Page 40

[ The Creepy Factor ]

If Target can develop a sophisticated algorithm and data-mine its way to figuring out that a teenage girl was pregnant before her own father was made aware, is it much of a stretch to imagine other entities could be gleaning our own personal, sensitive health information? Consumers may appreciate the cookies that enable a clothing retailer to deliver only the advertisements that are relevant to them, but those same private citizens recoil at the thought of searches of a more personal matter being followed as well. If Target can develop a sophisticated algorithm and data-mine its way to figuring out that a teenage girl was pregnant before her own father was made aware, is it much of a stretch to imagine other entities could be gleaning our own personal, sensitive health information? Debates about Do Not Track registries are under way, and regulatory frameworks across the globe are experiencing updates that would affect policing agencies and private industry. Accordingly, a new era is beginning in the privacy field, which has erupted over the last 20 years and is likely to only grow further, according to experts and those presenting at November’s Ohio State Law Journal

symposium “The Second Wave of Global Privacy Protection.” Kirk Herath, vice president and privacy officer for Nationwide Insurance Companies, cited his own career history at Nationwide as an example of how quickly the industry has expanded. In the late-1990s, he was an “army of one” at the company, charged with discerning what privacy issues surrounded the information they had on file about customers. Today, he works in a department with 16 other people who ensure Nationwide and its vendors meet privacy protection compliance standards across all 50 states. As technology continues to develop at breakneck speed, it’s likely the privacy profession will continue to swell in numbers. The International Association of Privacy Professionals, founded in 2000, estimates there could be as many as 200,000 privacy professionals working in the U.S. in the next decade. Swire jokes that it is an area of specialization that has kept him in a job for the last 20 years. In his office on the second floor of Drinko Hall hangs a framed USA Today article from June 7, 2000. The piece focuses on contributions Swire, the nation’s first Chief Counselor for Privacy, had made with privacy rights legislation in the medical field as well as banking industry. Fast-forward to November 2012, and Swire is the subject of more national coverage in The New York Times, as he accepted the challenge of co-chairing a World Wide Web Consortium working group developing Do Not Track

Primer on Privacy Protection 1980 - 1994

BEFORE THE INTERNET BOOM Privacy laws exist prior to the rise of the commercial Internet, including the Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1970 in the United States, as well as privacy laws in Europe. Fair Information Privacy Practices (FIPPs) are developed along the way.

40

In 1980, the U.S. signs the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines, which include seven, nonbinding principles governing the protection of personal data: notice, purpose, consent, security, disclosure, access, and accountability.

T H E O H I O S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y

1995

In the late-1980s and early-1990s, “packet switching” evolves into what eventually becomes known as the Internet. Commercial Internet service providers (ISPs) come on scene in the U.S., and the Internet expands rapidly across the globe.

The world’s first commercial cellular network is launched in Japan in 1979, with European countries and the United States following in the early-1980s.

The Internet becomes fully commercialized in the U.S. The European Union completes drafting its Data Protection Directive, focusing on protecting people’s privacy when their personal data is being processed and transmitted in an open market. The EU considers privacy a human rights issue.

All Rise Winter 2013  

All Rise Winter 2013 - The Creepy Factor

All Rise Winter 2013  

All Rise Winter 2013 - The Creepy Factor

Advertisement