Issuu on Google+

VOL. 11 NO. 2

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

50 cents

Citizen award

NEWS HEADLINES

Bobby Carey, of Carey’s Inc., U.S. 13, Laurel, was honored Monday night for his service to the town and citizens of Laurel. In making the presentation, Chief Jamie Wilson said that Carey always goes ‘above and beyond to support the Laurel Police Department and the citizens of Laurel.’ He added, ‘You will have to search long and hard in this town to find anyone who has not been touched in a positive way by this very humble man who is by far one of the WINNERS! The Delmar 9- and 10-year-old and 10- and 11-year-old softball teams celebrate their wins in the state championship games with a ride in a Delmar Fire Company truck last week. More photos on page 41. Photo by Mike McClure

DELIGHTED SCHOOL - After state test scores were released recently, one area high school is ‘delighted.’ Page 2 AFRAM COMING - See pages 13 through 20 for details about this weekend’s festival. TWO TEAMS LEFT - The District III Senior League Softball team opened World Series play last weekend, while the Laurel Junior League team is representing the district and the state in the Eastern Regionals in Syracuse. Junior softball page 41, Senior softball page 42

INSIDE THE STAR © Business . . . . . . . . .6 Bulletin Board . . . .22 Church . . . . . . . . .24 Classifieds . . . . . .32 Education . . . . . . .10 Gourmet . . . . . . . .21 Health . . . . . . . . . .48 Letters . . . . . . . . . .30 Lynn Parks . . . . . .31 Mike Barton . . . . . .30 Mike McClure . . . .44 Movies . . . . . . . . . . .7

Obituaries . . . . . . .26 Opinion . . . . . . . . .54 Pat Murphy . . . . . .52 People . . . . . . . . . .40 Police . . . . . . . . . .39 Snapshots . . . . . . .53 Laurel Socials . . . .53 Sports . . . . . . . . . .41 Todd Crofford . . . .25 Tony Windsor . . . .52 Tides/Weather . . . .55

hardest working and most caring people in Laurel.’ See story, page 4. Photo by Tony Windsor

Carnival calls people home to Sharptown By Lynn R. Parks It’s all about roots. At least that’s what Gary Ellis, standing in a line of people intent on getting a soft-shelled crab sandwich, said. His roots in Sharptown, Md., where he grew up, are what call him from his home in Wilmington to the Sharptown Carnival every year. “I’ve come to this carnival every year since I was old enough to come,” said Ellis, 70. Jim Marvel, Lewes, has also been coming to the festival since he was a child. But for him, it’s all about the food. “I have been here every year for 40some years,” said the Seaford native, talking around an oyster sandwich. “These oyster sandwiches are the best. They have good flavor and the fritters are big — they fill up the bread.” Regardless of their size, they still aren’t enough to satisfy his appetite. In

Jim Marvel, left, and Keith Adkins, both of Lewes, enjoy oyster sandwiches at the Sharptown Carnival Saturday night. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

front of Marvel, sitting on the wooden picnic table as though patiently waiting their turn, were two hamburgers. And Marvel was already looking forward to a trip to the French fry stand. “It’s a long drive from Lewes to Sharptown,” Marvel smiled. “You work up quite an appetite.” The Sharptown Carnival opened Thursday for its 80th annual run.

Operated by the Sharptown Volunteer Fire Department as a fund-raiser, the carnival will run until Aug. 26, open every evening except Sundays. Emma Adkins, Seaford, and her son, Keith, Lewes, arrived at the carnival grounds Saturday evening at around 5:45, an hour and 15 minutes before the food booths were set to Continued on page 8


PAGE 2

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Laurel High earns ‘superior’ rating School’s reading scores on state tests up 14 points, math scores up 15 points By Lynn R. Parks Teachers and administrators at Laurel High School are very pleased with the the latest round of state tests. With improvements in scores in all three areas tested, the school has been rated “superior” under the Delaware State Testing Program. “We are all delighted with the high school,” said Karen Hughes, the district’s No Child Left Behind coordinator. “We have done a lot of work there with the staff and it’s paying off. We are delighted with everything the staff has accomplished.” Reading scores at the high school were up 14 points, from 505 to 519 with 71 percent of the school’s students meeting the state standard. Of the 19 districts in the state, Laurel’s scores were ninth highest. Math scores were up even more, 15 points from 515 to 530; 54 percent of the student body met the state standard. The district’s ranking in 10th-grade math was 12th out of 19. Writing scores were up .5 points, from 7.6 to 8.1. Just over 73 percent of the students met the state standard and the district was ranked 10th out of 19. Ratings, like the Laurel High “superior,” are based on improvement over last year’s scores. Seaford High School did not fare so well. While the school saw slight gains in

math scores (1 point), writing and reading scores were down slightly (.3 points in writing, 2 points in reading.) Sixty percent of its students met the standard in reading, 68.7 percent in writing and 39 percent in math. The school is rated as “academic progress, under school improvement,” which means that it has two years to improve its scores before sanctions under the No Child Left Behind program kick in. “Last year, we were under ‘academic review,’” said Steve Garner, supervisor of assessment, accountability and technology. “We didn’t meet all the state targets, so now we have two years to show improvement. We need to take a look at our curriculum and instruction to make sure they are matched with our students’ abilities.” On a positive note in the Seaford School District, all four of its elementary schools were rated superior. Scores were up across the board in all subjects except reading, which declined by just one point. Just over 50 percent of the third graders met the writing standard; 84 percent met the reading standard and 86 percent met the math standard. In the fifth grade, 88 percent of Seaford’s students met the reading standard, 77 percent met the math standard and 48.8 percent met the writing standard. The middle school, which was placed on “academic progress, under school im-

provement” last year, was able to meet the ward the top,” Garner said. “That’s what state targets through “safe harbor,” a we strive for. But we are pleased with the process that permits a school that shows movement in a positive direction at the improvement but not in all areas to meet middle school.” state requirements. All middle school stuOther than the high school, the three redents showed improvement except for two maining schools in the Laurel district were groups, math special rated commendable. education students “Any time a school and language arts is not under review, ‘We have done a lot of work there special education we are delighted,” students. ImproveHughes said. with the staff and it’s ment in those two In the middle paying off. We are delighted with categories, however, school, 51 percent of was enough for the the eighth graders everything the staff has school to qualify for met the math stan“safe harbor.” dard. Nearly 86 peraccomplished.’ “If we can contincent met the writing ue progress there and standard and 78 permeet the targets next cent met the reading year, there is a real standard. Scores Karen Hughes good chance we will were up in writing Testing coordinator be removed from (.3 points) and down ‘under improvein reading (3 points) ment,’” Garner said. and math (3 points). Just over 40 percent of the middle Just over 40 percent of the district’s school students met the state standard in fifth graders met the writing standard, 70 math. Nearly 59 percent met the state stan- percent met the reading standard and 67 dard in writing and 71 percent met the percent met the math standard. And in the state standard in reading. third grade, 65 percent met the math stanEven so, the middle school scores put dard, 42.2 percent met the writing standard the Seaford School district at the bottom and 73 percent met the reading standard. of school districts in the state that have Scores were up across the board in the middle schools, 16th out of 16 in all three elementary grades except in fifth-grade subjects. “Obviously, we want to be toreading, in which students averaged the


AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 3

Woodbridge administrator pleased with scores, but work remains, he adds same as they did last year. In the three testing areas, the fifth graders ranked 14th out of 15 districts in writing and math and 15th out of 15 in reading. Third graders were 15th out of 15 districts in reading and writing and 14th out of 15 in math. In the Woodbridge School District, assistant superintendent Heath Chasinov said that administrators and teachers were pleased with improved scores on all grade levels and in nearly all subjects. Only the fifth-grade reading scores were down from last year’s, and those just by one point. “We saw incredible improvement in the percentage of students who are meeting the standard,” he said. Woodbridge Elementary School was rated superior and the middle school was rated commendable. The high school was placed on “academic progress, under school improvement” last year. With the improvements that its students showed this year, the school could get off that rating after next year’s tests, Chasinov said. Like the Seaford School District, however, rankings of Woodbridge’s schools put them at or near the bottom of the list: 19th out of 19 in writing for the high school, 18th out of 19 in math for the high school, 14 out of 16 in eighth-grade writing, 14th out of 15 in fifth-grade reading. “A few years ago, we were last in a greater

‘A few years ago, we were last in a greater number of categories. We had a long way to go. You are not going to go from losing 100 games in one year to winning the World Series in the next. We are showing steady growth every year.’

Heath Chasinov Assistant superintendent, Woodbridge School District

number of categories,” said Chasinov. “We had a long way to go. You are not going to go from losing 100 games in one year to winning the World Series in the next. We are showing steady growth every year.” Charity Phillips, in charge of the state testing program in the Delmar School District, is on vacation this week and was unavailable for comment. Delmar students’ scores were up across the board, in all three subjects in the eighth grade and in the 10th grade. In the 10th grade, the district is ranked fifth out of 19 districts in reading, third out of 19 in writing and seventh out of 19 in math. In the 8th grade, the district is fourth out of 16 districts in reading, second out of 16 in writing and seventh out of 16 in math.


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Police officer recognized for valor during standoff By Tony E. Windsor A Laurel police officer was honored Monday evening during the Laurel Town Council workshop meeting for his role in helping to save a local woman during an incident involving a man with a high-powered rifle. Laurel Police Chief Michael “Jamie” Wilson presented Patrolman 1st Class Adam Coleman with the Medal of Valor for his efforts while being dispatched to a complaint of shots being fired on Beaver Dam Branch Road on Wednesday, May 31. According to Wilson, at about 5:40 a.m. Coleman received a call regarding shots at a residence on Arvey Road, near Laurel. He was told that an unknown subject in a red truck had shot at a residence in that area “over 100 times.” While on his way to that complaint he was notified that the same man was now at another location, shooting at a residence on Beaver Dam Branch Road. Arriving at the scene, Coleman discovered the man with the red truck in possession of a highpowered .223 caliber rifle. A short distance from the man was a vehicle stopped in the middle of the roadway. The vehicle was operated by Esther Foskey, who was delivering newspapers that

morning. Immediately, Coleman made his way to Foskey and helped her to escape the area. Once Foskey was out of danger, Coleman called out to the man, Anthony J. Windels, of Omaha, Neb. Coleman called the Sussex Communications Center and notified them that he was behind cover but that Windels was pointing the rifle at him. Wilson said that Coleman began talking to Windels in an effort to calm him down. At about 6 a.m., a state police unit arrived and assisted Coleman in attempting to calm Windels. Despite their efforts, Windels shot and killed himself at the scene. Wilson said that the investigation revealed that during the shooting incidents, Windels fired several hundred rounds at the two locations. He was found in possession of the .223-caliber rifle and a .45-caliber and a .40-caliber handgun. “For 20 minutes, PFC Coleman, who was all alone, risked his life for the safety of others, engaging in a stand-off with a heavily armed subject,” Wilson said. “If not for the actions of PFC Coleman this situation would have been a lot worse.” He said that later in the day on

May 31, Esther Foskey called the Laurel Police Department to thank Coleman for his actions. “She said that the armed man pointed the rifle directly at her and she feared for her life,” Wilson said. “Ms. Foskey said that if PFC Coleman had not arrived when he did, the gunman would have fired at her.” In making the Medal of Honor presentation to Coleman, Wilson said the officer demonstrated true valor. “If you look up the word valor in the dictionary, it is defined as courage and boldness; bravery and strength. I cannot think of any other words more fitting to describe PFC Coleman’s actions on the morning of May 31, 2006,” he said. Coleman is the first Laurel Police Officer to receive the Medal of Valor. At the ceremony, Wilson pledged to make sure that officers and citizens who exhibit exemplary performance in service to the people of Laurel are recognized for their efforts. “For too long, citizens from our town and police officers from our department have done heroic deeds that have gone unnoticed. As the new police chief, that is one thing I am going to change,” Wilson said. Wilson also recognized a Laurel businessman who he said has

Always Caring, Always A Cut Above

302.542.3122

On All Diamond Jewelry

1258 Norman Eskridge Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $17 a year in county; $22 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $27 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

mal thank you for his support. “You will have to search long and hard in this town to find anyone who has not been touched in a positive way by this very humble man who is by far one of the hardest working, and most caring people in Laurel,” Wilson said. “Tonight we are here to say thank you to Mr. Bobby Carey for his long term commitment and support of the Laurel Police Department.” “I really appreciate this, but it is a two-way street,” Carey said. “You all help me a lot as well.”

Save 25%

Ray Adkins will diligently work for you, listening to you and delivering what you want and need. Because for him, he is Always Caring, Always a Cut Above.

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

contributed significant time and efforts to support the town of Laurel and the Laurel Police Department. In making the presentation to Bobby Carey, of Carey’s Inc., Wilson said there are a lot of people who work behind the scenes to help assure that the Laurel Police Department’s “day to day operations run smoothly.” Wilson said Carey always goes “above and beyond to support the Laurel Police Department and the citizens of Laurel.” He added that in many cases, Carey does not receive any for-

Summer Diamond Sale

Whether you are seeking a new home, acreage for a business or your dream retirement haven, placing in the hands of www.rayadkins.net your needs a creative, caring and knowledgeable native of the area will certainly place you in a prime place for success.

Laurel Star

Pfc Adam Coleman (left) receives the first ever Laurel Police Department Medal of Valor from Laurel Police Chief Jamie Wilson. Photo by Tony Windsor

Save 20% Storewide

Getting Married Soon? Know Someone Who Is? Stop By The STAR Office

Now Thru Saturday, August 12th

628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford (Next to Medicine Shoppe)

For A

FREE Copy of Our

Bridal Planner

629-9788

“31 Years Building A Heritage Of Quality and Trust” 555 North Hall St, Seaford, DE 19973 (Just off Stein Hwy.) 629-5698 HOURS: Mon.-Th 10-5:30, Friday 10-7; Saturday 10-2

Lay Away at Sale Prices


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 5

Council discusses sale of land along Broad Creek By Tony E. Windsor The potential sale of green space in the town of Laurel raised a few questions at a recent town council workshop meeting. During the Monday, Aug. 7, workshop, Mayor John Shwed presented the town’s idea of selling the land that for a number of years has been used as a vendor and carnival location for the annual Fourth of July celebration. The 4.5-acre parcel is located along Broad Creek, between Poplar Street and Central Avenue. The town has advertised its intentions in local media over the past few weeks and scheduled discussion of the sale at the recent council workshop. Shwed said there will also be a formal public hearing to discuss the land sale at the Aug. 22 regular council meeting. The mayor said that selling the land to a commercial developer would allow the property to be used for economic development and better benefit the town than simply sitting idle. He said there would be stipulations placed on the sale of the land to mandate that whatever is built on the property will fit in the architectural scheme promoted in the town’s comprehensive land-use plan. In addition, the state requires a 30-foot easement allowed along Broad Creek to allow the town to continue it already developed east to west greenway corridor. Laurel resident Dave Sully asked whether property owners in the areas surrounding the site will have the first opportunity to bid on the property. Shwed said that people who own property contiguous to the site will have an opportunity to bid on the property. He added that the town’s attorney may have to decide whether properties separated by the Broad Creek are considered contiguous. Councilman Chris Calio said that he believes they would be. “Roads, waterways and sidewalks would prove no impediment to the issue of contiguous,” he said. “If that were the case, we would never have the opportunity to annex out across US 13.” Ellie Shackle, Laurel, questioned whether the town should be selling open land. “All around Laurel we are seeing green space being developed,” she said. “It is nice that we can see deer in Laurel; I know this may be a nuisance to some people, but we are destroying the habitat of our wildlife. Is it really necessary to do this? We are losing trees all for the sake of economic development. A recent study has shown that for every dollar a municipality gains in taxes from development, it costs the town $1.24 in needed services such as fire and police and the building of infrastructure. I see us in a rush to do all this development and we end up destroying the beauty of our town.” Shackle added the town has empty shops in its downtown area and she feels it would be more productive to revitalize some of the existing buildings before building new storefronts in that same area. Frank Calio, Laurel, Delaware Election Commissioner and a former Laurel Councilman, asked the council if it is able to sell the property for less than its appraised value should a developer need to spend

money to prepare the land for development. “For example, this property is in a flood plain and may require a lot of fill dirt,” he said. “If a developer asked the council to sell the land at a reduced rate, because it may cost quite a bit to bring in dirt, does the council have the ability to do that?” Shwed said the town’s ordinance dictates that the town accept nothing less than the appraised value when selling surplus land. This particular piece of property has been appraised at $483,000. “This is an ordinance adopted by the council, so the council certainly has the ability to change that stipulation,” Shwed added. “However, I am not inclined to move away from selling at less than the appraised value. I believe the intention of the ordinance is to get as much for the property as possible.” Councilman Don Phillips said he feels the question at hand is simple. “We either let that property sit there and be used once a year for the Fourth of July, or we take the $500,000 that it is valued at and invest it to benefit the taxpayers. This piece of property has the potential to provide 20 to 30 new jobs in Laurel. Sitting like it is now that property does not provide one job. It is a question of how we as a town use our assets. That property is an asset and it is best used by selling and allowing it to be commercially developed. I am a steward of this town’s assets and as such, I plan to support the sale of this property.” Laurel resident Dave Herrick asked why the council is moving so fast toward selling the property. “We are being told that Laurel is growing and will be a beautiful place in the coming years,” he said. “Given that forecast, why not wait a few years to take advantage of higher property values?” Phillips said he feels the need to “put the property to work right now” and not take risks with future property values. Shwed said it is important to realize that the town already has a “balance” of green space. “We have the area along the Broad Creek, we also have the Laurel River Park and Janosik Park.,” he said. “Plus, by having new commercial businesses in that downtown area, it will help stimulate revitalization in some of those empty storefronts in downtown Laurel.” He said that the town’s annual July 4th celebration will go on, even if the property is sold. “Anyone who visits the annual Apple-Scrapple celebration in Bridgeville each year sees that they have no large open space, they largely use streets throughout the town,” he said. “We have made the Laurel Chamber of Commerce aware of our plans and the potential sale of the property and they have already begun a search for another site for the Fourth of July celebration. One consideration is the open space around the Laurel High School. We have a lot of green space in Laurel; we will just have to wait to see where our discussions lead us.” The town will hold a public hearing to discuss the sale of the 4.5-acre parcel of land, as well as four other smaller residential properties on West 6th Street, 7th Street and East 8th Street, on Tuesday, Aug. 22, beginning at 7 p.m.

80th Annual

Sharptown Fireman’s Carnival August 3 - 26 Open 7 p.m. - Closed Sundays Rt. 313 & Main Street in Sharptown Oyster Sandwiches, Freshly Made Crab Cakes, Ice Cream Cones, Funnel Cakes, Soft Crabs, Homemade Hamburgers, French Fries, Candy Apples,

Rides, Bingo & More!!!

RIDE ALL NIGHT

$10. ENTER TO

00

WIN!

• 2006 Ford 150 XLT OR 2006 Ford Fusion Provided by Preston Ford • Hunter’s Package (Deer Stand, Fishing Trip & Shotgun) • Big Screen Television AND MORE! Plenty of FREE Parking!


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Business Courtesy has World Class Technician Courtesy Chevrolet Cadillac is helping exceed customer expectations in the service department as they announce they have a GM World Class Technician, Eric Ewell. GM Goodwrench service technicians across the nation complete extensive GM training to earn the status of Mr. Goodwrench, “the one and only GM expert.” GM technicians like Eric Ewell take more than 450 hours of training to reach a higher level of expertise. Ewell is the only World Class Technician on the Eastern Shore and one of only 16 in the State of Maryland. There are only 846 World Class Technicians in the United States. “It takes a lot of commitment and hard work to earn the World Class distinction,” says Ray Nordstrom, president of Courtesy Chevrolet Cadillac. “Eric Ewell has completed this program and has earned Master Technician as well as an ASE Master technician. We are extremely proud to have Eric part of the Courtesy family.” Ewell is a resident of Laurel and has been employed with Courtesy Chevrolet for the last two years. He is engaged to Heather McLamb of Delmar, Md. Trina Joyner has been awarded the certified residential specialist designation by the council of residential specialists. Ms. Joyner, a Seaford Realtor has been awarded the prestigious Rodney and Trina Joyner Certified Residential Specialists (CRS) Designation by the Council of Residential Specialists, the largest not-forprofit affiliate of the National Association of Realtors. Realtors who receive the CRS Designation have completed advanced courses and have demonstrated professional expertise in the field of residential real estate. Fewer than 38,000 Realtors nationwide have earned the credential. Home buyers and sellers can be assured that CRS Designees subscribe to the strict Realtor code of ethics, have access to the latest technology and are specialists in helping clients maximize profits and minimize costs when buying or selling a home. Joyner is a sales associate with Home Team Realty in Seaford. She is a member of DAR and SCAOR in Delaware. She is also licensed in Maryland and holds memberships with NAR, National Association of Realtors, and CAR, Coastal Association of Realtors.

Local agent earns certification Rodney Joyner of Home Team Realty has successfully completed the Realtor e-Pro course to become one of a select few real estate professionals to earn the prestigious certification offered through the National Association of Realtors. The Realtor e-Pro certification course is an educational program unlike any other professional certification or designation course available, comprehensive and interactive. It is specifically designed to pro-

Ben Yates of GM Service and Doug Wilson, Courtesy Chevrolet Cadillac service manager, stand next to Eric Ewell, who attained the status of GM World Class Technician.

vide real estate professionals with the technology tools needed to assist consumers in the purchase of a home. With more than 70 percent of consumers beginning their real estate research on the Internet, e-Pro certified agents have

LOCAL CORN BEANS TOMATOES SQUASH From Blades take right on River Road to Holly Shores. Take left on Clark Rd. to Gum Branch. Take left on Johnson Rd. to US 13A. Take left past barricade to Mernie’s. Blades US 13 N Riv

er

Rd



MERNIE’S MARKET

Clark Rd

Joh

Gum Branch

nso

d n R

US 13 A

Trina Joyner is certified specialist

MERNIE’S MARKET 1/2 Mi. South of Blades on Rt. 13A

628-1110 • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon. - Fri. 10-6, Sat. 9-6, Sun. 10-5

the experience and expertise to meet the demands of today’s buyer and seller. “The real estate industry has undergone a fundamental change over the past several years,” said Rodney Joyner of Home Team Realty. “A majority of consumers are tak-

ing the time to conduct their own research prior to contacting an agent. In turn, real estate professionals must be knowledgeable of how technology can assist them in serving the needs of the buying and selling public.” The exclusive Realtor e-Pro certification course is presented entirely online and certifies real estate agents and brokers as Internet professionals. Because of its innovative design, students are able to complete the course at their own pace, when and where they want, via any Internet connection. The course is designed to help Realtors stay at the leading edge of technology and identify, evaluate and implement new Internet business models. Once completed, the e-Pro certified real estate professionals joins the ranks of a special community of highly skilled and continuously trained professionals who provide high quality and innovative online-based real estate services. Consumers can identify the e-Pro through the exclusive e-Pro Internet Professional logo. Both the content and the delivery platform were created by San Diego-based technology company InternetCrusade. The course instructs participants in the professional use of e-mail, the development of an interactive website, and the use of online research tools. Graduates use the skills they’ve acquired to provide clients information on properties for sale, local communities, and the local real estate market. For more information, e-mail Rodney Joyner at realestate@joynerteam.com, or call 302-745-7341.


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10-16, 2006

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

MOV I E S ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307

302-629-5575 • 800-221-5575 ______________________________ LICENSED IN DELAWARE & MARYLAND

SCHEDULE FOR FRIDAY, 8/11 THRU SUNDAY, 8/13 Monster House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8:20 Talladega Nights The Ballad of Ricky Bobby . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Follows 1st Show

P.O. Box 598-US 13, Seaford, DE 19973 Fax: 302-629-5573

www.cbbroadcreek.com

NEW LISTING

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 8/11 - FRI. 8/18. Talladega Nights: The Legend of Ricky Bobby . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 Daily, 2:00 Sunday

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 8/11 THRU THURSDAY, 8/17 John Tucker Must Die . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:50, 7:10, 9:40 Miami Vice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35 Lady In The Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30 Pirates of the Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:25 Zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:00 Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 9:45 The Devil Wears Prada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:45, 7:15, 9:35 Talladega Nights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25 Step Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:15, 7:00, 9:10 Monster House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:40, 6:30, 8:45 The Descent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:15, 4:25, 6:45, 9:05 Barnyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 6:25, 8:40 The Night Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:35, 7:10, 9:15

Perfect for the growing family. Well built home w/possible 4th BR, oversized 2 car-garage. Located on a landscaped 1.6 acre corner lot. New siding on garage. Hardwood under carpets. #539005 $169,900

Nice 2 BR home in Laurel. New carpeting & replacement windows in 2006. Spacious rooms & room for a garden make this a must see. #527132 $145,000

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 8/11 THRU THURSDAY, 8/17 World Trade Center . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . .Fri-Thu (12:30, 1:15, 3:30, 4:15) 6:30, 7:15, 9:30, 10:15 Step Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:30, 1:30, 3:00, 4:15, 5:30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:45, 8:00, 9:30, 10:35 Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:45, 3:00, 5:15) 8:15, 10:30 Zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:00, 2:15, 4:45) 7:15, 9:45 Talladega Nights The Ballad of Ricky Bobby . . . . .PG13 . . .Fri-Thu (1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00) 6:30, 7:45, 9:15, 10:15 Barnyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . .Fri (2:30, 4:45) 7:00, 9:15 Sat (12:15, 4:45) 7:00, 9:15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sun (2:30, 4:45) 7:00, Mon (2:30, 4:45) 9:15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tues (12:15, 4:45) 7:00 Wed (2:30, 4:45) 9:15 The Descent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:45, 4:30) 7:45, 10:35 The Night Listener . . . . . . . . . . .NR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Wed (4:00) 9:00, Thu 4:00 The Ant Bully . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:00) Miami Vice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri Thu (12:45, 3:45) 7:00, 10:00 John Tucker Must Die . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:45, 4:30) 7:30, 10:30 Miami Vice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:45, 3:45) 7:00, 10:00 Lady In The Water . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu 9:45 Monster House . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:00, 2:45, 5:00) 7:30 Little Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (3:45) 6:15, 9:00 You, Me and Dupree . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:30) 6:15 Pirates of the Caribbean . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri-Thu (12:15, 3:30) 6:45, 10:00 Snakes On A Plane . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thu Late Show 10:20 () Discounted showtimes in Parenthesis * Pass/Discount Restrictions Apply

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

Buy One Lunch Menu Items 1-13

or Buy One Dinner

CO RE UPO QU N IR ED

Great location with 3 BR 2 BA oneowner home on 1.22 landscaped acres. 2-car garage, all appliances, 2yr old carpet and vinyl, large master suite. #528693 $232,900

G reat weekend or summer getaway! 1 mile to Lewes Bch, less than 10 min to Cape Henlopen St. Park. Bring the rods & boat & beach chairs. All you need is the suitcase. Reasonable lot rent @ $285/mo. #527947 $12,500 Ni 3 BR h i l VIRTUAL TOUR

Nice 3 BR home in pleasant neighborhood on corner lot w/ fenced backyard. Close to shopping & schools. Sellers’ help w/closing costs. #535002 $160,000

G rand Victorian home built in the late 1800s. This 3000 sq. ft. home had 4-5 BR, 2 1/2 BA, hardwood floor, open stairs to partly finished attic, original ceiling beams, woodwork, updated kitchen, 3 bay garage & fenced yard, + much more. Great Buy at $259,900 #531923

Beautiful 3 BR 2 BA home w/walkin closets, finished bonus rm, walkin storage, ceiling fans, 2 x 6 walls, marble windowsills. Energy Star certified. #536531 $299,900

Ready to grow!! Completely updated farm with 67K broilers, computerized, tunnel, solid sidewalls, center brood, 135 KW Generator. Fenced pasture w/3 BR mobile, 2-car garage , approx. 12 acres. Additional land available. #528662

Combo Items 1-21

Get Second

MEXICAN BEERS DOMESTIC BEERS DAILY DRINK 501 N. Dual Hwy., Seaford, DE - Old English’s Bldg. SPECIALS 302-628-9701

1/2 Price

EVERY MONDAY

Cactus Margaritas

$2.50

REG. $4 Lime Only

Open Mon. - Fri. 11 am - 2:30 pm (Siesta) 5 pm - 10 pm, Sat. Noon to 10 pm, Sun. Noon - 9 pm

Ocean City, MD Easton, MD 12534 Ocean Gateway, 7813 Ocean Gateway, 410-213-7324 410-770-8550 Cambridge, MD Salisbury, MD Chestertown, MD 315 Sunburst Hwy. 1045 S. Salisbury Blvd. 715 Washington Ave. 410-228-7808 410-749-4303 410-810-1952


PAGE 8

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Rides, food and bingo draw people to carnival Continued from page 1

open. “We want to make sure that we get a good parking spot and a good seat,” said Emma, sitting at one of the picnic tables near the oyster sandwich stand. “And we want to make sure we get a good spot in line,” she added. At 6:30 p.m., 30 minutes before the shuttered booth was set to open, her son was one of about 200 people standing in the line that curved back and forth in front of the oyster sandwich booth. “We come here for the oyster sandwiches and the hamburgers,” said Emma. “Keith drives all the way from Lewes just for the oyster sandwiches.” Steve Hitchens, Laurel, was seated across the table from Adkins. He was helping her save seats — he was also waiting for sandwiches that his friends Marvel and Nate Motz, Greenwood, were fetching him. And beyond that, he was looking to playing a few games of chance. “I am so ready for bingo,” said Hitchens. Not too far from the oyster sandwich booth is the bingo booth, where a volunteer with the Sharptown Fire Department spins a large vertical wheel and calls out to the players the letter-number combinations on which the wheel lands. On Saturday night, George Henry, Sharptown, was spinning the wheel. “Every year, since I was little, I have come here,” said Hitchens, 47. “I used to enjoy the rides — now I enjoy the food

and the bingo.” So for some, it is the bingo. And for others, the reason that they visit the Sharptown Carnival is that favorite pastime of many: people watching. “We really come here to see the people,” smiled Bud Snyder, Seaford. He and his wife, Betty, were standing in front of Ellis in the soft-shelled crab line, a line they had chosen because it was shorter than the oyster sandwich line. Betty Snyder, 73, grew up in Laurel and remembers visiting the carnival every year with her parents. In addition to enjoying the food there, she and her husband always buy a chance on the car that is raffled off by the fire department. “We will keep coming as long as we can,” said Bud Snyder. “It’s tradition!” So roots, the food, the games, the people and tradition. That is why people visit the Sharptown Carnival. And then there are the rides. “This is very exciting,” said Tom Harvey, standing in the Ferris wheel line with his nephew, Cameron Harvey, 13, and his granddaughter, Abby Lyons, 3. “I haven’t been to one of these small carnivals in years.” The Harvey family is from Alexandria, Va., and have a vacation home near Rhodesdale, Md. “Someone told us we should visit the carnival,” Harvey said. “This is our first time here.” Abby’s mother, Kim Lyons, lives in Greensboro, S.C. As Abby went around and around on the Ferris wheel, Lyons stood on the ground nearby, waving every

Bedrock Bible Drive In

Craft Center

Tom Harvey, Alexandria, Va., enjoy a ride on the Sharptown Carnival Ferris wheel with his granddaughter, Abby Lyons, 3, and his nephew, Cameron Harvey, 13. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

time the car in which her daughter was sitting came into view. “I’m looking forward to the funnel cakes,” Lyons said. “And maybe some games of bingo. This kind of thing is very different from where we live, very small town. It is interesting, and fun.” As for Abby, Lyons had no doubt what she would want to do once the Ferris

wheel ride was over. “She will ride every ride here,” she said, taking in the carnival grounds with a large sweep of her arm. “And that’s OK. Because being here is really just all for her.” Roots, food, games, people, tradition, rides. And creating memories that will last a lifetime. That’s the Sharptown Carnival.

Seaford Dance Center Located 312A High St., Seaford Above Bon Appetit

Fall Session Begins Sept. 11 Registration Days and Times at Studio Pebble Preschool

Heart Rock Cafe

Wed., Aug. 16 th 4 pm - 7 pm Sat., Aug. 19 th 9 am - 11:30 am

Laurel Wesleyan Church VBS ‘06 Cliff Hangers 5th-6th Graders

August 21st-25th 6:30pm-8:45pm Ages 3 to 6th Grade

Mind Shaft

Rec Rock

Day 1 – U Rock! – Jesus can make a difference in you! Day 2 – Rockin’ Down the House – You can make a difference in your home! Family Night- Parents come see “how to tame your family zoo”, nursery care available

Day 3 – Solid as a Rock – You can make a difference in your community! Day 4 – Rockin’ the Red, White, & Blue – make a difference in your nation! Day 5 – Rockin’ Our World – You can make a difference in the world!

Psalm 18:2: The Lord is my rock, my fortress, and my deliverer; my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge.

Register on line at http://www.laurelwesleyan.org At the church Sunday mornings or call the office at 875-5380

CONTACT TELEPHONE NUMBERS: 302 629-2193 • 302645-9159 • 410543-1172 Maubra Jane Randolph, Director

TA P B A L L E T J A Z Z

Specials August 10-11-12

Turkey Ham

(Black Forest)...................$2.19 lb. Horseradish Cheddar. .$5.19 lb. Cucumber Salad...........$1.19 lb. Fresh Meats, Cheeses & Salads, Bulk Candy, Honey, Jams, Cakes, Pies, Cookies, Breads & More. Rotisserie Hams, Roast Beef, Pork & Turkey Breasts

Dutch Country Market Hrs: Thurs. & Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5

A Pennsylvania Dutch 302 Market in Laurel Across from Johnny Janosiks, Rd. 462

875-1678

Yoder Overhead Door Co. YOUR HOMETOWN GARAGE DOOR DEALER When It Comes To Good Looks And Great Value: We Have The Doors For You: • Insulated • Non-Insulated • Wood Grained • Raised Panel • Steel Doors • Flush Panel Doors • Wood Carriage House Doors Our Commercial Doors Available Up To An R Value of 24

SALES ~ SERVICE INSTALLATION 302

875-0663

13 SOUTH, LAUREL, DE www.yoderoverheaddoor.com

M A N Y D O O R PA RT S I N S TO C CK K


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 9

Ordinances would address abandoned cars and noise By Mike McClure The Delmar Joint Council, during its meeting last Monday, held first readings on three ordinances for the bi-state town: an abandoned vehicles ordinance, a noise ordinance and a flood plain ordinance. The council also discussed the possibility of starting a curbside recycling program in town. All three ordinances up for first reading apply to both sides of town, in Delaware and in Maryland. The proposed abandoned vehicles ordinance would amend the existing ordinance to allow for stricter enforcement. According to town manager Sara Bynum-King, residents have 30 days to remove a car from their property but the current ordinance doesn’t prohibit the residents from moving the vehicles back to their property. The amended ordinance would address this situation. The noise ordinance addresses complaints from some residents over outdoor amplifier systems at businesses and loud noise from cars at certain times at night. The ordinance requires the maintenance of a certain level of noise from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. The third ordinance deals with residents’ complaints that they couldn’t get flood insurance because they’re not in the 100 year flood plain. According to FEMA, the town can still adopt an ordinance that

would allow them to participate. A Delaware Solid Waste Authority representative spoke to the council about the statewide recycling and voluntary curbside collection program in Delaware. The town was approached about participating in the program, which would include pickup in the Maryland town as well as in Delaware. The council wants to see what the community thinks about the program before agreeing to take part in it. The program, in which containers and bags would be provided for residents, would be mandatory for all residents if the town agrees to participate. Delmar (Del.) Mayor John Outten said he would be more apt to take part in the program if it didn’t mean an additional cost for residents ($2 per week). In other business, Delmar Commons developer Robert Wittig has come to an agreement with the owners of the billboards on the property, located at the corner of routes 13 and 54. Wittig came before the commission during the June meeting asking for a certificate of occupancy even though the billboard still remained on the property (the previous property owner had a contract with the billboard owner). Council members asked Wittig to take down the billboards, which include an advertisement for the Canton Inn Gentleman’s Club. According to Wittig, they will be down by Jan. 15, 2007. The Delmar (Del.) Council agreed to grant Wittig a certificate of occupancy for Delmar Com-

HOME TEAM FANS - Delmar fans watch as players from the 9- and 10-year-old and 10- and 11-year-old state champion softball teams load onto a Delmar Fire Company truck in celebration of the teams’ wins last Tuesday in Delmar. See page 41 for more pictures. Photo by Mike McClure

mons if the project meets the other requirements. The Delmarva Day in the Park, which was rained out in June, is scheduled to take place on Saturday, Sept. 9. Also, Delaware State Treasurer Jack Markell will finish his bike tour at the park on

Aug. 25. The town received a plaque from the National Arbor Day Foundation as part of the Tree City USA. Delmar also hired three new police officers: Justin Smithart, Kevin McCahill and John Dallam. All three are currently in the police academy.

GOODFELLAS PIZZA & SUBS 1 Bi-State Blvd., Delmar, MD

500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com

410

896-9606

Come Enjoy Our

Brand New Dining Room

Sundays and Mondays Buy One Large Pizza Get A Small FREE Country Living! 3 BR/2 BA home with new hardwood floors, fresh paint & well landscaped yard. Detached oversized 2 car garage. All this just waiting for a new owner. 12620 Woodbridge Rd. Greenwood Call today! $199,000 MLS 537802

Great for starting out or slowing down. Cape Cod with personality and charm! Hardwood floors, and a brand new kitchen. 4 BR/2 BA with lg. rooms, fireplace, and open floor plan. 1219 North Atlanta Circle, Seaford $244,900 MLS 538237

TOPPINGS EXTRA Karen Hamilton 628-8500 Ext. 115 Member of President’s Club

ROOFING SALE The New Wave In Roofing

 Can be applied over rusted metal. No need to remove old roofing.

 Guaranteed to never rust!  Not affected by corrosive materials

Sale

$

14

*IN STOCK COLORS

*Black *Blue

49* Per 48”x79”Sheet

Tuesdays

Wednesdays

$1 Off Day Buy One Spaghetti & Meat Ball Dinner Large Subs, Dinners or Large Pizza Get One FREE TOPPINGS EXTRA Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials FRIDAYs Full Menu - Subs, Sandwiches, Dinners, Pizzas & Calzones

such as fertilizers, farm chemicals or fumes from animal waste  Reduces noise … Animals stay calmer  Lifetime Limited Warranty  Visit us at www.ondura.com

*White *Brown *Red *Gray *Green *Tan

Hand Tossed Pizza Baked In Brick Ovens Fresh Dough Never Frozen

2 Large

Dine In or Carry Out Italian Subs Hwy. 13 & Delaware Ave. Laurel, DE 19956 LUMBER & HOME CENTER 302-875-7588

SUN-THURS 11 AM-10 PM FRI & SAT 11 AM-11 PM

$

9

00 + tax

GROUPS & LARGE PARTIES WELCOME Ad specials subject to change without notice.


PAGE 10

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Education Seaford American Legion presents student awards

Commander Joe Tune presents awards to Seaford’s Eric Kimpton and Jennifer Stephens. From left, Post 6 Vice Commander Bob Michael, Eric Fisher, Tobias Harris, Jessica Ruehr and Commander Joe Tune at Seaford High School.

Education awards and scholarships were presented to students at Woodbridge and Seaford high schools recently from the American Legion Post 6 of Seaford. Receiving the JROTC Scholastic Medal and a $500 scholarship were Benjamin H. Massey of Woodbridge and Eric Fisher of Seaford. Margarita D. Contreras of Wood-

bridge and Tobias Harris of Seaford received the JROTC Military Excellence Medal and a $500 scholarship. At Seaford, Jessica Ruehr received a citation and a $1,000 scholarship; $500 scholarships and High Achievement School Awards were also presented to Eric Kimpton and Jennifer Stephens of Seaford High School.

A UD degree is closer than you think!

C OMPLETE

YOUR

UD D EGREE

in Southern Delaware

From left, Benjamin H. Massey, Post 6 Commander Joe Tune, and Margarita D. Contreras of Woodbridge High School.

NEW LISTING!

Angie Zebley Cell: 228-7653

Office: 629-7711 Fax: 628-7747 Email: angie@4htr.com

Beautiful rancher with recent renovations to the exterior of home and the interior has had some revamping done as well. This 3bd, 2.5ba home features master bed with full bath, a formal dining room, an enclosed porch, and a wood burning fireplace. Also attic is floored for extra storage, an attached two car garage, and to pull it all together the lot is beautifully landscaped! Call Angie today to see this home, you’ll be glad you did! $247,900. MLS #539186

Undergraduate Degree Opportunities:

Distance Learning Opportunities:

Associate in Arts Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science in Elementary Teacher Education Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and Natural Resources

Bachelor of Science in Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management

Graduate Degree Opportunities:

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS)

Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Master of Education in Educational Leadership Master of Instruction Ed.D. in Educational Leadership - Administration and Policy - Curriculum and Instruction

Master of Science, Health Services Administration major

• Day and evening classes to fit busy schedules • Added flexibility through Internet courses • On-site academic advisement and career counseling

Associate in Arts Online

Bachelor of Science in Nursing for the RN (BRN) Master of Science in Nursing—RN to MSN Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) with a concentration in Health Services Administration

Master of Engineering, Mechanical (MEM) Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (MSEE) Graduate Certificate in Composite Materials

866/820-0238 (toll-free) continuing-ed@udel.edu www.continuingstudies.udel.edu/south_del/ The University of Delaware is an Equal Opportunity University.


MORNING STAR

âœł AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 11

Koch Foundation awards scholarships to five grads Five local students were among 216 students in the United States and Canada chosen to receive an academic scholarship from the Fred C. and Mary R. Koch Foundation for the 2006-2007 academic year Matthew Thomas Terry, son of Christine and Michael Terry of Seaford, is the dependent of an employee of Invista. He will be attending the University of Delaware Ashley Grace Mocella, daughter of Renee Phillips of Laurel, Invista. She will be attending Salisbury University. Emma Louise Millman, daughter of Judy and Martin Millman of Seaford, will be attending Gettysburg College. Eric Kimpton, son of Steven and Kathryn Kimpton of Seaford, is the dependent of an employee of Invista. He will be attending the University of Virginia. Brett Wilson Barnes, son of Jerry and Suzanne Barnes of Seaford, is the dependent of an employee of Invista. He will be attending Virginia Wesleyan College. Scholarships are awarded yearly to applicants demonstrating a strong academic record, extracurricular involvement, leadership and service. The recipients, all of

whom are dependents of employees of Koch Industries Inc. or its wholly owned subsidiaries in the United States and Canada, are selected by an independent panel of judges with expertise in the field of education. For more than 35 years, the Fred C. and Mary R. Koch Foundation has provided academic scholarships for dependents of Koch employees. The foundation is heavily involved in the support of educational endeavors. Established in 1953, the Fred C. and Mary R. Koch Foundation directs its support toward organizations involved with the arts, environmental stewardship, human services and higher education. Koch Industries Inc., based in Wichita, Kan., owns a diverse group of companies in refining and chemicals; fibers and polymers; commodity and financial trading; and forest and consumer products. These companies have a presence in nearly 60 countries and employ about 80,000 people. More information is available at www.kochind.com.

Matthew Thomas Terry

Ashley Grace Mocella

Eric Kimpton

Brett Wilson Barnes

www.SussexTechTraining.net

Call Today For Information 302-856-9035


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

87th Annual Delaware State Fair a big success With eyes closed, one can imagine the scent of sausages served with peppers and onions filling the air; however, with eyes open, one would notice that the rides have been removed and there isn’t a sno-kone in sight. The memories, however, of yet another sensational Delaware State Fair will live on. Near midnight on Saturday, July 29, the 87th annual event came to a successful close. According to the Fair’s general manager, Dennis Hazzard, “This year’s Wilmington Trust Grandstand shows generated over $1.5 million in sales with 55,346 tickets having been sold — a true record. We sold-out the July 28th Demolition Derby and experienced a 98 percent sellout for Larry the Cable Guy and a 99 percent sellout for Brad Paisley.” Additionally, most of the Fair’s other shows experienced strong sales including the Big Rich concert which offered the most pyrotechnic displays ever presented on the Fair’s stage. “It was tremendous,” exclaimed Hazzard. According to Hazzard, the Fair also placed a real “hit” on the stage during Governor’s Day — The Beach Boys featuring John Stamos. “In recent years, we’ve experimented with alternative forms of entertainment such as Cirquestyle shows and Irish dancing on Governor’s Day; however, this year we contracted The Beach Boys, and we learned this was the Governor’s favorite groups and obviously a crowd-favorite as well.”

$

2.44 9

Per Gallon

#2 Fuel Oil Spot s i h T k C h e c T h u rs d a y E ve r y u r L o w Fo r O l P r i c e Oi Cash Aero reserves the right to change pricing due to sudden or dramatic changes to wholesale oil prices.

The 2006 attendance figures indicate attendance was up 2.3 percent over last year for a total of 284,436 people having visited during the 10-day event. Moreover, Wade Shows, the Fair’s carnival for eight years, established a new record gross due in part to the various unlimited ride promotion days. The Fair’s Junior Livestock Auction offered up Grand Champion, Reserve Champion and market livestock for recordbreaking bidding. This year’s auction raised roughly $138,000 — up 7.8 percent over last year. Monies raised during the event are offered to junior exhibitors to offset the cost of having purchased and raised the animal and to assist college savings funds; moreover, additional funds are donated to the 4-H and FFA organizations. According to Hazzard, overall livestock entries were up 7 percent over 2005 with goat entries being substantially higher. New sponsors and vendors, including fudge, soft pretzel and bakery stands, were added this year. “We want to ensure that we bring in the best vendors in terms of quality and presentation,” he said. “In spite of the warm temperatures and a few showers, the 2006 Delaware State Fair was outstanding,” said Hazzard. “Due to excellent pre-fair planning by a remarkably dedicated staff, aided by members of our volunteer board of directors and the additional seasonal paid personnel and volunteers, the event ran as smooth as I could have wished for.”

www.seafordstar.com www.laurelstar.com SUBSCRIBE ON LINE

Got A Minute? Call 302 629-9788 TO SUBSCRIBE BY PHONE

SAVE When You Pay Cash On Delivery Or Pre-Pay For Your Fuel Delivery Call Toll Free

(866) 423-0781

Yearly Subscription

ONLY $17.00*  My check for $17 is enclosed. Please send  Laurel Star  Seaford Star to: Name _____________________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________ City _____________________ State _______ Zip __________

1616 NORTHWOOD DR., SALISBURY, MD 21801

Serving Wicomico, Worcester & Somerset Counties In Maryland & Sussex County Delaware

Phone __________________ Mail to: Morning Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 *Sussex County $17, Kent & New Castle Counties $22 Delmar & Federalsburg, MD $22, Out of State $27

OR

MAIL COUPON


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 13

2006 EASTERN SHORE AFRAM FESTIVAL Entertainment lineup includes recording artists, drummers and Gospel music This is the week for the 2006 Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival on Friday and Saturday, August 11 and 12, in Nutter Park (located next to the Chandler Heights Apartments). AFRAM, an acronym for AFRican AMerican, is a twoday festival that celebrates the African American community with varied food vendors, entertainment, information, children’s activities and loads of fun. Sankofa Dancers and Drummers have performed at AFRAM for the past four years. Founded in 1994 by Dover City Councilman Reuben Salters, Sankofa is an African dance and African percussion performing arts company for youth ages eight to 18 years old. The company is designed to teach basic African percussion instrumentation and rhythms and dances from various African nations. They also

The Sankofa drummers perform during the 2005 Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival. The dancers and drummers from Dover are an important part of the festival each year. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

FERNWOOD

ROB HARMAN Licensed Broker - De. & Md. 1258 Norman Eskridge Hwy. Seaford, DE

Cell: 302-462-0510 Email: rob423@comcast.net

Fleetwood Estates New Construction! Beautiful new 3 BR, 2 bath home w/ master BR w/full bath featuring double vanities, walk-in closets, and an optional bonus room that can be finished for add’l. costs. The front porch is a great place to relax in the evening, walk-in utility closet, and a two car att. garage. MLS# 527849. $259,990

To Be Built! Gorgeous Rancher in very desirable neighborhood, with 2,512 sq. ft. of living space, 4 BRs, 2 baths, featuring a breakfast nook, LR, DR, laundry room, & storage room. Home also has 3 porches, one in the front & 2 on the rear, 6x24 & 6x15! A 24x28 oversized 2-car garage. Central A/C, carpet & tile flooring. All this on an almost acre lot! $365,000

New Construction!


PAGE 14

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

AFRAM FESTIVAL learn the history of the work and are exposed to various styles. Teachers from Philadelphia, Wilmington, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. are contracted to provide the best instruction available in the area. Sankofa will be in the AFRAM parade on Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. and will be performing at 12:00 p.m. at the festival. New to the AFRAM Festival entertainment lineup is the Red Alert Band from Coatsville, Pennsylvania. Red Alert Band was formed in 1995 of professional and seasoned musicians and they provide a wide range of songs to include Motown, Oldies, and R&B funk. The Red Alert Band will close out the AFRAM Festival on Saturday at 8:00 p.m. Another new AFRAM entertainer is Orlando Phillips, the RastAmerican, from Annapolis, Maryland. Phillips is a oneman steel drum entertainer. He also plays the saxophone, bass guitar, and keyboards to perform calypso, soca, and traditional reggae songs. “Evidently, Orlando Phillips performed here in Seaford at the Fire Hall a couple of years ago,” said Desiree Moore, president and parade chair of the Eastern Shore AFRAM. “Many people were extremely impressed with him and are awaiting his return to Seaford. We gladly welcome all of Orlando Phillips’ fans to the AFRAM Festival”

Phillips was born in the U.S. to Caribbean parents. He was also an original vocalist, bass and sax player for the nationally acclaimed group Starpoint, most known for the song “Object of My Desire”. He has also performed with Patti Labelle, Ashford and Simpson, Kool and the Gang, Natalie Cole, Luther Vandross, Toni Braxton, Morris Day of the Time, and Blackstreet. Phillips will be performing at AFRAM on Friday night at 8:00 p.m. Leading off the wide variety of entertainment that will be featured at this year’s festival is R&B artist, Jimmy Allen. This is Allen’s third year appearing at Amateur Night at AFRAM, which jump starts the festival on Friday night at 5:00 p.m. Allen has been singing since the age of five and is a self taught drummer, percussionist, and pianist. He is currently a sophomore at Delaware State University and has been the opening act for major artists including Usher, B5, and Musiq Soulchild. Allen’s first single is entitled “Perfect Stranger” and is currently receiving radio rotation in Philadelphia, Baltimore and parts of Michigan. Debuting in the entertainment lineup this year is Griots Wa Umoja, a group of African storytellers from New Castle, Delaware. Griots were once Africa’s major source of maintaining a cultural and historical past. Their role was to learn, re-

The City of Seaford

M.A. W illey , I nc . STRUCTURAL STEEL PRODUCTS NEW & USED

Custom Cutting Reinforcing Rod Mesh

302-349-4737 Fax: 302-349-9770 Finley “Butch” Jones, Jr., Pres./Owner Debbie Adams, Vice Pres. 14028 Sussex Hwy., Greenwood, DE 1 mile south of Greenwood

Enjoy the Afram Festival!

Welcomes You to the 2006 AFRAM Festival in Nutter Park!

CHAMBERS MOTORS INC. 24 HOUR TOWING & RECOVERY TRUCK REPAIRS EQUIPMENT HAULING 20610 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE

302

629-3553

100 Industrial Blvd. Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6200


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

tain and pass on the history, folklore and culture of their people. Griots Wa Umoja leads its audiences with song, music, dance, and storytelling on an entertaining and educational journey from Africa through the Caribbean to America. The group, which as been in existence since 1989, focuses on self-determination, Afrocentricity, awareness, education, pride, unity, and love in their performances. Members of Griots Wa Umoja include Stephanie “Jamila” Bell-Knight, an African dancer who specializes in Senegalese and Liberian dance; Patricia “Mama Pat” Butler, an actress, storyteller and dancer; Waju Christie, a percussionist and vocalist with roots in the Yoruba culture in Nigeria, West Africa; and Kamau “Baba Kamau” Ngom, music director and percussionist. Griots Wa Umoja will be performing at AFRAM at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, August 12, 2006. Also debuting this year is the jazz band, S-Quire. This Baltimore trio, which was formed in 1999, consists of an alto saxophone player, piano player, and drummer. They were discovered in 2004 by the founder and CEO of Sandtown Entertainment and their first album is slated to be released this summer. S-Quire will be the featured entertainment at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, August 12, 2006 One of the artists performing during the AFRAM Gospel Hour is Seaford native and Gospel rapper, Don-T, better known to the community as Donald Thompson. Don-T started in the music business in 1992 in Augusta, Georgia in the traditional rap arena and created his own production company. He performed with rap artists

PAGE 15

AZ Yet and MC Lyte and toured Germany with a band called X-Amount. In 2001, Don-T’s life changed when he turned his life over to Jesus Christ. Now his music and vision is to reach lost souls, especially youth. Don-T Records was formed in 2003, and he has helped other artist in Gospel to get their start. In June, Don-T performed at Camp Liberty in Baghdad, Iraq for the troops and civilians. The AFRAM Committee is pleased to welcome Don-T back to Seaford for the AFRAM Festival. (In addition to the AFRAM Gospel Hour, Don-T will also be performing at Amateur Night at AFRAM on Friday at 5 p.m.) Another featured entertainment troupe during the Gospel Hour is the Gospel Creations Mime Ministry from Middletown, Delaware. These young ladies silently interpret Gospel music through the art of pantomime and have been performing for the past eight years. They have performed at the world famous Apollo Theater in New York and on The Next Step talent showcase in Hollywood. This is Gospel Creations Mime Ministry’s third appearance at the AFRAM Festival. Other artists performing during the 3 p.m. AFRAM Gospel Hour are the Good News Tour Gospel Trio, the Sussex County Community Mass Choir, and local steppers, creative dance troupes, and spoken word. For more information on the schedule of events and the Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival, please contact Seaford City Councilwoman Pat Jones, executive director of AFRAM, at 302-628-1908.

We’ve searched the oceans to find the freshest, most tender seafood available.

Only the best makes it to your kitchen Fresh Fish - Crab Meat Shrimp - Clams - Scallops Oysters - Mussels Softshell Crabs All Types of Frozen Seafood

WEEKLY SPECIALS

302

629-0444

800-492-0444 Mon.- Thurs. 10-6, 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Fri. & Sat. 10-7

(Rodney) Mobile (302) 745-7341 (Trina) Mobile (302) 745-3840

Your Real Estate Connection! 1258 Norman Eskridge Hwy. Seaford, Delaware 19973

Licensed in Delaware & Maryland

Have A Great Event Afram 2006!

www.joynerteam.com

THE JOYNER TEAM RODNEY & TRINA JOYNER

G. Jane Drace, LUTCF Drace Insurance & Investment Services Life • Health • Group Insurance Mutual Funds • Investments I R A’s • T S A’s • P e n s i o n s Callaway, Farnell & Moore, Inc. Bldg., 500 Stein Highway P.O. Box 583, Seaford, DE 19973

302-629-4000 • Fax: 302-629-4513

Healthy Hair Clinique Healthy Hair With A Healthy Glow Men, Women, Children (302) 629-4281 Seaford, DE Gift Certificates Available Dorothy Merritt Owner / Operator

2006 Afram Festival A Family Event


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

AFRAM FESTIVAL

®

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 302-628-0767

FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 2006

1004 W. Stein Hwy. Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales

5 p.m. Welcome

320 W. DuPont Hwy., Ste. 2 Millsboro, DE 19966

302-934-8520

Children’s Events and Activities Basketball Skills Challenge to include a Foul Shot Competition, Three-point shooting Competition, and Slam Dunk Contest Vendors Amateur Night at AFRAM Featuring Jimmy Allen, R&B artist and Don-T, Gospel rap artist and other local talent 6:30 p.m. Little Miss and Little Mr. AFRAM Pageant Local children with celebrity judges

302-628-1327 1004 W. Stein Hwy Seaford, DE

8 p.m. Orlando Phillips, Reggae one-man-band steel drum artist 10 p.m. Closing

302-934-8520

410-819-6990

320 W. DuPont Hwy., Ste. 2 Millsboro, DE 19966

301 Bay Plaza, Ste. 308 Easton, MD 21601

GROUP BENEFIT CONSULTING

¢¢

SERVING GROUPS 35 & OVER HEALTH CLAIMS ADMINISTRATOR

Let Us Pay Your Medical Claims Great Service! Great People!

www.ritasice.com

110 S. Shipley St. • Seaford, DE 19973

302-629-3518 Web Address: www.INTEGRAtpa.com

Notary

Fax Center

Misto or Large Gelati

Copies

THE MAILROOMS, LTD. Your Personal & Business Service Center Mail-n-More Authorized UPS & FED-EX Shipping Outlets Custom Crating & Packaging Mon.-Fri. 9 am - 5:30 pm “Thank you for your prayers for Brooke Willin” President R. RICHARD THOMAS 302-628-9334

500 N. Dual Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973 Fax 302-628-9325

50 OFF Large Seaford Location Only Expires 8/15/06

Visit us before, during or after the festival for a cool refreshing treat. Anytime is a good time for

1250 Norman Eskridge Hwy. Seaford, DE

302-628-4294


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 17

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006 10 a.m. Parade from Frederick Douglass Elementary, down King Street, right onto North Street, and right onto Collins Avenue to Nutter Park. 11 a.m. Opening Ceremony Community Recognition Award presented to Dan Short Children’s Events and Activities Pony Rides Train Rides Vendors

MEMBERS American Institute of CPA’s Delaware Society of CPA’s • Income Tax Preparation and Planning

12 p.m. Sankofa’s Drummers and Dancers 2 p.m. Griots Wa Umoja, African Storytellers 3 p.m. Gospel Hour featuring Good News Tour Gospel Trio, Gospel Creation, Mime Troupe, Don-T, Gospel rap artist, and Sussex County Community Mass Choir and local steppers, creative dance troupes, and spoken word 5 p.m. S-Quire Jazz Band 8 p.m. Red Alert Band, featuring Motown and Oldies repertoire

• Small Business Services • Personal and Business Financial  Planning • Data Processing Services • Estate and Gift Tax Planning • Management Advisory Services • Accounting Services

114 N. Cannon St., PO Box 1300 Seaford, DE 19973 Phone (302) 629-3971

10 p.m. Closing

Enjoy the Afram Festival! Precision Ball Division Molding/Fabrication Division E

COM

302-628-9900 FAX 628-7985

N!

P.O. Box 180, 103 Davis Dr., Seaford, DE

N THE F

U

I JO

2006 Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival

Enjoy The Afram Festival!

SERVICE TIRE TRUCK CENTER Enjoy The Afram Festival! The rental property experts 302-629-8612 Visit our website at www.eastcoastpropertymanagement.com

24873 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973

302-629-5533 American Made - American Owned


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

AFRAM FESTIVAL

“Quality Healthcare with a Local Address” To find a Nanticoke Physician, visit

www.nanticoke.org or call 1-877-NHS-4-DOCS

801 Middleford Road Seaford, DE 19973

Job Hotline: (302) 629-6611 Ext. 2619

The Buffalo Soldiers take part each year in the Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival. They are shown riding in the 2005 parade. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

BETTER HOMES OF SEAFORD, Inc. Established 1969

Make your travel plans with us

A Non-Profit Corporation Formed to Provide Better Housing in the City of Seaford. 101 Independence Drive Seaford, Delaware 19973 TDD: (800) 232-5460

A Warm Welcome to the Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival

628-0212

Sum

Phone: (302) 629-8048 Fax: (302) 629-6362

25

% OFF

S er ale m Decorative Accessories & Candles

Ambassador Travel Serving Delmarva for over 35 years

CRUISES - TOURS - TRAIN HOTEL - BUS - AIR - CARS INDEPENDENT TRAVEL GROUPS 639 N. Phillips St., Seaford, DE 19973

302-629-9604 • 800-845-9939

IN STOCK WA LLPAPER & BORDERS

320 Stein Highway, Seaford, DE G W & Jeanne 302-628-0998

WITH STAR COUPON EXP. 8/31/06

Email: debbie@ambassador-travel.com Visit www.ambassador-travel.com Click on Hot Deals and start your search.

Clifford Lee “Biff” Your Full Time State Representative


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 19

AFRAM SPONSORS GOLD: CITY OF SEAFORD HAMILTON ASSOCIATES SILVER: SUSSEX COUNTY COUNCIL JOHNNY JANOSIK, INC. PIZZA KING NANTICOKE HOSPITAL PERDUE SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF SEAFORD BRONZE: KIWANIS DELMARVA POWER SUSSEX COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY EVERGREEN U.M. CHURCH PENINSULA OIL CO. MORNING STAR PUBLICATIONS HURLOCK CENTER OF AMERICAN MUSLIM MISSION, INC. SEAFORD FEDERAL CREDIT UNION EAST COAST PROPERTY MANAGEMENT IN-KIND: ASAP PRINTING & EMBROIDERY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPERS

CLEAR CHANNEL RADIO FRANKLIN BANK COMCAST WAL-MART MONEY MAILER BEST WESTERN SEAFORD INN HARLEY DAVIDSON SEAFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT DELAWARE STATE POLICE TAYLOR & SONS AMUSEMENT MS. MARGIE COOKE’S DAY CARE SEAFORD MISSION HERITAGE JEWELERS APPLEBEE’S RESTAURANT HAPPY HARRY’S GOLDEN CORRAL JOHN’S FOUR SEASONS HAMPTON INN PEEBLES CHURCHES: HEAVEN-BOUND MINISTRIES ST LUKE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH OUR LADY OF LORDES ATLANTA ROAD ALLIANCE CHURCH M & M MINISTRIES CLARENCE ST CHURCH OF GOD MACEDONIA AME CHURCH WESLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Harley-Davidson of Seaford, Del. 22586 Sussex Highway Seaford, Delaware 302-629-6161 www.hdofseaford.com

August 26 thth LIVE MUSIC FOOD

HARLEY-DAVIDSON OF SEAFORD, DEL, INC 22586 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, De 19973

302-629-6161

SEAFORD BOWLING LANES

Home of Galactic Bowling • Open & League Bowling for Adults, Youth, and Seniors • Bump ‘N Bowl • Complete Pro Shop ball drilling, bags, shoes, accessories • Lunch Counter • Air Conditioned Operated by Our Family For Your Family

Nylon Capital Shopping Center Seaford ~ 302-629-9778

Open Monday-Saturday 9 a.m. - midnight; Sunday 1 p.m. - 11 p.m.

Seaford’s Family Restaurant for Over 26 Years 302-629-7852

“Pizza Fit For A King”

Seaford Professional Center, Route 13 South of Seaford, DE 19973

Fresh Dough Pizza • Thick or Thin Crust Pizza Twists Our Specialty

www.seafordfcu.com

• On-Line Finance, Website, Touch Tone Teller, Electronic Bill Payment • Loans: Signature, New & Used Vehicles, Home Equity • Share Draft (checking) w/Visa Check Card, IRA’s • Payroll Deduction, Direct Deposit, ATM Card • Visa Credit Card - No Annual Fee

Serving Sussex County

Se Habla Espanol

DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY ed 1978 Establish

“More Than A Pizza Parlor”

HAND DIPPED ICE CREAM, SUNDAES & SHAKES SUBS • STEAKS • GRINDERS 1008 S. Central Ave. 300 Stein Hwy. Call Ahead F or Take Out Laurel, DE Seaford, DE

629-6003 Coming Soon To Millsboro 875-4477


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

AFRAM FESTIVAL

Scenes from last year’s Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival, clockwise from left, include a beauty queen, one of the Sankofa dancers, Latrelle Lee with a SPEAK sign, AFRAM chairman Pat Jones, and Sherman the Shorebird from the Delmarva Shorebirds. Photos by Ronald MacArthur

AFRAM Festival 2006 July 24, 2006— Morning Star “I am happ y, immensely surprised and honored to have been chosen for this award”

Danny Short 2006 AFRAM Public Service Award & Parade Grand Marshal


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 21

Bounty of summer can be preserved for cold winter In pre-refrigeration days the summer kitchen was a pretty busy spot. Nature’s bounty had to be preserved for those dreary winter months ahead. Even those cooks not lucky enough to have their own gardens would gain access to fresh fruits and vegetables somewhere and begin the process of preserving and storing them in the pantry. Today, as Italian cooking specialist Kyle Phillips tells us, refrigeration, cold storage and long-distance shipping have not only greatly increased the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables but have also made those which were once considered seasonal able to be sold year round. Yet, there are those who find a “quiet satisfaction” in the old process of picking at the peak of ripeness, cooking, packing jars and filling them with oil, vinegar or syrup before sterilizing and sending them off to storage. If you are one of them, here are some especially easy, tried and true Italian recipes that you can enjoy all year. They make great gifts, too. Giardiniera – Pickled Vegetables (Makes about 2-1/2 pounds. The typical Italian antipasto plate would not be without these mixed veggies.) 10 ounces button onions, peeled and soaked in cold water for an hour 10 ounces baby carrots, peeled and cut into sticks 10 ounces celery, stalks only, stripped of

The Practical Gourmet strings and cut into short lengths A medium-sized cauliflower 1 quart white wine vinegar (have more handy) Olive oil A couple of bay leaves 2 or 3 cloves 1 teaspoon peppercorns 1 tablespoon salt The vegetables listed are the standard ones one found in almost every recipe, but you can add other things to suit your taste, for example baby mushrooms, green beans, zucchini, baby cucumbers, or artichoke hearts — feel free to experiment. Set the vinegar to boil with the herbs, spices and salt. While it’s heating, separate the cauliflower florets. When the vinegar comes to a boil, add the vegetables and cook them for about 15 minutes. Remove them to the jars with a slotted spoon and pour the boiling hot vinegar over them; have more boiling vinegar handy should the cooking liquid not be enough. Sprinkle a tablespoon of olive oil over

the top of each jar; cover the jars tightly and let them cool. Store them in a cool dark place for a couple of weeks, and they’re ready for use. Expect them to keep for a year.

There are those who find a ‘quiet satisfaction’ in the old process of picking at the peak of ripeness, cooking, packing jars and filling them with oil, vinegar or syrup before sterilizing and sending them off to storage.

Pepperoncini al Tonno – Hot peppers Stuffed with Tuna These can be addictive. Though this recipe will in theory serve 8, you can safely halve that number. 25 small, round, hot peppers 1/2 pound tuna packed in oil (drained weight; you may need less, but won’t want to come up short) 1 quart olive oil 1 and 1/8 cups white wine vinegar Set the peppers out to dry in the sun for 2 days. Clean them by rubbing them with a moist cloth. Using a sharp paring knife, remove the stems, seed them, and remove the ribs, being careful not to puncture them. Put them in a bowl and add vinegar to cover. Let them rest for 3 days, making sure they remain submerged, and then let them drain well on a clean cloth. Drain the tuna, break it up with the tines of a fork, and use it to fill the peppers, tamping it down gently so they won’t split. Arrange the peppers in glass jars, add olive oil to cover, seal them, and let them rest for a week before enjoying them. They’ll keep for about 6 months.

LAUREL LOCATION ONLY

Sott’oli – Mixed Vegetables Packed in Oil Take firm vegetables, for example bell peppers, tiny button onions, baby mushrooms, carrots, baby artichoke hearts, tiny cucumbers, and so on, wash them well, cut them into small bite-sized pieces, and blanch them for a few minutes in a waterand-vinegar solution. Drain them well, pat them dry and pack them in olive oil in a jar with the herbs of choice, which can include pepper corns, coriander, bay leaves, parsley, oregano, cloves, or what have you. Garlic? It can harbor botulism spores, and though a commercial operation has the equipment for neutralizing them, you may not. Once you’ve filled the jar with oil give it a few sharp taps, turning it this way and that, to dislodge air bubbles, seal it tight, and store it in a cool dark place for a few weeks to give the herbs the time they need to flavor the vegetables.

Semi-Annual

Sale

Parking Lot 50% OFF (so me res tric tio ns app ly)

Two Big Days!!! Rain or Shine Saturday, August 12th • 9am-5pm Sunday, August 13th • 10am-4pm 5 piece set

$

149 Umbrellas $ as low as 89 Cushions $ as low as 5 as low as

SETS as lo w as $

149

T

Outdoor Fireplaces, Fire Pits, Tiki Torches, Rugs and much more.

yndall’s CASUAL FURNITURE

www.tyndallscasualfurniture.com US 13 & Discountland Rd., Laurel, DE • 302-875-2888 US 13 & State St., Dover, DE • 302-346-4600

100% FINANCING AVAILABLE


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BENEFIT EVENTS FALL VICTORIAN TEA SEPT. 16 The Seaford Historical Society’s fall Victorian Tea will be held on Saturday, Sept. 16, in the Ross Mansion at 2 p.m. There will be a showing of Victorian gowns along with the exquisite food in the elegant atmosphere. Peg Rider of Sharptown, Md., owns an impressive collection of Victorian gowns and will be modeling several of them. She also collects antique cars and is an active member of the Sharptown Historical Society. Jeanne Conner, chairperson of the Victorian Teas, does extensive research of Victorian era recipes in order to have a unique and different menu at each Victorian tea. She then instructs her team of volunteer cooks with preparation of the six sweets and six savories. Margaret Alexander oversees the serving. Hostesses are in period costume. Charge for the tea is $10 per person. Seating is arranged with four people at each table. Reservations re required and may be made by calling Ruthe Wainwright at 629-8765. Persons wishing to sit together should so indicate when making reservations. Seating is limited to 40 people.

LIFECARE BASKET BINGO LifeCare at Lofland Park Memory Walk team will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, August 31, starting at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Moose, Route 13A, Seaford. The evening will consist of 20 exciting games and will feature several filled baskets including the Spin Organizer, Heartwood Bread, Crocus as prizes. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win Gourmet Picnic Basket Bundle Set, Collectors Club Mailbox, Vintage Vine Serveware Set or one of the several door prizes. Nearly 30 chances to win. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information contact the LifeCare Memory Walk Team at 302-628-3000 ext. 8452 or email Dennist@nanticoke.org.

DANNY SHORT FUND RAISER

Fund raiser for Danny Short for Delaware House of Representatives 39th District, Saturday, Aug. 19, 5 to 8 p.m., Nanticoke River Yacht Club, tickets are $35. Food, live and silent auction. Call 628-5222 or visit www.dannyshort.com.

POSSUM POINT YARD SALE

Possum Point Players Community Theatre in Georgetown is sponsoring its second annual Yard Sale on Saturday, Aug. 19, starting at 7 a.m. This volunteer-run organization will accept donations for the sale at Possum Hall in Georgetown. “All proceeds from the yard sale go to our building fund,” explains the executive administrator, Mary Cahill, “As a non-profit organization, when something breaks we often don’t have the budget to fix it right away.” “There are innumerable small things that, when they go wrong at the wrong time, cause trouble for volunteers, cast, or audience,” stated board member Jim Hartzell. “The roof started leaking during a performance I was in once,” recalls member Cassandra Petersen, “It was sold out, and we had audience members watching the show with bowls and buckets in their laps!” Possums’ board of directors is asking for donations of sellable items for their favorite annual fund-raiser. They will take everything from furniture to office items or household items, baby items, books, bikes and other sporting equipment, just to name a few possibilities. Last year they did not offer clothes at the sale, but this

Submit Bulletin Board items by Friday at noon. E-mail: publisher@seafordstar.com Mail: 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 Items appear in both the Seaford and Laurel Stars. Mail to: Star Newspapers PO Box 1000 Seaford, DE 19973 year they will be accepting kids’ clothes (baby sizes through small children). Contact the office at 302/856-3460, to set up a delivery time, particularly for larger items, or for after-hours delivery. Items to be donated for sale can be delivered to Possum Hall. All donations for the yard sale are tax-deductible donations. Ask for your tax letter at the time of drop off.

BASKET BINGO

Laurel Historical Society is hosting a Basket Bingo on Tuesday, Aug. 29, at 7 p.m. (doors open 5:30 p.m.), at the Laurel Fire Hall Tickets $20 and include Lattice Weave Hamper Basket raffle ticket. Call Edna Marvil 875-9427 or Linda Justice 875-4217 for tickets or information.

PIG PICKIN’ FOR BIFF LEE

40th District Rep. Biff Lee’s annual “pigpickin’,” Saturday, Sept. 9, Laurel Fire Hall, 4 to 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 and can be obtained from Richard Small at Small’s Insurance on South Central Avenue, Laurel.

MILTON ARTS GUILD SIDEWALK ART

for $25. Phone 629-5331 or email shilohhouseofhope@msn.com. Drawing will take place on Oct. 16 during the golf tournament.

FOOD/EVENTS DUPONT 25 YEAR CLUB DINNER The Annual DuPont 25-Year-Club dinner will be held on Friday, Sept. 8, at the Laurel Fire Hall on Tenth Street in Laurel. Anyone eligible may contact Ray Whaley at 302-537-6113 on or before Aug. 18.

CHICKEN BARBECUE AUG. 12 The American Legion Log Cabin on Front Street in Seaford is having a chicken barbecue w/potato salad, baked beans, and roll on Saturday, Aug. 12, at 11 a.m..

DINNER RIDE AUG. 16 Harley-Davidson of Ocean City, located next to Stephen Decatur High School, will offer its weekly dinner ride Wednesday at 6 p.m. The ride is open to all riders and their passengers and to all brands of motorcycles. This week the ride will travel to Teaser’s Dockside Bar & Grille in West Ocean City, on Wednesday, Aug. 16. The ride will wander along country roads and arrive around 7 p.m. Last week the dinner ride visited Break Time Sports Grill in Salisbury and the week before to Traders Restaurant in Pocomoke City with 44 riders making the trip. For more information, contact Harley-Davidson of Ocean City at 410-629-1599 or hdoceancit@aol.com.

Milton Arts Guild’s 4th semi-annual Sidewalk Art Show, Saturday Sept. 30, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., rain or shine. The show is sponsored by the Abraxas Studio of Art, Deitrick Studios, Federal Street Gallery & Espresso Bar, Frank Ditman, Milton Chamber of Commerce, Milton V.F.W., and Norma Krauss.Call 684-0590 for more information.

Future rides: Aug. 23: Adam’s Ribs, Fruitland; Aug. 30: Mystery Ride. Arrive 15 minutes early with a full tank and an empty bladder. All rides leave at 6 p.m.

MEETINGS MASTER GARDENER The Kent and Sussex County Master Gardeners, of Delaware Cooperative ext. for both Delaware State University and University of Delaware, are trying to find former Master Gardeners who would be interested in attending a 20th Anniversary Celebration to be held in Dover on Oct. 18. If interested, call Sharon Webb at 302-856-2585, ext. 540 with your current address and phone number.

EQUINE COUNCIL MEETING Next meeting of the Delaware Equine Council to be held, Monday, Aug. 21, 7 p.m., at the Harrington Public Library, Harrington. All those interested in horses are welcome. For more information contact Nyle 422-4094; or Peggy 6295233.

MASTER GARDENERS WORKSHOP The Sussex County Master Gardeners, of Delaware Cooperative Extension for both Delaware State University and University of Delaware, announce a workshop “An Evening in the Vegetable Garden” to be held Tuesday, Aug. 22, at 6:30 p.m. Learn about vegetable gardening. Tour our garden and taste some of the tomatoes and other vegetables grown in our garden. The workshop will be held at the Carvel Building on Rt. 9, 16483 County Seat Highway,

TRINITY FOUNDATION GOLF TOURNEY

Saturday, Sept. 23, Trinity Transport third annual golf tournament to benefit the Trinity Foundation, Seaford Golf & Country Club at 9 a.m. and cost $75 a person following a four-person scramble format. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Tournament participants, hole sponsors and door prize donations are needed. Contact Lance Massey, Megan Smith or Alice Messick at 1-800846-3400 or go to www.puttforlife.org.

SHILOH HOUSE OF HOPE RAFFLE

Raffle tickets for a Royal Carribbean cruise to benefit the Shiloh House of Hope, a residential program for teens. Tickets are $10 or three

LOST BASSETT HOUND Black & White With Some Brown

Last Seen on Samuel Rd., Laurel

REWARD 302

875-0114

DELMAR VFW POST 8276

Super Bingo Every Tuesday! CASH PAYOUT $100* Over 60 People $50* Under 60 People *Based on the number of people No one under the age of 18 allowed to play

TIMES Doors Open 5:00 p.m. Games 6:45 p.m. TICKETS ON SALE

WINNER TAKE ALL

Bonanza Game $1000.00 Jackpot!

Tuesday Night Delmar VFW Bingo 200 W. State St., Delmar, MD

Information call:

410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379


MORNING STAR west of Georgetown. Call Sharon Webb at 8562585, ext. 540, to register for workshop. Preregistration is requested.

AARP BOARD MEETING AARP Chapter 5340 will hold a Board Meeting 10 a.m. Aug. 28, at the Sussex County Airport Conference Room, georgetown. All members are encouraged to attend. For details call Melissa Richardson, president, 945-1288.

KENDAL JONES SLIDE SHOW

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

COAST GUARD AUXILIARY

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. This month’s meeting is Thursday, Aug. 10, at 7:30 p.m. Anyone interested in promoting safe boating and would like to work with men and women who do vessel inspections, safety patrols and teach public safety courses, are welcome to join the Flotilla. Boat ownership is not required. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 or Jim Mullican at 732-1163.

The Laurel Historical Society’s own Kendal Jones will be presenting a 3-part slide show on “Places, Faces and Stories of Old-Time Laurel” at the Laurel Public Library in their new community meeting room. This meeting is open to the public as well as the membership. Now would be a great time to invite a non-member to join you for this interesting presentation. Dates are set for Wednesday, Sept. 27; Wednesday, Oct. 25, and Wednesday, Nov. 29. All programs will start at 7 p.m. Light refreshments will be offered.

SWEET ADELINES SEEKS SINGERS

SEAFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Two local young ladies will compete in the 2006 Miss Delaware National Pre-Teen Pageant, slated for Aug. 12-13 at the Sheraton Dover Hotel. Two winners in two age divisions will be selected to represent The First State at the 26th annual Miss National Pre-Teen Pageant to be held in Orlando, Fla. Nov. 18-25, and will have the opportunity to make public appearances throughout the year. On Aug. 12 at 7:30 p.m., preliminary talent, speech and modeling competitions will be held. These competitions have no bearing on who wins the overall state titles. Pageant finals will be held Sunday, Aug. 13, at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 for each day of competition and will be available at the door. Local participants include: Tatum Jones of Bridgeville and Moriah Reid of Laurel. Age divisions are Petite 5-8 and Pre-Teen 8-12. The winners of the state competition will receive their round-trip flight to Orlando as well as their national entry fee, meals and activities paid while at the pageant, a photo session and portrait from Sear’s Portrait Studio, a $100 savings bond and the official tiara, sash and trophy. For more information visit http://depreteen.tripod.com, e-mail demdpreteen@comcast.net, or call 302-296-0198.

The annual picnic for members of Seaford Historical Society has been rescheduled for Monday, Sept. 11, at 5 p.m., on the lawn of the Ross Mansion. Each family is asked to bring a vegetable, salad or dessert. The Society provides chicken and beverages. The charge is $3 per person payable at the door. Reservations are necessary and must be made by Tuesday, Sept. 5, by calling Anne Nesbitt at 628-7788. A recent suggested revision to the by-laws was included in the June issue of the newsletter. These revisions have been approved by the society’s operating board. A vote will be taken of members at the picnic to accept or reject the changes. The Grandpa Jammers will provide entertainment. Anyone who is not a member but would like to attend may join that day. Annual dues are $15 per person or $25 per family.

LAUREL LIBRARY GENEALOGY The Laurel Public Library is pleased to announce that an introductory genealogy program is planned for Saturday, Sept. 23, at 10:30 a.m., in the library’s new Carpenter Community Room. Experienced genealogists, Carolyn Miller and Ralph Nelson, both members of the Sussex County Genealogy Society, will be presenting a PowerPoint program on introductory research strategies, while library staff will offer an overview of materials available in the Delaware Room and the Genealogy and Family History Area. In the afternoon, the morning presenters will be available for an informal, hands-on help session in the second floor research areas until the library closing time of 2 p.m. Interested persons are encouraged to attend both sessions. Membership information about the Sussex County Genealogy Society will also be available. While lunch is not included in these activities, brown baggers may use the refrigerator in the meeting room kitchen. Call the library at 8753184 or visit www.laurel.lib.de.us.

NEW TOPS GROUP FORMS

TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), a nonprofit weight loss support group, meets Tuesdays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at Grace Baptist Church, Atlanta Road, Seaford. For more information, contact Jean Davis at 410-883-3407.

WIDOWED PERSONS MEET

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesdsay, Aug. 15, at 12:15 p.m., at the Golden Corral. The planned guest speaker will be a representative from The Salvation Army. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Sweet Adelines is inviting ladies interested in learning to sing four part a cappella harmony to practice sessions at the Church of the Nazarene (next to the Sussex Guide) on U.S. 13 in Seaford, every Tuesday at 7 p.m. For more information contact Kim Disharoon at 349-9652.

SPECIAL EVENTS NATIONAL PRE-TEEN PAGEANT

ELKS HOSTS HAWAIIAN LUAU

Seaford Elks Lodge Hawaiian Luau, Saturday, Aug. 12, 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at the lodge on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday nights after 6 p.m. or phone Janice Cecil at 875-3810. Cash bar and hors d’oeuvres at 6 p.m.; dinner at 7 p.m.; karaoke at 8 p.m. Also a male hula dance contest.

TRACTOR SHOW AT YODER’S FARMS

First State Antique Club of Delaware’s Tractor Show, Hit and Miss Engines, Oct. 6 and 7, Yoder Farms, Greenwood. Live auction, Friday, 6 p.m., flea market, both days, youth safety program, Saturday, 9 a.m., tractor games, refreshments and entertainment. For information, phone 875-3040.

TRIPS BUS TRIP TO WASHINGTON, D.C. Bus trip to Washington, D.C., Saturday, Sept. 30, will visit World War II and Vietnam Memorials, The Mall, Smithsonian, National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Natural History, with free time to enjoy the area. Bus leaves 8 a.m., at Fireman’s Carnival Grounds in Sharptown, Md. Cost $20. Lunch on your own, brown bag or at the Mall. Dinner stop on way home at “Old Country Buffet” Annapolis, again on your own. This trip is sponsored by

PAGE 23

Roelma Chapter, Order of Eastern Star of Sharptown. Any chapter member will help you. The public is invited. For reservations call 302-875-5911, or send check, payable to Susan Calloway, 32556 Holly Oak Drive, Laurel, DE 19956. Deadline for reservation is Sept. 21.

VACATION CLUB TRIPS Oprah’s Color Purple, Aug. 27 Oprah’s Color Purple on Broadway, N.Y., Sunday, Aug. 27, 7:30 p.m. Bus, show and dinner, $175 each now due. Vacation Club, 302628-1144. Tyler Perry’s play, Sept. 9 “What’s Done in the Dark,” Saturday, Sept. 9, at Morgan State College, Baltimore, Md., bus leaves at noon. $68 for show, bus, dinner. Vacation Club 302-628-1144. Atlantic City & Comedy Club, Sept. 30 On Saturday, Sept. 30, Atlantic City trip is $35 and $15 is returned. Comedy show with Bruce- Bruce is extra if attending. Vacation Club 302-628-1144.

SDPR TRIPS PLANNED Radio City Music Hall Dec. 3 The Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation will take its annual trip to a Radio City Music Hall Christmas show on Dec. 3. The cost is $115 and the departure time from the back parking lot of Seaford High School is 7 a.m. Call 629-6809 for more information. Boyds Bears Country, Sept. 23 The Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation is sponsoring a trip to Boyds Bears Country in Gettysburg, Pa., on Sept. 23. The cost is $30. It is the biggest teddy bear store in the country and restaurants and shopping are on site. The trip is scheduled during basket week and Longaberger will be there. Guests can also schedule an appointment to make their own basket. Call 628-6809 for more information.

TRIP TO NATIONAL CATHEDRAL

AARP Chapter 5340 of Georgetown trip to National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Sept. 20. The bus will leave Georgetown Delaware’s Square, East Market Street, near the Dollar General Store, at 9:30 a.m. A guided tour of the National Cathedral approximately 12:30 p.m. The tour of the National Museum at the Behring Center begins at 2:30 p.m. Dinner is on your own at the Country Buffet, Annapolis Mall. Return time to Georgetown will be approximately

9:30 p.m. The cost for each person is $32. For registration and additional information contact Hilda Parker at 856-2760 or Betty Schultz at 945-5721. Registration and payment is due by Sept. 1.

NAZARENE TRIP SEPT. 23

Saturday, Sept. 23, United Church of the Nazarene, Hurlock, Md., trip to Flea Markets in Englishtown, N.J. Price - adults $30; children 12 years and under $15. Money due by Sept. 9. Phone 1-410-9430900 or 1-410-754-9135. Bus will stop for breakfast. The public is invited.

REUNIONS MILLER FAMILY REUNION

The 22nd family reunion of Samuel and Elizabeth Miller will be at St. George’s church hall, near Laurel, Saturday, Aug. 12, at noon. Dinner will be served at 12:30 p.m. Each family should bring meat, vegetable, salad or dessert. Phone 846-2336 for more information.

SPECIAL INTEREST HISTORY OF 19TH CENTURY LAUREL Have you gotten your copy of this most informative book on early Laurel yet? We have several copies left which would make a wonderful and valued gift for the holidays ow whatever. The 430+ page book is a reprint written by the late harold Hancock in the 1980s and is selling for $45 or it can be mailed for an additional $5. To obtain a copy you can contact any board member or call Linda Justice at 875-4217.

HOLIDAYS VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS PLANNED

It may seem difficult to think about Christmas in July, but Seaford Historical Society members are being asked to do just that. The boutique at the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion is coming back. After an absence of several years Shirley Skinner, chairperson of the society gift shop committee, announces the return of this specialty. All members are asked to donate one item, large or small. Items may be placed in the gray box on the front porch of the Ross Mansion at any time before Dec. 1. For any questions or further information call Skinner at 629-9378.

SEAFORD DANCE & FITNESS STUDIO FALL REGISTRATION NOW IN PROGRESS

• Preschool • Ballet • Jazz • Tap • Adult Classes • Pilates Mat

Established Business Since 1987

Karen Baker Artistic Director

Masters Degree, Dance Education, Temple University Bachelor of Fine Arts, Dance University of the Arts

Metropolitan Regional Council Building, Alt. 13, Seaford, DE Office Telephone

(302) 628-1664

dancefitness@ce.net


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

CHURCH BULLETINS St. John’s fitness classes start New Fitness Classes start up Tuesday, Sept. 5, and Wednesday, Sept. 6. The classes meet in St. John’s United Methodist Church Hall in Seaford (Sponsored by St. John’s, but open to the public) Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a.m., and Tuesday and Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Sylvia will be providing a.m. only, excellent child care at no extra fee. Beginners to intermediate participants welcome in this co-ed, non-competitive, muscletoning, stretching, high/low aerobic class. Try a free one to see if it meets your needs. Only a six or eight-week commitment at a time. For more information or to register call 21-year AFAA certified fitness professional, Carol Lynch at 629-7539.

On Saturday, Aug. 19, from 10 a.m. to noon, there will be a registration period. Direct further inquiries at 629-7265.

Scott Family schedule The Scott Family will be at Grace Methodist Church in Georgetown on Sunday, Aug. 20, and Union United Methodist in Bridgeville on Sunday, Aug. 27. The Scott Family of Bridgeville has produced a CD of Christian music. Copies of the new CD will be available at their performances or by calling the Scotts at 337-3396.

St. Luke’s rummage sales

Old Christ Church near Laurel (built in 1771) is holding summer services for the first time since 1918. The services will begin at 9:30 a.m. each Sunday, Holy Eucharist will be Aug. 13 and 27. Morning prayer will be Aug. 20. Light refreshments of cookies and lemonade will be served following the service.

Plans are under way for this year’s rummage sale sponsored by St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. The sale will be on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the St. Luke’s Parish Hall on King and North streets in Seaford. Workers are now on hand at the Parish Hall each Monday from 9 a.m. to noon for those who wish to donate items. The St. Luke’s annual chrysanthemum sale will be at the end of August with pickup of flowers scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 16, at the Jackson Hewitt office in Seaford.

Blades UMC Treasure Cove VBS

Laurel Wesleyan VBS

Blades United Methodist Church, 306 S. Market St., will have Treasure Cove Vacation Bible School on Aug. 30, 31 and Sept. 1 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. On Sunday, Sept. 3 and 10, from 10-11 a.m. (Sunday School hour), the VBS will continue with crafts and games. On Sept. 3 and 10 during Children’s Time at the 11 a.m. morning worship, the Bible Lesson will be presented. The closing program for 2006 VBS will be on Sept. 10. Children 5-12 years old are welcome.

Rock Your World Vacation Bible School at Laurel Wesleyan Church for children ages 3 (pre-K) to sixth grade, Aug. 21-25, from 6:30 to 8:45 p.m. Find out how Jesus can make a difference in you and how you can make a difference in your family, community, nation, and world. Register at the church on Sundays (9 a.m. or 10:45 a.m.), online at www.laurelwesleyan.org or call the office at 8755380. Laurel Wesleyan Church is 1/2 mile north of Laurel on Alt. 13.

Old Christ Church summer services

St. John’s summer lunch program St. John’s United Methodist Church is sponsoring a summer lunch program through Aug. 16. Children and youth up to age 18 are invited to attend Monday through Friday between noon and 1 p.m. in the fellowship hall.

Bethel Vacation Bible School “Fiesta” is the theme of this year’s Vacation Bible School at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church on Seaford Road Aug. 7-11,from 9 a.m.until noon. The closing program will be Friday, Aug. 11, at 7 p.m. Bethel Charge consists of Sailor’s Bethel, Portsville and Mt. Zion United Methodist Churches. For information, call 875-2713.

13th annual Tent Services Everlasting Hope Ministries has announced the schedule for this year’s 13th annual tent services. The services will be from Monday, Aug. 14, through Sunday, Aug. 20, on the grounds of the Booker Street Church of God in Georgetown. Services will begin at 7 p.m., except Sunday, when they will begin at 5 p.m. A guest speaker will present a message nightly to inspire and challenge those in attendance not only to resist drugs/alcohol but also to strive for individual excellence through a personal relationship with Christ. The speakers are as follows: Monday, Aug. 14 - Evangelist Bernadette Foreman from Christ Church in Harbeson; Tuesday, Aug. 15 - Bishop Jamie Hazzard from Welcome Full Gospel Holiness Church, Slaughter Neck; Wednesday, Aug. 16 - Pastor Jesse Abbott from New Dimensions Family Worship Center, Salisbury, Md.; Thursday, Aug. 17 - Pastor Continued on page 25

Help with school expenses The poverty level in Sussex County is higher than other areas of the state. When the children need to get ready for school each fall, it is an expensive time of year. At poverty level when you have to decide notebook paper and pencils over paying the gas bill, the gas bill wins hands down. Many children come to school ready to learn but they don’t have the tools to learn. As a response to this problem Saint John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford started a program to collect school supplies in 2001. Churches and local businesses were asked to help support this program. Each year it has grown. Now it includes the Laurel, Bridgeville, Greenwood, Delmar, Georgetown and Dagsboro areas. Each of the communities collecting items for their own school districts. The supplies are then handed out by school guidance counselors to the children in need. Christ United Methodist Church, 510 South Central Ave., in Laurel, will serve as the coordinator for the Laurel School District this year. Churches have been sent a list of school items that are needed and local businesses asked to contribute. All items must be turned in to Christ Church by Aug. 21. The church office is open from 9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday. Call Teresa C. Littleton, 875-2729, with questions.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Tina Whaley

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 Web site: http://home.dmv.com/-stjohns/ E-mail: stjohns@dmv.com NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Sunday Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday Night 7 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 11 a.m. • Sun. School 10:00 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Bethel Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church 600 S. Central Ave., P.O. Box 293 Laurel, DE 19956 ~ (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector Holy Eucharist & Morning Prayer Sunday @ 9:30 am

“Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771 94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873 “A Place to Belong” SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Family Worship Prayer Team 7:00 p.m. 10:45 a.m. ‘The Table’ Sunday School 9:30 a.m. (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY God’s Big Back Yard Underground 6:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del. Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 25

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

Reach of repentance By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford Laurel Wesleyan Church

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Early Church historian AugusThe last thing the devil tine had an expression known as felix culpa.When translated it wants is to see Chrismeans “Happy sin.” Augustine went on to explain this as the relief tians walking in repenthat comes when sin is finally exposed, confessed, and repented. tance that brings freeOne of the most effective sedom and compassion. crets of the devil is to get us to keep secrets. Millions of people all around the world live under the Christ has offered forgiveness for sin constant weight of secret sin. Not just the and the ability to grow in holiness. This weight of sin itself, but the fear of being view of repentance moves us past the defound out that multiplies its burden on our featism of “Oh well, God will just have to spirits. always accept me as I am” to “God has a I have important news for you. Repenbrand new me that is being brought to tance can release you from this load. life.” Too often when we think of repentance People can change. People do change. we think of some sort of self-flagellation You can change through the power of that believes that we are horrible and growth resulting from genuine repentance. worthless. This is the exact opposite of the Finally, repentance leads to compastruth. The way to freedom and authenticity sion. Once we have experienced the freecomes through repentance. dom and delight of living the forgiven life The process comes through some liber- we extend much greater sympathy to the ating recognitions. First, our secrets aren’t lost. We can associate with the plight of really secret anyway. God already knows. those still caught in sin instead of just beThere is no dark corner where we can hide ing angry with the behavior of lost people. our indiscretions. If we look back on the path we have The children sing “Jesus loves me this I traveled this last two weeks, we have gone know” and yet we can equally rejoice over from what is usually a very unpopular top“Jesus knows me, this I love.” No matter ic — sin and repentance — to realizing what sin you have done, you have not there is great hope and freedom once we caused Christ to reject you. The worst see our need for them in our life. It is no thing you ever said or did can be comsmall wonder the devil wants that to be pletely forgiven. kept secret. Second, repentance leads to freedom. The last thing the devil wants is to see This is more than freedom from guilt. ReChristians walking in repentance that pentance is the first step to freedom from brings freedom and compassion. Such sinful bondage. What a hopeless thing it people not only enjoy life, but become a would be if we only repented to say sorry major impact on our world. for yesterday, but felt no power to live any The Rev. Crofford is Senior Pastor at Laurel Wesleyan differently today! The word repentance Church. His views do not necessarily represent the views of has built into it a change of direction. the congregation or Wesleyan Church International. You may email pastortodd@laurelwesleyan.org

CHURCH BULLETINS Continued from page 24

Calvin Abbott from the Lighthouse Church of God, East New Market, Md.; Friday, Aug. 18 - Pastor Roland Mifflin from Power & Love Outreach Ministries, Millsboro; Saturday, Aug. 19 - Pastor Noel Kidd, Church of God, Bellvue, Ohio; and Sunday, Aug. 20 - morning service (11:30 a.m.) - Bishop Marvin Morris, host pastor, Booker Street Church of God, Georgetown and evening service (5 p.m.) - Pastor Arlene Taylor, Chosen Generation ministries, Grasonville, Md. Everyone is welcome to attend. For more information, contact Anthony Neal at 854-6692 or call 856-9097.

Centenary Church Gospel Café Centenary United Methodist Church, Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, is hosting a Christian music hour each Saturday, 6-7:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. Bruce and Nancy Willey are presenting live Christian music, fellowship and refreshments. Guest singers are: Aug. 12 - St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Worshp Team; Shannon Whaley. Aug. 19 - Joe Dawson Aug. 26 - “Glory Bound”

Every week, Mary Ann Young and Jenny Price Kimbell join us. Everyone is invited to attend. Come as you are. For more information, contact the church office at 875-3983 or Bruce Willey at 875-5539.

Blades hosts ‘The Cash Family’ “The Cash Family,” a popular Southern Gospel Group will be appearing in concert at the Blades United Methodist Church on Sunday, Aug. 13, at 11 a.m. The Blades Church Family invites all who will join us to enjoy the presentation of this group, who have been traveling and singing throughout the East Coast for 30 years. Their unique blend of voices couples with their excitement and enthusiasm for serving the Lord touches the hearts and lives of all ages.

Rainbow Rally August 19 Macedonia African Methodist Episcopal Church, 431 North St., Seaford, presents the third annual Rainbow Rally, Saturday, Aug. 19, at 6 p.m. To be featured: outstanding talent to represent each color of the rainbow. Come worship and fellowship with us. Refreshments will be served. The Rev. Dania R. Griffin is pastor.

543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor MON. Youth Meeting SUNDAY 6:30 - 8 p.m. Sunday School ..... 9:45 a.m. WEDNESDAY Worship...............11:00 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30-5 p.m.; Sun. 8-8:25 a.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth: Ben Colegrove Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

Laurel, Del.

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE

“Come and Experience JESUS!”

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area

Sunday Morning: Worship 10:00 AM Wednesday: Prayer & Praise 7:00 PM Located in Hickman Commercial Park www.LivingWaterLaurel.org 302-875-7814

YOU ARE INVITED! Come into This Church and Gather in Christ’s Name to Worship Him! Psalm 95:6 Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor, Stacey Johnson

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

“A Growing Church For All Ages”

2 miles N. of Laurel, DE on Alt. 13

302-877-0443 410-957-4696

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-7693 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Ron Mayers • Rev. Andrew Kerr SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School to grade 6) & Divorce Care 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & 7:00 Evening Service Youth Group (grades 7-12)

To Come! Revelation 2 ime 2:1 T The Ark 7 It's Seaford Wesleyan Church

United Methodist Churches

Worship Sun. Sch.

King’s Gordy Rd. .......... 8:50....10:00 St. George’s St. George Rd. .... 10:10..... 9:00 Mt. Pleasant Mt. Pleasant Rd...11:30....10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

River of Life Christian Center 17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Pastor Arthur Smith III Sunday School - 10 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628 parsonage 875-2996

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby, Rector

Sunday School - all ages 9 a.m. Worship 9 a.m., 10:15 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Rainbow Day Care / Pre-School Rt. 13 South, Seaford, DE 302-628-1020

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 & 10:45 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship and Children’s Ministries 6 p.m. Wednesday Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Connecting People with Christ since 1804

CONCORD

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 25322 Church Road, Concord Seaford, DE 19973 Sunday Worship - 9 am Sunday School (all ages) - 10:30 am For More Information call 302-628-8114 Rev. Diane E. Melson, Pastor


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR

OBITUARIES Anne Catherine Rice Scott, 70 Anne Catherine Virden Rice Scott of Seaford, formerly of Bridgeville, passed from this life at her home on Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2006, following a long illness. Known to all as “Puff,” she was born in Lewes, in 1936, graduated from the former Bridgeville High, and was first in the fall class at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in 1958. She is survived by her husband of 49 years, Ralph Scott, Jr.; two sons and their wives, Ralph III and Ida Scott, and Jeff and Jeanine Scott; and five grandchildren. Active in many areas of Life, the family suggests memorials be sent to Maranatha, Inc (WOLC), P.O. Box 130, Princess Anne, MD 21853; or to Delaware Hospice, 20167 Office Circle, Georgetown, DE 19947; or to the Crisis Pregnancy Care Center, 5 Burger King Drive, Georgetown, DE 19947. A remembrance and celebration of her life was on Aug. 4, at Union United Methodist Church, Market and Laws street, Bridgeville, with the Rev. Charles Baker officiating. Arrangements were being handled by Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel, Bridgeville. Send online condolences to: condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com

William David Mort, 74

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches.

Post 6, the American Legion, the Loyal Order of Moose Lodge 1728, the Seaford Elks Lodge 2458 and a Marine Corps Veteran. In addition to his parents, he was also preceded in death by his wife, Darleen Kendra Mort in 2003. He is survived by two sons, David K. Mort and wife Sue of Lee’s Summit, MO. and Robert C. Mort and wife Mary of Port Penn. Services will be private, burial will be in the Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Millsboro. Arrangements by Watson-Yates Funeral Home Seaford, DE.

Dwayne A. Marine, 39 Dwayne A. “Tony” Marine, formerly of Laurel, died July 22, 2006 at his home in Pennsylvania. Born in Salisbury, Md., April 15, 1967, he was a son of Sylvia Rolison of Laurel, and Danny Rolison. Mr. Marine graduated from Laurel High School in 1985. He served in the U.S. Army for four years and also served in the U.S.C.G. He received his LPN in 1992. He was predeceased by his father. He is survived by his wife, Rose; his most beloved daughter, K.C.; his loving mother, Sylvia; three brothers, Freddie, Jeff and Ricky; all of Laurel. He is also

William David Mort of Seaford died Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2006 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford. Born in New Castle, Pa., the son of Izetta M. Foster and William J. Mort, he was a science teacher in the Woodbridge School District for 30 years. He also retired from Safeway Stores after 30 years. Mr. Mort was a member of Nanticoke

survived by his grandparents, Fred and Loretta Dykes of Laurel, and an aunt and uncle, several nieces and nephews, and cousins. His funeral service was on July 27, at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel, where friends visited prior to the service. The family requests donations be made to the Tony Marine Memorial Fund, c/o Bank of Delmarva, 200 East Market St., Laurel, DE 19956.

Alvah F. Cash, 80 Alvah F. Cash of Seaford died on Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2006 at Union Hospital in Elkton, Md. Mrs. Cash was a buyer for the DuPont Company in Seaford for 43 years before retiring. She was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, the Acorn Club, the Ladies Auxiliary at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, a charter member of the Seaford Lioness Club, the Golden Girls Club of DuPont employees, Birth Day club, the Democratic League and was also an active member of St. John’s United Methodist Church. Her husband, William L. Cash died in 2001 and her son, William L. Cash Jr. died in 1968. Many nieces, nephews and cousins survive her. Her funeral services were on Aug. 4, at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Seaford. There was an Order of the East-

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.) “We may not be Dairy Queen but we have Great “Sundays”.

What must I do to be saved?

Welcome…

Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. — Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. — Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. — Romans 10:9

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

ern Star Service in the Wesley lounge. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery. Donations may be made to the Order of the Eastern Star, c/o Esther Berner, 8277 Hearns Pond Road, Seaford, DE 19973; or St. John’s United Methodist Church, P O Box 299, Seaford, DE 19973. Arrangements by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Irving Albert Fields, 85 Irving Albert Fields of Seaford died Friday, Aug. 4, 2006, at the Methodist Manor House in Seaford. Mr. Fields was born and raised in Eden, Md, the son of Marie White and Albert Fields. He worked at the DuPont Company in Seaford as a millwright for 42 years. He was a life member of the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department, a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church, Nanticoke Post 6, American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Salisbury, Md., an Army veteran of World War II, and a member of the Whirlaways square dancing club. He was a loving husband, dad and an avid gardener. In addition to his parents, he was also preceeded in death by his wife, Kathleen Elliott Fields in 1989, and his brothers, Richard, Roy, Jay, and sister Ina. He is survived by four children, two sons, Philip I. Fields of Lewes, and Dale E. Fields of Laurel; two daughters, Alice F. Williams of The Woodlands, Texas and

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Christ Lutheran Church

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

Corner of Shipley & Spruce Sts.

A Family Friendly Church Home for You Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 am Phone: 629-9755 www.ChristLC.net Bible School for the Mentally Challenged Saturday at 10 am

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH

Senior Pastor

Located halfway between Seaford & Bridgeville, turn off Rt. 13 East at Cannon Rd. light, 4th place on left.

Harold Daniels 7046 Seashore Hwy. Bridgeville, DE 19933

1611 KJV, Independent, Fundamental, Soul Winning

When words are not enough, choose from our elegant selection of floral arrangements.

John’s Four Season’s Flowers & Gifts Stein Hwy. at Reliance, John Beauchamp 302

629-2644

410-754-5835

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 10:00 Sunday School 7:00 Prayer Service 11:00 Worship Service 6:00 Evening Worship Nursery Provided Rev. William Goslee - Ph. 349-0190

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor Ed Kuhling Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

302-337-3044

Church of God

Fax 302-337-8769

Worship Services: Seeker Service 8:30 am • Sunday School 9:30 Morning Worship 10:45 am • Wed. Night 7 pm

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


MORNING STAR Lynn F. Kortvelesy of Dagsboro; a brother, John Mark Fields of Laurel; a sister, Rosalie Fields of Eden, Md., seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The family is very grateful for all the people who extended care to Irv during his illness. His service was Aug. 7, at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Seaford, where friends called prior to the service. Burial was in Parsons Cemetery, Salisbury, Md. The family asks that contributions be made to St. John’s United Methodist Church, PO Box 299, Seaford, DE 19973; or to the Seaford Volunteer Fire Depart-

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

ment, PO Box 87, Seaford, DE 19973. Arrangements were by Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

Anga Lee Brittingham, 64 Anga “Angie” Lee Brittingham of Dagsboro (formerly of Gaston, S.C.) died Friday, Aug. 4, 2006 at Beebe Medical Center, Lewes. Born in Winnesboro, S.C., she was a daughter of Belton Hoover, Sr. and Sally Driggers Hoover. Mrs. Brittingham was a retail clerk serving in retail sales and grocery stores. She loved to play cards, to read and watch

westerns. She was a member of Antioch Baptist Church in Swansea, S.C. Besides her parents, she was also preceded in death by her long-time companion, Gene B. Austin in 2003. She is survived by her four daughters, Donna Waugh of Milford, Carolyn Nelson and her husband Dennis, Jr. of Seaford, Joanne Dorey and her husband Brett of Dagsboro, and Sandra Hudson and her husband, The Rev. Charles C. III, of Millsboro. She is also survived by four brothers, John Stanley Hoover of Augusta, Ga., Lewis Edward Hoover of Gaston, S.C., Belton Hoover, Jr., of North Augusta, S.C.,

PAGE 27 and Jack Hoover of Warrensville, S.C.; one sister, Mary Ann Beard, of New Ellenton, S.C.; eight grandchildren, Hoyt, Renee, John, Erin, Samantha, Hunter, Dennis, and Ryan; two great-grandchildren, Jonathan and Brielle. She is also survived by her devoted dogs, Lacey and Mikey. Her service was on Aug. 8 at the Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro, with Pastor Wayne Parsons officiating. Interment followed the service at Henlopen Memorial Park, Lewes. The family suggests contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, or the American Heart Association.


PAGE 28

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Apple-Scrapple Festival October 13 & 14 Bridgeville Apple-Scrapple Festival will be Oct. 13 and 14. Beginning on Friday, at 4 p.m. (entertainment, food court and carnival only), Saturday - All Day. The 15th annual Bridgeville AppleScrapple Festival will be held on Oct. 13 and 14, in the Town of Bridgeville. The small rural town, located 30 miles north of Salisbury, 30 miles south of Dover and 30 miles west of the resorts will be the center of attraction for approximately 30,000

people on the second weekend in October. Live entertainment hourly, scrapple carving contest, Lego contest, three craft show areas, health fair, carnival, kids games, huge Town and Country Car Show, antique tractor pull, including a kiddie tractor pull, pony rides, and trade show. There will be absolutely more food than you can shake an apple at. Foods include: apple dumplings, apple pies, oyster sandwiches, pig roast, scrapple sandwiches,

boardwalk fries, barbequed chicken, blooming onions, pit cheeseburgers, hot dogs, fish sandwiches, kettle corn, pizza, crab cake sandwiches, candies, cakes, and drinks of any kind. Enjoy live entertainment beginning at 10 a.m. on Saturday, including the “Gong Show” sponsored by Froggy 99; street dance on Friday night with the band, “Sticky Situation,” and a street dance on Saturday night, featuring the famous

“Mike Hines and the Look” band. Also new this year will be the dynomite professional wrestling group located at the corner of Laws Street and Delaware Avenue. The purpose of this festival is to help promote our area and help support our non-profit organizations as well as help everyone attending have a great time. If more information is needed, call 302337-7275 or 302-629-9582 or visit the website at www.applescrapple.com.

Wilmington College Web Information Systems Businesses depend more and more on web based technology every day. Companies like Amazon, Ebay, and Yahoo provide dynamic web pages tailored to individual customers. This capability provides a huge edge to the business, to the point where it is a necessity, since the competitors also use this technology.

NEW in Dover & New Castle sites Web Information Systems career emphasis has been added to the Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Resource Management. This new Track of the Information Resource Management degree looks at web development tools currently in demand. Learn the latest in software development technologies for the web, achieve a sound understanding of current business practices, and develop capable communications skills. The Web Information Systems concentration complements an existing ���Managerial Track” of the IRM degree, and is offered alongside the recently introduced Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer and Network Security (offered at New Castle and Dover sites).

Register Now for Fall!

Achieve Balance. Achieve Success.

w i l m c o l l . e d u New Castle

Dover

Georgetown


WATERFRONT TOWNHOUSES

“Life is too short to live any place else.”

For your private showing and appointment please contact Brian at Laurel Realty

presented by

A Delaware Corporation Since 1982

123 Lake Dr., Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-2296 Fax: 302-875-9629


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Letters Filing fee discourages candidates I read with interest the column on the back page of the Seaford Star by Mr. Richardson about elections. I agree that incumbents should not run unopposed and especially career politicians should not run unopposed. I believe there are two reasons why many folks don’t run for office: cost is a significant factor as well as un-statesmanship conduct by those in politics. As I understand it the cost to file can be up to 1 percent of the salary of the sought after position. In addition, this fee is paid to the party and not to the election commission. Perhaps I am missing something, but I fail to see why if I file that money should go to the party. The party I declare should be glad to have those who seek office on their ticket. The filing fee should be low to allow citizens to run for office and the fee should go to the election commission to help off-set the cost of elections. There are also other high costs involved such as printing campaign literature and mailings. To run for office these days means to be involved in politics and politics has become tarnished. Politicians are at times looked at as the used car salesman stereotype or insurance sales pitch. Gone are the days of citizen legislators and gone are the days of statesmanship. What’s in it for me, control, influence and/or power, and often name calling are the rule of the day. Debate of issues and doing right by the citizen has gone by the way side in many cases. I would like to run for office. Unfortunately I do not believe that it would do any good to declare a party unless I was one of the favored ones chosen by the party (either party). The party I do not believe would endorse me or contribute money or time to my campaign. The system today is not set up to be citizen friendly. Cronyism seems to be very important to running for office as well. So, why don’t more people run and why do we have unchallenged races? Just a few possibilities from someone on the fringes. John Poe Bridgeville

Anti-Christianism A recent article in the New York Times went out of its way to report on the lawsuit that a Delawarean is pressing against the Indian River School District for allegedly allowing a prayer during a high school graduation which included her

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net daughter while she and her family attended. She professed to be so offended by the mention of Jesus Christ during the prayer of benediction on the students that she and the ACLU are seeking a settlement of reputed six figures for the alleged offense. The article portrays a Mrs. Dobrich as someone who has been victimized, whereas the truth seems to be the opposite. A study of the facts surrounding that case shows that there was no intentional offense against her nor was any religious thing forced upon her. She just happened to be present at a public gathering. It was a case of a person who refused to allow others the privilege of religious expression in her presence. She clearly states that she demonstrates her own religion publicly and openly and that of her family as a right — and she is correct in that. But, what she objects to is seeing the same thing from others. Her case has been taken up by the ACLU which is notoriously against all religions, including her own, on the basis of the false premise of “separation of church and state,” a statement which is found nowhere in any of our founding documents, but was created out of thin air by a corrupted Supreme Court. Since the ACLU opposes public expression of religion of any denomination, she is cooperating with them in an act that, if successful, would encourage the denial of public expression of her own religion — if she is unaware of that end result. Yet, as Americans we are all guaranteed freedom of religion and freedom of speech, each of which are twisted by the ACLU to mean the opposite. The combination of Mrs. Dobrich and the ACLU is a hard one to figure out. In other words, there is discernible real basis for her case against the Indian River School District and those who object to her action have a right to disagree with what I consider her intolerance and lack of

Subscribe to the Star newspapers Call Karen at (302) 629-9788

respect for the religious expression of others while insisting on the unlimited expression of her own. It is not anti-Semitism to disagree with a Jewish person. They are no more 100 percent right than any other American and while it is politically correct to call any criticism of a Jew anti-Semitic, nevertheless not all criticism is of that nature. Yet, a local news cartoon labeled any criticism of Mrs. Dobrich’s lawsuit as “Jewish families being ridiculed, harassed, and threatened by the Indian River School District, 2006.” Actually, if there were any threats, ridicules or harassments, where is the public or police record of them? Since this case has not yet come to trial, any comment of fault is entirely uncalled for. I can speak freely as having been involved with the state of Israel in my former position as manager of government contracts for the Westinghouse Defense Center in Baltimore in which one of my clients was the state of Israel, where I have visited and been involved in their fight against terrorists even then. I experienced religious instances there where Christians and Jews practiced their religions side-by-side without incident, tolerant and respectful of each other. I experienced Jewish religious ceremonies where a rabbi invoked prayer upon us all and I ac-

cepted it as a well-intentioned gesture. Mrs. Dobrich was “offended” because a Christian pastor placed a prayer of blessing on the graduating students, one of which was her daughter. It is also curious how a “six figure dollar settlement” will somehow assuage any offended feelings. Since the ACLU promotes profanity, abortion, pornography, homosexual acts, same sex marriage, euthanasia, and other acts on the basis of privacy and free speech, it is also curious that they agree with Mrs. Dobrich that an expression of religion is a worthy basis for a lawsuit and in their inverted logic not a matter of free speech. Is it any wonder that people do not agree and ask her to be tolerant and to stop discriminating against Christians who show tolerance toward her? If anti-Semitism exists, then so does anti-Christianism. If one is to be observed, so does the other. Tolerance is a two-way street. The Indian River School District has not ridiculed, harassed and threatened anyone for any reason as reported by the New York Times and one of our local papers. Their stand for two-way tolerance is as American as you can get and should be respected and not abused. Charles N. Valenti Rehoboth


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10-16, 2006

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

MOV I E S ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307

302-629-5575 • 800-221-5575 ______________________________ LICENSED IN DELAWARE & MARYLAND

SCHEDULE FOR FRIDAY, 8/11 THRU SUNDAY, 8/13 Monster House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8:20 Talladega Nights The Ballad of Ricky Bobby . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Follows 1st Show

P.O. Box 598-US 13, Seaford, DE 19973 Fax: 302-629-5573

www.cbbroadcreek.com

NEW LISTING

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI, 8/11 - FRI.8/18. Talladega Nights: The Legend of Ricky Bobby . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 Daily, 2:00 Sunday

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 8/11 THRU THURSDAY, 8/18 John Tucker Must Die . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:50, 7:10, 9:40 Miami Vice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35 Lady In The Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30 Pirates of the Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:25 Zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:00 Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 9:45 The Devil Wears Prada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:45, 7:15, 9:35 Talladega Nights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25 Step Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:15, 7:00, 9:10 Monster House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:40, 6:30, 8:45 The Descent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:15, 4:25, 6:45, 9:05 Barnyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 6:25, 8:40 The Night Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:35, 7:10, 9:15

Perfect for the growing family. Well built home w/possible 4th BR, oversized 2 car-garage. Located on a landscaped 1.6 acre corner lot. New siding on garage. Hardwood under carpets. #539005 $169,900

Nice 2 BR home in Laurel. New carpeting & replacement windows in 2006. Spacious rooms & room for a garden make this a must see. #527132 $145,000

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 8/4 THRU THURSDAY, 8/10 Talladega Nights . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . .Fri-Sun (11:00, 2:00, 4:00. 5:00) 7:00, 8:00, 9:45, 10:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mon-Tues (1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00) 7:00, 8:00, 9:45 Barnyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (12:15, 2:30, 4:45) 7:15, 9:30 The Descent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (12:30, 2:45, 5:15) 7:45, 10:15 The Night Listener . . . . . . . . . . .NR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (1:30, 4:15) 7:30, 9:45 The Ant Bully . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (12:00, 2:15, 4:30) 6:45 Miami Vice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . Fri (12:45, 1:30, 3:45, 4:30) 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sat (12:45, 1:30, 4:30) 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sun (1:30, 3:45, 4:30) 7:00, 7:30, 10:35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mon (1:30, 3:45, 4:30) 7:30, 10:00, 10:35 John Tucker Must Die . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (12:00, 2:30, 5:30) 8:15, 10:30 Clerks II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues 8:15, 10:30 Lady In The Water . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (1:45, 4:45) 7:45, 10:15 Monster House . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (12:30, 2:45, 5:00) 7:15, 9:30 Little Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (1:15, 3:45) 6:30, 9:15 You, Me and Dupree . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (12:45, 3:30) 6:15, 9:00 Pirates of the Caribbean . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fri-Tues (12:15, 3:30) 6:45, 10:00 The Devil Wears Prada . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues (1:15, 4:00) 6:30, 9:15 Superman Returns . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tues 9:00 Cars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri.-Tues. (1:45, 5:15) World Trade Center . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wed-Thu (1:30, 4:30) 7:30, 10:30 () Discounted showtimes in Parenthesis * Pass/Discount Restrictions Apply

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

Buy One Lunch Menu Items 1-13

or Buy One Dinner

CO RE UPO QU N IR ED

Great location with 3 BR 2 BA oneowner home on 1.22 landscaped acres. 2-car garage, all appliances, 2yr old carpet and vinyl, large master suite. #528693 $232,900

G reat weekend or summer getaway! 1 mile to Lewes Bch, less than 10 min to Cape Henlopen St. Park. Bring the rods & boat & beach chairs. All you need is the suitcase. Reasonable lot rent @ $285/mo. #527947 $12,500 Ni 3 BR h i l VIRTUAL TOUR

Nice 3 BR home in pleasant neighborhood on corner lot w/ fenced backyard. Close to shopping & schools. Sellers’ help w/closing costs. #535002 $160,000

G rand Victorian home built in the late 1800s. This 3000 sq. ft. home had 4-5 BR, 2 1/2 BA, hardwood floor, open stairs to partly finished attic, original ceiling beams, woodwork, updated kitchen, 3 bay garage & fenced yard, + much more. Great Buy at $259,900 #531923

Beautiful 3 BR 2 BA home w/walkin closets, finished bonus rm, walkin storage, ceiling fans, 2 x 6 walls, marble windowsills. Energy Star certified. #536531 $299,900

Ready to grow!! Completely updated farm with 67K broilers, computerized, tunnel, solid sidewalls, center brood, 135 KW Generator. Fenced pasture w/3 BR mobile, 2-car garage , approx. 12 acres. Additional land available. #528662

Combo Items 1-21

Get Second

MEXICAN BEERS DOMESTIC BEERS DAILY DRINK 501 N. Dual Hwy., Seaford, DE - Old English’s Bldg. SPECIALS 302-628-9701

1/2 Price

EVERY MONDAY

Cactus Margaritas

$2.50

REG. $4 Lime Only

Open Mon. - Fri. 11 am - 2:30 pm (Siesta) 5 pm - 10 pm, Sat. Noon to 10 pm, Sun. Noon - 9 pm

Ocean City, MD Easton, MD 12534 Ocean Gateway, 7813 Ocean Gateway, 410-213-7324 410-770-8550 Cambridge, MD Salisbury, MD Chestertown, MD 315 Sunburst Hwy. 1045 S. Salisbury Blvd. 715 Washington Ave. 410-228-7808 410-749-4303 410-810-1952


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 31

Here’s hoping that this grand adventure won’t be much of an adventure My idea of adventure is when the pizza is a little too hot. Or YNN ARKS when my book, sliding from my fingers onto the beach as I drift off ‘This is one of our most to the warm sounds of surf and play, gets a little sand between the reliable routes,’ the pages. Or when the deck gets too warm Amtrak ticket agent and I have to move around to the assured me when I shaded porch. Oh, the tribulations of having leisure time! arranged our journey. My daughter’s idea of adventure is a little more, well, adventurethrough Montana and Idaho into Washingsome. She likes exploring unknown territon. At Spokane, we will head slightly tory, camping overnight in wilderness arsouth and into Oregon. eas. She is equally uninhibited by big We are set to pull into Portland at about cities. I have to have a map, she trusts her 10 Saturday morning. “This is one of our instincts. most reliable routes,” the Amtrak ticket And the two of us are going to spend agent assured me when I arranged our the next two weeks together, on what I journey. think anyone (except maybe Davy CrockI have traveled by train before, to ett) would call at least a medium advenChicago when our son lived there, and arture: We are taking the train across counrived on time, almost to the minute. In try, to Portland, Ore., to visit her brother January, our daughter took the train from and my son. My husband, whose boss is Omaha, Neb., to Chicago, where she had not as giving of vacation time as mine is, to spend the night because the train was so will fly to the west coast to meet us and late she missed her connection, and on to spend a week there. Washington, D.C., pulling into Union StaMuch to my daughter’s dismay, I tion just one day and five hours late. booked a sleeper from Chicago to PortOn the other hand, the last time she and land (we will be traveling coach from the I went to Portland, we flew and we had to nation’s capital to the Windy City). In the spend a night in Kansas City because, spirit of Woody Guthrie or John Steinwhile the airline had arranged for an airbeck, she wanted to get a real feel for her plane, it had forgotten to schedule a pilot. fellow man by traveling the entire 3,000 “It was an adventure!” my daughter would miles in a coach. “Oh, Mom, you can go without a show- say. On this journey, I am hoping for rest. I er for three days,” she said. am hoping that our chairs are comfortable, I didn’t think so. that the skies outside of our observation Our train was due to pull out of Washcar are clear and that the lore about sleepington, D.C., at about 4 p.m. Wednesday afternoon. We were to arrive in Chicago at ing to the sounds of wheel on rail is true. At least I know that, if my book slips about 8 that morning and leave there at from my fingers as I drift off to sleep, the about 2. pages won’t be infiltrated with sand. Now, We will travel northwest through Wisif only the pizza is served at the right temconsin and Minnesota, stop in Fargo, perature. N.D., then go across the top of the nation

L

GAIN BILL’ R S A FAMOUS ALL “U” B CAN EAT! RESTAURANT

5

131 Atlantic Avenue Ocean View, DE 19970

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

INCLUDES 2 SIDES, CHOICE OF BISCUIT, For more Dine In or Take Out Info 302-875-2478 POTATO WEDGES, GREENS, ETC.

302-875-9958

www.laytonassociates.com

AMBER MEADOWS - Exceptional Value with This 4 BR - 2 BA Home on Three Acres. Large 60 X 40 Storage For Boat or RV, Newly Paved Driveway and Much More. $239,900. Ask for Monte Carey

REDUCED - Millsboro Waterfront on The Indian River. 6 BR - 2 BA Multi-Family and a 2 BR - 1 BA Home All For $549,000. GREAT INVESTMENT! Ask for Bill or Carol Kardash

MILLSBORO - 3BR Home W/Garage Located on Rt. 24 near New Golf Course. Close To All Services. REDUCED To $196,500. Ask For Wayne Brittingham

IN TOWN MILLSBORO - Nice 3 BR - 2 BA Well Maintained Home Close To Ball Fields, Library and Downtown Shopping. $249,900. Ask for Monte Carey

POSSUM POINT - Corner Lot near The Indian River in Millsboro. Recent Upgrades And New 24 X 24 Pole Shed. Just a Short Walk To Fishing And Crabbing. $174,900. Ask for Monte Carey

PINE BLUFF - 3 BR 2 BA Class C Double Wide. Great for The First Time Home Buyer Located Outside of Georgetown. $179,900. Ask for Travis Layton

HARRINGTON – Great Investment Property. 4 BR 2 BA Duplex in Good Condition Located in the City of Harrington. $142,500. Ask for Monte Carey

A MUST SEE - Nice 3BR 2BA Class C Double Wide with 2 Car Garage. Well Landscaped One Acre Lot on Quiet Country Road between Laurel and Georgetown. $189,900. Ask for Monte Carey

SHILOH CHURCH ROAD - Well Built 3 BR, 1.5 BA Rancher with Large Addition. Many Possibilities. On One Acre in Country Setting. $229,900. Ask for Monte Carey

PHILLIPS HILL ROAD - 3BR 2BA Class C Double Wide on 3/4 Acre Lot with 2 Car Garage And Large Storage Building. REDUCED TO $199,900. Ask For Wayne Brittingham

DELMAR - POULTRY FARM w/4 BR Cape Cod With Attached Garage, Large 60 X 42 Barn, All On FIVE ACRES. Only $415,000. Ask for Wayne Brittingham.

COUNTRY LIVING - SEVEN ACRES with 3 BR - 2 BA Home. Large Workshop on Country Road near Trap Pond State Park. Possible Sub-division. $369,900. Ask for Monte Carey

STEAK NIGHT

3 ‘til 10 pm

5 9

$$

99 99

Choice of

For Monday thru Sunday Specials Look In This Week’s Star Classifieds

Travis Layton

302-537-5599 888-529-8667

FRIDAY

THURSDAY

FRIED CHICKEN 99 $ $599

Monte Carey

P

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

ALL DAY ALL NIGHT

Mearl Layton

8 oz. Ney York Strip or 8 oz. Hand Cut Rib Eye. Comes with side salad, baked potato and vegetable

L O T S

NEW - GEORGETOWN - 1 Acre, Gravity Septic $129,900 NEW - SELBYVILLE In-Town Lot W/City Water/Sewer $57,500 NEW - PITTSVILLE- In-Town Location City Water/Sewer $79,900 NEW - RT. 26 MILLSBORO - 1 Acre Wooded Lot - $69,900 DAGSBORO - Prince Georges Acres - Mound Septic - $99,900 SHILOH CHURCH RD - 1Acre, Wooded - LPP Septic - $92,500

LIST WITH LAYTON - YOUR REALTOR IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD


MORNING STAR

PAGE 32

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 3 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.30/inch Legals: $6.30 per inch LOST

CONSTRUCTION

LOST: SIAMESE CAT, Reward. Cream, blue eyes, brown face, 1 ear lays flat, last seen 7/2, Fleetwood Estates. 856-6915 days, ask for Brenda, or 344-6778.

GIVE-AWAY FREE TO GOOD HOME: 4yr. old male Akita, great with kids. Needs room to run. 628-7796. 8/10 2 SOFAS, 2 RECLINERS, 2 chairs. 628-4585. 7/13

HELP WANTED

Site work contractor seeks Utility Foreman w/10 years exp. Exc. pay, benes, 401(k). Email resume to kjones@triadcc.com or call 302-652-3339. Immediate openings for cosmetologists, spa techs and part-time spa receptionists. Call 855-1128 or fax resume to 855-1135

DENTAL HYGIENIST Dental Hygienist position open in Salisbury area. Established general practice is seeeking quality-oriented individual for long term employment. Position includes full benefits and retirement plan. Starting salary for position is 50K+, based on 32hour work week, without weekend or evening hours. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Allen from Gray, White and Allen, DDS, PA at 410-749-0108 or e-mail: G.AllenDDS@comcast.net 8/3/2tc

Enjoy the Star? Don’t Miss A Single Issue!

Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY HAIR SALON: Must sell entire salon by end of August. Everything must go! Entire business or just contents. (2) stations w/chairs, (2) shampoo stations, (3) dryers w/chairs, reception desk, all supplies. Call 302236-6781 for appt. to see, lv. msg. 8/10/1tc LOVE TO DECORATE? Earn $30-$50 per hour for part time fun. Call Debbie at 629-0402. tnnc LOOKING TO PARTNER WITH 4 BEAUTY CONSULTANTS. If you have tried other cosmetic companies, only to be let down, we need to talk. Call 1-800211-1202 x 16387. Lv msg.

Want to get paid to drive around listening to music? Sick and tired of being stuck inside? Need flexible hours?

Domino’s Pizza has the answer for you! Join our team of delivery experts and you can have all that, plus delivery experts make an average of $8-$12 per hour. So if you want the freedom to listen to music and you’re sick of being stuck inside and you want great earning potential, stop by our Laurel location to fill out an application. Remember, wind in your hair and money in your pocket, it doesn’t get any better that that.

302-875-1000.

NOTICE

CHILDCARE SOLUTIONS New Christian Home Day Care has openings for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Call Miss Marci at 875-4307.

FUNDRAISER Are you looking to raise money for a school, church, sports team, scout troops, clubs, day care centers, civic organizations, Relay for Life, or any other worthy cause? (Ask me more details about worthy causes). I can help you have fun while raising money. Call Debbie at 629-0402. 5/4/4tnc

RAIN OR SHINE, Every Wed.-Sat. in August from 9 am to 3 pm., Arvey Rd., Laurel. Dishwasher (new), book, CDs, movis, antiques, collectables, HH items, crafts, craft supplies & more, too much to list. Something for everyone! 875-4181 for directions. MOVING SALE: Aug. 19, 9 am. Everything must go. Dealer inquires welcome. 14726 Shiloh Church Rd., Laurel. 875-5232. Dish washer, washer/dryer, refrig., surround sound system, electronics, pool table, universal exercise system, hunting/fishing related, household furniture, kit. items, tools, yard work items, knick-knacks, & more. 7/20/5t

WANTED! SMALL KIT. CABINET, 10” wide, 26” deep, 36” high. 628-8215. 8/10 HOLDING TANK for shallow well pump, 422-6381. 7/27

YARD SALE EDUC. TOYS: New & slightly used Premier, Sat., 8/19, 8 am-5 pm. Shiloh Woods II, Laurel (from Rt. 13, E on Rt. 24 to Sandy Fork, left on Shiloh Ch. Rd., left at Church on Johnson Rd., Rt. into dev., follow signs. 875-4307. 8/10 MOVING SALE: Sat. & Sun., Aug. 11-12, 7 am until. 10-Pc. DR set, 5-pc. dinette set, 2 pc. entertainment center, patio table & 4 chairs, Christmas & household items, & more. 32519 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Laurel, Del. 875-7114. 8/10

4-WH. DUAL WH. LANDSCAPING TRAILER, 1416’, tagged. 875-2893. 7/27

AUTOMOTIVE PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc

OFFICE MANAGER WANTED W. Sussex County area for small co./must be selfstarter/possess good phone skills/detail oriented & organized. Knowledge of accounts payable & receivables a must-computer skills-peachtree & windows. Ability to communicate well & work independently. Pay neg. w/exp. Benefits. F/T-M-F 8:30-5:00. Resumes faxed to 302-875-8838 or mailed to P.M.B. Box 455 Seaford, DE 19973.

FACILITIES MANAGER Major non-profit is seeking an experienced manager of multiple leased/owned facilities located in Delaware and Eastern Shore of Maryland. Demonstrated experience in space planning and budgeting, bidding & managing maintenance & repair contracts, capital improvement projects, negotiating lease & purchase contracts, and risk management is required. Resume with salary to HR Department, Easter Seals, 61 Corporate Cr., New Castle, DE 19720. vnobles@esdel.org EEOE

K&C Sugar Free Store, LLC Sugar Free Food, Snacks, Diabetic Health & More

At Bargain Bill’s in Laurel 302-875-1805 ‘99 GMC SIERRA SLE P/U Ext. Cab 4x4 Z71. Tow pkg., orig. owner, garage kept, Michelin tires, $10,500. 6528-8754. 8/10 ‘93 HONDA ACCORD, 2 Dr., 5 spd., new timing belt & water pump, needs exhaust work. Exc. cond., $1700 firm. 628-9157. 8/10 NEW CLUTCH & PRES. PLATE for Toyota 22R motor, $100 firm. 628-9157. ‘95 OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME 104K, V6, 3.1L, 4 dr., AT, AC, flip top sunroof, exc. running cond. $2150. 629-6575 after 6 pm. 8/3 ‘88 S-10 PICK UP w/ Cap. 83K orig. mi., 5 Spd., AC, exc. cond. except needs engine work. $850. 410546-4335, Delmar. 8/3 CLASSIC CAR: ‘84 Buick Regal, $2500 OBO. 8754922. 7/20 ‘99 FORD EXPLORER, Eddit Bauer XLT, leahter, power moon roof, new front brakes, V8, AWD, all power, 90K mi., exc. cond., asking $6800. (new car ordered). 629-6550. 7/20 ‘78 FORD F150, 351 eng., 4 spd. OD, 9.5’ slide-in camper, $1750 OBO. 8757460 or 875-4700. 7/20

SHERRY LYNN’S JUST FOR KIDS “ A Distinctive Resale Shop ”

Pre-Owned Ralph Lauren, Gap, Gymboree & More Children’s Clothing; Newborn - Junior, Accessories Available.

We only look expensive, but we’re not! Great Selection of Fall & Winter Items Are In!

302-846-3037 Rt. 13A Bi-State Blvd., Delmar, DE 19940 Hrs: Wed.-Sat. 10:00 -3:00

‘93 HONDA CIVIC Hatchback, needs work. $1200. 875-8185 or cell 841-7780. 7/20 ‘94 DODGE CARAVAN, needs trans. work. $500. 877-0833. 7/13

BOATS EVINRUDE 25 hp Older Boat Motor, short shaft. Runs, but needs dome work. $300. 875-8677. 8/10 GRUMMAN BASS BOAT, 12’ semi-V front, $550. 4226381. 7/20

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS ‘99 LANCE TRUCK CAMPER Model #1020, 3 way refrig./freezer, 3 burner stove, oven, microwave, & qu. sz. bed. 10’11” floor length, fits 8’ long truck bed. $10,000. 436-2274. 7/27

GRAPHIC ARTIST

COMPOSITION DEPT. Looking for part-time graphic artist who is willing to expand hours along with growing business. Experience with graphic arts programs very helpful, but willing to train the right person. We utilize MultiAd Creator (Creator Professional), Quark Express and Photoshop on Macintosh computers. Candidate needs to be able to work quickly, be very accurate, be very good with details, and handle deadlines. Also needs to be flexible.

Send resumé as soon as possible to The Star, Attn: Tina, 628 W. Stein Hwy., PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or email to: ads.star@verizon.net Or stop in office and fill out application.


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY A/C & HEATING

ATTORNEYS

AUTOMOTIVE

SUSSEX HEATING & A/C

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

ALLEN BODY WORKS, INC.

302-947-4025

Service within 4 Hours Lowest Price in Sussex County Sales, Service, Installation

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

FUQUA and YORI, P.A.

413 NORTH CENTRAL AVE. LAUREL, DE 19956

Heat Pumps - A/C - Furnaces Over 20 Yrs. Experience Licensed & Insured

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777

302-875-3208

*Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

FAX 302-875-3229

BRIDAL See Us For Your Announcements, Napkins, Etc.

CONSTRUCTION

CONSTRUCTION

Factory Specialist on Carrier, York, Bryant, Trane, Rheem & Goodman

The Star 628 W. Stein Hwy. Seaford - 629-9788

EMPLOYMENT

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Build Your Home To Accommodate Your Needs!

CANNON Construction 12922 Laurel Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 302

875-7747

Cell Phones: 249-7247 Robert 381-6617 Maria

FARM & HOME

Dukes Builders INCORPORATED 55 Years Experience

Our Reputation Is Building In House Draftsman 28385 Dukes Lumber Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Barry Dukes Bo Dukes Fax (H) 875-2625 542-5149 875-7640 (C) 542-9106

FITNESS

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales 328 N. DuPont Hwy., Millsboro, DE 19966

302-934-9450

IRRIGATION R & L Irrigation Services Finish Site Work Complete Irrigation Systems Sod Laying & Seeding Exterior Lighting Ponds, Mulching, Concrete Pavers

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

U.S. 13 N., Seaford 302-629-9645 • 800-564-5050

MATERIAL HANDLING EASTERN LIFT TRUCK CO., INC. Materials Handling Equipment

Industrial Trucks New - Used - Rental

Parts & Service

The power to amaze yourself.™

216 LAURELTOWNE LAUREL, DEL. 302-875-4541

PHOTO COPIES Self Service

Photo Copies 10¢ per pg

302-530-3376

Morning Star Publications 628 West Stein Highway Behind County Bank 302-629-9788

REAL ESTATE

REMODELING

SALES

LAUREL REALTY

“Making A Difference” 1128 S. Central Ave. Laurel, Delaware

Directly Across from the Laurel enior High School

302-875-3000 800-887-3001

TAX SERVICE

New Homes Additions • Remodeling Trim • Repairs • Roofing Siding • Framing JOHN DIXON SR., President 9940 Birch St., Laurel, DE 19956

302-877-0250 • 302-228-4520

Over 15 years experience.

TREE SERVICE

Increase Your Sales Call Rick, George, Pat or Carol To ADVERTISE!



629-9788 WATER TREATMENT

All Work Guaranteed

Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE Fax: 302-628-0798 - www.jacksonhewitt.com

Independently Owned & Operated 328 N. DuPont Hwy. Millsboro, DE 19966

301 Bay St., Suite 308 Easton, MD 21601

302-934-9450

410-819-6990

J oh n’s TREE & LANDSCAPE SERVICE Commercial • Industrial • Residential John Liammayty - Licensed & Insured

628-0139 Emergency Number 875-5776

• Personal Property • Real Estate • Antiques • Farm (302)

Have Gavel Will Travel

(302)

875-2970 236-0344 Cell

Laurel, Delaware

CONSTRUCTION

Healthy Hair Clinique

Healthy Hair with a Healthy Glow Men - Women - Children Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

302-629-4281 Seaford, Delaware

COSMETICS

800-385-2062 • 302-628-2600 MUSSER & ASSOCIATES, INC. t/a Dick Anderson 9308 Middleford Rd., Seaford, DE

Fax: 302-628-9525 Serving DE, MD & VA

SALES “The Pole Building Specialists”

Pole Buildings - Residential Garages Horse Barns - & Other Complete Celebrating Buildings www.fettervillesales.com 25 Years

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Roofing, Siding, Decks, Window Replacement, New Homes, Home Improvements & Customizing Over 25 Years Experience

A complete line of salon quality cosmetics individually selected just for you. Ask about our custom blended foundations. Call for a FREE consultation

Jay Reaser

875-3099

http://elegantyou.motivescosmetics.com

INTERNET

Delmarva’s #1 Water Treatment Dealer Also Offering Premium Spring Water

410.742.3333 800.439.3853 sharpwater.com

Access, Design & Services

17792 Line Church Rd., Delmar, DE 19940 (302) 846-0372 (302) 236-2839 cell

888-432-7965 / www.ce.net

POWER WASHING

PRINTING For Your Business Needs Business Cards Letterheads, Etc. Call The Star

“Dependable” Power Washing Services

Residential & Commercial Free Estimates

302-841-3511

Owned & Operated by: Doug Lambert, USN Ret.

Licensed & Insured

SEAFOOD

FREE ESTIMATES 302-629-4548

AUCTIONEER

MICHAEL A. LOWE, SR.

Propane, Elec., Gas, Diesel 10254-1 Stone Creek Dr. Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-8961 • Fax 302-875-8966 www.easternlifttruck.com

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS

Lee Collins

BARBER/BEAUTY

All work guaranteed Free Estimates

M-F 8-5; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

302-628-0767

AUCTIONEER

28 Old Rudnick Lane, Dover, DE

628 W. Stein Hwy.

629-9788

SEPTIC SERVICE

GOO MAN

OF DELMAR

Septic Care Services 302

629-0444

800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

George M. Bennett

302-846-0593 Cell: 302-236-5327

4676 White Deer Rd., Delmar, DE 19940 Licensed & Bonded

WEDDINGS See Us For Your Announcements, Napkins, Etc.

WEIGHT LOSS

The Star

Make the Transitions Today! You owe it to yourself to check out this program! Call 302-875-3099 for Info HealthierYou.TransitionsLifestyle.com

628 W. Stein Hwy. Seaford - 629-9788

Are you ready to commit to a Lifestyle change?

Why Weight?


PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

‘02 VIKING POP-UP TENT, 17’, fridge, furnace, exc. cond. $5000. 875-0714, ask for Ann. 7/20 ‘03 25’ TRAVEL TRAILER, Nomad by Skyline. Queen bed, sleeps 6, full bath, used 3 times, tagged til May 07, $10,800 OBO. 629-6159. 6/22

FOR SALE STATESMAN LAWN RIDING TRACTOR, 12 hp Briggs, new blades, battery, exc. cond., $350 firm. 8/10 ZENITH 27” TV, color w/remote, have manual, exc. cond., $100 firm. 628-9157. 8/10 ATTIC ROOF VENT, thermo controlled, new, $65 firm. 628-9157. 8/10

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES LAUREL HS Year Books, ‘70 & ‘71, exc. cond., $50 ea. 628-9157. 8/10 Have a Passion for Arcade Classics? Stop buying those inferior ‘plug & plays’ and turn your PC into the arcade you’ve always dreamed of! Starting at under $100, I will set up a full-function Arcade with over 2000 titles on your home PC that won’t interfere with any of your computer’s other functions. Call 410-754-5985 or email thorwor82@aol.com for details. 8/10 ANT. OAK DRESSER, mirror, bow front drawers, $200. 4 Chairs, spindle back, caned seats, $200. 629-6337. 7/27

Enjoy the Star?

Call 629-9788

Interested In Sprucing Up Your Home Decor for Spring & Summer… With fresh new ideas? Call Debbie today for your personal appt. at 629-0402. 5/4/4tnc LADIES’ SHOES, sz. 9 1/2 or 10, $3. Penny loafers, black, low heal. Nice ladies’ summer tops, med. & lg., $1 each. Men’s new summer sandals, sz. 10, $5. 628-8215. 8/10 NEW WASHER & DRYER, Sears heavy duty, less than 6 mo. old. Moving, must sell, $600 OBO. 875-0964 before 7 pm. 8/10 GIRL’S BABY CLOTHES, 6 bags full, some still have tags. Crib, swing, blankets, etc., all for $200 or will sell separate. 875-0964 before 7 pm. 8/10

CANNER/PRESSURE Cooker, 12 qt. Mirro-Matic, $25. 875-1315. 8/10 COMMERCIAL POWER WASHER, 9 hp Honda, 2400 psi, belt drive, $300. 875-8677. 8/10 ROCKING HORSE, lg. oak, for a doll or child, exc. cond., $95. 629-6159. 8/10 PORCH/PATO FURN. - 7 pc., glass top table w/4 chairs, cushions, chaise lounge w/cushion, end table, $325 OBO. 6296159. 8/10 MUSIC EQUIPMENT - Mixing board, E-V Force PA speakers, 2 guitars, elec. fender violin (new), mic stands, & asst. cables. 8754181. 8/3 SOFA BED - 3 cushion beige/brown, VG cond. $75. Barca-Lounger Swivel rocker & lounger, $150. Exercise bike, E/Cel 280, $35. Tradewind comm. hair dryer w/adj. chair, $35. 8755200. 8/3 WOODEN QUILT FRAME, 30” wide, 10’ long. Can quilt a twin, double, queen or king size quilt. 629-4955. LAMPS: Pair, floral, brass, crystal, white shades, 27” hig, like new, $35. 6296159. 7/27

Corolla, NC Vacations! rindley each VACATIONS

&

SALES

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Vacation on the Outer Banks, NC Oceanfront to Soundfront 2 to 10 Bedrooms, Pool, Hot Tub, Pets, Wonderful Beaches! Online Booking! Now discounting spring and summer weeks!

Call us today for your Destination Guide!

1-877-642-3224

www.brindleybeach.com

COMPUTER DESK, $50. 2 Stud e n t s desks, $20 ea. 6298288. 7/27 TABLE, LT, R AT TA N , 42” round, w/4 chairs, $75. 6293312. 7/27

4 VHS CASSETTES of Pearl Harbor, never used. 20 Audio cassettes, 60 programs & 30 hrs. of old time radio shows. Never used. 875-0766, call after 6. 7/27 3 MILLER CENTRAL AIR COND., (2) 3 1/2 ton, (1) 3 ton, (1) gas pack (heating & A/C combined). Call after 8 pm, 846-9791. 7/27 SABRE Detail Master IV Electronic Controlled Wood Burning System, 14 burning tips incl. & The amazing Art of Pyrography teching book also incl. New $310, asking $200 OBO. 6288761. 7/20

4 STEEL FRAME CHAIRS, porch or patio, with cushions. $50. 875-3263. 7/13 BISSELL UPRIGHT VACUUM, $30. Floor lamp, $20. Mini exercise trampoline, $30. 628-1621. 7/13 CRUTCHES, 2 Sets, $5 ea. Folding walker, $5. Adjustable potty, $15. 3546735. 7/13 GOULD WATER PUMP, Model XSH 20, 2 hp, 115/230 Volt, used once. $350. 875-3176. 7/13 LEATHER ROCKER/RECLINER, $50. 628-4585. 7/13

LIGHTED CHINA HUTCH & base, overall sz. approx. 50” w x 75” tall. Will sell separately or w/a 42 x 60 x 78 table, w/a leaf, 2 arm chairs & 4 side chairs. All in great cond. $300 for hutch or $725 for all. 875-1158. 7/20

COSCO DREAM CAR bed, car seat for special needs infant, $100 OBO. Enfamil lipil w/iron, 10 cases, exp. 7/07, $200 or $20/case. 100 Kangaroo Pet Feeding Pump bags, $400 or $4 ea. 875-7643. 7/13

DINETTE SET: Table & 4 chairs, good cond. $100./ Custom made sofa, like new, $550. Moving - must sell. 337-9512, lv. msg. 7/20

BOYS’ WINTER CLOTHES, sz. 5, 75 items, $50. Baby girl clothes, 0-3 mo.; 3-6 mo.; 6-9 mo. All seasons, will sell ea. or all. 875-7643. 7/13

DK. GREEN SOFA, $50 OBO. 2 Pr. drapes, natural, 144x84 $50 ea. Canning jars, qt. $3/doz. 875-5376. 7/20/2t

AMANA REFRIGERATOR, white, 20.5 cu. ft., ice maker, exc. cond., $250 cash. 629-4330. 7/13

EXERCISE BIKE, $30. Tread mill, $100. Cardio glide $100. Moving! 8755376. 7/20/2t LADIES BLACK SEAL FUR Coat (CIRCA EARLY ‘40s) Size M. $150. 410-6415260. 7/20

TODDLER CAR BED, Little Tykes, like new, $75. 8753788 or 877-0644. 7/13 CHILD’S DESK & chair, $10. 846-2681. 7/13

ANIMALS, ETC. HRSE RACING CART w/2 spare tires. 349-4638. 8/3

COLOR CONSOLE TV, $25, it works, too! 8755749. 7/13

FISH AQUARIUM, 29 gal. w/all access, honey pine

cabinet, like new, $75. 8750582. 7/20 CHINCHILLA w/Cage, $75. 875-1045. 7/13 2 FISH TANKS, 30 gal., all access., $60. 55 GAL., Stand & all access., $240. 875-7643. 7/13 30 GAL. AQUARIUM, glass, $25. 846-2681. 7/13

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

LOT FOR SALE Waterfront lot, Old Meadow Rd., 3/4 acre, soil work complete. $279,000 Call Harry Wooding RE/MAX Coast & Country 302-684-3065 Office: 684-4800

WANTED TO RENT SENIOR LADY seeking to rent apt. close to shopping centers in Delmar, Del. Exc. housekeeper, keeps yard clean, no pets or chilldren. Steady income, references. Need ASAP. 877-0741. 8/3

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale. No Vendors Please.

Call 629-9788, or send to P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973.

Advertisement

DONATIONS NEEDED! Boats, Cars, RVs, Equipment, Real Estate, Forklifts & Wheelchair Access Vans

IRS Forms and All Paperwork Done for You. Associated Charities represents numerous non-profits in need of your property. Call Toll Free: 866-639-8724 or 410-603-3468 E-mail: bob3416@mchsi.com



WET BASEMENTS STINK !!

Mold, mildew and water leaking into your basement causes health and foundation damage. What can be done to fix the problem? Allstate American Waterproofing is an honest, hardworking local company. We will give you a FREE evaluation and estimate and a fair price. We have repaired thousands of basements in the area; we can provide local references. When your neighbors needed waterproofing they called Allstate American. Why don’t you? Call now to receive a 20% discount with your FREE ESTIMATE.

DONATIONS NEEDED! CALL 1 800 420 7783 NOW!

A Gold Mine in Bedroom Drawers

Newswire: People are selling their old scrap gold that is gathering dust for its cash value because gold prices are so high. With the price of gold at a 25 year high (over $650.00 per ounce), it makes sense. ScrapGold.com, a gold recycler, offers free insured recycle kits so people may cash in their scrap with 24 hour service and guarantee satisfaction. They accept

Want to Get Your

broken and outdated items like chains, charms, rings and more. "Everyone has bits of gold just lying around which can be turned into cash" says Richard Zakroff, VP of marketing. "Even old dental gold has value." ScrapGold.com processes over 10,000 recycle Kits per month. People can get a free GoldKit at 1-800-283-4700 or ScrapGold.com.

BUSINESS BOOMING? Place a 25 word ad in 121 MD, DE & DC newspapers with just one phone call and for one low price! Reach 4.8 MILLION People! Get the Best Coverage! ONLY $430 PER INSERTION. For details, call this newspaper or call MDDC Press Service directly at

410-721-4000 x17

PLACE 4 GET 1

FREE!

MDDC CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

302-875-3099 elegantyou.motivescosmetics.com


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

SPECIAL REGIONAL ADS

Home Improvement

Adoption

Employment

Healthcare

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring people specializing in matching birth mothers with families nationwide. EXPENSES PAID. Toll free 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6292

Sales Professionals Wanted $75,000+ Pre-qualified Leads helping Seniors Full Benefits, Retirement, Vacations, Stock Options + Management Opportunities Call Mr. Holland 443-394-3830 or toll free 1-866-229-8447

Affordable Healthcare! $59.93/ month per Family! Prescriptions, Dental, Vision, more! No limitations. All pre- existing conditions OK. Call P.S. Family Healthcare! (800)269-9947

FREE GRANITE - Let the Fabricator bid for your granite job. Countertops / Kitchens / Bathroom / Vanities. Free Granite vanity program (some restrictions apply). www.GRANITE101. com

Help Wanted

Land For Sale

Auctions

Employment Information NOW HIRING FOR 2006 POSTAL JOBS. $18/hour Starting, Avg Pay $57K/year Federal Benefits, Paid Training and Vacations. No Experience Needed! 1-800584-1775 Ref # P1021 Fee Required

FedEx Ground. O'O Teams. Avg 5000 miles week. 1.249 hub fuel, start .96. CDL-A with 1 yr Exp 866-832-6339 POLICE OFFICERS: Earn up to $20,000 bonus. Train to protect your fellow Soldiers & be a leader in the Army Nat’l. Guard. 1-800GO-GUARD.com/police

Financial Services

Help Wanted-Drivers

NYS LAND BEING SOLD. Many tracts, 5- 250 Acres, Over 9 Counties. 5 Acres/ Adirondack Camp $19,900. 45 Acres/ Woods & wilderness stream- $49,900. 4 Acres/ Steuben County$15,900. 765 Acres/ Adirondack Lake, $910/ Acre. 8 Acres/ Major Lakefront $129,900. Cabela's Trophy Properties. 800-229-7843, Christmas & Associates, participating broker www.landandcamps.com

NEED TO DRUM UP BUSINESS? Advertise in 121 newspapers across Maryland, Delaware, and DC, reach over 2.3 Million households for only $430. For more information contact this Newspaper or call Gay Fraustro, MDDC Classified Networks, 410-7214000, ext.17 or visit our www.mddcpress.com. Business Opportunity ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 30 machines and candy. All for $9,995. 888-753-3452 Professional Vending Route! Best Deal Around. Snack, Soda, Juice, Water. All Brand, Great Locations, Great Support! Finance Available w/$6K Down. 800337-6590

General Merchandise

#1 TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL. $50,000 $75,000. 1st/yr earnings Training for: Werner, Swift, CR England. Student Financing! Tuition Reimbursement! 100% Job Placement Assistance. 1-800-8830171 EXT A-53

ABSOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU!! ALL BRAND NEW POWER WHEELCHAIRS, HOSPITAL BEDS AND SCOOTERS. IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-9984111 TO QUALIFY

Driver - $1000 Sign on Bonus for Experienced Flatbed Drivers. Home Weekends - $950+ / week. Great Benefits & Equipment. Students w/ CDL-A Welcome. Call PGT: 800837-7748

$$CASH$$ Immediate Cash for Structured Settlements, Annuities, Law Suit, Mortgage Notes & Cash Flows. J.G. Wentworth #1 1-(800)794-7310.

PUBLIC AUCTION OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE & BUILDING IN BLADES, DELAWARE THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 2006 5:00 P.M. Location: 13 E. Third St., Blades, Delaware 19973. From the intersection of U.S. Rt. 13 & Concord Road in Seaford, travel west on Concord Road (past Royal Farms) towards Blades for 0.9 mile. Turn left onto Market Street and travel for 0.1 mile. Turn left onto E. Third St. Property will be on right (Signs Posted). Inspection: Tuesday, August 15 from 4:00 to 5:30 P.M. & Tuesday, August 22 from 4:00 to 5:30 P.M. The property is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 1-32 Map 1.15 Parcel 61.01 and is further described in Deed Book 3088 Page 174. The property consists of approx. 7,350 sq. ft. of land with approx. 61.25 ft. of frontage along E. Third Street. The property is zoned Residential and is improved with a 1,440 sq. ft. 3 BR/1 BA single-story block building. The building is in need of minor repairs & upgrades. The property has municipal water & sewer and is heated with electric baseboard heat (Sussex County Annual Property Tax- $214.46). The property is located on a quiet street in the town limits of Blades and would make a perfect starter home or investment property. Terms: $6,000.00 non-refundable down payment on day of sale in the form of Cash, Cashier’s, or Certified Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons with the balance to be paid in 45 days when a good & marketable deed will be given. Buyer & Seller will equally share all State & County transfer taxes. State and County and municipal taxes and assessments to be adjusted as of the date of sale. Buyer will be required to pay all costs of preparing and recording the deed. The property is being sold in “AS-IS” condition. Failure to comply with these Terms of Sale will cause the down payment paid on day of sale to be forfeited and the property will be resold at the buyer’s expense. A 3% buyer’s premium will be added to the final selling price. Seller(s) have the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property.

BAY COUNTRY VIRGINIA 4.64 Acres Waterfront

PAGE 35 $299,900 Rare opportunity to acquire large acreage homesite with mature hardwoods and dramatic sunsets. Won't last, call today! 1-804-687-6217 “Grand Opening” Sat./Sun. August 19/20. Land Sale! Private, country homesites from $29,900. Deep Creek Lake / Morgantown area. Financing! Humberson Homes Inc. 800-457-6777 20+ Acres with Private River Access. Perfect for a vacation getaway and retirement. Very usable with long range mtn views. www.landneardc.com ASHEVILLE, NC AREA 1 to 8 acre parcels from the $80s. Custom clubhouse with riverfront hot tubs. Exceptional mountain elevation & views! 4 beautiful seasons. 866-292-5760. Garrett County, MD. 35 acres w/BIG views and

Creek $129,900. Bruceton Mills, WV. 4+ acres w/Streamfront $39,900 800898-6139 A.L.S. www.landservice.com LOOKING TO OWN LAND? Invest in rural acreage throughout America: coastal, mountain, waterfront properties, 20 to 200 acres. For FREE Special Land Reports: www.land buyersguide.com/md/dc/de ROMNEY, WV- 12 AC. $79,500 Wooded, secluded, yet easy access from Rt. 50. Min. to canoeing, fishing & swimming in the S. Branch of the Potomac. Beltway only 2 hrs. away. Exceptional Sunsets! 866403-8037. RARE OPPORTUNITY Mature Hardwoods, 12+ac. 133,900, Gently rolling, park-like setting, 1 mile to the S. Branch of the Potomac, walk to Trout stream

PUBLIC AUCTION OF 3 BUILDING LOTS WITH APPROVED PERCS IN BETHEL, DELAWARE FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 2006 -- 4:30 P.M. Location: Hopkins Street, Bethel, Delaware. From the intersection of Georgetown Road (Del. Rt. 9) & U.S. Rt. 13 in Laurel, Delaware, travel west on Georgetown Road towards Laurel for 0.6 mile. At traffic light, bear right onto Woodland Ferry Road and travel for 2.5 miles. At flashing red light, turn left onto Bethel Road and travel for 0.3 mile. Turn right onto Hopkins Street and property will be on right (Signs Posted). This auction will consist of three wonderful building lots located in the town limits of beautiful & historic Bethel, Delaware. Lot #1 is a near rectangular-shaped lot and is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 2-32 Map 11.00 Parcel 11.00 Lot 1 and consists of 0.50+/- Acre of unimproved land. Lot #1 has approx. 120.66 ft. of frontage along Hopkins Street. Lot #1 has a site evaluation approval for a full-depth gravity-fed septic system. Lot #2 is a near rectangular-shaped lot and is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 2-32 Map 11.00 Parcel 11.00 Lot 2 and consists of 0.50+/- Acre of unimproved land. Lot #2 has approx. 151.37 ft. of frontage along Hopkins Street and lies at the northwesterly boundary of Lot #1. Lot #2 has a site evaluation approval for a full-depth gravity-fed septic system. Lot #3 is a near rectangular-shaped lot and is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 2-32 Map 11.00 Parcel 11.00 Lot 3 and consists of 0.50+/- Acre of unimproved land. Lot #3 has approx 213.70 ft. of frontage along Hopkins Street and lies at the northwesterly boundary of Lot #2. Lot #3 has a site evaluation approval for a fulldepth gravity-fed septic system. Order of Sale: Lot #1 will be offered first and will be followed by Lot #2 & Lot #3 with the bids being reserved. Then, all three lots will be offered in their entirety and sold whichever way produces the highest bid. Terms: Lot #1: $7,500.00 non-refundable down payment on day of sale in the form of Cash, Cashier’s, or Certified Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons. Lot #2: $7,500.00 non-refundable down payment on day of sale in the form of Cash, Cashier’s, or Certified Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons. Lot #3: $7,500.00 nonrefundable down payment on day of sale in the form of Cash, Cashier’s, or Certified Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons. Balance to be paid in 45 days when a good & marketable deed will be given. Buyer & Seller will equally share all State & County transfer taxes. State and County and municipal taxes and assessments to be adjusted as of the date of sale. Buyer will be required to pay all costs of preparing and recording the deed. The property is being sold in “AS-IS” condition with no contingencies. Failure to comply with these Terms of Sale will cause the down payment paid on day of sale to be forfeited and the property will be resold at the buyer’s expense. A 5% buyer’s premium will be added to the final selling price. Seller(s) have the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property.

Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons

Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons

AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS, INC.

AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS, INC.

11112 Laurel Road, Laurel, DE 19956

11112 Laurel Road, Laurel, DE 19956

302.875.5261 - 1.866.866.8758 www.onealsauction.com

302.875.5261 - 1.866.866.8758 www.onealsauction.com


PAGE 36 90 mins. West of Northern Virginia. Excellent financing 800-316-9821-echostoneproperties.com

MORNING STAR Available. Call now for free backyard survey! Crown Pools 888-590-6466. Real Estate

LAND BARGAIN 6+ac. $69,900. Open/ Wooded, stream, gorgeous Mtn. views. Pond access, mins to the South Branch, 90 mins west of Northern Virginia, Excellent Financing 800-316-9821 echostone properties.com NEW BARN / STREAM, 5+ac 69,900. Mature pasture 1 mile to the S. Branch of the Potomac, pond access 90 mins. West of northern Va. 1-800-3169821 echostoneproperties. com Berkeley Springs W.V. 1.5 to 2 ac building lots. Mature hardwoods / Mtn views 1 mile from town. Utilities / perc. Approved $67,900 call owner. 1-800-316-9821 “Limited availability” COASTAL NC Deepwater! 1.95 Acres- $139,900. Spectacular homesite waterfront in new upscale gated community. Prime yet secluded coastal location off scenic Hwy 17. Easy I-95 access. Enjoy full service marina, boat slips & boat ramp along w/ white sand beach! Paved roads, water, sewer, more. Excellent financing. Call now 1800-732-6601, X 1616 Charles Watkeys, BIC FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low Down! Gov't and Bank Repos No Credit O.K. $0 to Low Down. For Listings, (800)860-0732 New, Pre-Construction Golf Community-Coastal Georgia. Large lots w/deepwater, marsh, golf, nature views. Gated, Golf, Fitness Center, Tennis, Trails. Oak Park, Docks. $70k's- $300K 1877-266-7376 www.cooperspoint.com Miscellaneous Airline mechanic rapid training for high paying Aviation career. FAA predicts severe shortage, financial aid if qualify. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1-888349-5387 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal *Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement assistance. Computer Provided. Financial aid if qualified. Call 866-858-2121 www.OnlineTidewaterTech.com Pools SWIMMING POOLS - Pool Clearance. HURRY! Limited quantities available. For example: 19x31 oval pool with deck, fence and filter for only $1,180.00. Installation extra. 100% Financing

EASTERN SHORE, VACHESAPEAKE BAY: Extraordinary new community "Underhill Creek Landing". Spectacular sunset views, deep waterfront and water access homesites from $79,900. Toni Trepanier, Agent 888-824-0009 or 757-894-8909 Email: tellam1227@msn.com Real Estate Rentals NO RENT- $0 DOWN HOMES Gov't & Bank foreclosures! No Credit O.K. $0 to low Down! For Listings, (800)860-0573 Real Estate Wanted DON'T LIST - Sell to me. NO COMMISSION OR COSTS - FAST CLOSE: Residential, Comm'l, Waterfront, Farm, non-conforming, any location/condition, fair price, family business 8 6 6 - 4 7 4 - 7 0 0 0 . www.charlesparrish.com Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108. Vacation Rentals OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservation www.holidayoc.com Waterfront Properties Spectacular Virginia Waterfront CORBIN HALL Gated, private community on Atlantic side of Virginia's Eastern Shore. 3+ acre lots available from $130K to $650K with immediate, deepwater access to Chincoteague Bay. Amenities include community pier, boat launch & beautiful community center w/guest suites, pool, spa & fitness room. PORT SCARBURGH Gated, private community on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay. 1 to 12 acre waterfront lots available with pier access. Priced from $370K to $599K. Location ideal for boating & fishing. Privacy close to quaint villages, shopping & water activities. Both properties feature spectacular views, mild climate, low taxes, abundant wildlife. 757-709-9525 or visit www.corbinhall.com. COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA Waterfront Community. The Preserve at River

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Sea. Developer Closeouts. From $129,900. Incredible location. Far below market value. 18 month no payment plan. 866-213-6315. Broker, Neighborhood Properties, LLC

LEGALS BID NOTICE Sealed Bids will be received by the Town of Bridgeville, Attention: Town Manager Bonnie Walls, 101 North Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware 19933, for demolition of the houses at 102 and 104 North Main Street. Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. on August 28, 2006, at which time they will be opened publicly and read aloud. Contract A - 102 North Main Street, Work includes demolition of house with removal of all house material and debris; asbestos removal per Delaware regulations; utility disconnects (water, sewer, electric, gas, phone, etc.); and removal of a tree which has fallen on the house. All labor, materials, equipment and disposal to be included in bid. Contract B - 104 North Main Street, Work includes demolition of house with removal of all house material and debris; asbestos removal per Delaware regulations; and utility disconnects (water, sewer, electric, gas, phone, etc. ). All labor, materials, equipment and disposal to be included in bid. All work must be completed by September 29, 2006. A 10% bid bond is required as well as proof of insurance and Delaware State business license. The right is reserved as the interest of the Town of Bridgeville may appear, to reject any and all bids, to waive any informality or irregularity in bids received, and to accept or reject any items of any bid. 8/10/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE The Mayor and Council of the Town of Laurel, Delaware will sit as Court of Appeal for the hearing of appeals from assessment list for FY-2007. The hearing will be held in the Chambers of Mayor and Council located in the Municipal Building, 201 Mechanic Street, on Tuesday, August 22, 2006, at 7:00 p.m. or as soon as possible threafter. MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF LAUREL 8/10/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 9602 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XI, Subsection 11581, Item 2(c) of said ordinance of CLEAR CHANNEL OUTDOOR who are seeking a special use exception to replace an existing billboard, to be located west of U.S. Route 13, 200 feet north of Road 535. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, September 11, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 8/10/1t

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 9603 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception and a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XI, Subsection 115-81, Item 2(c) of said ordinance of CLEAR CHANNEL OUTDOOR who are seeking a special use exception to replace an existing billboard and a variance from the side yard setback requirement, to be located north of Road 535, 150 feet west of U.S. Route 13. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, September 11, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional informa-

tion, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 8/10/1t

NOTICE Estate of Phyllis J. Ruh, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Phyllis J. Ruh who departed this life on the 17th day of June, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Janet S. Wil-

son on the 25th day of July, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 17th day of February, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. See LEGALS—page 37

BARGAIN BILL’S FAMOUS

RESTAURANT DINE IN ~ CARRY OUT

302-875-2478 * 875-9958 * NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK * Good Ol’ Sussex County Cooking prepared by Our Chef Bill Wainwright from Family Style Meals, Parties, Birthdays, Special Occasions or Other Catering Needs. Try Our “Purnell’s” Eastern Shore Fried Chicken, Rotisserie Chicken, BBQ Baby Back Ribs, Buffalo Wings, Collard Greens, Country Style Green Beans, Pork N’ Beans, Buttermilk Biscuits, Mrs. Bargain Bill’s Homemade Macaroni N’ Cheese Plus Other Side Favorites!

DON’T FORGET Our Grill Specials, Subs and The Best Tastin’ Pizza On The Shore, Bargain Bill’s “Original Sussex County Recipe” 16” Lg. Cheese Pizza All Day Every Day $5.99

ALL ‘U’ CAN EAT SPECIALS Mon. thru Fri. - PIZZA $4.99 Kids 99¢ Wed. - SPAGHETTI $5.99 Thurs. - FRIED CHICKEN $5.99 Includes 2 Sides, Biscuit, Potato Wedges, Greens, Etc.

Fri. - STEAK NIGHT $9.99 Choice of 8 oz. New York Strip or 8 oz. Rib Eye. Comes with Side Salad, Baked Potato & Vegetable.

Sat. & Sun. - PRIME RIB Sat. & Sun. - BREAKFAST Mrs. Mary’s “Fresh Baked” Biscuit -Egg N Cheese with Bacon or Sausage, French Toast, Eggs Cooked to Order, Breakfast Pizza!

FRESH GROUND COFFEE (Reg., Decaf., 5 Flavors and “Shock”)

LET’S PARTY SPECIALS *16” L. Pepperoni Pizza & Dozen Hot Wings $12.99 *100 Pcs. Fried Chicken $65.00

FOR CATERING, PARTY INFO, COMMENTS, Please Call Our Chef “BILL WAINWRIGHT”

410-336-0764 OR 302-875-2478 WANT A MENU FAXED TO YOU? GIVE US A CALL! OPENING SOON! “THE HOUSE” SPORTS BAR & GRILL AND FOR WEDDING RECEPTIONS, PARTIES, MEETINGS, ETC. -- THE BANQUET ROOM For Info Call: 302-344-6502


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36

NOTICE

Executrix: Janet S. Wilson 6 Whipple Way Sewell, NJ 08080 Attorney: James A. Yori Fuqua & Yori P.O. Box 250 Georgetown, DE 19947 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 8/10/3tc

Estate of James F. Wheatley, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of James F. Wheatley who departed this life on the 15th day of July A.D. 2006 late of Bethel DE were duly granted unto Terry Lee Wheatley on the 21st day of July, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 15th day of March, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Terry Lee Wheatley 4 Chandler St. Maynard, MA 01754 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 8/3/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Reginald Ellingsworth, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Reginald Ellingsworth who departed this life on the 11th day of July, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford DE were duly granted unto Robert R. Ellingsworth, Norval L. Ellingsworth on the 19th day of July, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 11th day of March, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Robert R. Ellingsworth 725 Magnolia Dr. Seaford, DE 19973 Norval L. Ellingsworth 14734 Concord Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 8/3/3tc

Enjoy The Star? Subscribe Today!

NOTICE Estate of Patricia L. Damen, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Patricia L. Damen who departed this life on the 29th day of April, A.D. 1996 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Carrie A. Tingle on the 11th day of July, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administatrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to ex-

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

hibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 29th day of December, A.D. 1996 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Carrie A. Tingle 11506 St. Martin Neck Rd. Bishopville, MD 21813 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 7/27/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Audrey M. Wolf, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Adminstration upon the estate of Audrey M. Wolf who departed this life on the 31st day of May, A.D. 2006 late of Laurel DE were duly granted unto Dennis R. Wolf on the 13th day of July, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 31st day of January, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Dennis R. Wolf 5 Wallamsey Lane, Chesapeake City, MD 21915 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 7/27/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY DENISE DOLORES JOHNSON, Plaintiff v. GEORGE KOESTER and. EMMA KOESTER, Defendants.

: : : : : : : :

C.A. No. 06M-07-006RFS

NOTICE OF PETITION TO COMPEL SATISFACTION OF MORTGAGE TO:

George Koester Emma Koester Their executors, heirs, administrators or assigns

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that Denise D. Johnson, Altamont, New York, has filed a Petition in the Superior Court in and for Sussex County requesting the entry of an Order to Compel Satisfaction of her January 19, 1977 Mortgage for $6,750.00 to Charles Donald Koester and Diane L. Koester recorded in Mortgage Book 377, Page 235, and held by you by virtue of a December 17, 1979 Assignment recorded in Mortgage Book 5353, page 156. In her Petition Ms. Johnson alleges that the said mortgage was paid off and should have been marked satisfied near the end of 1986. A hearing has ben scheduled at the said Superior Court, 2nd Floor, The Courthouse, The Circle, Georgetown, Delaware, on Sept. 15, 2006, at 11:00 A.M. on her Rule To Show Cause why the said 1977 mortgage should not be marked fully paid and satisfied. You must then appear and show cause and serve a notice of intention to appear at least 5 days before the said hearing date on Petitioner’s attorney, James B. Tyler, III, 211 E. Market Street, P.O. Box 555, Georgetown, DE 19947.

At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and lying on the north side of Delaware Avenue and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a bolt in curb found lying on the northerly right of way line of Delaware Avenue; said bolt being a corner for this lot and tax map 2-32 12.1997.00; thence by and with aforesaid tax map North 22 degrees 16 minutes 30 seconds West 300.86 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and the southerly right of way line of Washington Street North 65 degrees 27 minutes 26 seconds East 62.68 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and tax map 2-32 12.19 99.00 South 21 degrees 44 minutes 18 seconds East 284.86 feet to a P.K. N ail set in curb; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and the northerly right of way line of Delaware Avenue South 50 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 62.75 feet home to the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Teresa A. Willey by deed of Thirza P. Hall, dated December' 21, 1996 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2172, Page 16. Tax Parcel: 2-32-12.1998.00 Property Address: 169 Delaware Avenue, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 5th, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the

PAGE 37 Superior Court on September 8th, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TERESA A. WILLEY and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 8/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Tax Parcel No. 5-305.00-3.08 ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being identified as Lot No. 3 on a plot of survey prepared by J.J. McCann, Surveyor, dated February, 1987, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, at Georgetown, Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 36, Page 325, said tract of land being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe set in the southeasterly right-ofway line of Route 13, said point of beginning being a corner for these lands and Lot No.4 as shown on the above identified survey; thence by and with the said Lot No.4, South 69 degrees 35 minutes 21 seconds East, a distance of 806.51 feet to an iron pipe; thence continuing South 69 degrees 35 minutes 21 seconds East, a distance of 25.15 feet, more or less, to a point in the center of

White Marsh Ditch; thence by and with the center line of White Marsh Ditch, South 12 degrees 45 minutes 30 seconds East, a distance of 238.93 feet to a point; thence North 69 degrees 35 minutes 21 seconds West, a distance of 22.17 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe; thence North 69 degrees 35 minutes 21 seconds West, a distance of 940.21 feet to an iron pipe set in the said southeasterly right-of¬-way line of Route 13; thence by and with the said southeasterly right-of-way line of Route 13, North 20 degrees 24 minutes 39 seconds East, a distance of 200.0 feet to the point of beginning, containing 4.12 acres of land, more or less. AND BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto John Mervine, Jr. and Jan Lynn Mervine, husband and wife, by Deed of Nanticoke Homes, Inc., a Delaware corporation, dated August 21, 1987 and recorded on September 9, 1987 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Record Book 1517, Page 8. Improvements include a single residential home with approximately 10,000 sq. ft. of gross living area, including 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 6 fireplaces, 3-car garage and indoor pool, wraparound decks/porch and gazebo. Tax Parcel No. 5-305.00-3.09 ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and being designed as Lot Number 4 as shown on a subdivision plot plan, made by J. J. McCann, Inc., Surveyors, dated February 1987, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, at Georgetown, Sussex County, Delaware, on April 12, 1987, in Plot Book 36, Page 325. AND BEING all of Lot #4 as conveyed unto Delmar Homes, Inc., a Delaware corporation, by Deed of Nanticoke Homes, Inc., a Delaware corporation, dated August 29, 2003 and recorded on September 25, 2003 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Record Book 2888, Page 17. AND FURTHER BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto John M. Mervine, Jr. and Jan Lynn Mervine, husband and wife, by Deed of Delmar Homes, Inc., a Delaware corporation, dated November 24, 2003 and recorded on December 2, 2003 in the OfSee LEGALS—page 38


PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37 fice of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Record Book 2916, Page 45. Tax Parcel: 5-30-5.003.08 & 3.09 Property Address: 11339 Sussex Highway, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 5th, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 8th, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAN L. & JOHN M. MERVINE, JR. and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 8/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, County of

MORNING STAR Sussex, and State of Delaware, being all of Lot No. 9 and the southern half of Lot No. 10 on a Plat of fourteen lots, containing a total of 8.63 acres, more or less, surveyed in 1949 by Harold L. Cook, Registered Land Surveyor, bounded and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at the common corner of Lots Nos. 8 and 9, said common corner being in the westerly line of the public highway leading from Delmar to Laurel at a point 600 feet from a stake in the western limits of said highway where it intersects the North side of a road leading to the residence now or formerly of Vernon Hastings; thence along the boundary line between Lots Nos. 8 and 9, North 67 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 350 feet to the easterly side of said alley North 22 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East 112 feet; thence by and with a new division line through Lot No. 10, between these lands and lands heretofore conveyed unto Howard Gordy, et ux, South 67 degrees 30 minutes East 350 feet to a point on the westerly side of said public highway; thence along said highway, South 22 degrees 30 minutes West 112 and feet to the place of Beginning, containing 39,375 square feet, more or less. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed to Patricia A. Short by Deed from Patricia A. Short, formerly known as Patricia A. Jones, individually and in her capacity as personal representative of the Estate of Sara B. Jones, also known as Sara E. Jones, or Sara Marie Jones, dated August 14, 1997, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware on August 15, 1997, in Book 2223 of Deeds, Page 307. THEREAFTER, the said Patricia Short-Childress, formerly known as Patricia A. Short, conveyed the subject premises to Kristy Anne Short-Divens, by deed dated November 3, 2001, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware on November 9, 2001, in Book 2647, Page 123. Tax Parcel: 5-32-13.0024.00 Property Address: RR2, Box 346, 36098 Bi-State Boulevard, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D.

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 5th, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 8th, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PATRICIA A. SHORT, A/K/A PATRICIA A. SHORT-CHILDRESS & KRISTY ANNE SHORT-DIVENS and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 8/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, lot or parcel of land, lying and being situate in the Town of Delmar, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a steel TBar set on the southerly side of a 4.5 foot sidewalk on the Southerly side of Delaware Avenue (formerly Hastings Street) at its intersection with North Seventh Street; thence along the aforesaid sidewalk, S82°10'00"E, 115.00 feet to a steel T-Bar; being a

comer for these lands and Lot 15; thence with Lot 15, S07°48'27"W, 136.76 feet to a steel T-Bar, being a common corner for these lands, Lot 15, land now or formerly of George E. Lohsen and other lands; thence with the lands now or formerly of George E. Lohsen, N82°00'43"W, 115.00 feet to a steel T¬Bar located on the southerly corner of this land and North Seventh Street; thence N07°48'27"E, 136.45 feet to the point and place of Beginning as shown on a survey prepared by Lowenstein, Soule and Associates, Inc. Registered Surveyors, dated February 1986. BEING THE SAME lands and premises which Jeffrey S. Scott, by Deed dated January 7, 2005 and recorded January 27, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3093, Page 321, did grant and convey unto Raymond F. Somers and Jennifer L. King in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.1519.00 Property Address: 700 Delaware Avenue, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 5th, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 8th, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff

of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RAYMOND F. SOMERS, JR. & JENNIFER L. KING and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 8/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron bar found located on and Easement, said bar being a corner for this lot and Lincoln Heights Subdivision; thence running along said Easement, North 08 degrees 47 minutes 57 seconds East 113.04 feet to a rebar found, said rebar being a comer for this lot and Lands of Country Meadows Housing, LP.; thence turning and running along the line of Lands of Country Meadows Housing, LP the following three courses and distances: 1) South 79 degrees 06 minutes 54 seconds East 128.46 feet to an iron pipe found, then 2) running with a 10' dirt drive, North 07 degrees 21minutes 13 seconds East 25.00 feet to a rebar found, then 3) South 80 degrees 54 minutes 47 seconds East 101.07 feet to a rebar found, said rebar being a corner for this lot located along the line of lands of Ellis E. Hammon; thence turning and running along the line of lands of Hammond, South 08 degrees 01 minutes 45 seconds West 135.11 feet to a rebar found, said rebar being a corner for this lot and Lot 3 of Lincoln Heights Subdivision; thence turning and running along the lines of Lots 3, 2 & 1 of Lincoln Heights Subdivision, North 80 degrees 38 minutes 33 seconds West 230.64 feet to an iron bar found, said rebar being the point and place of BEGINNING. SAID TO CONTAIN 27,966 square feet of land, more or less, with all the improvements located thereon, as surveyed by Lawrence R. Long, Registered Surveyor, dated July

7, 2004. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.115.01 Property Address: 405 N. Fifth Street, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 5th, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 8th, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHAD T. VICKERS and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 8/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land with improvements thereon situate, lying and being more particularly bounded and described as follows: Beginning at an iron pipe in the Northerly edge of the sidewalk on the North side of King Street at a corner See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 39

POLICE JOURNAL Fatal crash investigated The Delaware State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit is investigating a two vehicle crash, which claimed the life of a 44-year-old Greenwood man. On Tuesday, Aug. 1, at 8:40 pm, Troopers responded to the intersection of CR 594 (Oak Road) and CR 591 (Apple Tree Road), approximately three miles east of Bridgeville, for a two-vehicle crash. A 1996 Nissan 240, operated by Jason Anderson, 19, of Greenwood, was traveling southbound on CR 591. A 1996 Ford Ranger, operated by Robert Downes, 44, of Greenwood, was traveling westbound on CR 594. As both vehicles approached the intersection, Downes failed to stop at the stop sign and the two vehicles collided. After the initial impact, the Nissan came to rest in a ditch off the west edge of roadway. The Ford Ranger continued southwest and struck a pole off the south edge of roadway. Downes was transported to Nanticoke Hospital, where he later died from his injuries. It is unknown if Downes was wearing a seatbelt. Anderson, who was wearing his seatbelt, was treated at Nanticoke Hospital and released without injury. A preliminary State Police Investigation suggests that Downes was under the influence of alcohol. The crash remains under investigation.

Fraud warning Attorney Gen. Carl C. Danberg warns that Delaware citizens may receive fraudulent calls from thieves trying to obtain their confidential and private information. In this new form of “phishing,” consumers LEGALS - from Page 38 for these lands and lands now or formerly of Tommy C. Wilkins et ux; thence along a line between those lands and the said Wilkins land North 18 degrees 08 minutes 10 seconds West 126.31 feet to a pipe; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Franklin W. Baker, North 72 degrees, 00 minutes 00 seconds East 78.53 feet to a pipe; thence by and with the Westerly edge of Vine Street (which is unpaved) South 10 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds East 126.31 feet to a drill hole in the sidewalk on the North side of King Street; thence by and with the Northerly edge of said sidewalk south 72 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 78.34 feet to the point and place of beginning containing 9,907 square feet of land, more or less. This description is derived from a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. dated 20 June 1987. Being the same lands and premises which

receive fake voice mail messages purportedly from their bank or credit card company instructing them to call to verify account information. When consumers call the phone number given, a recorded message tells them to enter their account number by pushing the numbers on the phone keypad. What consumers do not know is that they are not calling a legitimate business but are calling a Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phone set up by a thief. The VoIP phone recognizes the keystrokes entered by consumers so that their bank and credit card account numbers are captured for use by criminals through this “vishing” scam. Attorney General Danberg offers the following tips to protect your confidential and private information: • Never provide personal or financial information in response to unsolicited emails or telephone calls. Legitimate businesses don’t ask for this information by email or phone. • If in doubt, contact the business directly through the phone number on your bank account statement or the back of your credit card. Never call the number given in the email or phone message. • Review credit card statements monthly to look for unauthorized charges. • Regularly monitor your credit reports from the three major credit bureaus. You’re now entitled to one free report each year from each of the bureaus. Get your reports by visiting www.annualcreditreport.com or by calling 877-322-8228. If you believe that your personal or financial information has been used by an identity thief, visit the Attorney General’s website at www.state.de.us/attgen/ and print the ID Theft Victim Kit which will

George W. Griebel, Jr., and Susan Griebel did grant and convey unto Veronica E. Dize by deed dated April 17, 1993 and recorded on August 2, 1993 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware in Deed Book 02380, at Page 271. Tax Parcel: 4 - 3 1 4.00-103.00 Property Address: 110 King Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 5th, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 8th, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent

Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of WILLIAM F. BOYLE III, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF VERONICA E. DIZE and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 8/3/2tc

guide you step by step guide on what your need to do to report and document the incident. You can obtain additional information by calling the Consumer Protection Unit at 800-220-5424.

Mountaire Employee injured Delaware State Police Troop 4 detectives are investigating an industrial accident that occurred Aug. 3 at approximately 11:10 p.m., in the rear parking lot of the Mountaire Poultry Plant. Michael Reed, 39, of Lincoln, arrived at Mountaire for the night shift and parked in the rear unlit parking lot. As Reed walked towards the building, he was struck by a forklift. The operator of the forklift apparently did not know Reed was struck. There were two forklift operators in the parking lot at the time of the accident. Investigators are still attempting to determine which forklift struck the victim. Employees found Reed lying on the ground with very serious injuries. Reed was airlifted to PRMC Hospital and later transferred to Baltimore Shock Trauma, where he was admitted in critical condition with internal injuries. This industrial accident remains under investigation.

DUI arrests now total 117 Delaware Law enforcement officers arrested 20 individuals for Driving Under the Influence (DUI) of alcohol during week six of the 2006 “Checkpoint Strikeforce” campaign. This brings the number of individuals arrested for DUI in the first six weeks of the safety initiative to 117. Five sobriety checkpoints were conducted last weekend. Five more sobriety checkpoints are scheduled for this coming weekend. Friday, Aug. 11 Wilmington Kent County Saturday, Aug. 12 Seaford Delaware Beach area Middletown Now in its fifth year, “Checkpoint Strikeforce” is a multi-state crackdown on impaired drivers coordinated locally by the Delaware Office of Highway Safety. Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia are conducting weekly DUI checkpoints now through New Year’s Eve, and monthly checkpoints in the spring, with the goal of deterring impaired drivers and arresting DUI offenders.


PAGE 40

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

People Dukes and Huston are wed in St. John’s Church Donna Sue Dukes and Stephen Robert Huston were united in marriage on April 15, 2006, at St. John’s United Methodist Church in Seaford. The bride is the daughter of William and Norma Dukes of Laurel. The bridegroom is the son of James and Donna Huston of Seaford and the grandson of Nell Huston Dolby of Seaford. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Boyd Etter. Music was performed by organist and pianist Ralph Holland. The bride was escorted by her father and wore a white satin halter A-line gown with crystal beading on the bodice, skirt and chapel train. The matron of honor was Cherie Meienschein of Salisbury, friend of the bride. The attendants were Faith Melvin of Delmar, Del., and Audra Kencitzski of Jacksonville, Fla., friends of the bride. The best man was Paul Dongarra of Catonsville, Md., friend of the bridegroom. Groomsmen were Rod McKenrick of Kinston, N.C., friend of the bridegroom, and Thomas Parietti of Glen Allen, Va., brother-in-law of the bridegroom. The ring bearer was Russell Parietti of Glen

Allen, nephew of the bridegroom. A reception was held at Dove Pointe in Salisbury, Md. Catering was provided by Dionysus’ Kitchen of Catonsville, and music was provided by Musical Memories. The bride is a 1989 graduate of Seaford High School, a 1993 graduate of Salisbury University with a bachelor’s degree in English/secondary education, and a 2005 graduate of Wilmington College with a master of education degree in school counseling. She is employed as an English teacher with the Delmar School District. The bridegroom is a 1987 graduate of Seaford High School and a 1991 graduate of East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C., and holds a bachelor of arts degree in psychology. He is a state-certified real estate appraiser with Huston Appraisal Co., Seaford, and also serves as a sales specialist with Re-Max by the Sea, Bethany Beach. Since returning from a honeymoon in the Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies, they are living in Seaford.

FRESH PRODUCE Our Own Watermelons, Tomatoes & More

LO C A L CORN O N LY

50 3 50 Doz. 40% OFF SELECT

$ $

YANKEE CANDLES

25 %% OFF Derek Meddings

Meddings joins National Guard Mr. and Mrs. Fred Meddings of Laurel announce that their son, Derek, has enlisted in the Maryland Army National Guard. He is a member of the 115th division in Salisbury, Md. He started doing monthly weekend drills in October 2005, while still in high school. He graduated from Seaford High School in June 2006. Meddings will leave for basic training in August 2006. He will be training at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri to be an MP.

YANKEE CANDLE FRAGRANCE OF THE MONTH MACKINTOSH

ALL SUMMER GARDEN FLAGS, FEEDERS & MORE

FALL IS ARRIVING

Laurel/Seaford Pottery • Custom Wreaths Maggie Brown Handbags• Rowe Pottery Framed Art • Flags • Cheese Ball & Dip Mixes • Mail Wraps • Yard Designs Large Selection Gifts & Cards For Any Occasion A Little Bit of Country Just Down the Road

11465 Sycamore Rd. MON. THRU SAT. 10-5:30 Laurel, DE SUNDAY 12-4 (1/2 mile from Rt. 13)

302-875-6922

Donna Sue and Stephen Robert Huston


MORNING STAR

âœł AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 41

Laurel Star Sports

Shown (not in order) is the Maryland state champion 10-11 year-old Delmar all-star softball team: Carlee Budd, Ashley Bennett, Cassie Brennan, Tori Luff, Riley Honess, Hunter Causey, Jenny Lee, Samantha Johnson, Amanda Malone, Tina Lehman, Bethany Wheatley, Kaylie Sprankle, Caroline Phillips, manager Deb Rachocki, and coaches Molly Gross and Dave Bennett. Photo by Mike McClure

JUNIOR SOFTBALL- Shown (top) Laurel Junior League softball manager Jeff Evans slaps hands with the team during the introductions at last Monday’s state championship game at Suburban Little League. The District III champs defeated Milford to advance to the Eastern Regionals in Syracuse, New York. Above Stephanie Wheatley makes a pitch as second baseman Brittney Brittingham gets ready to make a play. See Eastern Regional results on page 45. Photos by Mike McClure

STATE MAJOR SOFTBALL CHAMPS- The District III and state Major League Softball champions of Laurel were on hand at the opening day of the Senior League Softball World Series last Sunday. The players and coaches helped local representatives hand out medals to participating players. Laurel recently returned from playing in the Eastern Regionals. Photo by Mike McClure

Shown (not in order) is the Maryland state champion 9-10 year-old Delmar softball team: Amy Wilson, Deja Brown, Bethany Parsons, Kate Workman, Morgan Adkins, Miranda Scurti, Danielle Bradley, Courtney Melvin, Amanda Elliott, Tabby Deihm, Taylor Smith, Corie Disharoon, Tressie Windsor, manager Jeanne Foxwell, and coaches Karen Bradley and Tim Workman. Photo by Mike McClure

Shown (l to r) is the Delmar Little League tournament team which went 3-0 and placed first in the Berlin Tournament which was held on July 29 and 30: bottom rowNate Keplinger, Joel Scurti, Travis Hovatter, Trey Brennan; top row- Kane Lewis, Coach Scurti, Nick Cooper, Kyle Dykes, Coach Walburt, Brandon Walburt, and Brandon Shaver. Missing from the photo is Travis Jahnigen.


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

District III Senior League Softball All-Stars: Nanticoke

Kari Bergh

Danielle Haldeman

Megan Torbert

Kelsey Riggleman

Jenna Adkins

Jessica Gundry

Amanda Swift

Erin Timlin

Heather Draper

Stephanie Smith

Alexis Short

Andreah Smith

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 39682 Sunrise Court ~ Off Coastal Highway ~ Bethany Beach, DE

302.539.1777 • 800.234.1777

Owned & Operated by NRT Inc.

Julia Carr

VIRGIL V. BULLIS, SR.

Associate Broker, CREA, CRB, CRS, GRI, SRES

Toll Free: 800.336.9425 Cell: 302.841.9217 bullis@cbmove.com “ I’m ready to serve you using my 28 years of experience!”

Check out my other listings at - www.cbmove.com/virgil.bullis DISTRICT III- The host District III Senior League team from Seaford is shown during the World Series opening day festivities. The winner of the District III tournament automatically earns a berth in the World Series. “They (volunteers from all District III league) have all contributed to this World Series,” said Bruce Layton, president of the host Lower Sussex Little League. Photo by Mike McClure

8 LOTS IN 1!

Get the most for your money! Price includes 7 lots within Morning Side Village MHP and 1 lot on Dublin Hill Road. All lots have mobile homes with month to month rental leases. All mobiles sold “As Is.” Can also be sold separately at $90,000 each or all for $719,500. Call the “BULL” for more details. MLS # 537379

NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

Sitting on 11 acres, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is ready for you to finish. Located in a quiet, country setting in Greenwood. Property may be subdivided. Great investment or perfect for a growing family! $679,900. Call the “BULL” today to see for yourself! MLS # 537785

-4

1 at. 1

WORLD SERIES- Shown (clockwise from top left) is: the Windsor East Little League team of Windsor, Ontario sporting some decorative hats during the Senior League Softball World Series opening day ceremony; Nanticoke Little League president Robin Marine sings God Bless the USA during the ceremony last Sunday in Roxana; District III catcher Danielle Haldeman catches the first pitch from State Senator George Bunting during the Senior League Softball World Series opening ceremony. Photos by Mike McClure

S use • o H n Ope

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

8960 Bacons Rd. A must see. Call for the details of this 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home located in Delmar, Delaware with low taxes. Offered at $329,900. Call the “BULL” for more details. MLS # 529591

BEAUTIFUL LOT

to build your dream home. Located on Bacons Rd. in Delmar, DE. $315,900. Call the “BULL” for more details. MLS # 529597


MORNING STAR

STINGERS- Members of the Delaware Stingers field hockey club recently participated in the adult division of the Kent County Clash tournament held at Brown’s Branch County Park in Harrington, Delaware. The Stingers played well all eight of their games and although they finished fourth in the adult division, the team consisted of players aged 16 to 19 in a division where most of the players are over 20 years old. Members of the Stingers are (l to r): top Chelsea Collison, Heather Solomon, Sara McCabe, Lindsay Danz, Ellen Rowe, Caroline Darsney, Leslie Messick, Jordan Wheatley; middle- Jill Guerazzi, Kelsey Harmon, Jennifer Short, Cassandra Short, Nicole Bailey; bottom- Claire Rekitzke. The Stingers are coached by Lloydlee Heite. For more information about the Stingers call 337-8545 or go to the club’s website at www.lloydlee.com/DelawareStingersFieldHockey.htm.

The Bears’ Curtis Handley, left, breaks a tackle from the Cardinals’ Artie Darden during Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation football last fall. SDPR is currently holding registration for its football, cheerleading, and field hockey programs. File photo by David Elliott

Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation programs start next month The following SDPR programs will begin in September or October: Youth field hockey- Youth field hockey is available for children ages 8-12. The program starts Sept. 9 and runs every Saturday from 9-10 a.m. until Oct. 14. Mouth guards and t-shirts will be provided. Punt, Pass, and Kick- The SDPR Punt, Pass, and Kick competition will be held on Sept. 23 at 3 p.m. at the Field of Dreams. This is a football competition for boys and girls ages 8-9, 10-11, 12-13, and 14-15. Registration forms are available at the Parks and Recreation office or you can show up at the time of the event. Football, cheerleading signups now taking place- The SDPR football and cheerleading leagues will be starting soon and parents are encouraged to sign their kids up ASAP. Flag football games start the beginning of September and tackle football starts in October. Call 629-6809 for more information on any of these programs.

Laurel Pop Warner League plans to celebrate 25th anniversary Laurel Pop Warner, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, will hold a homecoming on Oct. 14. The league’s three football teams will play the Wicomico Panthers during the day and a dance will be held that night. The league is hoping to have players from each year present at the event. Former players, cheerleaders, and coaches with team pictures, rosters or records are asked to call league president Steve Gordy at 443-880-8266.

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 43


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor

Caroline Phillips rounds second and goes to third during the Delmar 10-11 year-old all-star softball team’s win over Elkton in the state championship game last Tuesday. The tournament, along with the 9-10 year-old softball tournament, was hosted by Delmar Little League at the Mason-Dixon sports complex. Photo by Mike McClure

STATE CHAMPS- Delmar’s Danielle Bradley looks to the home plate umpire for the call during a 9-10 year-old softball state championship at-bat last Tuesday in Delmar. Photo by Mike McClure

JUNIOR SOFTBALL- Laurel Junior League catcher Jenna Cahall fakes a throw to first base during the state championship game last week. Photo by Mike McClure

And then there were two. The Laurel Junior League softball team and the Seaford Senior League softball teams are the lone remaining teams in Little League play. The Senior League World Series kicked off across the county at the Lower Sussex Little League complex in Roxana on Sunday. The opening day ceremony was pretty much the same old thing, after all I’m a veteran World Series reporter. This is the third straight year the event has taken place in Sussex County. It took a long time to get through the opening ceremony (they did have two hours to kill before the first scheduled game), but then again a lot of people put in some hard work to make this event special for the young ladies. They certainly deserve some recognition. As for me, once the opening day activities concluded I had some time to reflect on the day’s event as I waited a half hour in the hot sun to get my press credentials. I guess I wouldn’t have minded as much if I wasn’t waiting outside an air conditioned trailer. The first day featured some great opening day games. While the Seaford team didn’t win, it certainly proved it can play with the best teams in the world. Things went a little smoother as far as taking pictures during the games. Last year I was thrown out of the teams’ dugouts so often I thought my name was Earl Weaver. This year we had the choice of taking turns standing in the dugout or take our chances on the scaffolding high above the softball fields. Needless to say, I did not choose the latter. I’m not a big fan of heights. Back when I was an intern at the sports radio station in Salisbury, we had a radio announcer who protested the Major League baseball strike/work stoppage by living on a billboard until the strike ended (or when the season was supposed to end). The station’s program director got the bright idea of sending his eager young slave, I mean intern, out to take pictures of his colleague to send in to a national sports publication. I knew the billboards were up in the air a little bit but I had no idea how high they really are. I started taking pictures from the

Wilgus Associates, Inc. 210 W. Market St., P.O. Box 750, Georgetown, DE 19947 • www.century21.com

SAC FLY-

302-855-0500

D e l m a r ’s Bethany Wheatley delivers a sacrifice fly during her team’s win in the 10-11 year-old softball state championship game last Tuesday in Delmar. Photo by McClure

ground, working up the nerve to eventually make the long journey up the ladder to take close up pictures. This was the first time I met the announcer, who later became a good friend, and after yelling up to him to introduce myself I told him “I’m not a big fan of heights.” I made the mistake of bringing my college roommate along for moral support (and as a safety net in case I fell). He started taking pictures of me as I made the climb. I eventually made it up there and got my pictures, of course they didn’t make it into the sports paper. I wish I could say that experience helped me get over my fear of heights, it didn’t. Eastern Regionals- Two Laurel teams advanced to the Eastern Regionals to represent Sussex County and the state. The Major League softball team went winless in the Eastern Regionals and was back in time to take part in the Senior League opening ceremony. Both manager Kenny Willey and his wife Kelly (a coach on the team) said the girls had a ton of fun despite not winning. “We had a ball,” Willey told me during a Senior League opening game. The team had so much fun, especially during the playing of the YMCA song, they caught the attention of everyone at the regional tournament in Albany, New York. It’s great to hear that kids can still have fun playing sports without worrying about whether they win or lose. Sure we all like to win, but youth sports are supposed to be about teaching children the fundamentals and allowing them to have fun while playing. The Laurel Junior League softball team also won the District III and state titles and is currently playing in the Eastern Regionals in Syracuse, New York. (More on this team next week.) Quick hits- The 9-10 and 10-11 Delmar softball teams each won state titles last week. For those of you who didn’t know, that’s why the fire trucks were going through town with the sirens and lights going and a bunch of happy young ladies loaded into one of the trucks. Seaford third baseman Julia Carr made a pair of nice plays in the field during Sunday’s game. I’d compare the plays to the glovework of Brooks Robinson but some younger readers probably have no idea who he is.

Mike PRICE BREAK...NOW $179,900 Make your dollars work for you. Good rental history & income. Call for all the details on #536602

NEW “LAND” LISTING in Greenbriar Way. Up and coming Executive Community. No builder tie-in Owner offering land / home package. Cleared acre, backs up to woods. Septic permit on file for gravity fed system.

Great Price $118,900


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 45

Laurel/Seaford Star Little League All-Star Scoreboard Nanticoke moves to 1-1 in Senior Softball World Series- The Nanticoke Senior League softball team of Seaford moved to 1-1 in World Series play with a 13-0 win over USA South (Morristown, TN) on Tuesday, August 8. The game began on Monday and was stopped due to lightning with the District III champions leading 13-0 in the bottom of the fifth. Seaford hurler Kelsey Riggleman picked up where she left off on Tuesday, retiring the side in the bottom of the fifth inning for the win by 10-run rule. District III put seven runs on the board in the top of the second. Jenna Adkins (first on error), Julia Carr (walk), Erin Timlin (single), Amanda Swift (walk), Riggleman (double), Kari Bergh (single), and Danielle Haldeman (triple) each scored in the inning. Timlin singled and scored a run in the third, then Seaford scored four more runs in the fourth. Haldeman (walk), Adkins (fielder’s choice), Megan Torbert (walk), and Heather Draper (double)all crossed the plate. Riggleman tripled and scored on a sac fly by Bergh in the top of the fifth. Riggleman allowed two hits (both in the fourth) and allowed just one run while striking out seven in the five inning shutout. Riggleman went 2-for-4 with two runs, a double, a triple, and an RBI; Timlin batted 2-for-2 with two runs and two RBIs; and Adkins scored a pair of runs. Bergh and Draper each had a hit and a pair of runs driven in while Haldeman added a hit, two runs, and an RBI. Alexis Short also went 1-for-1 with an RBI. Senior softball scoreboard- Sunday, Aug. 6- Latin America (Curacao) 4, USA West (Bloomington, CA) 2; USA East (Milton, PA) 6, District III (Seaford) 1; USA Central (South Bend, Indiana) 3, USA Southwest (San Antonio, Texas) 1 Monday, Aug. 7- Central 12, EMEA (Netherlands) 0; East 11, Canada (Windsor, Ontario) 0 Tuesday, Aug. 8- Southwest 9, West 1; Central 7, West 0; East 2, South 0 Junior softball- Saturday, August 5- Vermont (Essex) 3, District III (Laurel) 2; Sunday, August 6- District III 15, New Hampshire(Deerfield) 5; Monday, August 7- District III 4, PA (Greensburg) 2; Tuesday, August 8- Massachusetts (Worcester) 8, District III 6; Wednesday, August 9- District III vs. New Hampshire (Deerfield) Major League Softball Eastern Regionals- Saturday, July 29- New Jersey 10, District III (Laurel) 0; Sunday, July 30- Maryland 13, District III 3; Tuesday, August 1New York 12, District III 1; Wednesday, August 2- Pennsylvania 12, Delaware 2 Coaches, Little League officials, and parents are asked to send additional information to the Star at 302-629-9243 (f) or publisher@seafordstar.com.

Seaford/Laurel Star Summer Scrapbook

Jeremy Halter, swimming for SSA in the 15-18 boys, heads for a second-place finish in the backstroke during his team’s win over SGCC during a meet between the two local teams earlier this summer. Photo by David Elliott

Members of the Laurel girls’ Major League All-Star team take a victory lap with their District III championship banner after clinching the title. The team went on to win the state title and played in the Eastern Regionals in Albany. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

LATIN AMERICA- The Soraida Juliana Little League team from Willemstad, Curacao, representing Latin America, shows its spirit during the Senior League Softball World Series opening ceremony last Sunday. Photo by Mike McClure

Delaware Storm travel baseball teams to hold tryouts August 12-13 Attention serious and competitive baseball players: the Delaware Storm travel baseball teams will be holding tryouts for the 11U and 12U teams. Both teams will play a competitive schedule with the 12U going to Cooperstown Dreams Park in New York and the 11U playing in a World Series if qualified in the 2007 season. Tryouts will be on August 12th and 13th at the Georgetown Little League Complex starting at 1:00 PM. Saturday and Sunday.

Sussex Storm 18U softball team to hold tryouts starting August 13 The Sussex Storm 18U softball team will be holding tryouts on Sunday, August 13, 20, and 27 from 1-3 p.m. at their practice field. For more information and directions call Wayne Price at 302-875-5909 or 302-381-1542.


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR

Seaford Bowling Lanes Tuesday Nascar High games and series Ted Campbell 281, 776 Sandy Coulbourne 255, 725

Summer Senior Express High games and series Harold Sheets 279 Patrick Curran 773 Margie Tingler 261 Dot Cannon 743

Weds. Adult/Youth High games and series

Josh Graver 284 Phillip Childress 781 Mimi Blackwelder 243, 724 Nathan Katzaman 256, 731 Brooke Blackwelder 281, 807

Peterson Point High games and series Joe Messick 289 Garrett Sammons 984

Star Weekly Lg. Spotlight Tuesday Nascar Just Us 34-10 What Ever 28-16 Smart Construction 22-22 Jesse N Friends 22-22 Nascar Fanatics 22-22 Strikers 20-24 Just Do It 19-25 We’re Still Looking 0-44

Summer Senior Express Silver Lining Guys R Us Strong Possibility Seaford Lanes Imports We 3

30-14 30-14 26-18 20-24 15-29 11-33

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Delaware Diamonds Fast Pitch teams to hold ‘07 tryouts in August The Delaware Diamonds Girls Fastpitch Softball Organization will be holding tryouts during the month of August. For specific dates and times please contact the following team managers: 10 and under: Monroe Hudson: 302-245-9447 (cell), e-mailMonroe.Hudson@mchsi.com; 12 and under: Andy Givens: 302-228-7960 (cell); 14 and under: Dan Wright: 302-381-3912 (cell), e-mail- DAW3705@netscape.com; 16 and 18 Under: Gerald Jester: 302-856-3852 (home), e-mail- plummer@dmv.com; Steve Holston: 302-855-1212, e-mail- DSHolston@aol.com.

Weds. Summer Adult/Youth

Delmarva Dawgs Baseball Club to hold tryouts for travel teams

Bibb Brigade High Dreamers Seven Ten Split The Mustangs B&B Bold N Beautiful Morgan Mania Team Tiffany Chilly’s

The Delmarva Dawgs Baseball Club will be holding tryouts on the following dates for the following age groups: 9 Under: 8/20 and 8/27 at 10:00 a.m.; 15-16 Under: 9/10 and 9/17 at 10:00 a.m. All tryouts will be held at the Laurel Little League Park on Woodland Ferry Road in Laurel. Any questions feel free to call: Glenn Phillips Sr. (Home) 302-875-4506, (Cell) 302-236-0321 or Glenn Phillips Jr. (Cell) 302-236-1249.

30-14 29-15 25-19 22-22 21.5-22.5 20-24 19.5-24.5 18-26 18-26

Peterson Point Joe Messick 25.5-18.5 Kenny Thomas 24-20 Garrett Sammons 25-19

Eddie Wilson Chris Walker Bo Bennett Chris Patchett Mike Fletcher Andrew Motyka Jesse Evaristo Bob Motyka Doug Wearn

24-20 24.5-19.5 19-25 24-20 24-20 20-24 22-22 20-24 8-36

Youth fishing tournament to be held Aug. 12 at Trap Pond State Park A youth fishing tournament will be held on Saturday, Aug. 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for youth up to 12 years old. Children will be divided into the following groups: Group 1- up to six years old; Group 2- 7 to 9 years old; Group 3- 10 to 12 years old. The tournament will be held rain or shine at the Trap Pond State Park (enter Hitchpond Road and follow the signs). Prizes will be awarded for the casting contest, most weight caught, and most fish caught. Bring your own rod as a limited number will be available to use. Lunch will be provided. To pre-register send an e-mail to bassbum12000@yahoo.com or call 302-8550727 (leave a message). The fishing tournament will be conducted by Cory Matz, an Eagle candidate of BSA Troop 95 in Georgetown. No alcoholic beverages or pets, please.

Delmarva Lady Shorebirds to hold 14U, 16U travel softball tryouts The Delmarva Lady Shorebirds 14U and 16U travel softball teams will be holding tryouts on the following dates: Sat. Aug. 12 at Winter Place Park, Salisbury: 13-14 year olds 2-3 p.m., 15-16 year olds 3-4 p.m.; Sun. Aug. 13 at Sports at the Beach, Georgetown: 13-14 year olds 2-3 p.m., 15-16 year olds 3-4 p.m. Contact: Mike Knottingham at 410-603-0549 or Bill West at 302-855-9535 with any questions.

Delaware Magic travel softball team to hold tryouts for 2006-07 The Delaware Magic, a travel softball team, will be holding tryouts for their 20062007 teams. All interested players are encouraged to try out. Tryouts will be held Sunday, August 20 at Sports at the Beach in Georgetown at the following times: 11:30 a.m.- 10U; 1 p.m.- 12U; 2:30 p.m.- 14U; 4:00 p.m.- 16U/18U More information can be found at www.delawaremagic.org. or call 302-542-4927 and leave a message.

Subscribe to the Star today.

Eastern Shore Lady Cats to hold tryouts in Delmar on Sundays The Eastern Shore Lady Cats are holding tryouts for the 12 and under girls’ fastpitch softball team at the Mason Dixon Sports Complex in Delmar, MD. Tryouts will be held Sunday, Aug. 13, Aug. 20, and Aug. 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. If you have questions please call Charlie Wheatley at 302-846-0236 or Jeff Mills at 410-543-1742 or 410742-3338.

Diamond State Swoop fast pitch softball teams looking for players The Diamond State Swoop girls fast pitch softball organization is currently looking for players for the 2007 season for 10U, 12U, and 14U. If interested contact Dean Culver at 302-381-0282, Michelle West at 302-245-6174, Allen Bradley at 302-245-4080, or Jeff Smith at 302-875-3004 or visit www.diamondstateswoop.com. Tryouts will be held throughout the month of August.

Woodbridge Little League Fall baseball league holding registration The Woodbridge Little League is currently holding registrations for its 2006 Fall Baseball League. Registration is $20 per player and is open to boys who participated in any little league program as a 9-12 year old this past regular little league season. If registration is what the league expects, a 9-10 and an 11-12 year old league will be formed. If registration is lower than anticipated then a 9-12 year old league will be formed. The season will run Sept. 15 -Oct. 29. Teams will be scheduled for two games per week and all games are played at the Greenwood Little League field on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Team sponsors are still needed. You can register your child on Sunday Aug. 6 from 4-6 p.m. at the Greenwood Little League field or receive a registration form by mail by contacting Jose Vazquez at (302) 249-3655. A copy of your child’s birth certificate is required unless you have already participated in this program in the past. Woodbridge’s Fall Baseball League is currently in its fourth consecutive year of operation. This Fall Program has quickly grown to the largest and most successful program in the area. Thus far, the program has served baseball players from Bridgeville, Greenwood, Farmington, Milford, Milton, Georgetown, Millsboro, Seaford, Laurel and Delmar.

Covering all the local sports teams, the Seaford/Laurel Star.

One of the leading names in mortgages is right in your own backyard. CHASE PERSONALIZED MORTGAGES • An experienced mortgage specialist will work with you from application through closing—beginning with helping you select the right mortgage. • A variety of mortgage programs are available to meet your needs—fixed- or adjustable-rate, jumbo and government.

Becky Willey Becky Willey Mortgage Specialist Mortgage Specialist

HERE COME THE UMPSSeaford umpire Nick LLoyd leads the Senior League Softball World Series umpires into Ebbets Field during the opening day ceremonies last Sunday in Roxana. Melvin Hall of Salisbury represents the area as one of the World Series umpires. Photo by Mike McClure

Call for a free consultation today.

BeckyWilley Willey Becky Tel:302-226-8182, 302-226-8182,ext. ext. Tel: 11 11 Toll:866-299-4582 866-299-4582 Toll: Email:rebecca.f.willey@chase.com rebecca.f.willey@chase.com Email:

2A-7615 10/05

Eric EricC. C. Phillips Phillips Tel: ext.13 13 Tel:302-226-8182, 302-226-8182, ext. Toll: Toll:800-780-6962 800-780-6962 Web: Web: www.ericcphillips.com www.ericcphillips.com

All loans are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all states or for all loan amounts. Other restrictions and limitations apply. © 2005 JPMorgan Chase & Co. All Rights Reserved.


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 47

Seaford softball team falls in ‘06 World Series opener By Mike McClure

Nanticoke’s Kari Bergh stands at the plate during her team’s game against USA East last Sunday. Bergh had one of her team’s four hits in the Senior League World Series opener. Photo by Mike McClure OH, CANADASussex County Councilman Finley Jones and Laurel Major League softball player Bree Venables hand out medals to the Canadian team of Windsor, Ontario during the Senior Softball the opening day ceremony last Sunday. Photo by Mike McClure

The host District III softball team of Seaford fell to USA East (Milton, PA) in an opening day game of the Senior League World Series last Sunday in Roxana. USA East scored two runs in the first before adding four insurance runs in the sixth in the 6-1 win. East put a pair of runs on the board in the bottom of the first when Nicole Smith doubled and scored when Larissa Luu stole second. Luu moved to third on the throw home and scored on a sac fly by Amy Neitz. Nanticoke starter Heather Draper walked a pair and allowed an infield single as the East team loaded the bases in the bottom of the second before catcher Danielle Haldeman hauled in a popup for the final out of the inning. Third baseman Julia Carr made a pair of nice plays in the field and Draper notched her second strikeout in the bottom of the third. District III collected its first hit of the game in the top of the fourth on a single by Kari Bergh. Haldeman walked and Jenna Adkins put down a sac bunt to move the runners in scoring position. Bergh was

cut off at the plate on a fielder’s choice and Haldeman was thrown out trying to steal home. Draper made a nice off speed pitch for an inning ending strikeout after East put runners on first and second with one out in the bottom of the fifth. She was unable to avoid damage in the next inning. USA East’s Brittany Hoffman walked, Alysha Hoover hit a bloop single, and Kelly Pfleeger singled up to score Hoffman with both runners moving up on the throw home. Smith singled in Hoover and the runners moved up once again. Pfleeger scored on an error and Smith came home on a wild pitch to make the score 6-0. Adkins hit a one out double for her team’s second hit against Smith and Larissa Luu. Adkins went to third on a wild pitch and scored on a single by Megan Torbert. Draper singled to put runners on first and second but that’s where they stayed as Luu got out of the jam for the 61 victory. Bergh, Torbert, Draper, and Adkins had one hit each, Adkins scored a run and Torbert knocked in a run. For USA East, Smith went 2-for-3 with two runs and an RBI and Hoover batted 2-for-3 with a run. More results on page 45.

WWE’s ECW Live Events Tour comes to Salisbury on August 14 World Wrestling Entertainment’s ECW Live Events Summer Tour hits Salisbury on Monday, August 14. The lineup will include the ECW title match of RVD vs. Kurt Angle and the falls count anywhere match of Tommy Dreamer vs. Big Show. Other matches include Sabu vs. Test, Balls Mahoney vs. Mike Knoxx, FBI vs. Steven Richards and Justin Credible, and Sandman vs. CW Anderson. Tickets for the 7 p.m. show are on sale now at the Civic Center Box Office and online at www.wicomicociviccenter.org. To charge by phone call 410-548-4911. All tickets cost $25 plus fees. For more information visit www.ecw.com.

LADY TERPSCourtney Hastings of Laurel recently traveled to College Park, Maryland for a week to study her sport of choice, basketball, at the University of Maryland. She got to meet some of the Terps’ players as well as some of the coaches. Pictured, left, at the Comcast Center is Courtney along with Crystal Langhorne next to the trophy the Lady Terps received for winning the ACC tournament this year.

LaytonMortgage PRIMARY • SECONDARY • INVESTMENT

Bad credit? No credit history? I specialize in hard loans. Let me put my 31 years of experience to work for you! Bruce Layton, Licensed Broker in state of Delaware

J Construction Loans J Jumbo Loans J Bad Credit Loans J Primary Loan Financing up to 95% J Difficult Loans (B,C,D) J Debt Consolidation J Commercial Loans

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to publisher@laurelstar.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Call 302.539.4768 or 302.841.7961 today!


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Health Use your brain in a variety of ways to keep it healthy By Dr. Anthony Policastro Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Medical director

Modern research has resulted in many changes in the way we think about brain cells. Not too many years ago, the thinking was that we were born with all of our brain cells. Then over the years we continued to lose brain cells. That is not true. We are born with more brain cells than we need. We do lose some of those. However, the ones we have grow more after birth. Other new ones form. Our brain is constantly changing. Areas that we use a lot have more cells. Areas that we do not use a lot have fewer cells. For example right-handed individuals have a better-developed area of the brain for their right hand than their left hand. However, if those individuals use their left hands more than the average, the area of their brain controlling the left hand will go on to develop more. The best example of this is the violinist. Violinists use their left hands to control the strings of the violin. The area of the brain controlling their left hand is more developed than the average right-handed individual. Another example is individuals who undergo amputation of a limb. When that occurs two things happen in the brain. One is that the area controlling that limb becomes less active. The other is that the surround-

ing areas of the brain kind of take over that area. The result is that the nerves controlling those areas are more sensitive than they would have been. This might help explain why individuals who are deaf or blind have other senses heightened. A good example of this is seen in blind individuals. These individuals cannot read because they cannot see print. Therefore, you would expect that area of their brain to not be active. However, if they learn to read Braille, the area of the brain that develops for reading Braille is the same one that would develop if they read print. What this means to us on a practical level is that it is important for us to engage in many different activities. Each of those activities stimulates a different portion of the brain. Reading will be different from watching television. Doing puzzles will be different from listening to music. This is even truer for young children. They are born ready to learn things in many different areas. It is necessary for us to provide them with stimulation in as many of those areas as possible. This is one of the reasons that young children are much better at learning a second language than older individuals. Their brain cells are ready and able to do this. When I was an intern I noticed that infants who were demanding of their parents’ attention tended to get a lot more

Keep cool, but try to save electricity While Delaware Electric expects to have enough electricity to meet the demand for power throughout its service territory through the rest of the summer, the company is asking customers to use energy prudently to help prevent power supply problems. The cooperative offers the following conservation tips: • Close curtains and blinds to keep out

the sun and retain cooler air inside your home • Postpone using major electric appliances like stoves, dishwashers and clothes dryers until the cooler evening hours • Set you air conditioner thermostat higher than usual • Turn off non-essential electric appliances and equipment

stimulation. The interesting thing was that those same infants often proved to be smart when they got older. The question at the time was whether their intelligence

CHIROPRACTIC “Your Health Is A Valuable Resource”

Dr. James Hummel Advanced Chiropractic Massage Therapy • Physical Therapy AUTO & WORK INJURY Medicare & Most Insurance Accepted

Nanticoke Chiropractic Center 415 W. Stein Hwy.

(302) 628-8706

SENIOR CITIZENS Seaford Center Genesis ElderCare® Network • Retirement • Assisted Living • Skilled Nursing Care 1100 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-3575 • Fax 302-629-0561

HOME CARE “The best care, by the best people, in the best place … HOME” Compassionate, Medicare-certified care in the comfort of your home • Skilled nursing services • Physical & occupational therapy • Medical social worker services • Home health aide services

302-629-4914

made them demanding or the stimulation they got from being demanding made them intelligent. It is likely a combination of the two.

PHYSICAL THERAPY Southern Delaware Sports Care & Rehab Providing EXCELLENT OUTCOMES with a PERSONAL TOUCH Manual Therapy & Exercise Programs • Fibromyalgia & Arthritis • Auto and Work Injuries • Spinal Injury • Orthopedic Sports Injuries Park Professional Center, Suite 203 1320 Middleford Rd. 302-629-5700

ORTHOPAEDICS Richard J. Sternberg, M.D. Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon Specializing in Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports Medicine, Adult Reconstruction, Arthritis, Fractures & Injuries, Bone & Joint Disease, Occupational Orthopaedics ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

SUSSEX ORTHOPAEDIC & REHABILITATION CENTER 1200 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 302629-7900

OBSTETRICS/GYNECOLOGY ORTHOPAEDICS Women’s Medical Center, PA Welcomes

DR. ABHA GUPTA NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS Adolescent Gynecology High Risk Pregnancy Laproscopy Surgery • Hysterscopy 1301 Middleford Rd., Seaford, DE

800-990-3909 toll free 302-629-6542 fax

302-629-5409 • Fax 302-629-8072

PHARMACY

URGENT CARE

DELIVERY SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY

Sussex Medical Center

Call us anytime. We’ll be happy to deliver your low-priced prescriptions and drug needs at no extra charge.

BI-STATE PHARMACY Edward M. Asare, Pharmacist 5 East State St., Delmar, DE 19940

302-846-9101 Hrs: 9 am-7 pm Mon.-Fri.; 9-3 Sat.

H. PAUL AGUILLON, MD GENERAL & FAMILY PRACTICE INTERNAL MEDICINE • WALK-INS X-Ray and Lab on Premises Minor Emergencies • Lacerations Office Gynecology - Pap Smears Executive, Sports & Insurance Physicals Orthopedics • Minor Surgery Cardiology • Stress Testing

Se habla español 401 Concord Road, Blades, DE 19973

629-6664


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Volunteers with Red Cross recognized at party for their efforts

On July 20, the

What do you call people who go out 24 hours a day, seven days a week, when called to help their neighbors when disaster strikes? Or, people who teach lifesaving skills like CPR, lifeguard training and First Aid? Or, those who hold disaster preparedness presentations in order to educate the public about being prepared for emergencies? You call them American Red Cross volunteers. On July 20, the local American Red Cross recognized Sussex and Kent County volunteers by holding a Volunteer Recognition Party at the Red Cross Seaford office. In attendance were volunteers who began their volunteerism during the 2005 Gulf Coast hurricanes – many of them were deployed to the affected states to help their fellow Americans. They are now helping local families when disaster strikes. Other volunteers in attendance began their volunteerism with the Red Cross many years ago. Two of these volunteers are Dot Sapp of Georgetown, with 45 years of service, and Mavis Newton of Dover, with 50 years of service. Awards that were given included the Jefferson Awards to Boyd and Connie Mitchell of Seaford, the Exceptional Volunteer Award to Les Potter of Seaford, Outstanding Volunteer Award to Stan Mills of Rehoboth, Disaster Services Award to Chet Wilt of Dover, Health Services Award to Ginny Succarotte of Georgetown, Public Affairs to Pilo Gomez of Milford, Public Affairs Award to Lynda Messick of Georgetown, Lifeline Award to Jim Powell of Lewes, RCN Award to Helen Vavala of Dover, Office Support Award to Peggy Sarkis of Millsboro, Diversity

a

local

PAGE 49

American

Red Cross recognized

these

Sussex and Kent County

volun-

teers by holding Volunteer

Recognition Party at the Red Cross

Seaford

office.

It’s a problem that plagues women of all ages—six to eight million of them—particularly those who have had children. And now, there’s a place dedicated to treating women’s lack of bladder control right here in Seaford. Dr. Antonini is a urogynecologist—the only specialist in the area trained in both female urology and gynecology— who has successfully helped many women overcome this frustrating condition. There are treatments and therapies that can help regain control of bladders. Talk to us today to find out how we can help you.

For an appointment, call:

1-877-NHS-CONTROL

Les Potter, Seaford, received the Exceptional Volunteer Award at the recent Red Cross awards ceremony.

Award to Beverly Bright of Dover and Youth Award to Tamara Cook of Seaford. All volunteers were thanked for their dedication and commitment in helping the Red Cross carry on its mission of helping people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies.

(toll-free) Tomas Antonini, MD, FACOG, Urogynecologist

“I’m proud

that we are helping women overcome incontinence.”

LifeCare Basket Bingo LifeCare at Lofland Park Memory Walk team will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, August 31, starting at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Moose, Route 13A, Seaford. The evening will consist of 20 exciting games and will feature several filled baskets including the Spin Organizer, Heartwood Bread and Crocus as prizes. Tickets are $20 per person in advance, $25 at the door. Advance tickets include a chance to win a Gourmet Picnic Basket Bundle Set, Collectors Club Mailbox, Vintage Vine Serveware Set or one of the several door prizes. Nearly 30 chances to win. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information contact the LifeCare Memory Walk Team at 302-628-3000 ext. 8452 or email Dennist@nanticoke.org.

A renewed spirit of caring. 613 High Street • Seaford, DE 19973

www.nanticoke.org


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

AARP suggests ways to keep cool in summer heat Older people are especially at risk from heat related health problems such as heatstroke and heat exhaustion. With the heat wave Sussex County is currently experiencing, now is not the time to do chores, run errands or weed your garden. “Heat can be miserable for all ages, but potentially life threatening for older persons,” according to Elinor Ginzler, AARP Director for Livable Communities. Here are 10 tips for dealing with the heat wave: • Relax and put off chores and any strenuous activity. • Stay indoors during the hottest times of the day. • Close your shades to keep out the sunshine. • If you do not have air conditioning, stay on the lower-level in your home — heat rises. • Check with your local agency for cool places you can go, such as libraries and public buildings, or a mall with air conditioning. • Wear light-weight, loose fitting clothing and protect yourself from the sun by wearing a hat, sunglasses or use an umbrella. • Drink plenty of water even if you are not thirsty. This helps keep your body cool. • Avoid alcohol or caffeinated beverages.

• If you have a chronic medical condition, talk with your doctor about additional precautions you should take to prevent heat related illness. Some conditions and medications may place you at higher risk. • Neighbors, friends or family should check in on older people in their homes to make sure they are not suffering from the heat. AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization that helps people 50 and older have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial and affordable to them and society as a whole. It produces AARP The Magazine, published bimonthly; AARP Bulletin, a monthly newspaper; AARP Segunda Juventud, a bimonthly magazine in Spanish and English; NRTA Live & Learn, a quarterly newsletter for educators 50 and older; and the Web site, AARP.org. AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older people in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. The foundation has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

“I’m proud to bring over twenty-five years of healthcare experience to the Nanticoke community. I graduated from Wake Forest University Medical School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and completed my residency at Cooper Hospital University Medical Center in Camden, New Jersey. In addition to my medical experience I am a Registered Pharmacist and bring my knowledge and critical care experience to my patients.”

Murray Kemp, M.D. Internal Medicine

“I’M PROUD

of Opening a New Office in Seaford.”

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS 105A Front Street Seaford, Delaware 19973

302-628-4619

A renewed spirit of caring. 801 Middleford Road – Seaford, DE 19973 www.nanticoke.org To find a Nanticoke physician, call 1-877-NHS-4-DOCS.

“Let me take a moment to introduce myself. I received my medical degree from the New York Medical College in Valhalla, New York and completed my residency at Cabrini Medical Center in New York. I bring to Nanticoke experience in diabetes care management, women's health issues, substance abuse and I’m certified in acute care and intensive care unit procedures and fluent in Spanish and French.” Monique Ivanov, M.D.

Monique Ivanov, M.D. Internal Medicine Board Certified

“I’M PROUD

to open a New Office in Seaford.”

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS 701 Middleford Road Suite 200 Seaford, Delaware 19973

302-628-8374

A renewed spirit of caring. 801 Middleford Road – Seaford, DE 19973 www.nanticoke.org To find a Nanticoke physician, call 1-877-NHS-4-DOCS.


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

“Let me take a moment to introduce myself. I received my medical degree from the New York Medical College in Valhalla, New York and completed my residency at Cabrini Medical Center in New York. I bring to Nanticoke experience in diabetes care management, women's health issues, substance abuse and I’m certified in acute care and intensive care unit procedures and fluent in Spanish and French.” Monique Ivanov, M.D.

Monique Ivanov, M.D. Internal Medicine Board Certified

“I’M PROUD

YOUNG READERS - Above, Library Stars (not in order) Tyler Sparrow, Tiffany St. Vernquist, Jenna Pinson, Ashley Walker, Kate Davis, Daisey Wharton, Samantha Lewis, Courtney Bailey, Joshua Durea and children’s librarian, Rebecca Norton. They took a Gene’s Limousine ride to Barnes and Noble in Salisbury as a reward for their achievement in the summer reading program. Each participant received a $25 gift certificate sponsored by “Friends of the Laurel Library, a support group for the programs of Laurel Public Library. At right, avid reader Daisey Wharlon climbs into one of Gene’s Limousine Service cars as driver Bruce Evans awaits for everyone to load for the trip. Photos by Pat Murphy.

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS 701 Middleford Road Suite 200 Seaford, Delaware 19973

302-628-8374 “I’m proud to bring over twenty-five years of healthcare experience to the Nanticoke community. I graduated from Wake Forest University Medical School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and completed my residency at Cooper Hospital University Medial Center in Camden, New Jersey. In addition to my medical experience I am a Registered Pharmacist and bring my knowledge and critical care experience to my patients.”

Murray Kemp, M.D. Internal Medicine

“I’M PROUD

of Opening a New Office in Seaford.”

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS 105A Front Street Seaford, Delaware 19973

302-628-4619

to open a New Office in Seaford.”

A renewed spirit of caring. 801 Middleford Road – Seaford, DE 19973 www.nanticoke.org To find a Nanticoke physician, call 1-877-NHS-4-DOCS.

A renewed spirit of caring. 801 Middleford Road – Seaford, DE 19973 www.nanticoke.org To find a Nanticoke physician, call 1-877-NHS-4-DOCS.


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 51

College offers classes on massage therapy Delaware Tech’s Owens Campus offers a comprehensive training program for professional massage therapists. A free information session to introduce interested students to the program will be held on Thursday, Aug. 17, from 6 to 7 p.m., in the Jason Technology Center, Room 001. The three-semester, 624-hour massage therapy program meets local licensing and national certification standards and includes specialized training in the art and science of massage therapy along with a study of sound business practices. Graduates will be prepared to take the National Certifi-

cation Exam in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork and gain entry-level employment as massage therapists in private practices, physical fitness facilities, hotels and resorts, sports medicine clinics, and health care facilities. The program is designed to teach Swedish massage, deep muscle massage, and myofascial release techniques through a combination of classroom, laboratory, and clinical experience. For more information, or to request a detailed brochure prior to the information session, contact Lori Westcott at 302-855-5988.

Delmarva Power sets record for power use For the second straight day, Delmarva Power set an unofficial, new, all-time record peak demand for electricity, as customers relied on air conditioning to cope with the soaring heat and humidity. Wednesday’s, Aug. 2, record peak of 4,228 megawatts was surpassed at 5 p.m., Aug. 3. The new unofficial peak is 4,243 megawatts. One megawatt of electricity is enough to power about 800 to 1,000 homes. On an average summer day, Delmarva Power customers use about 3,500 megawatts. The new peak won’t be officially determined until later in the week when officials rec-

oncile the initial estimate with actual usage. The previous all-time peak demand of 4,174 megawatts set July 27, 2005 was surpassed on Wednesday of this week as the effects of the current heat wave gripped the mid-Atlantic region. With heat indexes over the 100 degree mark, air conditioners pushed up power demand by continuously running to keep residences and businesses comfortable. While power supply is adequate, Delmarva Power is continuing to ask customers to use energy wisely, especially during peak usage hours between 3 and 7 p.m.

Letter carriers reminded to take it easy in heat Recent spikes in temperatures and heat indexes have created a challenge for letter carriers as they carry out their appointed rounds. However, Postal Service employees have pushed on, keeping sufficiently hydrated and taking precautions against heat exposure. “We have had many instances reported to us of customers providing water or lemonade or some refreshment to our employees while they are out in the heat delivering the mail. I want to ex-

press my thanks to these kind folks and let them know that we will continue to get the mail to their addresses,” says South Jersey district manager/lead executive Joanna B. Korker. Postal Service employees are regularly given daily talks by supervisors reminding them to be safe in the heat and to maintain fluid levels and to report to the office anytime they may feel any symptoms that may represent a sign of heat exposure.

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

PAIN MANAGEMENT & REHABILITATION

GANESH BALU, M.D. • KARTIK SWAMINATHAN, M.D. • MANO ANTONY, M.D. • ALFREDO ROMERO, M.D.

Worker’s Comp. Injuries Auto Accidents Chronic Neck & Back Pain Medications X-Ray Guided Injections EMG Testing Massage Therapy New Location 34446 King Street Row Unit 2 Old Towne Office Park Lewes, DE 19958 (302) 645-9066

D g in o, M m r o lc me We o R o d fre l A

742 S. Governor’s Ave. Opp. Kent General Hosp. Dover, DE 19904 (302) 734-7246

Ne Acc w ept Pa i n tie g nt s

8957 Middleford Road Near Nanticoke Hosp. Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 628-9100

Sleep Through Your Pain Management Injections

Specializing In Glaucoma Treatment & Cataract Surgery Dr. Ortiz is a graduate of Swarthmore College and earned his medical degree from New York Medical College. He completed a one year residency in pathology at Yale University which was followed by a National Institute of Health fellowship in ocular pathology at the Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Ortiz completed his Ophthamology residency at the Scheie Eye Institute. This was followed by a glaucoma fellowship at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, England. He completed a concurrent fellowship in ocular immune disease at Moorfield’s Eye Hospital in London. Dr. Ortiz is a diplomat of the American Board of Ophthalmology and a member of the American Glaucoma Society. He has been practicing ophthalmology since 1983 specializing in glaucoma management and combined cataract-glaucoma surgery.

(302) 678-1700

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS.


PAGE 52

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

Group of baseball lovers off on 12th annual trip Well, by the time you read this, our baseball group, “The Friends of AT URPHY Baseball,” will be off on its 12th annual trip. How did this come It all started shortly after about? Of course every one of us is a lifetime avid baseball fan and we the baseball strike some love being at the ballparks. It all years ago as our way to started shortly after the baseball show that the game itself strike some years ago as our way to show that the game itself and the and the fans who support fans who support it are what really it are what really matters. matters. I have to say that Fred and Don Melvin are the inspirational away for six days as he is in the poultry leaders behind this as they encouraged me business. I could bore you to death with to get something like this going. The first year, 16 of us went to Yankee Stadium and some of our very amusing stories, but I Fenway Park with a group called “Champs won’t. I just wanted you to know about 20-plus members of a special group who Tours.” Since then we have gone on our enjoy the game of baseball and each othown, flying to most destinations. We have several other avid fans includ- er’s company. — Walt Hearn of Walt’s Barber Shop ing Loren Fuller and Ronnie Whaley, who never asks anybody for anything and is a would go if we were not flying, but now friend to everyone in Laurel, so I was surwe are. I think Barry Brumbly is in that prised when he asked me to do him a faclass too, along with Don Bradley. We vor the other day: “Pat, please put in your have promised to knock them out, similar column that the crosses that were put on to what they use to do to “Mr. T” on that popular television program years ago. This Vicky’s grave site were stolen the other day. They had better be returned by Sunyear, Blair Boyce and Johnny Rogers are with us and as first timers, we are going to day evening or I am going to the police, as I saw it as well as another witness.” The let them buy our dinner — a nice gesture egg-throwing business also continues as on our part. I sure hope Raymond Whaley well as several other acts of vandalism does not order another 24-ounce steak. within the town. Please report any unusual This year we lost two of our charter activities to the police. members, temporarily I hope, Pash Hud— Of course I think every baseball son of Seaford and Carl Short of Gumfield should be as elegant as a cathedral boro. They have been on every trip since and I will stop to look at one no matter we started and are great friends and fun to have on our trips. Carl was afraid to be

P

Great Rates. Great Service

4.48

%*

Money Market • Competitive rates • Check-writing choices • Personal service *Current historical 7-day taxable money market yield available on 08/03/06. Effective yield assumes reinvested income. The rate on the money market fund will fluctuate. An investment in the Fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although the Fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund. You should consider the investment objective, risks and charges and expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus contains this and other information. Your Edward Jones investment representative can provide a prospectus, or visit our website at: www.edwardjones.com, which should be read carefully before investing.

Melinda R. Tingle Investment Representative

204 Laureltowne Laurel, DE 19956 (302)

875-0355

www.edwardjones.com member SIPC

Serving Individual Investors Since 1871

M

where it is. It bothers me greatly that the old high school’s infield of the baseball field is just about completely grown over, although it is still sometimes used during the school year. This is not a slap at the school, as I am sure their hands are full getting ready for the return of students this fall. In addition I was hopeful that the field at the new high school could be improved with sidewalks and other things. It’s OK to dream isn’t it? — Kenny Willey is the manager of the Major League girls state champion team that was in Albany, N.Y., last week for games. Before one game the sound of the song YMCA echoed from the announcer’s booth. Quick as a flash Kenny got his players out of the dugout to participate in the YMCA dance and in seconds the whole park was doing the YMCA. Little League officials told Kenny in their long history of involvement in Little League they had never seen that kind of enthusiasm and spirit. Way to go, Kenny. I have to say that is you at your best! — On a recent trip to Delmar I came back with this tidbit of information: Bill Davis, a retired DuPonter and cookie salesman, has bought himself a horse from Gary Horseman. Bill, I still do not think that horse was in the Kentucky Derby. Some salesman, that Gary! — The Good Samaritan aid organization is really having a time of it recently, as someone has decided that it is a good dumping ground for everything from old logs to outdated soft drinks. It’s up to all

of us to report unacceptable things that go on in our community. I do know that area will be watched a lot closer for awhile. — The new Domino’s Pizza will open on Aug. 22. It is hiring, for those of you who may be interested. — There has been some talk among town officials and others about the possibility of closing Willow Street over Records Pond to car traffic and make it more enjoyable for walkers and fishermen. While visiting with Pastor Richard Blades the other day, the subject came up. “Dickie” grew up in the second house as you turn onto that street from Delaware Avenue. “Do you remember when it was a dirt road? Harrison Phillips used to spray it to keep the weeds down,” said Pastor Richard. Dickie Blades and his wife JoAnn are both graduates of Laurel High School and Dickie is the pastor of Calvary Baptist Church in Georgetown. Later this month, the church will celebrate its 50th anniversary and Dickie and JoAnn are very busy preparing for it. Dickie has been there for 29 of those years. The date is Saturday, Aug. 26, at the 7 p.m. service and Sunday, Aug. 27, at 9:30 a.m. There will be special guests and the Blades would like to include their old friends from Laurel. — Parting laugh of the week from the Bargain Bill Round Table Saturday morning. From Jim Galoppa to Paul Viehman: “If you ever give this up Paul, you can get a job circulating air through chicken houses.”

Life at home was a scare a minute Boo! Did I scare you? Sorry. It seems to run in my family. I sometimes think I grew up in the House of Horrors. My parents have always been wonderful people. Mom and Dad were great parents and they raised five successful children. But, at one time, there was a dark side to my parents. You see, they seemed to thrive on scaring the bejeebers out of their children. My father was the ringleader. He had a knack for hiding behind a piece of furniture and jumping out at you with a banshee scream as you walked by. I think he must have been a contortionist, because he had the ability to hide behind any size furniture. I think I remember him hiding behind a broom. It got so I was scared to walk through the house. I never knew when he would

TONY WINDSOR lunge out. Even today, I am half scared to open the basement door, or a kitchen cabinet, for fear that my father is waiting on the other side. My father’s high-pitched, shrill scream was also a favorite during a scary movie. It would always come at the precise moment that the movie was breaking for a commercial. When the television screen would blacken, just a split second before the commercial started, my father would let out that horrible, freakish scream. My mother was no slouch herself. Where my father used no props, simply utilizing his superb sense of timing and a set of great circumstances, my mother combined a grand sense of timing with ef-

500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com

This Classic Home in Bridgeville’s Historic District offers over 2,900 sq. ft. of updated living area with 3 BRs, 2 BAs, formal LR & DR. The spacious 2-story rear addition houses a modern kit., FR, upstairs utility room & lg. master BR suite. For your enjoyment there’s a lg. deck and swimming pool. A new front porch is shaded by lg. trees, and in the back yard you’ll find a 1-car det. garage/shop & stg. shed. Vinyl siding provides for low maintenance, and the inside is as neat as a pin! Extras include appliances, gas fireplace, hot tub/spa in MBR, & more! You must see this property to appreciate all it has to offer for $260,000 (#539120)

Charles Kelly 302-629-4514 Ext: 220

fects. Many was the night that I would walk past a screen door or look out a dark living room window and find my mother’s contorted face, pressed against the screen or glass, her head covered with a pair of nylon stockings. The nylon stocking gag was an inexpensive way to create horror, and gave old panty hose an alternative use after they were otherwise ready for the trash. On special occasions, my mother would pull out all stops and bring on the Freddie Krugar of my young life, Booger Jacob. My brothers and I had the utmost respect for Booger Jacob because we never knew when he would appear. For Booger Jacob’s visit, my mother had to enlist the help of my grandmother. She would wait until my brothers and I were playing in the living room floor and totally unaware of our surroundings. “Hush, hush,” she would say. “Did you hear that noise?” Our eyes would immediately become as big as satellite dishes and we would scamper on to the arms of my grandmother’s chair, virtually climbing on top of her. Then it would happen. From an old closet under the stairway, my mother would seemingly float out, covered from head to toe in a white sheet with a grotesque green mask over her face. She would loom there for a few seconds then go back into the closet, leaving my brothers and me gasping for breath. Today, my mother finds it hard to believe that she and Dad once did these kinds of things. They would have never done this to their grandchildren. Huh? Oh well, we were just lucky, I guess.


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 53

Snapshots

YOUNG READERS - On right, Library Stars (not in order) Tyler Sparrow, Tiffany St. Vernquist, Jenna Pinson, Ashley Walker, Kate Davis, Daisey Wharton, Samantha Lewis, Courtney Bailey, Joshua Durea and children’s librarian, Rebecca Norton. They took a Gene’s Limousine ride to Barnes and Noble in Salisbury as a reward for their achievement in the summer reading program. Each participant received a $25 gift certificate sponsored by “Friends of the Laurel Library, a support group for the programs of Laurel Public Library. Above, avid reader Daisey Wharlon climbs into one of Gene’s Limousine Service cars as driver Bruce Evans awaits for everyone to load for the trip. Photos by Pat Murphy.

WHERE ARE THE COINS? Collectors wait for the 9 a.m. opening of Happy Harry’s in Laurel and a chance to buy a popular baseball coin that was sold on a very limited supply at Happy Harry’s. Photo by Pat Murphy.

ALL LIONS - From left: Laurel Lion past president Brad Spicer; his wife, second vice president, Joy Spicer; and their daughters, newly inducted Laurel Lion Summer Spicer, a student at Swarthmore College, and Laurel Leo, Sierra Spicer, a student at Laurel Middle School.

THE AFTERMATH - A van remains parked at Carey’s Inc. after it was rear ended at the light on Dual 13 and Rt. 24 on Friday, Aug. 4. Several people were transported to the hospital but no serious injuries were reported. Photo by Pat Murphy.

GLIMPSE OF THE PAST - A bird’s-eye view of Laurel, 1909.


MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 53

Church camps offer a taste of a simpler life Along with people seeking a brief respite from the excessive heat we have been experiencing by going to the beach, late July and August bring about a bit of the past that still thrives in certain areas. For years and years, camp meetings were not only a place for townsfolk to get together and share their religion, but they were also the major social gathering for many people. Camp meetings were once very popular and many communities had a special area outside the confines of the town where friends met, studied the Bible, shared meals and friendship. Camp meetings were a relatively inexpensive part of summer life.

Moments with Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton At one time, the Del-Mar-Va camp meetings were at the top of the list. Home for this group was between Laurel and Seaford, just off of what at one time was the major road through the state, and is now alternate U.S. 13.

Doing the Towns Together LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS Sarah Marie Trivits . 875-3672

I’m off to a business start — of sorts — this week, announcing a merger of two towns. What are you thinking at this point? I have been requested to combine the social news from our Delmar friends with those from Laurel. So — if our readers in Delmar will call me with their notes of interest I will be happy to add them to my copy. My phone number is at the top of this column, I do have an answering machine and will return calls promptly. To begin this week I have a nice memo from a gentleman formerly of Delmar, Alvin S. Culver. I quote from his item: Ann Calloway called each one of the ones below to attend a get-together for dinner at 5 p.m. on Monday, July 24, at the Delmar Diner. Those faithful Delmar folks celebrated Delmar Days in Delmar just as they had in Florida over the past 15 years. They have now all returned to their respective areas after enjoying the dining and talking over the good old days. Just think of the 22 seniors who wanted to review the history of this small town. Can you name another town on the Eastern Shore where a group like this would have the desire to reminisce and leave so overjoyed to see old friends? Those attending were: Ann D. and Bill Calloway, Gladys and Thorpie Caldwell, Norma Lee and Ernest Pegelow, Walter Fisher, Doris Aydelotte, Jeanne Hearn, Betty Lloyd, Mary Jane and Richard Johnson, Betty Lou and Carl Wilkins, Jessie Calloway, Phyllis Parker, Claire and Douglas Grant of Akron, Ohio, Nadine and John Wimbrow of Salisbury, Md., and Irene and Alvin S. Culver, Frederick, Md. Mr. Culver asked me also to add this item: Mrs. Melba B. Hastings, much loved Delmar seamstress, is now in Assisted Living at Harbor Point, on Pemberton Drive in Salisbury, Md. Mr. and Mrs. Culver reside at 7401 Willow Road, Apt. 412, Frederick, MD 21702-2500. We’re congratulating this week John and Marcy Harrington Columna on the birth of a new daughter, Mallory Kate, on June 29, who weighed 9 pounds, 3 ounces, and was 21 inches long. Eagerly awaiting her arrival home were her sister, Maura, and brother, Nate. Mallory’s maternal grandparents are Bruce and Linda Harrington and her paternal grandparents are Bob and Sarah Lavery and Chuck and Diana Columna.

Minnie Culver spent the first weekend of August in Smithfield, N.C., with her grandson and wife, Chet and April Culver. Accompanying her were her son, Wayne, and his wife, Toni. Arvelene Moore and Beth Elzey thank B.J. Ellis and the Wesley United Methodist Church in Seaford for the wonderful trip to “Women of Faith Seminar” July 20-22. B.J. planned and entertained two busloads of ladies from the surrounding area churches. This seminar, held each year, was at the Verizon Center Arena in D.C. Participants heard wonderfully inspiring authors and speakers. Guest speaker was singer Sandy Patti. Thousands of women from all states attended.

Nestled in an area where the large trees provide shade, the campground was typical of the era. In the center was a tabernacle where Bible study and other study sessions were held. In the evening, campgoers would gather for a meeting, filled with powerful speakers and lively music. Around the tabernacle, in a circle, houses unique to camp-style filled the area. These small homes were usually one room wide, with some two-stories high, and had front porches. For years and years there was no indoor plumbing and central heat was not necessary. Air-conditioning was unheard of in those days. Special classes were held each day for the children, along with play period. Study groups for adults, often with guest speakers, were also held. “Camp” was open all summer but usually two weeks or 10 days were set aside for special sessions. Along with the special speakers and visiting musicians, area residents would “come home” during camp meeting for reunions with old friends. Life was very simple, friendships were renewed and everyone always had plenty of food to share along with the basics of the camp. Visiting preachers filled those present with the Holy Spirit and the women of the camp saw that everyone was well fed. Vacations were scheduled so that going to camp was a certainty. The Del-Mar-Va camp finally closed, along with most of the others throughout this area. Area residents bought the small homes and modernized them and now live in the camp area on a year-round basis.

Brandywine Springs Camp meetings, north of Wilmington just across the Pennsylvania line on 202, is still in existence, as is Carey’s Camp between Laurel and Millsboro. Many of the homes have been modernized and include year-round residents. Camp meetings were a very special part of the American way of life, especially in the rural areas. They were a special time when families and neighbors would assemble and visit and be a part of a deepseated faith. That same feeling has not changed in all the years since the first camp meeting. While some things have changed, the Walk Around on the final night of the sessions has not changed one iota. This is a time when everyone walks the circle between the tabernacle and the cottages, bidding farewell for another year to friends and family members. There is something very special about camp meetings and their lifestyle. One trip will make an impression that will stay with the visitor a lifetime. Camp meetings provided not only a time to worship together, but a time to be totally relaxed in a setting away from the normal routine. There seemed to be an unwritten rule that the words “hurry” or “rush” were not allowed. Camp meetings are a way of the American lifestyle that is fast fading away. Should you have a chance to visit a camp, do it now before this bit of Americana fades away. Guaranteed you will be happy you took the time.

A surprise limo ride from Arveline Moore’s children celebrated her birthday along with a festive dinner at Old West Steak House in Salisbury on Sunday, July 30. Her brother Norman, Mary Lee and sister Mildred Hitchens also attended. The Lunch Bunch, Red Hat ladies are swinging into this month with a day at O.C. Surf Casters on Aug. 8 and dinner that evening at J.R.’s Rib with Karen Hitch as hostess. Aug. 19, they will have their monthly breakfast at the Dutch Inn, and on Aug. 31, Carol McCrea will host dinner at the Texas Road House in Fruitland. The one birthday they observe this month is for Hazel Baker.

THE AFTERMATH - A van remains parked at Carey’s Inc. after it was rear ended at the light on Dual 13 and Rt. 24 on Friday, Aug. 4. Several people were transported to the hospital but no serious injuries were reported. Photo by Pat Murphy.

We express our deepest sympathy to Sylvia Rolison in the loss of her son. And to the family and friends of Richard Lee Johnson, James F. Neal and Martin Lynch. We continue with prayers for those who are ill: Jack Benson, Agnes Robinson, Kelly Griffith, Richard Cordrey, Joe Hitchens, Ralph Baker, Terry Layton and Hattie Puckham. One birthday overlooked last week was for Mark Adams, who celebrated his on Aug. 2. To Miranda Dickerson happy birthday (18) from Linze and friends on Aug. 9. Other August birthdays: George Bennett and Robert Bennett on Aug. 11; William Cummings, Doris Burton, Dorothy Murphy and Roy Reinhold, Aug. 12; Emma Jean Logan and Catherine Davis, Aug. 13; Annie Branham and Helen Turner, Aug. 14; Anna Cordrey, Aug. 16; Irene Hills and Pat Yates, Aug. 17.

WHERE ARE THE COINS? Collectors wait for the 9 a.m. opening of Happy Harry’s in Laurel and a chance to buy a popular baseball coin that was sold on a very limited supply at Happy Harry’s. Photo by Pat Murphy.


PAGE 54

MORNING STAR

✳ AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

OPINION Bringing meaning to this life

VIEWPOINT More facts and figures about schools and their influence on the economy Back-to-school activities have a tremendous impact on our nation’s economy, according to the Census Bureau. This week we look at technology in the schools and at the financial benefits of a good education. Technology in the classroom The number of computers available for classroom use in the nation’s 114,700 elementary and secondary schools as of the 2005-2006 school year were 14.2 million. That works out to one computer for every four students. Children ages 3 to 17 using a computer totaled 83% and those using the Internet at school totaled 43% as of fall 2003. One hundred percent of public schools had Internet access as of fall 2003. The Rewards of Staying in School Average annual earnThe average starting ings of workers age 18 salary offered to bacheand older with an advanced degree was lor’s degree candidates $74,600. This compares in petroleum engineerwith $51,206 a year for ing at $62,236 is those with bachelor’s deamong the highest of grees, $27,915 for those any field of study. with a high school diploma only and $18,734 for those without a high school diploma. The average starting salary offered to bachelor’s degree candidates in petroleum engineering at $62,236 is among the highest of any field of study. At the other end of the spectrum were those majoring in the humanities. They were offered an average of $31,565. The Cost of a higher education The current average tuition, room and board (for instate students) at the nation’s four-year public colleges and universities for an entire academic year is $12,605. The current average tuition, room and board at the nation’s four-year private colleges and universities for one complete academic year is $34,698. Both are more than double the corresponding 1990 figures. Graduation forecasts Projected number of high school diplomas that will be awarded this school year is 3.2 million. Number of college degrees expected to be conferred this school year is 2.9 million. Government Spending on Education The per-pupil expenditure on elementary and secondary education nationally in 2004 was $8,287. New Jersey ($12,981) spent the most among states or state-equivalents, followed by New York ($12,930), the District of Columbia ($12,801), Vermont ($11,128) and Connecticut ($10,788). Utah ($5,008) spent the least per student, followed by Idaho ($6,028), Arizona ($6,036), Oklahoma ($6,176) and Mississippi ($6,237).

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) morningstarpub@ddmg.net Subscriptions - $17 a year in-county, $22 a year in Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, Sharptown and Delmar, Md.; $27 elsewhere out of state.

Ronald MacArthur is still on vacation. Once again this gives me the opportunity to offer another viewpoint concerning the people and events making news in the area. First, I want to offer Ralph Scott and his family my deepest sympathy upon the passing of Ralph’s wife, Puff. Mrs. Scott went through a long illness and Ralph was there to provide as much comfort as possible. I have a lot of respect for Mr. Scott and I know that his faith has carried him through this difficult time. We never know what life will bring our way. We hope for the best and try to stay optimistic even in the most difficult of circumstances. Many will remember that Ralph Scott for many years wrote a column for this newspaper entitled, a “View from the Right.” In fact, a reader sent one of his columns to the paper just this past week because of its significance to the events occurring today. I’ll share part of that column in a future edition. Some of you may know that I’m a member of the Seaford Kiwanis Club. In fact, this year I’m serving as president. With my busy work schedule, I had no interest in serving as an officer of the club, but a few years ago at one of the Board of Directors meetings, Byron Palmer backed me into a corner and said he would not let me out until I agreed to serve. Anyone who knows Byron can tell you he’s a gentle man, but he can be persuasive when he wants to be. My reason for mentioning the Kiwanis is that I am amazed at the dedication of this club’s members. Many who belong to service clubs know that it is difficult to attract new members. The spirit of volunteerism is not as prevalent today as it was a decade or two ago. A few of our members are in their eighties, but you would never know that they are that age. At the last highway cleanup project, three of the members who showed up on a Saturday to pick up trash along

President Bryant Richardson Vice President Pat Murphy Secretary Tina Reaser Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson Executive Editor Ronald MacArthur

Managing Editor Mike McClure Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Kay Wennberg Cindy Lyons Taylor Circulation Karen Cherrix

the Bridgeville Highway were in their 80s. RYANT ICHARDSON As you know, bending over to pick up paper and bottles is no easy task, but these three men worked as hard as any one of the members. Some service club tasks are fun. The fellowship certainly is great, but some tasks others. The rewards include a long are not as easy. A case in point is and satisfying life. the bell ringing that the club does to help the Salvation Army. I know Speaking of service, there is no it’s difficult to imagine now, but greater group of men and women standing out in the cold ringing a than those who volunteer for the bell in December can bring you a fire and ambulance services. Their chill. dedication is amazing. The deTwice this past season, Dr. Ken mands on their time are unbelievMadden was the one who took my able. The benefits to the local complace at the kettle to ring the bell. I munities are enormous. hope he doesn’t mind me saying Show your respect for what they this, but he is just a couple of years do by supporting the local fire comshy of 90. You would not believe it panies when they ask for funds. to look at him. Somehow service to others helps to keep us young. Finally, I would like to end this You may remember that Dr. week with a few of my favorite Madden served as the superintendheadlines. They are actual headlines ent of schools for the state of that appeared in print. Delaware. A man of such dignity War dims hope for peace and stature should be the one being served, the one who can now take it Alarming isn’t it? easy and enjoy life. And I believe Teacher strikes idle kids he does enjoy life, not through That’ll teach ‘em. leisure, but through service. Squad helps dog bite victim If you want to stay young, join a Enough! service club, stay active serving

B

R

Somehow service to others helps to keep us young.

Sales George Beauchamp Barbara Conn Rick Cullen Carole Kauffman Jimmy McWilliams Debbie Bell Composition Rita Brex Carol James

Laurel Star Advisory Board Dale Boyce Sandy Davis Toni Gootee H. Robert Hickman Jane Hudson Linda Justice Albert Jones Kendal Jones Mike Lambert

Janet Lee Don Phillips Cora Selby Richard Small Debbie Waller Seaford Star Advisory Board Shirley Baynum Beverly Blades Tommy Cooper

Edward Cranston Mike Hall Nancy Harper John Hollis Karen Johnston Jan Lundquist Ron Marvel John Rittenhouse Bill Royal Steve Theis Layton Wheeler

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR

âœł AUGUST 10 - 16, 2006

PAGE 55

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Sunny to partly cloudy

A thunderstorm possible

A thundershower possible

Sunny to partly cloudy

Rather cloudy

Mostly cloudy and humid

Cloudy with t-storms possible

88/67

87/69

82/64

84/65

87/65

85/65

84/63

Almanac Statistics through Tuesday August 8 at Georgetown, Delaware

Temperatures

Precipitation

High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . 100° Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . . 64° Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86° Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65° Average temperature . . . . . . . . 82.9°

Total for the week . . . . . . . . . . 0.19� Total for the month . . . . . . . . . . 0.19� Normal for the month . . . . . . . . 1.16� Total for the year . . . . . . . . . . 26.86�

Smyrna 87/70 Dover 86/70

Time 2:29 p.m. 9:24 p.m. 11:08 p.m. 1:22 a.m.

Date October 6 October 19 November 3 November 15

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .6:12 a.m. .6:13 a.m. .6:14 a.m. .6:14 a.m. .6:15 a.m. .6:16 a.m. .6:17 a.m.

Full Aug 9

Harrington 87/70

Time 10:08 a.m. 5:36 a.m. 6:52 p.m. 6:21 p.m.

Milford 88/70 Greenwood 88/68

Lewes 84/70

Bridgeville 88/67

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

Set .8:03 p.m. .8:02 p.m. .8:01 p.m. .8:00 p.m. .7:58 p.m. .7:57 p.m. .7:56 p.m.

Last Aug 15

High 3:05 a 3:54 a 4:42 a 5:30 a 6:21 a 7:15 a 8:15 a

Low 9:55 a 10:41 a 11:28 a 12:15 p 12:56 a 1:58 a 3:04 a

High 3:31 p 4:22 p 5:13 p 6:06 p 7:00 p 7:58 p 9:01 p

Low 10:07 p 11:02 p 11:58 p —1:05 p 1:58 p 2:56 p

Vienna, MD

The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Date August 10 August 25 September 7 September 22

Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursday’s weather. High Low High Low Temperatures are Thursday’s highs Day and Thursday night’s lows. Thurs. 6:24 a 12:06 a 6:50 p 12:48 p Fri. 7:13 a 1:00 a 7:41 p 1:34 p Sat. 8:01 a 1:55 a 8:32 p 2:21 p Sun. 8:49 a 2:51 a 9:25 p 3:08 p Mon. 9:40 a 3:49 a 10:19 p 3:58 p Tues. 10:34 a 4:51 a 11:17 p 4:51 p Wed. 11:34 a 5:57 a —- 5:49 p

Apogee and Perigee

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

Moon Rise Thursday . . . .9:05 p.m. Friday . . . . . . .9:31 p.m. Saturday . . . . .9:57 p.m. Sunday . . . . .10:24 p.m. Monday . . . . .10:54 p.m. Tuesday . . . .11:28 p.m. Wednesday . . . . . .none

New Aug 23

Set . .7:23 a.m. . .8:41 a.m. . .9:56 a.m. .11:10 a.m. .12:24 p.m. . .1:37 p.m. . .2:49 p.m.

SEAFORD 88/67 Blades 88/67

Rehoboth Beach 86/69 Georgetown 88/69 Concord 88/67 Laurel 88/68 Delmar 88/67

Millsboro 88/69

Bethany Beach 83/70 Fenwick Island 86/70

First Aug 31

Day High Low High Thurs. 5:46 a 12:10 p 6:12 p Fri. 6:35 a 12:22 a 7:03 p Sat. 7:23 a 1:17 a 7:54 p Sun. 8:11 a 2:13 a 8:47 p Mon. 9:02 a 3:11 a 9:41 p Tues. 9:56 a 4:13 a 10:39 p Wed. 10:56 a 5:19 a 11:42 p

Low —12:56 p 1:43 p 2:30 p 3:20 p 4:13 p 5:11 p

Rehoboth Beach Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High 8:00 a 8:51 a 9:42 a 10:34 a 11:28 a 12:26 p 12:43 a

Low High Low 1:57 a 8:29 p 2:01 p 2:43 a 9:18 p 2:54 p 3:29 a 10:06 p 3:49 p 4:16 a 10:55 p 4:47 p 5:05 a 11:46 p 5:48 p 5:57 a —- 6:52 p 6:51 a 1:29 p 8:00 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š2006

* *DOOHU\3RLQWH

3 7KH$UWRI)LQH/LYLQJ 6LQJOH)DPLO\+RPHV

/RW3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW +RPH3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW

$W*DOOHU\3RLQWH 6HDIRUG¡VQHZHVWFRPPXQLW\ZH VWULYHWRPDNH\RXUQHZKRPHD ZRUNRIDUW:KHWKHU\RXDUH DQGROGHURUMXVWVWDUWLQJ\RXU IDPLO\ZHSXWDOOWKHOX[XULHVRI OLIHULJKWDW\RXUILQJHUWLSV

$FWLYH$GXOW&RPPXQLW\

/RW3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW 'XSOH[3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW

&DOOIRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQRUYLVLWXVRQWKHZHEDWZZZJDOOHU\SRLQWHFRP 


500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com

Julie Kennedy

Sue Bramhall Susie Mordes

in the town of Seaford situated on a large lot with 180 ft. of street frontage. There are 2 sheds - one 2-story with a concrete floor and one small shed. Also this property has a unique “Wye Oak” (Historic Tree) offspring located on it. The home has wood floors & has been painted inside with new carpet in the bedrooms and new vinyl in the kitchen and bath. Call Julie Kennedy for an appointment. . MLS# 533725

with 3 BR’s, 1 BA and a detached 2-car garage. There is also an extra room for hobbies, workshop, or exercise equipment and 2 sheds all situated on approximately one acre. . Call Julie Kennedy to view this property. MLS# 536683

l. There is also a large detached 2-car garage/storage building and a 1-car garage. Lots of space to play! Call Julie Kennedy to see this wonderful property. . MLS# 539155

3 BR, 2 BA Cape Cod looks as neat and well cared for from the rear as it does from the front. A large family room adjacent to the country kitchen opens to a rear deck for convenient access when preparing Summer barbecues with family and friends. Plotted access to the nearby creek gives you the opportunity to fish or put over a canoe or small boat for a twilight “cruise”. A first floor bedroom and bath is great for overnight guests or children wanting their privacy, or could be used as a home office. Call for an appointment. . MLS# 534961

This lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath rancher near Bethel has central air conditioning and a 24 ft. round above ground pool. On cold winter nights cuddle in front of the gas wall mounted fireplace in the family room that also features a built in bar. All kitchen appliances were purchased in February 2006. The back yard is completely enclosed with an almost new 6 foot fence for child protection and privacy. New carpet in bedrooms and hallway, Pergo floor in kitchen, interior repainted in Spring 2006, and natural stone added to front of home and laid as an attractive walkway. Appointment needed. MLS# 537337

builder or contact your mobile home dealer. This one acre wooded lot near Seaford is perfect for the person who wants a home with no builder tie-in or homeowner association fees. Recently reduced to . MLS# 534523

Spacious 3 - Story Colonial located in town of Bridgeville. This home features 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, hardwood floors, and 2 fire . MLS# places all situated on a large lot. 524238

- 2 houses, one mobile home, 2 non-operational chicken houses and 2 sheds on 18.4 acres. Main dwelling interior rebuilt in 2004. MLS# 534360.

located in Rivers End. 5 bedroom, 3 1/2 baths. Spacious kitchen and family room with brick fireplace. Full basement partially finished. . Beautiful yard with screen porch and deck. MLS# 532154


August 10, 2006