STATE LEADER

 COMMUNITY ORIENTED

 A COUNTY LEADER

 A FATHER & HUSBAND

Past Delaware Volunteer Firemen’s Assoc. President. Served in the Delaware National Guard for 7 Years

Represented Sussex Co. on the Governor’s Emergency Services Committee to Form the Current Paramedic System

Represents the Church Community on the Staff of Parish Relations Committee of St. John’s Church.

Mike's Pride and Joy: Wife Elaine, Daughter Michelle, Son-In-Law Keith, and 3 Grandchildren.

www.mikevincent.org


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Church served both the Tories and Patriots By Donna Dukes-Huston If you’ve ever been riding along Chipman Pond Road in Laurel, you have probably noticed a large red building which you may have assumed is an old barn. The building is actually one of about a dozen churches along the Atlantic Coast to survive unaltered from America’s pre-Revolutionary period. Kendal T. Jones, Laurel native and local historian, remembers riding down this road as a child and pointed out the old “barn” to his father, only to be corrected and find out that was a church. Many years later as an adult, Jones became very interested in the story behind this Episcopal church and has spent years studying its rich history. “I’ve always thought it was something special built by people who were not architects or even educated,” Jones said. “It’s been there since before we were a country.” In fact, it was there before Delaware was even a state. Old Christ Church was built between 1771 and 1772 to serve the 200 to 300 people of Old Forge Village which was located just south of where the American Legion sits today on Route 24. Before this time, the closest church was 21 miles away on the Wicomico River, according to Jones. “The local people petitioned the Maryland Assembly to build them a ‘chapel of ease’ which would be located near the pond,” Jones said. At the time the town of Laurel did not exist nor did the state of Delaware. This area was officially a part of Maryland, a point of contention between Cecilius Calvert of Maryland and William Penn of Pennsylvania and later their heirs, Jones said. It was eventually determined that this area belonged to Pennsylvania before Delaware became its own state in 1776. At the time Old Christ Church was built, the Church of England was the official church of the New World; however, Old Christ Church was built for all people, regardless of whether they were members of the Church of England, according to Jones. This may have led to a bit of controversy on how the altar was to be constructed. “The Church of England members preferred to kneel when taking communion, but the New Presbyterians preferred to stand,” Jones said. “This may be why the kneeling bench at the altar was built uniquely at a 45 degree angle, as sort of a compromise.” As the church was built for everyone, this meant that at the time of the revolution, parishioners included both Tories and Patriots, Jones said. One prominent figure of this time was Nathaniel Mitchell who is believed to have occupied pew number 38. Mitchell fought in the battles of Monmouth and The Brandywine and spent the winter of 1777 with George Washington at Valley Forge. He was a delegate to the Second Constitutional Convention from 1776 to 1778 and was elected governor of Delaware in 1805, making him the first Laurel native to hold that office, according to Jones. Mitchell is buried in the churchyard. Shortly before the turn of the century,

Old Christ Church began to see a change in its parishioners as the population shifted toward the new “town” of Laurel. Barkely Townsend, a merchant and ship owner from Maryland, is credited with founding the town and naming it for the laurel blossoms which grew along the Broad Creek, according to Jones. Townsend laid out 32 lots and sold them to tradesmen and merchants. Townsend occupied pew number 14 at Old Christ Church. His grandson, William Barkley Cooper, also a parishioner, was elected governor of Delaware in 1840. Over the years, Laurel grew in large part because of Broad Creek’s increased navigability with the Nanticoke River and the extension of the Delaware Railroad which provided access to northern cities such as Wilmington and Philadelphia. This growth spawned the need for a church in town, and St. Phillip’s Church was established in 1850, Jones said. At this point, Old Christ Church, the “mother church,” was basically retired and taken care of by St. Philip’s, one of its three “daughters.” In a collection of historical notes published in 1963, Henry Hutchinson stated, “Old Christ Church can be considered, directly or indirectly, the “Mother Church” for [six other] congregations in Sussex County. These include St. John’s Little Hill in Greenville (1808); St. Luke’s, Seaford (1834); St. Philip’s, Laurel (1850); St. Mark’s, Little Creek Hundred (1857); St. Andrew’s, Ellis Grove (1880); and All Saints, Delmar (1900). Old Christ Church is recognized not just for its perseverance but also for the fact that it has never been plumbed, heated, electrified or painted. Briefly during Victorian times, a few pews were moved out to make space for woodstoves which were ventilated by metal flue pipes which extended outside through holes in the walls. The woodstoves are long gone, but the closed holes remain. The construction and design of the church is unique as well. Hutchinson credits Robert Houston with building the church. Houston’s son, John, owned a shipyard in Concord and it is believed that Robert used some of those ship’s carpenters to build the church. This may account for the barrel-vaulted ceiling which is shaped like a ship’s bottom, according to Jones. Old Christ Church can actually hold up to 480 people. Parishioners sit in the original pew boxes which they enter through a swinging door, all of which still operate on their original hinges. In the early days parishioners paid pew rent instead of a tithe. This earned them the right to sit in the same pew box each Sunday, Jones said. The seat closest to the pulpit yielded the highest rent. Although parishioners were desirous of sitting near the preacher, most of them could not see the preacher from their seats. The pew boxes are simply that, benches formed in a square with their inhabitants facing four different directions. Additional seating is provided by a gallery which was used to seat visitors and those who could not afford pew rent, according to Jones. Today the gallery is used to house church artifacts. Although the church has not been altered or restored, it has been repaired over

Old Christ Church on Chipman Pond Road in Laurel was built between 1771 and 1772 to serve the 200 to 300 people of Old Forge Village which was located just south of where the American Legion sits today on Route 24.

the years. In 1922 the Old Christ Church League was established to help preserve the church. Although the church still operates under St. Philip’s, members of the League act as stewards. Now vice-president, Jones has been involved with the League for 48 years. A past-president of the Laurel Historical Society, Jones has always been interested in the history of Laurel. His elementary art teacher, Madeline Dunn, remembered this and, during her term as president, encouraged Jones to join the League. Ever since his childhood, Jones wanted to get to know Old Christ Church. The fact that Jones himself is a Methodist did not stop him. “When I was a kid, if you didn’t go to an Episcopal church, you didn’t know much about Old Christ Church,” he said. One does not have to be an Episcopalian to attend services at the church today or to be a part of the League. “The original mission of the church was to be open to all people,” said Tim Keenan, member of the League’s board of directors. “In keeping with the original mission, the Old Christ Church League is open to all.” Keenan said that the League has just over 100 members and a 15-member board of directors. The general membership meets once a year at a dinner meeting in February at St. Philip’s Church; the Board meets every other month. The mission of the League is to preserve the history and heritage of the church. Members help to ready the church for services every Sunday during the months of May through the first Sunday in October. This includes opening the large windows and flying the flags out front. Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware flags are flown along with the United States flag to represent the varying ownership of the church land over the years. Services begin at 9:30 a.m. and are conducted by Episcopalian lay leaders. The minister of St. Philip’s conducts a communion service the first Sunday of each of those months. Although the church is still not heated, this did not deter the League from hosting

Old Christ Church is recognized not just for its perseverance but also for the fact that it has never been plumbed, heated, electrified or painted. Shown here is the lectern in the church.

a special Christmas service this past year at which the Eastern Sussex Choral Society came to sing. “This was the first time the church had been opened in winter weather that any members could remember,” said Jones. “And we made out just fine.” The League plans to hold a similar service this Christmas. Members also serve as docents, or guides, for tours every Sunday afternoon during the summer. This year the League did not have enough people to be open every Sunday, much to Jones’ disappointment. Jones encourages anyone with a love of the rich history of this area to join the League to help ensure that their efforts can continue. “I want our local people to be able to appreciate what’s been standing there all these years,” he said.


PAGE 53

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

Things change at the Block, Doing the Towns Together but the fruit is still delicious LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS In the judicial world when the words “the block” come into the discussion, those involved in the conversation are referring to a particular section of a prison. In Laurel and the surrounding area that stretches into Maryland, when The Block comes into any discussion, most people know that means the Laurel Farmers’ Auction Market. VIRGINIA ‘MIKE’ BARTON It’s all a matter of how long one has lived here in Laurel. Many growers nowadays sell directly For locals who are familiar with the acfrom the field to the city purchaser, as option that takes place during the summer months, the Block is synonymous with the posed to going through the auction phase. Young boys have worked the Block for thousands of watermelons, cantaloupes generations, earning money to put away and other locally grown produce that go for their first automobile, for college or through the hands of growers and buyers for daily expenses. in a day. When our sons were teenagers, they A non-imposing structure, a newcomer worked hoeing cucumbers, cantaloupes is probably surprised to see what is defiand watermelons on farms owned by nitely not an area where high dollars have Emory Spicer, Tony Nero and others. been spent in construction of modern When the veggies and fruits ripened, they buildings with fancy fencing. then worked at the Block, transferring the This is a down-to-earth operation, produce from the vehicles of the farmer to where buying and selling is the order of the day. This is a place where time is defi- the large trucks that carried the end result nitely money and the main objective is for to the city markets. Working the Block was an education the grower to get his truckload of produce for hundreds of young men not only from through the auction building and transLaurel but from every surrounding town. ferred from his trucks to the buyer’s Times change. Not too many young lotrucks, then it is back to the field to get another load of ripe watermelons and can- cal men do this type of work anymore. The work is still betaloupes. ing done, but by Explaining the Working the Block was an educathose who follow the operation of the crops from Florida Block to a confirmed tion for hundreds of young men north during the city dweller can be a not only from Laurel but from growing season. bit difficult at times. The growing opMost city people every surrounding town. eration has changed, haven’t a clue as to as has the way sales all that is involved in are handled. the operation between spring planting and But, some things will never change. the eventual slice of juicy, ice-cold sweet The voice of the auctioneer can still be watermelon placed in front of them on heard throughout town, particularly early their dinner table. There are millions of city dwellers who in the day when the wind is right. Farmers still line up their trucks before dawn, still have never been outside the confines of work the fields from very early in the day the city. Hard to believe in this day of easy travel, yet it is true. These good folks until sundown and men of all ages still load the trucks. Wives still work their just know that the watermelon or canschedule around the long days of their taloupe or other fresh veggies they eat farmer husbands. each day come from the grocery store. And the wonderfully sweet taste of a The Block has provided summer emfreshly cut watermelon or cantaloupe as ployment for young men in the Laurel the juice runs down one’s chin is still a area for a long time. But, not without taste of heaven. change.

Moments With Mike

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SARAH MARIE TRIVITS • 875-3672 Congratulations are being sent to Ryan and Kelly Rogers of Delmar as they announce the birth of a son, July 28. Reid Burton Rogers weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and was 20 and 1/2 inches long at birth. He was eagerly welcomed home by two big sisters, Sarah Elizabeth and Laura Paige. His maternal grandparents are David and Joyce Burton of Delmar and his paternal grandparents are Reid and Delma Rogers of Raleigh, N.C., who recently visited for a few days to get acquainted with their new, young grandson. On Sept. 30 at the home of Alfred and Suzanne Layton in Seaford there will be a concert tea held for the benefit of Patrick Starr. The 2 p.m. affair will be presented by the Tri-County Chorus and the Federation Guild. Reservations are necessary as space is limited. Tickets are $20 per person, and you may call 875-7809. On Saturday evening, Aug. 9, there was a “rained-out indoor barbecue” held at the home of John and Donna Ward in honor of out-of-town guests, Laura Mitchell Whaley from Florida and Lisa Faye here from Pennsylvania. Also, it was a good old get-together reunion for some of the gals from the Laurel High School class of ‘85. I have been strictly instructed to end this clip with “and a good time was had by all” — so here ‘tis, Laura. Guests last week of Roy and Mary Ann Fasold were Helen and Frank Hickam of Wilmington. Mrs. Hickam is formerly from Laurel, remembered by all of you as Helen Progar. Seven-year-old Breanna Spahn of King, N.C., kept her godmother, Karen Pugh, mighty busy last week playing little girl games with her when she was Karen’s guest for the week. Darrell Meade was hosted to a very memorable birthday party last Saturday night in honor of his “big 50.” His three sons had prepared a video of his life and following the viewing of it, he was thoroughly roasted by a large group of family members and friends who were attending

The John Benson Support Group enjoyed a beautiful, late summer day for their benefit barbecue in John’s honor. It was a very well-organized event, well attended and sold out by a bit after noon. His family and friends are extremely grateful for the donations of any kind which were contributed and for those who participated in any way, making this event a huge success. About sixty Saturday-Morning Walkers, on Aug. 16, met for a picnic at the Delmar V.F.W. Memorial Park. There were refreshments galore, a good old-fashioned bean bag toss and many other games and fun and fellowship abounding on that pretty, sunny afternoon. We continue with prayers for all of our servicemen and servicewomen and for our friends who are ill: John Benson, Ted Clark, June Williams, Martha Windsor, Patrick Starr, Philip Lowe, Steve Trivits, Hattie Puckham, Pete Henry, Alvin Lutz, David Phillips, Harriett MacVeigh, Jean Henry, Donald Layton Sr., Herman Cubbage and Robert D. Whaley. Delmar get well wishes go out to: Louise Foxwell, Gloria Adkins, Lib Figgs, Bob Horn, Bob Christian, Joyce Lord and Darryl Haggar. Greg and Donna Adkins, on Aug. 27, will observe 25 years married and we wish them many more years to celebrate. Many happy birthday wishes with love from the family and friends were sent to Peg James on Aug. 20. Happy August birthday wishes to: Beverly Trice and Janet Redifer on Aug. 22; Virginia Foster and Joyce Jones, Aug. 23; Dennis Wilson, Aug. 24; Dr. W. Pierce Ellis and Delores Hyland, Aug. 25; Beatrice Joseph, Aug. 26, and Herman Cubbage, Aug. 28. “Practice makes perfect, so be careful what you practice.” See you in the Stars.

Dutch Country Market

Happy Birthday

Melissa LaMont Davis 8/24/61 - 9/29/07 We do not need a special day to bring you to our minds. The days we do not think of you are very hard to find. If tears could make a staircase and heartaches make a lane, we’d walk the path to heaven and bring you home again. Our family chain is broken now and nothing seems the same. But as God calls us one by one the chain will link again. WE LOVE YOU Terry & Jesse, Mom and Mickey, Michelle, Monique and Milinda and their families.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 53

Things change at the Block, Doing the Towns Together but the fruit is still delicious LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS In the judicial world when the words “the block” come into the discussion, those involved in the conversation are referring to a particular section of a prison. In Laurel and the surrounding area that stretches into Maryland, when The Block comes into any discussion, most people know that means the Laurel Farmers’ Auction Market. VIRGINIA ‘MIKE’ BARTON It’s all a matter of how long one has lived here in Laurel. Many growers nowadays sell directly For locals who are familiar with the acfrom the field to the city purchaser, as option that takes place during the summer months, the Block is synonymous with the posed to going through the auction phase. Young boys have worked the Block for thousands of watermelons, cantaloupes generations, earning money to put away and other locally grown produce that go for their first automobile, for college or through the hands of growers and buyers for daily expenses. in a day. When our sons were teenagers, they A non-imposing structure, a newcomer worked hoeing cucumbers, cantaloupes is probably surprised to see what is defiand watermelons on farms owned by nitely not an area where high dollars have Emory Spicer, Tony Nero and others. been spent in construction of modern When the veggies and fruits ripened, they buildings with fancy fencing. then worked at the Block, transferring the This is a down-to-earth operation, produce from the vehicles of the farmer to where buying and selling is the order of the day. This is a place where time is defi- the large trucks that carried the end result nitely money and the main objective is for to the city markets. Working the Block was an education the grower to get his truckload of produce for hundreds of young men not only from through the auction building and transLaurel but from every surrounding town. ferred from his trucks to the buyer’s Times change. Not too many young lotrucks, then it is back to the field to get another load of ripe watermelons and can- cal men do this type of work anymore. The work is still betaloupes. ing done, but by Explaining the Working the Block was an educathose who follow the operation of the crops from Florida Block to a confirmed tion for hundreds of young men north during the city dweller can be a not only from Laurel but from growing season. bit difficult at times. The growing opMost city people every surrounding town. eration has changed, haven’t a clue as to as has the way sales all that is involved in are handled. the operation between spring planting and But, some things will never change. the eventual slice of juicy, ice-cold sweet The voice of the auctioneer can still be watermelon placed in front of them on heard throughout town, particularly early their dinner table. There are millions of city dwellers who in the day when the wind is right. Farmers still line up their trucks before dawn, still have never been outside the confines of work the fields from very early in the day the city. Hard to believe in this day of easy travel, yet it is true. These good folks until sundown and men of all ages still load the trucks. Wives still work their just know that the watermelon or canschedule around the long days of their taloupe or other fresh veggies they eat farmer husbands. each day come from the grocery store. And the wonderfully sweet taste of a The Block has provided summer emfreshly cut watermelon or cantaloupe as ployment for young men in the Laurel the juice runs down one’s chin is still a area for a long time. But, not without taste of heaven. change.

Moments With Mike

SISK FURN ITURE

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SARAH MARIE TRIVITS • 875-3672 Congratulations are being sent to Ryan and Kelly Rogers of Delmar as they announce the birth of a son, July 28. Reid Burton Rogers weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and was 20 and 1/2 inches long at birth. He was eagerly welcomed home by two big sisters, Sarah Elizabeth and Laura Paige. His maternal grandparents are David and Joyce Burton of Delmar and his paternal grandparents are Reid and Delma Rogers of Raleigh, N.C., who recently visited for a few days to get acquainted with their new, young grandson. On Sept. 30 at the home of Alfred and Suzanne Layton in Seaford there will be a concert tea held for the benefit of Patrick Starr. The 2 p.m. affair will be presented by the Tri-County Chorus and the Federation Guild. Reservations are necessary as space is limited. Tickets are $20 per person, and you may call 875-7809. On Saturday evening, Aug. 9, there was a “rained-out indoor barbecue” held at the home of John and Donna Ward in honor of out-of-town guests, Laura Mitchell Whaley from Florida and Lisa Faye here from Pennsylvania. Also, it was a good old get-together reunion for some of the gals from the Laurel High School class of ‘85. I have been strictly instructed to end this clip with “and a good time was had by all” — so here ‘tis, Laura. Guests last week of Roy and Mary Ann Fasold were Helen and Frank Hickam of Wilmington. Mrs. Hickam is formerly from Laurel, remembered by all of you as Helen Progar. Seven-year-old Breanna Spahn of King, N.C., kept her godmother, Karen Pugh, mighty busy last week playing little girl games with her when she was Karen’s guest for the week. Darrell Meade was hosted to a very memorable birthday party last Saturday night in honor of his “big 50.” His three sons had prepared a video of his life and following the viewing of it, he was thoroughly roasted by a large group of family members and friends who were attending

The John Benson Support Group enjoyed a beautiful, late summer day for their benefit barbecue in John’s honor. It was a very well-organized event, well attended and sold out by a bit after noon. His family and friends are extremely grateful for the donations of any kind which were contributed and for those who participated in any way, making this event a huge success. About sixty Saturday-Morning Walkers, on Aug. 16, met for a picnic at the Delmar V.F.W. Memorial Park. There were refreshments galore, a good old-fashioned bean bag toss and many other games and fun and fellowship abounding on that pretty, sunny afternoon. We continue with prayers for all of our servicemen and servicewomen and for our friends who are ill: John Benson, Ted Clark, June Williams, Martha Windsor, Patrick Starr, Philip Lowe, Steve Trivits, Hattie Puckham, Pete Henry, Alvin Lutz, David Phillips, Harriett MacVeigh, Jean Henry, Donald Layton Sr., Herman Cubbage and Robert D. Whaley. Delmar get well wishes go out to: Louise Foxwell, Gloria Adkins, Lib Figgs, Bob Horn, Bob Christian, Joyce Lord and Darryl Haggar. Greg and Donna Adkins, on Aug. 27, will observe 25 years married and we wish them many more years to celebrate. Many happy birthday wishes with love from the family and friends were sent to Peg James on Aug. 20. Happy August birthday wishes to: Beverly Trice and Janet Redifer on Aug. 22; Virginia Foster and Joyce Jones, Aug. 23; Dennis Wilson, Aug. 24; Dr. W. Pierce Ellis and Delores Hyland, Aug. 25; Beatrice Joseph, Aug. 26, and Herman Cubbage, Aug. 28. “Practice makes perfect, so be careful what you practice.” See you in the Stars.

Dutch Country Market

Happy Birthday

Melissa LaMont Davis 8/24/61 - 9/29/07 We do not need a special day to bring you to our minds. The days we do not think of you are very hard to find. If tears could make a staircase and heartaches make a lane, we’d walk the path to heaven and bring you home again. Our family chain is broken now and nothing seems the same. But as God calls us one by one the chain will link again. WE LOVE YOU Terry & Jesse, Mom and Mickey, Michelle, Monique and Milinda and their families.

the celebration. Catered refreshments and desserts were served and the celebrating continued ‘til very late evening.

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SALES ~ SERVICE INSTALLATION 302

875-0663

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M A N Y D O O R PA RT S I N S TO C K

AUGUST DOG DAYS 21 - 22 - 23 Jumbo, All Beef & Cheese Hot Dogs On Sale Meatballs & Sauce...........................$3.29 lb. Veg. Farmer Cheese.........................$3.99 lb. A Pennsylvania Dutch 302 Market in Laurel Across from Johnny Janosiks, Rd. 462

875-1678

Come and See, Feel and Smell The Quality!

DUTCH COUNTRY HEIRLOOM Saleon FURNITURE WoodenL awn Located Next to Dutch Country Market

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 54

Opinion Editorial Organized youth activities providing healthy benefits In this age of escalating rates of early-onset diabetes and obesity, exercise is touted as something that everyone should engage in. And being active can result in more than keeping weight down and improving insulin resistance. Recent studies have linked exercise to lower cancer rates and improved immune systems. Participating in organized youth sports have all those health benefits. Then of course there are the lifelong lessons that being part of a team can teach — how to deal with adversity, how to retain a sense of sportsmanship even in the face of a loss. And the personal and social benefits — being part of a group that is working toward a single goal and just the sheer fun of playing. All of this was in action recently when the Laurel Senior Softball Team took to the field in the world softball championships, held in Roxana. The 15- and 16-year-old girls, coached by Jeff Evans, Rodney Hearne and Robert Trout, were automatically invited to the tourney when they won their district title. In the five years of the tournament, this was the fourth year that the Laurel girls were invited. The girls finished 3 and 2 and were denied a trip to the semifinals when they lost a controversial game to Puerto Rico. But through it all, the coaches were enthusiastic and were careful, following losses, not to let the players get down. It is a tribute to the coaches that the girls who will still be eligible to participate in the league next year, about half of them, have indicated that they will do so. We praise these coaches, and all coaches involved in youth sports, on the community level as well as in our schools. It isn’t easy to give up precious time to any volunteer activity, and coaching children and teenagers requires a lot of energy. Looking back on the summer softball season and forward to another school year, with the promise of football, field hockey and soccer games, we thank coaches for their gift of time and talent to helping youngsters enjoy whatever games they have decided to play. For the sake of our children, we are grateful for their dedication.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

County Council prepares for growth by setting aside funds for expansion By Dale R. Dukes Sussex County Council

GUEST COLUMN

On Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2008, the majority of the Sussex County Council voted to purchase 30 acres of land on Route 113 in Georgetown for a future County Administration complex. The current County building downtown has reached capacity, so it is appropriate now for the County to look toward the future. This decision was far from rash and sudden, as some might suggest. And it should come as no surprise to anyone. Almost a year of negotiations went into the planning of this purchase, after years of space problems being talked about and studied. Those negotiations paid off for the County and taxpayers: the first asking price for the property was $4.2 million; but, due to the economic times, the price came down to $2.4 million – a savings of $1.8 million. Our County Administrator, Mr. David Baker, and the budget committee have always looked ahead five to 10 years to assess the County’s needs. A few years ago, under our former County Administrator and upon staff’s recommendation, the Council voted unanimously to start setting aside money in each budget for a future Administration building. To date, the County has set aside approximately $14 million for a new building. That’s not rash and sudden. That’s appropriate planning. When our present building opened in 1996, it was estimated to last the County 20 to 25 years. However, due to the incredible rate of growth that no one could have foreseen, it lasted almost 12 years before our departments outgrew it. Today, because of that growth, we have employees scattered around Georgetown – at our West Complex annex on Route 113, at the Sussex County Airport terminal

building, and even in rented additional office space downtown that is costing the County’s taxpayers almost $44,000 per year. As anyone who has visited downtown Georgetown knows, parking is a huge problem and has been for a long time. The County has had conversations with the State of Delaware and the Town of Georgetown for needed office space. They, too, have similar space needs, and I am confident the County would have no trouble in accommodating. In fact, the current County Administration building could be rented to capacity immediately if we were to vacate it. The County likely would retain ownership of the building and just lease it out, with some space remaining for certain departments, such as the Recorder of Deeds, Clerk of the Peace, Register of Wills and Sheriff’s office, all of which are associated with the courts. I can imagine a County complex under one roof, with ample parking, allowing people to come for onestop permitting and most other services. This, however, will never happen if we stay in town. With the new location, prominently situated at the intersection of Route 113 and Trap Pond Road, it would be easy to access from all points throughout the county. Just recently, the County opened a new $13 million Emergency Operation Center. It took smart planning to make that project a reality. Because we recognized the need years ago, we started putting money away for the project. We can proudly say the County owns the building today debt-free. All of this was accomplished without raising property taxes for

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Frank Calio

Donna Huston Carol Kinsley James Diehl Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Ann Wilmer

the past 19 years. Investing in the future of the county with money set aside for capital projects we know are coming is good planning and responsible government. The decision to purchase the 30acre site for a future Administration complex is a wise investment – not for today, but for tomorrow. We can pay for this land with cash on hand now and still have almost $12 million left to start a new building project. It is my hope that a future Council can continue saving money, just as this one has, for a new building – allowing it to open debt-free. A few have criticized the County for not planning. And those same few have criticized this decision. Unfortunately, they do not have all the facts. Others have labeled the majority of Council as “lame ducks” and called on us to not make any real decisions in our remaining months. That is not good government, in my opinion. We are not a sit-backand-do-nothing Council. We try our best to do what is right for the people of the county. And we will continue to do that until the very last day in office. I can only hope that whoever succeeds us would do no less, and will carry with them, just as we have, the same vision and enthusiasm to serve the people of our great county.

Quoteworthy ‘No arsenal, or no weapon in the arsenals of the world, is as formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women.’ Ronald Reagan

Circulation Karen Cherrix Sales George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams

Composition Cassie Richardson Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Treasurer Rita Brex Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Carol James town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 21 - 27, 2008

PAGE 55

Here’s why we should be concerned about Georgia Georgia has been a nation of Christians since 400 AD

Georgia has been in the news recently and I didn’t know a thing about this country. What follows is a condensation of what I extracted from the Internet, specifically MSN ENCARTA. Perhaps you will enjoy this refresher. Georgia is a large part of the isthmus that lies between the Black Sea (accessing the world’s oceans) and the Caspian Sea (landlocked, no outlet). Georgia borders the Black Sea shore to the west, Armenia and Azerbaijan on the south and Russia along the north and east borders. It is a small country; it would rank No.41 in size among states in the USA, about the size of West Virginia. Its population would rank No. 27 among states in USA, similar to Minnesota. The terrain is mountainous except for a seaside plain and valleys cut by two major rivers. The climate and abundant water supply for irrigation make excellent growing conditions. Agriculture employs more than half of the population. Electric power is abundant, 83% from hydro-electric stations. Substantial but undeveloped oil and gas fields exist off the Black Sea coast. Georgia has abundant mineral deposits and forest products. There are three pipelines running through Georgia from the Caucasus to either Turkey or a Black Sea seaport, with Georgia collecting a fraction pumped as a transit fee.

FOOD LION WEEKLY SPECIALS

Final Word Georgia is a close-knit country with a proud and ancient history. It converted to Christianity in 400 AD. About 58% remain Christian (vs.19% Moslem). It is the sole official user of the unique Georgian language since 1919. Adult literacy is 99.5% thanks to mandatory, free education under the Soviets. Georgia has had a checkered political history since breaking away from Russia in 1991. Currently it is a constitutional democracy that includes two autonomous republics, Ajaria (adjacent to Turkey) and Abkhajian (adjacent to Russia), and one autonomous region, South Ossetia (adjacent to Russia). Each of the three has its own legislature and a local leader. The two adjacent to Russia speak Russian and have agitated for separation for a long time. Georgia has been in political turmoil for much of the time since it broke away from Russia (1990). Some positive signs were: accepting membership in the United Nations in 1990, a new constitution established by a representative government in 1995, inflation controlled to 1% per month by 1997 (previously up to 62% per month) and the election of Mikhail Saakashvili in 2004 and re-elected in 2008. Georgia is a small, westward leaning constitutional democracy with many positive attributes. It is worth saving as an independent democracy. It has territorial disputes with Abkhajian and South Ossetia which should be resolvable diplomatically, perhaps in the UN. Russia appears ready to swallow all of Georgia on the pretense of “protecting” those two territories. This must not be allowed to happen. Dick Livingston

Seaford

Ask your local Food Lion Manager how you can receive the Food Lion Weekly Specials Flyer. We need your help to get the Food Lion’s Weekly Specials Insert in the Laurel Star and the Seaford Star.

Action disturbs witness

On Aug. 12, my husband and I went to watch two of our grandchildren practice Pop Warner football. This takes place at Laurel High School. There are between 20 and 25 boys age 7-10 on this team. There were also about that many adults there. About halfway through practice we see two Laurel police cars and a van driving across the field. One car drove around the track field and parked down near some houses, the other car and van drove over to the end of the field. The people in the van got out and started walking over to practice, and then we could tell they were from Probation & Parole office. They walked around among the parents and then I heard one say, “He’s not here.” Evidently they were looking for someone. I know the officers have to do their job, but did they have to come to a kid’s practice? Think of the consequences if the person they were looking for had a gun and started shooting! The safety of a lot of kids and adults would have been in jeopardy.

If they found the person, were they going to arrest him there in front of his child? What a traumatic experience for the child and his friends. What would they have done, left the child there to get home anyway he could? I think the officers should have thought their plan out a little better. It looks as if they did not care about anyone or anything except getting their man. Does Barney Fife live in Laurel? Rose Hastings

Laurel

Concerned for our neighborhood

After reading and listening to the tragic story about the accident on the Bay Bridge, I had to write. This could have been an accident on (Road 446) Beaver Dam Branch Road in Laurel. The speed limit on Beaver Dam Branch Road is 40 mph, way too fast for a residential area (Our neighborhood is between Shiloh Church Road and Johnson Road). We risk our lives daily getting our mail, taking a walk, trying to ride our bikes and mowing our lawns, which we are entitled to do. The speed at which people travel through our neighborhood is unreal. Last year I contacted Rep. Biff Lee. In turn, he responded by asking the state police to contact me. They did and said our area would be monitored. Nothing at all has changed

since those contacts were made. I would like to invite Mr. Lee, the state police, DelDOT or any local authorities to come sit in my driveway (I’ll provide coffee and donuts) to witness the speed traveled on Beaver Dam Branch Road. With school about to start people need to slow down and obey the laws. A child, dog, or adult does not stand a chance of survival if an accident happens. By the way, about four years ago while mowing his lawn, a neighbor was killed by a speeding driver. To whom can we send our bills for mailbox replacements each time they are taken out by a careless speeding driver? Someone help us, please. Herb and Helen Cook

Laurel

More advice from Red Skelton

Following are a few more examples of Red Skelton’s humor taken from his advice for a “perfect marriage.” • My wife told me the car wasn't running well because there was water in the carburetor. I asked where the car was. She told me, “In the lake.” • My wife got a mud pack, and looked great for two days. Then the mud fell off. • My wife ran after the garbage truck, yelling, “Am I too late for the garbage?” The driver said, “No, jump in!”


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