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12th & High a very deliberative process that happens in between,” Walker said. “The justices interact primarily through written work going back and forth through draft opinions and comments.” After finishing his clerkship, Walker worked for Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel P.L.L.C., a boutique litigation firm in Washington, D.C. In the three years prior to his arrival at Moritz, he worked on both appellate and trial cases. Walker attended Brigham Young University as an undergraduate. He had dreamed of attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government since he was a kid in Las Vegas. The problem was he also was interested in law and fell in love with Stanford on a visit to the law school. “Stanford and Harvard law are really different,” Walker said. “Harvard is huge, with almost 550 J.D. students per class. Stanford is small, with one-third of the students. This meant I would have better access to professors, which was important to me because I knew I wanted to go into teaching.” Walker did the logical thing: He attended both. He spent his first year of law school at Stanford and then a year at Harvard, partaking of the first year of classes at the Kennedy School. For years three and four, he jetted across the country taking classes at both Stanford and Harvard. “I loved law school. It is really about breadth and depth at the same time,” he said. Walker’s favorite class in law school was constitutional litigation, which he took with Professor Pamela Karlan, the Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford. Walker teaches the same class, Constitutional Litigation, at Moritz, in addition to Legislation and upper-level electives related to administrative law. “That is one of the reasons I chose Moritz. It is a dream to teach this class,” he said. “It is a great mixture of constitutional law, civil procedure, and trial strategy. Lawyers really need to choose the right plaintiffs and defendants if the constitutional landscape is going to change.”

Christopher J. Walker

Sharing passion for community lawyering projects From Muslim to Arab and South Asian groups, from New York to that “state up North,” Akbar has put her lawyering skills to use in many communities. This fall, she began bringing them to students at Moritz as a visiting clinical professor of law. After providing legal services to immigrant battered women and then representing men held by the United States in the extraordinary rendition and secret detention program, Akbar saw U.S. national security policies were encroaching on the rights of Muslim, Arab, and South Asian communities not >>

“Obviously, very few people know about how the Supreme Court works. They see oral arguments, and then they read opinions. But there is a very deliberative process that happens in between.” – Christopher J. Walker

Moritz College of Law | W I N T E R 2 0 1 3

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All Rise Winter 2013  

All Rise Winter 2013 - The Creepy Factor

All Rise Winter 2013  

All Rise Winter 2013 - The Creepy Factor

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