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Denver Arts Center

M o r g a n Tad e

A R C H 6 0 9 S p r i n g 2 0 1 4


Our site, on the corner of 7th Street and Santa Fe Drive, provides advantageous opportunities in terms of accessibility and cultural connectivity. Sitting in the Lincoln Park neighborhood, Santa Fe Drive sits in the crossroads of industrial and contemporary styling, a culmination that contributes to the overall culture and aesthetics of the space. The neighborhood showcases a layering of various elements, from the numerous ethnicities represented to the building materiality and textural qualities within it, ultimately creating a “patchwork” of culture and a complex and unique urban fabric, which is highlighted best along Santa Fe Drive. We see this complexity as an opportunity, hoping to showcase this mix of cultures and building qualities within our design, utilizing a mix of repurposed materials and colors as well as displaying industrial and contemporary-based artworks within the space. Calling for an outdoor area, the program allows us to explore different iterations of this program element, as we envision a public space that feels accessible to all pedestrians and residents of the area, not restricted to solely the art center visitors. We hope to incorporate differing levels of containment, allowing for a multi-seasonal outdoor environment throughout the year. Overall, we will strive to reveal and expand upon the essence of the arts district and neighborhood, maintaining its unique sense of place.

Jessica Rea & Morgan Tade

Jessica Rea & Morgan Tade

1

Our site, on the corner of 7th Street and Santa Fe Drive, provides advantageous opportunities in terms of accessibility and cultural connectivity. Sitting in the Lincoln Park neighborhood, Santa Fe Drive sits in the crossroads of industrial and contemporary styling, a culmination that contributes to the overall culture and aesthetics of the space. The neighborhood showcases a layering of various elements, from the numerous ethnicities represented to the building materiality and textural qualities within it, ultimately creating a “patchwork” of culture and a complex and unique urban fabric, which is highlighted best along Santa Fe Drive. We see this complexity as an opportunity, hoping to showcase this mix of cultures and building qualities within our design, utilizing a mix of repurposed materials and colors as well as displaying industrial and contemporary-based artworks within the space. Calling for an outdoor area, the program allows us to explore different iterations of this program element, as we envision a public space that feels accessible to all pedestrians and residents of the area, not restricted to solely the art center visitors. We hope to incorporate differing levels of containment, allowing for a multi-seasonal outdoor environment throughout the year. Overall, we will strive to reveal and expand upon the essence of the arts district and neighborhood, maintaining its unique sense of place.


3 5 7 9 13 21 2


Pedestrian access to site

Sun

Wind

travelling to denver, as a class we each individually assessed the site on 7th and santa fe. taking pictures, sketching, and diagramming, we each came up with the core characteristics of the site and neighborhood that most inspired us in terms of design. We decided to pair together based on the commonalities between our analyses, both really emphasizing sante fe drive as the culmination of two cultures -- the modern, flashy aesthetic to the east and the industrial aesthetic to the west. the grittiness of materials in the neighborhood combined with the colorful murals and artwork around showcase this dynamic.

Site Stratigies : 3

Investigating Site


Santa Fe Drive

--”Gritty” --Simple Forms --metal, plaster, wood as materials

Most Common Materials

Most Common Colors

Wood Brick Steel Stucco Stucco ashy” --complex forms --glass, stone, concrete as materials --modernist styling

(grainy texture)

Glass block

4


using the site analysis as a foundation, we worked on collecting images that captured the essence of our project’s intent. consisting of images focused on repurposed materials, a mixing of textures, the incorporation of industrial qualities, as well as interactive and multi-seasonal spaces, these photos helped focus our overall core concepts for design. we next sketched out some preliminary design ideas using these photos as inspiration.

Process : 5

Response to site and Context


6


continuing on, we began exploring potential form configurations keeping our project values in mind. using other museums we have visited as precedents, particularly the clyfford still museum in denver, we strove to incorporate multiple moments of visual connectivity between spaces and floors. this ultimately had us layering spaces atop one another rhythmically, and after many iterations we eventually created a scheme that naturally promoted a strong structural grid formation.

Parti : 7

Developing and Exploring


8


from the parti, we moved into the longest phase of our design process. tweaking and finalizing programmatic configurations, we developed plans, sections, and initial elevational drawings. making sure to incorporate a strong circulation path through the gallery spaces was key, as well as highlighting the voids that penetrated through the building. Once the spaces, heights, and overall massing were determined, we began discussing materiality. drawing back to our core design thesis, we decided on using corten steel on the gallery areas and board-form concrete on the ground floor, which we felt showed the combination of the modern and industrial.

Development : 9

Evolving the parti


Materials: Board Form Concrete

Cor-ten Steel Rain Screen System

The concrete was used mainly on the lower level to ground the building, as well as visually representing the ‘gritty’ parts of the neighborhood that we observed while visiting the site. The cor-ten steel was used only on the gallery spaces, and was meant to represent the more modern aspects of the neighborhood. We also used it as a rain screen system facade.

10


We decided to keep the ground floor level idea from parti 1 when we chose to pursue our third parti design. Instead of keeping a completely transparent design, we desided to explore the idea of a space that could be adaptable to different weather conditions. We thought the best way to do this would be to create a facade of movable sliding panels that could open and closed based on the occupants needs, while still maintaing that connectivity to the pedestrians.

We created window pop-ups that acted both as a way to circulate air through the building and exhaust it out of the top through an operable vent, as well as aesthetically emphasizing the voids throughout the building.

11


We noticed a lot of repurposing in the Santa Fe area, as well as the use of glass blocks on many building facades. We thought this would be a good opportunity to bring both asethetics together, and create a bottle wall within our design. We found many local breweries in the Denver area, and would use their excess bottles in our bottle wall.

12


Building Process of the Slice Model

with the design reaching finalization, we moved on to detailing, creating wall sections to show how the assemblies within the building would all fit together. exploring cor-ten paneling systems, terrace pavement configurations, and more, these drawings took our design towards more practical realization. deciding on hvac placement, we learned firsthand how to combine all of these various elements effectively into one cohesive design. this knowledge and research was then put to the test as we embarked upon constructing a 1/2� scale sectional model slice of our building, giving us important insight into the constructional process of the space.

Detailing : 13

Exploring the way parts come together


20


2

3

1

2

1

6 7

3 5 4

8

Slope

Detail 1 - Cor-ten Panels

9

10 11 12 13

14

Detail 1 Level 3 31' - 0"

18 17

15

16

19

Level 2 16' - 0"

20

21 23 29

24 25

22 26

30

28 27

Level 1 4' - 0"

31 32

Slope <2%

33 34

Cafe Level 0' - 0"

35 36 39

40

37 41

38

42

15

43

Level 0 -11' - 0"

1. Double pane glass 2. Thermopane roof glazing 3. Vent/smoke extract aluminum 4. Roof drain 5. Counter flashing 6. Parapet coping 7. Membrane over parapet 8. Vertical 8” Stud 9. 8“ metal stud 2’ o.c. 10. Vapor barrier 11. Rigid insulation 12. Vertical aluminum top hat 13. Interlocking corten panels 4’x8’ 14. Fasteners 15. Wall construction: 2 layers 5/8” gypsum board 2” plywood 3.5” metal studs 2’ o.c. 16. Vertical running HVAC 17. 8” cast-in-place, board form, concrete walls 18. 2 layers 5/8” gypsum board, backed with 2” plywood 19. 6” one-way concrete floor slab (14“ total) with 2” leveling layer, polished finish 20. Metal flashing 21. 8” metal studs 2’ o.c. 22. 8” cast-in-place wall 23. 5/8” gypsum board 24. Sealant with backer rod 25. Aluminum trim 26. Drip edge 27. Hydraulic ram 28. Folding panel door (corten steel) 29. Hanging track lighting 30. Double glazing glass in aluminum frame 31. Floor construction: 2” Wood flooring 1.5” Decking 6” one-way concrete floor slab 32. Garage type bulb stop 33. Cement sidewalk 34. Earth 35. Gravel 36. Drainage mat faced with filter fabric 37. Rigid insulation 38. 2 layers 5/8” gypsum board 39. HVAC 40. Sprinkler system 41. Pendant lighting 42. Floor construction: 2” Wood flooring 1.5” Decking 4” Concrete slab 3” Rigid Insulation


Detail 2 - Bottle Wall

ROOF ASSEMBLY 12- Rigid Insulation (sloped) 3 4- 6” Insulation 5- Track Lighting 6- 8” Metal Studs (2’ apart) 7- 5/8” Gypsum Wall Board 8- Sealant and Backer Rod TERRACE ASSEMBLY 9 - 2” x 4’ Pavers 10- 12“ Drain 11- 8” - 12” Sloped Rigid Insulation 12- Interlocking Corten Panels (4’ x 8’) 13- 5/8” Gypsum Wall Board (2 layers) 14- 2” Plywood backing 15- 4” Metal Studs (2’ apart) 16- 8“ Metal Studs (2’ apart) 17 - Rotating Wheels 18- Aluminum Flashing 19- 1” Gypsum Wall Board 20- Recessed Outdoor Light (battery-operated) 21- 8” Bottle Wall assembly -glass bottles clamped between two metal die-cut sheets ,then encased in glass 22- 2“ Polish Finish Concrete Leveling Layer 23- 6” One-way Concrete Slab (14” total) 24- Pendant Lighting 25 26- Gravel 27- FLOOR ASSEMBLY (basement) 2” Wood Flooring Vapor Barrier Concrete Footing 28- Perforated Drainage Pipe

2 1/2”

2 1/2”

1

2 3 4

5 6 7

8

2 1/2” Level 3 31' - 0"

9 10 3 11

12 4 3

13 14 15 16

8

Level 2 16' - 0" 17 18 19 20

21

Detail 2

Level 1 4' - 0"

22 23

24

Cafe Level 0' - 0"

14

6

25 14 26

27

Level 0 -11' - 0"

28

16


Cor-ten panel construction

17


Sliding doors to the cafe

18


19


20


after constructing the large-scale version of a piece of our building, we adjusted our drawings to accomodate for any problems we encountered as we built, adjusting wall thicknesses and assemblies. we then constructed a smaller scale model of the project in its entirety, showing its placement within the urban fabric surrounding it. utilizing our digital model, we rendered views from outside and within the building, showing our overall experiential concepts for the design. combining our plans, sections, elevations, diagrams, and perspective views, we ended with a comprehensive design we were proud of.

Final : 21

The finished product


22


Jun 21

2

5

1

1

9 AM

6

21 Dec

S

June 21st

3

1

N

4

14 2

4 16

15 3

17 5

18 6

A

19 7

A

December 21st

B 4

C B

9 AM

Level 4 42' - 0"

26 24

Level 3 27' - 0"

23

19

Level 2 12' - 0"

8 17

12

18

Level 1 0' - 0" Cafe Level -4' - 0" 6

1

Level 0 -15' - 0"

23

Section CC


2

3

1 PM

D

C 5

E

December 21st

4 PM

F

4

5

9 AM

1

G

14 2

4 16

15 3

17 5

18 6

Level 4 46’ - 0”

25

4 PM

19 7

A

6 C4 PM

1 PM

6

1 PM

Level 4 46’ - 0”

26 25

Level 3 31’- 0”

Level 3 31’- 0”

23

22

21

Level 2 16’ - 0”

Level 2 16’ - 0”

17

12

Level 1 4’ - 0”

5

Level 1 4’ - 0”

11

Cafe Level

Cafe Level

0’ - 0”

0’ - 0”

6

Section AA 1

2

S

3

Lower Level -11’ - 0”

Lower Level -11’ - 0”

Auditorium Level -21’ - 0”

Auditorium Level -21’ - 0”

24


---

A ---

A

A -25.0’

UP

1

2 UP

20’

DN

7

8

UP

3

10

9

B

B

B

-

+0.0’

Santa Fe Drive

---

-

11

---

12

C 10’

-15.0’

20’

B

B

D

D

20’

4

5

15

14

13 6

E ALLEYWAY

F C

C ---

C

10’

16

F C

-

18

17

+4.0’

20’

---

UP UP

G DN

A

A

0

1

20’

2

10’

3

20’

7th Street

25

4

10’

5

20’

6

10’

7


---

A

---

A

A 8

A 8 24

DN

UP

19

20

21

DN

B 9

B 9

22

B

B

B

B

-

-

---

---

10 C

10 C + 12’0”

+ 27’0”

25

D 11

D 11

E

E 23

F

F DN

C

C

DN

C

-

-

---

---

C

26 UP

12 G

12 G

A

14 1 2

15 2 3

4 16 3

A

17 4 5

18 5 6

19 6 7

7

14 1 2

15 2 3

4 16 3

17 4 5

18 5 6

19 6 7

7

Level 3 Plan

Level 2 Plan

1/8” = 1’

1/8” = 1’

N

N

26


27 38


23 8 9


Denver Arts Center  

Architecture Student Portfolio - Spring 2014

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