Page 1

dabe

MArch Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 2

Part 2 architectural publication 2017


Editors: John R. Morgan, Assistant Professor in Architecture, Andrei C. Negrea Design Support: Dan Maguire, Jessica Booth, Ahmed Elamin, Sam Homer, Colin Smith, ChloÍ Thirkell, Matthew Yip Special thanks to: Katharina Borsi, Nicole Porter, Dik Jarman Š 2017 Department of Architecture and Built Environment, The University of Nottingham/ individual authors, unless otherwise stated. The views expressed as part of the individual projects are those of their authors and may not reflect the view of the publisher. This publication is created as a showcase to represent the work of the students. Department of Architecture and Built Environment The University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD United Kingdom


C o n t e n t s Y 6

t h e s i s

s t u d i o s

1_urban mediations

4

2_cool schools_ivor y tower

24

3_situations

32

4_biophilic design studio

60

Y5 comprehensive design projects art group

80

knowledge group

94

crafts group

104

performance group

122

civic group

134


Academic Staff Kat ha r i na B orsi Di k Ja rm a n Jo hn R . M orga n Ni col e Por te r A l isda i r R usse l l M att Strong C h r i s Snow La u ra Ga ske l l M i c ha el R a mwe l l

With special thanks to the following for their technical tutorials: Structure

Construction

Environmental Design

Will Arnold, Arup Tara Clinton, Arup Tom Clelow, Arup Jeroen Potjer, Arup Simon Bateman, Arup Billy Field, Arup Jan Topololski, Arup Adam Buchanan, Arup Dr Paolo Beccarelli

Tom Pearson, Arup Faรงade Maela Allegretti, Arup Faรงade Tania Milinkovich, Arup Faรงade Tim Collett, 6a Architects Graeme Barker Peter Russell John Morgan Graham Ford, G. Ford Architects

Dr Dr Dr Dr Dr

Y6 students James Morris Onyekachi Igbokwe Yaling Li Jack Mayger Chloe Thirkell Thien Huong Tran Amy Turner Nicolas Yiasemis Di Yuan Trina Bandyopadhyay Josh Bull Aimee Gyorvari Herbert Lee Hodgetts Fiona Johnson Ling Lee Andrei Negrea Josh Sharp Christina Stavrou Kathryn Thomas Esti Urquidi Yufan Wang David Whitehead Philip Win

Sergio Altomonte Robin Wilson Ben Jones Parham Mirzaei Peter Rutherford

Y5 students Vivien Cheung Lucy Edwards Stephanie Ioannides Ryan Kelly Victor Lam Tingting Li Chen Man Yi Dong Sophie McHale Akshey Shah Orthodoxia Varnava Katherine Whitehead Rory Wood Matthew Hiu Yuen Yip Choi, Pak Hei Benjamin Nally, Yasmin Patel, Deepan George Alexander Ahjeev Ananthasivam Jack Broad Raymond Chung Hannah Deacon Joshua Dobson

Rachel Clubb Alice Dammery-Quigley Max Eastwood Ross Elliston Timothy Fentem Sam Homer Andrew Jowitt Hiu Ching Leung Toan Nguyen Karim Rouabah Haya Zabaneh Ahmed Zidouri Chen, Zhenzi Elamin, Ahmed Ge, Yitao Geevarajah, Vaishnavi Hou, Shijing Hutchinson, Lorna Kwan, Hoi Shing Li, Dominic Savio Lin, Pui Yiu Lo, Long Yin Wyatt, Joseph Xu, Zihao Yang, Xianming

Jessica Booth Sandra Fonseca Faaizah Hosein Hattie Littlewood Dan Maguire Simas Ozolincius Jason Passmore Josie Reining Olly Reynolds Colin Smith Afifah Abdullah Leah Bingham Laura Brain Jack Cambridge Emily Danou Chin Ee Stavros Georgiou Benjamin Gess Nicholas Jackson Sam Kirk Theo Mortimer Nicolle Skett Ana Tuica Nicola Wernham Zhang, Ruijing


y6_thesis studios


1_urban mediations The studio is concerned with an in-depth investigation into the urban condition and the response of architecture as a catalyst. It understands architecture and urbanism as series of interlinked spaces, interstices and voids that deliver platforms and infrastructures for multiple, changing scenarios of occupation. The studio is a laboratory that seeks to explore how to draw, notate, model and diagram ideas, concepts and performances of architectural and urban spaces across scales. Our research project in 2016/17 was “Bloomsbury: Knowledge Types and Innovation Districts”. We explored ‘typologies of knowledge’ and their agency in urban innovation and transformation. Innovation districts thrive on urban intensity, strong links to higher education and research facilities, the access to a highly skilled workforce and, increasingly, a distinct offer of place. Bloomsbury exemplifies the characteristics of an innovation district in that it provides the right mix of ‘economic assets (universities and research institutes), physical assets (including public realm, transport and a diverse mix of buildings), and networking assets (formal and informal arrangements for knowledge exchange and collaboration).’ (Katz and Wagner in Hanna, 2016 p.13). Current research into the spatial form of these innovation districts emphasize permeability and connectivity; an inclusive, active and vibrant public realm; a fluidly evolving

groundscape, interconnecting external and internal spaces which blur the public and private, inside and outside, and a differentiated range of massing and urban forms. (Clare Melhuish, UCL Urban Laboratory September 2015; UCL East, Final Draft Masterplan Exhibition Boards, 2016). By contrast, our research focused on how architecture contributes to the formation of an urban innovation environment. Rather than the generic notion of place, graphic analyses, notations and mappings presented the formal and spatial specificity in which ‘knowledge types’ articulate an urban innovation environment. Case studies identified varying degrees of intersecting public realms; the sectional integration of inside and outside spaces; and layered thresholds, all in the service of promoting communication and collaboration. In conjunction, they illustrate how an urban groundscape has evolved which is not only fluid and permeable, but also articulated as a series of nodes of spatial, programmatic and social intensity. In each case, this is delivered through architecture’s capacity of formal articulation and spatial organization. The collective body of research provided the theoretical and conceptual grounding for individual design theses that are presented in the following pages.

Y6 students George Alexander Ahjeev Ananthasivam Jack Broad Raymond Chung Hannah Deacon Joshua Dobson Yi Dong Onyekachi Igbokwe Yaling Li Jack Mayger Chloe Thirkell Thien Huong Tran Amy Turner Nicolas Yiasemis Di Yuan Y5 students Rachel Clubb Alice Dammery-Quigley Max Eastwood Ross Elliston Timothy Fentem Sam Homer Andrew Jowitt Hiu Ching Leung Toan Nguyen Karim Rouabah Haya Zabaneh Ahmed Zidouri

Tutors Katharina Borsi Tim Collett, 6A Architects Graeme Barker Nick Haynes, Weston Williamson Guest reviewers Chris Schulte, Publica Matt Hopkins, Publica Will Beeston, Publica


Ja c k B ro a d, 1_ur ba n m edi ati ons, S T. V I N C E N T ’ S O F S H E F F I E L D : M A K E R S H O U S E

page

8

Fi g ure 1 : Studi os


The thesis is an exploration into understanding what activist architectural practice is, and could be, to enable worthwhile urban engagement. As a spine to the project the area of St. Vincent’s, a city quarter within Sheffield, was selected as an urban platform from which to the themes explored within the thesis research due to its high number of derelict and vacant sites, questionable proposals and rich history of making. The architectural outcome of this is the St. Vincent’s Makers House, a civic scheme that supports an alternative urban strategy to oppose current approaches, and promotes St. Vincent’s making once again.

F i gure 3:

M ai n workshop

page

9

F igure 2:

A er ia l v iew


H a nn a h De a con, 1_urba n m edi ati ons, M A K E _ N O T T I N G H A M

page

10

Fi g ure 1 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Corner vi ew


page

11

F i gure 3:

Se c ti on c -c

The thesis explored the role of architecture as a catalyst for innovation and inclusive urban regeneration within Nottingham’s Creative Quarter. Primary research identified the correlation of key anchor institutions with social and economic activity. Synthetic diagramming of key findings highlighted the Creative Quarter ‘high street’ and the current urban barriers that prevent socioeconomic activity progressing into Sneinton Market.

The proposal of MAKE_ Nottingham is a ‘Centre for Making’ that will mediate these barriers in order to extend the network of anchor institutions and provide a public platform for the creative industries; which aims to reconnect the public to the surrounding area and the industrial heritage of Nottingham. F i gure 4:

Ground f l oo r plan


Jo shua Do bson, 1_ur ba n m e di ati o ns, THE A RT J UNC TION

page

12

Fi g ure 1 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Tower threshol d


There is strong precedent for how the introduction of high speed rail networks between major cities can lead to significant economic growth for the towns and cities involved. My thesis explores why this occurs and how the benefits can be maximised through the architectural and urban strategies of the station and its context. Key findings from this research included the design of a ‘transit orientated development’ surrounding the station and the integration of ‘magnet buildings’. This research has been used to selectively analyse Sheffield to identify an appropriate site for the proposed HS2 Station in the Victoria District and to select a magnet building which reflects both the culture and needs of the city, an arts college.

F i gure 4:

E xhi bi ti on h all

page

13

F igure 3:

B a y st u d y


Ja c k M ayge r, 1_ur ba n m edi ati ons, S O M E R S T O W N C O - L I V I N G H U B

page

14

Fi g ure 1 : Isom etri c

Fi g ure 2 :

1:50 m odel


page

15

F i gure 3:

F i gure 4:

Co- l i vi ng i somet ric

Co- l i vi ng i nternal v iew

A thesis project aiming to retain the place-related social identity evident in the inner-city London community of Somers Town, through a counter-proposed masterplan integrating existing residents with new demographic groups. The mixed-use scheme combines a community hub with a shared housing model known as co-living; a direct response to the predominantly residential context and to help meet the demand for housing. With many community groups and individual housing estates within Somers Town, the CoLiving Hub mediates between private residential and public community spaces, whilst creating an active public realm that enhances the ‘heart’ of the neighbourhood.


Pa k H i u ng C hung , 1_ur ba n m edi ations, S T R AT F O R D N E W Q U A R T E R

page

16

Fi g ure 1 :

Struc tural strate gy


With urban vitality being an important component in the resilience of cities, my thesis explored the relationship between the high street and mixed-use developments based on the creation of vitality.

page

17

Following the discovery that there is a dependency of the high street on mixed-use developments, the design ambition focuses on the revitalisation of a “dead� high street through a series of mixed-use interventions. Using theories gathered from key urbanists in addition to my personal arguments, the proposed design solution would bring back life into Stratford high street by maximising its physical, social and economic benefits. F igure 2:

F i gure 3:

Street vi ew

Bir d ’s eye v iew


C h l o ĂŤ M a r i e T hi r ke l l , 1_urba n m ediat ions, J A M : I N T E R S E C T I N G E D G E S

page

18

Fi g ure 1 :

M appi ng contrasti ng net works of nodes and const rained edges in Syd n ey

Fi g ure 2 :

1:200 M odel

F igure 3:

1:200 Mod el


‘Jam: Intersecting Edges’, explores the creation of place through an intersection as opposed to boundaries formed by edges. London’s Knowledge Quarter, which emerges as a result of intersections and overlaps between functions, typologies and organisations, is a clear example of the value of interconnecting networks. Four mechanisms, constellation, membrane, assemblage and gradation, were identified as valuable urban conditions that break down the application of binary edges, hence promoting exploration and interaction. Utilising the fabric of the Western Distributor, which is seen as a boundary within the city of Sydney, aims to prove that through the application of constellation, membrane, assemblage and gradation, an edge is not actually a boundary but can be an area of intense interaction and productivity: a border zone where people are brought together.

F i gure 5:

Isom etri c of proposed planes in contex t

page

19

F igure 4:

E xp lo r a to r y Per s p ec t iv e V iew


Tu r ne r A my, 1_urba n m edi ati ons, ‘ H O M E , F R A G M E N T S ’

page

20

Fi g ure 1 :

Sketc h perspec ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Q uee n’s M arket detailed plan

The thesis makes a case for the definition of home to expand in response to modern conditions of migrancy, positing home as a process of negotiation that is enacted and cultivated within local territories through modes of inhabitation and social routines.

The proposal is for a new covered market in the Leicester’s diverse city centre. Using the existing historic fabric, strands of social and enterprise programmes are combined across different levels of the scheme, encouraging integration between them. The architecture is conceived as a robust framework within which inhabitation and expression is accommodated as a form of accretion and layering.


page

21

F i gure 3:

B ay study e lev at ion

F i gure 4:

Pl an obl i que


Yi a se mi s Ni col a s, 1_urba n m edi ations, R C A A R T D E S I G N A N D T E C H N O L O G Y C E N T R E

page

22

Fi g ure 1 :

Short se c ti on

Fi g ure 2 :

B attesea B ri dge Road V iew

Fi g ure 3 :

L ong se c ti on


page

23

F i gure 4:

Ground l evel plan

F i gure 5:

Internal vi ew

The thesis design project investigates the typology of the art and design educational institution and how contemporary learning theory has influenced its design. The design strategies aim to showcase the students’ work to the public and promote inter-disciplinary interactions that will lead to “cross-pollination”. A visually permeable façade with cantilevered exhibition pods draws the attention and gives glimpses of the students’ work to pedestrians passing by the building.

The building is organised based on an informalformal study hierarchy. Behind the glass façade, a timber frame supports a network of platforms, connected with stairs and bridges. These serve as exhibition spaces and sitting areas used for informal study, tutorials and social interaction. Behind the platforms are the main design studios. These spaces form the central part of the building and are allocated to the various design disciplines. The teaching spaces are organised behind the studios, along the south facade of the building.


I g bo k we O nyeka c hi , 1_ur ba n m e diat ions, W O R K P L A C E F O R E S T

page

24

Fi g ure 1 :

E x ternal vi ew

Fi g ure 2 :

Internal vi ew

Fi g ure 3 : Sec ti on

The thesis explored the perceivable role of biophilic interventions and its potential to be a modifier of behaviours within a selection of workplaces. Key biophilic interventions were identified from interviews and observations of the workplaces. The proposal is situated within the Bankside Urban Forest framework which proposes an intensifying of the greenery in the urban-scape of Bankside.

The Workplace Forest, creates a publicly permeable ground floor to extend the Bankside Urban Forest into the building and improve connectivity between fragmented green spaces around the site. Within the office component, a series of immersive biophilic spaces which will ameliorate stress in a typically high-stress environment were created.


page

25

F i gure 4:

B al cony vi ew

F i gure 5:

D etai l se c ti on


2 _ ivor y tower A secluded place that affords the means of treating practical issues with an impractical often escapist attitude; especially : a place of learning The term Ivory Tower is typically used in a negative manner referring to places of higher education as places of unworldly isolation, where there is a disconnection (deliberate or otherwise) between the academics and the real world outside. Ivory is the term as although it is considered a fine material it is not practical for building towers.

The Sixth Years were asked to develop a response to the changing nature of universities and to put forward a position of which way they think university education and research should go in the future. This could explore the cultural, civic, technological or other aspects of the university, in the area of research or teaching or both. We considered what type of knowledge is fundamental and necessary to the completion of the individual and the process of individuation and alternative views of ways of becoming.

Y5 students Chen, Zhenzi Elamin, Ahmed Ge, Yitao Geevarajah, Vaishnavi Hou, Shijing Hutchinson, Lorna Kwan, Hoi Shing Li, Dominic Savio Lin, Pui Yiu Lo, Long Yin Wyatt, Joseph Xu, Zihao Yang, Xianming Zhang, Ruijing

For this studio we looked the civic role of universities and asked them to consider design solutions which strengthened this aspect. To do this we explored the context of the global university campus environment, its history, its issues and its possible future incarnations to give a base to react to.

The students were asked to particular consider the civic role of the university and to create solutions that helped promote this role.

Tutor Dik Jarman

Y6 students Choi, Pak Hei Benjamin Nally, Yasmin Patel, Deepan

Guest reviewers Mani Lall Charlie Harris Aaron Marriott


Na l l y Ya sm i n, 2_i vor y towe r, I N S T I T U T E O F M E N TA L H E A LT H A N D W E L L B E I N G

page

28

Fi g ure 1 :

Internal perspec ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve


page

29

F i gure 3:

Ni ght ti m e view

F i gure 4:

L ong di stance v iew

Mental health affects the majority of University students. Why is this? This is from anxiety about grades, money and over expectations. How can this be reduced? There is endless research into the affects of learning spaces on the health and wellbeing and attainment of its users – both students and teachers. Can designing better learning environments reduce the mental health of its users and increase their wellbeing within a University setting? Using precedents of creative cultures created within collaborative working environments, can experimental learning spaces focussed on the collaboration between students, teachers, researchers and mental health professionals

benefit the mental health community of Wolverhampton whilst encouraging learners to use varied teaching spaces? The idea behind the Institute of Mental Health and Wellbeing at the University of Wolverhampton is to build a creative, comfortable building which provides a collaborative environment for all members of the University and local mental health community groups to use at once, encouraging inter-disciplinary discussions that wouldn’t usually happen, encouraging greater research to be undertaken around learning spaces and there effect on the mental health of there users.


Pate l De e pa n, 2_Ivor y tower, U N I V E R S I T Y O F A R T S L O N D O N : C A M B E R W E L L T O W E R

page

30

Fi g ure 1 : E l evati on

Fi g ure 2 : Cafe

The diversity of Camberwell is one of the boroughs greatest strengths. However, the University typology is one which advocates elitism, threatening the community strength of Camberwell. Ivory towers are ever evolving, and are in need of integration into local communities. This project looks at offering up well equipped civic opportunities and mixed housing within Camberwell.

It works in conjunction with local galleries, the university, local gyms, sports clubs and the council; to provide new important infrastructure, which will act as a catalyst for social cohesion between students and the residents they once rejected. The new tower will be a beacon for Camberwell, representing the enriched community.


page

31

F i gure 3:

Short se c ti o n

F i gure 4: Atri um


C h o i B e nja mi n, 2_Ivor y tower, F O O D G E N E T I C L A B O R AT O R Y & E X H I B I T I O N C E N T R E

page

32

Fi g ure 1 :

Courtyard vi ew

Fi g ure 2 :

E xhi bi ti on vi ew


page

33

F i gure 3:

Aeri al vi ew

Many modern cities in first world countries are facing the imminent threat of global warming, Hong Kong is one of the most polluted cities among them. Deforestation and greenhouse gases are two of many the major contributors to the destruction of natural habitats and ozone layer. Sustainable architecture (to merely maintain at zero input & output) is no longer the best solution to help our environment. Productive architecture is the practice which engages every level of the society.

It responds to and utilizes the living and natural systems and aims to make positive impacts to the community. In the social perspective, my project aims to improve the quality of food by modifying the existing genes of the sourced cattle and get rid of the natural diseases like mad cow disease and any other food borne illness due to the quality control of the lab. In terms of ethical principles, this concept can stop cattle from being slaughtered while meat lovers can still enjoy the food they like.


3_situations The city is both a physical and mental construct. In this stage, the latter is our focus. What we are interested in is the experience of spaces, be that streets or public spaces, and how there are comparative approaches to representation through mapping techniques and frameworks or structures. If we look back a century ago, in the fiction of Baudelaire and Zola, the city was described through language (a mental picture); in the theory of Camillo Sitte, it was through a analytical diagram of the figure ground (a picture of a mental construct). The latter’s idea was that the folds and turns of ‘crooked streets’ of medieval urban form was more suited to capturing memories and experiences when compared to the grid organisation of the then emerging metropolis. When compared to the urban rooms of church squares, Sitte anticipated the idea that the city was an interconnected network of spaces that the observed would inhabit in their daily lives. That thinking was later picked up in the C20th by a number of prominent ubranists who were concerned that the authentic experience offered by the city was being eroded by universal space that was espoused by CIAM’s theories about modernist town planning.

While they differ significantly from Sitte’s theory, what is interesting is that within the time span of a decade, there emerged on the scene Guy Debord (and the Situationists), Kevin Lynch and Gordon Cullen. In their own ways, each was attempting to engage with the fabric of cities as lived space, one which relies on an the fabric to provide enclosure or to frame the sequence of experiences. For Cullen, this was the idea of Serial Vision, in which the streetscape was to be explored as a pictoral sequence of vignettes with varied visual qualities. By contrast, Lynch, being deliberately more objective, developed a method of notation in order to construct a mental map to represent the navigation of the city. For Debord, a Marxist reactionary, his idea about ‘unitary ubranism’, was contingent upon the collective consciousness of the populace. As a result, the Derive (or drift) was intended as a loose idea of promenade that would be driven by experience rather than consumption. Our work over the course of the semester has attempted to synthesise findings from each analytical approach towards investigating the means of creating appropriate event interventions within the found public realm that Leicester has to offer.

Y6 students Trina Banerjee Josh Bull Aimee Gyorvari Herbert Lee Hodgetts Fiona Johnson Ling Lee James Morris Andrei Negrea Josh Sharp Christina Stavrou Kathryn Thomas Esti Urquidi Yufan Wang David Whitehead Philip Win Y5 students Jessica Booth Sandra Fonseca Faaizah Hosein Hattie Littlewood Dan Maguire Simas Ozolincius Jason Passmore Josie Reining Olly Reynolds Colin Smith

Tutor John R. Morgan Assistant tutor Samuel Critchlow, Rayner Davies Guest reviewers Julian Lewis, East Alun Jones, Dow Jones Jonny Pugh Jõao Baptista


U rqu i di Fe r re i ra E sti , 3_si tuati ons, T H E U R B A N PA L I M P S E S T O F B O R O U G H B A N K S I D E

page

36

Fi g ure 1 : Arc hae ol ogy

Fi g ure 2 :

Internal vi ew

Fi g ure 4 :

Fac i ng e l evati on

The city is a constantly evolving and metamorphosing entity, emerging over time, with many intertwining narratives and histories to be explored and experienced. The metaphor of the palimpsest is employed due to the inherent layer and trace factors; the importance of text and literature is embedded deeply into the Borough-Bankside context, adapting and

F igure 3:

Ex ternal v iew

evolving with sociocultural and temporal changes. The proposed Borough Arts Library and Printworks connects with past and present practices in the area, whilst forming similar connections with site and context to draw on the traces left behind of the many visible and invisible layers.


page

37

F i gure 5:

Street el eva t ion


Ne g re a A nd re i , 3_si tuati ons, C IVIC UTOPIA TYPOLOGY

page

38

Fi g ure 1 : R hy thm anal ysi s

Fi g ure 2 :

Knowl edge and c i vi c

Civic, knowledge and media designing for civic situations.

Exploring the relation between the social sphere and the build environment, the thesis project proposes a Civic Centre in Leicester with the scope of reorienting public opinion towards matters of community participation, public speaking and debate, and away from a consumerist oriented agenda.

F igure 3:

Civ ic and public


page

39

F i gure 4:

Granby street v iew

F i gure 5:

M edi a and public

F i gure 6:

Ci vi c and m edia

The architectural proposal sets out to inform programmatic relations between typologies of knowledge, media and civic through principles of spatial juxtaposition, superimposition of activities and volumetric composition. This results in a series of situations and a disruption of monotonous rhythms, ultimately aiming to intervene in matters of the everyday life, for exploring more equitable social alternatives.


S h a r p Jo sh, 3_si tuati ons, U R B A N S T R AT I F I C AT I O N O F D E VA

page

40

Fi g ure 1 :

South facade vi ew

Fi g ure 2 : Re cepti on

Archaeological Museum, Education Centre & Research Archive - Market Square, Chester Can Chester’s elevated ‘Row’ walkways be perceived as an adequate routing construct, when considering their potential on a new site? A literal pastiche of these promenades in a new location may serve to devalue both the new site and the original architecture.

F igure 3:

Concept ual car v ing I


page

41

F i gure 4:

Ground l evel plan

F i gure 5:

Cur ved gal l er y

The rich heritage of the city’s conflicting street axes and unique archaeology could be promoted by transposing the key characteristics of the Rows into a contemporary building.

F i gure 6:

Conceptual car v ing II

With a focus on twisting axes and one’s shifting perception of the ground plane, the Roman’s influence on the Medieval Rows has in turn influenced the key ethos for this thesis proposal.


M o r r i s Ja m e s, 3_si tuati ons, T H E C O N N E C T I V I T Y M E M B R A N E

Cities are the natural creators of diversity, this diversity forms edges where communities touch. These areas are often voids within the urban realm, with little or no attraction. page

42

Fi g ure 1 : M asterpl an

Fi g ure 2 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 3 :

Short se c ti on

This thesis explores how these edges within a city can be softened. Focusing on the city of Leicester, a connection is forged between the city centre and the Golden Mile towards the north.


page

43

F i gure 4:

Connec ti ng communit ies


B u l l Jo sh , 3 _si tuati ons, T H E D E G E N E R AT I N G B O D Y I N A R C H I T E C T U R E

page

44

Fi g ure 1 :

M ai n perspec ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Aeri al pe rspe c ti ve

The thesis aimed to investigate healing environments within architecture concerning the decentralisation within the NHS and the movement of “New Residentialism�, whilst also examining the disparity between the traditional spa and typical treatment centres. The result of my research was my proposal for the High Tor Health Park, a scheme situated within the Peak District between Matlock and Matlock Bath.

The Health Park consists of a spa/fitness centre including a hydro/aqua therapy pool, sauna and aqua treadmills etc, a cafe, a treatment suite with ancillary accommodation and cafe, and lastly 3 private guest houses all arrayed across the landscape.


page

45

F i gure 3:

Si te pl an

F i gure 4:

Si te E l evati o n


T ho ma s Kat hr yn, 3_si tuati ons, R E - G E N E R AT I O N O F T H E N E W WA L K

page

46

Fi g ure 1 : E l evati on

Fi g ure 2 :

Street vi ew

In the thesis, the Re-Generation of the New Walk, the role of the architect is to facilitate the debate between clinical environments and home. Architects must create environments with a genuine haptic consideration and a program which stimulates the mind, body and soul.

F igure 3:

New Walk diagram


page

47

F i gure 4:

Internal court y ard

This thesis focuses on facultative decline as a product of ageing with particular attention paid to the needs of the elderly suffering from disorders such a Dementia. The final ambition was to define a form of universal design appropriate to the current social, economic and cultural needs of the population of inner Leicester through the use of intergenerational learning. F i gure 5:

Car vi ng m odel


W h i te h e a d D avi d, 3_si tuati ons, URBA N S UBLIME

page

48

Fi g ure 1 :

Instabi l i ty gal l e r y

Fi g ure 2 :

Car park theatre


page

49

F i gure 3:

B ath house ex ternal

F i gure 5:

Anec hoi c c h amber

F igure 4:

Ba t h h o u s e inter n a l

‘The Sublime’ teaches us that something seemingly unpleasant/overwhelming can lead to a higher and more fulfilling experience - Can we design similar unpleasant yet experiential encounters, to invigorate our bland public realm?

F i gure 6:

B ath house model

This project bases itself around two existing sites of ‘Urban Sublime’, and reaches out from them to encircle a piece of bland public realm design around the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre. 8 Pavilions are realised from 8 unpleasant sensations, intended to provoke a more experiential reaction than the usual comfort we seek.


S tav ro u C h r i sti na , 3_si tuati ons, C YPRUS ARCHA EOLOGICA L MUS EUM

page

50

Fi g ure 1 :

Aeri al vi ew

Fi g ure 2 :

B ac k entrance


page

51

F i gure 3: Re staurant

F i gure 4:

B ac k vi ew

F i gure 5: E x hi bi ti on

The civilization of Cyprus encompasses a history of 12.000 years of human presence on the island, primarily the result of its resources and strategic location. The New Cyprus Museum should be promoting the rich cultural heritage of Cyprus and the quality of its collections in the best possible way. At the same time, it should be borne in mind that research on the history of Cyprus is ongoing, technology is developing

and the Museum continuously is receiving new material from excavations. In addition, its collections are a significant part of archaeological research of the Eastern Mediterranean and provide a perennial source for educational programmes and exciting visitor experience.


B a n dyo pa dhyay Tri na , 3_si tuati ons, T R A N S C U LT U R A L H A C K N E Y: R E P O S I T O R Y A N D M A R K E T

page

52

Fi g ure 1 :

Ethni c m i nori ty di stri b ut ion collage

Fi g ure 2 :

Arc hi te c tural el em e nts

Palimpsest of cultures have inhabited London’s east end. Imminent regeneration of Hackney Road is also threatening the area with gentrification. The design aims to slow down the gentrification process by combining programmes that would both sustain the urban tissue and give permanence to the memories of the many transient cultural minorities.

It creates a collection of institutions: an archive and gallery for the documentation of diverse cultural groups; a market with transcultural borrowings of public space use; artists workshops to rehouse those displaced in the process of gentrification, and offices for young start up companies.


page

53

F i gure 3:

Arc hi ve i nternal v iew

F i gure 4: Sec ti on


Jo hnso n F i o na , 3_si tuati ons, C O - O P E R AT I V E I N D I V I D U A L I S M

page

54

Fi g ure 1 :

Si te c i ty deve l opm ent

Fi g ure 2 : M ode l


page

55

F i gure 3: Workshop

F i gure 4:

Fi rst f l oor plan

The thesis examined how institutions can act as tools to re-activate the declining public sphere in Leicester. Collectivist and individualist approaches were compared and an institution embodying co-operative individualism is proposed; where individuals can come together whilst maintaining their identity. Craft is used to re-skill the public in co-operation.

Weaving and mat buildings embodied these principles architecturally to form a workshop and exhibition centre on an inactive island site between the new and old city centres. The building has the horizontal emphasis of the mat allowing individual drifting (in conjunction with the warp and weft structure). Key nodes such as the cafĂŠ and courtyards encourage gathering.


L e e Li ng , 3 _si tuati ons, T H E E V O L U T I O N O F T H E H O M E

page

56

Fi g ure 1 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 2 : Adaptati on

F igure 3:

Unit axo


page

57

F i gure 4:

Courtyard view

F igure 6 :

F i gure 5:

M ethods of adaptat ion

C o u r t ya r d wa lkwa y

The adaptable lifetime home aims to support people struggling to get onto the housing ladder, especially in London, by providing a home that is not only affordable but can also adapt over time to changing spatial and social needs. With the integration of live/work spaces along with communal facilities and shared courtyards, this distinct approach towards mass housing can truly transform a community and encourage local residents to integrate with the wider public realm.


H o dgetts Le e , 3_si tuatua i tons, B I R M I N G H A M S M I T H F I E L D

page

58

Fi g ure 1 : M asterpl an

Fi g ure 2 :

Parti di agram s


page

59

F i gure 3:

D e an street v iew

F i gure 5:

Courtyard view 2

F i gure 6:

Ground f l oo r plan

F igure 4:

Court y ard v iew

This thesis explores density as a qualitative measure, with a focus on complexity, intensity and urbanity and how this can be achieved through the use of a ’finer’ urban grain. The project establishes a series of density rules, which form the basis of a wider critique of placemaking. Based on the site of the former Wholesale Markets in Birmingham, the scheme responds at a variety of scales; masterplan, urban block and building, demonstrating how these rules can be applied at a multitude of scales in order to create sustainable and contextually sensitive places.


W i n Ph i l , 3 _si tuati ons, T H E H A R M O N I C E S S E N C E O F D A N C E

The thesis proposes the use of dance and its mystical qualities in mediating against an entrenchment of cultures brought on by the fast pace of globalisation. The research focuses on the ‘ephemeral’ bonding qualities of dance and discovers the ‘harmonic properties’ which are associated with the Art.

page

60

Fi g ure 1 :

Ki neti c m ove m ent

Fi g ure 2 :

Ephem e ral rehearsal s pace

Fi g ure 3 : D ance rs

This same ‘harmonic essence’ is carried over to the realms of Architecture in producing a tectonic language which is ‘harmonic’ in both ‘form and movement’. The resulting design is a proposal for a Kinetic Architecture which, with the use of strategically placed keyframes and harmonic algorithms, manages to create movements from the built environment which are both wondrous and contextualised to some form of legibility.


page

61

F i gure 4:

Form al enc l o sed t heat re space

F i gure 6:

Struc tural d iagram

F i gure 7:

Key sec ti on

F igure 5:

H yp er b o lo id t h ea t r e s p a ce


4_biophilic design studio Biophilic relationships with nature offer the hope of enchantment, delight, respect, and a deeper sense of our place in the world. This studio explores how biophilic design can enhance human health and wellbeing, encourage deeper connection to ourselves, facilitate meaningful relationships between people, and connections to our environments. Wellbeing serves as the overarching theme which guides critical building typology investigations in the studio, based on the principles of holistic integrated health and human flourishing. What characterises a salutogenic place, one that can encourage (bio)diversity, healing, retreat, collective identity, and connectedness? How can the application of biophilic design principles at the object / room / building / site / landscape / urban scales lead to healthier places, including and beyond conventional health care settings? Biophilic design foregrounds the importance of numerous design attributes, including but not limited to the presence of vegetation. Other attributes such as environmental features (water, sunlight), natural features (water, sunlight),

natural shapes and forms (arch, tree-like columns), patterns and processes (fractals, sensory variability, ecological processes), place (history / temporality) and spatial qualities (indoor-outdoor relationships, prospect + refuge) are also fundamental. The studio encourages the exploration of these through theory, direct first-hand engagement and design application. Multidisciplinary enquiries that synthesise ideas and methods from environmental psychology, ecotherapy, landscape and human geography and architectural / urban theory inform these explorations. Methods include fieldtrips to Guys Cancer centre (London) and Derby Multifaith centre, live user / client consultation, primary research such as conducting qalitative assessments and user surveys of existing sites, as well as drawing, diagramming and 1:1 prototyping.

Y6 students Vivien Cheung Lucy Edwards Stephanie Ioannides Ryan Kelly Victor Lam Tingting Li Chen Man Sophie McHale Akshey Shah Orthodoxia Varnava Katherine Whitehead Rory Wood Matthew Hiu Yuen Yip Y5 students Afifah Abdullah Leah Bingham Laura Brain Jack Cambridge Emily Danou Chin Ee Stavros Georgiou Benjamin Gess Nicholas Jackson Sam Kirk Theo Mortimer Nicolle Skett Ana Tuica Nicola Wernham Tutor Dr Nicole Porter Contributing Tutors and Critics Professor Julian Marsh, Marsh Grochowski Matthew Vaughan, Doanld Insall Valentina Nullo, CPMG Chris White, CPMG Martin Noutch Richard Pulford, Cullinans Jane Findlay , FIRA landscape architects Juliet Gooden, artist


Yi p M atth ew, 4_bi ophi l i c desi gn studio, LEV EN ROA D COMMUNITY FOREST

LEVEN ROAD COMMUNITY FOREST

page

64

Fi g ure 1 :

Aeri al perspec ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Regi onal Vi si on- L e e Valley socio-ecological net work


page

65

F i gure 3:

Com m uni ty cluster roof plan

F i gure 4:

L ong se c ti on

F i gure 5-7: E xpe ri e nti al renders

Urban loneliness is a growing issue, particularly for the digital generation, as screen-based technological consumption often propels the vicious cycle of loneliness. As the human social brain developed in parallel to biophilic tendency, the thesis project examines the strong relationship between positive social capital and the natural environment.

Designing from the urban to the human scale, Leven Road Community Forest aspires to stitch together the fragmented urban landscape of the Lee Valley through the activation and connection of green spaces; restoring nature deficit by nurturing biodiversity and ultimately, disrupting the loneliness loop by creating a stimulating socio-biophilic environment.


M a n C he n, 4 _bi ophi l i c de si gn stud io, THE HA LE (COMMUNITY MENTA L WELLBE I NG C E NTR E )

page

66

Fi g ure 1 :

Axonom etri c m aster plan

Stigma is a socially constructed concept. It stems from the majority view of normality, the categorisation of it and the devaluing of what is deemed abnormal. This project seeks to understand the role architecture has played in defining stigma and can the architecture itself challenge it. The resultant project is a community mental well-being centre, focused on the prevention of mental ill-health; located in

Tottenham Hale, London an area deprived of access to healthcare and community dissatisfaction with regeneration schemes. Through multiple scales, from the masterplanning of the proposed High Street to the design of interior retreat places, the design addresses the role of a building’s access, façade, threshold spaces and interior organisation as veritable means to challenging stigma.


page

67

F i gure 2:

Netw ork m apping

F i gure 4: Co-L i vi ng

F i gure 6:

Se c ti on thro ugh court y ard

F igure 3:

Sc h em a t ic m o d el

F igure 5: C o u r t ya r d


S h a h A kshey, 4_bi ophi l i c desi gn studio, S T U D E N T S I T O P I A

page

68

Fi g ure 1 :

D e si gn strategi es

Fi g ure 2 :

Si te anal ysi s


page

69

F i gure 3:

E xpl ode d axonomet ric

Food consumption and Produce convenience has been taken for granted in the contemporary industrialised world. Distrust and disconnect to scale, food source and production methods have resulted in the blind-sight of ramped up production to provide for the growing global population. This uncontrolled, mechanised growth has resulted in ecological devastation.

F i gure 4:

Perspec ti ve sect ion

Student Sitopia mitigates some of the common environmental issues associated with Agriculture and Housing schemes, implementing innovative permaculture techniques and exploiting synergies to shift from linear to a closed loop resource model. This Biophilic Urban Farm helps to sustain the local ecology whilst the Student Housing scheme promotes environmental life skills and ethos for healthy eating through food production interactions.


I o a nn i d e s Stepha ni e , 4_bi ophi l i c design st udio, A TRIP DOWN MEMORY LA NE

page

70

Fi g ure 1 :

Fi g ure 2 :

Surgace drawi ng of sensor y garden

Se nsor y garden

My project looks at architecture as a form of reminiscence therapy for Alzheimer’s. The design works with three zones looking at individual and collective memory of Liverpool and also memory at different scales. The public zone addresses the trade and manufacturing history of Liverpool through public street markets and workshops, with an intermediate zone of a Public Square, Park and café enabling a social integration point of meaningful activity for public and residents. The residential zone reminisces Liverpool’s traditional housing of terraced rows and a vibrant and lively Street life with a central sensory garden.


page

71

F i gure 3: Sec ti on

F i gure 4: E l evati on

F i gure 5:

M em or y room

F igure 6:

Pu b lic s q u a r e


C h e un g V i v i a n, 4_bi ophi l i c de si gn st udio, H O M E AWAY F R O M H O M E

page

72

Fi g ure 1 :

Concept drawi ng

Fi g ure 2 :

T he l i ttl e expl ore r ’s hideaway


page

73

F i gure 3:

L ong se c ti on

F i gure 4:

T he forest cafe

The focus on treating patients is not solely based upon the science of medical drugs, in reality, people require more than just medicines. Children are too often neglected in architectural planning within the medical field. However, when they are faced with a diagnosis of cancer, they are seen more fragile and vulnerable than adults, thus, a more sympathetic approach towards the healing environments must be pursued.

Ultimately, healing children goes hand in glove with places, this presents the opportunity to provide an architectural response to help children who have recovered from a chronic illness to regain confidence through play in Bristol.


Va r nava O r t hodox i a , 4_bi ophi l i c d esign st udio, THE F LA MINGO PROJ EC T

page

74

Fi g ure 1 :

Concept i m age

Though my thesis project I wanted to explore how architecture can provide a place for wellbeing that can prevent and heal addiction, a major social problem of our times. Being influence by a relatively new adolescents’ addiction problem arising in Cyprus, I have decided to place my project there.

Fi g ure 2 :

E x ternal re nder

My proposal is the development of an ‘Addiction Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre for Teenagers and Young Adults’, which will consist a place for mainly hosting outpatient programmes with a low capacity residential unit. Following the new model for addiction rehabilitation centres proposed, this place aims to fuse the patients following alternative treatments methods, to the members of the public that wish to exercise their hobbies by providing spaces for common art, drama, fitness, and dance classes.


page

75

F i gure 3:

E xpl ode d axonomet ric

F i gure 4:

E x ternal re n der


W h i te h e a d Kati e , 4_bi ophi l i c design st udio, INTERGENERATIONA L CONV ERSAT I O NS

page

76

Fi g ure 1 :

T he oranger y

Fi g ure 2 :

Juni or sc hool north e lev at ion

Fi g ure 3 :

Juni or sc hool se c ti on


page

77

F i gure 4:

L ong se c ti on

F i gure 5:

E xi sti ng sec t ion

F i gure 6:

Prospec t vi ew of infirmar y

The sustainable rehabilitation of at risk historic building is key to both capitalising on our historic building stock and maintaining our architectural and cultural history. This thesis project explores how taking references from all aspects of a buildings context, alongside other key biophilic ideas, can create a viable solution for a growing group of underutilised buildings. A programme of cross generational living through a mix of elderly and student accommodation and shared facilities translates the idea of learning from older generations from architecture to occupant, creating intergenerational conversations across the scales.


Wo o d Ro r y, 4_bi ophi l i c de si gn studio, FORT WA LNEY CA NCER CA RE RETREAT

page

78

Fi g ure 1 :

Se c ti onal m odel

The thesis hypothesised that historic buildings could provide similar healing qualities as artand heritage-in-health interventions through their ineffable qualities, connection with the past and ability to create positive distractions. The scheme converts and extends the former observation tower of Fort Walney, a World War coastal artillery battery off the coast of Barrowin-Furness to create a cancer care retreat and drop-in centre.

Terraforming the existing surrounding golf course enhances the natural environment and the resulting biophilic qualities provide further healing benefits to users. Dual-aspect accommodation is sunk into the new duneland landscape and the centre provides facilities such as therapy rooms, a library, a greenhouse and a workshop - allowing users further positive distraction and the opportunity to read, grow and craft objects with items found within the wider natural environment.


page

79

F i gure 2: Sec ti on

F i gure 3:

Vi ew ac ross landscape

F i gure 4:

E x ternal re n der


Edwa rd s Lucy, 4_bi ophi l i c de si gn st udio, T H E U R B A N C R A F T C O L L E C T I V E

page

80

Fi g ure 1 :

Concept col l age

Fi g ure 2 :

Internal vi ew


page

81

F i gure 3: Courtyard

F i gure 4:

F i gure 5:

E x ternal vi ew

Si te pl an

The Urban Craft Collective is a craft centre in the heart of Derby which aims to improve well-being through the activity of mindful crafting and through the creation of a place that expresses the continuous narrative of the site and wider context of the city. The program and design of the scheme takes inspiration from research into the idea of continuity in architecture; in particular the expression of human use over time. The form of the building responds to the immediate surroundings of the site while the tectonics and construction reflect both the internal program and the local historic context.


115

12 0

115

120

105

25

12

5

12 5

11 5

110

0

12

0

10

104

110

115

5 10

25

100

110

0 12

105 11 0

110

105

100

12 5

5

10

100

111.3

106.3

115

5 10

11 0

5 11

110

5

10

5

10

5

5

10

10

105

0

10

11 5

100

10

5

105 110

110 115

110

100

100

5 11

12

0

10 5

115


y5_birmingham

comprehensive design projects


y 5 _

a r t

Students Jessica Booth Rachel Clubb Emily Danou Yitao Ge Faaizah Hosein Nick Jackson Hattie Littlewood Simas Ozolincius Jason Passmore Zihao Xu Nicola Wernham

Tutor Chris Snow


H o se i n Fa a i za h, a r t, T H E M E TA L YA R D

page

86

Fi g ure 1 :

B ay study

Birmingham’s Creative Quarter, Digbeth, has been identified as a major enterprise zone in need of regeneration. Its strong industrial history is clearly seen by its disused and refurbished warehouses and factories. The Metal Yard seeks to link the existing creative industries in Digbeth to Birmingham’s city centre. Lying at the core of Digbeth, the scheme allows local artists to create metalsculptures for exhibition and F igure 2:

Workshop space


page

87

F i gure 3:

Aeri al perspect iv e

F i gure 4:

E x ternal pe rspect iv e

sale purposes while also providing affordable housing. Artist and community workshops promote the reduction of metal waste, including scrap metal provided by neighbouring service/repair centres. Since casting requires large amounts of heat energy, heat recovery systems and renewable energy sources have been incorporated to further diminish the levels of waste in Digbeth. F i gure 5:

E xhi bi ti on sp ace


L i ttl ewo o d H atti e, a r t, T HE BASIN GA LLERY

page

88

Fi g ure 1 :

Internal perspec ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve


page

89

F i gure 3:

L ong se c ti on

F i gure 4:

Studi o sec ti on

The aim of my proposal is to provide Gallery, Studio and Workshop space in order for the students of University College Birmingham to produce and exhibit their work. The scheme is based in Birmingham’s historic Jewellery Quarter and sits alongside the Birmingham and Fazeley canal.

The original concept stemmed from a need to create a through route or miniature ‘street’ cutting through the site and provide space for social interaction along the neglected canal frontage. The Studios offer generous amounts of space for students to work, whilst the Gallery features a double height exhibition space and subtle north-lighting.


B o o th Je ssi ca , a r t, T HE C R EAT IVE COLLEC TIV E

page

90

Fi g ure 1 :

E xpl ode d axonom etri c

Perspective Drawing 01_Open Exhibition & Public Space, Ground Floor

The Creative Collective

There is a wide variety of artistic education available in Birmingham, however, there are very few galleries in which the work of locally educated artists can be exhibited, particularly in the Jewellery Quarter; an area of the city with a strong creative and cultural heritage. The scheme aims to benefit artists, sculptors and painters who have recently left education, yet do not posess a sufficient body of work in order to curate a debut exhibition. F igure 2:

Ground floor perspect iv e

Birmingham, UK


Perspective Drawing 03_Principal Galler y Space, Second Floor

The Creative Collective

Birmingham, UK

page

91

Perspective Drawing 05_Street View External Pespective

F i gure 3:

e Drawing 02_Touring Exhibition Space, First Floor

F i gure 4:

F i gure 5:

The Creative Collective

Birmingham

Se cond f l oor perspect iv e

The Creative Collective

Birmingham, UK

Street pe rsp ect iv e

Fi rst f l oor p erspect iv e

The scheme will facilitate further refinement of skills, in an environment which allows them to find their creative voice by exhibiting smaller bodies of work, therefore removing the creative and financial pressures of a major debut exhibition. The environment aims to facilitate interaction between different artists and their mentors, as well as between young artists and the public through exhibiting their work in a more informal environment than is usually experienced in an art gallery.


Ja c kso n Ni c hol a s, a r t, D IGB E T H ART COLONY

page

92

Fi g ure 1 :

Gal l er y detai l se c ti on

Digbeth Art Colony comprises a proposal for an integrated live, work, and exhibition space for artists within the Birmingham City Centre Quarter of Digbeth, a former industrial district under reinvention as a key creative and cultural hub within the city.

F igure 2:

Ex ternal perspect iv e


page

93

F i gure 3:

E x ternal pe rspect iv e

F i gure 4:

E x ternal pe rspect iv e

A functionally differentiated conceptual approach is taken within the scheme, in which building masses with distinct functions, such as gallery, residential, and public spaces, are afforded separate architectural treatments.

F i gure 5:

Internal perspect iv e

The scheme includes the creation of a public square within its urban block, with connections to the street facilitated through the Art Colony.


Pa ssm o re Ja son, a rt, D IGB E T H ARTS HUB

page

94

Fi g ure 1 :

Publ i c square

The scheme’s aspirations are to create a prominent art hub which could link together and develop Digbeth’s arts culture to help to regenerate the area. The main aims of the project were to provide facilities and housing for artists and those working in art related professions such as frame making, commercial printing and art sales within Digbeth.

F igure 2:

Galler y interior


page

95

F i gure 3:

Arts bui l di ng long sect ion

F i gure 4:

Canal el evat ion

By locating these industries adjacent to each other, sharing of knowledge and expertise could help to develop Digbeth’s arts culture. By locating the scheme in a public space and providing opportunities for public engagement, the scheme’s aspirations could also influence and benefit the wider city.

F i gure 5:

Aeri al perspect iv e


Ozo l i nc i us Si m a s, a r t, ART CO LO NY

page

96

Fi g ure 1 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve

An Art Colony or artists’ colony is a place where creative practitioners live and interact with one another. Artists are often invited or selected through a formal process, for a residency from a few weeks to over a year.

F igure 2:

A erial v iew


page

97

F i gure 3:

Si de l evati on

F i gure 4:

Vi ew under bridge

Main strategy is to extend the volume of Typhoo factory to our site and open up for accesses to site from the canal, from Fezeley Street and Pickford Street corner and leave existing entrance from Pickford Street. In order to extend the volume of Typhoo factory, a side of canal will be covered and amended to keep existing width.

F i gure 5:

Entrance f rom t y phoo factor y


y5_ knowledge

Students Alice Dammery-Quigley Max Eastwood Vaishi Geevarajah Tianqi Guo Shijing Hou Andrew Jowitt Josie Reining Oliver Reynolds Colin Smith Maria Tsvetkova

Tutor John Morgan


Jow i tt A n drew, knowl edge , D IGB E TH LIBRA RY & MA KERS PACE

page

100

Fi g ure 1 :

Axonom etri c vi ew

Fi g ure 2 :

Se c ti on through cafe and workspace


page

101

F i gure 3:

Perspec ti ve v iew showing site ent rance

F i gure 4:

Perspec ti ve v iew showing riv er inlet

A place in which people with shared interests can gather to work on projects while sharing ideas, equipment, and knowledge. An architectural response to the rising trend of alternative creative spaces provided by local and regional libraries, the scheme provides “makerspaces� for the growing creative community in Digbeth.

The development provides a number of collaborative spaces for new businesses and startups. A library incorporates shared spaces for co-working that foster creativity and community, providing flexibility for those starting out. A bustling ground floor cafĂŠ and residential common area form active frontages for a creative corridor through the site, encouraging the engagement of passers-by.


Ea st wo o d_ M ax , knowl e dge , FA C U LT Y O F B R E W I N G S C I E N C E S

page

102

Fi g ure 1 :

E xpl ode d axonom etri c

A study into the public realm between the Francis Crick Institute and St Pancras Station. A quantitative and qualitative study into the soundscape in the British Library Piazza, where blue shows desirable sounds, and red areas are undesirable. This impacted on the patterns of use in winter and summer. An exploded isometric drawing of the Institute of Making, part of a masterplan for a block in Bloomsbury. F igure 2: S oundscapes


page

103

F i gure 3:

Ni ght ti m e view

F i gure 4:

L ong se c ti on

F i gure 5:

Short se c ti o n

Faculty of Brewing Sciences, Digbeth, Birmingham. A university, research led brewery and hop greenhouse with a public bar and beer garden. An external render taken at night, showing the occupation of the project at different times of day. The greenhouse will be illuminated at night to maximise the growth of the hops, whilst acting as a beacon for the local area. Two rendered sections, cut through different bays showing lab spaces, the brewery and the hop greenhouse.


Re i ni n g Jo se phi ne , knowl e dge , D IG BETH MA INF RA ME & DIGITA L LIBRA RY

A digital and programming hub. The basis for a new computational infrastructure to spark and support regeneration and industry in Digbeth. Four main focal points define the scheme: Exhibition, Education, Design and Production. These ideas are connected throughout by physical bridges which encourage intersection and flow between the sections of the building.

page

104

Fi g ure 1 :

Ground f l oor si te pl an

Fi g ure 2 :

Perspec ti ve vi ew

Fi g ure 3 :

Se c ti on vi ew

Whilst the more public areas of the building provide spaces suitable for teaching, presentations and exhibitions, specialised programming and research areas will provide the resources necessary to support innovation in the computational field. A cafe and adjoining museum space has the potential to generate revenue for the building, as does the presence of accommodation as part of the scheme.


page

105

F i gure 4:

Internal perspect iv e v iews

F i gure 5:

Internal perspect iv e v iews

F i gure 6:

North e l evation

F i gure 7:

West el evation


Rey n o l d s O l iver, knowl e dge , B IR MINGHA M CRA F T LIBRA RY

page

106

Fi g ure 1 :

Se c ti onal pe rspe c ti ve v iew

Based on the history of craft industries within the Jewellery Quarter, the new library serves as a learning resource for both those in the industry as well as local people. There are spaces for both researching craft techniques and participating in craft activities, within a complex programme that includes a workshop, housing and an onsite dockyard and public event space, which together respond to the needs and opportunities of the canal-side site.

F igure 2:

Ground floor plan


page

107

The programme aspires to firstly stimulate the learning of craft theories and techniques, whilst also creating a new boatbuilding industry to enliven the canal system. This subsequently feeds into a number of pageantry boat exhibitions which travel around the city.

F i gure 3:

Handm ade model


C o l i n Smi th, knowl edge , T Y PHO O WHA RF

page

108

Fi g ure 1 :

T Y PHOO WHAR F m asterplan concept diagram

Fi g ure 2 :

M asterpl an concept perspect iv e

The project seeks to speculate on the creation of a new inner-city campus within the Digbeth area, plugging into the Knowledge Hub masterplan currently under development as part of the HS2 regeneration programme. Occupying an area of land to the east of the city centre, the campus will provide new higher education teaching spaces within a regenerated listed factory building (the ‘STEAMHOUSE’) in addition to incubator spaces

focused on encouraging local enterprise (the developed ‘STACKT’ building) as well as general commercial and residential offerings. The ’STACKT’ building serves as an entry point to TYPHOO WHARF with a number of atrium spaces that lie adjacent to a new metro station. In addition, a series of office spaces offer a more enclosed experience for workers.


page

109

F i gure 3:

Ground f l oo r site plan

F i gure 4:

STACKT bui l ding east elev at ion

F i gure 5:

Se c ti on thro ugh STACKT building


y5_craft space

Students Leah Bingham Laura Brain Jana Channing Jack Cambridge Tim Fentem Sam Kirk Dan Maguire Tom McLean Theo (Oliver) Mortimer Alex Wilkinson Ana Tuica Haya Zabaneh

Tutors Laura Gaskell Michael Ramwell


M a g ui re Da ni el , c raf t spa c e , D IGBETH FA RMING COOPERATIV E

page

112

Fi g ure 1 :

E xpl ode d axo

Fi g ure 3 :

Se c ti on A

F igure 2:

The position and programme of the scheme allude to a sense of growth within the community of Digbeth. The proposals will draw from the existing overgrowth on site and will take into consideration the importance of plant life on this particular block within Birmingham. The intention is to retain and enhance the community garden by incorporating an urban farming framework within the workshop scheme.

Workshop interio r

The images investigate the potential form reclamation and redistribution of the vegetation across the site throughout the construction of the project. In order to respond to the context of the scheme and the clients the tools created at the site will be used to harvest the land. The image at the bottom illustrates how the project could look after its completion, with a repurposed urban landscape.


page

113

F i gure 4:

Upper groun d + first floor plans

F i gure 5:

Se c ti on B

F i gure 6:

E x ternal axo nomet ric v iew


Za ba ne h H aya , c raf t spa c e , C YC L E MA NUFAC TORY

page

114

Fi g ure 1 :

Se c ti on B

Fi g ure 2 :

E x ternal Perspec ti ve

Fi g ure 3 :

Se c ti on A


page

115

F i gure 4:

E xpl ode d Axonomet ric

A cultural intervention in the chosen strategic location will represent the creative quarter Digbeth will be transformed into, by designing a cycle hub. Set in the heart of Digbeth, a vibrant promotion centre that celebrates the Birmingham bicycle heritage as a historical forgotten asset of the metal industry back in the 1900s. The scheme will provide a public piazza and a roof garden as opposed to the current use of the site as a car park. It will also

encompass one of the first cycle stations in the city allowing more connectivity from and throughout Digbeth. The process of the bicycle craft is to be displayed and transparent throughout the building as a celebration to the heritage and promotion to the sustainability of the city. The intervention as a whole will present a living museum taking the visitor through time with an evolutionary sequence of galleries and spaces.


M c l e a n Th o m a s, c raf t spa c e , AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN INSTITUTE

page

116

Fi g ure 1 :

Workshop hal l conce pt ual perspect iv e

The proposed scheme is for an automotive design institute to educate students and exhibit their work. The space will also work as a place for larger automotive companies in Birmingham to connect to the greater public from exhibitions and community schemes. The proposed project consists of four key spaces:

- Accommodation and facilities for ex-offenders in the way of an approved premises. - Student/Apprenticeship training facilities for both Birmingham City University and NAPA. - Public exhibition spaces used as a way of the users of the craft space to engage with the community. - Outdoor spaces embracing the canal


page

117

F i gure 2:

Axonom etri c details

F i gure 3:

Workshop ha ll t hrough t he void

F i gure 4:

Workshop l ook ing out to park


Fe nte m T i mothy, c raf t spa c e, T HE WATCHMA KERS STUDIO

The project is a mixed-use workshop scheme designed to facilitate the needs of both students and young professionals in the art of professional watchmaking. The scheme encompasses workshops, start up spaces and accommodation for both professionals and graduates from the Jewellery School of Making, as well as also facilitating shops, exhibitions and a much needed public realm for the general area.

page

118

This includes providing large market squares and pop-out workshops for public events and trade markets, as well as a large public space for an auction house which will be available for use for markets and various others community events. Fi g ure 1 :

Se c ti on A

Fi g ure 2 :

L ow e r and upper ground floor plans

Fi g ure 3 :

Courtyard perspec ti ve


page

119

F i gure 4:

E x ternal axo nomet ric

F i gure 5:

Si te sec ti on and elev at ions


B i ng ha m Le a h, c raf t spa c e, T HE D I GBETH UPCYCLING + UPS KILLING COLLEC TI V E

page

120

Fi g ure 1 :

Axonom etri c vi ew I

Fi g ure 2 :

Axonom etri c vi ew II

The Digbeth Upcycling and Upskilling Collective is a shared craft workshop space where makers and crafters of both private artists and the public come together. The 6 inresidence artists teach members of the public the skills in wood and metal working, necessary for upcycling unwanted items into usable pieces of furniture or art.

F igure 3:

S ect ional collage


page

121

F i gure 4:

Internal foyer space

F i gure 5:

East si de galler y space

F igure 6:

Ex ter n a l f r o nt ent r a n ce

The site is on the former Fairbanks Works, on the end fork point of the old industry’s transport system along the canal. The scheme ties into potential future pedestrian links along the canal, as a landmark building, before continuing into the Creative Quarter of Digbeth.

F i gure 7:

L ow e r and u pper ground floor plans


C a mb r i dge Ja c k, c raf t spa c e , D IGBETH BICYCLE HUB

page

122

Fi g ure 1 :

E x ternal pe rspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Urban L andscape


page

123

F i gure 3:

F i gure 4:

F i gure 5:

Internal Perspect iv e

Ground Fl oor Plan

Se cond Fl oo r Plan

Bicycle production had steadily risen throughout the late 1940s to mid-1950s, with Birmingham a hub of trade. Cycle-making became concentrated in Birmingham, Coventry and Nottingham; where massproduction techniques had already been applied to the manufacture of textiles, sewing machines and clocks. Famous cycle manufacturers in Birmingham included Dawes Cycles, New Hudson, Hercules, The Sun Bicycle Company. Today, the focus of transportation infrastructure in the City is now shifting away from the car, back towards the more sustainable bicycle. With environmental targets and rising levels of obesity, it is the obligation of city councils to improve infrastructure and promote cycling. As such, the proposition of an intervention that reinvigorates the craft of cycle manufacturing and the activity of bike riding within Birmingham is most suitable.


Tu i ca A na I r i na , c raf t spa c e , D IGB ETH FA S HION HUB

page

124

Fi g ure 1 :

B i rd’s eye vi ew

Fi g ure 2 :

Si te sec ti ons


Digbeth Fashion Hub is to be Birmingham’s new fashion focal point, by completing the Custard Factory development. The proposed building is for recently graduated students that want to further their skills into both textile making and fashion industry; they will be guided by professionals that have their own studios to work in.

Two separate blocks define the public space, creating important views in and out of the site. One block encompasses exhibition spaces, a shop and an internal and external catwalk which are open to the public and different workshops with the necessary facilities for crafting, whilst the other is for student accommodation.

F i gure 4:

Se c ti on D

F i gure 5:

Internal vi ew of t he maker ’s space

page

125

F igure 3:

G e n e r a l a r r a n g em e nt p la n


Ki r k Sa m u e l , c raf t spa c e , JE WE L L ERY QUA RTER V IRTUA L HUB

page

126

Fi g ure 1 :

Pi rate street f rom west ent rance

Fi g ure 2 : Pl an

Fi g ure 3 :

Se c ti on A


page

127

F i gure 4:

Publ i c street corner intersect ion

F i gure 5: Perspe c ti ves

Birmingham is one of the largest cities in the UK with a rich history and design language throughout the city. The city is on the rebound from its gradual industrial decline and subsequent regeneration. Tasked with developing a design proposal for a public building with a complex mixed-use programme, that will fulfil the local community’s amenity requirements as to what is seen fit. It was therefore concluded that the area of the

Jewellery Quarter could benefit from a arts and craft space. Its purpose to act as a set of programmes that mix spaces for making and displaying artefacts: either fine arts (painting, sculpture) or craft-based making (furniture, digital fabrication). The rising advent of digital technologies and virtual reality. it is a fine craft which is already established in Birmingham which can benefit from this induction of a virtual reality facility.


y5_performance

Students Zhenzi Chen Chin Yuan Ee Ahmed Elamin Stavros Georgiou Ben Gess Lorna Hutchinson Long-Yin Lo Tahima Rahman Karim Rouabah Joseph Wyatt Xianming Yang Ruijing Zhang

Tutors Matt Strong


R a hma n Ta hi m a , pe r for m a nc e , T H E B A L L E T B O X

page

130

Fi g ure 1 :

Facade m odel

Fi g ure 2 :

E l evati on I

Fi g ure 3 :

E l evati on II


page

131

F i gure 4:

Si te pl an

F i gure 5:

Se c ti onal m odel

Freefall Dance Company is a group of highly gifted dancers with severe learning disabilities from Birmingham. With aspirations to expand, the highly successful ballet troupe has a vision of opening a new dance specific performance venue with adequate facilities for dancers and audience members.

Freefall wish to expand their involvement with audiences that have special requirements, by running workshops and performances that will have higher levels of accessibility. This project aims to promote equality among people of all abilities by providing an inclusive space to experience and practise ballet.


S tav ro s G e o rgi ou, per for m a nc e, C H A R L O T T E S T. P E O P L E ’ S T H E AT R E

page

132

Fi g ure 1 :

Internal vi ew

Fi g ure 2 : Sec ti on

Birmingham is currently the second largest city in UK, after London, with a population of 1.1 million in 2014. As someone would expect this increased younger age structure population, and the fact that Birmingham has become a major city in the UK, could provide the foundations of the issue of increasing large amount of homeless people to be present. Charlotte St. People’s Theatre, will be the home of a new theatre of dancing and

performing arts and will also provide opportunities to homeless people, as well as the public, to explore their potentials and talents through dancing, singing and performance arts as well as the mental health benefits gained from them. The scheme will provide solution to the immediate and long-term issues associated with homeliness such as accommodation, food, job opportunities as well as improvement of high mental health issues, seen across homeless communities.


page

133

F i gure 3: Cafe

F i gure 4: Pl an


El a m i n A h me d, pe r for m a nc e , A C E D A N C E A N D M U S I C

The scheme proposes to rehouse the ACE Dance and Music company, an internationally recognised leader in the field of Contemporary African and Caribbean Dance. The architectural proposition employs a strong use of material and form to project the identity of ACE to the city of Birmingham.

page

134

Fi g ure 1 :

Si te pl an

Fi g ure 2 : Courtyard

The contrast between the perforated, rustic Corten Steel and the crisp smooth finish of the white onyx stone that wrap the theatre and dance spaces acts as an architectural metaphor for the fusion of the Afro-Caribbean dance aesthetic and contemporary techniques. Externally the massing creates a secluded pocket of urban landscape that falls to create a level interaction with the river Rea.


page

135

F i gure 3:

T he atre spa ce

F i gure 4: E l evati on

F i gure 5:

Sketc h sec ti o n


H u tc h i nso n L or na , pe r for m a nc e, J E R W O O D C H O R E O G R A P H I C R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M M E

page

136

Fi g ure 1 :

Perform ance space

The client, The Jerwood Charitable Foundation is an independent grant making foundation and UK registered charity dedicated to funding of the arts. One particular branch of their funding is to encourage research into choreography through the Jerwood Choreographic Research Project (JCRP).

F igure 2:

Dance st udio


page

137

F i gure 3:

Se c ti on I

F i gure 4:

Se c ti on II

This particular research grant is funded by many dance companies, the most prominent of which is DanceXchange, based in the Birmingham Hippodrome. The proposed development will provide a permanent physical home for the Jerwood Choreographic Research Programme which has so far not had a base in which to concentrate its energies.

F i gure 5: Courtyard


Ee C hi n Yua n, per for m a c e, C E N T R E F O R C H O R E O G R A P H I C R E S E A R C H A N D P E R F O R M A N C E

page

138

Fi g ure 1 : Approac h

Fi g ure 2 :

Perform ance space

Fi g ure 3 :

D etai l se c ti on


page

139

F i gure 4:

Axonom eti c v iew

The Centre for Choreographic Research and Performance is located in Digbeth, Birmingham, which will be developed into a “creative and cultural hub for the city�, according to the Birmingham Development Plan 2031. Midlandsbased dance organisation, DanceXchange, is the client of the project. As a forward-looking group, DanceXchange both produces and promotes UK as well as international dance.

The site of the former Fairbanks Works next to the Digbeth Branch Canal was decided upon, in hopes that the re-adapted factory building, with its pitched roofs, and its waterfront location would complement the activities taking place.


y 5 _ c i v i c Students Afifah Abdullah Shaun Davey Ross Elliston Sandra da Fonseca Sam Homer Billy Hoi Shing Kwan Vanessa Hiu Leung Dominic Savio Li Peggy Pui Lin Peter MacNaughton Toan Nguyen Ahmed Zidouri

Tutors Alisdair Russell


A bdul l a h A f i fa h, c i vi c , T HE GR E E NHOUS E

page

142

Fi g ure 1 :

Interi or perspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Interi or perspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 3 :

B i rd’s-eye vi ew


page

143

F i gure 4:

Short se c ti o n process

F i gure 5:

L ong se c ti on concept

Project ‘The Greenhouse’ is a hub in the city dedicated to using a vertical farm technology to grow crops for the purpose of commercialisation and spreading education on healthy eating to the general public. Crops grown in The Greenhouse is then sold at a market space within the building that is open to local entrepreneurs, especially young start ups who seek for a platform to commercialise their products.

The Greenhouse will also include residential units aimed towards the young professionals demographic, and also flexible incubator spaces in the hopes of integrating its use with the Steam House, a knowledge and start up hub, a development adjacent to the site.


Davey Sha un, c i vi c , D IGB E T H B IC YCLE S HED

page

144

Fi g ure 1 :

M odel photograph

Fi g ure 2 :

Cut-aw ay axonm etri c v iew

Digbeth is set to see huge changes in the coming years with the arrival of HS2 and the association with Birmingham’s Creative Quarter. This proposal aims to create a warm and friendly community resource centre which focuses on providing spaces the missing from traditional, efficient urban living.

F igure 3:

S hort sect ion


page

145

F i gure 4:

Street pe rsp ect iv e

F i gure 5:

Publ i c space perspect iv e

Situated on the Digbeth branch canal, the site is perfectly suited to be a hub of cycling transport connecting the suburbs with the city centre and the new HS2 station. The spaces will be a warm retreat from Digbeth’s post-industrial landscape.

F i gure 6:

Interi or pers pect iv e


S a m H o me r, c i vi c , D IGB E T H C IVIC HUB

page

146

Fi g ure 1 :

Cut-aw ay axonm etri c v iew

Fi g ure 2 :

Si te pl an

The scheme engages with three scales of spatial problem resolution: 1. The Urban - the proposals will act as a catalyst in the wider regeneration of Digbeth from a post-industrial wasteland to the new ‘Creative Quarter’ envisioned in the Birmingham Big City Plan.

F igure 3:

Ex terior perspect iv e


page

147

F i gure 4:

Se c ti onal Perspect iv e B

F i gure 5:

Se c ti onal perspect iv e C

2. The Building - the layout of the scheme aims to combine different uses and user groups within a holistic plan, providing opportunities for workers, residents, bars, cafĂŠs, shops and artists to come together in unexpected and intriguing ways.

F i gure 6:

E x teri or perspect iv e

3. The Tectonic - the scheme relies on layers of visibility through the façade; the different building types clearly express their activity and function onto the public realm.


H i u C hi ng Va nessa L eung , c i vi c , D I GBETH BIKE S ERV ICES A ND LEIS URE CENTRE

The proposed project is to convert an existing factory block in Digbeth to a civic bike services and leisure centre. It promotes cycling in Birmingham and help share population pressure from the public transportation.

page

148

This proposed project, together with another new regeneration development, sited on the opposite side of our site, across the canal basin, to reactivate the Tyhpoo Wharf. The Digbeth Bike Services and Leisure Centre will become a key landmark of Birmingham and acts as a transition hub for local green transportation. Fi g ure 1 :

Ground f l oor pl an

Fi g ure 2 :

Interi or perspe c ti ve


page

149

F i gure 3:

B i rd’s-eye view

F i gure 4:

Se c ti onal perspect iv es

F i gure 5:

Front E l evat ion


Pu i Yui Pe g gy L i n, c i vi c , L IVING L AB FOR CREATIV E INDUSTRIES

page

150

Fi g ure 1 :

E x teri or perspec ti ve

Fi g ure 2 :

Interi or perspe c ti ve

Fi g ure 3 :

Interi or perspe c ti ve


page

151

F i gure 4: E l evati ons

F i gure 5:

E x teri or perspect iv e

Situated on a vacant brownfield site in central Birmingham the scheme focuses on creating a centrally-located civic for the public to get involved in the booming creative fabrication industry in Birmingham. Although seemingly a well-established typology in central Birmingham creative hubs are too scattered and without strong links. Therefore this

generously-sized central site is a perfect fit for a new creative civic centre, offering the public centralised access to high-demand fabrication technology. Members of the public who wish learn more about the creative industries may book a tour of the facilities, including the fabrication hall and an auditorium for lectures given by professionals.


This publication is created as a showcase to represent the work of the students. MArch Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 2 Department of Architecture and Built Environment The University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD United Kingdom

DABE_Part 2 Architecture_Catalogue 2017  

Catalogue of student projects from the Part 2 Architecture Course 2016-17, as prepared by the students to showcase their work.

DABE_Part 2 Architecture_Catalogue 2017  

Catalogue of student projects from the Part 2 Architecture Course 2016-17, as prepared by the students to showcase their work.

Advertisement