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THURSDAY, ApRil 15, 2010

vol. 14 No. 51

Seaford school referendum passes 475-222

News KIDS FIRST - Children’s health is the focus of two weekend events. Page 3 COUNCIL RACE - Seaford City Council election Saturday. Page 5 HEROES - Desire to help youth excel in life is John’s goal. Page 8

By Lynn R. Parks

BRIDGE - Public invited to ‘open house’ of Indian River Bridge project. Page 11 SCAMS - IRS says to be aware of these latest tax scams. Page 14 ENFORCEMENT - OHS and State Police partner on speed enforcement initiative. Page 15 GREEN - Del Tech’s first Energy House to be built on Georgetown campus. Page 28 CLASS PLAY - Seaford Middle School students presenting Beauty and the Beast Jr. musical. Page 49 FINAL WORD - What is your share of the national debt? The answer may shock you. Page 51

BRIDGEVILLE CELEBRATES - Fire company member Doug Jones drives the Bridgeville volunteer Fire Company’s 1936 REO Speedwagon fire engine in the Bridgeville volunteer Fire Company’s 100th anniversary parade. Story and related photos about Saturday’s celebration on page 47. Photo by Lynn Parks

Sports

BURGESS INvITATIONAL - The Seaford, Woodbridge, and Sussex Tech track and field teams take part in the Keith S. Burgess Invitational. Page 39 BACK IN ACTION - The local high school teams return to action this week. See page 42 for results from Mondays and Tuesdays games. STARS - A baseball player and a track and field athlete are this week’s Seaford Stars of the Week. Page 41

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Inside Bulletin Board Business ChurCh Classifieds eduCation final Word Gas lines Gourmet health letters lynn Parks movies oBituaries oPen houses PoliCe Puzzles sPorts tides tony Windsor

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SEAFORD CELEBRATES - State Rep. Danny Short presents the Seaford volunteer Fire Department’s Ladies Auxiliary with a proclamation from the House of Representatives in recognition of their 75th anniversary. The presentation was made during SvFD’s annual banquet. Receiving the proclamation are Ginny Tice (left), vice president, and Donna Bennett, president of the auxiliary. More photos from the banquet on pages 46 and 48. Photo by Chuck Snyder

The Seaford School District got an OK from its residents for a tax hike to pay for new roofs and elevators. Tuesday’s referendum won with 68 percent of the vote. Nearly 700 people voted in the referendum, according to unofficial results posted by the Sussex County Department of Elections. Of those, 475 voted for the measure and 222 voted against. “We won!!!” said an e-mail sent out by district spokeswoman Bonnie Johnson. For the average homeowner in the district, approval of the referendum will mean an additional $10 a year. Property owners pay school taxes based on county assessments. Average property assessment in the district is about $16,000. The additional revenue will help pay for new roofs for Central Elementary, Seaford Middle and West Seaford Elementary schools, as well as a new roof for the gym at the Seaford Middle School. It will also pay to replace elevators in Seaford Middle School and Seaford High School. The state will pay 73 percent of the cost of the roof replacement and elevator projects. The district will also build a wing on Central Elementary School to accommodate elementary students who are orthopedically handicapped. Those students currently meet in four classrooms in Frederick Douglass Elementary School. The state will pay 100 percent of the cost of that construction. Total project cost will be about $6.6 million. Of that, the district will pay $1.172 million and the state the balance.


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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

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Sussex Child Health Coalition walks Saturday The Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition and the towns of Laurel, Bridgeville, Georgetown, Lewes and the city of Seaford have joined together for a fourth year to promote the “Spring into Health Community Walk.” This walk is being held simultaneously in all five towns, Saturday, April 17, at the following locations: 1. Woodbridge Athletic Complex, 14714 Woodbridge Road, Greenwood 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. walk 2. Seaford Athletic Complex Track, Virginia Avenue, Seaford - 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. walk 3. Laurel Senior High School, 113 S. Central Ave., Laurel - 9:30 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. walk

4. Sussex Technical High School, 17099 County Seat Hwy., Georgetown 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. walk 5. The Villages of Five Points, 17339 North Village Main Blvd., Lewes - 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. walk The Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition, towns/cities and partners, have been actively engaged in promoting a healthier lifestyle for Sussex children and their families and is holding this annual walk as a way to get Sussex County excited about getting healthy. This year’s theme, “Get Out, Get Moving and Get Healthy,” promotes area state parks and local parks which are a great place to get outside and be physically active.

The goal of the walk is to promote the prevention of childhood obesity and early onset diabetes particularly in children. There is no cost for this event and it is not a fundraiser, simply an awareness campaign. Special guests will appear around the community. The first 100 children at each site will receive a free t-shirt just for participating. Each location will offer kids activities and health screenings. The mayor from each town or their representative will be present to read a proclamation on behalf of the town council promoting April 17th as Community Health Day. Laurel, Bridgeville, Seaford, Lewes

and Georgetown encourages its residents to engage in a healthy lifestyle. This healthy effort includes the 521AN program where people are encouraged to eat 5 fruits or vegetables per day. They are also encouraged to cut down on computer or TV screen time to no more than 2 hours per day. And they are encouraged to get a minimum of one hour of exercise per day and to reduce the consumption of all sugar sweetened beverages to almost none per week. For more information on the Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition, call 302-444-9062 or visit their website, www.SussexKids.org.

The St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital Wheels For Life Bike-a-thon is 2 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at West Seaford Elementary School. Volunteer workers and riders are needed to raise funds for the world famous research center in its battle against childhood cancer and other catastrophic childhood diseases. If you can’t ride, consider sponsoring a rider or sending a donation. Ron Breeding, who is in charge of fundrais-

ing efforts, hopes to raise $2,500 this year and it can not be done without community support. Make checks payable to “St Jude’s Children Hospital” and mail to Seaford Kiwanis, P.O. Box 1017, Seaford, DE 19973. “We’re looking for riders who will contribute their time and talent to help children live. We really need lots of riders, since they are the ones who can make this Bike-a-thon successful,” Breeding said.

Riders are asking sponsors to make donations based on each mile completed. All riders turning in money will receive a certificate. Those who raise $35 will receive a certificate and a special St. Jude t-shirt. When $75 is raised, the rider receives a backpack as well as the certificate and the t-shirt. Plans are being made to give a $100 savings bond to the top fundraiser plus gifts to the child who collects the most money.

The Seaford Kiwanis Club will provide refreshments. Entry forms are available at all school offices, the Nemours Health and Prevention Office and Seaford City Hall. Anyone wishing to provide a prize, sponsor a rider or participate in the ride should call Breeding at 629-3964. This fundraising effort, headed by Breeding, has averaged $1,600 in donations each year. For more information, call Breeding at 629-3964.

St. Jude’s Children’s Research Wheels for Life Bike-a-thon Sunday

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

BRYAN’S

BOWLING CENTER

Summer Leagues Forming Sign up soon — filling up fast! Monday Night ......... 4-Mens Peterson Point Tuesday Night ........ 4 Mixed 2-Men 2-Women Wednesday Night ... Adult Youth Thursday Night ....... Peterson Point Sport Shot ................................ Possible Have A Ball League Friday Night ............ Glow 6 pm til closing Saturday Night ........ Open Bowl “Wednesday” Sunday Night .......... Scotch Doubles Senior Color Pin Noon ................................ 1-Man 1-Woman

A NATIVE SON TO BE PROUD OF – A sign on Main Street in Bridgeville welcomes passers-by to the “Boyhood Home of Gen’l Custer.” This Gen. Custer is not the George Armstrong Custer of the Battle of Little Bighorn fame. Rather, he is Gen. John M. Custer, a graduate of Woodbridge High School and commanding general at Fort Huachuca in Arizona and the United States Army Intelligence Center. The sign was posted by Allen Jones, Bridgeville. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Seaford emergency roof repair funded By Lynn R. Parks

Declaring it an emergency, the city of Seaford will spend more than $4,000 in unbudgeted expenses to fix the roof on the recreation office. The city council Tuesday night voted to accept the lower of two bids on the roofing project. Tri-State Roofing Co. won the project with a bid of $4,560. R. L. Ewing Company had the other bid, at $4,721. Assistant city manager Charles Anderson told council members in a memo dated April 8 that shingles had blown off the building, which is on Virginia Avenue and is part of the former city pool complex. “The building is suffering water damage due to the leaking roof,” Anderson said. “We have to have these repairs done as quickly as possible.”

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City manager Dolores Slatcher told council members that she was not sure how the city will pay for the project. “It will come out of the budget, someplace,” she said.

Candidates’ Night

The Woodbridge School District PTO will host a “Meet the Candidate” night at the Woodbridge Elementary School auditorium on Monday, April 26, at 7 p.m. The candidates involved in this election are Walt Gilefski (incumbent), Evard Hall, Darrynn Harris, and John Poe. The PTO encourages the Woodbridge community to come and get a better understanding of the candidates and ask questions pertaining to their views on the future of the district.

Seaford Star

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Seaford Star (USPS #016-428) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown, and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

Laurel Star

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

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Seaford City Council election Saturday By Lynn R. Parks

In an election set for Saturday, citizens of Seaford will decide between two contenders for a three-year seat on the city council. Incumbent Leanne Phillips-Lowe is being challenged by Doug Lambert. This is the third time that Lambert, who has lived in Seaford for seven years, has run for the council. He ran unsuccessfully in 2005 and again in 2006. “I want to get involved and get into the nitty-gritty of how the city works,” said Lambert, 53. “I want to be an insider so I can make sure that things are running on the up and up and make sure the public is informed.” Phillips-Lowe, who was appointed to the council in 2006 and won re-election in 2007, agrees with Lambert that the city should find a way to better get information out to its citizens. “Everybody needs to be better informed and it is our responsibility to do that,” she said. “Maybe we need to be more proactive.” She said that improvements in the city’s newsletter are under discussion. And she hopes that the city’s newly-redesigned Web site will increasingly be a place where citizens go for information about the city. Both candidates also agree on the need to get young people interested in the city’s goings-on. “I’d like to see more young people coming to our meetings,” PhillipsLowe said. “I think it’s time for younger people

Leanne Phillips-Lowe

Doug Lambert

to get involved,” Lambert added. “That’s something that’s needed all over the country.” They differ, however, on the proposed purchase of the former Seaford Golf and Country Club by the city. Phillips-Lowe said that the city council has not received sufficient information about the purchase yet for her to lean one way or the other. “I am always in favor of whatever we can do to support the senior center, as well as the library,” she said. If the city buys the golf course, it could sell the clubhouse to the senior center, which is in temporary quarters on U.S. 13. “But I want to wait until I have all the facts and until I have heard from the public,” Phillips-Lowe added. “I have not yet made a decision.” But Lambert said that he believes that the purchase is a bad idea. “I don’t like it,” he said. “It would be

frivolous spending on the city’s part.” He believes that other golf courses in the area, in particular the golf course at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville, are in better shape than the Seaford course. “Getting the course up to snuff would cost too much money,” he added. “In the end, the city wouldn’t make any money on it. The golf course has outlived its usefulness and developing it for houses is the best thing to do.” And he scoffs at the idea that the property could be used as a site for spray irrigation of treated wastewater and storm water. The city is contemplating that as an option in order to meet new federal regulations regarding wastewater in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, of which the Nanticoke River, where the city currently dumps treated wastewater and storm water, is part. The regulations are expected to be published in 2012 and go into effect shortly thereafter. A spray irrigation site “sounds like it would just be a place for mosquitoes to be breeding,” Lambert said. Phillips-Lowe believes that her time on the city council is an asset. “I…feel that after several years of service, I’m better able to understand the issues the city faces and the challenges it must meet,” she said. In particular, she said, she wants to help the city through difficult economic times. “Balancing the needs of the citizens, the desire for growth and jobs within the city, and providing adequate city services against the rising cost of almost everything

we do is no easy task, especially since we have a strong determination that the city will operate in the black,” she said. Phillips-Lowe, who serves as council liaison with the city’s administrative services, counts the implementation of new software at city hall among the major accomplishments during her tenure. “That was a huge technological step that will make things a lot better for the staff and for city residents,” she said. Other accomplishments during that time, she said, are the expansion of the city’s 911 Center and new administrative wing at the Seaford Police Department, the efforts of the police department’s task force on Front Street and the surrounding area, and the enforcement of building codes to improve the quality and appearance of city housing. Phillips-Lowe, 62, is public relations manager for Delaware Technical and Community College in Georgetown. She and her husband, Tony, have one daughter and three grandchildren. Lambert is retired from the U.S. Navy and is owner of American Powerclean. He and his wife, CarolBeth, have six adult children and four grandchildren. For your information: The city of Seaford will hold an election for one council seat Saturday, April 17, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in council chambers in Seaford City Hall. Residents must be registered with the city to vote. For details, call city hall, 6291973.


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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Business High steel costs aren’t helping construction firms If you’re a business owner and you think new construction costs will start falling just because the nation’s economy remains sluggish, you may want to reconsider. Even with the challenging economy in recent years, the price of steel is beginning to rise across the country. This will hamper southern Delaware’s construction firms as the region continues to recover from the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. “This continuing rise in steel prices has made an already tough business climate even more difficult,” admits Bob Wheatley, president of the Laurel-based Whayland Co., a nearly 60-year-old construction management firm. “We’re optimistic, however, that this rise in costs is a positive sign that the broader economy is beginning to come around.” Industry leaders have established a number of reasons why the price of steel continues to rise at a time when growth in housing sectors is being encouraged and supported by the federal government. One key factor driving the marketplace is the noticeable lack of competition from markets overseas. The manufacturing of steel has long

been an American industry, especially in neighboring Pennsylvania, and that trend continues today. The fact that steel supply competition from beyond America’s borders is very light, due to the weakening dollar, keeps prices higher than normal in the First State and throughout North America. “Like other industries, we’re in a global market for materials,” says Wheatley. “There aren’t always less costly alternatives available from overseas markets. Actually, all of the steel we buy for our projects is purchased from service centers right here in America.” Another reason analysts state for the rising costs of steel products is that the economy, in fact, is beginning to show signs of improvement – as such, the demand for these products is starting to rise. Construction firms on Delmarva have yet to see a huge spike in demand, but the industry as a whole expects to see moderate growth in the coming years. Industry leaders believe this will lead to even greater demand and higher prices for steel and other construction-related products. “Producers across the nation drastically reduced production capacity at the beginning of the recession and are reluctant to

gear up again until they see evidence of a sustainable recovery. Meanwhile current supplies continue to tighten, which results in higher prices,” says Wheatley. “It’s unfortunate, but I don’t see steel prices coming down anytime soon.” In the last few years, southern Delaware’s construction industry has suffered through a huge downtown as housing

SBA Disaster Assistance available

The U.S. Small Business Administration announces certain Private Non-Profit Organizations (PNPs) that do not provide critical services of a governmental nature may be eligible to apply for low interest rate disaster loans. These loans are available following a Presidential Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance resulting from damages caused by severe winter storms and snowstorms that occurred on Feb. 5-11, 2010. PNPs located in Kent, New Castle and Sussex Counties are eligible to apply to SBA. Examples of eligible non-critical PNP organizations include food kitchens, homeless shelters, museums, libraries, community centers, schools and colleges. PNP organizations may borrow up to

developments have been put on hold, business expansions have been tabled and the demand for new home construction has diminished. But positive signs are on the horizon as government subsidies and other programs have helped stimulate the economy in the last 12-18 months. The construction business is beginning to rebound. $2 million to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory and other business assets. The SBA also offers mitigation funds to disaster victims based on 20 percent of the verified physical damage. These funds are designed to help borrowers pay for protective measures to minimize damages of the same kind in the future. Interest rates are as low as 3 percent with terms up to 30 years. For more information, call the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-6592955 or e-mail disastercustomerservice@ sba.gov. The deadline to file for physical property damage is May 31. The deadline to return economic injury applications is Dec. 31.

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MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI, 4/16 TO TUES. 4/20 Death At A Funeral . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:15, 5:15, 7:20, 9:40

“A Healthy Family Affair” HEALTH SYMPOSIUM Sponsored by: Nanticoke Health Services In Partnership with: Atlanta Road Alliance Church

FREE Snack Bag • Information Booths • Door Prizes

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Kick-Ass . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:40, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35

YOUR FAMILY’S

Clash of The Titans . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D 1:20, 3:50, 6:30, 9:00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Not 3D 2:00, 4:40, 7:00, 9:30

HEALTH

The Last Song . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:35, 4:05, 6:45, 9:00 How To Train Your Dragon . . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D 1:30, 4:00, 6:35, 8:50

IS YOUR FAMILY’S

The Runaways . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:15, 5:15, 7:20, 9:40 Date Night . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:10, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20

Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too? . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:20

Hot Tub Machine . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 9:40 Bounty Hunter . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10, 4:20, 7:05, 9:30

Diary of a Wimpy Kid . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:05, 5:05, 7:10, 9:15 Alice In Wonderland . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:15, 3:40, 6:40, 9:05 Shutter Island . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:10, 9:10

Crazy Heart . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:50, 6:50

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 4/16 Death at a Funeral . . . . . R . . . 12:10, 1:00, 2:35, 3:20, 4:55, 5:40, 7:30, 8:20, 9:55, 10:45

Kiss-Ass . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:40, 1:50, 3:40, 4:35, 6:50, 7:50, 9:40, 10:35

Date Night . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . 12:45, 2:00, 3:00, 4:10, 5:25, 6:40, 7:40, 9:15, 10:10

Clash of The Titans . . . . PG13 . 12:00, 2:45, 5:20, 8:00, 10:40 3D:1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50

Tyler Perry’s Why Did I

Get Married Too? . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . 12:20, 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 6:30, 7:20, 9:25, 10:20

The Last Song . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:50,, 6:35, 9:10

Hot Tub Time Machine . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:10, 5:35, 8:10, 10:30

How to Train

Your Dragon . . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:55, 5:15, 7:35, 10:00

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D: 11:55, 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20

The Bounty Hunter . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:20, 4:00, 6:55, 9:45

Diary of a Wimpy Kid . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:30 OC = Open Captioned & Descriptive Audio Showtimes www .fandango .com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 4/16 THRU THURSDAY, 3/22 Diary of a Wimpy Kid . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . Nightly 7:00, Sat . 4:30, Sun . 2:00 & 4:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Closed Monday & Tuesday

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WEALTH Activities for ALL Ages Wii Strength Training Healthy Eating Demo Brain Fitness Diabetes Education Prescription Relations Car Safety Trauma Education Face Painting Child Identification Cancer Awareness Kids Fitness Activities

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Desire to help youth excel in life is John’s goal By James Diehl

T

he sharp dressed man strode through the doors of the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club one day in early March, knowing all the while who he was looking for. His eyes becoming accustomed to the inside light, they immediately latched on to the man who helped him become who he is today. Inside these walls, he became inspired, he became empowered and he became successful. An embrace between Robert Banks and Seaford’s John Hollis quickly followed, a moment both mentor and mentee enjoyed and savored for just a few seconds, but one that seemed frozen in time. This man, this time, this success story is the reason Hollis does what he does. It’s what makes the long hours and all the sweat and tears worth it. “I know there are a lot of problems in the world, but there are also so many great things happening,” says Hollis, who for the last 33 years has played a vitally important role in Sussex County’s M.E.R.I.T. program. “I’m very proud that, in the 33 years of the program, more than 95 percent of the kids who have been involved with M.E.R.I.T. have gone on to achieve fouryear college degrees.” An acronym for Minority Engineering Regional Incentive Training, the M.E.R.I.T. program encourages AfricanAmerican and Hispanic youth to pursue college educations, particularly in science or engineering fields. The program has held a special place in Hollis’ heart for more than three decades and is but one example of the passion he feels for children, and any program that helps them make better lives for themselves. Hollis and his family have a deep history with the city of Seaford, with its schools, its industry and its communities. His grandfather, Charles Sr., was the town dentist, his father, Charles Jr., became an important cog in the city’s banking community and his father-in-law, Sted Hines, trained with famed DuPont scientist Wallace Hume Carothers, who invented a polymer called nylon that would later change Seaford forever. Hollis himself graduated from Seaford High School in 1962 after running track and playing quarterback for the 1960s versions of the Blue Jay football teams. After attending the University of Delaware and Salisbury State University, he later married the former Linda Hines and settled in

Heroes series

If you know of someone who has dedicated his or her life to service to others, suggest their names for this series. Contact James Diehl at 302-222-2685 or email Bryant richardson, brichardson@ mspublications.com the city he had called home for nearly his entire life. For 30 years, he helped shape the lives of young Seafordians in his roles as teacher and coach. A successful football and track coach, his most successful record was in the pool at the former Seaford Golf & Country Club. A better than average athlete in his youth, the swimming pool was not exactly the place he felt most comfortable. “We won like 58 meets in a row, which is funny because I can barely doggie paddle from one end of the pool to the other,” Hollis says with a chuckle. “But coaching is coaching, and it’s a great blessing to have coached the number of young people I have over the years.” Hollis’ resume reads like a laundry list of children’s organizations from throughout the First State. If there’s a group or association in Delaware that works at improving the lives and shaping the futures of the state’s youth, chances are Hollis is involved in one way or another. His name is on the annual scholarship awarded by the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club, he’s been named “Citizen of the Year” by the Delaware Association for Retarded Citizens and he’s served two terms as chairman of the advisory board for the Delaware Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families, appointed by the governor. The accolades go on and on and Hollis is proud of them all, though he’s determined to divert the focus of his accomplishments to those around him. “Not a single thing on my resume was done by me, it was all a result of teamwork,” he likes to say. A bit overwhelmed, even embarrassed at times, by the recognition he’s received, Hollis has nonetheless devoted his life to the betterment of area children. He doesn’t like being told something can’t be done, and often goes the extra mile to prove that what was thought to be impossible is anything but.

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coming a cheerleader. Watching doctors make his daughter whole again was one reason Hollis committed much of his life to helping children, but it was far from the lone catalyst spurring his devotion. Another was preserving his father’s legacy of community involvement – the plans for developing the trophy awarded to the winner of the annual Seaford-Laurel football game were laid in his boyhood home on Arch Street. But the biggest catalyst for Hollis was meeting the famed neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson. It was in the late 1980s during a bus trip to Salisbury. The objective for the day Continued to page nine

‘SPRING into PHYSICAL FITNESS’ A Day Long Festival For Health Awareness Saturday, April 17 • 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Hosted by Flex World Fitness 20930 DuPont Blvd. (Rt. 113) in the rear of Greystone Towers, Georgetown, Del.

Cycle-A-Thon

(Proceeds to benefit American Legion Post 28)

Post 28 Ladies Auxiliary will be collecting items for Care Packages to our Military. Stop by & donate an item or two: hard candy, cans of peanuts, beef jerky, chocolates, small packs of tissues, chewing gum, puzzle books, etc.

Stop By For Fun & Fitness!

Local Author James Diehl will be on-site signing copies of his books,

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He learned as a young father that just because something seems improbable doesn’t mean it can’t be done with a little extra effort and a lot of faith. “We were told our daughter, Jenny, had a birth defect in her hip when she was born and probably wouldn’t walk,” remembers Hollis. “Our last hope to correct it was to take her to A.I. DuPont Hospital, which my wife, Linda, did for 52 consecutive weeks. I’ll never forget when she was an infant, the doctor could put her hand above her knee, flick his wrist and dislocate her hip. But it just shows you the faithfulness of my wife.” Her hip later corrected, Jenny Hollis was an outstanding athlete at Seaford High School, playing field hockey as well as be-

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John Hollis, as the director of community relations for Nemours Health and Prevention Services, is shown in 2006 presenting a certificate of appreciation to Dr. Samuel K. Miller of Nanticoke Surgical Associates in Seaford for the use of part of their office suite. Hollis has a special heart for recognizing the efforts of others who play roles in helping improve the quality of life in the area. Photo by Ronald MacArthur

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‘World War II Heroes of Southern Delaware’ and ‘Remembering Sussex County’ 20% of Sales from ‘Heroes’ will be donated to American Legion Post 28 in Oak Orchard For More Info Call 856-7771 or visit www.flexworldfitness.com


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

pAGE 9

Helping children build self-esteem is one of his goals was simply for the M.E.R.I.T participants, especially the boys, to meet a role model, someone to inspire them in their life’s work. It was the beginning of a very long and very meaningful friendship, both for Hollis and for Carson. “The way that Ben practices medicine and the way he lives his life are about investing in the lives of children,” says Hollis. “Because of him, I’ve had tremendous exposure to a lot of motivating experiences. Just meeting some of those kids and their families, and seeing some of the obstacles they’ve overcome, has been incredible.” A pediatric neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore, Ben Carson was raised in difficult circumstances in Detroit, the son of a mother who had nothing more than a third grade education. Failing school in the fifth grade, he persevered and later became one of the world’s most highly-respected surgeons. His story is an inspiration to youngsters around the country, and to Hollis, who likes to tell the tales of his special friend as a way to motivate the more than 40 kids who are part of his beloved M.E.R.I.T. program. “Ben loves to tell these kids that what they need to know is that he did not receive a brain

transplant,” Hollis says. “What he did receive was a motivational transplant, and he started to look inside himself to find hope.” Another common inspiration to Hollis’ group of minority students is Bill Yoast, the white football coach portrayed in the 2000 movie “Remember the Titans.” The famed coach, who today makes his home near Bethany Beach, speaks to the children in Hollis’ M.E.R.I.T. program at least twice a year, motivating them to be all they can be. Hollis has coached and mentored white children, minority children and, because of his involvement in the annual BlueGold football game, mentally challenged children as well. After coaching in the game many times, Hollis was chosen to oversee the event in the mid 1980s. Having never been exposed to children with developmental difficulties before, it was not the easiest of transitions to make. “When I was coaching in the game in 1979, I went to an event and I stayed away from the (developmentally challenged) children. I was subconsciously afraid of them,” he recalls. That was before leaning on his spiritual beliefs and before meeting a young man from Milford who would change his views entirely. The boy’s name was Danny Yonker and he was Hol-

In the wake of two recent crashes resulting in the deaths of two pedestrians, Delaware Office of Highway Safety, Delaware State Police, and State Department of Transportation officials are urging both drivers and pedestrians to be on heightened alert when using Delaware roadways. The latest two fatalities bring the number of pedestrians killed in crashes so far this year to nine. Last year to date, there were two pedestrian deaths. In Kent and Sussex Counties, traffic deaths occur on the 13 and 113 corridors most often, not at the beach as many people believe. More fatalities involve error on the part of the pedestrian than the driver of the vehicle. Safety officials urge pedestrians not to sacrifice safety by crossing in an area that is more convenient for them versus where it is safest to do so. Lighting issues play a major factor in pedestrian fatalities. At night, lack of street lighting makes it harder for drivers to see pedestrians and pedestrians aren’t always in light colored clothing or wearing reflective items/carrying a flashlight as required by state law.

For the pedestrian, lack of lighting makes it harder to accurately judge how fast a vehicle is going and how far away it is. The public can find pedestrian safety tips and information on the Office of Highway Safety website at www.ohs.delaware.gov as well as on the DelDOT website at www.deldot.gov under Community Programs and Services. The public is urged to review and follow these safety tips: • Drivers should watch out  for pedestrians especially in very commercial areas. • Drivers are also encouraged  to slow down as pedestrians are extremely vulnerable in crashes. • Do not walk or try to cross  a road if you have alcohol and/or other drugs in your system. Walking under the influence of alcohol is illegal. • Be visible - It’s the law that  you wear reflective clothing or carry a flashlight when walking at night. • Always cross at marked intersections or crosswalks when possible. • Don’t walk in the roadway -  If no sidewalk is available, walk facing traffic and as far from the edge of the roadway as possible.

Continued from page eight

Drivers, pedestrians urged to be more alert, cautious

lis’ “buddy” during the weeks leading up to the annual game. “I can’t explain mental retardation or Down’s Syndrome, but the kids I know who have Down’s Syndrome have become one of the richest parts of my life,” says Hollis. “I remember seeing how Danny loved me whether we won or lost that game. He always showed me that smile and that positive regard each and every time I saw him.” Sit down for a few minutes with John Hollis and you’re sure to hear a bevy of inspirational stories. You’ll hear tales of miraculous recoveries, courtesy of Ben Carson, you’ll hear stories of racial injustice in the South during his youth and you’ll hear pride-filled stories of M.E.R.I.T. students who have accomplished bigger and better things than even he could have imagined.

And you’ll hear them with a passion and with a fervor that comes shining through whenever Hollis begins talking about children, particularly about maximizing the potential within each and every one of them. You may even hear the story of Travis Jackson, who one day graduated with honors from a four-year college. It’s Hollis’ “favorite M.E.R.I.T. success story.” “When Travis came into M.E.R.I.T., I was still an employee of the Seaford School District and I had a teacher ask me one day why Travis was in M.E.R.I.T.,” remembers Hollis, who said the teacher did not see any potential in the student. “But we helped him believe in himself and to see the potential in himself. We really try to inspire these kids to be their best.” Nearly 200 children in the M.E.R.I.T. program over the

years have earned four-year college degrees. There are doctors, there are lawyers, there are accountants and countless other success stories from the program started by John Hollis and a few other devoted individuals more than three decades ago. Hollis spends a good deal of his time these days working for, and raising awareness of, Nemours Health and Prevention Services and it’s healthy kids initiative. But he still doesn’t like to take the credit for anything, even though the sign on the building outside the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club bears his name. “There’s just an enormous satisfaction and return on investment when you work with young people,” he says. “I hope people remember one day that I cared about my community and I saw a lot of potential, particularly in young people.”


OPEN HOUSES Sunday,

902 E Ivy Drive, Seaford This 4 bdrm, 2 ba home has been renewed inside/out. Refinished hdwd flrs, new energy efficient appliances and Low E windows, new roof, updated plumbing, new HVAC, hot water heater, upgraded kitchen cabinets and wiring all on a lg corner lot. MLS# 574014 $174,900 Directions: Take 20 W (Stein Highway), turn R onto Ivy Dr., (just past Hardees), stay on E Ivy, look for sign. Hostess - Trina Joyner 302-7453840

539 Rodney Street, Seaford Unique 5 bdrm, 4.5 ba home in a desired neighborhood w/3300 sq ft downstairs. Huge unfinished basement, 650 sq ft upstairs is unheated, 2 outblds, garage w/pit and more. Priced to sell. MLS# 575877 $160,000 Directions: Take 20 W (Stein Highway), turn L on Rodney St., house on left. Hostess - Keri Simpler 302-236-5257

16042 Hardscrabble Rd., Seaford This 5+ bdrm, 2.5 ba spacious rancher is located on 1.62 partially wooded acres. Home features oversized garage, inground pool, sunroom, large composite deck, exquisite master suite with sitting room, large living room w/fireplace. A must see!! MLS# 563724 $299,00 Directions: From 13 S, take 20 E, go straight thru Route 9 (traffic light), approx. 1 mile on right. Hostess - Donna Neithardt 302-858-729

Home Team RealTy • 629-7711

Home Team RealTy • 629-7711

305 CHRISTOPHER DR., CRESTFIELD, SEAFORD Lovely 3 BR, 2.5 bath home. Nice floor plan w/spacious rooms. New kit. in 2004, hardwood floors & more on a nicely landscaped lot. $250,000 Directions: From Shufelt Rd., west of Seaford, turn left into Crestfield. Turn right, then first left. Home on right.

322 Shipley St. Seaford REDUCED, MOTIVATED SELLER, BRING OFFERS! If you’re looking for a 2 BR home this one you must see. The inside has refinished hardwood floors, new appliances, an updated bath room, new heater, interior walls painted within the last two years. Now, the outside has a fresh coat of paint! All you need to do is move in. $147,900 (MLS#560756) Directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, go West on Rt. 20 to Left on Shipley St. at Wilmington Trust. Home on right. Your Host: Steve Taylor

31155 S. Shellbridge Rd., Laurel A SPACIOUS AND CHARMING HOME SET FAR FROM THE ROAD IS NOW AVAILABLE. This 3/4 BR, 2BA Home features a sitting area overlooking the L/R with a corner gas F/P, a bright kitchen, a 4th BR/den/office on the 1st floor, and a formal dining room. Also has a 1 car garage, 1 carport, rear deck, storage shed, partially fenced rear yard, on 1.5 acre lightly wooded lot. This home offers the perfect setting for quite family life. $219,528 (MLS#574714) Directions: Take Rt. 13 South from Seaford, turn Right onto Camp Rd. Cross over 13A and proceed to and through Bethel, over the bridge to second Left on S. Shellbridge Rd. 1 mile on Left. Your Host: Fred Sponseller

CooPeR RealTy • 629-6693

CooPeR RealTy • 629-6693

PHAM- Danmakay Dr. $5,000 PRICE REDUCTION -$4,000 Seller’s Closing Cost Help for Buyers!! Flawless workmanship can describe this brand new home just days from completion. Bamboo HW Floors, ceramic tiled floors, granite counter tops, 2 car finished attached garage and over 1,600 Sq.Ft. of living space. Great country location! $215,900 (MLS#569103) Directions: From Rt. 13 in Laurel, go West on Rt. 24 through town of Laurel, past the airport. Go Right on Airport Rd. Home is 1/2 mile on left. Your Host: John Allen

603 ELM DRIVE, SEAFORD. Great home on corner lot in-town. 1,500 sq.ft. w/ 2 full baths, 2-car detached garage. New roof, siding, painting, hardwood, tile, new cabinets with granite. Directions: Follow RT. 20 west through Seaford, after last traffic light in town take second left. House is on left corner of first block. Host: Owner. $154,900

75 RIVERS END DRIVE, SEAFORD. Two story contemporary on corner lot in one of Seaford’s most sought after neighborhoods. Large rooms w/ partial finished basement. Open kitchen/breakfast/living layout makes this home great for entertaining. Directions: From Rt 13 go east on Middleford Rd. Turn right @ the stop sign, go over the bridge, turn right on Old Meadow. Travel approx 1 mile to Rivers End entrance on the left, follow Rivers End Drive to 75. Hostess: Russell Griffin $440,000

613 ELM STREET, SEAFORD. Roomy Ranch w/many updates. New roof, siding, hdw floors, dual fuel system, Rinnai hot water heater, fenced in yard w/deck. Split BR w/vaulted great rm. w/2 car garage & nice utility room on quiet street. Directions: From 20 west, turn left onto Nylon Blvd. Turn left onto Elm St. house will be on right. Hostess: Brenda Rambo. $199,000

115 TRACY CIRCLE, LAUREL. Outstanding 4 BR, 3 BA home in a quite neighborhood. Many upgrades w/ granite hardwood, tile, upgraded trim, etc. Located on a corner lot across the street from Horsey’s Pond. Directions: Alt. 13 South through Laurel, right on Dukes Road. Left on Hastings Drive. Home is on the left corner of Hastings and Tracy Circle. Host: Owner $299,900

CeNTURy 21 Ramey Real eSTaTe • 629-5575

CeNTURy 21 Ramey Real eSTaTe • 629-5575

CeNTURy 21 Ramey Real eSTaTe • 629-5575

3594 WOODLAND FERRY RD, SEAFORD – This updated house features 3 BR, 2 BA, back-to-back fireplace in LR & FR, stunning Kit., Hdw. floors, 20’x16’ finished sunroom, heated garage, 12’x20’ shed, & more! $219,900 (#576304) Directions: W on Rt 20, at RR xing turn L on Woodpecker Rd 80, then turn L on Woodland Ferry Rd, 1st prop on R. HOSTESS: Fran Ruark

11543 BAKER MILL RD, SEAFORD - Nearly 2400 sq. ft. of home w/many extras for the whole family’s enjoyment. Large Master BR w/ walk-in closet & bath, LR w/ vaulted ceiling, spacious & beautiful KIT, upstairs FR, garages for 3 cars & apx 1 acre in Pond Haven! $279,900 (#574212) HOSTESS: Leona Dorsch & Dee Cross

157 LAKESIDE DR, LAUREL - This ranch in Lakeside Manor has approx. 1,800 sq. ft. of living area, including a LR, FR & spacious eat-in KIT, plus 4 BRs, sep. utility, & 2.5 BAs. HW floors & split-BR floorplan w/private master BR & full BA. $183,900 (#571286) HOSTESS: Susie Mordes

April 18th 2-4 Pm

GleNN SIZemoRe RealToRS • 629-3066

CeNTURy 21 Ramey Real eSTaTe • 629-5575

27 RIVERS END DRIVE, SEAFORD. Lowest price in Rivers End! Live in one of Seaford’s nicest waterfront communities. Gorgeous remodeled kitchen, open floor plan, and great screened porch to enjoy the wooded view of the backyard. Directions: From Rt 13 go east on Middleford Rd. Turn right @ the stop sign, go over the bridge, turn right on Old Meadow. Travel approx 1 mile to Rivers End entrance on the left. Stay to the right and home is on the right. Hostess: Jessica Bradley. $339,000

CeNTURy 21 Ramey Real eSTaTe • 629-5575

Home Team RealTy • 629-7711

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

CooPeR RealTy • 629-6693

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

SPECIAL 9219 SHARPTOWN RD, LAUREL - Freshly painted 3 BR Cape Cod across from Horsey Pond area. HW floors, new carpet, heat pump & replacement windows add to the value of this home w/det garage, LR, KIT w/ breakfast nook, formal DR, pt. bsmt., & separate utility. 3rd BR could be used as a FR, & 2 rooms in the pt. finished upstairs could be used as extra BR & additional living space. Only $152,900 (#576576) HOSTESS: Mona Wright

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

9727 CEDAR LANE, SEAFORD - Beautiful waterfront home on apx. 1.6 wooded acres on the Nanticoke River! Apx. 2,300 sq. ft. ranch w/3 BRs, 3 BAs, FR, workshop, stg. shed, floating dock on the deep-water lot in Nanticoke Acres, & much more! $359,900 (#576677) HOSTESS: Tina Moore & Dee Cross

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

43 ROBINSON CIRCLE, SEAFORD Custom-built home with 3 BRs, 2 BAs, master suite, large FR & private office or hobby room. Apx. 1,900 sq. ft. ranch in Virginia Commons, ready to move in! $229,900 (#568545) HOSTESS: Casey Price

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514

PRICE

12 E EIGHTH ST, BLADES - This 4 BR, 2 BA ranch home features FR, appliances, 14’x16’ deck, & 2-storage sheds. Specially priced for Open House at $157,900 (#550945) HOSTESS: Eileen Craft

CallaWay, FaRNell & mooRe • 629-4514


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

pAGE 11

Savings from electric agreement nearly $13.2 million Governor Jack Markell announced a three-year-long electricity agreement with Washington Gas and Electric that will save the State, local governments, higher education institutions and school districts substantial dollars in their yearly energy budgets while boosting the amount of clean power. The agreement will provide electricity at a rate of $0.0752 per kWh, which is a reduction of approximately 18 percent from the current year’s electricity contract rates. In total, these agreements represent a savings of $13.165 million over three years for the State and its aggregation partners as compared to current contract rates. In addition, the agreement calls for an initial set-aside of 30.5 percent of power to come from clean sources for Fiscal Year 2011 as compared to the current level of 8 percent. The percentage of clean power purchased will increase to 35 percent by the third year of the contract. “We will continue to push for ways to drive down the cost of government,” Governor Markell said. “These electricity agreements not only save taxpayers’ money but allow the state to increase the amount of clean power it uses in state facilities. I am pleased we were able to make

energy purchases that represent a win-win for Delawareans.” In March, Governor Markell signed Executive Order #18, setting forth a broad agenda for Delaware to lead by example in energy efficiency efforts, waste management and renewable energy purchases. The results of the recent auction achieves the 30% renewable energy target in the Order, ahead of schedule, and ties into the Governor’s broader efforts to integrate energy efficiency and renewable energy into state operations to save money, reduce environmental impacts, and create jobs in Delaware. “We are very pleased with the results of today’s auction,” said Ann Visalli, director of the Office of Management and Budget. “By combining our electricity purchase with all of our aggregation partners, we were able to secure very favorable prices from electricity generators using the innovative reverse auction methodology.” “Saving money while buying cleaner, less polluting energy is a great deal for Delawareans,” said Collin O’Mara, secretary of DNREC. “Through OMB’s innovative approach to energy procurement, Delaware is once again leading by example and demonstrating the way toward a cleaner energy economy”

The State’s partners for the energy bid includes school districts, volunteer fire companies, New Castle County, Kent County, Sussex County, the University of Delaware, Delaware Technical and Community College, the Delaware Solid Waste Authority and the Riverfront Development Corporation.

The State worked in conjunction with World Energy Solutions, a leader in the online energy brokerage market, on a reverse energy auction. The reverse energy auction provides a mechanism to achieve attractive commodity prices while maintaining fairness for all interested bidders.

The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) and Skanska USA Civil Southeast, Inc. (Skanska) announce that construction on the new Indian River Inlet Bridge is approximately 50% complete. To celebrate this milestone, DelDOT and Skanska invite the public to attend an outdoor “open house” style public workshop and participate in a construction site tour at the Indian River Inlet Bridge on Saturday, April 24, from 1 to 4 p.m. The event will be held in the Delaware Seashore State Park’s South Inlet Day Use parking lot on the southeast side of the existing bridge. Parking will be available and free to the public. The project is expected to be completed in late spring 2011. The workshop will consist of information stations where the public can receive specific information about various aspects of the bridge construction.

Representatives will be onsite to discuss the monitoring capabilities of the new bridge. Several bridge designers, engineers and specialists will be on hand to discuss the bridge’s construction. A highlight will be the opportunity to participate in a construction site tour. A bus will allow attendees to take a guided and narrated tour of the construction site. This location is accessible to persons having disabilities. Any person having special needs or requiring special aid, such as an interpreter for the hearing impaired, is requested to contact DelDOT by phone or mail one week in advance. Check www.irib.deldot.gov for the latest construction progress information, view a monthly photo gallery, view real time cameras, and obtain educational material to learn more about the bridge.

Public invited to ‘open house’ of Indian River Bridge project

Friday, April 23 12 :00 - 5:00 pm GOLF DEMO DAY ALL ARE WELCOME 3:30 - 4:00 pm Ribbon Cutting 4:00 - 6:00 pm Live WGMD Radio Saturday, April 24 10 :00 - 4:00 pm FREE Golf -tee time required Refreshments - Tour the Club ~Hourly Drawings~ 4:00 Grand Prize Drawings in the Grille Room 3 Social Memberships - must be present to win


pAGE 12

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Police Journal Fatal home fire in Millsboro

The Delaware State Fire Marshal’s Office, the Delaware State Police and the Delaware State Medical Examiner’s Office are investigating a fatal fire which occurred on Tuesday, April 6, at 4:57 p.m. The Indian River Fire Department assisted by Mid Sussex Rescue, Lewes and Millsboro Fire Departments responded to a mobile home fire in the 25000 block of Lingo Lane, Lingo Estates, Millsboro. The fire departments encountered heavy fire upon arrival. A deceased male, who was found in the mobile home, was pronounced dead at the scene. The victim was transported by the Delaware State Medical Examiner’s Office to their facility for positive identification and cause of death. Fire damages are $40,000. No smoke detectors were found in the residence. The origin and cause of the fire is under investigation.

Suspect surrenders to LPD

The Laurel Police Department recently issued a warrant for Katie Miller, an 18-yearold white female, who was wanted for first degree robbery in connection with the Craigslist robbery that occurred on March 29 in Wexford Village. Miller The victim responded to an ad on Craigslist for a car and was directed to Wexford Village where the victim was robbed at gunpoint. On April 8, Miller turned herself into the Laurel Police and was charged with first degree robbery, second degree conspiracy and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony. She was processed and released after posting $21,000 secured bond. Police are still searching for Scott Thompson for his part in the same robbery. This investigation is ongoing and anyone with information on either of the Craigslist robberies - the first robbery was on March 24 - is asked to contact the LauGEORGETOWN - Nice 3 BR A-Frame home on quiet town side street! Fully remodeled with new siding, windows, carpet & paint! Lg. rooms, nice kitchen & great floor plan! Ready for new owner to move right in! Must See! $189,900.

LEE FARRIS Realtor

302-258-5467 leefarris@remax.net The FARRIS DEAL in real estate!

The LEE Team

NEW LISTING

rel Police Department at 875-2244 or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or online at www.tipsubmit.com. You may remain anonymous.

Brutal assault reported

Delaware State Police are searching for the suspect who brutally assaulted a 54-year-old Bethany Beach man. Troopers were called to Sand Court, outside of Bethany Beach, on Thursday, April 8, at 1 a.m. A 54-year-old man had just returned home and was putting the top up on his convertible when he was approached by a white male suspect. The suspect demanded the victim’s wallet at which time the victim refused. The suspect used a rock and began to viciously assault the victim in the head. The suspect removed the victim’s wallet and then continued the assault until the victim lost consciousness. When the victim came to, he was able to summon help. He was taken to Beebe Hospital in Lewes where he was admitted with a skull fracture. If anyone has any information concerning this robbery, call Troop 4 at 856-5850, ext. 206. Callers may remain anonymous. Tips may also be forwarded to law enforcement through tip lines maintained by Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP3333 or online at www.tipsubmit.com.

Arrested for sexual assault

Delaware State Police have arrested a Lewes man for the sexual assault of a 16-year-old girl. Troopers were called to the 1000 block of Savannah Road in Lewes on April 8, after they received a call about a possible sexual assault. When troopers arrived, they made contact with Thomas Ott, 39, and arrested him after they discovered evidence linking him to the repeated assaults of a 16-year-old girl. Ott was taken into custody and transported to Troop 7 where he was charged with four counts of second degree rape, two counts of fourth degree rape, one count of first degree unlawful sexual contact, four counts of second degree unlawful sexual contact, one count of continuous sexual abuse of a child and unlawful imprisonment. He was committed to the Department of Correction in default of $128,500 bail.

Police search for suspect

On April 7 at 9:30 p.m., Seaford Police officers responded to the parking lot of Kimbrough Court, Chandler Heights, for a shooting. Officers arrived and located the victim, a 21-year-old Seaford man, in the parking lot with two gunshots to his hip and buttocks. The victim was transported by Williams Seaford Fire Department ambulance to Nanticoke Hospital where he was listed in stable condition. Detectives were able to link Leondre M. Williams, 32, a black male, with a last known address of the 400 block of Elizabeth Cornish Landing in Bridgeville, to the incident and obtain warrants for his arrest for attempted murder, possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by person prohibited. Anyone with information about this crime or the suspect’s whereabouts is asked to contact Seaford Police at 6296644 or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or www.tipsubmit.com. Delaware Crime Stoppers is offering a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons involved.

Couple faces theft charges

On April 12, Carlene A. Lloyd, 27, and her husband, Richard W. Lloyd, 30, both of Stuyvesant Avenue in New Castle, voluntarily turned themselves in for numerous counts of the following felony charges: theft over $100,000, first degree conspiracy, first degree forgery and falsifying business records. The charges are the result of their actions while both were employed with Drywall Inc., located on King Court in New Castle. Since 2006, Carlene Lloyd was employed as Drywall Inc.’s office manager. Her duties consisted of printing company checks for payroll and issuing checks to client businesses. Over the five year period, Carlene

Lloyd issued checks to either herself or her husband, Richard W. Lloyd, causing Drywall Inc. to suffer a financial loss totaling approximately $220,597.72. In an effort to avoid detection, Carlene Lloyd deCarlene Lloyd leted the fictitious transactions from Drywall Inc.’s database which enabled them to profit from their actions for so long. The caper was uncovered by the business owner of Drywall Inc., with the help of PNC Bank, and a subseRichard Lloyd quent audit. Carlene Lloyd was released on a $24,000 unsecured bond. Richard Lloyd was released on a $20,000 unsecured bond.

Scrap Tire Drop Off Day

The DNREC Scrap Tire Control and Cleanup Program is hosting a Scrap Tire Drop Off Day on Saturday, April 24, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., rain or shine, at the Seaford Boat Ramp parking lot in Seaford. Per household, Delaware residents may recycle up to 10 passenger or light duty truck tires free of charge. Oversize tires, tires on rims and bicycle tires can not be accepted. No commercial dealers or Maryland residents. Proof of residency is required, such as a driver’s license or utility bill. The boat ramp is located at the intersection of Nanticoke Street and Nanticoke Avenue in Seaford. The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control is partnering with the City of Seaford to bring this recycling opportunity to Delaware citizens. For more information, call 302-739-9403 or 800-662-8802, or visit www.dnrec.delaware.gov.

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Families conference focus: ‘Life by Design’

The Families, Individuals and Communities Conference (FICC) is a longstanding tradition in Sussex County. The 2010 conference, “Life by Design: Helping you help yourself personally & professionally,” will take place on Friday, May 7, at Wesley United Methodist Church, Georgetown. As part of the 2010 Conference, we are celebrating a new level of independence. In an effort to continue to bring valuable information and education to families, individuals and communities in Kent and Sussex, the Conference has a new format, a new location and a new price. The day will include four interactive presentations including the following: Cleansing Space with Rev. Keith Goheen and Cheyenne Luzader of Beebe Medical Center; Energizing Space with Karen Barwick of Open Heart Studios; Designing Space with Blythe McManus of Aerie Design. The featured speaker for the afternoon will be Ellyn Herbert of Herbiz, who will prepare the participants for energizing and moving forward. Ellyn comes to us as a featured speaker with the Delaware Commission for Women (DCW). The DCW is also sponsoring her presentation at this year’s FICC. There will also be a variety of vendors and information available from many health agencies and health screenings conducted by Beebe Medical Center and the Alzheimer’s Association. As part of the conference, the fourth annual Ray Lloyd Memorial Award will be awarded. Lloyd was a long-time, popular Delaware Tech instructor who passed away in 2007. In the early years of the conference, he was a keynote speaker at the conference and also facilitated workshops. His accepting, supportive demeanor has made a lasting impression on many who have roamed the halls at Delaware Tech. To nominate someone or for more information on the scholarship, e-mail FICConference@ yahoo.com. Cost to attend the conference is $15 per person, which includes a continental breakfast and a hearty lunch. To contact the committee, e-mail FICConference@yahoo.com. For more information or to register for the conference, contact the secretary/treasurer, Betty Metzler at 302-422-7517.

Dial-A-Story helps entertain kids

It doesn’t take high-tech toys to tickle a child’s imagination. Just a story, a friendly voice and a telephone can take their minds halfway around the world. During National Library Week 2010, April 11 through April 17, the Sussex County Department of Libraries reminds parents of the importance of reading to children, and a great way to do that is by using the County’s free Dial-A-Story program. For nearly 30 years, Dial-A-Story has allowed young children and their parents to dial a local telephone number and listen to a two- to three-minute story right over the phone. In this day of digital music players, handheld video games and the Internet, Dial-A-Story gives children ages 3 to 6 a chance to escape the trappings of modern life and enjoy the simple act of reading. “The goal is to prepare young children to be ready to read, and at an early age,” said Carol Fitzgerald, director of the Department of Libraries. “One of the best ways to start the process is by having somebody read for them. Children respond to that.” Twice a week, library staff members record new stories – usually from books in the department’s collection – for children to hear. The topics vary depending on the time of the year and holidays. On average, more than 1,600 calls are made each month to the County’s DialA-Story telephone numbers. To use Dial-A-Story, call 856-3535 or 856-3536. For Dial-A-Story in Spanish, call 856-3537.

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

IRS says to be aware of these latest tax scams The Internal Revenue Service issued its 2010 “dirty dozen” list of tax scams, including schemes involving return preparer fraud, hiding income offshore and phishing. The IRS urges taxpayers to avoid these common schemes: 1. Return preparer fraud Dishonest return preparers can cause trouble for taxpayers who fall victim to their ploys. Such preparers derive financial gain by skimming a portion of their clients’ refunds, charging inflated fees for return preparation services and attracting new clients by promising refunds that are too good to be true. Taxpayers should choose carefully when hiring a tax preparer. To increase confidence in the tax system and improve compliance with the tax law, the IRS is implementing a number of steps for future filing seasons. These include a requirement that all paid tax return preparers register with the IRS and obtain a preparer tax identification number (PTIN), as well as both competency tests and ongoing continuing professional education for all paid tax return preparers except attorneys, certified public accountants (CPAs) and IRS enrolled agents. 2. Hiding income offshore The IRS aggressively pursues taxpayers involved in abusive offshore transactions as well as the promoters, professionals and others who facilitate or enable these schemes.

Taxpayers have tried to avoid or evade U.S. income tax by hiding income in offshore banks, brokerage accounts or through the use of nominee entities. Taxpayers also evade taxes by using offshore debit cards, credit cards, wire transfers, foreign trusts, employee-leasing schemes, private annuities or insurance plans. IRS agents continue to develop their investigations of these offshore tax avoidance transactions using information gained from more than 14,700 voluntary disclosures received last year. While special civil-penalty provisions for those with undisclosed offshore accounts expired in 2009, the IRS continues to urge taxpayers with offshore accounts or entities to voluntarily come forward and resolve their tax matters. By making a voluntary disclosure, taxpayers may mitigate their risk of criminal prosecution.

3. Phishing Phishing is a tactic used by scam artists to trick unsuspecting victims into revealing personal or financial information online. IRS impersonation schemes flourish during the filing season and can take the form of e-mails or phony websites. Scammers may also use phones and faxes to reach their victims. Scam artists will try to mislead consumers by telling them they are entitled to a tax refund from the IRS and that they must reveal personal information to claim it. Criminals use the information they get to

steal the victim’s identity, access bank accounts, run up credit card charges or apply for loans in the victim’s name. Taxpayers who receive suspicious e-mails claiming to come from the IRS should not open any attachments or click on any of the links in the e-mail. Suspicious e-mails claiming to be from the IRS or web addresses that do not begin with http://www.irs.gov should be forwarded to the IRS mailbox: phishing@irs.gov.

4. Other scams and schemes In contrast to shady tax preparers, some con artists openly tell you that you do not have to pay taxes. Be wary of anyone who encourages you to side-step your responsibility to file an income tax return or to pay the proper amount of tax due. Some promoters make outlandish claims that taxes are not legal, that wages are not income, that a voluntary tax system means you can choose not to file or pay and that income tax returns violate your protection against self-incrimination or the right to privacy. Often these promoters will use techniques that are strikingly similar to any other con-artist to charge a high fee to share their “secrets” with you. Such arguments are false and have been repeatedly rejected by the courts. You may end up paying for this mistake twice, first when you pay for the bad advice and second when you are faced with a higher tax bill plus penalties and interest. For more information about these and

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Laurel Police report theft of International tractor trailer

The Laurel Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying whoever stole a 2004 International tractor trailer from MSP Equipment Rental Inc. on East 4th Street in Laurel. The vehicle is white with MSP Equipment Rental on the driver’s and passengers’ doors. The vehicle was taken on April 11 at 8:14 p.m. and was parked east of Laurel on Samuel Hill Road at 8:34 p.m. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Laurel Police Department at 875-2244 or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333 or www.tipsubmit.com.

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OHS and State Police partner on speed enforcement initiative Speeding. Almost everyone does it. But is it really that dangerous? Nationwide, speeding claims more than 13,000 lives each year and in 2009 speeding was the leading cause of aggressive driving related fatal crashes in Delaware, responsible for 31% of them. Although to date in 2010, speeding is only listed as a primary contributing factor for 6% of the state’s fatal crashes, it is expected to increase as the weather gets warmer. In an effort to reduce these preventable tragedies, the Delaware Office of Highway Safety and the Delaware State Police are partnering on a three-week statewide speed enforcement blitz that began Monday, April 12. Enforcement will be conducted on roadways with statistically identified speed related crash problems. “Speed related deaths are 100% preventable, yet people continue to pay the ultimate price as a result of this risky behavior,” said Andrea Summers, program manager for the Office of Highway Safety. “It’s important that we be proactive and start addressing this issue now rather than wait for tragedies to occur and be reactive. In the absence of high visibility enforcement, speed related crashes tend to spike in March and April. Given our difficult winter, it’s likely more people will start hitting the road and we want them to be safe.” Throughout the month of April, the Delaware State Police will conduct a total of 144 speed enforcement patrols statewide. In addition, one team enforce-

ment operation, consisting of five troopers, will be conducted in each county during the three week time frame. Enforcement will take place primarily in the afternoons and evenings on both primary and secondary roadways with identified crash problems. Nationally, 86 percent of all speeding-related traffic fatalities occurred on non-Interstate roadways, and that trend is mirrored in Delaware. During the first weekend of speed enforcement (April 16 – 18), Delaware will also join other nearby states (Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, D.C., Kentucky and North Carolina) in a regional initiative to slow down speeding motorcyclists. 57% of Delaware’s motorcycle fatalities in 2009 involved speed. Who is at greatest risk for injury and death in speed related crashes? Men ages 15 - 27 are. They account for roughly 54% of the persons killed in Delaware traffic collisions. While primarily looking for speeding motorists throughout the campaign, police will continue to stop and arrest other dangerous drivers such as those who run red lights, or are impaired by drugs and or alcohol. Office of Highway Safety officials say speeding can really cost you. In addition to the possibility of losing your life or being seriously injured, speeding will cost you money from citations, higher insurance premiums from points on your license, and more money for gas. Additionally, speeding greatly reduces the driver’s ability to slow a vehicle when necessary or to steer safely around an unex-

Ride to the Tide will benefit Special Olympics Delaware The Ride to the Tide to benefit Special Olympics Delaware is a police-escorted motorcycle ride that will take place on Sunday morning, April 18. The ride is organized by the Delaware Blue Knights - Chapter 1, and supported by Delaware’s Law Enforcement for Special Olympics, Jake’s Seafood and Fox 21 Delmarva. Bikers can either depart from the University of Delaware football stadium parking lot at 10:30 a.m., the Smyrna Park and Ride at 11:15 a.m., or the Seaford Harley Davidson at 11 a.m. All riders will end at Jake’s Seafood Restaurant in Rehoboth, where lunch will be provided compliments of Jake’s.

The cost to participate is $20 for riders and $15 for passengers, if registered before April 16. Dayof registration fee will be $25 for riders and $20 for passengers. Delaware Law Enforcement for Special Olympics has emerged as one of Special Olympics’ largest grassroots fundraising and public awareness vehicles. Its year-round effort not only involves police officers presenting medals at all Special Olympics Games, but also organizing and participating in fundraisers such as the DSTA Golf Classic, yearbook ads solicitation, Pigskin Pass, Ride to the Tide, Truck Convoy, and a 160-mile Torch Run.

Fines and points increase from 2009 Stop Aggressive Driving pected curve, another vehicle or there putting your driving privicampaign resulted in another hazardous object in the roadway. leges at risk. 6,322 citations for speeding vioIn school zones or neighborOHS will institute phase two lations. hoods, that can include a child of the Stop Aggressive Driving For more information about or an animal running across the campaign in June and involve not the Stop Aggressive Driving road. only Delaware State Police but campaign and OHS’s other safety Drivers ticketed for going 10 also additional law enforcement initiatives, visit the OHS website mph over the speed limit, will receive 4 points on their license agencies. A similar speed enat www.ohs.delaware.gov or foland be fined $77.40 after court forcement blitz last April resulted low OHS on Twitter at www. costs are assessed. in 244 speed citations, and the Twitter.com/DEHighwaySafe. 10CSDB_04ADV_6x10MRNGSTR_0408_00328 (Seaford Star & Laurel Star) 6”w X 10”H

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PAGE 16

Community Bulletin Board NHS dinner/auction

The Nanticoke Health Services dinner & auction planning committee of “crew members” is preparing for the 24th annual dinner and auction at Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville on April 17. Proceeds benefit the Womens Health/Digital Mammography Services at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. For details, contact the Corporate Development office of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at 629-6611, ext. 2404 or morrisr@nanticoke.org.

Support the Seaford Library

The Friends of the Seaford Library & Cultural Center invite everyone to come out and enjoy a meal at Seaford Pizza King on Monday, April 26, between 5 and 8 p.m., in support of the Seaford Library and Cultural Center. A portion of each bill will be donated back to the Seaford Friends Organization to support the services of the Seaford Library and Cultural Center when the library coupon is presented upon checkout. Coupons may be obtained from the Seaford Library and Cultural Center or from any member of the Friends organization.

Spring fair

The spring fair, a fundraiser for Our Lady of Lourdes, Catholic Church, located next to the junior high school on Stein Highway, will take place this Saturday, April 17, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Attic treasures, flowers, clothing, jewelry, books, toys, bake table, furniture and much more will be available. There will also be a money raffle, drawing at 1 p.m. Homemade soup, scrapple, hamburgers, hot dogs and sausage sandwiches to eat in or take out.

DCHS Legacy Classic Golf Tourney The 2010 Delmarva Christian High School Legacy Classic Golf Tournament will be held on Thursday, April

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29, at The Rookery Golf Club. Shotgun start at 8 a.m. Event format: four-person scramble. Funds raised through the Legacy Classic provide money for student scholarships and other school activities. Enjoy a great day of golf, goodie bag, polo shirt, continental breakfast, lunch, golf package prizes for low gross and low net scores. For more information, contact Jeff Bell at 841-7276.

Scholarship Fundraiser

The Georgetown AARP chapter #5340 is holding a Scholarship fundraiser dinner on Monday, April 19, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Roadhouse Steak Joint on Rt. 1, Rehoboth Beach. AARP greeters will be on hand from 5 to 8 p.m. Call Peggy at 856-3404 or Pat at 856-6178 for more information.

Booker Street Church Fundraiser

The Booker Street Church of God is holding a fundraiser dinner on Monday, April 26, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Roadhouse Steak Joint on Rt. 1, Rehoboth Beach. Members will be on hand to greet you from 5 to 8 p.m. Proceeds will benefit the building fund. Call Peggy at 856-3404 or the church at 856-9097 for more information.

Pancake & sausage fundraiser

The Pastor’s Aide Committee will sponsor an all you can eat pancake and sausage fundraiser from 8 to 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 17, at Applebee’s in Salisbury, Md. Cost is $7 per person. For details call Brandon Gale Sr. at 410-845-5991.

CHEER Golf Tournament

CHEER’s First Annual Golf Tournament will be held on Friday, April 23, at Heritage Shores Golf Club, Bridgeville. For more information, call Elizabeth Walls or John Argo at 856-5187.

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Spicer Memorial Golf

The Chad Spicer Memorial Golf Tounament will be held June 17. Registration, 11 a.m.; shot gun start, 12:30 p.m.; event format: four-person scramble. Enjoy a great day of golf and the opportunity to contribute to the trust fund for Officer Chad Spicer’s daughter, Aubrey Spicer. To pre-register or for more information, call Stefanie Sirota at 337-9910 ext. 316 or e-mail HS Tournament@HeritageShoresGolf.com.

Celebrity Golf Classic

The Horsey Family Youth Foundation Celebrity Golf Classic will take place May 12-13 at Heritage Shores Golf and Country Club. There will be a host of celebrities this year with the addition of four time Super Bowl Champion, Rocky Bleier of the Pittsburgh Steelers, and more to come. For more information, contact Dale Webb at 841-5120.

Class of 1965 Reunion

Class of 1965 looking for addresses The SHS Class of 1965 Reunion Committee is planning their 45th class reunion for Saturday, Oct. 9. The Star has published a list and some of the classmates have been located. They still need addresses for the following classmates: Luiz Bueno, Barry S. Cordrey, Tyronne Drummond, Barbara Frazier Burk, Faye Hayes Wright, Sherry Hoster, Irvin Johnson, Kenny Mullin and Ronald West. If you have any information about them, call Donna Hastings Angell at 629-8077 or email her at woodlandangell@hotmail. com.

Home Team Realty on Stein Highway in Seaford. The BBQ is to raise money for next year’s prom. Pre-orders or drive up will be available. Cost is $7 per chicken dinner. For more information, call Leigh Ann Tull or Kedra Lineweaver at 6294587.

PTO Auction/Fun Day

The Frederick Douglass Elementary PTO is preparing for its annual Auction and Family Fun Day on Saturday, April 17, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the school (rain or shine). The event includes a live and silent auction, food and outdoor fun for the kids. Proceeds help fund educational assemblies and field trips, and put much needed supplies into the classrooms.

Seaford Library

• The Seaford Library and Cultural  Center has joined IHOP in an effort to raise money for the library. Eat a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth or Salisbury, Md. IHOP locations and return the itemized receipt along with a comment card to the Seaford Library and Cultural Center. We must have the itemized receipt in order to receive the reimbursement. The Library will receive 10% of the total receipt. • The “Science and Religion” book  discussion will meet at the Seaford Library and Cultural Center on Monday, April 19, at 6 p.m. For more information, call Rose Harrison at 629-2524 or visit www.seaford. lib.de.us.

Safe Boating Class

AARP Seaford Area Chapter 1084 of Western Sussex County will have their annual “fun in the sun” day outing at Soroptimist Park in Seaford, across from the Methodist Manor House on Middleford Road. For more information and to register, call Gladys Bonowicz, chapter president, at 875-1519. Deadline to register is May 6.

The United States Power Squadron will conduct a Safe Boating Course at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 24. The fee is $20 per person or $30 for up to three in the same family. Pre-registration is Saturday, April 17, from 9-11 a.m. You may also register on April 24 from 8:30 to 9 a.m. For more information, contact CM Kohlenberg at 629-0687 or Rob Hutton at 628-0312.

SHS Class of 2012 BBQ

Commemorative bricks on sale

AARP Annual Picnic

Seaford High School’s Class of 2012 will hold a Chicken BBQ on Saturday, May 8, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., in front of

The Friends of the Seaford Library are holding a sale of commemorative bricks for display near the reading terrace at the

Golf Club Demo Day Friday, April 23rd

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PAGE 17

MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 new library. The tax-deductable 4x8 inch bricks may be purchased for $100 each, and may be inscribed in honor of, in memory of or as a gift for friends, neighbors or relatives. Proceeds will be donated to the library building fund. Order forms are available at the library. Contact Friends President Peggy Boyd (536-1449) or Vice President Connie Halter (628-0554) for details.

Stay and Play program

Parents As Teachers announces the free Seaford Stay & Play program. Come have fun playing and learning with your child through a variety of toys and activities. The program is open to children birth through 48 months and their caregivers, on Mondays from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Seaford Parks & Recreation. For more information and a complete schedule, contact Anna Scovell at 856-5239.

Nanticoke Riverfest is July 8-10

The 16th annual Nanticoke Riverfest, designed to showcase the Nanticoke River and downtown Seaford, will take place Thursday and Friday, July 8-9, starting at 5 p.m. and all day Saturday, July 10, in the area in and around downtown Seaford. This year’s theme “Sweet 16,” celebrates the longevity of the festival and adds a 1950’s flare. The festival will kick off on Thursday, July 8 with the carnival, opening ceremonies and music in and around Gateway Park. Friday night will feature the popular Little and Junior Miss Riverfest Pageant and entertainment by the Funsters. On Saturday, the Nanticoke Riverfest will feature the annual float-in, canoe and kayak races and duck dash and shopping, entertainment and giveaways for the casual visitor. Riverfest is partnering with the Seaford Historical Society and Southern Delaware Tourism to showcase the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail, America’s first national water trail. For more information about Riverfest, visit www.nanticokeriverfest.com or call 629-9173.

April 19 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $12 for AARP members, $14 for nonmembers. To register, call 875-2536.

Troop 90 Benefit Dance

The parents of Boy Scouts Troop 90 in Laurel are having a benefit dance on Friday, May 7 from 8 p.m. to midnght, at the Laurel Fire Hall to raise money for a new trailer. Cost is $10 at the door. The current trailer is no longer safe for travel outside of the local area. Proceeds will be used to purchase a new, larger trailer to carry camping equipment. The goal is to purchase and equip the trailer before a June camping trip to Lehigh Valley for white water rafting. There will be light snacks, a silent auction and music by The Jones Boys.

Italian Night at the Fire Dept.

The Laurel Fire Department Auxiliary cordially invites you to attend their first Italian Night on April 17. The buffet will be held at the fire hall on 205 W. Tenth Street, from 5 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. Children 10 and under are free. For tickets contact Ann at 875-4789 or Sandy at 875-2164.

Visitors Day at the Farm

Stop by Whimsical Equine Rescue, 29573 West Elliotts Dam Rd., Laurel to share in the 3rd Annual Delaware Week for the Animals, on Saturday, April 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This is the first year that Whimsical Equine is participating in this celebration of the wonderful animals that touch all of our lives. You will have the opportunity to meet our horses and find your new partner!

April 21st is Administrative Professionals Day Tell your secretary ‘Thank You’ with a Floral Arrangement or Snack Basket from Kitty’s Flowers “Be Happy Bouquet”

AARP Driving course

An AARP Driving course will be held at the Laurel Senior Center on Monday,

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You can check out the New “used” tack store. Buy raffle tickets for several different raffle items, enjoy the food, games and prizes. Donations of feed, hay, gift cards from local feed stores would be appreciated. For more information, check out the website www.whimsicalequine.rescuegroups.org. This celebration is sponsored in part by Barton’s Southern States.

rational message. All area churches and Woodbridge School District residents are invited to attend. Seating is limited. Call George Hardesty at 337-7070 for details.

Delmar Alumni Banquet

Ghost Tales

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library will host storyteller Ed Okonowicz Delaware History, Ghost Stories and Tall Tales. The event will take place on Friday, April 23 at 6 p.m., in the Bridgeville Library Meeting Room. His books will be on sale at a discount. For more information, call 337-7401.

Kiwanis Prayer Breakfast

The Kiwanis Club of Bridgeville is sponsoring its annual Prayer Breakfast at 8 a.m. on Saturday, May 1, at Union United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall. Tickets are $10 each or may be obtained at no charge from one of the many area corporate table sponsors. This annual event features a full buffet breakfast, prayer, fellowship, music and an inspi-

The 8th Annual Delmar High School Alumni Association banquet will be held on Saturday, April 24, at the Delmar VFW. Social hour will begin at 5 p.m. followed by dinner at 6. Cost is $20 per person. For more information, call Carol Warrington at 875-7427 or email deldeerelady@bwave.com.

Basket Bingo for Relay for Life

The Mothers Against Cancer Relay for Life Team will have its annual Basket Bingo on Thursday, May 6, at the Salisbury Moose Lodge. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. Food, raffles, silent auction, door prizes and 50/50 will be available. The Delmar Teens Against Cancer Relay for Life Team will sell baked goods. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. For more information, call Terry at 410-896-3195. All proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society.

Cheerleading Clinic

The Girl Scouts of the Chesapeake Bay Council will sponsor a Cheerleading

SUPER

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Friday Night Dinner April 16th Deal or No Deal Bingo coming May & July

Grocery Night Bingo coming June and August

Tuesday nighT

Delmar VFW Post 8276

410

896-3722

200 West State St., Delmar, MD 410

896-3379

Call for more information 410-896-3722 or 410-896-3379


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

Clinic for girls in kindergarten thru fifth grade on Saturday, April 17, at Delmar Middle/High School, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Delmar High School Varsity Cheerleading Squad will be the instructors for the clinic. Activities include stretching, tumbling, arm movements, chants, dance and building skills. Cost is $25 per girl. Bring a sweater or sweatshirt and wear comfortable pants and sneakers. Also, bring a bag lunch and drink. Water will be provided. Financial assistance is available. You do not have to be a Girl Scout to register for the camp. For more details or to sign up, call Pat Lewis at 410-742-5107 or 1-800-3749811, ext. 26, or email plewis@cbgsc.org.

Casino Night

Casino Night at the Delmar Fire Department is Saturday, April 10, from 7 p.m to 1 a.m. Games include blackjack, poker, money wheels and 50-50’s. Admission is $10. Must be 21 and older to enter.

Kiwanis Prayer Brakfast

The Kiwais Club of Delmar will hold their annual prayer breakfast at Camelot Hall, St. Stephens United Methodist Church, 101 State Street, on Saturday, May 8 at 9 a.m. Tickets may be purchased at the door. The Rev. Timothy Duffield Sr. will deliver the message. Music will be provided by the Gospel Choir from Union United Methodist Chuch. For further information contact Jack Lynch at 410-896-9067 or Pete Overbaugh at 410-896-3725.

CHEER’s 36th anniversary

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center will be celebrating their 36th anniversary with a week-long celebration during the week of April 26-30. Throughout the week, there will be special events, guests, games, raffles and door prizes. The Cape Henlopen Gospel Choir will perform on Monday, April 26 and Leighton-Taylor will perform on Wednesday, April 28. The public is welcome. For more information, call the center at 349-5237.

Learn about rain gardens

Would you like to beautify your yard, create a habitat for birds and beneficial insects, and do your part to reduce storm water pollution? Come to the Greenwood Library on Monday, April 19 at 6:30 p.m., and learn about rain gardens. Jennifer Nelson of DNREC will describe rain gardens, sharing their benefits and giving advice on how to plan and plant one. The program is free and open to all, and no registration is required. For more information, call the Greenwood Library at 349-5309.

Beginning Basket Weaving

Come to the Greenwood Library and learn the art of basket weaving. Basket weaving workshops will be offered from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the following Saturdays: April 17 and April 24. These workshops will be taught by Brenda Brasure, a member of the North Carolina Basket Makers Association and Nature Coast Basket Makers Guild. She will present the basics of basket weaving and then help each participant create a different basket for each Saturday they are able to attend. The fee for each session (payable on the day) will range from $25 to $30, depending on the cost of the basket. On the following Saturdays, the choices will be a Cutie Cracker Basket, Bread Basket and Napkin Basket. Space is limited and pre-registration is required. To register, call Robin Miller at 349-5309.

‘Vietnam Mailbag’ book signing

Award-winning author Nancy E. Lynch will be at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center at 12:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 20, for a presentation and book signing. Anyone with any connection to those involved in the war in Vietnam will find this a rare opportunity to meet Lynch and obtain a signed copy of the book, a compilation of letters between our military and their families and friends, giving first-person insight into the experience of this historic conflict. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call the center at 349-5237.

Eat at IHOP to help the library

Enjoy a meal any time at the IHOP restaurant in Seaford and support the Greenwood Library. Simply fill out a comment card after eating and give it to the cashier as you pay. You will be given a special receipt which you then take to the Greenwood Library on your next visit.

Basket Bingo to Benefit I.O.O.F. Hebron Lodge #14

Friday, April 23 Doors Open 5:30 - Games Begin 7:00 held at Federalsburg V.F.W. TickeTs $2000 in advance $2500 at door Contact Robert Anger at

542-4751 or Henry Tift at

302

858-7588

302

Chicken & dumpling dinner

Bethel United Methodist Church is offering a chicken and dumpling dinner on Saturday, April 24, from 4-6 p.m. Tickets in advance only, phone 410-754-8681 or 337-8836. They are $10 adults, $5 children under 12. The prices include dessert. No tickets will be available after April 11. The church is located west of Seaford and the north end of Oak Grove Road.

Emings BBQ at Delmar Wesleyan

Delmar Wesleyan Church presents “Emings BBQ” on Saturday, April 17, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tickets are $9.50 per person. Carry-outs only. For tickets, call 410-896-3600 and leave a message or call 875-1153.

Fried chicken buffet

Bethany Church at Lowes Crossing Roads, eight miles east of Laurel off Route 24, will have a Fried Chicken Buffet on Saturday, April 17, from 2 to 6 p.m. Menu includes fried chicken, real mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, greens, coleslaw, applesauce, rolls, assorted desserts and drinks. Adults are $10, children $5 and carry-outs will be available.

Covered dish dinner

The Old Seaford Block Watch will be hosting a covered dish dinner on Monday, April 19, at 6:30 p.m. It will be held in the City Hall, 414 High Street. Please use the ramp door. Drinks and desserts will also be furnished. Arlene Marvel from the University of Delaware Extension Office, Master Gardener, will be the guest speaker. For further information call 629-9844.

Expo this weekend. The Expo will take place Saturday, April 17, at Sussex Tech High School, Georgetown. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. This event, which is sponsored by the Sussex Amateur Radio Association and the Sussex Technical High School Amateur Radio Club, will feature all facets of amateur radio and electronics, including forums, vendors and informational displays. There will be demonstrations by the American Radio Relay League, Delmarva Power, Delaware State Police Aviation unit, Sussex County Emergency Operations Center. Beebe Medical Center will administer free blood pressure tests. Door prizes, raffles and giveaways including a HDTV, 4 kw generator and a laptop computer highlight this family style event. For more information, visit www.radioelectronicsexpo.com or call 645-2226.

Chicken & dumpling dinner

The women of Woodland United Methodist Church will serve a Chicken and Dumpling dinner on Saturday, April 17, at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $10; children 6-12 are $4; 5 and under are free. Woodland Church is located 4.5 miles west of Seaford, next to the Woodland Ferry house. No carry-outs. For more information, call 629-5404 or 629-4662.

Minner-Windsor Dinner

The Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club is hosting a Minner-Windsor Dinner at the Bridgeville Fire House on Saturday, April 17, at 6 p.m. All you can eat Chicken and Dumplings, door prizes and an auction. Speaker is Russ McCabe. Tickets are $25. For more information, call Betsy Davis at 875-7091 or e-mail betsy. davis7091@gmail.com.

Centenary Church dinner

Centenary UMW in Laurel will sponsor an all-you-can-eat chicken and dumpling dinner from 4 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 17, in the dining hall. Adults are $10, children ages 6-12 are $5, and 6 and under are free. Sweets are also available.

Free chicken lunch at Expo

A free Delmarva chicken lunch will be available with each $5 donation to the Delmarva Amateur Radio and Electronics

Sight & Sound Trip

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center is offering a motorcoach trip to see Joseph at Sight & Sound Theatre in Lancaster, Pa., on Tuesday, May 4. This is an all-new live musical production about Joseph’s epic story of character and forgiveness. Cost is $98 for members, or $105 for

LetTony TonyWindsor Windsor perform perform for Let foryour yourevent event! Tony Windsor

Guaranteed affordable! Portions of proceeds will benefit the Newspapers in Education program.

Tony TonyWindsor Windsorisisaccepting accepting bookings for entertaining any bookings for entertaining size from the living anyevent, size event, from the room to the great outdoors! living room to the great outdoors! Singing classic Singing classic country and country and rock, with rock, with special 50s, 60s special 50s, 60s and 70s and 70s hits! hits! Also, gospel and Also, gospel and holiday music holiday music available. available. Booking now for Christmas parties and beyond. Call: Booking now for 2010. 302-236-9886 forfor info. Call 302-236-9886 info.


PAGE 19

MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 non-members and includes transportation, show ticket and smorgasbord dinner at Hershey Farm Restaurant. Tips and gratuities are not included. The bus departs the CHEER Center at 10 a.m. and returns at 8 p.m. For more information, contact Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Seaford AARP trips

June 5-6 - Strasburg, Pa. - Solve a murder mystery while having dinner on a train. Lunch at the Shady Maple before checking into your hotel and then boarding the train at 6 p.m. After buffet breakfast the next day, travel to Longwood Gardens for a guided tour before time on your own. Mid afternoon travel to Winterthur Museum and Gardens for a guided tour and tram ride before some free time. Cost: $225/ double. July 22 - A day trip to Norfolk for lunch on the Spirit Of Norfolk and bingo where you can win prizes. Cost: $79. Oct. 25-29 - Pigeon Forge & Smoky Mountains Tenn. - Visit the Titanic Pigeon Forge Museum and board an actual life boat, touch an iceberg and experience the chill of the 28 degree water. The museum will display hundreds of artifacts in 20 galleries on two decks. Admission to Dollywood, Dixie Stampede Dinner Show, Black Bear Jamboree Dinner Theatre, Smith Family Dinner Theatre, Magic Beyond Belief Show. A performance at Country Tonite with entertainment of humor, dancing and singing. Also a guided tour of the great Smoky Mountains. Four breakfasts, four dinners, two lunches included. Cost: $595/double. Seaford AARP trips are open to the public. Note that all trips require a deposit on hotels, meals, entertainment, tour guides, etc. and we must have enough people booked two months in advance or we have to cancel the trip. For more information, contact Rose at 629-7180.

National Zoo trip

Greenwood CHEER Activity Center is offering a motor coach trip to the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, June 24. The bus departs Greenwood CHEER Activity Center at 8:30 a.m. and leaves Washington at 3 p.m. Cost is $30 per person and includes transportation. Zoo admission is free. Deadline for payment is June 3. All meals are on your own. There will be a fast food stop on the way back. Food is available at the zoo. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

Trip to Yankee Stadium

Centenary Church Sunshine Class is sponsoring a bus trip to Yankee Stadium on Saturday, May 29, to see the Yankees vs. the Cleveland Indians. Call 875-2823 for ticket information.

AARP trip to Chicago

AARP #915’s trip to Wisconsin Dells/ Chicago is June 20-26. The trip includes transportation, 6 nights accommodations, 6 breakfasts and 6 full dinners, including two dinner shows. The package includes the following sites: House on the Rock, Magnificent Mile, Tommy Guns Garage, Upper Dells Boat Cruise, Sears Tower Sky Deck, Paul Bunyan’s Restaurant, Circus World, Navy Pier and Carr Valley Cheese Company; six full dinners and six breakfasts; accommodations; baggage handling; taxes; and gratuities. Cost per person, single occupancy is $790; and per double occupancy, $1,010. A $75 deposit is required at sign-up. Final payment is due April 30. For reservations, call 410-754-8189 or 410-754-8588.

Lunch from the menu is optional. For more information call Gloria Burton at 629-4370.

USPS monthly meeting

United States Power Squadron (USPS) meets at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. If you are interested in boating education and safety, and enjoy boating, sailing or canoeing, join us and participate in our classes and outings. For more information, contact C.M. Kohlenberg at 629-0687 or Rob Hutton at 628-0312.

SCGS meeting

The Sussex County Genealogy Society (SCGS) will meet at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 17, at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library. Guest speaker is Dr. Tom Brown, former manager of Archival Services in the Center for Electronic Records, who will speak about the online records at the National Archives and Records Administration’s website, www.archives.gov. There is no charge for the meeting and anyone interested in their family history is welcome. For more information, visit www.scgsdelaware.org or call 875-5418.

Two genealogy classes offered USCG Auxiliary

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary meets the second Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club. For more information, contact Cindi Chaimowitz at 302-398-0309.

Sussex County Marines

Marine Corps League Detachment #780, Devil Dog Detachment, meets the first Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at American Legion Post #6, “the log cabin,” in Seaford. All former and retired Marines, from all generations, are welcome.

Adult Plus at Delaware Technical and Community College is offering two classes to help people in the area develop their own family histories. “Mommy, Where Did I Come From?” is Tuesday, April 20 and “Research Fa-

49th Annual

cilities of the Eastern Shore” is Tuesday, April 27. Ralph Nelson, president of the Sussex County Genealogical Society will present the programs and provide handouts to aid in personal research. Both programs begin at 7 p.m. To register, call Del Tech at 856-5618.

NARFE meeting

The Georgetown Chapter 1992 of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE), will hold their next meeting on Monday, April 19, at noon, with lunch at Pizza King Restaurant on Stein Highway in Seaford. Speaker will be Linda Rogers, Master Gardeners of Sussex County, who will talk about “Planting Seeds.” or more information, contact Betty Graebner at 875-7287.

School Board meeting

The next Board meeting for the Seaford School District is at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 26, at the Seaford District Office.

Seaford Widowed Persons

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, April 20, at 12:15 p.m. at the Georgia House in Laurel. The planned guest speaker will be John Kisela. He plays a dulcimer, an instrument originating in the Appalachians. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Please come join us. We all enjoy the trips, lunches, dinners, etc. that we do.

LaureL Lions

Variety show

Seaford Republican Women’s Club The Seaford Republican Women’s Club will meet on Thursday, April 22, at 10:30 a.m. at Pizza King Restaurant. Nichole Theis will be the featured speaker. She will talk about the goals and plans of the Delaware Family Policy Council. The meeting is open to the public. There is no charge.

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302-629-3338 or 302-629-3299

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Tickets: Adults $600 Youngins

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PAGE 20

Bug and Bud Festival

This year’s annual Bug and Bud Festival in downtown Milford is Saturday, April 24, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There is the annual Ladybug Parade, many vendors, games, fun, family activities and live entertainment.

Country breakfast buffet

A country breakfast buffet will be held every fourth Sunday each month - September through June, from 7 to 10 a.m. at Galestown Community House. Adults, $7, ages 6 to 12, $4, under age 6, no charge. The buffet includes eggs, scrapple, sausage, pancakes, potato casserole, hominy, biscuits, toast, fruit cup and sticky buns. The community house is located on School House Road at the intersection of Galestown and Reliance Roads in Galestown, Md. The dates are: April 25, May 23, June 27.

DSTA Golf Classic

The 2010 DSTA (Del. State Troopers Assoc.) Golf Classic sponsored by Jack Lingo Realtors is accepting registrations for its May 20th tournament, held at the Jack Nicklaus signature Bayside Resort Golf Club in Fenwick Island. Fee is $700 per foursome with all proceeds benefiting law enforcement for Special Olympics Delaware. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, visit www.sode.org/support.

Delaware Grange schedule

Sunday, May 2 - State Grange Worship Service, 2:30 p.m., in the church at Marvel Carriage Museum, 510 S. Bedford St., Georgetown Sunday, June 13 - Sussex County Pomona Grange picnic, 2 p.m., Soroptimist Park, Seaford Saturday, June 26 - Bus trip to Washington, D.C., to help celebrate 50 years of the National Grange Building being in existence For more information, contact Rosalie Walls at 302-5423875.

Vera Bradley Bingo

The Greater Millsboro Kiwanis Club will host a Vera Bradley Bingo fundraiser on Saturday, April 24, at the

MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

Colonel Richardson High School, Class of 1985, is planning a 25th high school reunion for this fall. The committee is updating classmate addresses. For more information, contact Debbie (Feyl) Brohawn at 410-7548910 or crhs1985@gmail.com.

will be held at Dover Downs Hotel & Casino on Friday, June 11 and Saturday, June 12. Player registration is $125 for individual players or $500 for a foursome, which includes green fees, cart, unlimited range balls, gift bag, lunch and dinner and tournament prizes. Tournament hole sponsors are $125. The Hole-In-One prize is a 2010 Mercedes C300W, sponsored by I. G. Burton, Milford. Prizes will also be given for top 3 gross and net, longest drive and closest to the pin. A dinner and live auction will be held at 6 p.m., after the tournament in the banquet room of the country club. Cost is $25 (cost for players is included in the registration fee). A cash bar will be available. For more information, contact Georgeann White at 302236-1955, 302-934-9797 or ghwhite70@aol.com.

Basket Bingo

Delmarva Birding Weekend

Millsboro Fire Hall, featuring 20 regular games, two special games and two raffles, along with a 50/50 raffle and refreshments. Bingo prizes will be Vera Bradley handbags and other products. Doors open at 6 p.m. and games start at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Proceeds from the bingo will benefit local children and youth. For information, contact Millsboro Kiwanis at 934-8424 or e-mail gmillsborokiwanis@ mchsi.com.

Reunion

Basket Bingo will be held April 23 at the Federalsburg V.F.W. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Games being at 7 p.m. Bingo will benefit the International Order of Odd Fellows, Hebron Lodge #14. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. Contact Robert Anger at 302-542-4761 or Henry Tift at 302-858-7588 for tickets or information.

‘Unrinetown, The Musical’

“Urinetown, The Musical” will open on Friday, April 16 at Possum Point Players in Georgetown. The idea for “Urinetown, The Musical” came to playwright Greg Kotis when he planned a trip to Paris without considering the cost. Public bathrooms in Paris are pay-per-use, and some are nicer than others. In one trying, but funny afternoon, Kotis wandered the city trying to decide whether he should wait and combine the bathroom with the dinner meal, or take his chances behind a bush in a formal garden. Thus, the concept for “Urinetown” was born. Ticket reservations can be made by calling 856-4560.

Miss Delaware Golf Classic

The Miss Delaware Golf Classic, hosted by the Miss Delaware Scholarship Organization, will be held at Maple Dale Country Club in Dover on Monday, June 7. The tournament begins at noon with a shotgun start. The Miss Delaware pageant

Delmarva Birding Weekend, which combines boat trips, paddling treks and expeditions by foot, is April 22–25. Field trips take place in the land and water that feed into the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays and the Atlantic coastal bays. More than 400 bird species have been recorded in the region. Birders can paddle during sunrise and sunset in the marshes of the Delaware Bay and the inland bays. Boat excursions will search for birds at the mouth of the Delaware Bay and along the Broadkill River. Hikes and driving tours around Bombay Hook & Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuges and Cape Henlopen & Delaware Seashore State Parks are sure to tally dozens of migratory and resident songbirds, shorebirds and wading birds. Social events, known as “Tally Rallies,” will be held at Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Milton and Dogfish Head restaurant in Rehoboth Beach. For more information, email dlitedirector@comcast.net or call 443-614-0261. For more information and to register for field trips, visit www.delmarvabirdingweekend. org.

Submit Bulletin Board items by noon Thursday, at least one week before. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email to editor@ mspublications.com.

4 W 0

1 T

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 44


MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 21

Church Bulletins Women’s Day at Gethsemane UMC Women’s Day will be held on April 17 from 9 a.m. until noon at Gethsemane United Methodist Church. This year’s theme is “Thank You for a Being a Friend.” Call 629-2862 to register. Cost is $5 per person which includes lunch.

Family and Friends Day

Clarence Street Church of God, Seaford, will be celebrating “Family and Friends Day” on Saturday, April 17, at 6 p.m. Elder Willie Williams of Glassboro, N.J., will be the guest minister. Special honoree is Rita Williams Boardly. For more information, call 629-9443.

Free soup and sandwiches

New Zion United Methodist Church in Laurel offers free soup and sandwiches every Wednesday from noon to 2 p.m. For more information, contact Pastor Timothy Duffield Sr. at 875-0727.

First Annual Gospel Fest Weekend

Join us on April 23 and 24 for our first annual “Fellowship of Christian Artists Gospel Fest Weekend” Concerts. On Friday, April 23 at 7 p.m., members of the Fellowship of Christian Artists will sing at Elkton Church of God, Elkton, Md., and again at 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 24, at Grace United Methodist Church, Georgetown. For more information, call Jeannie and Jerry Jones, 228-4813. For more about FCA, visit the website www.fellowshipofchristianartists.net.

Free luncheon at Laurel Baptist

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon on Saturday, April 17, from noon to 2 p.m. The luncheon will consist of chicken, dumplings, stuffing, mashed potatoes, green beans and cupcakes. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Blvd. (west side of Rt. 13A, approx. 2 miles south of town). Any questions, call Shirley at 875-2314.

Mens & Ladies Conferences

Join us at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 24, at Grace United Methodist Church, Georgetown, for an annointed time of fellowship and learning more about the works of God in our lives as men and women. For more information about FCA, visit www.fellowshipofchristianartists.net or call 302-228-4813.

Eunice Wright in live recording

Crossroad Christian Church is featuring Eunice Wright in a live recording on Friday, April 30. Doors open at 6 p.m., recording begins at 7 p.m. General admission is $10. VIP tickets, which includes preferred seating and a copy of the CD when released, are $20. Tickets are available at the Mustard Seed in Milford or the Gospel Shoppe in Salisbury. The church is located on 4867 N. DuPont Highway, in Dover. For more information contact Joyful Noyze Entertainment at 302-241-5015.

Pancake breakfast for preschool

Come to Applebee’s Restaurant in Seaford from 8 to 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 17, for a pancake and sausage breakfast

to raise money for Mt. Olivet Preschool. Tickets are $6 for adults, $3 for children, under 2 are free. The preschool is a ministry of Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church in downtown Seaford and has classes for ages 2, 3 and 4-year-olds.

Spring Festival/Yard Sale

Christ the Cornerstone Community Church, located on the corner of Bethel and Seaford Roads, will hold a Spring Festival/Yard Sale on Saturday, April 24 beginning at 7 a.m. Oyster sandwiches, chicken salad sandwiches, hot dogs, hamburgers, vegetable beef soup, peas and dumplings, and Scrapple sandwiches will be available. To reserve yard sale space, call 875-8150.

Paul Wilbur performs

Worship4Him will present Paul Wilbur, praise and worship leader, on Friday, May 7 at 7 p.m. at Crossroad Community Church. The church is located at 20684 State Forest Road in Georgetown. Tickets are available online only at Worship4Him.org. The cost is $20 general admission, $30 Gold Circle. Children 12 and under are free with a ticket. For questions or information, call 443-523-4095. Doors open one hour prior to the concert. Please do not contact the church.

St. Luke’s Newsletter

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church offers its newsletter on line and also, via email. Our “Luke’s Letter” is published approximately once a month and will be available on our website www.stlukesseaford.org.

You can also join our e-mail list if you send a request to StLukesEpis@ comcast.net St. Luke’s services are Sunday, Holy Eucharist at 9 a.m., and Thursday evenings, Holy Eucharist and Healing at 6 p.m. The Rev. Jeanne Kirby-Coladonato is the Rector/Pastor.

Kidstuf 103 at Alliance Church

Atlanta Road Alliance Church in Seaford is offering Kidstuf 103 on Wednesday evenings. Kidstuf is a program designed for children and parents to attend together. Each month features a different Biblical virtue using music, drama, a storyteller and games. A light supper is served at 6:15 p.m., followed by the program at 6:45 p.m. Kidstuf is designed for kindergarten through 6th grade; however, parents are welcome to bring their preschoolers with them. Registration is free. No drop-offs. For more information, call 629-5600 or visit www.atlantaroadcma.org

Weekly Bible Study

A weekly Bible study is being held every Wednesday night from 7:15-8:15 p.m. at the Days Inn, Rt. 13 South, Seaford (next to KFC). Family oriented Bible lessons for all ages. Sunday worship service is at 12 noon in the same location. The Pastor is Elder Cornell Johnson of Jesus The Christ Apostolic Ministries. Call 628-0349 or 302-344-9672 for more information.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship CHURCH OF CHRIST

Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

1010S . Central Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

www.laurelcentenaryumc.org

875-3983

200 W. Market Street, Laurel, Del. Contemporary Worship, 8:45 a.m. Traditional Worship, 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, for ALL Ages, 9:45 a.m. Wednesdays: Bible Study 1 p.m.; & Youth Ministry 6:45 p.m.

Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church

Christian Church of Seaford

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

(302) 875-3644

Centenary UMC

Christ Evangelistic Church

The Gift of His Love Let others know where you are and when you meet. To advertise in this directory, call

629-9788

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Centrally located at

14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org Pastor Timothy Dukes, Senior Pastor Pastor John Lanzone, Youth/Family Pastor

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: Bible Study 7 PM


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Obituaries Carol Hasty Davis Gourley, 83

Carol Hasty Davis Gourley of Haines City, Fla., passed away on Friday, April 9, 2010, in Auburndale, Fla., of heart failure. She was born on Nov. 11, 1926, in Charleston, W.V., and moved to Haines City in 1979 from Seaford. Carol was a homemaker the majority of her adult life but she also worked as a salesperson for Gourley Belk in Haines City for 15 years. She was a member of First Christian Church in Haines City and she loved to work on her computer. She was preceded in death by her husband, Alvin C. Gourley and her son, Steven Brent Davis. She is survived by her children, Bill (Andi) Davis of Seaford, Susan (James) Jones of Winter Haven, Fla., Jeff (Margie) Gourley and Lisa Gourley, both of Sebring, Fla.; brother, Bill Hasty of Haines City; grandchildren, Cohen Davis of Seaford, Shannon Napoli of Brunswick, Ohio, Erin (Chris) Euverard of Winter Haven, Megan Evans of Lakeland, Fla., and Christina and Gabrielle Gourley, both of Sebring; and great-grandchildren, Carson and Casie Euverard, Emilee Moore and Liam Evans. A memorial service will be held at 11:30 a.m. on Sunday, April 25, at First Christian Church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Good Shepherd Hospice, 105 Arneson Ave., Auburndale, FL 33823. Condolences may be sent online at www. oakridgefuneralcare.com.

Phyllis A. Baker McNatt, 66

Phyllis Ann Baker McNatt of Seaford, died Tuesday, April 6, 2010, at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford. Born in Upland, Pa., she was the

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

daughter of the late Jeanette Bailey and James F. Baker. Phyllis was a registered nurse with a BSA and MA. She was a graduate of Salisbury University and the University of Miami where she earned her master’s degree. She retired from Genesis Elder Care in Seaford. Prior to that, she worked at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford, Mariner Hospital in the Florida Keys, Tappahannock Hospital in Virginia and Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. She was a member of Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church, where she was involved in Our Lady of Lourdes Ministries, Eucharistic Minister, Pastoral Care, Lectoral Ministry and Educational Ministry. She was also a member of the Soroptimist Club, Chaplain of the Republican Women’s Club, 2008 volunteer of the year for the Seaford Historical Society and president of the Save the Turtle Foundation of the United States. She is survived by a son, Mickey McNatt Jr. and his wife Ness of Seaford; a daughter, Erin McNatt of Seaford; three sisters, Gilda Miller of Seaford, Janet Waterfield of Warsaw, Va., and Deborah Dennis of Georgetown; four grandchildren, Ellie Anne McNatt and Peyton, Levi and Boone Perkins; her former husband, Mick McNatt Sr. and wife Marie of Seaford; and former brother-in-law, Bill McNatt of Seaford. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a brother, Eugene Baker. Funeral services were held on Saturday, April 10, at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Seaford. The Rev. John McKenna officiated. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963. Arrangements are in the care of Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church

GETHSEMANE

Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Pastor - O. Kenneth Scheller 302-875-0140

A Safe Sanctuary & Stephen’s Ministry Church Rev. E. S. Mallozzi

26295 Sussex Highway (south on 13), Seaford, DE

All are welcome to worship here every Sabbath.

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Contemporary Services ... 8:45 & 10:30 a.m. Nursery Care & Children’s Church Provided Corner of Woodland Ferry Rd. & Stein Hwy., 4 miles West of Seaford • 629-2862 Jeans Expected! No Halos Required!

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

VICTORY TABERNACLE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC 22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. 6:45 Catalyst Youth (gr. 7-12), Worship, Nursery, Classes DivorceCare, KidStuf 103 (K-6 kids & their parents, 1st & 3rd for Kids & Adults Wednesday) 7:00 Intercessory 7:00 p.m. Prayer, Men’s Group Evening Service

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE

(302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburyworship.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458

Union

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Welcome…

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s

Episcopal Church Front & King St., Seaford, DE

629-7979

Holy Eucharist: Sunday, 9:00 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743E . Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Pastor

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

MOUNT PLEASANT

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Dale Evans

Contemporary Service............9:30 a.m. Sunday School.............10:15 a.m. Regular Service. . . . . . .11:30 a.m. Mount Pleasant Road, Laurel (Just off Rt. 24 west, on Rd. 493A)

875-1045


MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

Shirley R. Slavens, 73

Shirley Rozella Slavens of Delmar, died Monday, April 5, 2010, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. Born Jan. 23, 1937 in Carleton, Mich., she was the daughter of the late Russell Trouten and Hazel Ford Trouten Scheid. She attended Frankfort Pilgrim College in Indiana and God’s Bible School and College in Ohio. She was a faithful pastor’s wife for 35 years and a member of Crisfield Wesleyan Church. She is survived by her husband of 50 years, the Rev. Larry Eugene Slavens; two sons, Thomas Slavens & his wife Joy of Laurel, and Timothy Slavens & his wife Maureen of Beavertown, Pa.; a daughter, Charidth Collins & her husband Paul of Carroll, Ohio; 13 grandchildren; and three brothers, Earl Trouten & his wife Mary Lou of Bellville, Ohio, the Rev. Edsel Trouten & his wife, Alice of Kuna, Idaho, and Harry Trouten of Florida. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a brother, Harold Trouten and a sister, Nola Shukait. A funeral service was held on Friday, April 9, at God’s Missionary Church in Delmar, Md. Interment was held at Beavertown God’s Missionary Cemetery in Beavertown, Pa., on Saturday, April 10. The Revs. Rob Dicken and James Plank officiated. Memorial contributions may be made

to God’s Bible School and College, 1810 Young St., Cincinnati, OH 45210 or Penn View Bible Institute, Box 970, Penns Creek, PA 17862. Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, PA, 501 Snow Hill Rd., Salisbury, MD 21804. To send condolences to the family, visit www.hollowayfh.com.

Robert W. King, 82

Robert W. King of York, Maine, passed away peacefully on March 27, 2010, at Watson Fields, Dover, N.H. He was born in Seaford on May 2, 1927, the son of the late Louis C. and Dorothy W. King. He graduated from Seaford High School after serving in the U.S. Navy during WWII. He received a degree in electrical engineering from Tri-State University in Angola, Ind. He retired as a project engineer and construction manager from WTE Corporation of Bedford, Mass. Mr. King is survived by his wife, Lee Beth, two sons, David and John, and two grandchildren, Jason and Andrew. He was preceded in death by his brother, Harry. Private internment was in Odd Fellows Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions be made to National Parkinson Foundation, Inc., Office of Development, 1501 NW 9th Ave., Miami, FL 33136-1494.

What Must I Do to Be Saved? Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. ~ Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. ~ Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ~ Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. ~ Romans 10:9

Harold R. Brooks, 72

Harold R. Brooks of Delmar, and formerly of Lake, Mich., passed away on Saturday, April 10, 2010, at his home in Delaware. Harold was born on Oct. 22, 1937, in Clio, Mich. He was the son of Ray and Alice (Edwards) Brooks who preceded him in death. He was united in marriage to Barbara Brazelton on Oct. 31, 1959, and she predeceased him on March 13, 2000. Harold was then united in marriage to Jane Ward Bonsall on April 30, 2006. After many years as a maintenance man for the former Farm Maid Dairy Company in Detroit, Mich., Harold retired to enjoy the passions of his life family, deer hunting, riding motorcycles, watching NASCAR, spending winters in Florida playing golf and volunteering at the Lake George Booster’s Club. Harold also enjoyed parking RV’s at the Bay Shore Camp during the annual Lloyd Severance Thumb Gospel Music Convention, and waiting patiently for the loons to return each spring to their nest on Windover Lake. Harold is survived by his wife Jane; three sons, Glen Brooks of Walden, Colo., Barry (Jody) Hargraves of Alberta, Canada, and Bradley Brooks of Madison, S.D.; four stepchildren, Carol (Jim) Hill of Seaford, Jeff (Cheryl) Martin of Middletown, Greg (Bernadette) Martin of Lewes, and Melissa (Richard) Malone of Delmar; and four brothers, Robert (Diane) Brooks of Lapeer, Mich., Phillip Brooks

PAGE 23 of Burton, Mich., David (Charlene) Brooks of Holly, Mich., and Paul (Barbara) Brooks of Elkton, Mich. Harold is also survived by many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Funeral services in Michigan will take place at 11 a.m. on Friday, April 16, at the Farwell Chapel of StephensonWyman Funeral Home with Pastor Chuck Malson officiating. Burial will take place in the Freeman Twp. Cemetery in Lake. Visitation will be held on Thursday, April 15, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. A “Celebration of Life” will be held at a later date to be announced in Delaware. Memorial contributions may be made to the Lake George Boosters Club, the Bay Shore Camp and Family Ministries, or to Delaware Hospice. If you are unable to attend Harold’s services, please consider leaving his family an online condolence at the website, www.stephenson-wyman.com.

Death Notices William H. R. deRooy

William H. R. deRooy, of Seaford, died Friday, April 2, 2010. The funeral was held on Saturday, April 10, at Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Our Lady of Lourdes Cemetery.


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

Health briefs Stroke and osteoporosis screenings

Residents living in and around the Blades community can be screened to reduce their risk of having a stroke or bone fracture. The Blades Town Hall-Hardin Hall will host Life Line Screening on May 17. The site is located at 20 W. Fourth St. in Blades. Appointments will begin at 9 a.m.Four key points every person needs to know: 1. Stroke is the third leading cause of death ad a leading cause of permanent disability. 2. 80% of stroke victims had no apparent warning signs prior to their stroke. 3. Preventative ultrasound screenings can help you avoid a stroke. 4. Screenings are fast, noninvasive, painless, affordable and convenient. Screenings identify potential cardiovascular conditions such as blocked arteries and irregular heart rhythm, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and hardening of the arteries in the legs, which is a strong predictor of heart disease. A bone density screening to assess osteoporosis risk is also offered and is appropriate for both men and women. Packages start at $139. All five screenings take 60-90 minutes to complete. For more information regarding the screenings or to schedule an appointment, call 1-877-237-1287 or visit our website at 222.lifelinescreening.com. Pre-registration is required. Life Line Screening was established in 1993, and has since become the nation’s leading provider of preventive screenings.

Azar Eye Institute recognized

AZAR Eye Institute (AEI), founded by Dr. Alex Azar who has practiced ophthalmology in Salisbury, Md. since 1976, has been recognized for cataract surgery excellence by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) Institute for Quality Improvement as a “2009 Best Performer.” AEI ranked in the top five-percent among 95 eye centers to voluntarily participate in the national benchmark study. “We have four accomplished ophthalmologists performing up to 1,700 cataract surgeries each year in the AEI surgery center, said Dr. Alex Azar, founder and president of AZAR Eye Institute. “By making a few small adjustments to our pre-op and postop procedures last year, we saw a 37-percent increase in our efficiency rate.” The AAAHC study measures efficiency based on the amount of time a cataract surgery patient spends from the time they walk in the waiting room to the time they walk out the door after the surgery is complete. AEI has streamlined its cataract services by starting surgery preparation at home. In many cases patients are able to administer the dilating eye drops before they report to the eye center for surgery. An AEI nurse also contacts each patient at home 48 hours before surgery to review their health history, answer questions or address any problems they are experiencing related to the cataracts. What historically took many eye centers an hour and a half to accomplish now only takes AEI 20-30 minutes.

Dr. Francisco

ussex urgical

Rodriguez

announces effective 1/1/10 the joining with

Atlantic Surgical Associates, LLC, Dr. David Cloney and Dr. Neil LaHurd. The new location for Sussex Surgical is: 806 Seabury Avenue, Milford, DE 19963 Phone: 302-424-7522

Jona Gorra, M.D. FACP

Nicholas M. Macharia, M.D.

Board Certified in Internal Medicine

10 West Laurel St. Georgetown, DE 19947

Board Certified in Internal Medicine

302-855-0915

Monday thru Friday 9:00 - 12:00 & 1:00 - 6:00,

302-629-4569 Monday thru Friday 8:30 - 12:00 & 1:00 - 5:30

1501 Middleford Rd. Seaford, DE 19973

MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED

Accepting New Patients

Walk-Ins Accepted, Appts. Preferred

AZAR Eye Institute is a full-service eye care practice. For more information, visit www.azareyeinstitute.com or call 410-5462500.

Keep horse vaccinations current

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control has announced that mosquito control season has begun; and Delaware State Veterinarian Heather Hirst is reminding horse owners to be sure that their equines’ vaccinations are up to date. Both horses and humans can contract West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis (EEE) if they are bitten by a mosquito carrying the virus. Mosquito activity peaks at dusk and dawn. The diseases are potentially fatal in horses, with the most severe cases occurring in unvaccinated animals. The viruses cannot be transmitted from horses to humans or from human to human. The viruses are normally maintained in a cycle between mosquitoes and birds. Occasionally, the EEE virus is transmitted from mosquitoes to mammals, with illness and sometimes death occurring in equines and humans. For human health questions about EEE or West Nile virus, call the Delaware Division of Public Health at 888-295-5156 or 302-744-1033. For animal-related questions about EEE or West Nile, call the Delaware Dept. of Agriculture at 800-282-8685 (Delaware only) or 302-698-4500, and ask for the Poultry and Animal Health. For questions about the Mosquito Control program or mosquito biology, call DNREC at 302-739-9917.

Lunch and Learn about diabetes

The Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition Diabetes Prevention and Control Program will hold Lunch and Learns throughout Sussex County for individuals with diabetes and their caregivers. Participants will learn more about diabetes and how to manage the disease. The following area lunches are scheduled: • Clarence Street Church of God, Seaford - Thursday, May 20, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. To register, contact Pastor Cannon at 629-9443 by May 14. • Laurel Public Library - Monday, May 3, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. To register, call 875-3184. • Delmar Public Library - Thursday, May 20, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. To register, call 846-9894 by May 14.

Win a NASCAR pit package

The Bayhealth Foundation, in conjunction with Dover Motorsports, is selling raffle tickets for a NASCAR Pit Pass Package to benefit Bayhealth Medical Center’s Cancer Institute. For $10 per raffle ticket (or three tickets for $25), you’ll have a chance to win the Kasey Kahne Pit Pass Package for two, which includes: • A guided tour of the pit and garage area before the Sunday, May 16, NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Dover International Speedway • A meet & greet with Kasey Kahne, driver of the No. 9 Budweiser Ford in the


MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series • Two pit and garage passes to use before the May 16 event • Two grandstand tickets to see the race  ($110 value) Raffle tickets are available at Kent General and Milford Memorial Hospital gift  shops and the Bayhealth Foundation office. The winning ticket will be drawn on  May 13 at the Golf Tournament Awards  Dinner. Winner will be notified by phone  if not present at the event.   For more information, or to pay by  MasterCard or Visa, contact the Bayhealth  Foundation at 744-7015 or email foundation@bayhealth.org.

cial kids activities and health screenings.  The mayor from each town or their  representative will be present to read a  proclamation on behalf of the town council  promoting April 17 as Community Health  Day. For more information on the Sussex  Child Health Promotion Coalition, call  444-9062 or visit www.SussexKids.org.

5K benefits Breast Cancer Coalition

The Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition  announces its First Annual DE-Feet Breast  Cancer 5K Run/1M Walk sponsored by  Tanger Outlets will take place on Sunday,  May 2, at 9 a.m. The 3.1 mile course will  begin and end at Applebees restaurant at  Tanger Outlet Center, Rehoboth Beach.  Walk MS at Heritage Shores The family event is open to runners  Heritage Shores in Bridgeville is home  and walkers of all ages. All proceeds from  to the annual MS fundraiser, Walk MS:  Tanger’s DE-Feet Breast Cancer 5K/1M  Twilight at Heritage Shores. This year’s  will benefit the Delaware Breast Cancer  event steps off at the Heritage Shores club- Coalition (DBCC). On the heels of a very  house on Friday, April 30, at 6 p.m.  successful Pink Card campaign in which  “After the walk,” promises the chapTanger Outlets raised more than $90,000  ter’s director of development, Holly Madd- for the Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition  ams, “we’ll gather in the grand ballroom  last October, Tanger’s general manager  and outdoor patio, enjoy some good food  Amy Norgate eagerly stepped up to sponand entertainment, and hand out prizes.  sor DBCC’s 5K event. We’re giving a BPA-free water bottle to  Advanced registration, which is recomevery participant who raises at least $25  mended, is $20/person. On-site registration  and an event t-shirt to anyone who raises  is $25/person, beginning at 7:30 a.m. on  $100 or more.” Day-of registration begins  race day; and the first 100 people regisat 5 p.m., but advance registration is rectered receive a long-sleeve T-shirt.  ommended. For more information, visit  There’s even a “Sleepwalkers” category  delawarewalk.org or call 655-5610. for those who are unable to attend but  want to show their support. Sleepwalkers  Spring into Health Walks simply register for $20, check the “SleepThe Sussex Child Health Promotion  walker” category and then sleep in on SunCoalition and the towns of Laurel, Bridday.  To register, visit www.seashorestridgeville, Georgetown, Lewes and the city of  ers.com or www.active.com.  Seaford have joined together for a fourth  year to promote Sussex County’s “Spring  Registration open for Walk MS into Health Community Walk.” Registration is now open for this year’s  This walk is being held simultaneously  Walk MS season in Delaware. Organized  in all five towns on Saturday, April 17 at  by the Delaware Chapter of the National  the following locations: Multiple Sclerosis Society, the goal is to  • Woodbridge Athletic Complex, 14714  raise awareness and funds for the programs  Woodbridge Rd., Greenwood; 8:30 a.m.  and services needed by more than 1,500  registration, 9 a.m. walk  Delawareans with MS and their families.  • Seaford Athletic Complex Track, VirEach of the five events takes place on  ginia Avenue, Seaford; 8:30 a.m. registraan accessible 5K route, and plenty of suption, 9 a.m. walk  port is available as well as the opportunity  • Laurel Senior High School, Laurel;  for lots of fun with family and friends. 9:30 a.m. registration; 10 a.m. walk Two events take place in Sussex Coun• Sussex Technical High School,  ty: Georgetown; 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m.  • Walk MS: Twilight at Heritage Shores  walk steps off at Providence At Heritage Shores,  • The Villages of Five Points, 17339  One Heritage Shores Circle in Bridgeville,  North Village, Main Boulevard, Lewes;  on Friday, April 30, at 6 p.m. 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. walk • Walk MS: Twilight at Baywood  There is no cost for this event and it is  Greens steps off at the Baywood Greens  not a fundraiser, simply an awareness cam- Golf Course, 32267 Clubhouse Way in  paign. Special guests will appear around  Long Neck, on Friday, May 21, at 6 p.m. the community. The first 100 children at  Day-of registration begins one hour beeach site will receive a free t-shirt just for  fore the event. For more info or to register,  participating. Each location will offer specall 655-5610 or visit delawarewalk.org.

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cancer enhance their health and well-being through participation in a professional  Delaware Hospice’s Beef and Brew  program of emotional support and hope.  fundraiser will be held on Friday, April 16,  All facilitators of these groups are  from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. at the Georgetown  trained mental health professionals. Call  CHEER Center. Tickets are $30 per person  645-9150 for information or to register. through Monday, April 12, and $35 per  person after April 12 or at the door. Beef  Man to Man support group and sides will be catered by the Georgia  Nanticoke Memorial Hospital offers  House and beer sponsored by Banks Wines  a Man to Man support group meeting on  & Spirits and the Starboard. The evening  the fourth Wednesday of each month.  will include raffles, a silent auction and  Man to Man helps men cope with pros“The Funsters.” Delaware Hospice invites  tate cancer by receiving information and  you to participate through sponsorships or  peer support. Man to Man is a forum for  donations. Call Peggy Dolby, 856-7717, or  men and their support network to learn  Mary Morgan, 800-838-9800, for tickets  about diagnosis and treatment options  or sponsorship information. through presentations, written materials  and videos. Specialists share information  Cancer support group such as side effects and how to cope with  The Wellness Community-Delaware  prostate cancer and its treatment. News  offers a free general cancer support group  and information about nutrition, general  for people affected by cancer and their  health, research and treatment, as well as  loved ones at Nanticoke Memorial Hosmessages from men living with prostate  pital in Seaford. The monthly support  cancer and other Man to Man activities,  group meets in the second floor conferare offered to assist in the recovery proence room of the Cancer Care Center on  cess. Pre-registration is not required for  the third Monday of each month from  this free support group. For more infor4:30 to 6 p.m. The Wellness Community  mation, contact Larry Skala (337-3678) or  is dedicated to helping people affected by  Grafton Adams (628-8311).

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MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

Sensory Integration Disorder is now more widely recognized and treatable By Anthony Policastro One of the things that I see with increasing frequency in my developmental practice is sensory integration issues. This is an area that is relatively new in its recognition, but it has been present for a long time. As the name suggests, individuals with this type of problem overreact to sensations. The most obvious is with the sense of touch. These individuals have what seems to be oversensitive skin. They react to things such as clothing tags. They do not like socks on their ankles. They might not like the feel of some types of clothing. In more extreme cases, they might not like to be held or hugged. The sense of taste is also often affected. They will like only certain food textures and avoid others. They do not like lumpy foods or smooth soft foods. The result is often a very limited diet. Some children will have only a handful

of foods they are willing to eat. Other senses are also affected. They may not like loud noises. Even noises that we do not think are loud, they will find offensive. Bright lights and aromas might be offensive to them. Again, these lights and aromas might not bother others but they are hypersensitive to them. Treatment for these symptoms is available through occupational therapists. Some therapists do more of this therapy than others. Of interest is the fact that right now this diagnosis is not included in the manual of diagnoses that is published periodically. Therefore, when a physician finds a patient with it, he/she cannot really include it as a diagnosis. The new version of the manual will be coming out soon and it will include Sensory Integration Disorder. This means that it will finally become a real diagnosis. Currently, health insurance companies do not reimburse occupational therapists for treat-

WALK THIS WAY - Bayhealth Medical Center employees recently celebrated National Start! Walking Day by joining community members in a short walk near the campuses of Kent General Hospital and Milford Memorial Hospital. The walk marked the fundraising kickoff for the 2010 Heart Walk this fall, and helped raise public awareness about the health benefits of walking. Bayhealth employees strolled from the Discharge Entrance at Kent General Hospital to Lifestyles Fitness Center in Dover (shown here). In Milford, Milford Mayor Dan Marabello, Southern Delaware American Heart Association Chair Eugenia Thornton, and Greater Milford Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Jo Schmeiser were among the community members who joined Bayhealth employees in a brief walk around the perimeter of Milford Memorial Hospital. Walking for just 30 minutes each day, five days a week can significantly reduce your risk for many health problems including heart attacks.

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DSWA’s Public Outreach The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) visits different schools and groups throughout the year to educate children on various environmental topics like recycling, landfilling, composting, and anti-littering. In 2009 DSWA attended 96 school and community presentations and 28 community events, reaching over 308,000 residents.

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ing the disorder. Since it is not included in the manual, they say it does not exist and there is no reason to pay for its treatment. That should change when the new manual comes out. In the interim, mild cases just need to be recognized. The family can adjust to the needs of the individual. That is all that is necessary. More severe cases that are somewhat disabling would benefit from treatment. The question would be if the family could pay for the treatment since the insurance company might not. In these cases the best first step is to get an occupational health evaluation to confirm the diagnosis. Once that is done, then a call to the insurance company might result in some coverage for therapy. Sensory integration is more common than most people realize. Once it becomes a formally allowable diagnosis, it will likely become even more commonly recognized.

CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION MONTH - As part of Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, Bayhealth Medical Center hopes to raise public awareness about the role of health care providers in fighting child abuse. During the month, the hospital will sponsor a variety of educational activities and encourage providers to wear blue ribbons in support of the campaign. In recent weeks, Prevent Child Abuse Delaware provided special training to Bayhealth caregivers on how to prevent infant brain trauma and injury from “shaken baby syndrome.” For the last three years, Bayhealth has also sponsored a special Child Advocacy Committee which meets monthly to discuss initiatives to improve child protection. Since 2007, the Committee has helped Bayhealth implement several key initiatives to protect child patients including: The Shaken Baby Syndrome Awareness Program; an alert system for high risk children; and sex offender visitation guidelines. Bayhealth recently sponsored a seminar on Shaken Baby Syndrome. From left are Marjorie Hershberger from the Delaware Child Death, Near Death & Stillbirth Commission and Lisa Zaccardelli, MSN, RNC, Women’s Services nurse manager for Kent General Hospital.


MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 27

Kline reflects on his experience as a Delaware Hospice volunteer

Leon Kline has been a dedicated volunteer for Delaware Hospice for five years, since caring for a neighbor who had become ill. Leon’s the kind of guy who would care for a sick neighbor. He’s the kind of guy who will sit vigil at the bedside of a dying patient; he’s a guy who will drive 80 miles through a snowstorm on an errand for a family in need; and he bakes like Julia Child and delivers cakes to Delaware Hospice’s Milford office on their luckiest days. Leon grew up in a little town called Sellersville, about 20 miles from Philadelphia. He met his wife while roller skating. Leon was 12 and she was 11. He said, “We lost contact after school, but while serving in the National Guard with her brother, we were reunited one Thanksgiving Day, and started dating again. They married in 1954, had four children in five years. Leon said, “For a while we lived in a one bedroom apartment with three kids!” Leon was a “jack of all trades,” and his ventures included farming for many years, and also driving a school bus. But he said, “My greatest passion is roller skating. I’ve always skated, and I still do. Last week I drove four hours to a rink near Harrisburg to skate. It’s worth the trip, because the people who go are friends my age, and we skate to live organ music.” Leon and his wife retired to Delaware to be near one of their sons who had moved here, which was when he was first exposed to hospice. He said, “I became good friends with a neighbor, who eventually became quite ill. I would go over to make sure he had food and didn’t need anything. Then he was moved to a nursing home in another town, and I felt driven to continue visiting him. I met his nurse and was impressed with the care Delaware Hospice was giving him. When he passed away, I started thinking, ‘I can do this. I like to help out people like this.” He called and signed up for the next volunteer training. “Their training prepares you pretty well for what you’re going to encounter with patients and families. Of course, you’re always learning new things, like how to deal with Alzheimer’s patients, but the Volunteer Office’s support is great. At first I ran errands, took folks to the hair dresser, picked up medicines, or changed light bulbs in the house — whatever I could do to help. In the beginning, I said that I would not sit vigil; but now I do a lot of this. It’s easy to do and I think it’s really appreciated.” “What they say is true, you get more than you give as a hospice volunteer. It’s one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve had in my life. And whomever you

speak to about Delaware Hospice says ‘you can’t find a better organization.’ Leon took some time to recover from his own loss last May when he lost his wife of 55 years. But he stays busy roller skating, and spending time with his two sons and two daughters and their families in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia and North Carolina. And he bakes. “Yesterday I tried a new cake, but it didn’t turn out

as I thought, so I’ll do another one this afternoon.” The Delaware Hospice staff looks forward to Leon’s visits to the office, because he often arrives with cake! On April 27, Delaware Hospice will hold its New Volunteer Training for Sussex County in Milford. As the only not-for-profit hospice in the state, Delaware Hospice relies on its volunteers

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to help support ongoing programs and services which meet the needs of patients and families in the community. Anyone who signs up goes through a comprehensive orientation and then chooses a volunteer role that suits his or her own interests and abilities. Many individuals help organize fundraisers which are held throughout the year. Others run errands or provide transportation for patients.

Delaware Hospice’s offices are supported through volunteers donating time to perform clerical duties. Family members are forever grateful for those who are willing to sit with a patient to give the caregiver a break. For more information, call Mary Costello, volunteer coordinator for Sussex County, at 8567717, or visit www.delawarehospice.org to sign up.

1-800-464-HELP • delawarehelpline.org


pAGE 28

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Del Tech’s first Energy House to be built on Georgetown campus By Lynn R. Parks

Using $800,000 in federal stimulus funds, Delaware Technical and Community College will build the first of three planned Energy Houses on the college’s Georgetown campus. Groundbreaking for the house is set for May and is expected to be complete by May 2011. Total construction cost will be $1 million. Architect for the project is the Element Design Group in Lewes. A bid for the construction work is expected to be awarded in late April. “Energy House will be a powerful combination of energy efficiency and the best in sustainable home design,” college president Orlando George said in announcing the project. “It will serve as a center for alternative and renewable technologies and as a demonstration facility and education lab for Delaware Tech’s new Applied Energy Education [courses].” The Energy House will be located on about an acre of land along Vaughn Road, on the west edge of the Del Tech campus. It will be positioned in a way that maximizes its exposure to the sun for light and warmth in the winter; large overhangs and trees will block the sun in the summer. The 6,354-square foot structure, including open porches, will have two classrooms, a conference room that will seat about 50 people and a lab. Interior workings of the house, including some studs and parts of the plumbing and duct work, will be exposed so that students and visitors to the house can examine them. Matthew Peterson, principal with Element Design, said that the company is working to get the building’s consumption of energy as low as possible. The Energy House’s current home energy rating, according to a scale developed by the U.S. Department of Energy, is 34, Peterson said, “and we think that we can get that even lower.” A house built in the traditional manner has a rating of 100. A house that generates all the power it uses is rated at 0. Element Design is also getting the building certified by the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED program. “I know that we can get the gold rating,” the coun-

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Above is the west elevation rendering for the Energy House to be constructed on the college’s Georgetown campus. Architect for the project is the Element Design Group in Lewes.

cil’s second-highest rating, he said. “And we feel like we can get the platinum,” its highest rating, he added. “From top to bottom, from inside to out, the building…will be built and used with minimal impact to the environment,” according to a statement from Element Design. It “will consume very little bought energy, reduce the amount of water needed and help keep the occupants and users healthy.” “This kind of building is the wave of the future,” Peterson said. The Energy House, along with Del Tech’s Applied Energy Education program, will train contractors in sustainable construction, ensuring that they have good-paying jobs and that the buildings that they put up contribute to lowering the county’s energy consumption, he added. “We think that this is the right thing to do, and we believe that this kind of construction is available to everyone,” Peterson said. “It does not have to be expensive.” Cost per square foot of the Energy House will be about $157, Peterson said. Average costs of a traditionally-built custom home range from $125 to $175. Reduced power and water bills make this kind of construction even more practical, he added. A home that was recently built in Rehoboth Beach and that was designed by Element Design with many of the same features as the Energy House had a power bill in August, during the heat of the summer, of just $31, he said. The Energy House will feature superinsulated walls and energy-efficient win-

dows. It will have solar panels to generate power as well as to heat water that will run through the concrete floor in the 543-square garage/workshop and through the concrete handicapped-accessible ramp. A windmill will generate electricity for the house and, when there’s power left over, for the electric grid. The building will have three heating and air conditioning systems so that students can compare the systems’ efficiency. A geothermal system will use the earth’s constant temperature to heat as well as to cool. There will also be a high-efficiency electric HVAC unit, complete with small solar panels on the unit to provide electricity, and a second, high-efficiency compact HVAC unit, also powered by electricity. The building’s water will be heated by a tankless propane-powered unit. A rainwater collection system will provide water for the building’s toilets. In addition to being efficient, Peterson said, the Energy House will also be healthy. All paints and caulks will emit no or low levels of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). While the building will be very airtight, limiting the amount of hot air that leaks in in the summer and cold air in the winter, there will be a controlled transfer of air to keep the house fresh. The outside air will be filtered and conditioned before it enters the living space. The building will have a vegetated roof, with small plants growing in about 4 inches of soil. Pollutants that typically settle out of the atmosphere onto rooftops and

then are washed to the ground and into watersheds will instead settle onto the plants and be washed into the soil, from which the plants will take them up as nutrients. A vegetated roof also adds a layer of insulation, making the building envelope more efficient than it would be otherwise, and helps to protect the roof’s waterproof membrane, that without the soil and plants would be exposed to the weather. The Energy House won’t be just for people interested in new construction. “It will have a lot of ideas about what can be incorporated into existing homes,” Peterson said. Peterson said that he is very excited about the Energy House. “This is a great project and an example of everything that Element Design stands for,” he said. “We are dedicated to sustainability. It just makes sense: You spend less money, you get sick less often and your house will live with you for a long time.”

Golf Tournament/Dinner Dance

Century 21 Ramey Real Estate is hosting a Golf Tournament/Dinner Dance to benefit Easter Seals on Friday, May 7, at Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville. Golf teams of four are $400 and will include 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes, gross and net divisions, as well as closest to the pin on all Par 3’s. Dinner Dance tickets are $50. Activities include cocktails, dinner, dancing, silent, live and Chinese auctions, and a 50/50 raffle. Help support people with disabilities in the local community. Call 628-9000 for registration or tickets.

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Progress at any price? A Special FREE Not in this household GIFT INVITATION MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

pAGE 29

I have devised a new way of handling telephone calls. And it is ynn arks simply this: About half the time that it rings, I don’t answer it. I tried to retrieve her This wonderful new routine is made possible by our recent purtelephone number, to chase of a telephone with a small screen on which appears, every call her back and tell time the phone rings, the number of her that she had dialed the person who is calling. Far too many calls that come through our the wrong number. line are from someone who wants to sell me something or who wants me to contribute to some cause. “Hey, it’s me,” the voice said. “Give Not answering them seems the easiest way me a call back, son. Love you.” to say, “I’m not interested.” It wasn’t my mother or father. In any Through trial and error, I have devised case, they rarely call me “Son.” It was a a simple system for deciding which calls woman, whose voice I didn’t recognize, to answer and which to ignore. Callers and she wanted to talk with her son, whom who are identified as “Unavailable” never she loves. get a response. They are invariably selling I tried to retrieve her telephone number, or pushing something. to call her back and tell her that she had Similarly, callers whose telephone dialed the wrong number. numbers start out with an 800 area code The 800 number was all the phone and who are identified as “Unknown” could give me, and when I dialed it, I got are good candidates for ignoring. And a machine telling me that I had reached there are some who are honest about their a credit service, and that I had to punch identities — representatives of our grown in the number for whatever extension I children’s alma maters, for example, who wanted. persist in the notion that the tens of thouSo somewhere out there, there is a son sands of dollars we paid for the privilege who did not get a telephone call from his of our offspring attending their fine instimother. And there’s a mother who expects tutions was somehow not enough money a call from her son that she will not get. — to whom I don’t want to talk, despite You can see how this has the makings of a their frankness. tragedy of Shakespearean proportions. For the most part, my new system is Hopefully, everything will turn out. working. But recently, something inexThe mother will realize that her son hasn’t plicable happened. And if it turns into a called her back and will try again, this trend, I’ll have to go back to answering time dialing the right number. Or the son, every ring of the telephone, no matter lonely for his mother’s voice, will call her what the small screen says. without the prompt of her message. A recent call caught me in the middle On the other hand, this could be the of a book and a large bowl of popcorn. final call that the mother, tired of never When I saw that the telephone screen identified the caller as “Unknown” and the hearing back, makes. And her son, weary that she never has caller’s number as starting with 800, I was the time for him, might swear never to dial happy to ignore the persistent ring. her number again. All because I was too Sometime later, when the bowl was selfish to set aside for just a moment my empty and there was a break in the action, book and popcorn. I glanced at the telephone. And the small Strife between a mother and her son red light that blinks when someone has left is too high a price to pay for progress, no a message was doing its thing. matter its benefits. If I have to talk with a Strange, I thought, that someone calltelemarketer now and then to keep peace ing from a toll-free number would leave in a family, even that of a stranger, then a message. But sure enough, when I punched in our special code, there was one so be it. I’m sure those old friends, Unavailable message waiting for me. And that message and Unknown, will be happy to hear my has put into question the efficacy of my voice again. new system.

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ure By Mike McCl r Bill science teache Delmar High teaching to learning from Mills will go s the Honeywell Space when he attendEducators in Alabama Academy for Mills had a similar this summer.in 2004 but was also cho-of rk Netwo ’s opportunity in NASA m. sen to take part aut Teachers progra take Educator Astron ly selected to Mills was recent Space Academy well’s part in Honey at the U.S. Space and for Educators r in Huntsville, Alabama. hours Cente 45 cks t es and Warbu for Rocke program featurtory, and inside starred as Annie The five day om, labora space sci“Annie”. See Kirsten Cook classro of and e tt on intens mance of perfor - Adam Benne with a focus l Drama Club’s WARBUCKS training time exploration. Mills wasto High Schooby Mike McClure in the Laurel ence and space are educator selected . Photo additional photos the only Delaw m the program. take part in accepted into the progra Mills was e due to his had to declin in 2004 but with NASA. He was a Space involvement ’s Teacher inopporNASA in finalist Page 54 gave him the n Program which spokesperso NASA a ’s be NASA tunity to a member of and serve as Educator Astronaut Network of spring tunity Teachers. Laurel Star’s for the oppored this IEWS - The g on page Bill resubmitted and was accept SPRING PREV this week, startin the world ws continue with Honeywell from all overthe acadesports previe in year. Educators d to take part opportunity,” 41. l sports seae were selecte schoo intens high pretty camp at S - The my. “It’s a Monday and leaves for the SPRING GAME to open this said Mills, whoof the school year. “I scheduled was son on page 48. the conclusion

ndum l District refere in the Laurel Schoo ndum rally RALLY - The public refere from 5-6 p.m. to will hold a l March 30, committee l on Tuesday, All Laurel Schoo high schoo questions. referendum e to attend. answer all nts are welcom proDistrict reside l graduate high schoo 3 Laurel Page al. PROMOTION Brigadier Gener Force moted to Air patients saving procedure New heart HEALTH Page 10 new close to home. warn of a - State police SCAMMERS your identity. Page 11 steal scheme to Services oke Health MENT - Nantic ENTERTAIN n April 17. Page 27 Auctio Dinner and makes a just being there Sometimes ES HERO Page 51 . difference. to the voters now it’s up UM - And REFEREND

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duret Tomorrow” perform “Cabin l. Photo by Mike of “Annie” Schoo of the cast Laurel High - Members e performance at ay’s matine

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49 ing last Saturd AUTO ALLEY McClure 18 BULLETIN BOARD in terblications.com 6 the schools are is not kcherrix@mspu now “I know that BUSINESS 23 e director rible shape. I just feel that schools all News CHURCH of former financ four new doesn’t Laurel Star against 32 investigation ications.com the time to build DS mspubl residents spoke CLASSIFIE editor@ This community Bill Hitch. Two which will take place 55 ure at one time. base for that,” said Donna FINAL WORD By Mike McCl Sports the referendum, March 31 from 10 a.m. Star have the tax l bus contractor. “If not l l 37 l District heard Laure library. on Wednesday, GAS LINES ications.com The Laurel Schoo Reed, a schoo ,” asked North Laure of the public 26 the Laurel Hightwo people sports@mspubl when? then to 8 p.m. in four members 31 referendum from now GOURMET from heard March 30 The board also proposal to issue bondsl on page 5 concerning the g last Wednesday. HEALTH Advertising ations.com Continued 54 in favor of theuction of two new schoo during its meetinhired a new business sales@mspublic constr LETTERS 36 The board alsoreceived an update fromthe for theexes (four schools). t LYNN PARKS compl manager and r’s office concerning 13 Business Repor cations.com mspubli MIKE BARTON the state audito 7 businessreport@ MOVIES al 25 Business Journ ations.com OBITUARIES spublic 28 brichardson@m PEOPLE 11 VOL. 14 POLICE 22 NO. P48 UZZLES 12 SOCIALS 41-48 THURSD SPORTS 46 AY, MA TIDES RCH 25, 37 INDSOR 2010 TONY W

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TOURS - Seafo rd Histor houses. Pages 5 and 52 ical Society offers tours of Ross HEALTH New heart to home. Page procedure 10 saving patien ts close SCAMMERS State steal your identity. Page police warn of a new schem 11 e to PRAYER ance. Page - Mayor’s Prayer Break 12 fast celebrates endurAMNESTY gram brings - Sussex County tax and fee in $1.5 million amnesty pro. Page 15 ENTERTAIN MENT and Auctio n April 17. - Nanticoke Health Services Dinne Page 27 r HEROES ence. Page - Sometimes just being there 51 makes a differAPPRECIAT ION time to say thanks. PageNanticoke Health Services 54 takes FINAL WOR D - How long lion? Page will it take 55 to spend $138 bil-

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SPRING sports previe PREVIEWS - The ws continue Seaford Star’s this week, spring starting on SPRING page 41. opens. See GAMES - The high results on school sports page 48. season HALL OF coaches are FAME - Three western Susse inducted into x the Hall of Fame. Page players/ 42

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AUTO ALLEY BULLETIN BOARD BUSINESS om CHURCH RCH Seaford Star Sports CLASSIFIEDS mmcclure@ mspublicatio EDUCATION ns.com ENTERTAINMEN Advertisin g FINAL WORD T sales@mspub lications.com GAS L GOURMET Business Report HEALTH businessrepo rt@mspublic LETTERS ations.com LYNN P Business MOVIES Journal brichardson@ OBITUAR mspublicatio ns.com PEOPLE IES POLICE PUZZLES SPORTS TIDES TONY WINDSOR editor@msp

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ublications.c

Gabriel Jules

and Seafo

Artist gave interest in up law to pursue h e the creati ve processr

By Lynn

R. Parks

rd High Scho

ol art teach

Ever 49 Gabr since she was a smal iel Jules had 18 created art. l child, “I 6 befor illustratedd books 23 woul e I could write,” for my mother she said. “I 32 woul d give her the pictu 38 woul d tell her the storie res and then s and she d write them 27 down “I had one doll that satfor me. on a shelf

er Dana Pater

noster work

on an etchin

g in Jules

’ Seaford

studio. Photo

by Lynn R.

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Parks

in her life, Gabriel Jules ducing anyth wasn’t of two wom ing artistic. She wasprorefresh her er in Fairfax, en in a family law as one like riding skills — “D “Doi D ngg art Doin clients tookVa., and working forpractice just can’t a bicycle,” she said. isn’t every bit of her up “You had. of not doing and start again aft energy that after years anything.” she “Practicing And she law just she said. “I centuries-o was introduced to was earningwiped me out,” friend and ld art of etching by the a living but I professor City College of Newfamily Willi York “I was in am Behnken. visiting my Provincetown, Mass is a master brother, when Bill, ., a prepared printmaker, came who in with etching plate Behnken hand ,” ed her the Jules said. zinc plate Continued , to page 13

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MORNING STAR

• APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

Classifieds WANTED

FOR SALE

(For Subscribers - Personal Use Only)

OUTBOARD MOTOR, 25 hp w/short shaft, good cond. 875-7119. 4/1

CHEST FREEZER, Gibson, 22 cu ft., exc. cond., $200. 628-8761. 4/15

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch

42” LAWNMOWER DECK to fit 2130 Cub Cadet. 8751246. 3/18

24” TILLER, 5 hp, $130. 875-7775. 4/15

FREE CLASSIFIEDS* *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

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629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com LOST

LOST DOG, on 3/13, in town, Seaford. Jack Russell Terrior, blk & wh., ‘Trixie.’ Reward. 629-5500. 4/8

COMPUTERS

FOUND

GIVE-AWAY BLACK LAB MIXED PUPPIES, about 8 wks old, to good homes. 629-4930 after 7 weekdays. 4/8 FREE HORSE MANURE, great for gardens, shrubberies. 337-3840. 3/11 50 MINITRAN PATCHES 0.2 mg/hr, Good thru 8/10. 628-2961. 3/11

HELP WANTED DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

The Laurel School District is seeking applicants for a Director of Human Resources. Interested applicants should apply by submitting a Letter of Interest, District application, Resumé, college transcripts, and 3 letters of professional reference to Judy Evans, 1160 South Central Avenue, Laurel, DE 19956, 302-875-6108. An application can be obtained online at LaurelSchoolDistrict.org. A copy of the job posting can be viewed at our website. All documents must be received by 12 p.m. on April 23, 2010. An open and continuous search will be conducted until the position is filled. 4/15/1tc

AUTOMOTIVE ‘92 TOYOTA PREVIA VAN, 190k mi., runs but needs work, $800 neg. 629-4969. 4/15 BRUNO LIFT SCOOTER CARRIER for handicap for back of vehicle. Fits Class 3 hitch, appx. 5 yrs. old. BEST OFFER! 841-9845. 4/15/2t PU TRUCK CAP, Dk. Blue, 8 ft., $210. 875-5406. 4/8

YOUNG PIT BULL, black & white, very gentle nature. Needs a good home. 2362413. 4/15 BRACELET, found in Seaford WalMart on March 11. Call 629-4446 to describe. 3/25

DELMAR CLASS OF ‘64 H.S. Yearbook, 875-1246. 3/18

‘70 PONT. LEMANS, new eng. new int., many new parts, runs great, $4500 OBO. 875-5543. 3/18

SERVICES FREE PICK UP of Old Appliances & BBQ grills, etc. Call 245-2278. 4/15/2t

CHEV. 350 AUTO. TRANS., completely rebuilt, $550 firm. 628-9696. 3/11

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES

BEE REMOVAL. Professional removal of honey bee swarms & all kinds of bees & nest, inside & outside of structure. 236-8133. 4/15/2t

‘08 SUZUKI GZ250 Motorcycle, 1400 mi., 2 owners, like new. Perfect stater bike. $2200. 628-8532. 4/1

NOTICE

BOATS

WANTED: Crafters & Vendors for the St. Philip’s Strawberry Festival, May 22. Contact Gloria Ellis at 875-2775 or Jen Fleming at 610-703-5452. 4/1 STOLEN: March 18. On 10th Street, Laurel, items were stolen off back deck. These were personal items purchased for a gift. The thief knows who they are. If returned, no questions will be asked. We just ask that they are returned. 3/25

YARD SALE

‘05 16’ CAROLINA SKIFF, exc. cond., incl. trolling motor & trailer, 15hp motor, $3000. 875-7775. 4/15 16’ ROWING SHELL, 9.5’ carbon fiber oars, dolly; cost new $3700. Sell for $1750. 349-4107. 4/8 EVINRUDE-JOHNSON PROS., 13.75 x 21 SS, 13.75 X 15 SS, 14X19 alum. $50 ea. SS, $35 alum. 6294195. 3/25

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

GARAGE SALE, Fri. & Sat., 4/16 & 17, 8 am - non; 6958 Atlanta Circle, off Atlanta Rd. Household & yard items. 4/15

(4) OAK CANE-BOTTOM CHAIRS, $60 ea. 629-7363. 4/8

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LG. CAST IRON CALDRON, 3-legged, great shape, $175. 846-9788. 3/11

Call 629-9788

WROUGHT IRON FLOOR LAMP, $50. 629-7363. 3/25

KENMORE AIR COND., 18,500 BTU w/remote, good cond., $100. 8770476. 4/15 LIFT CHAIR, gold, good cond., $300. 349-4103. 4/15 JAZZY 600 POWER Chair, like new, fully equipped. High Back Wheelchair, fully equipped, good cond. Must sell, make offer. 628-3362. 2 CEMETERY LOTS, Odd Fellows, Seaford cemetery, $1000 for both. 349-4103. 4/15 WATER CONDITIONER, North Star, only used 10 months, like new, $300. 349-4103. 4/15 GAZELLE Exercise machine, total body workout, $100. Lg. Bookcase, $75. 875-9401. 4/15 12 - 1/2 BUSHELL PEACH BSKTS., new, wooden, $39. 20 - 1 Qt. New wooden Berry Baskets, $7.60. 8459788. 4/15 LONGABERGER BASKETS, 846-9788. 4/15 ROMANCE & MYSTERY Books, $2 a bag. DVD movies, $3 ea., some new, science fiction. 875-3744. 36” MURRAY RIDING MOWER, 11 hp, Briggs & Stratton, great cond., $300. 875-5889. 4/15

2 TICKETS to “Singing In The Sun” in Myrtle Beach, Apr 20-24, exc. seats! 6298175. 4/8/2t TIMBERS: 30 - 4x6x11.5 creosoted, $300. 2 - 4x6x 11.5 pressure treated, $44 for both. 846-9788. 4/8 2 LG TREES, 1 black walnut, come & get it. Laurel area. Call Jeff, 542-2832. 4/8 OAK DESK- Exc. cond. $85 OBO. 337-3239. 4/8 4 KLIPSCH SURROUND Sound Speakers, $25 ea. 629-7363. 4/8 WEIGHT LIFTING MACHINE, Complete, w/free weights incl., exc. cond., must see, $400 OBO. 8754486. 4/8 BEAUTY SALON EQUIP. for sale, Call Carol at 6292309 or 228-4996. 4/8 TABLE, mahogany stained wood, 30”H x 24”W x 46”L, used in home office, $25. 875-5086. 4/1 OSTER KIT. CENTER, blender, mixer, grinder, dough maker, slicer/shredder, all in 1. 875-2028. 4/1 CROSSBOW, Barnett Wildcat, w/36 bolts & carrying case, $250. 875-1862. 4/1 COFFEE & END TABLES, matching, glass, blond rattan frame, $30 firm. 410641-5260. 4/1 FUTON BUNK BED in fair cond. w/Futon mattress in great cond., white frame. $75 firm. 628-8309. 4/1 FULL SIZE BED. 841-3992. 4/1

YARD EQUIP: Lawn mowers (1 push, 1 self-propelled), leaf blower, string trimmer & chipper. 6296337. 3/25 COMPUTER, PRINTER, & desk, $50. 629-4195. 3/25 YOUTH 3-IN-1 GAME TABLE, foose ball, air hockey, pool, exc. cond., no elec. needed, $30/ 628-1393. COLEMAN SPA 38”x85”x 85” Exc. cond., 33 jets, seats 5. Incl. chaise, comfort collar, 1 waterfall, fiber optic lighting, 2 spd therapy jets, 2 foot-relief jets. Complete w/ insulated cover & easy spa cover lift, ground panels & 2 85” steps for set up. $3000 OBO. 875-5665. CHERRY DR SET, 46”x74” table w/2 addl. 18” leaves. 10 chairs -8 side & 2 arm. Ivory brocade cushions. China cabinet w/rounded top, glass doors, shelves & encl. storage on base. Intricate carved detail on all pieces. Exc. cond. $6000 OBO. 875-5665. 3/18 SERTA MATTRESS, king size, firm, quilted, and two low profile box springs. $500. 3 pc. set of navy blue Jaguar suitcases. Garment bag & 28” suitcase have retractable handles and wheels. exc. cond., $100. 236-9075. 3/11 DINING ROOM SUITE, Queen Anne Style, oak, china closet, table w/2 ext., 6 chairs, buffet server, like new. Pd. $10,000, $6000 OBO. 628-2961 lv. msg.

ANIMALS, ETC. 1 MALE PEACOCK for sale, $25. 875-4952, lv. msg. 4/15


MORNING STAR

LEGALS NOTICE OF ZONING AS LARGE PARCEL DEVELOPMENT (LPD-OD) OVERLAY DISTRICT AND APPROVING A MASTER PLAN BY THE TOWN OF LAUREL

NOTICE OF ZONING AS LARGE PARCEL DEVELOPMENT (LPD-OD) OVERLAY DISTRICT AND APPROVING A MASTER PLAN of certain property located on the northeasterly side of the town, east of U.S. Route 13, Laurel, Sussex County, Delaware, being the lands of and also contracted by Samanda Properties Delaware II, LLC, Tax Map Parcel Numbers 1-3212.00-111, 111.01, 111.02, & 111.03, 109, 118 & 119, containing approximately 394.396+/- acres, known as Village Brooke North, by action of the Town Council of the Town of Laurel, Delaware, at its regular meeting on April 5, 2010. THE TOWN OF LAUREL BY: JOHN J. SHWED, MAYOR 4/15/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

The following Ordinance has been proposed at the regular meeting of the Sussex County Council on March 30, 2010: AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR A SIX MONTH MORATORIUM ON APPLICATIONS FOR CASINO AND/OR GABLING OR GAMING VENUES IN SUSSEX COUNTY. Copies of the above Ordinance are available in the Office of the Clerk of the Sussex County Council, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware. Public Hearings thereon will be held in the Chamber of the Sussex County Council, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on MAY 18, 2010, at 1:30 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. At that time and place, all persons interested shall have a reasonable opportunity to be heard. 4/15/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on MAY 13, 2010, in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing concerning the following proposed amend-

ment to the Code of Sussex County: AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR A SIX MONTH MORATORIUM ON APPLICATIONS FOR CASINO AND/OR GABLING OR GAMING VENUES IN SUSSEX COUNTY. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Copies of this proposal may be examined by interested parties in the Planning and Zoning Office, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, between 8:30 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday. 4/15/1tc

NOTICE

Estate of Paul Isaac Nichols, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Paul Isaac Nichols who departed this life on the 4th day of December, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Lisa N. Martin on the 16th day of March, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 4th day of August, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Lisa N. Martin 24825 Woods Drive Denton, MD 21629 Attorney: James A. Yori, Esq. Fuqua, Yori & Willard P.A. 28 The Circle Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/1/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of John G. Puloskie, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of John G. Pusloskie who departed this life on the 16th day of February, A.D. 2010 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Roger Price on the 18th day of March, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 16th day of October, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf.

Administrator: Roger Price 5112 Woodland Ferry Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Shannon R. Owens, Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/1/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Howard Charles Ellis, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Howard Charles Ellis who departed this life on the 10th day of March, A.D. 2010 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Wayne Ellis on the 22nd day of March, A.D. 2010, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 10th day of November, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Wayne Ellis 31594 Fred Adkins Rd. Parsonsburg, MD 21849 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 4/1/3tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being known as LOT NO. 27 in NANTICOKE ESTATES, SECTION II and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument on the Northerly right of way line of Sussex County Road No. 490 “River Road” (50 foot right of way) at a corner for this lot and Lot No. 27A; thence with the Northerly right of way line of Sussex County Road No. 490 “River Road” (50 foot right of way) South 58 degrees 42 minutes 34 seconds West 100.06 feet to a concrete monument at the intersection of Rivershore

• APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 Drive (50 foot right of way and Sussex County Road No. 490 “River Road” (50 foot right of way); thence with the Northerly right of way line of Rivershore Drive (50 foot right of way) North 59 degrees 44 minutes 48 seconds West 75.12 feet to a concrete monument at a corner for this lot and Lot No. 26; thence turning and running with Lot No. 26 North 01 degree 30 minutes 00 seconds East 211.90 feet to a concrete monument at the tie line; thence continuing with Lot No. 26 North 01 degree 30 minutes 18 seconds East 101.36 feet to a PK nail in edge of wood bulkhead at a corner for this lot, Lot No. 26 and in line of the Nanticoke River Prong Hurts Creek; thence turning and running with the Nanticoke River Prong Hurts Creek North 51 degrees 36 minutes 03 seconds East 30.45 feet to a PK nail in edge of wood bulkhead at a corner for this lot, Lot No. 27 A and in line of Nanticoke River Prong Hurts Creek; thence turning and running with Lot No. 27A South 20degrees 23 minutes 48 seconds East 83.38 feet to a concrete monument at the tie line; thence continuing with Lot No. 27A South 20 degrees 24 minutes 55 seconds East 255.86 feet to the point and place of beginning. Being the same lands and premises which Dan H. Henderson and Karen S. Henderson by Deed dated September 11, 2006and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and the State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3359, Page 298, did grant and convey unto Curtis W. Armstrong. Tax Parcel: 1-32-6.0016.00 Property Address: 7591 RIVERSHORE DRIVE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax,

PAGE 31 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CURTIS W. ARMSTRONG and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and being more fully described according to a survey prepared by Walter R. Todd, Registered Surveyor, dated August 2, 1998, and as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point situate on the southerly right-of-way of Delaware Route 18, said point being a corner of these lands and lands n/f of Samuel W. Nickerson and being the beginning of a curve bearing to the right, said curve having a delta angle of 04° 43’ 34” and a radius of 1940.22’; thence by and with said curve, an arc distance of 160.05’ to a pipe, said pipe being a corner of these lands and lands n/f of John W. O’Day; thence by and with said lands n/f of John W. O’Day, the following two courses and distances, S 12° 20’ 00” W, 250.00’ to a pipe; thence N 74° 35’ 18” W, 160.00’ to a pipe being a corner of these lands, lands n/f of John W. O’Day and lands n/f of Samuel W. Nickerson; thence by and with said lands n/f of Samuel W. Nickerson N 12° 20’ 00” E, 250.00’ to the point and place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Gerald Richard Wolfe and

Linda C. Wolfe, his wife by deed dated August 11, 1988 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 1589, Page 178 did grant and convey unto JAMES K. BECKWITH, III and SHEILA M. BECKWITH, his wife. The said Sheila M. Beckwith having departed this life thereby vesting title in JAMES K. BECHWITH, III, surviving tenant by the entirety. Tax Parcel: 2-31-7.0035.02 Property Address: 16732 SEA SHORE HIGHWAY, GEORGETOWN Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMES K. BECKWITH, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, DelaSee LEGALS—page 33


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LEGALS - from Page 31

ware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain piece, parcel and lot of land lying and being situate in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, comprising all of Lot #7, Section B of “Westview Extended” subdivision, being described more particularly in accordance with a survey plat prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., dated December 8, 2006, as follows: BEGINNING at a point an the westerly right-of-way line of Hickory Lane (36’ wide) distant on a bearing of South 59°-33’-10” West 1.18 feet from a disturbed concrete monument (found); said point being situate southerly 120 feet, more or less, from right-ofway of Allen Ave.; thence with Hickory Lane South 00°-37’-49” West 60.00 feet to a concrete monument (found); thence with Lot # 6 North 89°-18’-31” West 118.60 feet to a concrete monument (found); thence with Lot #31 North 00°-37’-51” East 60.14 feet to a concrete monument (found); thence with Lot # 8 South 89°-14’-20” East 118.59 feet home to the point of beginning. BEING the same lands and premises which Berley A. Mears, III, dated December 19, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3399, Page 253, did grant and convey unto Tonya E. Bratten. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.0972.00 Property Address: 216 HICKORY LANE, SEAFORD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser.

MORNING STAR Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TONYA E. BRATTEN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the TOWN OF LAUREL, Sussex County, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron rebar set on the South right of way line of Tenth Street at a corner for these lands and Lands of Jack Daniel Currie, etux; thence with the South right of way line of Tenth Street South 79 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East 50.00 feet to an iron rebar set on the South right of way line of Tenth Street at a corner for these lands and Lands of Donald W. O’Neal; thence with said O’Neal Lands South 11 degrees 16 minutes 55 seconds West 135.90 feet to an iron bar found at a corner for these lands, Lands of Donald W. O’Neal and in line of Lands of Odd Fellows Cemetery Co .. Inc.; thence with Lands of Odd Fellows Cemetery Co., Inc. North 79 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 49.72 feet to a pipe found at a corner for these lands, Lands of Jack Daniel Currie, etux and in line of Lands of Odd Fellows Cemetery Co. Inc.; thence with said Currie Lands North 11 degrees 09 minutes 55 seconds East 135.90 feet to an iron rebar set on the South right of way line of Tenth Street located at the point and place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they

may, as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A, Temple, Jr. DEL. P.L.S. No. 242, dated June 5, 2002. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Robert J. Perry and Daniela K. Perry by deed dated June 7, 2002 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2717, Page 66 did grant and convey unto WALTER W. FOX, JR. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.1078.00 Property Address: 224 WEST 10TH STREET, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of WALTER W. FOX, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit:

• APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 ALL that certain lot or parcel of land with the improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known as Lot Number A-6, PINE BLUFF No.2, as shown on a revised plot prepared by McCann, Inc., Registered Surveyors, which is filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Plot Book 57, Page 196, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Tammac Holdings Corporation, by deed dated February 25, 2008 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3554, Page 292 did grant and convey unto GEORGE J. MACKENRODT, JR. AND SANDRA F. MACKENRODT, his wife. Tax Parcel: 2-31-3.0058.00 Property Address: 15400 FORSYTHIA DRIVE, GEORGETOWN Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SANDRA F. & GEORGE J. MACKENRODT, JR. and will be sold by

PAGE 33 Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and being all of Lot Nos. 58, 59, 60 and 61 of Lake Pines and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at an axle found on the Northerly side of Laurel A venue and being a corner for these lands and those of Lot No. 62; thence along Laurel Avenue North 70 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 218.69 feet to a pipe found at lands of George Walson; thence with Walson lands, North 08 degrees 22 minutes 27 seconds East 153.15 feet to a pipe found at Lot No. 113; thence with Lot Nos. 113, 112, 111, 110, 109 and 106, South 69 degrees 55 minutes 19 seconds East 249.75 feet to a pipe found; thence with Lot No. 62, South 20 degrees 04 minutes 31 seconds West 149.67 feet to the point and place of beginning. BEING the same lands and premises which Michael W. Messick and Alice E. Messick by Deed dated March 30, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3433, Page 272, did grant and convey unto Michael W. Messick. Tax Parcel: 3-32-2.0034.00 Property Address: 104 LAUREL AVENUE, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May

21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL W. MESSICK and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN L1TIlE CREEK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY, DELAWARE, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO WIT: BEGINNING AT A POINT LOCATED IN HOLLY BRANCH 0 THE SOUTHERLY SIDE OF ROUTE #24 (30 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE THEREOF) AND IN THE LINE OF LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF GEORGE H. ALVAREZ, ET AL.; THENCE WITH HOLLY BRANCH THE FOLLOWING TWO COURSES AND DISTANCES: (1) SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST 112.54 FEET TO A POINT; AND (2) SOUTH 08 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 216.28 FEET TO A POINT IN HOLLY BRANCH AND AT A CORNER FOR LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF ERNEST F. HORSEY; THENCE WITH THE LINE OF LANDS OF SAID HORSEY, SOUTH 52 DEGREES 49 MINUTES See LEGALS—page 34


PAGE 34 LEGALS - from Page 33

59 SECONDS WEST 10.28 FEET TO A 4” CONCRETE MARKER FOUND; THENCE CONTINUING THE SAME COURSE 91.28 FEET (A TOTAL DISTANCE ON SAID COURSE OF 101.56 FEET) TO A 3/4” IRON PIPE SET IN THE LINE OF LANDS OF SAID HORSEY AT A CORNER FOR LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF KENNETH M. AND KATHLEEN A. HASTINGS; THENCE WITH THE LINE OF LANDS OF SAID HASTINGS, NORTH 20 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 346.45 FEET TO A 3/4” IRON PIPE SET ON THE SOUTHERLY SIDE OF ROUTE #24 AT A CORNER FOR LANDS OF SAID HASTINGS; THENCE WITH THE SOUTHERLY SIDE OF ROUTE #24, NORTH 69 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 182.18 FEET TO THE POINT AND PLACE OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 1.0 ACRE OF LAND, MORE OR LESS, AS WILL MORE FULLY AND AT LARGE APPEAR UPON REFERENCE TO A SURVEY PREPARED BY MCCANN, INC., P.L.S. 299, DATED JANUARY 22, 1990 AND INCORPORATED HEREIN. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO SHARON L. BOYCE BY DEED FROM DARRELL S. HASTINGS, LINDA M. HASTINGS RECORDED 03/15/1990 IN DEED BOOK 1705 PAGE 041, IN THE RECORDER’S OFFICE OF SUSSEX COUNTY, DELAWARE. Tax Parcel: 4-32-11.006.04 Property Address: 8416 SHARPTOWN ROAD, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent

MORNING STAR to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SHARON L. HURLEY A/K/A SHARON L. BOYCE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being designated as Lot#594-E-4, shown on the plot of “Newberg Lots”, prepared for Paul Wilson, as surveyed by Coast Survey, Inc., Land Surveying and Planning, dated November 8, 1992, divided March 16, 1994, filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 52, page 50, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the southeasterly right-of-way line of County Road #594 (50 feet wide), a corner for this lot and Lot #594-E•5; thence continuing with said right-of. way north 33 degrees 07 minutes 08 seconds East 300.00 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and Lot E-3 South 56 degrees 52 minutes 52 seconds East 525.30 feet (passing over a pipe at 195.00 feet) to a point in the center of Gum Branch Ditch; thence with said Ditch South 29 degrees 23 minutes 05 seconds West 204.20 feet to a point and continuing South 27 degrees 31 minutes 00 seconds West 385.07 feet to a point; thence turning and running by and with

Lot E-5 North 22 degrees 55 minutes 28 seconds West 513.82 feet to a pipe; thence continuing on North 22 degrees 55 minutes 28 second West 106.59 feet to a pipe; thence continuing on North 56 degrees 52 minutes 52 second West 150.00 feet to the place of beginning said to contain 5.000 acres more or less. Tax Parcel: 4-30-9.0042.04 Property Address: 14499 OAK ROAD, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of REBECCA R. & CHARLES A. HOLLINGSWORTH, II and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following

• APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate lying and being on the North side of Eight Street, in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex county, Delaware being more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe (found) lying on the Northerly right of way line of West Eighth Street (21.75 feet f/f), said iron pipe being 762 feet more or less to centerline of West Street and being a common boundary line for this land and for land snow or formerly of Eric L. Savage; thence by and with Savage lands North 14 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East 209.85 feet to a concrete monument (found); thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Gary W. Flood South 77 degrees 51 minutes 08 seconds East 41.40 feet to an iron pipe (set); thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Catherine L. Wilkerson South 14 degrees 44 minutes 28 seconds West 209.02 feet to an iron rod (found); thence turning and running by and with the Northerly right-ofway line of West Eighth Street North 79 degrees 13 minutes 24 seconds 38.73 feet home to the place of beginning said to contain 8,379 square feet of land more or less with improvements thereon as shown on a survey prepared by MillerLewis, Inc., dated October 5, 2005. BEING the same land conveyed unto Thomas H. Riggin and Dorothy O. Riggin, his wife, by deed of Maggie C. Callaway and William A. Callaway dated June 16, 1947, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 370, Page 469. The said Thomas H. Riggin departed this life on or

about May 28, 1994, and by operation of law his onehalf interest in the property conveyed unto his wife, Dorothy O. Riggin. The said Dorothy O. Riggin departed this life on or about March 16, 2005, and by her Will of record in the Office of the Register of Wills in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Will Book 447, Page 261, did devise and bequeath her property to her children: Thomas K. Riggin, Marilyn E. Johnson, Penny M. Tyndall and Doris Jean Tubbs. BEING the same land conveyed unto Thomas W. Watson and Sharon A. Watson, his wife, by deed of The Estate of Dorothy O. Riggin, by Thomas K. Riggin, Executor, Thomas K. Riggin, Penny M. Tyndall, and Doris Jean Tubbs and Marilyn E. Johnson dated October 14, 2005, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3223, Page 64. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.10200.00 Property Address: 213 8TH STREET, LAUREL Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax

is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of THOMAS W. & SHARON A. WATSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the TOWN OF BLADES, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known as LOT NO. A-I as shown on a plot of lots of Thomas R. Young, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an Iron rebar found at the intersection of the Southerly right of way line of East Second Street with the Easterly right of way of East Cannon Street; thence with the Easterly right of way line of East Second Street South 89 degrees 10 minutes 44 seconds East 124.95 feet to a concrete monument found on the Southerly right of way line of East Second Street at a corner for this See LEGALS—page 35

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MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 34 lot and Lot No. A-3: thence with Lot No. A-3 South 01 degrees 28 minutes 32 seconds East 112.04 feet to a concrete monument found at a corner for this lot and Lot Nos. A-3, A-4 and A-2; thence with Lot No. A-2 North 89 degrees 3S minutes 00 seconds West 124.39 feet to a concrete monument found on the Easterly right of way line of Cannon Street at a corner for this lot and Lot No. A-2; thence with the Easterly right of way line of Cannon Street North 01 degrees 43 minutes 2S seconds West 112.94 feet to an iron rebar found at the intersection of the Southerly right of way line of East Second Street with the Easterly right of way line of Cannon Street located at the point and place of beginning, containing 14,013 square feet of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. DEL. P.L.S. No. 242, dated April 23, 2005. Being the same lands and premises which Diane D. Webb, did grant and convey unto Robert W. Buecker and Natasha M. Buecker, by deed dated May 12, 2005 and recorded on May 13, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3143 AT Page 97. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.11131.02 Property Address: 201 E. SECOND STREET, BLADES Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be

refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ROBERT W. & NATASHA M. BUECKER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece, parcel and tract of land, lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, and the State 01” Delaware, being depicted on a survey as Parcel 2.02 and consisting of 35.0 I acres more or less with improvement thereon, as survey prepared by Charles D. Murphy Associates, Inc. dated September 20, 2006, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 108, at Page 141. Being the same lands and premises which Noble M. Schuyler, did grant and convey unto Jason C. Clagg and Jennifer J. Clagg, by deed dated June 15, 2006 and recorded on June 19,2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3323 at Page 201. Tax Parcel: 4-30-6.002.02 Property Address: 12935 LIGHTHOUSE LANE, GREENWOOD Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject

to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JASON C. & JENNIFER J. CLAGG and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot or piece of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, known as Lot 9 West Ninth Street, situated in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, and known as part of Lots Nos. 41 and 46 on the sub-division of land of W.A. Larrimore and Co” as said plan is of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 284, Page 601, more particularly bounded and described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point in the northerly side of West Ninth Street at the distance

• APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 of two hundred seventeen feet measured westerly along said side of said street from the point of its intersection with the westerly side of the road leading from Seaford to Laurel, known as U.S. Route 13, as laid out; thence northerly by a line drawn parallel to said Route 13, one hundred feet to a point; thence westerly parallel to West Ninth Street, forty-three feet to a point; thence southerly, parallel to the first described line, one hundred feet to a point in the northerly side of West Ninth Street, and thence, thereby easterly, forty-three feet to the place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. TOGETHER with the use in common, with others entitled thereto forever, of a four foot wide pavement extending along the northerly side of West Ninth Street from a point on the northerly side of West Ninth Street, beginning one hundred and twenty feet westerly from Route 13 and extending westerly the distance of two hundred and twenty three feet, more or less, to the boundary line of the abovenamed Sub-division. Being the same lands and premises which Victory Hurley did grant and convey unto Paul M. Davis, III by deed dated April 15, 2005 and recorded on April 20, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3131 Page 86. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.15184.00 Property Address: 9 WEST 9TH STREET, BLADES Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by

PAGE 35 the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PAUL M. DAVIS, III and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, April 20, 2010 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate in the Town of Bridgeville, Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: On the east side of Main Street, BEGINNING at the southwest corner of Mrs. Moore’s lot and running with said lot South 89.5 degrees East, 220 feet to M.E. Brown’s lands; thence South 5.5 degrees East, 52 feet to a corner of No.2; thence North 89.5 degrees West, 217 feet to Street; thence North 7.5 degrees West, 52 feet to the place of beginning, containing 11,471 square feet of land, more or less,

together with all improvements located thereon. Being the same lands and premises which Douglas A. Moore as attorney in fact for Pamela L. Quillen did grant and convey unto John E. Quillen by deed dated November 19, 2004 and recorded on December 1, 2004 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3067 Page 201. Tax Parcel: 1-31-10.16181.00 Property Address: 211 S. MAIN STREET, BRIDGEVILLE Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before May 17, 2010. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on May 21, 2010 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOHN E. QUILLEN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 4/8/2tc


pAGE 36

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Education

Mace’s Lane Middle School hosts SGA

From left are Dr. Louis Owens, trustee and development council chairperson; Matt Parks, director of investments for Discover Bank; Delaware Tech students and scholarship recipients Jodie Green and Pete Stephanos; Dr. Ileana Smith, vice president and campus director; and Robert Hearn, business manager, at Delaware Tech’s Scholarship Donor & Recipient Luncheon.

Lunch honors donors, recipients Scholarship donors and the students who benefited from their generosity were able to meet at the annual Scholarship Donor & Recipient Luncheon held on March 25 at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. The event kicked off as four children who benefited from the “Little Scholars” Child Care Scholarship thanked Matt Parks, director of investments for Discover Bank, by presenting him with a framed work of art that they had created. Discover’s “Little Scholars” Child Care Scholarship pays the tuition for children of Delaware Tech students to attend the Child Development Center, located on campus; the scholarship was awarded to six students this year. Discover Bank also provided an underwriting sponsorship for this event for the second year in a row, and the Discover Foundation funds scholarships for numerous students every year. Dr. Ileana Smith, vice president and Owens Campus director, discussed the reasons donor scholarships have been created, which include supporting the workforce in the donor’s field, giving back to the community and in memory of a loved one. She also spoke about the students who juggle multiple responsibilities in order to continue their education. Dr. Louis Owens, college trustee and chairperson of the Owens Campus Development Council, spoke to donors about the significance of their contributions. The featured speakers included two scholarship recipients, Jodie Green and Pete Stephanos, who shared their stories with the audience. Jodie Green, of Selbyville, a secondyear paralegal student and a recipient of the Joshua M. Freeman Endowed Scholarship, discussed the impact the scholarship has had on her life. “Without this scholarship, it would

have been very difficult for me to attend (college),” said Green, who also received the Freeman scholarship last year. “My experience at Delaware Tech has been lifechanging; I have watched my confidence and self-esteem grow.” Pete Stephanos, a second-year elementary education student from Lewes, received the Education Club Book Scholarship. Education is a second career for Stephanos who had been working full-time until he decided that he was not doing what he had wanted to do with his life – making a difference. “Scholarships like this make it easier to focus on coursework rather than paying bills,” said Stephanos. “I am very passionate about what I do. I look forward to becoming a teacher and making a positive impact on our youth.” The Scholarship Donor and Recipient Luncheon was established in 1997 to honor the student recipients and donors of private scholarships and give them the rewarding experience of meeting. Private scholarships are a vital supplement to federal and state financial aid in providing the financial resources that allow students to attend Delaware Tech. These are the only scholarships which reward students for high academic achievement and/or provide greatly needed financial aid to those students whose monetary needs cannot be met by federal or state aid programs.

Mt. Olivet Preschool registration

Mt. Olivet Preschool, located at 315 High St. in Seaford, has begun registering children for classes this fall. Classes will be offered for 2, 3 and 4-year-old students. For an appointment or information, call the church office at 629-4458 or Jackie Hashagen at 629-5733.

Student government officers from Laurel Middle School, Mardela Middle School and Seaford Middle School will meet with their counterparts at Mace’s Lane Middle School, Cambridge, all day on Friday, April 23, to determine how they may become more effective at completing the responsibilities of their office. Using John F. Kennedy’s “Profiles in Courage” as the backdrop, the students will answer four major questions: What is courage; what is leadership; how to discern between the popular choice and the right choice, and how to deal with peer pressure. Additionally, they will work in small groups to develop strategies for returning to their schools and making improvements in their student bodies, schools, and communities. After participating in three breakout sessions, they will report out to their colleagues and respond to intense questioning about the richness and quality of their reports. Embedded in the day’s activities are social stands to help students develop more

confidence in interacting with new people, and adapting to various social situations. The workshop begins at 8:30 a.m. in the Mace’s Lane Middle School media center and concludes at 2:30 p.m.

American Legion scholarships

Laurel American Legion, Post 19 announces that applications are available for two $2,500 scholarships. They may be picked up at the Laurel High School office, Sussex Tech office and the Laurel Public Library. The applications must be returned by May 1.

School board candidates forum

The Western Sussex Branch of AAUW will sponsor a Seaford School Board Candidates Forum on Wednesday, April 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the Central Elementary School Auditorium, Delaware Place. The two candidates running for the five-year term beginning July 1 are John Hanenfeld and Frank Parks. The election will be held on Tuesday, May 11, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., at the District Administration Office located on North Market Street, Seaford.

Gas Lines

Tuesday, the highest crude oil price in 18 months.

Gas prices have resumed their climb after a brief retreat last week, moving closer to the $3 gallon mark. The national average price for regular grade gasoline rose to $2.86 last Friday, a 5-cent increase from a week ago and an 18-month high. Last year, gas prices peaked in mid-June, which is still two months away. Current prices are 81 cents higher than a year ago, but still $1.25 less than the record high set in July 2008.

Forecast “If motorists blinked they may have missed last week’s brief reprieve at the gas pumps, as prices rebounded 5 cents a gallon nationally last week,” said Jana L. Tidwell, acting manager of Public and Government Affairs for AAA MidAtlantic. “The further we get into the spring and summer driving season the higher gas prices will tick, as we see increased demand, increased crude oil prices and more expensive summer blends at the pumps.”

Crude Oil Prices Crude oil ended last week with a three-day streak of losses to close at $84.92 a barrel Friday. Despite losses late in the week, crude oil prices traded just above $87 a barrel Monday and

Local pricing On Monday gas stations from Delmar to Greenwood were selling regular gasoline in a range from $2.759 to $2.849 a gallon. The high price is down a penny, the low the same as last week.

Regular Unleaded Gasoline & Crude Oil prices National

Delaware

Oil Barrel

4/11/10

Week Ago

Year Ago

$2.86

$2.83

$2.05

$2.81

$2.76

$1.97

4/9/10

Week Ago

Year Ago

$84.92

$84.87

$52.00


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

pAGE 37

Is it so hard to empty the trash or fill ice trays? There is a question that I have pondered for many years and have ony indsor yet found an answer. Perhaps someone wiser than I can solve this We would come inside mystery. How high above the kitchen garfrom a hot summer’s bage can does the trash need to be in order for it to be considered full? day, sweating like a I am amazed. I remember that when he lived at home, my son CEO at a Senate hearmade an art out of balancing mi1k cartons, empty TV dinner boxes and ing... soda cans on top of one another. this way. I can remember dad’s pride and This feat has only one goal in mind joy in the refrigerator was the ice water. — not to be the one to take the trash out. He would fill old orange juice bottles with It irritates me, but I guess the proverbial tap water and put them in the refrigerator. apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree. I We would come inside from a hot sumrecall being the same way when I was a mer’s day, sweating like a CEO at a Senyoung boy. ate hearing, and drink Dad’s water. I remember opening the basement door The trick was to never drink the last where Mom kept the trash can and blindly drop of water. I would drink the water throwing trash at the can. Usually there until it stood about one micro-meter above would end up being a stack of trash at the the bottom of the jug. I would then put bottom of the basement stairs the size of it back into the refrigerator only to have Mount Ararat. Dad come in the kitchen 15 minutes later, I could even look directly at the trash raging, “Who was the last one to have the can, which would be filled above the rim, water?” and still attempt to get another piece of Of course we would all say in unison, trash inside. It would take me longer to “There was still some water in the jar balance the trash than it would have to when I put it back.” When we talk about take the bag outside. this scenario, we can’t forget the all imI think they should have trash stacking portant ice cube trays. as an Olympic event. My son and I would You see, growing up in my house we bring home a guaranteed Gold Medal for had no air conditioning and the summers the United States. seemed hotter than Satan’s sauna. But it is not just trash that gets treated

T

Flex World Fitness Festival

On Saturday, April 17, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Flex World Fitness, Georgetown, will present a daylong festival, “Spring into Physical Fitness,” geared toward health awareness. “Being a part of the medical center, as well as a fitness center, we wanted to hold some type of spring event to help emphasize the important of physical fitness in all our daily lives,” says Heidi Helou, owner. Portions of the April 17 event, including Flex World’s first-ever “cycle-a-thon,” will benefit the Oak Orchard/Riverdale American Legion and many of the area’s war veterans. The cycle-a-thon features teams of up to four participants at a time, all peddling to benefit area veterans. “If Mother Nature cooperates, this portion of the spring festival will be held outside under what we hope will be sunny blue skies,” says Helou. “Either way, it’s going to be a fun activity. It costs $25 a person, 100 percent of which goes toward the programs of the American Legion.” Other activities include blood pressure screenings, nutritional tips, massages, product tastings and door prizes. Childcare will be available. Local author James Diehl will be on site signing copies of “Remembering Sussex County” and the award-winning “World War II Heroes of Southern Delaware.” Twenty percent of sales from “Heroes” will also be donated to American Legion Post 28 in Oak Orchard. Items will also be collected on April 17 for packages that will be sent to local members of the military who are serving overseas.To learn more, call Flex World Fitness at 856-7771, stop by the center or visit www.flexworldfitness.com

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So, when you were thirsty, there was only one thing worse than finding the ice water jug empty. That would be finding the ice cube trays empty, too. Long before the time when the refrigerator had its own ice maker, there were ice cube trays. You would pull the metal crank on the top of these contraptions to loosen the ice cubes. Nine times out of 10, someone would have filled the trays with too much water and the handle would be firmly frozen to the top of the tray. I can’t recall a time when I didn’t scrape the skin off four of my knuckles trying to bust the ice loose. The trick here was to always leave at least one ice cube in the tray. That assured your not having to refill the tray. However, when Dad went into the refrigerator and found his water jug empty, you could be sure his temper heightened when he discovered one lone ice cube in the tray. The thick, hot Crisfield tap water needed a minimum of six ice cubes to give any semblance of cool. I just can’t figure out why it seemed such a major task to empty the trash or fill an ice cube tray or water jug. The same lazy people who do this are the very ones who leave a quarter-ounce of ice cream lodged in the corner of the box, a millimeter of milk in the bottom of the carton and 10 corn flakes in the bottom of the cereal box. It is nothing less than torture to have

become enticed with the thought of a dish of ice cream or a bowl of cereal, only to find the boxes are a mere façade for the emptiness inside. Oh well, I guess every family has at least one of these predators. You know who you are! It’s a generational plague. It’s like heart disease: it’s passed down through our genes. I know I will go home tonight and find a trash can overflowing, toilet paper with one sheet left on the roll, a piece of soap the size of a quarter in the soap dish and enough underarm deodorant to do one armpit. Oh well, it keeps me feeling needed.

National Volunteer Week

Nanticoke Health Services joins communities across the nation in celebrating National Volunteer Week, April 18–24. The highlight of the week is the Volunteer Appreciation and Recognition Banquet on Thursday, April 22 at 5 p.m., at Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville, where many of Nanticoke’s volunteers will be recognized for their dedication and commitment. This year’s theme is, “The Magical World of Nanticoke Health Services Volunteers.” Dedicated volunteers gave over 43,000 hours of service in 2009. To learn more about becoming a Nanticoke Health Services volunteer, call 629-6611, ext. 2475.

ELECT

Doug Lambert

To Seaford City Council I am seeking a seat on the Seaford City Council.

I want to make a difference in my community and work hard for the citizens of Seaford. I feel it is important to keep the citizens informed, by keeping them up to date on the current events of our city, its council and their decisions, changes to laws and directives from upstate and in the county, and listen to the citizens about their concerns and feedback regarding the events and changes of this city.

I will strive to do the very best for all of you and stand on my principles of fiscal responsibilities, honesty, straight forwardness, faith in God and my fellow man, and hard work.

I will ensure that through these values I will work for the PEOPLE of Seaford as THEIR councilman, because I have to answer to The PEOPLE.

Thank you for Your Vote on Saturday, April 17, 2010 at the Seaford City Hall. Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your next City Councilman


pAGE 38

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Rhubarb can be used to clean pots, but can be eaten, too Can you name a food coming into season that can also be used oretta norr to clean your pots and pans? How about one that can be used as a hair dye or one that can double as an insecticide? If you answered rhubarb to all of the above, you’d be right. The following nuggets come from The Rhubarb Compendium. Rub some rhubarb on burns and stains on your pots and the shine will quickly return. If your vegetables and flowers your hair for a rinse. are plagued by leaf eating insects, boil up Rhubarb is a vegetable that originated a few pounds of rhubarb leaves, strain the liquid into a container, dissolve some soap in Asia 2,000 years ago and cultivated for medicinal purposes. It wasn’t until the flake in the liquid and spray those critters 18th century that it was used here in cookaway. Note that rhubarb leaves stain and are considered to be poisonous so take care ing but if you’re more interested in rhubarb’s culinary assets than the applications to use old utensils. above, these tips may be more practical. If you’d like to create a more golden When buying fresh rhubarb, look for hue to your blond or light brown hair, moderately thin, crisp, dark pink to red simmer 3 tablespoons of rhubarb root in stalks. Greener, thicker stalks are stringier, 2 cups of water for 15 minutes, set aside overnight, and strain. Test on a few strands coarser and more sour. The leaves should be unwilted and free of blemishes. Plan on to determine the effect, then pour through one pound of rhubarb to equal 3 cups of

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

Henry graduates

Air Force Airman Kyle B. Henry graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio. The airKyle Henry man completed an intensive eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits towards an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. He is the son of Elston Henry and Lesley Henry, both of Laurel. His grandparents are Richard and Kaye Donoway of Seaford,

Eleanor and the late Edwin Henry of Laurel, and Jack and Judy Booze of Bethel. Henry is a 2008 graduate of Laurel Senior High School.

raw, sliced rhubarb. Fresh rhubarb is quite perishable. Place the stalks in a plastic bag to retain moisture and store for 3 to 5 days in the refrigerator crisper drawer. To freeze, cut the rhubarb stalks into 1-inch chunks and seal in an airtight bag. Frozen rhubarb will keep up to a year. Rhubarb has a ton of fans, one of whom penned this limerick: Rhubarb when raw is so tough And its leaves contain poisonous stuff, But when cleaned and de-soiled Dipped in sugar and boiled Then the stalks are quite tasty enough. This recipe for Cream Cheese Rhubarb Pie is indeed “quite tasty enough.”

8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature 2 eggs 1/2 cup sugar Whipped cream and sliced almonds for garnish Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Combine cornstarch, sugar, salt, and water in a saucepan. Stir until combined. Turn burner heat to medium, add rhubarb, and cook until the mixture boils and thickens. Stir often. Pour the rhubarb mixture into pie shell. Bake 10 minutes. Meanwhile, beat the cream cheese, eggs and sugar until smooth. After the pie bakes for 10 minutes, pour the cream cheese mixture over the rhubarb layer. Reduce oven heat to 325 degrees. Bake pie an additional 35 minutes until center is almost set. Remove from the oven and let cool 30 minutes away from drafts. Chill before serving. Garnish the chilled pie with whipped cream and almonds.

Cream Cheese Rhubarb Pie Serves 8 1/4 cup cornstarch 1 cup sugar 1/8 tsp salt 1/2 cup water 3 cups sliced fresh rhubarb (1/2-inch pieces) 1 (9-inch) unbaked pie shell Cream cheese layer:

Delaware Today and Delaware Bride magazines’ 4TH ANNUAL DOWNSTATE

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Congratulations to Aaron and Tara Jefferson of Richlands, N.C., on the birth of their daughter, Karley Alania, on March 15, 2010. She was 8 lbs. 9 ozs. and 21 inches Karley Jefferson long. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Craig Derr of Long Neck. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Jay Jefferson of Seaford.

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MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 39

Seaford’s Tim Fields finished first in the boys 1,600 meter race last Saturday at Lake Forest. Fields helped the Blue Jays finish fourth overall at the invitational. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Western Sussex athletes compete in Keith S. Burgess Invitational By Lynn Schofer

The Keith S. Burgess Track and Field Invitational was held last Saturday at Lake Forest High School. Sussex Tech, Woodbridge, Laurel, and Seaford all participated in the yearly event. Seaford finished fourth place overall in the boys’ division and the Sussex Tech girls placed third overall. The invitational is named after Keith Burgess, who promoted cross country and track and field in Delaware for many years. He also helped to begin track programs in several local Delaware towns. The following are the local results from the invitational. Sussex Tech (Paige Morris, DaNee White, Thomeka Floyd, and Shanay Snead) took second place in the girls’ 4X100. The Ravens’ boys’ 4x100 team of Darrin Beckett, Elijah Fountain, Emir Laroya, Desmond Sivels placed fourth and Woodbridge’s Rasaun Dale, Mathieu Andrew, Jermaine Roberts, and Jacob Fooks finished fifth. The Woodbridge girls’ 4x200 team (Tanisha DeShields, La’Taija Maddox, Tiarrah Hinton, and Sheena Mathieu) finished fifth. In the boys’ 4x400 relay race, Seaford’s Nazaret Garcia, Lee Mayer, Alfred Cetoute, and Jacque Jules finished second. The 4x800 Seaford’s Cetoute, Mayer, Jules, and Tim Fields placed first and Laurel’s Ryan Boyce, Adam Horner, Caleb McDonough, and Lee Butler finished fifth. The Sussex Tech girls’ 4x800 team of Isabel Wharton, Bethany Killmon, Taylor Payne, and Emily Ruth finished third.

In the 100 meter dash, Sivels took fourth place; Woodbridge’s Korian Majette won the 400 meter run and Cetoute came in fifth; and Wharton placed third in the girls’ 800 meter run. For the boys, Aaron Betts of Sussex Tech finished third and Seaford’s Tim Fields was fifth. Fields also took first place in the 1,600 meter run and Ryan Boyce of Laurel finished fifth. In the girls’ 1,600, Wharton finished third. Sussex Tech’s Kelly Mullen placed fourth in the girls’ 300 meter hurdles while Laurel’s Sierra Butler was fifth. Mayer came in second in the boys’ 300 meter hurdles. In the field events, Laroya finished second in the long jump and Sivels placed fifth. Morris won the long jump and the discus for the Lady Ravens. In the boys’ shot put, Seaford’s George Blanchard finished third and Laurel’s Justin Rife was fourth. Rife also finished first in the discus. Morris placed third in the discus and teammate Mary Bratten came in fifth. Laurel’s Roosevelt Joinvil (fourth) and Jermaine Harris (fifth) each finished in the top five in the boys’ triple jump. Sussex Tech’s Emily Ritter finished second in the girls’ triple jump. Mayer finished third in the boys’ high jump. Sussex Tech’s Dylan Pepper was second In the boys’ pole vault while Patrick Davis of Woodbridge came in third and Sussex Tech’s Jeff Davenport placed fifth. Sports editor’s note: Not all of the meet’s local results are listed. Results were not submitted by the local coaches or the meet organizers prior to presstime.

EYES ON THE BALL- Seaford second doubles player Tyrek Camper keeps his eyes on the ball as he prepares to hit it during Monday’s home match. See story on page 41. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Seaford’s Lee Mayer clears the pole in the boys’ high jump for a third place finish at the Keith S. Burgess Track and Field Invitational. Photo by Lynn Schofer


PAGE 40

  MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

DEL TECH GOLF- Shown (l to r) is the Delaware Technical and Community CollegeOwens campus golf team: back- assistant coach Tom Butterly, Alex Hatter (Lewes), Patrick Hines (Millsboro), Donny Ernakovich (Shippensburg, Pa.), Colby Mross (Houston); front row: Cory Ewing (Seaford), Dennis Kent (Ridley, Pa.), coach Tom Jackson.

ROADRUNNERS- Shown (l to r) is the Delaware Technical and Community CollegeOwens campus baseball team: front- Jordan Fisher (Erial, N.J.), Eric Reiske (Chesapeake, Va.), Seth Potter (Harrisonburg, Va.). Evan Grac (Harrisburg, Pa.), James Reeser (Hershey, Pa.), Dustin Thomas (Currituck, N.C.), Luis Barrientos (Frankford); middle row: Josh Cesario (Haymarket, Va.); David Webster (Delmar), Kyle Hains (Pottstown, Pa.), Derek Thomas (Currituck, N.C.), Sammy Farnell (Aston, Pa.); third row: coach Curtis Brock (Georgetown), assistant coach Joshua Miller (Lancaster, Pa.), Anthony Butler (Salisbury), Cory Hendricks (Virginia Beach, Va.), Ethan Calloway (Laurel), Mark Timmons (Delmar), Kyle Lindstrom (Middletown), assistant coach Danny LeBright (Milford); back row: David Jones (Hebron), James Selvaggi (Moyock, N.C.), Matt Eskridge (Georgetown), Joe El-Bisi (Manassas, Va.), Sillas Shaw (Culpeper, Va.), Mark Shoff (Dallastown, Pa.), Allen Beall (Culpeper, Va.). Not pictured: Korey Hearn (Seaford) and Tony Messina (Washington Township, N.J.),

Western Sussex collegiate sports statistics (as of 4/7)

LADY ROADRUNNERS- Shown (l to r) is the Delaware Technical and Community College- Owens campus softball team: back row: coach Bob Perry (Georgetown), Ashley Ivory (Greenwood), Shannon Wilson (Delmar), Hannah Rust (Greenwood), Kassie Attix (Lincoln), Brittany Williams (Delmar), assistant coach Wayne Price (Laurel); middle row: Kristine Jackson (Pittsville), Jenna Adkins (Seaford), Kelsey Riggleman (Seaford), Megan Bilbrough (Camden), Brittani Scott (Delmar); front row: Shawna Strong (Georgetown), Connie Davis Floyd (Lincoln), Melony Thompson (Rehoboth Beach), Leah Bowman (Greenwood), Curtisha Ross (Seaford).

Delaware Tech-Owens baseball team loses a pair of games The Delaware Technical and Community College- Owens campus fell to Anne Arundel College and Chesapeake College in games early last week. DelTech lost to Anne Arundel, 8-2, last Monday. Jordan Fisher doubled and Luis Barrientos went 2-3 with two doubles and an RBI in the loss. The Roadrunners were edged, 12-11, on Tuesday in a match-up with Chesapeake. Del Tech’s Kyle Lindstrom went 4-5 with four RBIs, Anthony Butler was 3-5 with a double and three RBIs, and Barrientos had two hits including a home run and drove in three.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

The following are the stats for Western Sussex graduates who are playing sports in college: Track and field- Andrew Townsend, Sussex Tech, St. Joseph’s University- 800 meter run- 8. 1:57.39 at Lafayette meet March 27; David Albert, Laurel, Wesley College- long jump- 6.19 and triple jump- 12.83 at WCU; Twila McCrea, Laurel, Wesley College- 200- 30.34 at MDC, 400- 70.82 at UDT, 4X400 relay- 4:43.77 at MDC; Darius Sivels, Sussex Tech, Delaware State University, NA Softball- Caitlin Dolby, Laurel, Lynchburg College- 7-0, 1.88, 16G, 52 IP, 38 K, 9 BB; Erin Tingle, Delmar, Wilmington University- 3-2, 3.37, 10 G, 35.1 IP, 30 K, 16 BB; Kristen Burns, Sussex Tech, Arcadia University- NA; Bethany Pavlik, Sussex Tech, Delaware Valley College- 19-49, .388, 11 R, 2 2B, 1 HR, 14 RBI; Hope Cornell, Sussex Tech, Shippensburg University- 26G, 24-71, .338, 17 R, 4 2B, 1 3B, 5 HR, 13 RBI, 15 BB; Kim Owens, Sussex Tech, Fairmont State University- 0-1, 4.48, 20.1 IP, 5 K, 5 BB; Jenna Allen, Sussex Tech, Shippensburg University- 3-21, 3 R, 1 RBI; Brooke Tull, Sussex Tech, Seton Hall University- 0-0, 2/3 IP, 0R and 4-24, 3 R, 6 RBI; Brittany Joseph, Sussex Tech, Florida State University- 2-11, 4 R, 1 2B, 1 RBI, 1 SB; Heather Draper, Seaford, Goldey Beacom- 4-2, 2.15, 42.1 IP, 41 K, 16 BB; Lauren Witzke, Delmar, Goldey Beacom- 24-66, .364, 13 R, 3 2B, 2 3B, 17 RBI, 8 BB, 10 SB; Sadie Jones, Sussex Tech, Goldey Beacom- 2-0, 1.24, 17 IP, 17 K. 7 BB Baseball- Zach Adkins, Sussex Tech, Delaware State University- 1-4, 6.62, 34 IP, 35 K, 20 BB; Chad Sturgeon, Sussex Tech, Delaware State University- 1.2 IP, 5 ER, 1 K, 4 BB; Seth Hastings, Sussex Tech, Wesley College- 13-33, .394, 5 2B, 2 3B, 8 RBI, 13 R Golf- Clayton Bunting, Sussex Tech, Wesley College- 18t. 161 (+17) at McDaniel Spring Invitational (3/27) Lacrosse- Taylor Ballard, Delmar, Anne Arundel Community College- NA Anyone who knows of a Western Sussex grad not included on this list who is playing college sports this spring is asked to contact sports editor Mike McClure at sports@mspublications.com with the athlete’s name, college, and sport.

Sussex Tech softball team loses to Caravel, 7-0 The Sussex Tech varsity softball team fell to Caravel, 7-0, in an non-conference game last weekend. Lauren Smith collected two hits including a double for the Ravens.


MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 41

Seaford Stars of the Week

Male Athlete of the WeekT.J. Jefferson- Woodbridge Woodbridge senior T.J. Jefferson collected three hits and drove in three runs in his team’s win over Smyrna last Tuesday. Jefferson also had a hit in the Raiders’ non-conference game against St. Michaels.

Female Athlete of the WeekPaige Morris- Sussex Tech

Sussex Tech’s Paige Morris placed first in the long jump and discus at the Burgess Invitational last weekend. Morris also finished third in the shotput and was on the 4X100 meter relay team Honorable mention- Korian Majette- Woodbridge; Tim Fields- Seaford; Lee Mayer- Seaford; George Blanchard- Seaford; Patrick Davis- Woodbridge; C.J. Pleasants- Woodbridge; Trez’mon Kane-Grant; Jordan Lewis- Woodbridge; Javier Cardenas- Woodbridge; Eric Willey- Woodbridge; Desmond Sivels- Sussex Tech; Aaron Betts- Sussex Tech; Emir Laroya- Sussex Tech; Dylan Pepper- Sussex Tech; Izzy Wharton- Sussex Tech; Lauren Smith- Sussex Tech; Emily Ritter- Sussex Tech

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Woodbridge varsity baseball team blanks Smyrna, 13-0

The Woodbridge varsity baseball team picked up a 13-0 road win over Smyrna last Tuesday as C.J. Pleasants tossed a one-hit hit shutout. Pleasants also struck out 10 batters and went 3-3 with two RBIs at the plate. T.J. Jefferson went 3-5 with 2 RBI’s, Trez’mon Kane-Grant was 3-3 with two RBIs, Jordan Lewis had a two-run home run and four RBIs, and Javier Cardenas was 2-3 with an RBI for the Blue Raiders. Woodbridge baseball team falls to St. Michaels- The Woodbridge varsity baseball team lost to St. Michaels, 6-2, in a non-conference contest last Saturday. Starting pitcher Eric Willey collected two hits and drove in a run and T.J. Jefferson, Micah Idler, C.J. Pleasants, Jordan Lewis, Trevor Wescott, and Jordan Vazquez each had a hit for the Raiders. Trez’mon Kane-Grant

Seaford varsity boys’ tennis team picks up another 5-0 win By Lynn Schofer

The Seaford High School boys’ tennis team continues to dominate the courts with another 5-0 win on Monday against St. Thomas More. First singles player Tim Halter defeated his opponent 6-0, 6-0; second singles

player Ethan Lee won 6-0, 6-0; and third singles player Phillip DeMott added 6-1, 6-0 wins. The first doubles team of Tyrek Camper and Corey Dardin won their match 6-1, 6-1; Dustin Venables and Zak Parks finished their second doubles match with 6-1, Continued on page 42

HAND OFF- Woodbridge’s Sheena Mathews hands the baton to Tiarrah Hinton in the girls’ 4x200 relay race. The Raiders’ team also included Taneshia DeShields and Kera Sampson. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Youth prevails as Jordan Watson takes Delaware opener

The following are results from the Delmar Night opening race at Delaware International Speedway which took place last Sunday. RESULTS: 25-Lap NAPA Big Block Modified Feature: 1. JORDAN WATSON; 2. Kenny Brightbill; 3. Brad Trice; 4. H.J. Bunting; 5. Jamie Mills; 6. Matt Jester; 7. Joseph Watson; 8. Beau Wilkins; 9. Michael White; 10. Chad Clark; 11. Norman Short; 12. Scott VanGorder; 13. Dale Hawkins; 14. Tim Trimble; 15. Jeff Brown; 16. George Richardson; 17. Robert Dutton; 18. Bobby Watkins; DNS: Billy Collingsworth. 20-Lap Super Late Model: 1. DONALD LINGO, JR.; 2. Mark Byram; 3. Ray Davis, Jr.; 4. David Pettyjohn; 5. Kerry King; 6. Herb Tunis; 7. Ross Robinson; 8. Rob Schirmer; 9. Dale Lingo; 10. David Hill; 11. Amanda Whaley; 12. Bob Geiger; 13. Hal Browning; 14. Staci Warrington; 15. Barry Beauchamp; 16. Andrew Mullins; 17. Rick Whaley; 18. Bryan Driver; DNS: Brian Donley. 15-Lap Crate Model Feature: 1. JOE WARREN; 2. Nick Davis; 3. Chris Hitchens; 4. Matt Hill; 5. Clint Chalabala; 6. Kelly Putz; 7. Eric Vent; 8. Tyler Reed; 9. John Emory; 10. John Imler; 11. Justin Breeding; 12. Jack Mullins; 13. Mike Wilson; 14. Sparky White; 15. Robert Bragg; 16. Roy Hassler; 17. Skip Syester; 18. Clay Tatman; 19. Dylan Evans; 20. Michael Wilkins; 21. Tony Bowers; 22. Randy Given; 23. Richard Harden. 15-Lap AC Delco Modified Feature: 1. JOSEPH TRACY; 2. Westley Smith; 3. Scott Baker; 4. John Curtis; 5. Matt Hawkins; 6. Billy Carr; 7. Scott Calhoun; 8. Brandon Blades; 9. Kyle Fuller; 10. Ted Reynolds; 11. Shawn Ward; 12. Jerry Carter; 13. Herbie Hempel; 14. Scott Hitchens; 15. Garrie Bostwick; 16. Bryan Applegate; 17. Taylor McCracken; 18. Greg Taylor, Jr.; 19. Ryan Anderson; 20. Tom Moore; 21. Brandon Sturgis; 22. Danny Smack; 23. Corey Cohee; 24. Braondon Perdue; 25. David Scarano. 15-Lap Mod Lite Feature: 1. BRANDON DENNIS; 2. James Hill; 3. Steve White; 4. Kevin McKinney; 5. Tim White; 6. Curt Miles, Jr.; 7. Tyler Reed; 8. Billy Thompson; 9. Matt Glanden; 10. Ty Short; 11. Stacy Roberts; 12. Shawn Weber; 13. Ray Gulliver; 14. Landis Musser; 15. Jason Musser; 16. Alan Passwaters; 17. Kirk Miles; 18. Paul McGinley; 19. Scott Tessman; 20. Chris Jestice; 21. T.J. Williams.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.


PAGE 42

   MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010 Seaford tennis continued

6-0 wins. The Seaford Blue Jays move to 5-0 and are undefeated both in individual and team matches. Coach Phil Burtelle said, “It is nice but the big one is next week (against undefeated Dover).” “On Monday someone is going to walk away with a loss,” Burtelle added. If Seaford wins the Monday duel it

Woodbridge goalkeeper Megan Sirkis looks to make a play on the ball during Tuesday’s game against Smyrna. Sirkis and the Raiders kept the Eagles off the board in the second half in the 2-0 loss. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford Star Monday/Tuesday high school sports scoreboard

Girls’ soccer- Smyrna 2, Woodbridge 0- Megan Sirkis recorded six saves for the Raiders, who held the Eagles scoreless in the second half. Indian River 3, Sussex Tech 1- Tori Seuss scored off a feed from Leeanne Rowe for the Ravens’ lone goal. Lisa Sekscinski made six saves for Sussex Tech. Girls’ lacrosse- St. Thomas More 13, Delmarva Christian 4 (Monday)- Jessica Stratton netted all four of the Royals’ goals. Golf- Dover 181, Seaford 217- Adam Caldwell shot a 44 for the Blue Jays in the loss. Sussex Tech 173, St. Marks 187 (Monday)- Sussex Tech moved to 3-0 as Tim Gaskin shot a 39, Dustin Miller had a 39, and Josh Mohun added a 45. Campus Community 225, Layton Prep 276, Woodbridge 277- Kara Dunnigan led the Raiders with a 55. Baseball- Delmar 5, Woodbridge 3- Trez’mon Kane-Grant and Jordan Vazquez each hit a home run for the Raiders in the loss. Kane-Grant had three hits including a triple and C.J. Pleasants added a double. Caesar Rodney 26, Seaford 0- Ryan Shockley collected the Blue Jays’ only hit.

Nowakowski named new Sussex Tech varsity football coach Sussex Tech High School named Bernie Nowakowski as the new varsity football head coach during a press conference on Tuesday. Nowakowski, a 1990 graduate of St. Mark’s where he was the captain of the football team his senior year, went on to play football as Wesley College (1990-94). Bernie was an all-conference linebacker in high school a Division III All-American in college. He coached at Wesley College from 1994-99 before joining the Sussex Tech staff as a teacher and assistant football coach. Nowakowski went back to Wesley College (while still teaching at Sussex Tech) to head up the schools strength and conditioning program and coach the linebackers. Bernie returned to the Ravens as the defensive coordinator and special teams coach last Fall. He resides in Milford with wife, Brandi, and their twin sons, Bret and Brock.

will be Coach Burtelle’ss 100th win in his highly successful coaching career. “These kids are such a great group and are now focused on getting the job done,” said Burtelle. “Don’t get me wrong, they know how to clown around and have a good time, that is what makes them so coachable and easy going.” Seaford will take on Dover at Dover High Tennis Courts on Monday, April 19, beginning at 4 p.m.

CLEARING THE HURDLE- Seaford’s Alexis Spence clears a hurdle in the 100 meter event in Monday’s high school tri-meet with Lake Forest and Sussex Central. See next week’s Star for stories from Monday’s meet and Tuesday’s Seaford girls’ soccer game. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Help promote children’s literacy and education with Morning Star Publications

Newspaper In Education program. The Seaford and Laurel Stars make learning more interesting for students by providing local community news.

It’s an easy and affordable way to

make a world of difference. Please donate when you renew or subscribe to the Star (details on renewal notice or call 629-9788 for info) Mrs. Clarke’s 4th grade students at West Seaford Elementary enjoy looking through the Star for a “Sports” Scavenger Hunt.

Thank You!!

Bernie Nowakowski

Charles Hastings Kathy Tucker Norma Kohlenberg Shirley Skinner For Your Donation


MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

PAGE 43

YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL THE BEST BUY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.

SPRING SPORTS- Shown (clockwise from top left) are scenes from the high school spring sports season: Seaford catcher Jordan Stanley connects with the ball for a double; Sussex Tech catcher Eric Sharff settles down pitcher Jessie Swanson; Zach Hearn of Seaford clears 10’ 2” in the boys’ pole vault and would later clear 12 feet to win the event in the Blue Jays’ season opening meet; Seaford third singles player Phillip DeMott serves the ball in his match against Lake Forest. Photos by Lynn Schofer

In today’s world, fifty cents doesn’t buy a heck of a lot — except of course, when it comes to your newspaper. For less than the cost of a bus ride, you can get word from across town or across the nation. For less than the price of a cup of coffee, you can get your fill of food, politics, or whatever else News is your cup of News tea. From cover to cover, your newspaper Sports Sports Artist gave up law to pursue her is still the most interest in the creative process Inside “streetwise” buy Laurel gears up for referendum in town! THURSDAY, mARcH 25, 2010

vol. 14 No. 48

VOL. 14 NO. 34

50 cents

TOURS - Seaford Historical Society offers tours of Ross 50Pages cents houses. 5 and 52

THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2010

Mills to participate in Honeywell Educators Space Academy

HEALTH - New heart procedure saving patients close to home. Page 10

SCAMMERS - State police warn of a new scheme to steal your identity. Page 11

RALLY - The Laurel School District referendum committee will hold a public referendum rally in the high school on Tuesday, March 30, from 5-6 p.m. to answer all referendum questions. All Laurel School District residents are welcome to attend.

PRAYER - Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast celebrates endurance. Page 12

pRomotion - Laurel high school graduate promoted to Air Force Brigadier General. Page 3 HEALtH - New heart procedure saving patients close to home. Page 10

SCAmmERS - State police warn of a new scheme to steal your identity. Page 11 EntERtAinmEnt - Nanticoke Health Services Dinner and Auction April 17. Page 27

HERoES - Sometimes just being there makes a difference. Page 51

wARbUCkS - Adam Bennett and Kirsten Cook starred as Annie and Warbucks in the Laurel High School Drama Club’s performance of “Annie”. See inside for additional photos. Photo by Mike McClure

REFEREnDUm - And now it’s up to the voters. Page 54

SpRing pREviEwS - The Laurel Star’s spring sports previews continue this week, starting on page 41.

SpRing gAmES - The high school sports season was scheduled to open this Monday and Tuesday. See results on page 48.

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CAbinEt - Members of the cast of “Annie” perform “Cabinet Tomorrow” during last Saturday’s matinee performance at Laurel High School. Photo by Mike McClure

By Mike McClure The Laurel School District heard from four members of the public concerning the March 31 referendum during its meeting last Wednesday. The board also hired a new business manager and received an update from the state auditor’s office concerning the

investigation of former finance director Bill Hitch. Two residents spoke against the referendum, which will take place on Wednesday, March 31 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the Laurel High library. The board also heard from two people in favor of the proposal to issue bonds for the construction of two new school complexes (four schools).

AMNESTY - Sussex County tax and fee amnesty proBy Mike McClure gram brings in $1.5 million. Page 15 Delmar High science teacher Bill Mills will go from teaching to learning - Nanticoke Health Services Dinner ENTERTAINMENT when he attends the Honeywell Space and Auction April 17. Page 27 Academy for Educators in Alabama this summer. Mills had HEROES a similar- Sometimes just being there makes a differopportunity in 2004 but also ence.was Page 51 chosen to take part in NASA’s Network of Educator Astronaut Teachers program. - Nanticoke Health Services takes APPRECIATION Mills was recentlytime selected to take Page 54 to say thanks. part in Honeywell’s Space Academy for Educators at the U.S. Space and - How long will it take to spend $138 bilFINAL WORD Rocket Center in Huntsville, lion? PageAlabama. 55 The five day program features 45 hours of intense classroom, laboratory, and training time with a focus on space science and space exploration. Mills was the only Delaware educator selected to take part in the program.SPRINg PREvIEWS - The Seaford Star’s spring Mills was acceptedsports into previews the program continue this week, starting on page 41. in 2004 but had to decline due to his involvement with NASA. He was a SPRINg gAMES - The high school sports season finalist in NASA’s Teacher in Space opens. See results on page 48. Program which gave him the opportunity to be a NASA spokesperson HALL OF FAME - Three western Sussex players/ and serve as a member of NASA’s coaches are inducted into the Hall of Fame. Page 42 Network of Educator Astronaut Teachers. Bill resubmitted for the opportunity us this with Honeywell andContact was accepted year. Educators from all over the world Subscriptions were selected to take part in the acadekcherrix@mspublications.com my. “It’s a pretty intense opportunity,” Auto Alley 49 said Mills, who leaves for the camp at Bulletin BoArd 18 the conclusion of the schoolStar year.News “I Seaford Business 6 editor@mspublications.com ChurCh 23 Continued on page 4 ClAssifieds 32 Seaford Star Sports eduCAtion 38 mmcclure@mspublications.com entertAinment 27 finAl Word 55 Advertising GAs lines 37 sales@mspublications.com Gourmet 26 heAlth 30 “I know that theBusiness schools are in terletters 54 Report rible shape. I just feel that now is not 36 businessreport@mspublications.com lynn PArks the time to build four new schools all movies 7 at one time. This community doesn’t oBituAries 25 Business Journal have the tax base for that,” said Donna PeoPle 28 Reed, a school bus brichardson@mspublications.com contractor. “If not PoliCe 11 now then when?,” asked North Laurel Puzzles 22 s Ports 41-48 Continued on page 5 tides 46 tony Windsor 37

gabriel Jules and Seaford High School art teacher Dana Paternoster work on an etching in Jules’ Seaford studio. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

By Lynn R. Parks

Ever since she was a small child, Gabriel Jules had created art. “I illustrated books for my mother before I could write,” she said. “I would give her the pictures and then would tell her the stories and she would write them down for me. “I had one doll that sat on a shelf and one stuffed bear, but I didn’t play with them. I didn’t do the Barbie thing. I was doing art instead.” But in the 1980s, for the first time

in her life, Gabriel Jules wasn’t producing anything artistic. She was one of two women in a family law practice in Fairfax, Va., and working for her clients took every bit of energy that she had. “Practicing law just wiped me out,” she said. “I was earning a living but I was not creating anything. I was utterly wretched.” Jules decided to close her practice, a process that took two years. She took classes at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, D.C., to

refresh her skills — “Doing art isn’t like riding a bicycle,” she said. “You just can’t up and start again after years of not doing anything.” And she was introduced to the centuries-old art of etching by family friend and City College of New York professor William Behnken. “I was in Provincetown, Mass., visiting my brother, when Bill, who is a master printmaker, came in with a prepared etching plate,” Jules said. Behnken handed her the zinc plate, Continued to page 13

NEWSSTAND LOCATIONS laurel ram deli Shore Stop Britts’ rite aid Stop & Shop Food lion dollar general Bargain Bills laurel exxon royal Farms Sandy Fork Sussex machine Works

NEW LOCATION

SeaFOrd rite aid Shore Stop dollar general Super Soda Center royal Farms uncle Willies Frans dairy de-lux dairy middleford deli

if you are a business and would like to sell the Seaford or laurel Star, call 302-629-9788.

DELMAR

WAWA


PAGE 44

 MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

ON THE RUN- Sussex Tech’s Desmond Sivels starts the 100 meter dash in last Saturday’s Keith S. Burgess Invitational held at Lake Forest High School. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Delaware Tech-Owens softball team wins one of two The Delaware Technical and Community College- Owens campus won one of two games last Saturday against County College of Morris. Hannah Rust allowed three runs on four hits and struck out six in six innings in the Roadrunners’ 3-0 loss in game one. Del Tech bounced back with a 3-0 win in game two. Kristine Jackson earned the win on the mound and Kelsey Riggleman went 2-3 with a home run and an RBI.

Delaware Tech-Owens baseball team wins five of six

MAKING THE LEAP- Sussex Tech’s Emily Ritter jumped to a second place finish in the girls’ Triple jump at the Keith S. Burgess Invitational which took place last Saturday at Lake Forest High. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Summer field hockey camp to take place July 12-15 in Delmar

The After Hour Sports field hockey camp will take place July 12-15 (July 16 raindate)from 9 a.m. to noon at the Delmar Middle/Senior High School field hockey field. The camp instructors are Delmar varsity coach Jodi Hollamon and Pocomoke assistant coach Juli Bradford. The cost of the camp is $125. For more information contact Hollamon at jbhollamon@comcast.net.

TIDE CHART SUDOKU ANSWERS:

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

The Delaware Technical and Community College- Owens campus baseball team won five of six games in last weekend’s action. The Roadrunners swept a doubleheader against Sussex County College on Friday, starting with a 12-6 win in game one. Luis Barrientos went 2-4 with a home run and two RBIs, Evan Graci was 3-4 with a home run and four RBIs, and David Webster struck out two and allowed one hit in one and two thirds innings of relief. In game two, Derek Thomas went 4-5 with a double, home run, and four RBIs; Barrientos collected three doubles and three RBIs; and Eric Reiski and Sammy Farnell each homered to lead Del Tech to a 24-3 win. Delaware Tech won the first game of Saturday’s twin bill against County College of Morris, 5-3. J.R. Reeser allowed three runs and stuck out five in seven innings and Graci and Kyle Lindstrom each doubled. Farnell doubled in the Roadrunners’ 4-2 loss in game two. Del Tech added an 11-3 win in the first game against Cumberland County College on Sunday. Anthony Butler, Farnell, and Barrientos had two hits apiece and Lindstrom allowed three runs on seven hits and no walks and struck out five in seven innings. In game two, Korey Hearn allowed one run and struck out six in six innings and Webster gave up two hits and no runs in one inning of relief as the Roadrunners won, 10-1. Barrientos was 3-4 with a double, home run, and three RBIs; Tony Messina went 3-3 with a double; and Jordan Fisher batted 2-2 with a triple.

SHARPTOWN

04/16 L-12:48A H-7:04A 04/17 L-1:27A H-7:44A 04/18 04/19 04/20 04/21 04/22

L-2:10A L-2:58A L-3:52A L-4:54A L-6:02A

H-8:27A H-9:14A H-10:07A H-11:07A H-12:12P

L-1:30P L-2:12P L-2:57P L-3:48P L-4:44P L-5:45P L-6:49P

H-7:26P H-8:06P

H-8:50P H-9:40P H-10:36P H-11:40P

See more tides at www.saltwatertides.com


MORNING STAR • APRIL 15 - 21, 2010

Seaford Bowling Lanes

Wednesday AM

Seaford Lanes 34.521.5 Lucky Strikes 33-23 Lefty Left 30-26 Two Plus One 29-27 Jean and the Guys 29-27 Bee Movie 28.5-275 ABC of It 28-28 High games and series Gerald Sammons 257, 682 Shrley Bramble 260, 723

Club 50

3 Wise Men 39.516.5 Gamblers 3917 Three B’s 36-20 Pinbusters 34-22 2-1 31.524.5 Pretenders 30.5-25.5 Cowboys 30-26 Three Buddies 29.526.5 Deal or No Deal 22.533.5 RRK 22-34 The Zips 21-35 The Untouchables 20-36 Lucky Strikes 19-37 Magic Markers 17.538.5 High games and series Jack Murphy 267 Fred Phillips 712 Marcia Regan 275 Ann Brumbley 708

Eastern Shore Men

DAZK 22-10 Who Cares 18-14 3 Men and a Handicap 17-15 Spicer Electric 17-15 Delmarva Consignment 16-16 Always Second 14-18 Hoobers 13-19 Pain 4 11-21 High games and series Jack French 298 Thomas Wheatley 767

Tuesday Early Mixed Vacationers Seaford Moose 23.5 Empty Pockets

33-19 28.528-24

Down N Out 28-24 Killer Bees 27-25 Bass Awkwards 25-27 Cross Fire 25-27 Just Chillin 24-28 B Attitudes 21.530.5 Dreamers 20-32 High games and series Rick Baker 283 Buzzy Watson 725 Travis Sirman 272, 716

Mardel ABC

Spicers Electric 61-19 Sandbaggers 52-28 Wroten’s Rollers 49-31 Four Horsemen 47-33 Team Dynasty 46-34 Jaws 42-38 3 Men and a Babe 34-46 3 Plus 1 29-51 Henry’s Furniture 26-54 High games and series Tom Koontz 304, 790

Tuesday AM Mixed

Fun Bunch 37-19 Getter Dun 34-22 The Strikers 30-26 Pindrops 27-29 Trouble 20-36 Sparetimers 20-36 High games and series Mike Baker 270 Jenn Kerr 231, 634

Seaford City

Ruff Ryders 43-13 Seaford Lanes 36-20 Phillips Construction 31-25 Git-R-Done 28-28 Guardian Angels 27.528.5 Palmers Construction 27-29 Easy Pickins 25.530.5 High games and series Linwood Jenkins 299 Paul Jenkins 773

Christian Fellowship Apostles 31-13 WWJD 30-14 Grapes of Wrath 30-14 Ten Commandments 24-20

Alpha and Omega 16-28 High games and series Mark Melson 256, 681 Terri Hayes 248 Joyce Tull 666

Senior Express

Rack Attack 36-12 Just Us 31-17 Just the Guys 29-19 Mission 3 28.519.5 Russ Morgan DDS 28-20 Senior Survivors 28-20 ABC 27.5-20.5 Curves Chicks 27-21 Strikers 27-21 Mighty Pioneers 27-21 Blue Stars 25-23 Guys and a Doll 24.523.5 Pin Pals 24.523.5 Chick’s Rollers 23-25 New Crew 22-26 Kellam’s Crew 20.527.5 Attitude with Spares 18-30 Pinbusters 15-33 New Comers 13.534.5 High games and series Cal Brundick 274, 744 Edith Krause 275 Elizabeth Pinkett 748

Young Adults

Lightening 34-14 Toy Soldiers 29-19 Pinbusters 29-19 Dust Balls 29-19 New Beginnings 24-24 Just for Fun 22-26 Lucky Charms 14-34 Strikes and Spares 11-37 High games and series Ben Hearn 265, 707 Morgan Slavin 240 Katie Hickey 629

Baby Blue Jays

New Beginnings 33-6 Hot Shots 29-10 Strikes and Spares 18-21 Girl Power 18-21 Strikers 15-24 Just Starting 4-35 High games and series

Harrison Barnes 331 Dallas Slavin Amanda Carey

190, 186 327

Star

Strikemasters 36-16 Dead Eyes 35.516.5 Spare Timers 33-19 Ten Pins 30-22 Pin Destroyers 30-22 Pin Smashers 20.531.5 Strikers 14-38 High games and series Robert Bay 269 Austin Kraft 693 Sierra Shockley 241, 646 Makayla James 241

Friday Trios

Woodworkers 29-15 Terry’s Tigers 29-15 3-Da-Hardway 29-15 Comebacks 27-17 Norma’s Crew 27-17 Strikes and Spares 26-18 7-Up 26-18 BKB FAB 25-19 Three Alive 23-21 Fear the Handicap 20-24 James Gang 20-24 Touch of Class 20-24 Wolf Pack 18.525.5 All in the Family 18.525.5 Sugar and Honey 18-26 Pins Astounding 17-27 The Uh Ohs 13-31 High games and series Michael Swartz 279, 765 Shirley Greene 246, 684

Sunday Nite Mixed

Hit or Miss 32-20 Gutter Cleaners 28-24 2 Fer the Gutter 26-26 Mischief Makers 26-26 Advanced Aerosol 23-29 Fun in It 20-32 High games and series Sean James 278 Matt Wheatley 771 Amber Taylor 292, 808

SEAFORD BOWLING LANES Home of Galactic BowlinG

629-9778

302

Nylon Capital Shopping Center Seaford, DE

Senior Women’s Softball League practices start April 19

The Senior Women’s Softball League will start practices on April 19, at Sports at the Beach in Georgetown. The minimum age for players has been lowered from 50 to 45. These younger players may now play on any senior team in the spring and summer league. However, for a team to participate in the Delaware Senior Olympics in the fall, it must have enough players over 50 to register a full team of over-50 players. The Alley Cats 50s and the Delaware Diamonds 50s are returning from last year. The Slammin’ 60s is the new team name for women over 60, replacing last year’s Delaware Diamonds 60s. Two new teams are forming. If you are interested in playing Senior Women’s Softball on Monday evenings from 6-8 p.m. this spring and summer, please contact one of these captains. Sue Brooker, Slammin’ 60s, 644-4094; Maureen White, Alley Cats 50s, 226-8080; Debbie Estes, Delaware Diamonds 50s, 644-7220; Kit Ryan, (New 50s Team), 226-2712; Diane Milam, (New 45-49+ Team Forming), 855-9320. For more information call Marion Lisehora, coordinator, 934-9512.

Western Sussex Little League opening day dates, times set

Little League opening day begins in Western Sussex on April 24. Laurel and Delmar will each hold opening day on Saturday, April 24. Laurel’s parade will take place at 9 a.m. with the opening ceremony around 10. Delmar’s parade is also scheduled for 9 a.m. with the opening ceremony at 9:30-10. Seaford’s Little League ceremony will take place on May 1 at 8 a.m. Woodbridge’s parade lineup will begin at 9 a.m. on May 1 with the ceremony to follow.

Seaford Bowling scores can only be found in the Star.

PAGE 45

Tickets available for 55th Annual Blue-Gold All-Star football game The DFRC Blue-Gold All-Star Football Game Committee recently announced that tickets for the 55th annual DFRC Blue-Gold All-Star football game are on sale now. Tickets are available for purchase through the Delaware Lions Clubs, B&B Tickettown, or online at www.blue-gold.org/football. General Admission tickets for the 2010 game are $10. Discounted tickets are available for groups of 25 or more, and Reserved Box seating is also available by contacting DFRC at 302-454-2730 Parking areas on game day will open at 3 p.m. and stadium gates open at 5 p.m. Opening Ceremonies begin at 6 and kick-off is at 7 p.m. Parking is $5 per car and tailgating is welcomed. Tailgaters should call DFRC to make arrangements for an approved tailgating location. All tailgating activities must follow the University of Delaware rules, which are posted on the DFRC web site. The DFRC Blue-Gold All-Star Football Game, played each year since 1956, showcases Delaware’s finest high school students who participate as football players, cheerleaders, band members and school ambassadors. For more information about the game, and to purchase tickets and merchandise, visit www.blue-gold.org/football.

Twisters Gymnastics hosts Beach Party Invitational

The Twisters gymnastics team hosted the Beach Party Invitational on March 21. Twisters’ gymnasts in levels three through eight competed at this event. The team defended their home gym by winning the team trophy in all levels they had gymnasts entered in (3, 4, 5, 6, and 7). Members of the Level three champion team are: Summer Brenner, Lexi Walker, and Akira Winder. Winder was the all around champion (30.3) and champion on vault, bars, beam, and floor. First place Level 4 team members are: Victoria Dixon, October Gradows, Jessie Lupiwok, Maggie Mitchell, Jada Saunders, Skyler Mahoney, Sierra Eisemann, Savanna Jurist, Rachel Hobbs, Piper Connors, Olivia Beard, Nay’Yarrah Winder, Michaela Vinogradov, Joey Guard, Erin Hurley, Erin Lambertson, Clarice Pamplona, Chelsea VanVonno, Aryan Peters, Amiyah Rounds, Alyvia Ciurca, and Alyssa Weldon. In the individual competition, the Twisters had many first place winner including Ciurca (bars, beam, floor, aa; 37.3), VanVonno (bars, beam, floor, aa; 36.35), Pamplona (bars, beam, floor, aa; 37.375), Lambertson (vault; 9.15),Beard (beam, floor, aa; 37.35), Connors (vault; 9.425), Hobbs (vault; 9.325), Jurist (bars; 9.2), Eisemann (vault; 9.275, bars; 9.5), and Mitchell (vault, beam, floor, aa; 37.175). Level 5 champion team members are: Ashley Tyndall, Abbie Baker, Abi Brown, Mia Brown, Cassidy VanVonno, Davina Graybill, Ivy Stearn, Kayla Janek, and Tyanna Handy. First place finishers were: Baker (vault, bars, beam, floor, aa; 38.45) and Handy (vault, bars, beam, floor, aa; 38.125). The Level 6 winning team included Dana Kim, Mackenzi Wagner, Megan Evans, Serena Michnick, Larissa Wiencek, and Madeline Barton. Individual winners were Kim (bars, beam, floor, aa; 37.375), Evans (bars, beam, floor, aa; 34.55), and Wiencek (vault; 9.2). The Level 7 first place team was Emily Timmons, Hailey Brown, Hannah Arrington, Jennah Lupiwok, Neva Richardson, Mallory Rolleston, Valerie Petsche, Katherine Pavlos, and Casey Ross. First place finishers were Arrington (bars; 9.0, floor; 9.35), Lupiwok (bars, beam, aa; 35.65), Richardson (vault, bars, floor, aa; 36.7), and Ross (vault; 9.4). The Twisters are based in Berlin and are coached by Carmella Solito, Fran Fennell, Carrie Baker, Donna Miller, Shannon Tustin, and Mark Solito.

This week in Star sports history

10 YEARS AGO- The Seaford varsity baseball team picked up wins over Woodbridge and Delmar to move to 5-1. Seaford edged Woodbridge, 6-5, thanks to a two-run double by Jason McCluskey. Jason Rust had three hits for the Raiders. Toby Waller tossed a five-hitter in the Blue Jays’ 6-3 win over Delmar. The Laurel baseball team advanced to 7-1 with a 4-2 victory over Polytech. D.J. Tudor earned the win, John Small got the save, and Robbie Macklin collected three hits. FIVE YEARS AGO- Laurel High fielded a track and field team for the first time since the 1980’s. Seaford’s Kelsey Riggleman, a freshman, tossed a no-hitter in her team’s 4-0 win over Indian River. Chelsea Collison and Mellissa Baker each tallied a goal to help the Woodbridge girls’ soccer team to a 2-1 win over Laurel. Alayna Whitney scored for the Bulldogs. LAST YEAR- Joe Thomson stepped down as the Sussex Tech varsity boys’ basketball coach. Thomson stayed on as the school’s athletic director. The Laurel baseball team improved to 5-1 with wins over Crisfield and Snow Hill. Chris Cutsail homered in the Bulldogs’ 13-3 win over the Crabbers. Laurel topped Snow Hill, 16-8, as Cutsail had three hits and Jamie Ruhl added four hits and four RBIs.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.


pAGE 46

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

scenes from seaford Volunteer Fire department’s 2010 Banquet

Top AMBuLAnCe responders - John Kimbler, eric Wright and Calvin Yelverton.

sussex County Council proclamations presentation for sVFd Ladies 75th Anniversary. From left are Wayne Truitt, Ginny Tice, donna Bennett, Mike Vincent and sam Wilson.

sVFd presents the volunteer of the year award

T

Top Fire responders - Gary Moore, Jermey Moore, Jared elliott, eric Wright, ed Hurley, Bill Kohler, Ben o’Bier, Mark o’Bier, John Botdorf, ron Marvel, Ken Tull. photos by Chuck snyder

City of seaford proclamations presentation for sVFd Ladies 75th Anniversary. From left are Leanne phillips-Lowe, Grace peterson, delores slatcher, Bill Bennett, Wayne Truitt, Mark o’Bier, Ginny Tice, donna Bennett, ed Butler, rhea shannon and dan short.

he Volunteer of the Year award is given to a volunteer of the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department for notable service this member has given throughout the year, whether on Richard emergency incidents Toulson and/or behind the scenes. An individual or group of SVFD members nominates the member. The nominations are given to the president and/or chief in writing. As usual, we had several nominations, but one individual stood out above the rest for his dedication to SVFD. This year the volunteer of the year award goes to Rich Toulson. Toulson came to the SVFD in February 1990 from Cranston Heights Fire Company. He coordinates the chicken BBQ at Riverfest. He coordinated the building of the storage shed on Atlanta Road. He has taken care of portable radios — telephone systems in house phones and cell phones. Toulson is on the driver trainer committee, is one of the advisers for the Junior Program, and helps with the upkeep of the banquet floor. Toulson has held the office of chief engineer, 2nd asst., and president of the department and the county association. He is currently the Sussex County Director of the Delaware Volunteer Firefighters Assoc. Anytime you ask him for help he is always there and willing to help.


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

pAGE 47

Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company celebrates 100th anniversary

T

Members of the Bridgeville Lions Club wave to parade watchers. Photos by Lynn Parks

he Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company celebrated its 100th anniversary Saturday, April 10. Spokesman Steve McCarron said that the celebration, which was scheduled for December but had to be postponed due to rain, enjoyed perfect weather. The temperature was in the low 60s and while it was blustery, “the wind doesn’t really blow in town,” he said. “The cooler temps allowed everyone to be comfortable outside.” The celebration included a parade, which had more than 75 entries with around 150 pieces overall. The winners of the parade were: Best fire company with music – Seaford. Best fire company without music – Greenwood. Best pumper – Greenwood, Engine 78-4. Best aerial – Laurel, Ladder 81. Best rescue – Blades, Rescue 71. Best tanker – Blades, Tanker 71. Best brush unit – Dagsboro, 73-0. Best ambulance – Greenwood. Best antique – Seaford. Best non-fire unit – Bridgeville Lions Club. Station traveling the longest distance – Cheswold. Best fire prevention queens – Little Miss and Miss Laurel Fire Prevention. Dover, Lewes and Farmington fire companies also sent manpower and apparatus. No bands participated due to the spring break. An open house followed the parade. “We estimate there must have been at least

900 people in attendance since we went through all 1,500 hot dogs purchased,” McCarron said. Displays in the fire hall featured antique fire and emergency medical equipment that the company has held onto throughout the years as well as numerous photos and albums. There were also displays of all the documentation of the 100th anniversary that include senate and house tributes on the federal level to declarations and proclamations on the local level. Ed Kee, Delaware’s Secretary of Agriculture, thanked the BVFC for its 100 years of service on the governor’s behalf. “Since Bridgeville is an agricultural town it was nice to have Sec. Kee visit,” McCarron said. State Sen. Joe Booth and state Rep. Dave Wilson presented the company with a state of Delaware flag that had been flown over the State House. At the end of the ceremony, the company dedicated its new apparatus building to the men and women of the Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company, past and present, the Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company Auxiliary and the members of the public who help the fire company’s cause year after year. The company then publically took its antique 72-3 out of service and parked the truck in a museum area in the apparatus building.

John Tomeski Jr. (left) and Eric Peterson pull an old hose cart, one of the original pieces of equipment owned by the Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company.

Tommy Jones (right) and his son Zach ride in the Greenwood Volunteer Fire Company’s 1924 Model T fire engine.

At the Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company’s open house on Saturday, many children, including these, were given firefighter hats. Back, from left: Dessaray Nichols, 6, Xander Mansfield, 6, and Peter Nichols, 7. Front, Willow Mansfield, 4, and Abigail Nichols, 2. The Nichols children are from Greenwood and the Mansfield children, their first cousins, are from Bridgeville.

Members of the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department march in the parade, kept in time by a drum corps.


pAGE 48

MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

FIRE DEPARTMENT OFFICERS - Seaford Volunteer Fire Dept.Officers were photographed the night of the SVFD annual banquet. Seated from left are: Jim Mitchell, treasurer; Ken Tull, secretary; Wayne Truitt, president; and J.C. Willin, vice president. Standing from left are: Mark O’Bier, fire chief; Curt Purse, deputy chief; John Botdorf,first assistant chief; Brad Taylor, second assistant chief; Jermey Moore, chief engineer; and Calvin Yelverton, ambulance captain. Photo by Chuck Snyder

AUXILIARY OFFICERS - Seaford Volunteer Fire Dept. Ladies Auxilliary Officers were photographed the night of the SVFD annual banquet. Seated from left are: Julie Rigby, assistant treasurer; Ginny Tice, vice president; Donna Bennett, president; Isabell Stevenson, secretary; and Carolyn Calhoun, treasurer. Standing from left are; Elaine Vincent, director; Deb Marvel, director; Sherry Smith, assistant secretary; and Margie Clayton, director. Photo by Chuck Snyder

INVESTMENT STRATEGIES - On Jan. 6, Chris Vane and Don Birch of Morgan Stanley spoke to Soroptimist International of Seaford about investment strategies. Birch encouraged members that “the worst recessions have the best recoveries.” He also advised that getting back into the stock market is very important, but it is crucial to diversify investments in order to stay ahead of possible inflation. They recommended that people still working need to “save a lot more than anybody has ever told you,” while cautioning current retirees to be more frugal than they may have anticipated.

SCOUT SUNDAY CORRECTION - Seaford Boy Scout Troop 249 attended St. John’s UMC on March 14, to participate in Scout Sunday. St. John’s has sponsored scouting for 54 years. Pictured are scouts Greg Kisela, Brad Morgan, David Simpler, Raekwon Willey, Jeremy Dulis, Travis Collins, Justin Gray, Mason Whitelock, Nick Smart, Travis Sewell, CJ Ellis, Jacob Tull, Austin Kraft. In the photo from this week’s Seaford Star, the names of the back row were omitted. In the back row from left are Christy Potter, Mike Tull, Matthew Tull and Betsy Godfrey.

Staying informed about digital books Digital books have the potential to transform access to knowledge in the United States ad abroad. They eliminate the purchasing, cataloguing and problems that physical books require. Digital books offer hope of reducing traditional barriers but will happen only if readers demand it. Technology companies need to design their systems to accommodate and support public domain and license options. Traditional libraries frown on limiting access to books unnecessarily. The proposed Google Book Search service reserves to Google the right to exclude any book “for editorial reasons.” If, as is possible, Google becomes the only viable source for digital works, this means that Google will have extraordinary influence over public access to works. The vast majority of global readers

Page by Page News from the Seaford Library and Cultural Center

By Anne Nesbitt

will never be able to afford the $300 Kindle 2. Digital book providers should ensure that readers in resource-poor areas have options for engaging with new digital resources. For example, Google has, as part of its proposed Google Book Search settlement with authors and publishers, proposed offering a free public access terminal for the Google Books collection to every public library in America. The best way to bring costs

down is to foster vibrant, free-market competition in these technologies. Booksellers, publishers and authors must work together to enable accessibility features so that people with print disabilities can enjoy the vastly expanded world of books on the same terms as others. The future of digital books must not be shaped solely by authors, publishers, booksellers or even librarians. Readers can and should play an active role in realizing the extraordinary potential of digital books – but only if they stay informed, ask questions and demand that providers respect the rights and expectations that have been developed ad defended for physical books. *This information is provided by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Bingo for Life on April 22

The Trinity Foundation will be hosting a “Bingo for Life” Basket and Pottery Bingo at The Elks Lodge Seaford, on April 22 to benefit the American Cancer Society. The doors open at 6 p.m. for seating, bingo begins at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased ahead of time for $20 each or for $25 at the door. Hot Items include Medium Wash Day Basket, Recycle Bin w/lids, and Pie Plate Bundle with wrought iron stand. To purchase tickets, contact Ashley Connolly, 253-3900, ext. 3978, or stop by Trinity’s office at 1201 Bridgeville Highway. The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer through research, education, advocacy, and service.


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Send in your recipe selections for the Seaford Historical Society Cookbook By Anne Nesbitt The Seaford Historical Society has a new-old cookbook in the making. It is part of the 150th anniversary celebration of the opening of the Ross Mansion and will be available for distribution at the evening gala scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 16. Retired home economics teacher and expert administrator of Victorian Teas at the Ross Mansion, Jeanne Conner, is masterminding this publication. Because the project is part of the celebration of an event of 150 years ago, Conner thought it would be appropriate to feature recipes of a bygone era. She is asking people to check their heirlooms for recipes that date back to the late 1800s and 1900s. She hopes that some individuals have old cookbooks that

they have preserved through the years and will pore over them for recipe ideas. She would also like to have stories to go along with the recipes that will tell about life in those long ago years. Conner would like recipes that emphasize local products such as peaches, apples, oysters, corn, garden crops and poultry. With the Ross Mansion dating back to the Civil War years, she would like recipes that were used during that time both at home and in the military encampments. The Seaford Historical Society has in its possession one of the old Ross family cookbooks. Conner will include in the new book some of those old recipes. She hopes that others will have old family cookbooks from that time and from all levels of income. Conner would like to have copies of

the old recipes just as they appeared in the old cookbooks. It will be her challenge to interpret the recipes into a format that will make them usable by today’s cooks without losing the old character. Conner already has a wealth of Victorian tea recipes which she has used during the ten years of teas at the Ross Mansion. She also has some that she had researched but did not use at the teas. Recipes should be in Conner’s hands before May 15, 2010 in order to the publication deadline. Hence, there is no time to tarry. Recipes should be sent to the Seaford Historical Society office at 23 High Street, Seaford, DE 19973 marked, “Attn. Cookbook.” Recipes also may be emailed to seafordsociety@verizon.net with cookbook in the subject line.

Seaford Middle School students presenting Beauty and the Beast Jr. musical April 15 - 17 Seaford Middle School (SMS) will present “Beauty and the Beast, Jr.” on April 15, 16, 17 at 7 p.m. in the SMS Auditorium. The cast includes: Belle - Mackenzie Wooters; Beast- Troy Miller; Gaston Tawn Beard, Jr.; Lefou - Lavaro Holley; Maurice - Alex Caporale; Lumiere - John Hare; Cogsworth - Jyree’ Brice; Madame de la Grande Bouche - Shanda Saylor; Babette - Taylor Prance; Mrs. Potts Taschianna Gibbs-Hughes; Chip - Mary Niles; Silly Girls - Shianne Sparrow, Rebecca Zachry, Hailey Parks; Monsieur D’Arque - Ricky Johnson; Baker - Jessica Hennessey; Bookseller - Michael Joseph; Hat Seller - Ariana Myers; Aristocratic Lady - Kierstyn Woody; Lady with a cane - Payton Monroe; Lady with a baby - Desiree Smith; Narrators - Memoree Adkins, Ariana Myers; Sausage Curl Girl - Katherine Gladding; Shepherd Boy - Megan Messick; Fish Man - Haley Miller; Candle Man - Haley Miller; Egg Man - Ricky Johnson; and Shadows/Wolves - Courtney Michel, Michael Joseph, Desiree Smith.

pAGE 49

Community Notebook

Have dinner with the captain

Nanticoke Cancer Center’s Relay for Life Team is sponsoring “Dinner With the Captain” aboard the Dorothy Megan (Suicide Bridge restaurant) on Wednesday, April 28, from 6 to 9 p.m. The cost is $40 for adults, $23 for children (10 and under). Dinner will be comprised of prime rib, crab cake, salad, two sides, dessert and non-alcoholic drinks. A cash bar will be available. For tickets call 629-6611, ext. 2588.

DelDOT reports road closing

The Department of Transportation (DelDOT) crews will close Greenhurst Farm Road between Woodyard Road and Route 36/Shawnee Road near Greenwood to repair a failing crossroad pipe. The road will be closed at 7 a.m. on Monday, April 19. The roadway will reopen on or before Friday, April 30, pending weather. Detour signs are posted to guide motorists.

DelDOT reports road opening

Old Furnace Road should reopen later this week, according to DelDOT’s Tina Shockley. “We have been waiting for some hotmix for the hotmix curbing on the project. The plant didn’t open until (Monday), so we haven’t been able to get it to finish the project. We should get that material in this week, along with the guardrail and the project will be finished, with opening scheduled for later this week,” Shockley said. “Please note bad weather could delay the opening if we can’t get the material in,” she added.

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MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Vince Morris 5K Walk/Run

The ongoing battle against cancer and maintenance of a popular nature trail will benefit from the 2010 Vince Morris 5K Walk/Run, set for Saturday, April 24, at Chapel Branch. The event, held in memory of the beloved Seaford School District teacher, coach, athletic director and mentor, will begin at 8 a.m. Race day check-in opens at 7:30 a.m. Proceeds will support Seaford High School’s Relay for Life effort as well as maintenance of the Vince Morris Trail at Chapel Branch, home course for Seaford High School cross country. The first 10 registrants receive either a hat or shirt, and every entrant will receive an official Vince Morris Certificate of participation. Prizes and giveaways will be awarded. Entry fee is $15 through pre-registration (received by April 20) and $20 the day of the event. Harry Brake

Seaford

Delaware Tea Party to protest

One year later and the Delaware Tea Party is still at it. The Tea Party movement started in Delaware last year with a round of protests across the state. They are at it again. This April 15, citizens will again create signs and protest their concerns over the unprecedented spending of our current government. Current efforts include voter registration as well as providing information on the issues and potential candidates. This year’s round of Tea Parties will start at 11 a.m. in Rehoboth. Protestors will line the sidewalks in front of the outlets. The group will meet in the K-mart parking lot. This protest will last until 1 p.m. when the group will head to the Legislative Mall in Dover to join the 9-12 club’s rally. That rally will end at 5 p.m. and will include speakers. For more information, contact Chris Shirey at 875-5489, email Delawaretaxteaparty@gmail.com or visit www.delawareteaparty.org. Chris Shirey Laurel

Vote ‘no’ for gambling casinos

The following is a letter I e-mailed on March 26, to our Sussex County legislators that are supporting the expansion of gambling into our county. The casino gambling bill is rumored to be coming to the floor for a vote on Thursday, April 1. Coinci-

Letters to the Editor

dentally, this is also April Fools’ Day. How appropriate is that? It is important that the citizens of Sussex realize who is behind this bill and its amendments. I decided not to send this letter to Rep. Pete Schwartzkopf knowing it would be a waste of time as he is a fiscal social and moral liberal with no sense of right, wrong, good or bad. Rep. Schwartzkopf continues to be the ring leader in the three-ring circus that our state government has become.

Dear Sen. Joe Booth, Sen. Robert Venables, Rep. John Atkins and Rep Biff Lee: As you know, HB 194 along with some of its amendments will cause the expansion of gambling casinos into Sussex County. On behalf of many who feel the same as I do, I want you to ask you to please change your minds about supporting something that will forever change our county for the worse. Please do not vote “Yes” on HB 194 and its amendments when they come to the floor. Please remove your names as additional sponsors of the bill and/or its amendments. Please lobby your peers to vote against the bill and its amendments also. As citizens of Sussex County, we want to hold you in high regard as moral and social conservatives but your continued support of these bills and amendments could cause us to believe otherwise. The Indian River School Board has passed a resolution against placing casinos near their campuses and the Sussex County Council has placed a moratorium against building gambling casinos in the county. Please realize that your moral and social conservative constituents do not want gambling casinos to be in the future of Sussex County. Please act according to the will of the people that understand right from wrong and good from bad. Eric Bodenweiser

Georgetown

Thank you for your support

The Seaford Kiwanis Club would like to thank everyone who made our March 27th Bingo Night a great success. Thanks to the following sponsors for their financial support: Birch/Vane of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Chambers Motors, Cut’em Up Tree Care, Hoobers Farm Equipment, Nanticoke Health Services, Penco Corporation, Peninsula Oil and Propane, Pizza King, Soil Service, Wash’n Vac, ALL-CON World Systems, Ambassador Travel, Phil Burtelle Painting, First State Chevy, Griffin Home Builders, Harley Davidson, Helena Chemical, Home Team Realty, Mow-N-Trim, Phillips

Morning Star Publications Inc.

P.O. Box 1000 • 951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

President Bryant L. Richardson

Signs, Scott Frye’s Floor Coverings, and Seaford Cigarette Outlet. Thanks also to those businesses that contributed door prizes and to those who played bingo. Your support enables Kiwanis to provide financial assistance to a variety of community organizations and functions. A good time was had by all. See you next year. Karl Van Tine Jr.

Bingo chairman

Trouble ahead for America

The Senate Health Care Bill passed by the House represents a “new dawn” in America. Within most of our lifetimes, I believe it will prove to the be single largest expansion of and overreach by the federal government into the ability of ordinary Americans to live free from control and intrusion. 16,000 new IRS agents will be hired, tasked with the monthly monitoring of 330 million plus or minus citizens and their insurance coverage or lack thereof. They will have the authority to levy fines, garnish wages and withhold tax refunds if you either fail to carry coverage or carry coverage that does not meet the minimum requirements. Most folks will be slow to see the changes, as they will be phased in over a number of years. Not so for the folks with incomes over $200,000. These individuals and families are most likely to be your plumber, electrician, contractor, auto body shop owner and the poultry farmer down the road. These folks will see an immediate increase in social security and medicare taxes. Further, the largest part of the funding for our massive new entitlement is derived by cutting a half a trillion dollars from Medicare. If this is accomplished it likely will pit the health care needs of those under age 65 against the needs of those over age 65. If they fail to cut $500 billion from Medicare, where will the money come from? Will the Treasury simply continue to print it until they run out of paper and ink? And what of the states? Now facing a largely unfunded mandate for expanded Medicaid? Someone will have to pay. That’s the bottom line here. There is a fundamental divide between liberal progressives who view health care as a basic right and conservatives who perceive it to be a good or service to be purchased. The same could be stated for how we got into the subprime mortgage crisis. If you still believe that our condition is “not that bad” here is one final example. I recently received my annual Social Security Statement, which is sent to every income earning tax paying American every Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial

year. On page two it states, “Your estimated benefits are based on current law. Congress has made changes to the law in the past and may do so at any time. The law governing benefit amounts may change, because, by 2037, the payroll taxes collected will be enough to pay only 76% of scheduled benefits.” In 2037, I will be 75, if I am lucky enough to be alive. It grieves me to think of myself as a potential “job seeker” at this age. Is this what you envision for your children and grandchildren? Independents and those who believe themselves to be “unaffected” must wake up and take action. Hard choices will need to be made regarding moral obligations with respect to financial responsibilities. A line in the sand must be drawn or all of us, together, will be washed into the sea. Penny Atkins

Seaford

Support all school activities

I am quite disturbed at the amount of participation that administration, parents and community members have at Seaford High School. I have been to several different functions there in my years and there is quite a difference at what people support. Certain sports apparently get top billing, like football and basketball. Yet, plays, music concerts and even functions that are held to boost the school, such as the recent Family Appreciation and Awareness Night, are poorly attended. To me, this explains why the school is having problems. Apparently the community only wants to support certain activities and administrators appear only at certain sporting events because they are popular. Ask around and you will hear the disdain folks have. Parental involvement is key for any kind of success. The school has been blasted for underachieving. Administrators and teachers take the heat. But if you talk to them, they see little interest by parents in their students and the interest only peaks when students fail and it is too late to do anything about it. This community needs to rally around all activities in the school - all sports, academics and extracurricular activities and the students who participate in them. This is the only way to guarantee any kind of success. Until this happens, expect failure and disgust to continue. Parents, rally around your children. They are not going to succeed just because you send them to school. It takes more than that for success to happen. Emilio Largo

Seaford

Carol Kinsley Elaine Schneider

Sales

Rick Cullen

Kay Wennberg

Brandon Miller

Composition Cassie Richardson Rita Brex

Doris Shenton

Laura Rogers

Lynn Parks Morning Star Publications Inc. Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Tony Windsor has been serving the Delmarva Circulation Treasurer Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Cathy Shufelt Karen Cherrix Peninsula since 1996. town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • ApRIl 15 - 21, 2010

Final Word

pAGE 51

The ‘actual’ share of the federal debt for taxpayers The figures appearing in the Vital Stats are taken from a website found by Googling National Debt Clock. The process used to determine the average debt per citizen is correct. However, this does not paint a true picture of the tax burden on those who are actually paying taxes. The number of taxpayers filing returns in 2007 was almost 138.9 million. When this number is divided into the most recent national debt figure, each “taxpayer’s” share of the debt is $92,450.

Deficit spending quickly adds up Last year’s annual deficit in the United States was $1.42 trillion. So, whatever you paid in taxes this year, add $10,223 to the amount you owe. That’s what would have been needed to balance last year’s budget. Why not trim government? In many businesses payroll is the number one expense. To take a serious stab at reducing the deficit and attacking the national debt problem, federal jobs need to be cut across the board. Here’s an idea: Provide an incentive for 10 percent of those on the federal payroll to move into the private sector, to start businesses for example. This would lessen the burden on taxpayers and be a more compassionate way to reduce the payroll. What’s that I hear? The government cannot reduce the payroll that much without causing chaos. Don’t tell that to those working in the private sector. Businesses have had to make dramatic cuts and those lucky enough to still have jobs are working harder to compensate for the fact there are fewer workers to share the workload. If workers in the private sector have to make sacrifices, why not those on the federal payroll? Those in business will be more respectful of lawmakers and bureaucrats if they are participating in the sacrifices needed to get this nation back on track. Bryant Richardson Publisher

Spring Has Sprung At

C

The

Vital Stats

Federal Debt as of April 12, 2010 at 11:30 a.m. $12,841,349,740,165 Population of United States 308,180,680 Each citizen’s share of debt $41,668 The average citizen’s share of debt increased $199 in the past six days. The debt increased by more than $63 billion and the population increased by 35,403. Vital Stats Correction Last week’s Federal Debt was not properly updated. For that period the debt increased by more than $77.7 billion and the population increased by 43,028. The increase in the average citizen’s share of debt was correct at $247.

Last Laugh

A Far East newspaper reports that one morning not long ago a man called a taxi company and complained that the cab he had ordered to take him to the airport had not arrived. The woman who took the call apologized. “I’m very sorry the cab isn’t there yet, sir,” she said. “But don’t worry. The plane is always late.” “Well, it certainly will be this morning,” the caller said sharply. “I happen to be the pilot.” Bob Wootten New Bern, NC

Final Word

Submit items foro Final Word by email to editor@mspublications.com. Include your name, hometown and a daytime phone number.

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April 15 2010 S  

HEROES - Desire to help youth excel in life is John’s goal. Page 8 Business Journal B ulletin B oard 16-19 B usiness 6 C hurCh 21-22 C lassi...