Page 1

OfComhaimseartha Our Times

Irish World Academy of Music and Dance / University of Limerick Dรกmh Chruinne ร‰ireann Rince agus Ceol / Ollscoil Luimnigh

AUTUMN AN FOMHAR

2016


Contents

Credits General Editor: Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin Text Editor: Gráinne O'Donovan Compilation of Material: Alexandra Dougall Photography: Maurice Gunning Design: Joe Gervin Space Booking Coordination: Melissa Carty Ag Féachaint Siar/Recent Events: Jennifer de Brún (Media Office) Tower/Logos Module Coordinator (Colloquium): Aileen Dillane Tuesday Lunchtime Performance Coordinator: Sandra Joyce/Niall Keegan Thursday Lunchtime Performance Coordinator: Lisa McLoughlin Taighde/Research Editor: Helen Phelan

2

EKLEGO: THE ART OF LISTENING

4

FACULTY AND STAFF

7

LUNCHTIME PERFORMANCE SERIES

13

THE TOWER SEMINAR SERIES

19

LOGOS SEMINAR SERIES

21

SPECIAL EVENTS

25

AG FÉACHAINT SIAR/RECENT EVENTS AT THE ACADEMY

33

BEALACH/COMMUNITY CULTURAL PATHWAYS AT THE IRISH WORLD ACADEMY

37

CÓNAÍ/ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE

41

TAIGHDE/RESEARCH AT THE ACADEMY

47

IRISH WORLD ACADEMY ENSEMBLES

49

SCHOLARSHIP AND AWARD RECIPIENTS

53

CLÁR/IRISH WORLD ACADEMY PROGRAMMES

56

OTHER PROGRAMMES AND ARTS OFFICES


Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

Magdalena Hylak performing as part of the Step Up Repertory Programme Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

1

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Front cover: BA Voice and Dance students performing at the Academy


EKLEGO: TheListening Art of The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance can date its foundation to January 1994. From its inception, it strove to be a listening-post for cultural globalisation out of an educational base. Beginning with music, the inclusion of dance was firmly on the agenda from the earliest articulation of the concept. With the construction of a specially designed building on the banks of the River Shannon on the University of Limerick campus and supported by the ever-generous Atlantic Philanthropies, a third addition was made to the Academy’s offerings: the perspectives of theatre, spectacle, circus, festivity and related areas were now represented by the inclusion of a Festive Arts programme. This move towards a wider inclusion of performing arts is reflected in the change of title of the Chair of Music to the Chair of Performing Arts, which has already commenced. In all of this, the terms Irish and World have held firm. Irish World Academy® refers to a global listening out of the local, thus giving rise to the term lobal as containing the meaning of that local/global synergy so resonant with our times. A number of key philosophies have been central to this development. Howard Gardiner’s Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences opened the way for new thinking that brought performance into the fold of legitimate academic endeavour. David Elliot’s Music Matters: A Philosophy of Music Education copper-fastened this

2

MÍCHEÁL Ó SÚILLEABHÁIN

process. The poetic voice of Séamus Heaney rang out through it all with its eloquent advocacy of the poetic/ practical spectrum that evoked a new level of listening across the dial.

…we were as susceptible and impressionable as the drinking water that stood in a bucket in our scullery: every time a passing train made the earth shake, the surface of that water used to ripple delicately, concentrically, and in utter silence. But it was not only the earth that shook for us: the air around and above us was alive and signaling too When a wind stirred in the beeches, it also stirred an aerial wire attached to the topmost branch of the chestnut tree. Down it swept, in through a hole bored in the corner of the kitchen window, right on into the innards of our wireless set where a little pandemonium of bubbles and squeaks would suddenly give way to the voice of a BBC newsreader speaking out of the unexpected like a deus ex machina.

The antenna can be a global ear. Radio waves travelling in a straight path around the curvature of the earth bring the local and the global together through a kind of listening. Sometimes, for Heaney, that listening is best done at the water’s edge.

Everything in me Wanted to bow down, to offer up, To go barefoot, foetal, and penitential,

And pray at the water’s edge.

Just like Heaney’s bucket in the scullery, sound and water are good bedfellows. Keeping faith with the river had maximised the efficacy of sound travelling through water at approximately four times that of travelling through air. Sometimes this is best done in a silence that breaks down the fences of existence, merging ‘here’ with ‘there’ in a lobal movement – as in Philip Larkin’s poem ‘Here’.

And past the poppies bluish neutral distance Ends the land suddenly beyond a beach Of shapes and shingle. Here is unfenced existence: Facing the sun, untalkative, out of reach.

The art of listening is a liminal space that both receives and broadcasts. It is an open door for the known and for the strange to pass. It is a wireless reception for whatever wishes to come in. Famous lines from Heaney’s ‘Postscript’ capture the moment: You are neither here nor there, A hurry through which known and strange things pass As big soft buffetings come at the car sideways And catch the heart off guard and blow it open


Keeping faith with the river has allowed the zeitgeist to maintain a presence and has powered the Academy's antenna through a world listening.

Alone and mirrored clear in love’s deep river, ‘To labour and not to seek reward,’ he prays,

A prayer his body makes entirely For he has forgotten self, forgotten bird And on the riverbank forgotten the river’s name.

EKLEGO is a word that enshrines intelligence. From the Greek meaning ‘to choose, to select, to pick up’, it is cognate with the Danish word Leg as in Leg Godt – the motto for the game Lego, meaning ‘to play well’. The leg root is also found in the Latin legere meaning to pick out, to select. Inter “between” + legere give us the word intelligence. Lego, then, becomes a symbol of intelligence in the sense of the ability to pick up and pick out elements that make sense across various domains. And so we are back to Gardiner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory. His proposed series of intelligences can easily be viewed in terms of a kind of ‘playing well’. Numerical intelligence allows us to run with numbers and mathematical formulae. Conceptual intelligence binds likely and unlikely ideas together to produce innovative thought patterns and concepts. Spacial intelligence allows us to dance with originality and find our very physical space in the world. Physical intelligence shows through skilful coordination of the

body, such as in the movements of a great athlete. Musical intelligence, in this perception, is a game of sonic Lego in real music time where motifs and phrases, rhythms and dynamics are clipped together as a form of knowledge in itself. And so on. The journey of the Irish World Academy in the twentytwo years since its foundation has indeed been an eclectic one – but the eclecticism has been within the bounds of a hard-edged formula. Founded from its inception on the four principles of Research and Performance (under the shared title of CLÁR), Community Cultural Pathways (BEALACH), and Artists-in-Residence (CÓNAÍ), the Academy has striven to throw an Irish light on a contemporary global world. The myth of the birth of the River Shannon so strikingly portrayed in The Sionna Mosaic by Desmond Kinney in the Academy Foyer (or Street, as the architect Daniel Cordier envisaged it) has given voice to the flow of knowledge coming in off the wind. Keeping faith with the river has allowed the zeitgeist to maintain a presence and has powered the Academy’s antenna through a world listening. European Union full-time students from twenty-one countries and international full-time students from twenty-nine additional countries, including Belarus, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Nigeria, Palestine, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam, have now graduated from the Academy.

The Academy antenna continues to pick up signals from across a shared world. This antenna is also a baton, a sound post (as in the belly of a fiddle), a nautical yardarm, a flagpole (where the message is in the wind as much as in the flag). The art of listening across the first twenty-two years of the Academy’s life will be celebrated with a new composition, EKLEGO for Tape, Symphony Orchestra and Traditional Musicians (led by our new Chair of Performing Arts, Professor Mel Mercier), at University Concert Hall, Limerick this autumn. The performance will mark the transition between Chairs and will mark the passing of the baton to another generation. Furthermore, it will pick up and receive sounds passing through and transmit them through a broadcast of sonic seeds into the offing. Mícheál Ó Súílleabháin Mícheál Ó Súílleabháin (www.mosmusic.ie) is Chair of Music and Founding Director of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick. Noted for his development of a uniquely Irish traditional piano style, he has recorded extensively with the Irish Chamber Orchestra. In 2005 he was awarded an honorary D.Mus. from the National University of Ireland at his Alma Mater, University College Cork, for his contribution to music in Ireland over the past thirty years. He was Director of the Academy from its inception in 1994 until 2012, and he retired from his position as Inaugural Chair of Music at the University in 2016. Under the new title of Chair of Performing Arts, Mícheál’s successor is Professor Mel Mercier, with whom he has performed and recorded extensively since 1975.

3

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

In ‘St Kevin and the Blackbird’, Heaney paints the saint with his hand out in the rain as a bird nests in it. He is obedient to the emerging life of the bird to the point of self-forgetfulness:


Faculty & Staff

IRISH WORLD ACADEMY OF MUSIC AND DANCE, UNIVERSITY OF LIMERICK

Dr Sandra Joyce Academy Director Course Director, MA Irish Traditional Music Performance sandra.joyce@ul.ie +353 61 202065

Dr Niall Keegan Academy Associate Director Director of Undergraduate Studies niall.keegan@ul.ie + 353 61 202465

Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin Emeritus Chair of Music Founding Director irishworldacademy@ul.ie + 353 61 202590

Professor Mel Mercier Chair of Performing Arts mel.mercier@ul.ie + 353 61 202918

Paula Dundon Academy Administrator paula.dundon@ul.ie +353 61 202149

Barbara Christie Senior Administrator barbara.christie@ul.ie +353 61 202030

Melissa Carty Administrator melissa.carty@ul.ie +353 61 202590

Jennifer de Brún Performing Arts Coordinator jennifer.debrun@ul.ie +353 61 202917

Alan Dormer Academy Technical Officer alan.dormer@ul.ie +353 61 202726

Ernestine Healy Director, BLAS International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance ernestine.healy@ul.ie +353 61 202653

Dr Aileen Dillane Lecturer, BA Irish Music and Dance aileen.dillane@ul.ie +353 61 202159

Jean Downey Course Director, MEd (Music), Professional MEd (Music) jean.downey@ul.ie +353 61 213160

Dr Catherine Foley Course Director, MA Ethnochoreology catherine.e.foley@ul.ie +353 61 202922

Dr Yonit Kosovske Lecturer, MA Classical String Performance yonit.kosovske@ul.ie +353 61 234922

Course directors of MA Classical String Performance, MA Contemporary Dance Performance and MA Ritual Chant and Song to be announced.

4


Dr Triona McCaffrey Lecturer, MA Music Therapy triona.mccaffrey@ul.ie +353 61 234358

Lisa McLoughlin Lecturer, BA Voice and Dance lisa.c.mcloughlin@ul.ie +353 61 234967

Dr Mats Melin Course Director, MA Irish Dance Studies mats.melis@ul.ie +353 61 202542

Dr Hilary Moss Course Director, MA Music Therapy hilary.moss@iul.ie +353 61 213122

Dr Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain Course Director, MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance orfhlaith.nibhriain@ul.ie +353 61 202470

Dr Niamh NicGhabhann Course Director, MA Festive Arts niamh.nicghabhann@ul.ie +353 61 202798

Professor Helen Phelan Programme Director, PhD Arts Practice helen.phelan@ul.ie + 353 61 202575

Dr Colin Quigley Course Director, MA Ethnomusicology colin.quigley@ul.ie +353 61 202966

Kathleen Turner Course Director, MA Community Music kathleen.turner@ul.ie + 353 61 213762

BA Voice and Dance student Jean O'Donoghue Photograph © Maurice Gunning

5

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Dr Óscar Mascareñas Lecturer, BA Voice and Dance oscar.mascarenas@ul.ie +353 61 202990


6


VENUE: THE TOWER, IRISH WORLD ACADEMY (UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED) 1.15PM ADMISSION IS FREE, ALL ARE WELCOME

MA Contemporary Dance students performing at the Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning

7

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Lunchtime Performance Series


ELIKYA

ARUM

EVERY TUESDAY

Tuesday, September 27th

EVERY TUESDAY AT 1.15PM IN THE TOWER THEATRE, THE ACADEMY WILL PUT ON A TRADITIONAL MUSIC AND/OR DANCE PERFORMANCE THAT FEATURES A WIDE VARIETY OF TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTISTS VISITING THE ACADEMY DURING THAT WEEK.

Thursday September 22nd

SEPTEMBER

Elikya Choir Performance Elikya Elikya specialises in sacred and secular music from the Congo but is also inspired by other African and Irish musical traditions. This performance features a number of pieces from Elikya’s two recordings as well as some new repertoire. Elikya (the Lingala word for ‘Hope’) Choir was formed in 2002 in association with the Sanctuary initiative at the Irish World Academy and Doras Luimní (Development Organisation for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Limerick). The choir comprises members of the refugee and asylum-seeking community as well as students of the Academy. Elikya’s first CD, To Lingana / Love One Another, was launched in 2002 and the second, Catholic Liturgical Songs, in 2016. Specialising in secular and sacred Congolese music, the group includes members from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ireland, South Africa, Scotland, Angola, Nigeria, Kenya, Holland and Burundi.

8

DEBBIE DIAMOND

Arum Comprising Alan Reid, Conor Crimmins, Karen Hickey and Marty Barry, Arum is an Irish quartet whose members have created a progressive style of folk music like no other. hese exceptional musicians are in a realm of their own and are stunning audiences with their detailed exploration of music and song. Arum is leading the way for this adventurous new turn in Irish music, and with something for everyone, the band is not to be missed. Arum’s members are graduates of the Irish World Academy, and Alan and Conor are currently tutoring in banjo and flute. The four members are all from different counties in Ireland and came together in Limerick to form the group.

Thursday September 29th Baroque Violin Sonatas Debbie Diamond, baroque violin and Yonit Kosovske, harpsichord This lunchtime concert celebrates the violin sonata of the 17th and 18th centuries. The programme presents Arcangelo Corelli’s Sonata op. 5 no. 3 in C major along with works by two notable female composers from France and Italy: Élisabeth Claude Jacquet de la Guerre’s Sonata no. 1 in D minor and Isabella Leonarda’s Sonata duodecima in D minor. Diverse in nature, these compositions feature flashy virtuosity, improvisatory and notated ornamentation, wild harmonies, luxurious lyricism, imitative counterpoint and elegant dance movements.

YONIT KOSOVSKE

ÉLISABETH CLAUDE JACQUET DE LA GUERRE

Debbie Diamond received her master’s from the University of Toronto and continued doctoral studies at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. Since 1999 she has been a member of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, directed by Sir Simon Rattle, Sir Charles Mackerras, Sir Mark Elder, Vladimir Jurowski, Ivan Fischer, Sir Roger Norrington and Franz Bruggen. She has performed regularly with English Baroque Soloists and L’Orchestre Romantique et Revolutionnaire (dir. Sir John Eliot Gardiner) and as a soloist with Fiori Musicali, Ensemble Sonnerie and Sweelinck Ensemble. Debbie has given masterclasses in Latvia, the USA and Ireland. She coaches at the Junior Academy, Royal Academy of Music, London. Yonit Kosovske performs on harpsichord, fortepiano, modern piano and chamber organ. She specialises in 17th-century solo harpsichord and chamber music, Lieder, Contemporary Art Song and new works for harpsichord. She holds degrees from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music (DM), San Francisco Conservatory (MM) and Rutgers University’s Mason Gross School of the Arts (BM). She is a lecturer at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. Yonit gratefully acknowledges support from the Music Network Music Capital Scheme, funded by the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, which enabled her Italian harpsichord, built by Colin Booth, to be purchased.

Thursday September 29th (Theatre 1) The Changing Role of Art in Society Maureen Fleming This one-hour presentation geared to third-level comprises excerpts of Fleming’s repertoire. The excerpts are presented with intermittent projected videos and narratives that deal


ST. FRANCIS COLLEGE CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA

with the philosophical underpinnings of Fleming’s work and process and its relationship to the changing role of art in society. The presentation was developed and presented for the Juilliard School Dance Division. Choreographer and performance artist (Fulbright artist) Maureen Fleming invents surreal movement poetry with the discipline of a classicist and the imagination of an iconoclast. She is renowned for her original form of visual theatre. According to The New York Times, “she seemed to transcend the material world and enter a realm of pure spirit…wondrous choreographic metamorphosis.” Her works have received international acclaim at prestigious international festivals in Italy, Japan, Iceland, France, Colombia, Korea, Brazil and the US. She has received numerous fellowships from around the world. Some of her evening-length works include collaborations with playwright David Henry Hwang, composer Philip Glass and light and visual designer Christopher Odo. For more information, visit www.maureenfleming.com.

Wednesday October 12th

OCTOBER

Mid-October MusicFest! St. Francis College Choir and Orchestra The concert will be a mixture of group and solo performances of music from a variety of genres: popular, jazz, music theatre and religious. As much as possible, the choice of music will be chosen by the students themselves and will look to showcase their individual and group music-making skills. St. Francis College is an all-boys post-primary school of over 700 students under the trusteeship of the Franciscan Capuchins. Music has always been a very important part of school life, and

ALMA

PADDY O’BRIEN

the students are encouraged to develop their skills both as individuals and as part of the choir and orchestra. Performing arrangements of songs from the musicals, popular songs, Negro spirituals, religious songs and Christmas carols, St. Francis College Choir and Orchestra has built up a wide repertoire over the last few years. The choir and orchestra has participated in a number of prestigious musical events and takes part in the annual International Youth Choirs Competition in Prague.

Tuesday October 18th „Transalpin“ Alma: Julia Lacherstorfer (violin, voice), Evelyn Mair (violin, voice), Marie-Theres Stickler (diatonic accordion, voice), Matteo Haitzmann (violin, voice), Marlene Lacherstorfer (double bass, voice) In their program „TRANSALPIN“, five young musicians illustrate their idea of how traditional Austrian music translates to the present and to a contemporary audience. With violins, double bass, accordion and vocals and with great ease, passion and originality, they make the roots grow musical shoots and blossoms. Their music knows neither geographic constraint nor stylistic boundaries – it is inspired as much by travelling as by local culture. Alma’s melodies cannot be attached to specific points on a map; they traverse national limits and musical limitations. The sounds and rhythms are meant to reach the listeners in the place where their own roots lie hidden. Alma began in 2011. The lives of the five young musicians have always been entangled with music: they all grew up in musical families and, from an early age, their involvement with traditional Austrian music was as important to them as

EILEEN O’BRIEN

DEREK HICKEY

going to school or riding a bike. The ensemble is dedicated to revitalising tradition and exploring musical roots. Whatever Alma discovers is skilfully arranged, interpreted and put into a contemporary context.

Wednesday October 19th The Music of Paddy O’Brien Eileen O’Brien, Derek Hickey and Jack Talty Eileen O’Brien, fiddler, long-time Academy tutor and daughter of influential traditional composer and accordion player Paddy O’Brien, will present her father’s music in this performance. Eileen will be joined by Derek Hickey on accordion and by Jack Talty on concertina and piano. Eileen O’Brien is the bearer of a musical dynasty that can be traced back through generations on both sides of her family: on her father’s side, the legendary O’Brien family from Newtown, Nenagh and on her mother’s side, the Seerys from Dublin, who were founder members of Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann. Eileen’s father, Paddy O’Brien, established the B/C accordion-playing style in the 1950s, and his innovative style both as a musician and a prolific composer continues to have a profound influence on Irish traditional music. Eileen performs, teaches and composes. She graduated from the Irish World Academy’s MA Irish Traditional Music Performance in 2006 with a first-class honours degree. Hailing from Adare, Co. Limerick, both of Derek Hickey’s grandfathers played fiddle. Derek’s own musical career began at ten years of age when his uncle left an accordion in the family home. At 18, he joined the band Arcady and at 21, was invited by Frankie Gavin to join De Danann. He recorded two albums with the band during this time. In addition to performing, Derek is also a regular tutor at the Irish World Academy.

9

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E M Y O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

MAUREEN FLEMING


JACK TALTY

ADRIAN McNEIL

In his rich and varied performing experiences, he has shared the stage with some of the world’s greatest talents, including Stéphane Grappelli and the Rolling Stones. Jack Talty is an Irish traditional musician, composer, producer  and educator from Lissycasey in Co. Clare. Jack has performed expensively throughout the world and has contributed to over 30 albums as a musician, producer, composer, arranger and engineer. In 2011, with double bass and flute player Neil O’Loghlen, he formed Ensemble Ériu, which was awarded the prestigious Gradam Comharcheol TG4 in 2015. Since 2013, Jack has performed as a section leader with Dave Flynn’s Irish Memory Orchestra. An Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Scholar, Jack is currently undertaking a PhD at the Irish World Academy.

Tuesday October 25th Hindustani Sarod: An improvising instrument Adrian McNeil Adrian McNeil will perform the classical Hindustani music of North India on the sarod, a 25-string plucked lute. Adrian began his training in Hindustani music in 1980 when he became a disciple of Pt. Ashok Roy, the renowned sarodiya, himself a long-time disciple of the legendary Ustad Ali Akbar Khan. Adrian spent four years studying with his guru in India and Australia, and studied for three year with senior musician and sitariya Professor Sachindra Nath Roy (Ashok Roy’s uncle and a senior disciple of Ustad Alauddin Khan and Ustad Enayat Khan – two of the most important figures in 20th-century Hindustani music). Adrian was lucky enough to have learned many traditional and rare compositions and ragas from the late Professor S.N. Roy. Adrian also studied classical vocal music intensively in Mumbai with the well-known vocalist and musicologist Dr Ashok Ranade.

10

CROAGH SCHOOL OF MUSIC

STUDENTS OF THE IRISH WORLD ACADEMY

Adrian McNeil has a passion for exploring the nexus between scholarship and performance. He specialises in Hindustani music as a scholar and as a performer on the sarod. Since his initial training in Hindustani music with Pt. Ashok Roy, he has studied the sarod and Hindustani classical music according to the guru-sishya parampara traditional training method. He has published extensively on improvisation, aesthetics and the globalisation of music, and the political and cultural history of Hindustani music. He is a senior lecturer in ethnomusicology at the Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia and coordinator of the school’s postgraduate research programme.

Wednesday November 2nd

NOVEMBER

Croagh School of Music Lunchtime Performance Students from the Croagh School of Music This performance features a variety of music from traditional to modern pop and includes soloists and group performers. The recital showcases some of the school’s exceptional performers. Croagh School of Music was founded in 2001. Located in the heart of West Limerick, the school is one of Munster’s largest established music schools. It caters for all genres and styles of music, from beginner to undergraduate level. The school prides itself on the standard and quality of its dedicated teachers, who have trained and performed both at home and abroad. Many graduates of the school have progressed to study music at third-level and have launched their own careers in the field of music-making. The school fosters an active community of musicians, young and old, who enjoy performing in a variety of venues around the city and county.

LIMERICK SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Thursday November 3rd Free to Fall Students of the Irish World Academy This event is a work-in-progress performance platform for undergraduate and postgraduate students of the Irish World Academy: a showcase of original and re-worked pieces by students in music, dance and related subject areas. Come and experience the unique voice of the young and emerging artists from the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance.

Wednesday November 9th Limerick School of Music Recital Advanced student soloists from Limerick School of Music Limerick School of Music was founded in 1962. Located in the heart of Limerick city, the school is the largest provider of music education in the mid-west region. The teachers are performers of the highest calibre, and students enjoy being part of an exciting, vibrant and supportive community of musicians. Students are encouraged to take every opportunity to become involved in live performance, both individually and as members of the school’s many ensembles and orchestras. To find out more about Limerick School of Music events. To learn more about Limerick School of Music events, go to www.limerickschoolofmusic.ie or find them on facebook or twitter @LimerickSOM.


DIANE DALY

AOIFE NIC ATHLAOICH

CIAN Ó DÚILL

Thursday November 10th Chamber Music Recital Trió This performance by Trió features a selection of works for string trio by Mozart, Dohnanyi and Schubert. Trió is an exciting new string trio comprising musicians from the Irish Chamber Orchestra: Diane Daly (violin), Cian Ó Dúill (viola) and Aoife Nic Athlaoich (cello). Violinist and community musician Diane Daly represented Ireland performing as soloist with the RTÉ Concert Orchestra at the age of 14. She received a BMus from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, a postgraduate diploma from the Royal Northern College of Music (specialising in string teaching and the methodologies of Kodaly and Dalcroze) and an MA (first-class honours) from the University of Limerick. She has toured the world with a number of prestigious ensembles, including the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields and the European Union Chamber Orchestra, and has been a member of the Irish Chamber Orchestra since 1998. Cork-born viola player Cian Ó Dúill has performed with the Vanbrugh, Carducci and Calino String Quartets, the Fidelio Trio, the Avalon Ensemble, Chroma and the Crash Ensemble. He has played in chamber music recitals with Anthony Marwood, Howard Shelley, Jorg Widmann, Natalie Clein and Patricia Rozario, members of the Leopold Trio, the Nash Ensemble and Schubert Ensembles and has appeared at Cheltenham, Warwick Arts, Chichester, Aldeburgh, Wye Valley, Kings Lynn, Sligo Spring, Killaloe and West Cork Chamber Music Festivals. He was a founder member of the Regent String Quartet and the Rothko String Trio and is a member of the Oriel Trio and the Londonbased string sextet Chamber Players.

ENNISTYMON VOCATIONAL SCHOOL

Dublin-born Aoife Nic Athlaoich is equally at home playing on period instruments and performing newly commissioned works. She has collaborated with jazz musicians and contemporary dance groups and plays as an orchestral musician under the baton of eminent conductors such as Sir John Elliot Gardiner, Sir Colin Davis and Bernard Haitink. She has performed with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, la Serenissima, the Avison Ensemble, Irish Baroque Orchestra, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Classical Opera Company and London Mozart Players and is a member of the Irish Chamber Orchestra and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique.

Thursday November 17th (Theatre 1) MA Contemporary Dance Performance MA Contemporary Dance Performance students The performance will feature a programme of original ensemble choreographic works created by guest choreographers and solo choreographies created by the students. The guest choreographers include New York-based choreographer/ performer and distinguished Fulbright artist Maureen Fleming.

Wednesday November 16th Spraoi agus Spleodar!!!!!! Ennistymon Vocational School Students from Ennistymon Vocational School are delighted to return to the Irish World Academy to present a selection of Irish traditional tunes, songs and dance at this lunchtime performance. The concert showcases the talent of the young musicians, who love to learn and share their music-making in a strong community context. Ennistymon is situated in the heart of the North Clare Music tradition, and this group comprises a cross-section of young people who enjoy performing the tunes, songs and dances of North Clare. The students regularly perform in their local community.

BA Irish Music and Dance students performing during a recording for RTÉ Radio na Gaeltachta at the Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning

MA CONTEMPORARY DANCE PERFORMANCE STUDENTS

11


MA COMMUNITY MUSIC STUDENTS

LIADAIN HERRIOTT

Wednesday November 23rd

A spellbinding feat of technical excellence, Liminal offers the viewers a visual act of listening and an aural act of seeing. It is a fantastical fairy tale that speaks a universal truth. (Note: This performance is a modification of the original work – it is tailored for this Tower lunchtime performance.) Choreography: Liadain Herriott. Music: Eomac, Handel, Grieg, Shane Latimer, Mahler and Tchaikovsky.

(Theatre 1) MA Community Music Ensemble MA Community Music students Each year the students of the MA Community Music programme work together to create an original musical work drawn from their experiences throughout the semester. The performance demonstrates the students’ understanding of community music principles, such as the power of collective creativity and a belief in our innate musicality as people. How the students interpret and create using these principles is entirely up to them. Join us for what promises to be an exciting performance. Students of the Irish World Academy’s full-time, postgraduate MA Community Music programme are drawn from a variety of musical backgrounds. During their studies, they work to enhance their own musical and facilitation skills in order to facilitate the expressive work of communities in a diverse range of settings, such as schools, hospitals, care centres, music schools and community education branches of arts organisations.

Thursday November 24th Minimal Liminal Liadain Herriott Everybody has a story to tell. This is the story of a classical girl living in a modern world. A girl trying to find her way – in, out and through the darkness. She chases the light. Her quest creates a liminal universe where fragments make sense and sense is fragmented. A kaleidoscope of worlds where classical influences in movement and music morph with minimal electronic beats.

12

JOHN SCOTT’S IRISH MODERN DANCE THEATRE

Awarded ‘Best Performer’ in Dublin Tiger Fringe 2015, choreographer and dancer Liadain Herriott trained originally in Dublin, Monte Carlo and Madrid. Choreographing since 2009, her work has been performed at festivals in Belgium, India, Latvia, Spain and Ireland.

John Scott’s Dublin-based Irish Modern Dance Theatre is a physically and culturally diverse ensemble ranging from Virtuosic Cunningham dancers to African Torture survivors. A choreographer and singer, Scott has studied and performed with Meredith Monk, Sara Rudner, Yoshiko Chuma and Anna Sokolow and has studied with Susan Buirge. Recent works include Body Duet, Actions, Fall and Recover, and The White Piece. Scott’s choreography is playful, virtuosic and passionate and has been described as Beckett meets Monty Python. Touring Ireland, the ensemble pioneers dance as an art form in a country known more for literature and text-based drama.

The artist would like to graciously acknowledge the support-inkind for this work from Arts Council Ireland, Dance Theatre of Ireland, Dance Ireland, Firkin Crane, I.F.O.N.L.Y. and Mermaid Arts Centre.

Thursday December 1st Metal Fragments John Scott’s Irish Modern Dance Theatre John Scott, whose recent award-winning work includes Hyperactive and Lear, now brings to the Irish World Academy a cast of culturally diverse, compelling dancers showing physical difference and shared vocabulary of movement. Metal Fragments is a dance drawn from movement phrases – some of short duration, some longer – which overlap and draw from a vocabulary both pedestrian and virtuosic. Using the cast as a reflection of contemporary society and diversity, this performance celebrates what is essential in the inner and outer self. Martha Campbell performing with ACADEMOS and members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra Photograph © Maurice Gunning


VENUE: THE TOWER, IRISH WORLD ACADEMY 4PM TO 5.30PM ADMISSION IS FREE, ALL ARE WELCOME

13

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

The Tower Seminar Series


RUSANGANO FAMILY

Wednesday September 7th

KATHLEEN TURNER

SEPTEMBER

Performing Irish Identity Presenters: Rusangano Family Chair: Kathleen Turner (Irish World Academy) As part of its programme of events commemorating the 1916 Rising, the Irish World Academy is hosting throughout the autumn semester a series of Tower seminars that focus on the role of the artist in Irish society and reflect on the echoes and resonance of 1916 in the contemporary world. In this interactive performance-based seminar, Rusangano Family will perform songs in response to this extract from the 1916 Proclamation: “The Republic guarantees religious and civil liberty, equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens, and declares its resolve to pursue the happiness and prosperity of the whole nation and of all its parts, cherishing all of the children of the nation equally…” Formed in early 2015 and based in Limerick city, Rusangano Family produces social-engaged music that mixes a global variety of cultures and traditions. The musical trio comprises MCs MuRli and God Knows and producer/DJ mynameisjOhn. The three group members have been collaborating for a number of years on individual projects, including recordings Surface Tension and Rusangano/Family. They released their debut album, Let the Dead Bury the Dead, in April 2016 to great critical acclaim. God Knows is rapidly becoming one of the most electrifying souls in music in Ireland. An MC with no concern for boundaries,  he has consistently smashed all live shows and guest appearances around the country. His unique MC fusion of grime, rap and spoken word has firmly established him as one of the most formidable front men in Ireland.

14

MEHMET ÖCAL ÖZBILGIN

MuRli is a Limerick-based 24-year-old poet and wordsmith of Togolese descent. As an MC, he has studied his trade and been building his story-telling abilities and charismatic stage presence for some time. Released in January 2015, his debut EP, Surface Tension, “offers an insight into the battle within the mind of its author and his resistance against the pressures that come with feeling helpless”. mynameisjOhn grew up on the cold hard streets of Ennis, headphones on and hood up. He collected tapes, played basketball and entered radio competitions. Now he DJs and makes beats. He has released a number of solo EPs, DJ'd with the likes of Kutmah, Gaslamp Killer, Hudson Mohawke and Prefuse 73 and currently spends his days chopping up foreign sounds on a sampler with a cup of tea close at hand. 

Wednesday September 14th Staging Traditional Dances during the Early Turkish Republican Era Presenter: Professor Dr Mehmet Öcal Özbilgin Chair: Dr Catherine Foley (Irish World Academy) During the foundation of the Turkish Republic, important factors affected the changing processes of traditional dance. Because of the dominant nationalist trend of the era, the variety in the ‘indivisible national cultural source’ was defined according to a ‘union in diversity’ principle that was applied to regional dance forms. In this seminar, the effect of the modernisation policies of the young Turkish Republic on folk dances is examined. The political role that was provided for traditional folk dances is analysed in light of the memoirs of Halil Oğultürk (1914–), the first officially appointed person to stage folk dances.

CATHERINE FOLEY

GRAHAM WELCH

Professor Dr Mehmet Öcal Özbilgin is head of Ege University State Turkish Music Conservatory, Izmir, Turkey. He is course director of the BA degree and lectures on both undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. He is also the art director of the Turkish Folk Dance Department in the State Turkish Music Conservatory. His current research is on Turkish Folk Dance and the Zeybek Dances. He is a long-standing member of the International Council for Traditional Music (ICTM).

Wednesday September 21st Singing and Sustainable Social Integration Presenters: Professor Helen Phelan, Dr Oscar Odena and Professor Graham Welch Chair: Professor Helen Phelan (Irish World Academy) This seminar is part of the Irish Research Council’s New Foundations scheme. Helen Phelan will introduce the New Foundations project on singing and sustainable social integration, which has been developed in partnership with Doras Luimní. A brochure on the work of the initiative will be launched at the end of the seminar. Oscar Odena will discuss the use of music education activities as a way of addressing social inclusion and respect for diversity. The presentation will draw on recent publications and research on cross-community settings in Northern Ireland and migrant children in Scotland. Graham Welch will address the growing body of research on the wider benefits that can accrue from sustained, structured and successful experiences in music. Helen Phelan is Associate Professor of Arts Practice at the Irish World Academy and programme director of the PhD Arts Practice. She is the recipient of the New Foundations ‘Singing and Sustainable Integration’ project in partnership with Doras Luimní. The project has enabled her to build on her work with


HELEN PHELAN

Sanctuary, a HEA-funded initiative that promotes access to university for new migrant communities through culturally based projects. Dr Oscar Odena is Reader in Education at the Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change, University of Glasgow. Previously he held university posts at Hertfordshire, Brighton and Queen’s University Belfast; he completed a study at Queen’s on the potential of music education to diminish crosscommunity tensions. His areas of expertise comprise qualitative research approaches, social inclusion and music education. He is past co-chair of the Research Commission of the International Society for Music Education (2012-2014) and serves on the boards of leading journals and the Review College of the Irish Research Council. Professor Graham Welch PhD holds the UCL Institute of Education (formerly University of London) Established Chair of Music Education since 2001. He is a past president of the International Society for Music Education (ISME) (2008-2014) and elected chair of the Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research (SEMPRE). He is chair of the new Paul Hamlyn Foundation National Commission on music education in England since 2015. He holds visiting professorships at universities in the UK and overseas and is a former member of the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Review College for Music. His numerous publications embrace diverse aspects of the social sciences and music.

LIAN BELL (Photo: Róise Goan)

THE CASEMENT PROJECT

LISA McLOUGHLIN

Wednesday September 28th

Wednesday October 5th

#WakingTheFeminists Presenter: Lian Bell Chair: Lisa McLoughlin (Irish World Academy)

Behind the Scenes of The Casement Project Presenter: Fearghus Ó Conchúir Chair: Lisa McLoughlin (Irish World Academy)

Beginning as a response to the Abbey Theatre’s male-dominated 2016 programme, #WakingTheFeminists is a grassroots movement calling for equality for women in Irish theatre. The announcement of the programme prompted from both women and men working in Irish theatre an outpouring of testimonies that highlighted the disenfranchisement and chronic under-representation of the work of women artists – not just at the Abbey but throughout Irish theatre. Following a historic meeting at the national theatre in November 2016, #WakingTheFeminists has successfully worked with major Irish theatre organisations and the Arts Council to ensure that gender equality is addressed across the sector in a way that will be practical, significant and long-lasting.

In this seminar, the artistic director and choreographer of The Casement Project, Fearghus Ó Conchúir, will trace the genesis, aspiration and realisation of this ambitious dance project and will share his working process through live performance, video and discussion. The Casement Project is an Open Call National Project in ART:2016, the Arts Council’s contribution to the Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme. It is co-commissioned by 14-18 NOW, WW1 Centenary Art Commissions.

Lian Bell is a freelance arts manager and designer for performance. She has worked with some of the most significant organisations, artists and makers in Irish performing arts over the past 20 years. As a designer, she most often works on interdisciplinary, contemporary, off-site or devised work; as a manager, she tends to work on projects that have a significant international dimension. Having accidentally started the #WakingTheFeminists campaign in October 2015, she has since been instrumental in coordinating it.

OCTOBER

For more information, visit www.thecasementproject.ie. Fearghus Ó Conchúir is a choreographer and dance artist whose film and live performances create a space for audiences and artists to build communities together. Brought up in the Ring Gaeltacht, he completed degrees in English and European Literature at Magdalen College Oxford before training at London Contemporary Dance School. He was curator of the artistic programme at Firkin Crane, Cork from 2013 to 2015 and is a former board member of Dance Ireland, Dance Digital, Project Arts Centre and Create. He is currently a trustee of the BBC Performing Arts Fund and is undertaking a PhD at NUIM with the support of an IRC scholarship.

15

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E M Y O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

OSCAR ODENA


EMMA FISHER

SARAH MOORE

Wednesday October 12th Creating Work for Young Audiences Presenters: Professor Sarah Moore, Dr Thomas Johnston and Emma Fisher Chair: Dr Niamh NicGhabhann (Irish World Academy) In this seminar, we explore the creative processes involved in developing work for young audiences. The presentation offers diverse perspectives from practitioners in literature, puppetry and music. Professor Sarah Moore chairs the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning and is Associate Vice President Academic at the University of Limerick. Also a creative writer, she has presented on creative writing and education at Edinburgh Book Festival and at the Sharjah International Book Festival. Her novels for young adults have been translated into 12 languages and adapted for the stage at Edinburgh and the West End. She is the current winner of the Jack Harte bursary (a literary prize of the Irish Writers’ Centre), and her work has been shortlisted for the CBI book of the year, the Independent Booksellers’ award and the Waterstones Prize. Musician, educator and researcher Thomas Johnston’s work lies in those spaces between Irish traditional music, performing arts for children and young audiences, community music, and music education practice and policy. He is the artistic director of Ceol Connected, whose productions include The Quiet Tree and the Creatures of Whistleberry Forest, a traditional music performance experience (for children aged 2-6); The Far Field, a musical world of fairy and otherworldly folklore (for children aged 3-7); and The Wonderful Tune, an ocean-themed music, puppetry and storytelling piece (for children aged 6-9). 

16

THOMAS JOHNSTON

EILEEN O’BRIEN

Emma Fisher is currently pursuing her PhD in puppetry at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick. Her research explores disability in the context of creativity and communication. She is a puppeteer, set designer and writer who has been working since 2009 with Helium Children’s Arts and Health. She set up Beyond the Bark, an inclusive puppet and installation theatre in 2007. She was nominated for an Irish Times theatre award for set design in 2010 for Revengers Tragedy (Bottom Dog) and Don Juan in Hell (Limerick Theatre Hub).

Wednesday October 19th The Music of Paddy O’Brien Presenters: Eileen O’Brien, Dr Colin Quigley, Dr Niall Keegan and Dr Máire O’Keefe Chair: Dr Sandra Joyce (Irish World Academy) Paddy O’Brien is one of Ireland’s best-known composers in traditional music and an innovator in the history of the accordion. His music comes out of a deep family tradition and network in the hinterland of Nenagh in North Tipperary as well being influenced by his years in New York. In this presentation, his daughter Eileen O’Brien, fiddler and long-time Academy tutor, will examine the role of composers in traditional musics and her father’s particular contributions to the Irish tradition. Eileen will be joined by ethnomusicologist Dr Colin Quigley and Irish music specialists Dr Niall Keegan and Dr Máire O’Keefe, the latter whose dissertation investigated the history of the accordion. See page 9 for a biographical note on Eileen O’Brien.

COLIN QUIGLEY

NIALL KEEGAN

Dr Colin Quigley is a senior lecturer and course director of the MA Ethnomusicology at the Irish World Academy. His research with Newfoundland fiddler and composer Emile Benoit, entitled Music from the Heart (1995), was a detailed examination of compositional processes. Traditional Irish flute player and ethnomusicologist Dr Niall Keegan is associate director of the Irish World Academy and director of the Academy’s undergraduate studies. His PhD, The Art of Juncture – Transformations of Irish Traditional Music, focused on the language-based structures used by traditional musicians to account for and shape their performance practices. His research also engages the diasporic experience of traditional music, particularly in the UK. He has performed extensively throughout the world with musicians such as Sandra Joyce, Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin and Clive Carroll. Originally from Tralee in Co. Kerry, fiddle-player Dr Máire O’Keeffe is now based on the west coast of Ireland in Kinvara, Co. Galway. She has many different musical interests, including the fiddle traditions of Ireland, Scotland, Shetland and Cape Breton as well as the music of Galicia in north-west Spain. She has many research interests and completed a PhD entitled Journey into Tradition: A Social History of the Irish Button Accordion at the Irish World Academy. She has given fiddle master classes all over the world – from Europe to America and Australia – and has performed at many major festivals and events.


MÁIRE O’KEEFE

SANDRA JOYCE

ADRIAN McNEIL

FLORIANE GABER

LUCY MEDLYCOTT

KIM TILBROOK

PASCHALE STRAITON

(Photo: Con Kelleher)

Wednesday October 26th Improvisation: The Role of “seed ideas” in Hindustani Music Presenter: Adrian McNeil Chair: Colin Quigley (Irish World Academy) Using Hindustani music of North India as his reference case, Adrian McNeil will discuss processes of improvisation in this seminar. He will examine how generative processes such as ornamentation, variation, improvisation and composition are conceptualised and realised in many different ways around the world. This classical music is renowned for the significance and virtuosity of musicians’ extended improvisatory performance.

Floriane Gaber is a writer, researcher, journalist, teacher and cultural consultant. She is a well-travelled European commentator and critic of street theatre, mime, circus and spoken/written word performance. She has been published widely and is a regular contributor to cultural and arts journals and magazines. Her books 40 ans d’arts de la rue and How it all started: street arts in the context of the 1970s are important texts that chart this history of street and outdoor arts. Lucy Medlycott BA, FRSA is project manager for the Irish Street Arts, Circus and Spectacle Network ISACS. ISACS is Ireland’s lead umbrella organisation for the development and support of these art forms in Ireland today Lucy co-founded and managed outdoor arts company Bui Bolg in Wexford from 1994 to 2013.

See page 10 for a biographical note on Adrian McNeil.

Wednesday November 9th

NOVEMBER

Critical Encounters with Street Arts, Circus and Spectacle Presenters: Floriane Gaber, Lucy Medlycott, Kim Tilbrook and Paschale Straiton Chair: Dr Niamh NicGhabhann (Irish World Academy) This seminar explores different ways of critically engaging with street arts, circus and spectacle. Drawing from their own experience within the sector, the speakers will explore the role of reflective and critical frameworks in the development of the position of street art, circus and spectacle in a range of international contexts. Ailish Maher and Sarah Ryan performing as part of the Step Up Repertory Programme Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Kim Tilbrook is a producer and facilitator with over 25 years’ experience of working on socially engaged arts projects, including Nowhere Island for the 2012 Olympiad, Wye Valley River Festival and numerous opportunities for youth participation in the South West. Paschale Straiton is artistic director of Red Herring, an outdoor theatre company based in Brighton. She trained at Circomedia Circus School, Bristol and holds an MFA in Theatre Directing from Birkbeck, UCL. She has worked as a deviser with companies ranging from Wildworks to Improbable.


ELEONORA BELFIORE

KERRY McCALL

Wednesday November 16th Cultural Policy Research Observatory Methodology Seminar Presenter: Professor Eleonora Belfiore Chair: Kerry McCall This keynote address by Professor Eleonora Belfiore takes place as part of a seminar on research methods in cultural policy research organised by the Cultural Policy Research Observatory and hosted by the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. The Cultural Policy Observatory Ireland: an all island research network is a new initiative designed to promote research and information exchange on cultural policy across the island of Ireland. The project is supported through a partnership between Dr Victoria Durrer, Queen’s University,  Belfast and Kerry McCall, Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology. It is seed funded by the Irish Research Council under the New Foundations scheme, 2014. Professor Eleonora Belfiore is Professor of Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University. She has published extensively on cultural politics and policy, particularly in relation to the place that notions of the ‘social impacts’ of the arts have had in British cultural policy discourses. She published The Social Impact of the Arts: An intellectual History (Palgrave, 2008) with Oliver Bennett and co-edited Humanities in the Twenty-First Century: Beyond Utility and Markets (2013) with Anna Upchurch. She was Director of Studies of the Warwick Commission on the Future of Cultural Value (2013-15) and co-authored its final report, Enriching Britain: Culture, Creativity and Growth, which was published in February 2015.

18

HILARY MOSS

TRISH KAY VELLA-BURROWS

Kerry McCall Magan has lectured at UCD, DIT, Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art and Design and Queen’s University Belfast and specialises in teaching cultural management, leadership and policy issues. Kerry is co-founder of the Cultural Policy Observatory Ireland (CPOI) all-island research network, a founding editor of the Irish Journal for Arts Management and Cultural Policy and a coordinator of the Arts Management Research Studies Stream (RS01) in the European Sociological Association. She is currently completing doctoral research entitled The Social Life of Cultural Taste in Ireland at the Institute of Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship, Goldsmiths’ University of London.

Wednesday November 23rd Singing and Health Presenters: Dr Hilary Moss, Dr Trish Kay Vella-Burrows, Dr Sandra Joyce and Deirdre Kiernan Chair: Dr Hilary Moss (Irish World Academy) Bringing together a variety of perspectives from music therapy, music and health practice, traditional singing and speech and language therapy, this seminar presents research and practice in the field of singing and health. The aim of the seminar is to explore the role of singing for health and wellbeing across ages and cultures and from different perspectives. The seminar’s presentations are: ■ Singing in Hospital: Dr Hilary Moss ■ The Science behind a ‘Sing-Song’: Dr Trish Vella-Burrows ■ Here’s a Health to the Company: Aspects of Wellbeing in Irish Traditional Song: Dr Sandra Joyce ■ Singing for a Lifetime: Prevention and Treatment of Problems: Deirdre Kiernan

SANDRA JOYCE

DEIRDRE KIERNAN

Dr Hilary Moss lectures in music therapy at the Irish World Academcy. Her research centres on aesthetic deprivation, the role of the arts for older people in hospital, music therapy in mental health and older age and arts and health practice. She has an MBA in Health Service Management and a PhD from Trinity College Dublin School of Medicine. Dr Trish Kay Vella-Burrows, RN. FRSPH. BA (Hons) Music. PhD (Music and Dementia) is deputy director of the Sidney De Haan Research Centre for Arts & Health, lecturer in music, arts and health at Canterbury Christ Church University, which is one of the international leaders in singing and health research. She is co-director of the ‘Music4Wellbeing: bringing harmony to life’ research-based music services in health and social care settings. Dr Sandra Joyce is director of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. Together with Niall Keegan and Mícheál O Súilleabháin, she founded the Academy’s BA Irish Music and Dance and MA Irish Traditional Music Performance programmes. She is a traditional singer and bodhrán player and has performed at the Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow and Farmleigh House, Dublin. She is artistic director of the a capella female vocal ensemble Hazelwell, which explores repertoire from the Irish and related traditions. Her research interests include the Irish song tradition, the Irish harp tradition and historical sources of Irish traditional music. Deirdre Kiernan is a speech and language therapist who has specialised in the treatment of voice disorders for over 25 years. She works with singers of all levels and styles. She recognises the enormous benefits of singing and works on the prevention and treatment of problems experienced by singers. She has worked with the Limerick Choral Union and is lectures on voice disorders on the MSc in Speech and Language Therapy at UL.


LOGOS Seminar Series LOGOS IS A SERIES OF EVENTS TAKING ITS PLACE ALONGSIDE THE LONG-ESTABLISHED PUBLIC TOWER

VENUE: CONFERENCE ROOM, FIRST FLOOR, IRISH WORLD ACADEMY 10AM TO 12 NOON ADMISSION IS FREE, ALL ARE WELCOME

Aoife Burke performing with ACADEMOS and members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra Photograph © Maurice Gunning

19

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

SEMINAR AND LUNCHTIME PERFORMANCE SERIES.


MEHMET ÖCAL ÖZBILGIN

Thursday September 15th

FEARGHUS Ó CONCHÚIR

SEPTEMBER

The Effects of Migration between Southeastern Europe and Anatolia on Traditional Dances Presenter: Professor Dr Mehmet Öcal Özbilgin Chair: Dr Catherine Foley (Irish World Academy) Since the expansion period of the Ottoman Empire, many emigrations between Anatolia and the Balkans have occurred for political reasons. During this long period of time, the repertoires of traditional dances of emigrant communities have been separately defined from national culture as sub-cultural, class-cultural, regional, local or ethnical dances. Using anthropological, historic and comparative methods, Professor Dr Mehmet Öcal Özbilgin will identify in this seminar the elements of the dances that carry political and social messages. His work is based on field research undertaken between 2000 and 2010 with emigrant communities in Southeastern Europe and Turkey. See page 14 for a biographical note on Professor Dr Mehmet Öcal Özbilgin.

Thursday October 6th

OCTOBER

Bodies Politic: The Casement Project Presenter: Fearghus Ó Conchúir Chair: Dr Niamh NicGhabhann (Irish World Academy) Artistic director, choreographer of The Casement Project and IRC scholar Fearghus Ó Conchúir will combine his artistic and academic practices to lead this seminar on the politics of embodiment in Ireland. For more information, visit www.thecasementproject.ie. See page 15 for a biographical note on Fearghus Ó Conchúir.

20

ADRIAN McNEIL

FLORIANE GABER

Thursday October 27th

I

Inventing the Sarod Presenter: Adrian McNeil Chair: Colin Quigley (Irish World Academy) Adrian McNeil will discuss the themes of his book Inventing the Sarod (2004). The book documents the cultural origins, historical development and music styles of this instrumental tradition and provides an account of how this community of musicians devised and implemented strategies to deal with major challenges to their survival. While firmly committed to the tradition of Hindustani music and its performance, Adrian’s wide musical interests extend to traditional, contemporary and intercultural music around the globe. His trio Rasa Duende explores meeting points between Hindustani and Flamenco musics. The trio was nominated for an ARIA (Australian Recording Industry Award) in 2013. See page 10 for a biographical note on Adrian McNeil.

Thursday November 10th

NOVEMBER

Writing about Street Arts, Circus and Spectacle Presenters: Floriane Gaber, Lucy Medlycott, Kim Tilbrook and Paschale Straiton Chair: Dr Niamh NicGhabhann (Irish World Academy) This practical seminar explores different ways of writing about street arts, circus and spectacle. See page 17 for biographical notes on Floriane Gaber, Lucy Medlycott, Kim Tilbrook and Paschale Straiton.

LUCY MEDLYCOTT


BA Irish Music and Dance student Cian O'Flynn performing at the Academy Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

21

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Special Events


ACADEMY STUDENTS AT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL LIMERICK

Wednesday September 14th

ALEC BROWN

SEPTEMBER

‘Sonas is Sláinte’ 1.15pm, University Hospital Limerick Students and staff of the Irish World Academy The Irish World Academy and University Hospital Limerick have been exploring ways in which to improve people’s experiences and change their impressions of a hospital environment. In autumn 2015, a pilot project brought students of the Academy’s MA Music Therapy, BA Voice and Dance and BA Traditional Music and Dance programmes to perform in a shared café space within the hospital. Following an extremely positive response, this new programme of concerts brings music to a healthcare setting with the aim of providing calm and restoration to patients, staff and visitors. ‘Sonas is Sláinte’ is a joint initiative of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance (Dr Alpha Woodward, Dr Hilary Moss and Kathleen Turner) and University Hospital Limerick (Dr Paul Finucane).

Wednesday October 5th

OCTOBER

‘Sonas is Sláinte’ As above.

Monday & Tuesday, October 10th & 11th International Day of the Girl Art installation in Irish World Academy Foyer, Monday 10th and Tuesday 11th Performance in Theatre 1, Tuesday 11th at 3pm Kathleen Turner, Niamh NicGhabhann, Jennifer De Brún,

22

GARY ANSDELL

Hannah Fahey, Fiona Quill, Des MacMahon and students of local schools International Day of the Girl was founded by the United Nations in 2011 to recognise girls’ rights and the unique challenges girls face around the world. In response to this theme, the Irish World Academy has proposed a two-day mentoring programme that involves working with 20 transition-year students from Limerick city. Incorporating composition, improvisation, movement and music , students and Academy mentors will use visual imagery to explore emergent issues around the theme of Day of the Girl. The programme will culminate on the Tuesday in a short informal showing of work at 3pm in Theatre 1.

EVA BOURKE

American, Irish and classical cello playing. Spreagadh is rooted in Irish traditional music and is formed from Alec’s quest for inspiration to continue his journey of pushing the harmonic, rhythmic and melodic capabilities of the cello within the Irish tradition. Having found the inspiration, it is hoped that this performance will encourage and inspire others to continue their journeys through music and life. While his first performance, Transcending Liminality: (Re)Locating Thebrowncello, explored the process of developing this style of cello playing, this performance will demonstrate a more cohesive integration of the cello within the Irish music tradition. Adding a unique flavour to the performance, Alec will be accompanied by several Irish World Academy graduates who are well versed in the Irish music tradition as well as in other genres.

The programme involves collaboration with the Department of Print Contemporary Practice at the Limerick School of Art and Design. Students from second-, third- and fourth-year will respond to the theme through their selected media. The printmaking faculty facilitating the project comprise Des MacMahon and Fiona Quill. Des and Fiona have recently worked with seven international partners on SYMBOLS, a Creative Europe project, and have run several international print exchanges, including workshops in New York and Berlin.

Alec Brown is an from Pine Bluff, Arkansas. After finding a deep love of Irish traditional music following an injury to his hand, he completed the MA in Irish traditional Music in the Irish World Academy on both traditional flute and the cello. His doctoral research focuses on how to expand the role of the cello within Irish traditional music by expanding the technical arsenal of cello players to better enable them to accompany dance music in different ways as well as playing the melodies.

Tuesday October 11th

Tuesday October 18th

Spreagadh: Inspiration (PhD Performance) 7pm, Theatre 2, Irish World Academy Alec Brown

Community Music Therapy as Pragmatic Practice and ‘Disruptive Theory’ 1pm to 2pm, IW2-48 Studio, Level 2, Irish World Academy Professor Gary Ansdell

Spreagadh: Inspiration is the second of two performances by American cellist Alec Brown in part-fulfilment of his Arts Practice PhD. The performance will feature Alec’s unique cello-playing style, in which he fuses elements of Scottish,

This event will outline how community music therapy has developed internationally as both pragmatic practice – matching current needs and resources – and a ‘disruptive


theory’ – challenging previous models and suggesting fresh ways of exploring the relationships between music, illness, disability and wellbeing. In his presentation, Gary Ansdell will draw on two of his recent publications: How Music Helps: In Music Therapy and Everyday Life (Ansdell, 2014) and Musical Pathways in Recovery: Community Music Therapy and Mental Wellbeing (Ansdell & DeNora, 2016). Professor Gary Ansdell has been a music therapist for nearly 30 years, working mostly in the area of adult mental health in the last decade. He has been involved in a wide range of music therapy practice areas and in developing the community music therapy movement. Gary has also been active in training and research: he developed new master’s and PhD programmes for Nordoff Robbins, UK where he was Director of Education from 2008 to 2015. He has published widely in the areas of music therapy and music and health and has written or co-written six books on music therapy, the latest two of which are referenced above. His long-term collaboration with the music sociologist Tia DeNora has led to them jointly editing the new book series Music and Change for Ashgate Publishers. Gary currently works as an independent music therapy practitioner, consultant and scholar and is an associate of Nordoff Robbins, where he is convenor of the MPhil/PhD programme. He is an honorary professor in the Department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology at Exeter University.

CONNECTIONS IN MOTION (Photos: Bettina Stoess)

Wednesday October 19th Launch of Fermata: Music through Poetry and Prose Editors: Eva Bourke and Vincent Woods Fermata is the title of the first contemporary anthology of poetry and prose on the theme of music to be published in Ireland. Edited by Eva Bourke and Vincent Woods, the book is an entertaining and rich collection of writing on music by over 65 of Ireland’s best-loved poets and prose writers. Inspired by jazz, opera, traditional, country, blues, pop or the musical sounds of the natural world, the book honours musicians and composers and celebrates the close link between music and word. Fermata is published by Artisan House Books in Connemara and features an introduction by Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin.

Joint organisers: Dr Sabine Egger (Irish Centre for Transnational Studies, Mary Immaculate College); Dr Gisela Holfter (Centre for Irish-German Studies, UL); Dr Catherine Foley (Irish World Academy of Music and Dance/The National Dance Archive of Ireland, UL); Professor Meg Harper (Glucksman Chair in Contemporary Writing in English, School of Culture and Communication, UL)

Wednesday to Friday, November 2nd–4th Samhain Festival of Research

Wednesday October 26th ‘Sonas is Sláinte’ As for Wednesday September 14th, page 22.

Monday October 31st and Tuesday November 1st

with issues relating to cultural memory, (trans)formation of place, crossings of boundaries (intermedial, intercultural, temporal), relationships to space, modernity and postmodernity, and the archiving of connections in motion.

NOVEMBER

Connections in Motion: Dance in Irish and German Literature, Film and Culture – 16th International Conference in Irish-German Studies 10am to 6pm on both days, Theatre 1, Irish World Academy The 16th International Conference in Irish-German Studies looks at Irish-German connections in motion from the 1920s to today. The conference focuses on dance in Irish and German literature, theatre, film and new media. It engages

The Irish World Academy is home to over 40 postgraduate research students, the vast majority of whom engage in PhD research. Some researchers are completing projects with traditional, text-based outputs while others are registered on the PhD in Arts Practice. While students on the PhD in Arts Practice produce text-based research outputs, their work specifically includes aspects of practice. The work of both groups of researchers reflects the whole range of expertise represented in the Academy and beyond. Once a year, the work of this exceptionally rich research community is presented in a festival known as Samhain. The 2016 Samhain festival will take place from Wednesday 2nd to Friday 4th November, inclusive. For further details, see the Irish World Academy research website, http://www.irishworldacademy.ie/research/.

23

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

VINCENT WOODS


MICHAEL TUBRITY

(Photo: Kristen Anderson)

Monday & Tuesday, November 7th & 8th Tráth na gCos Mon 7th: Launch – 5pm, Academy Foyer; 6pm–8pm, master class (Tower Theatre) Tues 8th: 10am–12 noon, MA dance master class; 1pm–2pm, lunchtime concert (part of) 3pm–5pm, flute workshop Michael Tubridy Musician and dancer Michael Tubridy hails from Kilrush in Country Clare. He was a founder member of The Chieftains, with whom he played the flute, tin whistle and concertina between 1962 and 1979 before leaving the band to pursue a significant career in structural engineering. In the Irish traditional music and dance world, Michael is known as a promoter of traditional-style flute-playing and for keeping alive and passing on the solo step-dance tradition of Dan Furey. Together with his wife Celine, he has toured widely and taught many workshops over the years. Tráth na gCos will celebrate Michael’s achievements by inviting him to share his music and dancing with Academy students and the public.

Wednesday November 16th ‘Sonas is Sláinte’ As for Wednesday September 14th, page 22.

24

June 19th to 30th 2017

JUNE 2017

Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance 2017 The 21st Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance will take place in the Irish World Academy at the University of Limerick from June 19th to 30th 2017.  Blas is now firmly established as one of Ireland’s most prestigious summer schools and has developed a reputation for its quality and innovation. The school provides students (aged 16 and over) from around the world with access to the expertise of some of Ireland’s finest musicians, singers, dancers and academics, who, in previous schools, have included Donal Lunny, Andy Irvine, Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Paul Brady, John Carty, Steve Cooney, Colin Dunne, Catherine Foley, Martin Hayes, Jim Higgins, Sandra Joyce, Niall Keegan, Kevin Crawford, Matt Molloy, Ryan Molloy, Michelle Mulcahy, Nóirín Ní Riain, Michael Ryan, Karan Casey, Zoe Conway, Siobhan Peoples, Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh and Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin. The two-week programme entails the best of tuition, ranging from formal lectures, public seminars, interactive master classes, daily Irish classes, an excursion to a number of Ireland’s greatest tourist attractions in Co. Clare, daily lunchtime concerts featuring tutors and local musicians, an Irish traditional table quiz, evening concerts, céilí and, above all, the opportunity to share tunes with some of Ireland’s finest traditional musicians. 

The programme is worth three academic credits or six ECTS credits towards an undergraduate degree, which makes Blas unique within the world of traditional music summer schools in that the study of Irish traditional music, song and dance can count as a modular component of a university degree. For information on the summer school in general, scholarships that are available and the early bird tuition fee offer, please visit www.blas.ie. Alternatively, contact Ernestine Healy, Director, Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick, Ireland. Email Ernestine at ernestine.healy@ul.ie or call her on +353 61 202653/202030.

Arabella Ayen performing with the Croan yn Tead traditional harp group from the Isle of Man Photograph © Maurice Gunning


25 I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Recent at the Events Academy

Ag Féachaint Siar


UL President Don Barry launches the Irish World Academy Artist, University of Limerick award on January 26th and welcomes Martin Hayes as the inaugural artist in residence under the initiative.

January Irish World Academy Artist Initiative SEPTEMBER The University of Limerick has named Clare fiddler Martin Hayes as its inaugural Irish World Academy Artist. The new three-year arts patronage award through the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance was launched on January 26th by President Don Barry at the Irish World Academy.

Students of the BA Irish Music and Dance programme performing for the launch of Ar Bruach na Sionnaine

Entitled Irish World Academy Artist, University of Limerick and with a budget of €60,000, the award will facilitate the creative process of selected artists in 2016, 2017 and 2018. The first artist to receive the award is Clare fiddler Martin Hayes, who commenced his three-year association with the Irish World Academy in January 2016. Martin Hayes has been internationally acclaimed for bringing his local East Clare traditional fiddle style to a global audience through his many performances and recordings. More recently, he has formed the ensemble The Gloaming, which has further pushed the boundaries of Irish traditional music in the field of ensemble playing that started with Seán Ó Riada’s (1930–1971) pioneering ensemble Ceóltóirí Chualainn in the 1960s. The Irish World Academy Artist, University of Limerick will undertake a series of creative projects across the three-year span. Students of the Academy will have access to open workshops in the state-of-the-art Academy building on the banks of the river Shannon on the UL Campus.

February Launch of ‘Ar Bhruach na Sionnaine’ ‘Ar Bhruach na Sionnaine’, a series of six programmes for Raidió na Gaeltachta presented and produced by UL undergraduate students, was launched on February 9th by President Don Barry at the Irish World Academy and was attended by Raidió na Gaeltachta director Seán Ó hÉanaigh, who welcomed the initiative. The UL students can be heard presenting their radio series on national airwaves on Fridays at 2pm (with a re-broadcast every Sunday at 8pm). The initiative is the culmination of an innovative collaboration between Scoil an Chultúir agus na Cumarsáide, UL and Raidió na Gaeltachta (RnaG). The collaboration sees students of the Irish World Academy's BA in Irish Music and Dance working with well-known RnaG broadcaster Áine Hensey.

26


Irish Research Council (IRC) scholarship recipients, L-R: Mattu Noone, Desi Wilkinson, Shannon Burns, Carrie Dike, Francis Ward and Jack Talty

March Ceiliúrtha: A Celebration of Irish Research Council Awards at the Irish World Academy On Wednesday February 24th, the Irish World Academy celebrated past and present doctoral and postdoctoral recipients of Irish Research Council (IRC) scholarships. A dedicated seminar sharing the work of recipients was opened by Dr Niall Keegan, Associate Director of the Academy. Following the seminar, Dr Sandra Joyce, Academy Director, launched a brochure providing details on all awardees. The seminar included contributions from UL Vice President of Research Dr Mary Shire and Academy Founding Director Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin. Speaking of the historical support received by the Academy from the IRC, Professor Ó Súilleabháin noted that, “from its inception in 1994, the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance has challenged the space between research and performance. The visionary support of the Irish Research Council is the wind beneath our wings”. Professor Helen Phelan, programme director of the PhD in Arts Practice, referred to the welcome inclusion of arts practice in IRC-funded research, including the receipt of the first ever awards for arts practice research in dance and in circus arts by students at the Academy. Closing the seminar, IRC Chair Professor Jane Ohlmeyer spoke warmly of the passion and commitment demonstrated by all the recipients: “It was a privilege to attend the Academy’s showcase, which celebrated some of the outstanding research that the IRC has funded. The event captured the passion of the IRC awardees for their research and its wider impact for Ireland and globally. I would like to congratulate the IRC awardees on their achievement and the staff of the Academy for their commitment to achieving excellence.”

ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings Performance On March 3rd, the Irish World Academy and Irish Chamber Orchestra presented ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings. Led by members of the dynamic Irish Chamber Orchestra, directed by Katherine Hunka, this exciting collaborative project saw string students from four of the country’s foremost academies come together as part of the ACADEMOS Irish World Academy strings initiative. Students from CIT Cork School of Music, Royal Irish Academy of Music, DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama and the Irish World Academy performed works by Mendelssohn, Sam Perkin and Elgar in Limerick, Cork and Dublin.

Kayvon Sesar performing with members of ACADEMOS and the Irish Chamber Orchestra

For information about the IRC’s LoveIrishResearch initiative, visit www.research.ie/aboutus/loveirishresearch.

27

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

February


March Promoting Ethiopian Indigenous Music: The Role of Higher Institutions On March 7th and 8th, a delegation from the Irish World Academy attended an international conference at Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia entitled Promoting Ethiopian Indigenous Music: The Role of Higher Institutions. Facilitated by the introduction last year of a direct flight from Addis Ababa to Dublin and on to Los Angeles, Ireland has growing economic and cultural connections with Ethiopia. Handled by Ethiopian airlines, this is the first time the three continents of Africa, Europe and North America are directly connected with one airline through Dublin Airport. As well as attending the conference, the UL group, which included Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, SEPTEMBER Professor Helen Phelan and Dr Niall Keegan, met with Irish Ambassador to Ethiopia Aidan O’Hara to discuss growing cultural links between the Academy and the Yared School of Music. Academy doctoral student RAS Mikey Courtney (the first Irish Research Council recipient for arts practice research in dance) is currently doing fieldwork on the indigenous dance traditions of Ethiopia and has facilitated conversations with the Ethiopian ambassador to Ireland, Ambassador Lela-Alem Gebreyohannes Tedia, concerning a potential memorandum of understanding between the Yared School of Music and the Irish World Academy. The Director of the Yared School of Music, Marta Samuel, will visit the Academy in the 2016 autumn semester.

March Seminar on Songwriting Process The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance intends to introduce an MA in Songwriting in September 2017. On March 10th 2016, a seminar on the songwriting process was held to mark the beginning of the programme’s design in consultation with performing artists, writers and industry professionals. A number of prominent writers, including Joseph O’Connor, Julie Feeney, Pól Brennan, Mick Hanly and Kathleen Turner, took part in the seminar. Pictured at the Promoting Ethiopian Indigenous Music: The Role of Higher Institutions conference at Addis Ababa University in March 2016 are (left to right) Dr Niall Keegan (Irish World Academy); RAS Mikey Courtney (Irish World Academy); Mintesinot Getachew (Yared School of Music, Addis Ababa University); Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin (Irish World Academy); Marta Samuel (Yared School of Music, Addis Ababa University); and Professor Helen Phelan (Irish World Academy).

28

Mick Hanly performing at the songwriting process seminar with Pól Brennan, Julie Feeney, Kathleen Turner and Joseph O’Connor


March Playing Music Without Dancers At the invitation of the Royal Anthropological Institute (RAI), London, Dr Catherine Foley of the Irish World Academy conducted a public seminar entitled Play Music Without Dancers and It’s a Waste of Music: Sounding Movements, Changing Contexts, and the Sean Nós Dancer at the RAI in London on March 16th. The seminar ethnochoreologically examined sean nós dancing and focused on contexts of practice with particular reference to the emergence of new contexts of transmission and performance from the 1970s. It highlighted concerns sean nós dancers have in relation to these developments in a context of globalisation and transnationalism.

Dr Catherine Foley (front row, centre) and Dr Mats Melin (back row, right) pictured at Cape Breton University in April with fellow participants of the Step Research project. Photo: Chris Jones, Cape Breton University

April

SYMBOLS SYMBOLS – Culture of Death and Cultural Life: New Audiences and Creations around European Cemeteries opened in Limerick School of Art & Design (LSAD) Gallery on March 22nd and ran until April 1st. Irish World Academy artists Hannah Fahey and Jennifer de Brún worked collaboratively with European partners to create a joint multidisciplinary exhibition around ‘symbols of death’ (with print, music and dance) through several international residencies. The exhibition will travel to Avilés, Dundee, Corsica, Maribor and Verona throughout 2016. SYMBOLS is an international cultural cooperation project co-financed by the European Commission under the Creative Europe programme.

Step Research Dr Catherine Foley and Dr Mats Melin of the Irish World Academy participated in Step Research, a step-dance research project, from April 1st to 3rd 2016 at Cape Breton University, Nova Scotia, Canada. Funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the research investigated connections between several Canadian step dance traditions, specifically Ottawa Valley, Newfoundland and Cape Breton, and those of England, Scotland and Ireland.

Jennifer de Brún performing at the launch of SYMBOLS – Culture of Death and Cultural Life: New Audiences and Creations around European Cemeteries in LSAD Gallery on March 22nd 2016. Entitled Vanitas, 2015, the artwork is that of Spanish artist Fernanda Álvarez. (Photo: Fusion Shooters)

29

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

March


April Health Research Futures Lab On April 6th and 7th, Irish World Academy researchers took part in a series of intensive, residential labs aimed at designing innovative approaches to health and society. The research project, which was held at the Castletroy Park Hotel, Limerick, was led by Limerick-based researchers in collaboration with Tipperary Dance Platform and Johnson & Johnson. The UL research team was led by Dr Annmarie Ryan (Kemmy Business School), Dr Muireann McMahon (Product Design), Dr Niamh NicGhabhann (Irish World Academy) and Jazmin Chiodi (Tipperary Dance Platform). Dr Tracy Fahy and Dr Marilyn Lennon of the Limerick School of Art & Design were also part of the team. Lisa McLoughlin (Irish World Academy) was one of the lab researchers, and the keynote presentation on interdisciplinary approaches to health was given by Dr Hilary Moss (Irish World Academy). The project was funded by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Reflecting the global shift from STEM (science, technology, engineering and medicine) to STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and medicine) and integrating different ways of knowing and researching across disciplines, the aim of the labs is to facilitate the difficult and often messy process of interdisciplinary work. Selected following an open call, participants include food scientists, dancers, art therapists, psychologists, medical humanities scholars and designers.

Pictured at the Health Research Futures Lab at the Castletroy Park Hotel, Limerick in April 2016 are (back row, left to right) Donald McDonagh, UL; Muireann McMahon, UL; Niamh NicGhabhann, UL; Rita Boland, Health Research Institute (HRI), UL; Liam Bannon, UL; Marilyn Lennon, LSAD; Helen Carroll, Business to Arts; and Ciarán Duffy, Horizon2020. Front row, left to right: Firiha Shaikh, Irish Research Council; Annmarie Ryan, UL; Imelda Doolan, HRI, UL; and Jazmin Chiodi, Tipperary Dance Platform. (Photo: Press 22)

30

Fran Garry with pupils from Our Lady’s Secondary School, Templemore (Photo: Brian Gavin/Press 22)

April Connected: A Music Ethnodrama (PhD Performance by Fran Garry) Fran Garry performed the first part of her PhD Arts Practice project on April 18th. With the long title Lived Experiences in Community Arts in Ireland: An AutoEthnographic and Ethnographic, Practice-based Study, the script and original songs in this performance represent Fran’s accumulated experiences as a choral director for school musicals in Our Lady’s Secondary School, Templemore combined with the lived experiences of the research participants. The script is drawn from in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation, journal entries and contextual literature. The cast performed their lived experiences, and their words blended with some musical memories from previous shows. It is widely acknowledged that these voices of first-hand arts experiences are invisible in current arts literature but are essential to building a qualitative evidence base that could inform future policy and practice while capturing the value of participation.


Michael Flatley, Ali Hewson and Adi Roche enjoy a performance in their honour by students and staff of the Irish World Academy just prior to being conferred with honorary doctorate degrees by the University of Limerick. (Photo: Karen Goltz)

Students of the MA Festive Arts programme with course director Niamh NicGhabhann take a bow at Dolan’s Warehouse in Limerick after creating and performing The Space of Us: Probing the Politics of Performance in April 2016.

April Performance for Honorary Doctorate Recipients Faculty and students from the Irish World Academy were delighted to welcome honorary doctorate recipients Michael Flatley, Ali Hewson and Adi Roche to a special concert in Theatre 1 of the Academy on April 28th. The performance featured students from the BA Voice and Dance, BA Irish Music and Dance, MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance and MA Irish Traditional Music Performance. Chair of Music Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin and Chair of Performing Arts Mel Mercier also performed for the special guests.

April Traditional Arts within a University Context At the invitation of the University of Performing Arts, Graz, Austria, Dr Catherine Foley presented a public seminar entitled Irish Traditional Dance and Music Within a University Context at the host university on April 20th 2016.

April The Space of Us: Probing the Politics of Performance In 2016, the Limerick Spring Festival of Politics and Ideas explored the theme ‘The State of Us’ to reflect on the state of the nation and politics in Ireland over the past 100 years and to enable many new and old questions since the rebirth of our nation to be investigated. In response, ‘The Space of Us: Probing the Politics of Performance’ was devised by MA Festive Arts students and staff to explore Irish attitudes to daily life and the ways in which individuals participate and engage in public space. The performance, in which Limerick city is the primary character, offers a glimpse into the people and landscape of the city through the probing of performance pieces, which members of the public stumble upon as they walk through their daily lives. A video of the performance is available to view on vimeo at https://vimeo.com/164384730.

April 1916 Commemoration – Colbert Station Performance Students from the Irish World Academy performed in a special lunchtime concert on Tuesday April 26th at Colbert Station, Limerick. The hour-long concert featured several of the vocal and dance ensembles from the Irish World Academy undergraduate programmes and included a range performances from gospel singing to Irish traditional dance. The event forms part of the programme of events planned by the Irish World Academy to commemorate the events of 1916 and to reflect on the meaning of the Rising in the contemporary world.

As part of a series of Irish World Academy events to commemorate the 1916 Rising, BA Irish Music and Dance students performed a special lunchtime concert at Colbert Station, Limerick on April 26th.

31


32


Bealach

Abbas Wahbi, with Zubair Asghar and Haidar Ali of the Safa Sufi singing group, preparing for their performance at the Academy Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

33

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Community Cultural Pathways at the Irish World Academy


CRUINNIÚ

IONAD NA CRUITE

NATIONAL DANCE ARCHIVE OF IRELAND

MAOIN CHEOIL AN CHLÁIR

Cruinniú

National Dance Archive of Ireland

Maoin Cheoil an Chláir

Cruinniú, the Irish World Academy’s outreach initiative, sees staff from all walks of life at UL engaging in free weekly classes/sessions of Irish traditional music. The sessions have been facilitated by a number of players within the group and by students of the Irish World Academy. All members of UL staff are welcome to participate, so come along if you fancy a tune! Sessions take place at the Irish World Academy from 1pm to 2pm every Wednesday in Room IW2.51.

The National Dance Archive of Ireland (NDAI) at the Glucksman Library, University of Limerick was founded in 2009 with a seed funding award from the Arts Council. The NDAI works in partnership with the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and Dance Research Forum Ireland.

In partnership with the Vocational Education Committee of County Clare and with the assistance of Clare County Council and Ennis Urban District Council, Maoin Cheoil an Chláir (MCC) is a local cooperative model serving the needs of County Clare from its Ennis headquarters in the 18th-century Erasmus Smith School building owned by the Sisters of Mercy. MCC celebrated its twentieth anniversary in 2014. With members of faculty from the Irish World Academy on its board (Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin and Jean Downey along with former board member Helen Phelan), MCC enjoys a special relationship with the Academy. MCC Director Hans Boller is a graduate of the Academy’s MA Ritual Chant and Song programme. MCC is a member of the Clare Music Education Partnership, which was awarded €450,000 from Music Generation (funded by U2 and The Ireland Funds) in 2014.

For more information, contact Noel McCarthy at noel.mccarthy@ul.ie, telephone 061 213326.

Ionad na Cruite (Irish Harp Research Centre) Ionad na Cruite was established at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance in 2013 and was formally launched with a special performance by The Chieftains. Ionad na Cruite aims to stimulate scholarship, performance and advanced research on the Irish harp. It also aspires to being a national and international centre of excellence for the Irish harp at doctoral and postdoctoral level, to building effective links with colleagues in the field of harp research and performance internationally and to providing a stimulating environment for performances, research and interdisciplinary projects at the University of Limerick. Ionad na Cruite recognises the centrality of The Chieftains Fund (in memory of Derek Bell) in its founding.

34

The NDAI is devoted to the collection, preservation and promotion of dance in Ireland and is accessible to all. It chronicles dance in Ireland in all its manifestations (contemporary dance, traditional step dancing, set dancing, ballet, social dance, urban dance and world dance) and conveys an understanding of the different processes and practices of creating, performing and writing about dance in Ireland. For further information, please contact the NDAI founding director, Dr Catherine Foley, at catherine.e.foley@ul.ie, telephone +353 61 202922 or Special Collections Librarian Ken Bergin at ken.bergin@ul.ie, telephone +353 61 213158. Alternatively, email ndai@ul.ie or telephone +353 61 202690. Visit the NDAI at www.nationaldancearchiveireland.ie. Access to the National Dance Archive of Ireland is by appointment only.

For more information on Maoin Cheoil an Chláir, email hans@maoincheoil.com or call +353 65 6841774.

Dance Limerick Since its inception, the contemporary dance programme at the Irish World Academy has sought to twin-track its activities with the professional contemporary dance energy in Limerick city. The emergence of Dance Limerick at the former aghdha Space in St. John’s Square sets the scene for a new level of cooperative dance activity. The Irish World Academy is proud to be associated with Dance Limerick and looks forward to reclaiming the original spirit of contemporary dance cooperation in Limerick.


DANCE LIMERICK

IONAD NA nAMHRÁIN

ACADEMOS

Ionad na nAmhráin

ACADEMOS

Ionad na nAmhráin (The Song Centre) was set up in 1995 by sean-nós singer and academic Dr Lillis Ó Laoire (NUI Galway) and Professor Mícheál Ó Súílleabháin to support the performance and transmission of Irish sean-nós/traditional singing. Ionad na nAmhrán welcomes research into Irish traditional singing in Irish and English as well as in related areas.

ACADEMOS is a string ensemble comprising students of the MA Classical String Performance led by members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra (ICO). During their two-year programme, students in ACADEMOS attend classes from ICO leaders and engage in ensemble work with orchestral members. Refer to the ACADEMOS entry on page 48 for more details on the ensemble.

Eugene Alves in rehearsal with ACADEMOS and members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra Photograph © Maurice Gunning

35


36


BA Irish Music and Dance students performing at the Irish World Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning

37

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Cónaí Artists in Residence


IRISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

THE CHIEFTAINS

FIDGET FEET AERIAL DANCE COMPANY

Irish Chamber Orchestra

Fidget Feet Aerial Dance Company

The Irish Chamber Orchestra (ICO) has gained a remarkable reputation as a fresh and vibrant force on the Irish and international music scene and is recognised as one of Ireland’s world-class cultural assets. The ICO excels in a diverse repertoire that ranges from classical to modern-day masterpieces and new commissions. Outside the concert hall, the ICO stimulates minds and hearts with a vitality unmatched by other ensembles. It offers music as an instrument of social change; by introducing children to music, creativity, innovation, understanding and openness, it helps them to reach their full potential as individuals. The ICO resides on UL’s north campus adjacent to the Irish World Academy and is funded by the Arts Council of Ireland/An Chomhairle Ealaíon.

Fidget Feet Aerial Dance Company has been appointed Irish World Academy Dance Company in Residence for an additional three years following a year of creative interaction with the Academy’s newest programme – the MA Festive Arts. Originating in Donegal, Fidget Feet is Ireland’s leading aerial dance theatre company and is internationally renowned for creating spectacular indoor and outdoor productions for both theatres and festivals. The company’s dynamic work draws on dance, aerial circus, theatre, music and video art. Founded in 2004 by choreographer Chantal McCormick (Donegal) and musician Jym Daly (Cork), Fidget Feet work with an outstanding production team to create productions that are both original and fresh.

The Chieftains Interacting with up to 80 student musicians and dancers from Irish World Academy programmes, The Chieftains continue their iconic association with the Academy through their occasional concerts at UL. In memory of their late harper Derek Bell, The Chieftains Fund has been in operation at the Academy for a number of years, and it is through this fund that the Academy launched Ionad na Cruite, the Irish Harp Research Centre, in 2013.

38

Elements of aerial dance have already begun to permeate aspects of the curricular offerings of the Irish World Academy’s programmes.

Martin Hayes Irish World Academy Artist University of Limerick On January 26th 2016, the University of Limerick announced a new three-year arts patronage award through the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. The award, entitled Irish World Academy Artist, University of Limerick and worth €60,000, will facilitate the creative process of selected artists across a three-year period. The Irish World Academy is grateful to the University of Limerick Foundation (ULF) for its generous financial support of this initiative. The first artist to receive the award is Clare fiddler Martin Hayes, who commenced his three-year association with the Irish World Academy in January 2016. For more details on Martin and the Irish World Academy Artist initiative, see page 26.


The Martin Hayes Quartet is the working title for the first of a series of creative workshops by Irish World Academy Artist Martin Hayes, which will take place at the Irish World Academy on the University of Limerick campus on January 26th, 27th and 28th 2016. On Friday 29th January, the Quartet will perform at the Temple Bar TradFest in St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin. The Martin Hayes Quartet members are Liz Knowles (fiddle), Doug Wieselman (bass clarinet), Dennis Cahill (guitar) and Martin Hayes (fiddle).

The Martin Hayes Quartet (Martin Hayes, Liz Knowles, Doug Wieselman and Dennis Cahill)

Liz Knowles had her auspicious beginnings as the fiddler for Riverdance and as soloist on the soundtrack for the film Michael Collins. She has performed with the New York Pops and Cincinnati Pops orchestra as well as being a member of Cherish the Ladies and String Sisters. She toured for four years in Europe, Asia and South America as performer and artistic and music director of the popular Celtic Legends Irish music and dance show. She has performed in venues including Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and on Broadway with artists such as Marcus Roberts, the Bang-on-a-Can Orchestra, Bobby McFerrin, Steve Reich, Don Henley and Tim O’Brien.

Dennis Cahill is a master guitarist, a native of Chicago born to parents from the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry. He studied at the city’s prestigious Music College before becoming an active member of the local music scene. Cahill’s spare, essential accompaniment to Martin Hayes’s fiddle is acknowledged as a major breakthrough for guitar in the Irish tradition. In addition to his work with Martin, Dennis has performed with such renowned fiddlers as Liz Carroll, Eileen Ivers and Kevin Burke as well as with many Irish musicians on both sides of the Atlantic. He is a soughtafter producer for musical artists, whom he records in his own Chicago studio, and is an accomplished photographer.

Doug Wieselman has worked as a composer, arranger and musician with a variety of artists in different fields: in theatre with director Robert Woodruff and the Flying Karamazov Brothers, in dance with Jerome Robbins and Paul Taylor and in music with, among many others, Victoria Williams, Robin Holcomb, Wayne Horvitz, Lou Reed, Tricky, Anthony Coleman, Laurie Anderson, Syd Straw, Steven Bernstein, Joan as Police Woman and John Lurie. He is currently composing music for the animated Nickelodian show "The Backyardigans" in association with Evan Lurie.

Martin Hayes and Dennis Cahill met in Chicago in the 1980s. They formed the jazz/rock/fusion band Midnight Court, which allowed them to experiment with a variety of new music styles. After recording two solo albums grounded in his traditional roots, Hayes began a new musical relationship with Cahill, beginning with the lyrical music of East Clare. They played long, sometimes thirtyminute, multi-tune sets in their concerts, starting from the simplest of melodies, building in intensity, but never abandoning musicality and ideas.

Martin Hayes is regarded as one of the most extraordinary talents to emerge in the world of Irish traditional music. His unique sound, his mastery of the fiddle and his acknowledgement of the past and his shaping of the future of the music combine to create an astonishing and formidable artistic intelligence. He has drawn musical inspiration from sources as diverse as the Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, the Spanish viola da gamba master Jordi Savall and the jazz genius John Coltrane but remains grounded in the music he grew up with in his own locality in Feakle, Co. Clare. The music Hayes learned at home from his late father, P. Joe Hayes, the renowned founder/leader of the long-lived Tulla Céilí Band, profoundly influenced his musical accent and ideas. His latest performing project is with The Gloaming, a band that has burst on the music scene with a rare combination of Irish tunes, ancient sean-nós song, brave explorations and exhilarating and explosive medleys with a distinctive new sound. The virtuosic fiddles of Hayes and Ó Raghallaigh, the soaring voice of Ó Lionáird, Cahill's minimalist guitar work and Bartlett's sparse, yet insistent, piano deliver an astonishing, combustible and unforgettable listening experience, deeply rooted in the tradition but moving into an entirely new musical dimension of rhythm, melody and texture.

Rose Carey, BA Irish Music and Dance Photograph © Maurice Gunning

35 39

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

The Martin Hayes Quartet


40


Sándor Varga (Hungarian traditional dancer) with Péter Árendás (folk viola) and Adam Kiss-Balbinat (violin) Photograph © Maurice Gunning

41

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Taighde/ Research at the Academy


Founded as a research centre in 1994, the Irish World Academy has grown to include a vibrant undergraduate and taught postgraduate suite of programmes but has remained committed to its initial vision of being a home for researchers in music, dance and other performing arts disciplines. Research at the Academy is conducted by faculty, doctoral and postdoctoral candidates and artists-in-residence. Areas of research excellence include Irish music and dance studies; ethnographic and practice-based research approaches; pedagogical, therapeutic and community-led research in music and dance; and curatorial, entrepreneurial and landscape-based research initiatives. Researchers continue to attract prestigious national funding from the Irish Research Council. This year, for example, researchers at the Academy won four new doctoral Government of Ireland scholarships and a New Foundations project award for work with the music of migrant communities. International fellowships received this year include the Balassi Institute Fellowship for Advanced Academic Study, University of Szeged, Hungary and the O’Donnell Research Fellowship in Irish Studies at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Academy researchers also won prestigious Arts Council awards as well as commissions associated with the 1916/2016 centenary commemorations, including new composition and choreography supported by the Dublin Dance Festival. Doctoral, postdoctoral and faculty-led research initiatives give rise to a wide range of outputs, including peer-reviewed journal articles, books, commissioned compositions and choreographies, audio and audio-visual recordings and live performances of international calibre. The following is a selection of recent publications from faculty and postgraduate students at the Irish World Academy.

42

Bernini, Leah (2015) ‘Capitalism and resistance in professional Irish music’, FocaalBlog of Focaal: Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology, April 9, www.focaalblog.com/2015/04/09/leahobrien-bernini-capitalism-and-resistance-in-professional-irishmusic. Brown, Russell Patrick (2014) Mercy of Trees, creator and performer, Origin Theatre’s First Irish Theatre Festival, in partnership with New York Public Library, 27 September, New York City. Brown, William ‘Alec’ (2015) Transcending Liminality: (Re)Locating Thebrowncello, composer and performer, PhD in Arts Practice Performance, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, 7 April. Byrne, Fiona (2016) Review of ‘Museum Space: Where Architecture Meets Museology’, Kali Tzortzi, ISBN 9781472439017, Irish Museums Association Journal, Vol. 25. (2015) Any news from Inside? in Mac Lellan, A., NicGhabhann, N. and Byrne, F., eds., St. Davnet’s: The Story of a Monaghan Institution, Health Service Executive & Stair: An Irish Public History Company Ltd., Monaghan. (2015) Community remembering: exploring the histories of St. Davnet’s campus in Monaghan town, paper for Designing Commemoration: Performance, Process and Participation, Irish World Academy, Limerick. Cotter, Pamela (2013) ‘Foreigners in the Session: An Examination of Participation and Authenticity at the Costello’s Irish Music Session’ in Taking Part in Music: Case Studies in Ethnomusicology, Elphinstone Institute Occasional Publications 9, eds. Ian Russell and Catherine Ingram. Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, in association with the European Seminar in Ethnomusicology, 198-215. Courtney, RAS Mikey (2015) YeBuna Alem (A Coffee World), choreography and performer, 26 May, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Africa Day. 


(2014) Limerick Winter Carnival Cabaret, choreography and performer with Nigerian musician David Idioh, 27 December, Limerick Milk Market. Dillane, Aileen (2016) with Hayes, A., Power, M., Devereux, E. and Carr, J., eds., Public and Political Discourses of Migration: International Perspectives, London: Rowman and Littlefield. (2016) 'Irish traditional music dissemination at the end of the long nineteenth century: Francis O'Neill's Music of Ireland (1903) and the City of Chicago' in Dossena, M. and Rosso, S., eds., Knowledge Dissemination in the Long Nineteenth Century: European and Transatlantic Perspectives, Newcastleupon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 65-88.  (2016) with Noone, M., ‘Irish Music Orientalism’, New Hibernia Review, 20:1, 121-137.  Dooley, Paul (2014) ‘Reconstructing the medieval Irish harp’, The Galpin Society Journal, 67, 107–42. (2013) String Wizard: A string calculator for metal-strung harps. [Online Javascript application] available: http://www. wirestrungharp.com/material/strings/string_calculator.html  [accessed 10 November 2015].

Foley, Catherine E. (2015) 'Cultural tourism, negotiation and re-presentation of heritage: traditional step dance and Siamsa Tíre, the National Folk Theatre of Ireland', Yearbook for Traditional Music, vol. 47, 141-160. (2015) 'Cultural memory, step dancing, representation and performance: an examination of Tearmann and the great famine', Traditiones, 44/2, 135-148.

Kjeldsen, Svend (2016) ‘Mancunian Irish: identity, cultural intimacy and musical hybridization: urban ethnomusicology and cultural mapping’ in Ross, S. and Sweers, B., eds., Urban Ethnomusicology and Cultural Mapping, Sheffield: Equinox Publishing.

(2013) Step Dancing in Ireland: Culture and History. Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series, Scott, D.B., ed., Surrey: Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

(2016) ’En transkulturel rejse. Fra Hindustani musik til irsk traditionel musik. Fra tabla til bodhrán. Introduktion til dadra taal, ektaal, keherwa taal og teentaal’, Roskilde: Lirum Larum Forlag.

Garry, Fran (2016) Connected, a musical ethnodrama written and performed in collaboration with students from Our Lady’s Secondary School, Templemore, Co. Tipperary, 18 April 2016, Theatre 1, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance.

(2016) ’Sticking i dobbelt-tempo for sammensat tid: 9/8’, Roskilde: Lirum Larum Forlag.

Joyce, Sandra (2016) 'The Fianna to Liam Mellowes', setting of a text by Countess Markievicz: the 1916 Song Project; National Library, Dublin (April 15); the Lexicon, Dún Laoghaire (April 22); Séamus Ennis Centre, Fingal (April 23); Church of Ireland, Athboy (April 30); Nun's Island Theatre, Galway (May 7); the Athenaeum, Enniscorthy (May 14). Supported by the Arts Council, the Irish Traditional Music Archive and the National Library of Ireland.

Fahey, Hannah (2016) SYMBOLS: “Culture of Death & Cultural Life: New Audiences and Creations around European Cemetaries”, Exhibition tour opening, 4th March, Palazzo Ducale, Genoa, Italy. Composer and performer. Supported by Creative Europe.

(2015) with Ní Ghallóglaigh, R. ‘Threshing in the haggard to her heart’s delight: women and erotic expression in Irish traditional song’ in Mantymaki, T., Rodi-Risberg, M. and Foka, A., eds., Deviant Women: Cultural, Linguistic and Literary Approaches to Narratives of Femininity, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 211-229.

(2015) Le Festival Voix et Route Romane/France’s Premier Festival of Vocal Music from the Middle Ages, Chant and Songs of the Wandering Irish, September 13, Surburg, Alsace. Ensemble Performer.

(2014) Naturstimmen Klang Festival im Toggenburg, [CD], track 4, ‘The Haymaking Song’, CD1; Track 17, ‘Gemeinsamer Ausklang’, CD2, Toggenburg: Toggenberg Festival Recording.

(2014) Cantoral. Let the Joyous Irish Sing Aloud!/Laetabundus decantet hybernicorum cetus [CD], ensemble performer. IWA001.

(2012) Gradam Ceoil TG4, arrangement of music for live television broadcast on TG4, April 15, 21.30.

Keegan, Niall (2015) Traditional Music and Irish Society: Historical Perspectives by Dowling, M., reviewed in The Journal of Music [online], available: http://journalofmusic.com/. (2012) 'The linguistic turn at the turn of the tune: the language of 'contemporary ensemble' in Irish traditional music', Ethnomusicology Ireland, 1.

Mascareñas, Óscar (2016) Song No. 7 ½ (for piano). Written for the film ‘A thing is a thing is a thing is something else’ produced by Alexander Iseli and Jazmín Chiodi for the series PROCLAMATION. Commissioned by Iseli-Chiodi Dance Company. Showcased at the Irish Arts Centre, New York City, 16-29 May 2016. (2016) Intimate Infinity (for piano). Opening theme of the film ‘The Cheese Box’. Commissioned by IsleBoro Productions, Limerick. Screened at Cannes Film Festival, Cannes, France, May 2016. (2016) Found sounds and strings. A sonography written for ‘The Endless Story of Trying to Make New Out of a Single Self’ by Jazmín Chiodi and Alexandre Iseli. Commissioned by Iseli-Chiodi Dance Company with support from the Dublin Dance Festival. Performed at the GPO, Dublin within the centenary celebrations of the 1916 Easter Rising, 20-22 April 2016. Mateos Morante, Rebeca (2016) Inbeatween. Ensemble choreography, MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Final Presentation, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, 5 May 2016. (2015) ‘La diosa que habito en el espejo: formación de un cuerpo que baila’ in Actas del VII Congreso Internacional de Análisis Textual, Segovia, Spain: Trama & Fondo [online], available: www.tramayfondo.com/actividades/vii-congreso/ las_diosas/downloads/mateos-morante-rebeca.pdf [accessed 23 May 2016].

43

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

(2015) Our City, Our Culture, choreography and performer, 11 April, Limerick City, Bedford Row.


(2015) Shadow. Duet choreography, MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Final Presentation, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, 11 May 2016. McCaffrey, Triona (2016) with Edwards, J. ‘Music therapy helped me get back doing”: using interpretative phenomenological analysis to illuminate the perspectives of music therapy participants in mental health services’, Journal of Music Therapy [online], available: http://jmt.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/ 2016/02/24/jmt.thw002.abstract [accessed 23 May 2016]. (2015) with Edwards, J. ‘Meeting art with art: arts-based methods enhance researcher reflexivity in research with mental health service users’, Journal of Music Therapy, 52(4), 515-32. (2015) with Ledger, A. ‘Questions for developing arts-based research in music therapy’, Journal of Music Therapy, 52(4), 441-56. McLoughlin, Lisa (2016) ‘Alice M’ – Galway Theatre Festival. A collaboration with Guerrilla Aerial exploring the life and works of Alice Milligan and her forgotten role in the 1916 rising. (2016) ‘Scaramouch’. A commission from the Iniscealtra Festival of the Arts. A collaboration with Diane Daly, Alec Brown and Deirdre Murphy. (2015) ‘Moved to dance: an exploration of dancers’ phenomenological perceptions of what influences their movement while dancing and how they view themselves as dancers’, MA in Dance from the University of Limerick.

Mercier, Mel (2014) A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing (Eimear McBride), music composed by Mel Mercier, directed by Annie Ryan, produced by Corn Exchange. Performances: Dublin Theatre Festival, October 2014; Project Arts Centre, Dublin, February 2015; MAC, Belfast, February 2015; Edinburgh Festival, August 2015. 2015 The Shadow of a Gunman (Seán O’Casey), music composed by Mel Mercier, directed by Wayne Jordan, produced by the Abbey Theatre/Lyric Theatre. Performances: Abbey Theatre, Dublin. 2015 The Three Forges, CD recording of original compositions by Mel Mercier and co-composers. Performed by Cork Gamelan Ensemble, directed and produced by Mel Mercier. Publisher: Diatribe Records (Dublin). Moss, Hilary (2016) with Khan, W., Mohammad, I. and O’Neill, D. ‘Perceptions of music therapy for older people among healthcare professionals’, British Medical Journal: Medical Humanities, 42:1, 52-56. (2014) with O'Neill, D. ‘Aesthetic deprivation in clinical settings’, The Lancet, 383, 1032-3. (2013) with O'Neill D. ‘The aesthetic and cultural interests of patients attending an acute hospital: a phenomenological study’, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 121-129 [online], available: doi:10.1111/jan.12175 [accessed 23 May 2016].

Melin, Mats (2015) One with the Music: Cape Breton Step Dancing Tradition and Transmission, Sydney, Nova Scotia: Cape Breton University Press.

Murphy, Laura (2015) Folkestone Moves, dance installation with filmmaker Gemma Riggs and sound artist JJ Maurage, 21 and 22 November, Light Moves Festival of Screen Dance. Exhibition at Folkestone Fringe Festival (Oct, 2014). Funded by the Arts Council of England and the University of the Creative Arts.

(2014) The Piper’s Schottische, choreography of a new social couple dance [online], available: http://hdl.handle. net/10344/4362 [accessed 23 May 2016]. First performed in South Uist, Scotland at the Ceolas Summer School.

(2015) A Dance Concerto (opening event), created as part of Laura Murphy, Cork’s Dancer in Residence Programme for Cork Midsummer Festival, 19 June, Cork City Hall, supported by Firkin Crane and the Arts Council.

(2013) ‘Step dancing in Cape Breton and Scotland: contrasting contexts and creative processes’, MUSICultures. Special Issue: Atlantic Roots and Routes, Sparling, H., Szego, K. and Wilkinson, F., eds., 40(1), 35-56.

(2014) Wunderbar (premiere), duet dance performance choreographed by Laura Murphy and Rob Heaslip with live music by Irene Buckley. Directed by Tom Creed and Dramaturgy by Ailish Claffey. Firkin Crane, Cork; Dance Live, Aberdeen (2014).

44

Project Arts Centre, Dublin; Tocht Festival, Siamsa Tire, Tralee; Cork Midsummer Festival; Shenzhen China (2015). Supported by Cork City Council, Creative Scotland, Dance Limerick and Firkin Crane, Cork. Ní Bhriain, Orfhlaith (2015) with Cahalan, R., O'Sullivan, K., Purtill, H. Bargary N. and O'Sullivan, P. ‘Inability to perform due to pain/injury in elite adult Irish dance: a prospective investigation of contributing factors’, Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. (2015) with Shanahan J., Morris M.E., Saunders J. and Clifford A.M. ‘Dance for people with Parkinson’s disease: what is the evidence telling us?’, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 16, 96(1), 141-53. (2015) with Shanahan J., Morris M.E., Saunders J. and Clifford A.M. ‘Is Irish set dancing feasible for people with Parkinson’s disease in Ireland?’, Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 21(1), 47-51. NicGhabhann, Niamh (2016) Editor, Volume 3 of the Irish Journal of Arts Management and Cultural Policy, Mapping an Altered Landscape: Cultural Policy and Management in Ireland. (2015) Medieval Ecclesiastical Buildings in Ireland, 1789-1915: Building on the Past, Dublin: Four Courts Press. (2015) with Mac Lellan, A. and Byrne, F., eds., St. Davnet’s: The Story of a Monaghan Institution, Health Service Executive & Stair: An Irish Public History Company Ltd., Monaghan. Ní Ghallóglaigh, Róisín (2015) with Joyce, S. ‘Threshing in the haggard to her heart’s delight: women and erotic expression in Irish traditional song’ in Mantymaki, T., Rodi-Risberg, M. and Foka, A., eds., Deviant Women: Cultural, Linguistic and Literary Approaches to Narratives of Femininity, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 211-229. Noone, Mattu (2016) ‘Third space ensemble and the Bucks of Bangalore: an ethnography of Irish-Indian music pedagogy’, Journal of the Vernacular Music Center, 1(2). (2016) with Dillane, A. ‘Irish music orientalism’, New Hibernia Review, 20 (1), Spring/Earrach


Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

45

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Maggie Wallace, Professional Master of Education (Music) student


(2015) ‘A way in to India’, Journal of Music [online], available: http://journalofmusic.com/focus/way-india [accessed 23 May 2016].

Painter, Eli (2015) ‘Born to dance’, Centrepiece, Spring 2015, 18-20.

Nunan, Mary (2014) Starting with T 2, director; screen video installation, FabLab, Limerick, November, funded by Limerick City of Culture, LCGA and Create.

Phelan, Helen (2015) Le Festival Voix et Route Romane / France’s Premier Festival of Vocal Music from the Middle Ages, Chant and Songs of the Wandering Irish, September 13, Surburg, Alsace. Managing Director and ensemble performer.

(2014) ‘In the Bell’s Shadow’, performer; film directed by Mary Wycherley and Joan Davis. Premiere showing IFC Dublin December, funded by the Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon.

(2014) Cantoral. Let the Joyous Irish Sing Aloud!/ Laetabundus decantet hybernicorum cetus [CD], managing director and ensemble performer. IWA001.

(2013) Dancers ensemble, choreographer; premiere performance Oct 3, the Daghdha Space, Limerick. Commissioned by Dance Limerick.

(2013) ‘Immigrant Music, Ritual and Religious' (517-519), 'Music and Vatican II' (7-4-706), in White, H. and Boydell, B. (general eds.), The Encyclopaedia of Music in Ireland, Dublin: UCD Press.

O'dyke Nzewi (2014) 'Performance Composition: For Effective Classroom Music Education', Saarbrücken: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing. (2014) 'Libation' African Ensemble music performance (director/performer), 8th May 2014 at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. (2014) 'Contextualizing traditional music studies in an institution of higher learning: a case study of the BA Irish Music and Dance at the University of Limerick', in Mangeni, P., ed., Pan African Journal of Musical Arts Education, 1(1), 74-86. Ó Súílleabháin, Mícheál (2015) Lumen i Luimneach. Closing concert of Limerick National City of Culture, St. Mary’s Cathedral Limerick, RTE Concert Orchestra, David Brophy conductor, Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin piano. Televised concert broadcast on TG4 on 16 January 2015. Repeat broadcast March 2015. (2014) Pioneers and Aviators: A Century of Irish Aviation. Limited edition publication [Book/DVD/CD] from the film documentary by Alan Gilsenan with orchestral score by Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, performed by the composer with the RTE Concert Orchestra. (2013) Three Sean-Nós Songs for Singer and Symphony Orchestra. First Performance RTE Concert Orchestra. Soloist Iarla Ó Lionáird (National Concert Hall, Dublin). Broadcast RTE lyric fm.

46

Quigley, Colin (2015) ‘György Martin’s place in applied ethnochoreology’, Acta Ethnographica Hungarica, 60(1), 111-120. Budapest: Akademia Kiado. (2014) ‘Dance revival activism and ethnochoreological research: the Hungarian dance house example’ in Fiskvik , A. and Stranden, M., eds., Festschrift for Egil Bakka, 279-289. Trondheim: Akademia Academic Press. (2014) ‘The Hungarian dance house movement and revival of Transylvanian string band music’ in Bithell, C. and Hill, J., eds., The [Oxford] Handbook of Music Revivals, 180-200. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Talty, Jack (2016) Imagining Home: Out of the Tradition, tribute performance to Seán Ó Riada as part of a concert at the National Concert Hall on 3 April 2016. Broadcast live on RTÉ Radio 1. (2015) ‘Music education and ethnomusicology, the state of the field’, SEM Student News: 4, The Society for Ethnomusicology. (2015) Gradam Ceoil TG4, performance with Ensemble Ériu at Cork Opera House to celebrate the ensemble’s Gradam Comharcheoil (Musical Collaboration Award) 2015. Broadcast live on TG4 on 22 February 2015.

Turner, Kathleen (2015) Ubuntu, interactive community music performance featuring pupils of St Mary’s National School and Galvone National School. Supported by the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and the Irish Chamber Orchestra. 10 June 2015, Tower Theatre, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. Vaughan, Mairéad (2014) TerrainSkin: Four dimensional flow, Director; collaborative dance, video and visual arts installation, Firkin Crane, Cork, funded by the Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon, supported by Firkin Crane and Dance Limerick. (2014) TerrainSkin, choreographer; dance video installation, Premiere 29 April, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Firkin Crane, Cork, Light Moves Festival of Screendance, Limerick, funded by the Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon, supported by the Irish World Academy. (2014) ‘Emanating awareness: tracing the impact of Bharatanatyam and Iyengar yoga on my contemporary dance and choreographic practice’, The Journal of Dance, Movement and Spiritualties, 1(1). Ward, Francis (2016) Processes of Transmission in Irish Traditional Music: Approaching a Virtual Orality, unpublished thesis (PhD), University of Limerick. (2015) Music recital (piano) with Bríd Harper (fiddle) in the Regional Cultural Centre as part of the Errigal Arts Festival and Ceol na Coille Summer School, 15 July 2015. (2014) The Vanishing Lake (music composition and dance choreography), ‘Out and About UK 21’, broadcast on Sky channel ‘Irish TV’, June 2014 [online], available: http://www. irishtv.ie/out-about-in-the-uk-21. Woodward, Alpha (2015) Tapestry of Tears: An Autoethnography of Leadership, Personal Transformation, Music Therapy and Humanitarian Aid in Bosnia and Herzegovina, unpublished thesis (PhD), Antioch University, USA [online], available: http://aura.antioch.edu/ etds/192/ [accessed 23 May 2016].


BA Voice and Dance student Charlotte Morrissey Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

47

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Irish World Academy Ensembles


CANTORAL VOICE ENSEMBLE

ACADEMOS

Cantoral Voice Ensemble

ACADEMOS

Cantoral is an all-female vocal ensemble from the University of Limerick, Ireland. The ensemble specialises in Western plainchant and early polyphony and has a particular interest in medieval Irish repertoire. Formed in 2008 at the Irish World Academy, the ensemble had its first international appearance in 2009 at the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris. Other highlight performances include Imbolc, a programme of chant and Irish language song for St. Bridget, which premiered in New York in 2010, and a programme for the Galway Early Music Festival entitled … sed diabolus irrisit (‘… but the devil laughed’) in the same year. In April 2011, Cantoral sang for the Dalai Lama during his visit to Ireland, and in April 2012, the ensemble conducted a public seminar and a concert of Irish medieval music for Holy Week at the Yale Institute of Sacred Music. In 2013, Cantoral performed again at the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris and at Harvard University and the University of Notre Dame in the USA. In 2015, Cantoral performed at France's most prestigious early music festival, Festival Voix & Route Romane.

Led by members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra (ICO), ACADEMOS is a string ensemble comprising the postgraduate students of the MA Classical String Performance. The full-time, two-year programme is offered jointly by the ICO and the Irish World Academy. Students in ACADEMOS interact with the ICO throughout the programme – they attend individual classes are taught by ICO leaders and engage in ensemble work with orchestral members. Classes, workshops, seminars and performances with a host of international performers, conductors and directors with whom the ICO works on a regular basis are a feature of the programme. Members of ACADEMOS have regular opportunities to engage with acclaimed ICO community music public outreach programmes. Graduates of the programme are invited to apply for a place on the Irish World Academy’s innovative PhD Arts Practice (a four-year structured doctoral programme) while maintaining ongoing contact with the ICO.

Cantoral Artistic Director Catherine Sergent is an acclaimed Paris-based singer who has performed and recorded extensively with several early-music ensembles, including Discantus and Obsidian. Catherine is a chant tutor for the MA Ritual Chant and Song programme at the Academy. The singers in Cantoral are graduates, doctoral students and members of faculty at the Irish World Academy and are from Ireland, France, the United States and Mexico. Cantoral issued its first CD recording, Let the Joyous Irish Sing Aloud/Laetabundus Decantet Hybernicorum Cetus, in 2014. The CD was recorded on location at Ballintubber Abbey, Co. Mayo with the assistance of the Keough Naughton Institute of Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana.

48 42

The ICO resides in its own specially designed expansive building beside the Irish World Academy in a wooded area on the banks of the River Shannon on UL’s north campus. The location includes the university’s Graduate Entry Medical School, Health Sciences building, superb sports facilities and three modern student villages.

Kevin Burke, 2016 TG4 Musician of the Year, performing at the Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning


49 I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Scholarship and Award Recipients


AILEEN DILLANE

HELEN PHELAN

2016 O’Donnell Research Fellowship in Irish Studies: Aileen Dillane Dr Aileen Dillane of the Irish World Academy was awarded the 2016 O’Donnell Research Fellowship in Irish Studies by Newman College, University of Melbourne, Australia. In early January 2016, Aileen undertook a five-week research project based on Miss Cecilia Curtin, a local chorister, soprano and ethnic entrepreneur, who was active in Melbourne in the first decades of the 20th century and whose performance life intersected with Irish-born Archbishop Mannix’s lengthy episcopacy in Melbourne. Aileen presented her preliminary findings at the Melbourne Irish Studies Seminar (MISS) series hosted at Newman College by the Irish Studies Association of Australia and New Zealand (ISAANZ), and her research will be published in the Australasian Journal of Irish Studies. Since returning from Australia, Aileen has delivered conference papers on this topic at ICTM-Ireland at DCU (February) and at ACIS (American Conference for Irish Studies) at the University of Notre Dame (March). Aileen was a consultant for the Univeristy of Melbourne-produced documentary ‘Michael, they’ve shot them’, which explores how Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising helped to shape political forces in Australia at a crucial time in its national history. Also in January of this year, Aileen was appointed an Honorary Fellow at the Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne for the next three years and will continue to build connections between the Academy and University of Melbourne.

Irish Research Council New Foundations Award: Helen Phelan Professor Helen Phelan was awarded the Irish Research Council (IRC) New Foundations award for her research

50

SHANNON BURNS

RAS MIKEY COURTNEY

project Singing and Sustainable Social Integration: Towards an International Model of Best Practice. Bestowed by the IRC in association with Dóchas, the Irish Association of NonGovernmental Development Organisations, the award offers scholars the opportunity to work with Irish-based NGOs involved in international development. Singing and Sustainable Social Integration is a research project coordinated in partnership between the Irish World Academy and Doras Luimní, the support group for refugees, asylum seekers and new migrants in Limerick. The project builds on the work of the HEA-supported multi-annual project 'Sanctuary', which seeks to build bridges between higher education and new migrant communities in Ireland.

Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award: RAS Mikey Courtney

Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award: Shannon Burns

RAS’s current research, entitled Bridging Horizons: Embodied Cultural Understanding Through Dance: An Investigation into the Development and Presentation of Ethio-Modern Dance, is grounded in ethnochoreology; from this interdisciplinary perspective, he investigates the use of dance composition/ performance as a cultural conduit. With an emphasis on Ethiopia, Ethio-modern dance is a movement study based on RAS’s amalgamated embodiment of global cultures, which he uses as a tool in his creative work as a western urbancontemporary performing artist.

PhD Arts Practice candidate Shannon Burns received an IRC Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award. Originally from New York, Shannon trained as a music teacher and studied the saxophone at Ithaca College. After Ithaca, she moved to Ireland to pursue a master’s degree in Ethnomusicology at the University of Limerick. Since moving to Ireland, Shannon has performed with the Irish Youth Wind Ensemble, University of Limerick Orchestra and Irish Symphonic Wind Orchestra. She is a founding co-director of the Limerick city-based Redemptorist Centre of Music, which provides access to music tuition for both adults and children. Through her research, entitled Transmitting Music Theory: A Performative and Pedagogical Exploration of Teaching and Learning in a Higher Education Institution, Shannon aims to develop and test a performance-based curriculum for teaching music theory to non-classical musicians and dancers at a higher education level.

PhD Arts Practice candidate RAS Mikey (Michael) Courtney received an IRC Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award. RAS has an MA in Ethnochoreology from the University of Limerick and a BFA in Modern Dance Performance from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. He has taught, presented and produced dance as well as other performing arts worldwide with his company, Fore I’m a Versatile Entertainer (F.I.V.E.) Productions (www.fivedance.com).

Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award: Carrie Dike Carrie Dike, PhD student in Ethnomusicology, received an IRC Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award for her investigation into the social life of Irish traditional singing. Social singing and traditional song have long been a vital aspect of Irish musical life. Carrie’s thesis sets out to investigate how traditional singing is being brought into the 21st century, particularly within the context of the Irish singing session. She conducts case studies on singing events in Ireland,


SHANE HOLOHAN

including two monthly singing sessions, the Ennis Singers Club and The Night Before Larry Got Stretched, and two annual weekend festivals, The Clare Festival of Traditional Singing and the Inishowen Folksong and Ballad Seminar. Through a participant-observer approach to field research, interviews and direct involvement in the events, Carrie hopes to answer how the Irish model for sustaining the social life of Irish traditional singing can apply to the broader world of sustaining intangible cultural heritage.

Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award: Shane Holohan PhD Arts Practice candidate Shane Holohan received an IRC Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award. Shane’s research incorporates his background in three areas: He is an experienced teacher of English and art, he trained and worked as an integrative psychotherapist and he coaches and choreographs floor and aerial acrobatics and dance. Shane’s research considers how we can facilitate and document embodied creativity in high-level students of circus arts. Last year he gathered ethnographic data through three case studies of international circus schools – one each in Montreal, Stockholm and Melbourne, which will be presented through three ethno-fictions. From these, Shane will develop a model of practice that he will apply through two creativity residencies in the current academic year: (i) a two-week residency using improvisational strategies to develop creativity and explore documentation practices for creative process and (ii) working for six weeks with a group of students from the above international schools and with Irish circus practitioners and vocal artists, culminating in a public showing at the National Gallery of Ireland in August 2017.

MATTU NOONE

Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award: Mattu Noone PhD Arts Practice candidate Mattu Noone is in receipt of an Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award. Originally involved in the post-rock scene in urban Australia, Mattu has travelled an eclectic musical route via North India to Ireland. A student of the sarode (25-stringed India lute) since 2004, he has spent many years studying Indian classical music with Sougata Roy Chowdhury in Kolkata and more recently with K Sridhar in the UK. He completed his MA (1st Honours) in Ethnomusicology at the Irish World Academy and has been supported by both Culture Ireland and the Music Network to tour India and develop a new sarode, particularly for playing Irish music. Mattu’s research topic is Reclaiming the Mongrel: Irish Traditional and North Indian Classical Musical Connections – a practice-based exploration of hybridisation. This research is an interdisciplinary investigation of the relationship between Irish traditional and North Indian classical music. Grounded in ethnomusicological theory (Rice, 1994; Aubert, 2007), the research utilises an arts practice approach, theorising complex musical relationships through practice, analysis and the production of new hybrid musical works. The methodology draws upon the concept of ‘critical meta-practice’ (Melrose, 2002) to employ musical skill sets to generate data and pursue research questions. 

Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award: Jack Talty Doctoral student Jack Talty received an Irish Research Council Postgraduate Scholarship Award for his study entitled Exploring Fifty Years of Institutionalisation in the Transmission,

JACK TALTY

CELINA JAFFE

Pedagogy and Performance of Irish Traditional Music in Irish Higher Education from 1963 to 2013. Jack’s study looks at the relationship between the ‘Ivory Tower’ – a metaphor for the university, commonly misconceived as being removed from reality and social contact with others (Phillips and Pugh 2000) and the ‘Commons’ – the perceived ‘community-owned’ practices of Irish traditional music (McCann 2001; Smith 2006). New discourse is offered to the ethnomusicological record to present a critique of prevailing perceptions on the intra-communal relationship between academic and extraacademic representations of Irish traditional music discourse, pedagogy, transmission and performance.

Go Overseas 2016 Ireland Scholarship: Celina Jaffe In 2016, Celina Jaffe won a scholarship to do a master’s degree at UL through the Go Overseas campaign supported by Education in Ireland. Hailing from Indiana, Celina was accepted onto the MA Contemporary Dance Performance at the Irish World Academy and then applied to Go Overseas Inc. to support her studies in Ireland. In her award-winning application, Celina wrote that the Irish World Academy had an individualist approach to learning and was recommended to her by professors of dance and anthropology in her home state of Indiana. In her efforts back home to advance her goal of becoming a professional dancer and teacher, she has already founded a modern dance company, directed a youth company, performed with local professionals and taught dance to the community by establishing various outreach programmes. Celina believes Ireland to be the ideal country in which to further her education because “its world-renowned musical culture holds the key to my research in dance as a catalyst for social change”.

51

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

CARRIE DIKE


MAEGHAN DINEEN

ANDREW O'GRADY AND SIOBHÁN NELLIGAN

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Graduate Arts Award: Maeghan Dineen MA in Irish Traditional Music Performance student Maeghan Dineen received the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s Graduate Arts Award, America’s leading graduate scholarship in visual arts, performing arts and creative writing. Having previously studied under Dr Anneliese Weibel at SUNY Geneseo, New York and Dr Ambrose Field at University of York, UK for music composition, Maeghan now seeks to broaden her creativity on the master’s programme at the Irish World Academy.

EMI Music Sound Foundation Bursary in Community Music 2015/16: Sharon Howley, Siobhán Nelligan, Andrew O’Grady and Kate Scales The 2015/16 EMI Music Sound Foundation Bursary in Community Music was awarded to MA in Community Music students Sharon Howley, Siobhán Nelligan, Andrew O’Grady and Kate Scales. EMI Music Sound Foundation was established by EMI in 1997 to commemorate the centenary of EMI records. EMI Music Sound Foundation is an independent charity supported by Universal Music Group. It is now the single largest sponsor of specialist performing arts colleges in England and has created vital bursaries at music colleges to assist music students. In 2005, EMI Music Sound Foundation extended its remit to cover the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick – a bursary was made available on an annual basis for the establishment of the EMI Music Sound Foundation Bursary in Community Music at the Academy.

52

CLAIRE HEFFERNAN

LAURA MURPHY

Applicants should normally be under 25 years of age, have been born in either the UK or Ireland and have applied for admission to the MA in Community Music at the Irish World Academy. In certain instances, bursary applications may be considered with applications for admission to Irish World Academy programmes other than Community Music. A CV should be included with the application form for admission to the relevant degree programme along with a covering letter applying for the bursary and sent to Jean Downey, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Telephone: +353 61 202030; email: jean.downey@ ul.ie. The criteria for selection of a bursary winner include the excellence of the CV and evidence of financial need. EMI Music Sound Foundation patrons: Sir George Martin, Sir Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, Sir Simon Rattle, Sir Cliff Richard, Diana Ross and Tina Turner.

Roche Continents Scholarship: Claire Heffernan Roche Continents is a project grown from a partnership between Roche and the Salzburg Festival. One hundred students from across Europe are selected to participate in this exceptional challenge; participants are students of life sciences, chemistry, the fine arts or music and are between 20 and 29 years of age. Roche is well known for promoting culture in novel settings, and Roche Continents is an example of this commitment. Participants attend concerts and talks by guest speakers and are given the opportunity to explore

the common ground of innovation and creativity in the arts and science by joining in discussions with artists and taking part in group workshops. Irish World Academy student Claire Heffernan was selected to attend the 2016 Roche Continents Conference in Salzburg in August. A pianist, vocalist and harpist from Limerick, Claire completed her MA in Music Performance (2014) and her BMus (2012), both with first-class honours from CIT Cork School of Music. Claire is very grateful to have been selected for this unique experience. She feels that her engagement with renowned scientists, artists and fellow students, as well as the opportunities to attend contemporary music performances of the Salzburg Festival, have collectively broadened her appreciation of both science and the arts.

Dancer in Residence at Firkin Crane: Laura Murphy Laura Murphy is the recipient of a Dancer in Residence Award from the Arts Council of Ireland/An Chomhairle Ealaíon. The residency is at Firkin Crane, Cork from September 2015 to June 2016, and this is the fourth consecutive year in which Laura has been awarded Dancer in Residence at this venue. The aim of the residency is to promote the professional practice of dance in Cork city. Laura will work with community and professional dancers on various projects throughout the residency and will premier a new choreographic work for an ensemble of eight dancers at Cork Midsummer Festival 2016. Laura was acting course director of the MA Contemporary Dance Performance at the Irish Wold Academy in 2014/15.


Meadhbh Lynch and Liam Monagher, Professional Master of Education (Music) students, Irish World Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning

53

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

Clár Irish World Academy Programmes


BA Irish Music and Dance BA Voice and Dance Certificate in Music and Dance Director, Undergraduate Studies: Dr Niall Keegan niall.keegan@ul.ie + 353 61 202465 MA Classical String Performance (in association with the Irish Chamber Orchestra) Course Coordinator to be announced Contact barbara.christie@ul.ie + 353 61 202030 MA Community Music Course Director: Kathleen Turner kathleen.turner@ul.ie + 353 61 213762 MA Contemporary Dance Performance Course Director to be announced Contact barbara.christie@ul.ie + 353 61 202030 MA Ethnochoreology Course Director: Dr Catherine Foley catherine.e.foley@ul.ie; +353 61 202922 MA Ethnomusicology Course Director: Dr Colin Quigley colin.quigley@ul.ie +353 61 202966

54

MA Festive Arts Course Director: Dr Niamh NicGhabhann niamh.nicghabhann@ul.ie +353 61 202798

MEd (Music) Course Director: Jean Downey jean.downey@ul.ie +353 61 213160

MA Irish Dance Studies Course Director: Dr Mats Melin mats.melis@ul.ie +353 61 202542

Professional MEd (Music) Course Director: Jean Downey jean.downey@ul.ie +353 61 213160

MA Irish Music Studies Course Director: Dr Aileen Dillane aileen.dillane@ul.ie + 353 61 202159

MA (Research) Enquiries: Relevant Supervisor/Faculty Member or paula.dundon@ul.ie +353 61 202149

MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Course Director: Dr Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain Orfhlaith.nibhriain@ul.ie +353 61 202470

PhD Arts Practice (Structured Programme) Programme Director: Professor Helen Phelan helen.phelan@ul.ie +353 61 202575

MA Irish Traditional Music Performance Course Director: Dr Sandra Joyce sandra.joyce@ul.ie +353 61 202065 MA Music Therapy Course Director: Dr Hilary Moss hilary.moss@ul.ie +353 61 213122 MA Ritual Chant and Song Course Director to be announced Contact barbara.christie@ul.ie + 353 61 202030

PhD (by dissertation) Enquiries: Relevant Supervisor/Faculty Member or paula.dundon@ul.ie +353 61 202149 Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance Director: Ernestine Healy ernestine.healy@ul.ie +353 61 202653

Kathryn Monahan and Shaunagh Smith, BA Irish Music and Dance students, performing at the Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning


The Irish World Academy continues to have a very strong international student profile. Since its inception in 1994, students from the listed countries have graduated from the Academy.

INTERNATIONAL: Australia Belarus Brazil Canada Chile China Colombia Ecuador Ethiopia Georgia India Indonesia Israel Japan Malaysia Mexico Nepal New Zealand Nigeria Norway Palestine Russia Singapore South Africa Taiwan Thailand Turkey USA Vietnam

55

I R I S H WO R L D A C A D E MY O F M U S I C A N D DA N C E

EU: Austria Belgium Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Netherlands Poland Romania Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden UK


Other Programmes and

Faculty of Education and Health Sciences: Graduate Diploma/MA in Dance (part-time) This two-year, part-time postgraduate programme is designed to offer students the opportunity to explore practical and theoretical aspects of dance through reflection, revisiting choreographic practice, a somatic approach to movement and developing dance workshop and lesson planning skills. Course Director: Brigitte Moody Email: Brigitte.moody@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 202807 Website: www.ul.ie/ehs

Faculty of Science and Engineering, Centre for Computational Musicology & Computer Music: MA/ MSc in Music Technology The MA/MSc in Music Technology is a one-year, intensive course designed for graduate musicians from all disciplines who are interested in combining technological competence with artistic endeavour.

Association of Irish Choirs The Association of Irish Choirs supports and promotes excellence in choral music in Ireland. It does this by providing information and advice and presenting a range of programmes and activities designed to respond to the needs of members, the wider choral community and the public. CEO: Dermot O’Callaghan Email: dermot.ocallaghan@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 202715 Administrator: Michelle Hynes Phone: +353 61 234823 Email: aoic@ul.ie Website: www.aoic.ie

University of Limerick Arts Office Arts Officer: Patricia Moriarty Email: patricia.moriarty@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 202130

University of Limerick Visual Arts Administrator: Yvonne Davis Email: yvonne.davis@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 213052

Digital Media and Arts Research Centre (DMARC)

Course Director: Jürgen Simpson Email: jurgen.simpson@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 202759 Website: www.csis.ul.ie

Director: Jürgen Simpson Email: jurgen.simpson@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 202759 Website: www.dmarc.ie

Faculty of Science and Engineering, Interaction Design Centre (IDC): MA in Interactive Multimedia

Aonad na Gaeilge/UL Irish Language Centre

The MA in Interactive Multimedia is a one-year, intensive course designed specifically for art and design graduates who are interested in pursuing studies that combine technological competence with design/artistic endeavour. Course Director: Mikael Fernstrom Email: mikael.fernstrom@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 202606 Website: www.idc.ul.ie

56

Department of Music, Mary Immaculate College, UL The Department of Music at Mary Immaculate College (MIC) offers music for the BEd and BA (Liberal Arts) programmes as well as a taught MA in Music Education and other postgraduate degrees to doctoral level by research. Regular choral and chamber concerts are a vital part of the life of the department and there are close ties with the Irish World Academy. MIC has a 500-seater performing arts venue, the Lime Tree Theatre (www.limetreetheatre.ie). Dr Gareth Cox (Head of Department); Dr Paul Collins; Dr Michael Murphy; Dr Gwen Moore; Dr Ailbhe Kenny Departmental enquiries: musicinfo@mic.ul.ie Phone +353 61 204540 Website: www.mic.ul.ie

Dr Deirdre Ní Loingsigh, Stiúrthóir na Gaeilge Email: deirdre.niloingsigh@ul.ie Phone: +353 61 213463 Ciara Considine, Oifigeach Margaíochta/Riarthóir Feidhmiúcháin Email: ciara.considine@ul.ie Phone +353 61 234754

Patricia Bolonia and Rocio Gil from the Al-Andar Flamenco dance company performing at the Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Back cover photo: Angie Smalis in a contemporary dance performance at the Irish World Academy Photograph © Maurice Gunning


Maurice Gunning MFA is an Irish photographer and documentary filmmaker. Appointed to the position of artist in residence at many cultural institutions, Gunning continues to exhibit internationally with support from the Irish Arts Council and Culture Ireland. He is currently a member of the advisory board of PhotoIreland. Since 2006, Gunning has been the resident photographer at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick. He continues to collaborate with many national and international artists through this residency. His work was celebrated in 2010 in the form of an extensive permanent exhibition and catalogue at the Irish World Academy. Dance Ireland invited Gunning to be their artist in residence at Dance House, Dublin, where he created a new body of photographic work. This work was premiered in May 2013 with a large permanent solo show at Dance House. “We are delighted to commission such unique images from Maurice, a photographic artist of the highest quality whose work will add to our understanding of the beauty of movement.” (Paul Johnson, Dance Ireland Chief Executive). Gunning has worked extensively in Buenos Aires with the Argentine Irish Diaspora over a number of years. With support from Culture Ireland and the Irish Embassy, he exhibited his solo show, Encuentro, at the Centro Cultural de Recoleta in Buenos Aires, in several UK galleries and at the Irish National Photographic Archive at the invitation of PhotoIreland Festival 2012. According to Sean O’Hagan of The Guardian, the show “focuses on the Argentine-Irish community in Buenos Aires, descendants of the original immigrants that arrived there in the 1800s. Gunning’s poetic, fragmentary style is perfectly suited to the kind of visual storytelling that draws on memory, text and longing to at once evoke the past and the present”. In 2013, the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest invited Gunning to be their first artist in residence. The work produced during this residency will be premiered in Budapest at the Liszt Academy in 2015 with support from Culture Ireland, the Arts Council and the Irish Embassy. In 2014, Hope & Homes for Children (Romania) commissioned Gunning to create a book and exhibition, Family:Familie – Stories of Five Romanian Families, which were premiered in May of that year at the National Parliament and National Library, Bucharest. In 2015, Irish Aid and the Department for Foreign Affairs and Trade awarded Gunning the Simon Cumbers Media Fund, which enabled him to work in The Gambia on themes relating to the UNHCR Millennium Development Goals. Gunning’s first documentary, The Chile 33, filmed during 2010, was broadcast in over 50 countries to commemorate the first anniversary of the mining incident. Gunning continues to work internationally as a cinematographer with Swedish intergovernmental organisation The International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA).


www.irishworldacademy.ie

Of our times autumn 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you