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Class Notes within GE Aviation, and then became general counsel for GE Aviation’s business and general aviation business. “GE does compliance and legal better than anybody, and they empower their general counsels. At Unison, I was parachuted into a sophisticated executive team. I was learning so much. It was like drinking from a fire hose. Over time, I found myself morphing almost entirely into business leadership and was simply acting as an interpreter between environmental lawyers and business lawyers and the business team. I loved the role,” Lowe said. “There was a highperformance mentality at the core of GE, and it was fun and thrilling. We got to do big things. … I learned so much at GE about leadership and running teams and being around great CEOs that it enabled me to think about roles outside of law.” While he considered that his trajectory might be like that of other GE general counsels who went on to head those Fortune 500 companies, Lowe was equally comfortable thinking that he could spend the next 30 years at GE. It was a career connected to a very sturdy trunk, and he was climbing near the top at a very young age. There were very few people with whom Lowe would have considered venturing out on the thinnest of limbs. “A handful of college buddies,” Lowe said, “and my old drinking buddies who happen to make the world’s finest ice cream.”

“Jeni and I are incredibly different people, but we share one overriding characteristic: We are both ferociously competitive.” “It was a bigger risk than I wanted to admit at the time because I wanted to do it so bad,” Lowe said of the couple inviting him to join the Jeni’s team in January 2009. “I loved GE. I loved everything I was able to do there and the opportunities. But these were two people I totally believed in and a product I truly thought was world-class.” He added: “I was able to take that risk because my wife was an accomplished lawyer. If Jeni’s didn’t work out, we could still pay the bills because my wife could go back to practicing law. My wife’s brains and abilities freed me up to give this a try.” He and Britton Bauer made a 20-year commitment to running the business together. In addition to growing the wholesale and retail business at Jeni’s, Lowe has allowed his creative side to come through in the development of Eat Well Distribution, an affiliate he created that buys dried goods and marshals the ice cream company’s distribution and marketing prowess to help other small food companies get on the shelves of specialty retailers. For the man who has had little time to decorate his office, there is one sign hanging up that gives a nod to the instincts that brought him here. It reads: “A ship in harbor is safe. But that’s not what ships are built for!” AR

1950s The Honorable David A. Katz ’57 was profiled in the September 2012 issue of The Federal Lawyer. The article shares a Henry David Thoreau quote Katz carries in his wallet, details about when his dreams of a career in law began, and other interesting points of his career. To read the full story, visit http://moritzlaw. osu.edu/alumni/sidebar/docs/ Katz.pdf.

1960s James R. Barton ’61 was honored at a luncheon in April by the Cincinnati Bar Association as its 2011 Volunteer Lawyer of the Year. Barton retired in 1992 after a 30-year career in the life insurance, mortgage and real estate industry with The Columbus Life Insurance Co., a subsidiary of Western & Southern Financial Group. In 2008, he became involved with the Volunteer Lawyers Project as a foreclosure defense attorney, accepting 17 foreclosure client referrals. For election news on William Batchelder ’67, see Page 87. Michael G. Long ’69, a partner with the Columbus office of Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP, was included in the 2013 Best Lawyers in America List, which entails an exhaustive peer-review survey. Long’s practice focuses on bet-the-company and commercial litigation.

J. Jeffrey McNealey ’69, a partner at Porter Wright’s Columbus office, was recognized again by Chambers USA 2012, which refers to him as “Senior Statesman” of Ohio environmental lawyers, as a leading lawyer in his field of real estate zoning and land use. McNealey also has been named for many years in Best Lawyers in America and recognized by Ohio Super Lawyers. Jack R. Pigman ’69, a partner at Porter Wright, was recognized by Chambers USA 2012 as a leading lawyer in his field of bankruptcy and restructuring. Pigman works in the firm’s Columbus office. Thomas M. Tarpy ’69, a partner with the Columbus office of Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP, was included in the 2013 Best Lawyers in America List, which entails an exhaustive peer-review survey. Tarpy’s practice focuses on employment and labor law.

1970s Charles C. Warner ’70, a partner at Porter Wright’s Columbus office, was recognized by Chambers USA 2012 as a leading lawyer in his field of labor and employment law. Warner also has been listed for his practice in Best Lawyers in America for more than 10 years and has been recognized by Ohio Super Lawyers.

Moritz College of Law | W I N T E R 2 0 1 3

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All Rise Winter 2013  

All Rise Winter 2013 - The Creepy Factor

All Rise Winter 2013  

All Rise Winter 2013 - The Creepy Factor

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