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SPRING/SUMMER 2012

MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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KING Among

Presidents


MOREHOUSE COLLEGE NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 2010-2012 OFFICERS Kevin R. McGee ‘93 President kevin.mcgee@morehousecollegealumni.com Emanuel Payton ‘85 Vice President-at-Lange epayton403@msn.com Earl Nero ‘72 Executive Director earl.nero@morehousecollegealumni.com Michael J. Brooken, Jr. ‘94 Treasurer mbrooken@carterdavisgroup.com VACANT Secretary Thomas N. Scott ’84 Financial Secretary tscott@investorscapital.com James D. Henry ‘61 General Counsel jamesdhenry@msn.com Jeffrey L. Riddle ‘90 Parliamentarian jlriddle@riddleschwartz.com Alvin H. Darden ‘72 College Representative adarden@morehouse.edu Henry M. Goodgame, Jr. ’84 Director, Alumni Relations hgoodgame@morehouse.edu REGION I-IX VICE PRESIDENTS Don McCarthy ‘89 Vice President, Region I dmccarthy@mcsdga.net Vice President, Region II VACANT Melvin D. Caldwell, Jr. ’75 Vice President, Region III 11312 Treebark Drive Pineville, NC 28134 Sheerms@aol.com Mark W. Hill ’67 Vice President, Region IV 103 Persimmon Circle Reisterstown, MD 21136 hillm@peercpc.com Charles H. Neal ’64 Vice President, Region V 13957 Stahelin Detroit, MI 48223 charlesneal101@AOL.com

9.1.12

George W. Thompson ’66 Vice President, Region VI 597 Viking Drive East Saint Paul, MN 55117 Jags597@aol.com Corey E. Thomas ‘93 Vice President, Region VII 920 South Commerce Street #309 Little Rock, AR 72202 Cethomas1091@gmail.com Donald E. Long ’64 Vice President, Region VIII 7950 Alida Street LaMesa, CA 91942 dlong@sdccd.edu Michael Bryant Vice President, Region IX bryant1831@gmail.com

Visit nationsfootballclassic.com


Renaissance Legacy

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A KING AMONG PRESIDENTS Hundreds of thousands of people from the four corners of the globe gathered on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to see the towering likeness of Martin Luther King Jr. ’48. But none were as proud as his Morehouse brothers, hundreds of whom converged around the stone image to take photos, sing the College’s alma mater, and pay tribute to a Morehouse Man who has been immortalized among presidents.

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SAVING OUR BLACK BOYS In Crenshaw, things are not always what they seem. Carefully manicured lawns under cloudless skies belie the seedier elements that sprout violence and fear in South Central L.A. The Leadership Center at Morehouse College teamed with L.A.’s 2nd district supervisor, Mark Ridley Thomas, to work with organizations throughout the area to produce a model of leadership and collaboration that will help save our black boys from the deceptive streets of L.A.

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145 YEARS OF LEADERSHIP AND EXCELLENCE Who could have imagined that a small school in a church basement would one day become a nationally recognized college that produced graduates who, quite literally, changed the world? Morehouse celebrates its remarkable legacy of 145 years of leadership development and academic excellence with a series of events that honored a constellation of luminaries, brought great music to campus and hosted an important dialogue on black male education.

d e p a rtm e n t s 6

INSIDE THE HOUSE

14 16 18 20

IN THE NEWS HOMECOMING ON THE FIELD AND COURT ON THE SHELF

ON THE COVER:

21 47 48 50 52 56

DEVELOPMENT NEWS BROTHER TO BROTHER ALUMNI NEWS CHAPTER NEWS CLASS NOTES THE ROAD TAKEN

Morehouse Men gather in Washington, D.C. to honor Morehouse’s “King among presidents.” Photo by Phillip McCollum

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RENAISSANCE GRADUATES Last May, the first class to matriculate all four years under President Robert M. Franklin ’75 marched across the stage and became the College’s first Renaissance graduates. It has been Franklin’s vision to produce Renaissance Men--men who are well-read, well-spoken, well-traveled, well-dressed and well-balanced.

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f ea tu re s

contents MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

After five years of ushering in his vision of a Morehouse Renaissance, President Robert M. Franklin ‘75 has announced that he will step down as president to pursue research on the plight of black boys. In this issue, we highlight just a few of his varied accomplishments—from initiatives he envisioned to Renaissance Men who have flourished under his tutelage. Look for the “Renaissance Legacy” banner throughout the issue to read more about the vision of a president who dared to revisit the past to ensure a brighter future for Morehouse College.


“We must remember that intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character— that is the goal of true education.” Martin Luther King Jr. ‘48

Morehouse College has always been committed to producing leaders who will change their communities, the nation and the world. Not only do Morehouse students receive a rigorous liberal arts education, but an awakening to their capacity for integrity, compassion, civility and leadership.

Resource the Renaissance Give online at giving.morehouse.edu


president’s message

Renaissance Legacy

Forever Connected to Morehouse

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nother academic year is drawing to a close and we are rapidly approaching Commencement 2012, my last as the president of Morehouse. In January, I announced that I would not renew a contract to continue as president of my beloved alma mater. Although a difficult decision, it is a correct one for me and the institution, as I will have the opportunity to return to my research on boys and men of color and teaching courses on ethics, religion and leadership. As a student during the administration of Dr. Hugh Gloster ’31, I was inspired by his love for Morehouse and his encouragement to me to prepare for a leadership role here. It has been my honor and joy to serve as the tenth president of Morehouse College. It is my hope that during my tenure, I have enhanced this great institution and built upon the terrific work of all of my predecessors. This was the purpose and goal of the renaissance I sought to lead. I hope students of this era remember me for how I challenged them to expand their critical thinking skills and how I impressed upon them the need to see the world and develop an appreciation for other cultures. And I hope that they will embrace my call for them to become leaders with a social conscience and global perspective. But more important than any of those things, I hope that each Renaissance Man of Morehouse will know that his brother president’s loftiest goal for him is to become a change agent who lifts others as he climbs wherever he is called to thrive. Nearly 41 years ago, I arrived as a naïve freshman equally nervous and exhilarated to realize my father’s dream for me to attend Morehouse. Nearly five years ago, I returned to serve as its chief visionary and executive, realizing my own dream. Now, I look forward to a variety of ways in which I will advance and serve Morehouse in the future, hopefully giving back to it a fraction of what it gave me. As you read this issue of Morehouse Magazine, I am confident that you will connect with at least one of the initiatives underway at the College. I urge you to pledge your support to advance it. I plan to do exactly that, because while I will no longer occupy the office on the third floor of Gloster Hall, I forever will be connected to Morehouse, her people and her mission.

“I hope that each Renaissance Man of Morehouse will know that his brother president’s loftiest goal for him is to become a change agent who lifts others

Sincerely,

as he climbs wherever he is

Robert M. Franklin Jr. ’75

called to thrive.”

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“It’s all about possibilities.� architect or activist educator or engineer poet or pastor surgeon or senator

When you give to Morehouse, anything is possible. Resource the Renaissance Give online at giving.morehouse.edu


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editor’s notes

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Robert M. Franklin ’75 President

Dreams Realized

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ust recently, I was out with friends and the conversation turned to our most popular subject: dreams not yet realized. One friend dreams of owning a business, but still works a 9-to-5. Another dreams of marriage, but is hesitant to even ask for a date. And then another one dreams of somehow making a real difference in people’s lives—but is not sure how to get started (that would be me). What is it that moves people from just talking about their dream to taking the action to realize it? Believe it or not, I found the answer in this issue of Morehouse Magazine. In three very different stories, you’ll see how passion, perseverance and people motivating people are the common denominators that moved dreams from nebulous to concrete. For example, what started as a shared “I Have a Dream” vision among five determined men was for many years a dream deferred.  After years of behind-the-scenes negotiations, congressional committee politics, government red tape and consistent knocking on doors to raise funds, their dream was finally realized last August when the $120-million monument of Martin Luther King Jr. ’48 was dedicated.   In our cover story, beginning on page 35, learn how the College’s celebration of the monument’s dedication was deferred at the last minute, but the Morehouse family persevered, remained flexible, and ultimately held a tribute to its most acclaimed alumnus who is now “A King Among Presidents.” Each year, the College admits a freshman class of young men who dream of graduating from Morehouse. Unfortunately that same year, more than 80 students end up with a dream deferred because their money runs out. Enter a handful of Morehouse Men who realized that their dream of graduating was realized due to the generous support of the College’s top donor – Ms. Oprah Winfrey – and that it was time for them to pay her life-altering gift forward (see page 24). Five years ago, President Robert M. Franklin ’75 came to Morehouse College with a dream – which translated into a vision of a Morehouse Renaissance. That Renaissance called for a renewal of core values, including a student development model characterized by the five wells: well-read, well-spoken, well-traveled, well-dressed and well-balanced. This month, as we celebrate the graduating Class of 2012, we look back at Commencement 2011. It was with great pride that President Franklin witnessed his dream come true as he presided over the Commencement exercises of the first graduating class of Renaissance Men. These graduates will forever carry the distinction of being “Franklin’s Men.” (See story on page 28.) Incredible things can happen if you follow your passion, stay on course regardless of obstacles and enlist the help of people who believe in your dream. I can’t wait to share this with my friends. Hope you do the same. Keep Reading,

Toni O’Neal Mosley Executive Editor

Willis B. Sheftall ’64 Interim Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Phillip Howard ’87 Vice President for Institutional Advancement Toni O’Neal Mosley Executive Editor and Director of Public Relations

STAFF Editor Vickie G. Hampton Writer Add Seymour Jr. Contributing Writer Kai Jackson-Issa In the News Elise Durham Class Notes Julie Pinkney Tongue Contributing Photographers William Coyle Philip McCollum James Robinson Add Seymour Jr. Graphic Design Glennon Design Group Administrative Assistant Minnie Jackson Web Manager Hana Chelikowsky Morehouse Magazine is published by Morehouse College, Office of Communications, Division of Institutional Advancement. Opinions expressed in Morehouse Magazine are those of the authors, not necessarily of the College. Letters and Comments: Letters must be one typed page in length and signed. Please include complete contact information. Send to: Morehouse Magazine Editor, Morehouse College, Office of Communications, 830 Westview Dr., S.W., Atlanta, GA 30314 E-mail: morehousemageditor@morehouse.edu Fax: 404-215-2729 Change of Address and Class Notes: http://giving.morehouse.edu/NetCommunity Morehouse College is the nation’s largest liberal arts college for men. The College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of the Atlanta University Center consortium of four schools. Morehouse does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, handicap, or national or ethnic origin in the recruitment and admission of its students, in the administration of its educational policies and programs, or in its staff, as specified by federal laws and regulations.

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Renaissance Legacy

President Franklin Follows

By ADD SEYMOUR JR.

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fter five years of leading one of the nation’s top historically black colleges, President Robert M. Franklin ’75 has decided to step down when his term ends on June 30, 2012. He will become scholar-in-residence at Stanford University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Institute, but plans to return to Morehouse in the role of president emeritus and distinguished professor. “I look forward to a sabbatical, during which I intend to travel, write, speak and interview leaders about the condition of black boys and men in the U.S. and around the globe, research that I began years ago in my book, Crisis in the Village,” said Franklin. “I am grateful to the Board of Trustees for the invitation to return as President Emeritus and Distinguished Professor of Social Ethics, and the opportunity to continue supporting the mission of Morehouse in a different way.” The Morehouse Board of Trustees has instituted a rigorous search to identify a successor. If a new president has not been selected by July 1, 2012, Franklin will continue in his current role until

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a new president has been selected by the board, but no later than Dec. 31, 2012. Since the announcement of President Franklin’s transition plans in January, a Presidential Search Committee has been established by the Board of Trustees to lead the search effort for his successor. The 13-member search committee is comprised of a diverse cross-section of representatives from the Morehouse College Board of Trustees, including students, alumni and faculty. Dean John Williams ’69, Division of Business and Economics, and General Counsel Robyn Crittenden are providing administrative support to the committee. The search committee has selected Heidrick & Struggles International, Inc., a premier international executive search firm with more than 55 years of experience in executive search and leadership consulting services. The firm has worked with search committees to identify outstanding leaders for a variety of private and public colleges and universities, as well as education-related institutions. “We are confident the search process will identify a strong pool of candidates from across the country,” said Robert Davidson


insidethehouse

His Passion Back to Classroom ’67. Since succeeding Walter E. Massey ’58 as president in 2007, Franklin has directed fund-raising efforts that increased alumni giving from 17% to 36%, three times the national average. His leadership generated $60 million in federal grants and contracts, and $33 million from corporations, foundations and individual donors to support the College’s capital campaign during its quiet phase. The College also has renewed its commitment to academic vigor, being reaffirmed for accreditation in 2009 by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. “Dr. Franklin has served an integral role leading the renaissance of Morehouse, and his dedication is greatly appreciated,” said Davidson, chairman of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees. “In addition to his years of service, Robert led by example, dedicating a substantial portion of his time to community service, which is one of the core values that Morehouse seeks to instill in each and every one of its students. We will miss him as the Board endeavors to find a replacement who will help to usher the College into a new era.” n Editor’s Note: To read more about Dr. Franklin’s decision, see “The Road Taken” on page 56.

THE PRESIDENTIAL SEARCH Visit the presidential search website at www.morehouse.edu/ presidentialsearch. Nominations and applications, as well as comments for the search committee may be submitted on the website. In addition, nominations and applications may be sent directly to: Morehouse College Presidential Search, Heidrick & Struggles, Inc., 303 Peachtree Street, Suite 4300, Atlanta, Georgia 30308, or via email to morehouse@heidrick. com. All other forms of confidential communication related to the search should be sent directly to: Morehouse College Presidential Search Committee c/o Robyn A. Crittenden, General Counsel, Morehouse College, Suite 109, 830 Westview Drive, S.W., Atlanta, Georgia 30314.

PRESIDENTIAL SEARCH COMMITTEE Robert C. Davidson Jr. ’67 (chairman) Boris Dobrijevic (student trustee) General James R. Hall ’57 (alumni trustee) Michael A. Lawson Robert J. Levin William M. Lewis Jr.

Bryant Marks ‘94 (faculty trustee) Kevin McGee ’93 (alumni trustee) Jim Moss ’70 The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss Jr. ’56 John L. Thornton John A. Wallace Dorothy C. Yancy

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insidethehouse Parents Council Helps Support Parents and Students By ADD SEYMOUR JR.

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hen parents send their sons to Morehouse, their connection to the College is much more than just being cheerleaders from home. Every Morehouse parent is a member of the new Morehouse College Parents Council, a second-year group that helps support students and their parents during their Morehouse years. “We are strong advocates of our sons and making sure they have a great experience at Morehouse, and we help parents to navigate the Morehouse system,” said Dr. Darlene Willis, co-chair of the Council with her husband, Phillip Willis Jr. Their son, James C. Willis, is a senior Spanish major. According to Harry Wright, associate vice president and dean of the Office of Student Services, the idea for the council came from William Bynum, vice president for Student Services. Wright, who is the Council’s liaison to the College, said Bynum’s idea to mobilize parents at the ground level is working “extremely well” so far. “In only one year, they’ve raised $12,000 – 70 percent of which we have given to students for things such as book scholarships, emergency plane tickets to get home and even clothing,” said Wright. “They’ve also partnered with regional alumni groups and with the Office of Admissions to help reach out because they know the high schools and students in their area,” he said. A 15-member executive board directs the Council’s activities through its nine regional groups across the country. Council members are on campus at least twice a year—during New Student

President Robert M. Franklin ’75 joins members of the Morehouse College Parents Council.

Orientation and Parents Weekend—and often are around for other College events, such as the “A Candle in the Dark” Gala, Commencement and Homecoming. “We just love Morehouse,” Wilis said. “When people want to know about a great place for their son to attend college, we always say Morehouse College without any hesitation.” n For more information about the Morehouse College Parents Council, go to www.morehouse.edu/parents/index.html.

Peter Buffett Shares Insight on Realizing Your Dreams Emmy Award-winning musician and composer Peter Buffett (left) performs in the Ray Charles Performing Arts Center’s Emma and Joe Adams Concert Hall during his multi-media presentation, “Life Is What You Make It: A Concert and Conversation with Peter Buffett.” Buffett talked about how people should follow their passions and take the reigns of their own destiny. This was Buffett’s second concert at Morehouse. Both were sponsored by Goldman Sachs. MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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Morehouse Among Top HBCUs in Producing Peace Corps Volunteers MOREHOUSE IS ONE of the nation’s top producers of Peace Corps volunteers from historically black college and universities. According to Peace Corps officials, Morehouse produced nine alumni who are in the Peace Corps in 2011, second only to Howard University, which had 17. Spelman College was third with six. “We are thrilled to congratulate these academic institutions for continuing to cultivate a commitment to public service,” said Peace Corps Director Aaron Williams. Peace Corps volunteers serve 27-month commitments in more than 75 countries, promoting world peace and friendship, and a better understanding between Americans and people of other countries. n


insidethehouse Morehouse Is First Course on Table of Brotherhood Project By ADD SEYMOUR JR.

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he Rev. Otis Moss Jr. ’56 took the audience gathered for the Table of Brotherhood Project on a quick oral tour of the Auburn Avenue that Martin Luther King Jr. ’48 walked as a youngster. Strolling by churches, successful black businesses and positive black images, a young King saw that despite the racism of the times, he and other black people were destined for much more. “He realized there was nothing wrong with him. There was something wrong with THEM,” Moss said to shouts from the audience of approximately 1,500 in the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel. “We’ve got to recreate that type of nurturing community. It seems to be an impossible task, but we’ve got to try anyway.” Sponsored by Chevrolet and the General Motors Foundation, the Table of Brotherhood Project was a discussion tour in four cities that were vital to King’s life, said GM Foundation President Vivian Pickard. Moderated by CNN’s Roland Martin and author Lisa Nichols, the talks delved into politics, health care, education and other pressing issues. Besides Atlanta, the tour also went to Memphis, Chicago and Washington, D.C., as a lead-in to the dedication of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial. “We all know the importance of Morehouse to Dr. King,” Pickard said. “That’s why we’re here. We wanted to be in a venue that was significant and important to Dr. King. What better place

Roland Martin, moderates the panel featuring activist and broadcast pioneer Xernona Clayton, Otis Moss Jr. ’56, GeorgiaForward executive director Amir Faroki, State Rep. Alicia Thomas Morgan, publisher Munson Steed ’88, Chevrolet dealer Warren “Greg” Cole, WVEE/V-103 program director Reggie Rouse and filmmaker Shelton “Spike” Lee ’79.

could we be than Morehouse? The history here is phenomenal.” “We have young black minds who somehow believe education equals ‘white’ and ignorance equals ‘black,’ which means you are ghetto or whatever ignorant term you want to use,” Lee said when the discussion turned to education. “We’ve got to get back to education,” he said. “It’s suicide to make fun of young black minds that want to achieve. We’ve got to turn that around.” n

Washington Monthly and U.S. News and World Report Give Morehouse Top Rankings

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wo national publications have put Morehouse top on their list of the nation’s best schools. For the second consecutive year, Morehouse has been recognized by Washington Monthly magazine as one of the best liberal arts colleges in the country. In the magazine’s 2011 College Guide, Morehouse was ranked second nationally, behind Berea College of Kentucky. The Washington Monthly’s college rankings differ from others by asking more of what colleges do for the country. For example, they focus on whether institutions are educating low-income students or just catering to the affluent. This guide, according to the editors, asks, “Are we getting the most for our money?” President Robert M. Franklin ’75 said the ranking speaks to Morehouse’s mission, which is about serving the larger society. “Morehouse has always been concerned with developing the whole man,” he said. “As the nation’s only institution of higher

learning devoted to educating African American men, it is rewarding to know that the work we have done for the past 144 years is valued by the public, and particularly by an institution that grants institutional rankings.” In U.S. News and World Report’s 2012 College Rankings issue, Morehouse was ranked the No. 3 HBCU in the country. Spelman College topped the list while Howard University was ranked second. Morehouse has been listed among the nation’s top HBCUs in all five years that U.S. News and World Report has been ranking HBCUs. The College also was listed as one of the magazine’s top National Liberal Arts Colleges. n To view the entire U.S. News and World Report 2012 College Rankings, go to http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/ best-colleges. S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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peopleatthehouse Four Morehouse Faculty Receive Achievement Awards MUSIC DEPARTMENT chairman Uzee Brown ’72 was announced the 2011-12 Vulcan Materials Company Morehouse Faculty Member of the Year. Sponsored by Vulcan Maerials Company, the annual award is presented to a faculty member who is deemed an outstanding teacher through peer reviews and student evaluations; has served the College on various committees and other activities; and who provides service to the community and the teaching profession. Along with a certificate, Brown received $1,000. Ron Thomas, director of the College’s Journalism and Sports Program since its inception in 2007, spent nearly 40 years writing about football, baseball, basketball and other sports and their intersection with social justice. His accomplishments have been recognized by Sport in Society at Northeastern University, which has awarded him its Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Sports Journalism.

Uzee Brown ’72

Ron Thomas

Thomas, who is the author of They Cleared the Lane: the NBA’s Black Pioneers, covered college and professional sports, specifically the National Football League and the National Basketball Association, for the San Francisco Chronicle, USA Today, the Marin (Ca.) Independent Journal, the Chicago Daily News and BlackAmericaWeb.com. Anne Watts, associate vice president for Academic Affairs, and Tobe Johnson ’54, interim dean of the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences and the College’s longest tenured professor, were

Anne Watts

Tobe Johnson ’54

among the honorees in the 2nd Annual Diamond Awards held on March 17, 2012, in the Ray Charles Performing Arts Center. Presented by the non-profit Not Alone Foundation, Inc.—which was founded by Morehouse alumnus Mark Dodd ’09—the Diamond Awards honors individuals in the entertainment and business worlds who, through their perseverance and success, have made a significant impact in their fields. n For more information about the Diamond Awards, go to www.thenotalonefoundation.org.

P A S S A G E Parthenia H. Franks Devoted 25 Years to English Department

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arthenia H. Franks, a respected speech pathologist who ran a private practice in Atlanta and devoted 25 years to teaching at Morehouse, died on Oct. 15, 2011. “She was not only one of the hardest workers in the English department for students, but she also was extremely supportive of her colleagues, especially the junior faculty,” said English professor Stephane Dunn. “She would always take that moment to stop and encourage you.” Franks presented papers at many conferences and conventions around the country during her career and published many articles on speech communication. She served as the Morehouse Divisional Advisory Dean of the Humanities from 1996 to 1998. The Morgan State graduate had been the clinic coordinator of the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Georgia State University and a lecturer for the Georgia Speech and Hearing Association. She also was a longtime member of the International Listening Association, serving as national secretary in 1999. She was once featured on NBC’s

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“The Today Show.” Franks, also a poet, earned her master’s degree from Howard University and her doctorate from Georgia State University. “Dr. Franks will be remembered for her composed and genteel personality that brought calm and balanced rationality to every situation,” said English Department Chairwoman Consuella Bennett. “Her students remember her for demanding academic rigor, yet showing concern for their well-being. She loved teaching at Morehouse College, and that was exemplified by her commitment, not only to teaching, but also to advising students.” n


peopleatthehouse “Growing up in the projects, I just used to dream about stuff I thought I’d never be able to obtain. I’d say, ‘Grandma, I’m going to get you a brand new house,’ and she’d say ‘I know baby.’ So I’m big on family because it’s my family who made me who I am today. [They] showed me the blueprint and how to master that blueprint.” —NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, Nov. 22, 2011

’HOUSE GUESTS Men of Morehouse were repeatedly given the message—by everyone from executives and activists to well-known entertainers— that, with greater opportunities come greater responsibility to lead.

“The reality now is our voting rights are under attack; our right even to aspire for a home is under attack and even to expect that our children can drink clean water and breathe clean air is even under attack. At this moment, the right to organize is under attack. So many of our rights are under attack everywhere. There is a real need for Morehouse Men to continue the tradition of the greatest Morehouse Men before and since Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” —NAACP President Benjamin T. Jealous Leadership Crown Forum, Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, Oct. 6, 2011

“Willie Lynch in 1712, well the alleged Willie Lynch, said ‘I want to tell y’all something, if you want to control these black people and control their minds and control these black slaves, there’s only one way to do that and that’s through separation.’ You separate them by fear, distrust and envy. So that’s why we’re doing ‘Reverse the Lynch Curse.’ We’ve heard all our lives that black folks can’t work together. We can. We can reverse that curse. We can work together. We can love together. We can fellowship together.” —Actor Tommy Mikal Ford presenter of “Reverse the Lynch Curse” town hall meetings, for a Morehouse interview, Nov. 2, 2011

“My challenge to you, my brothers, is to avail yourselves to the opportunities and experiences you have before you right now.  Your future glory is directly related to the story that you are writing today.” —Lamelle McMorris ’95 Head of the Perennial Group and the Perennial Law Group, Homecoming Crown Forum, Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, Oct. 20, 2011 S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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peopleatthehouse David Satcher ’63: ‘Improving American Health Care Starts at Home’

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hooping cough left many young black children deathly ill in the 1940s. David Satcher’s parents worried he would be another casualty. But they found a black doctor in their home-

town of Anniston, Ala., who went out of his way to make sure Satcher would be cured. That commitment to medicine was the inspiration behind Satcher becoming a physician and his commitment to ensuring

Satcher addresses audience at the Health Awareness Crown Forum.

Awarding Academic Leadership LAWRENCE E. CARTER SR., dean of the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, presented the Gandhi King Ikeda Community Builders Prize to Dr. Hi-Soo Kim, president of Konyang University in South Korea in October 2011. The award was designed to promote the importance of peace and positive social transformation by honoring those demonstrating extraordinary global leadership through non-violence to reconcile differences. In 1962, Kim opened an eye hospital for Seoul’s underserved. He also founded Konyang Junior and Senior high schools, as well as Konyang University, where service to community is as much a focus as academic excellence. Carter later spoke to nearly 1,500 students at Konyang University. n MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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that quality health care was available to everyone. During a Health Awareness Crown Forum speech on Nov. 17 in the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, Satcher—a 1963 graduate and the former U.S. Surgeon General—told students they should have the kind of attitude he had when he went to medical school. “My attitude was that it was not enough for me to finish medical school and practice medicine,” he said. “I was expected to be a leader. I was expected to help make medicine better than when I found it.” It’s this lesson in leadership that he wanted Morehouse students to understand. “Leadership is like a relay race. It doesn’t matter

how fast you run,” Satcher said. “You’ve got to make sure you’ve got the baton; that you pass the baton to the next generation; that it is received in such a way that no momentum is lost.   “So we are depending upon you to make sure that we continue to advance this baton and that health care in America and in the world continues to improve, starting with our individual behaviors,” he said. Satcher, who was surgeon general from 1998 to 2000, also previously served as president of the Morehouse School of Medicine and Meharry Medical College in Nashville. He is now director of The Satcher Health Leadership Institute at the Morehouse School of Medicine. n


peopleatthehouse

Strive Maniyiwa, executive chairman, Econet Wireless Dec. 6, 2012

Robert J. McCarthy, Group president, Marriott International, Sept. 26, 2011

Robert Youngjohns, president, Microsoft North America Feb. 2, 2012

Nick Stuart, president and CEO, Odyssey Networks, Oct. 13, 2011

Campus Visits

Several times each year, the Morehouse College Corporate Alliance Program and the Leadership Center invite senior-level executives from the world of business to participate in the Leadership Lecture Series to share their experiences and expertise with a select group of business students and other members of the campus community. The session includes a short presentation by the visiting professional and an opportunity for informal interaction between the executives and students.

Doug Braunstein, chief financial officer, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Nov. 3, 2011

Terry Lundgren, chairman, president and chief executive officer Macy’s, Inc., Sept. 20, 2011

Janie Hendrix, president and chief executive officer, Experience Hendrix, Sept. 27, 2011  

Steve Stoute, founder and CEO of Translation, March 28, 2012 S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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Morehouse in the

NEWS n April 30, 2011, Afro Times HOW HBCUS HAVE LEARNED TO GO GREEN The commitment to going green on HBCU campuses is not an easy one, but with ambassadors like alumnus Markese Bryant ’10, the success rate for these campus initiatives is steadily improving. Bryant works for Green for All, an Oakland, California-based organization that works to advance a clean energy economy as a solution to both environmental

and economic challenges and coordinates the HBCU Green Ambassadors internship program, which trains and supports students organizing sustainability initiatives at HBCU campuses. n May 1, 2011, “CBS Sports” SUNRISE TO SUNSET: A PGA PROFESSIONAL’S LIFE Morehouse Head Golf Coach Bill Lewis was featured during this “CBS Sports” special, which aired nationally on the CBS Network. Lewis, who is a certified PGA Golf professional, was profiled in the special for his contributions to the Morehouse golf program, as well as his work with First Tee of Atlanta, a program geared toward providing affordable and accessible instructions along with educational programming for youth through the game of golf in

the greater Atlanta area.

n May 18, 2011, Focus Daily News (“NBC Nightly News,” Atlanta Journal Constitution, WXIA-TV, WSB-TV, WAG-TV, WGCL-TV) MOREHOUSE GRADUATES FIRST RENAISSANCE CLASS Four years ago, when he took the helm of the presidency, Robert M. Franklin ’75 stood before members of the freshman class and challenged them, as Renaissance Men, to take their place in the world. On Sunday, May 15, 2011, nearly 500 graduates became the first Renaissance class to graduate under Franklin’s vision. n August 15, 2011, JET magazine COLLEGE BOUND Jet profiled some of the innovative new courses and programs on HBCU campuses for fall 2011. Featured in this article was

Morehouse College’s new Cinema, Television and Emerging Media Studies Program, also known as CTEMS. The new [program] allows students to follow in the footsteps of alumni Spike Lee, Samuel L. Jackson and Bill Nunn. It includes a screenwriting workshop and a lecture series on black men, black boys and the psychology of modern media. n September 11, 2011, USA Today MOREHOUSE HOWARD RENEW FOOTBALL RIVALRY IN WASHINGTON, D.C. The Nation’s Football Classic featuring a revival of the historic match-up between the Maroon Tigers and the Howard Bison drew media attention from across the nation. The event was cov-

n April 25, 2011, Crain’s Chicago Business

7 Over Seventy What’s age got to do with it? After decades in public life, Morehouse President Emeritus Walter E. Massey ‘58 was featured with six other Chicago leaders who still thrive to put power behind business and civic causes. The last thing Massey was expecting after retiring as president of Morehouse was to be another college president. But when the offer came to head up the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, he couldn’t resist. “I was stunned,” said Massey. “I wasn’t sure I’d fit into a school of art and design.” He, like many others, is bringing new meaning to the term “senior executives.” Photo: Crain’s / Credit: Erik Unger MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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insidethehouse ered in The Washington Post, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and TheRoot.com, as well as on several television and radio stations. n November 3, 2011, Florida Courier MOREHOUSE QUES GIVE $100,000 TO THEIR HBCU In celebration of its centennial, Psi chapter members of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., presented Morehouse with a $100,000 check to endow a scholarship at the school. Psi chapter celebrated its 90th anniversary in 2011.

n October 24, 2011, Newsweek Magazine

The Unlikely Rise of the Anti-Obama: Yes We Cain! As alumnus Herman Cain’ 68 rose through the ranks to top the GOP presidential candidates list, media attention followed. Cain was profiled, featured and interviewed on every major national media outlet, as well as in hundreds of local and regional outlets. It was a cover story for political powerhouse Newsweek magazine as it and others tried to dissect the meteoric rise of the self-named American Black Conservative (ABC). “…By the magic of his personality, a preacher-bred speaking style, a bootstrap personal narrative, and a catchy name for a tax overhaul, the ABC was back at the hotel as a frontrunner against the perpetually unexciting Mitt Romney,” the article stated.

n December 2011, “O” The Oprah Winfrey Magazine

The Ripple Effect In 1989, when Oprah started a scholarship fund at Morehouse, her goal was to help a few young men earn their degrees. Her generosity set off a chain reaction of giving that continues today.

Several alumni and students are paying it forward by

giving back in their own communities, and the people they Courtesy: HARPO, Inc.

help are now helping.

n May 27, 2011, Diverse Issues in Higher Education

Oprah’s Generosity Spurs Morehouse Scholarship Recipients When Oprah bade farewell to her audience after 25 years of “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” little did she know that she would have 300 Sons of Oprah to help her say goodbye. These Morehouse Men graced the staged during the “Surprise Spectacular Finale” to say thank you to the queen of talk for all she’s done for them. Oprah remains the College’s top individual donor, having given $12 million to support the Oprah Winfrey Scholarship. Countless national media outlets covered the Morehouse segment across every media platform, including CASE Currents, the organ for the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.

For more on the story go to: http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Ripple-Effect-ofOne-Act-of-Kindness-Oprah-Scholarship.

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E M O H

G N I M O C

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Party at the ‘House Nobody puts on a Homecoming like Morehouse. And that’s not just thousands of Morehouse Men and students talking. The Center for HBCU Media Advocacy in its HBCU Awards in 2011 listed Morehouse among the top eight HBCU homecomings. With an unrivaled tailgating experience, mixers, golf outings, balls and of course an exciting clash on the gridiron—the ‘House party that annually draws more than 20,000 alumni, students and staff from Morehouse and Spelman is worthy of the claim. This year’s speakers included two Morehouse Men. Lamell McMorris ‘95, founder and CEO of Perennial Strategy Group and managing parter of Perennial Law Group in Washington, D.C., and the Rev. Kevin Johnson ‘96, senior pastor of Bright Hope Baptist Church in Philadelphia, were featured speakers for Crown Forum and Sunday Service, respectively. Crowned Miss Maroon and White was Lauren Wicker, with her court, First Attendant Ashley Calloway and Second Attendant Jessica Williams. n

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onthefieldandcourt Jerome Singleton ’11 Aiming to Blunt the Blade Runner Again Paralympic sprint duel with Oscar Pistorius could be a highlight of the summer By Phil Minshull, Special to Universal Sports (printed with permission)

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t is already one of the most eagerly anticipated sporting clashes of the summer – former Morehouse sprinter Jerome Singleton ’11 vs. Oscar Pistorius at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London this summer. It will be Paralympics’ version of the match up between Tyson Gay and Usain Bolt that is expected to happen a few weeks earlier at the Olympic Games. The two heavyweights of Paralympic sprinting will be sparring for supremacy and the rather gross moniker, which both men graciously acknowledge, of being the fastest amputee on the planet. In a contrast of skills, Pistorius’ true talent lies over one lap of the track while Singleton is more of a pure dash man. However, Pistorius competes over 100 meters and 200 meters at Paralympic championships and was dominant over all the three distances from 2008 until Singleton, who is just a few months older than the South African, beat his rival over 100 meters at the IPC Athletics World Championships in New Zealand in January 2011. The long-range view is that Singleton should be the favorite in the 100 meters while Pistorius could dominate over 200 meters at the Paralympics. He inflicted a comprehensive defeat on Singleton in New Zealand, flying around the furlong in 21.80 seconds, while Singleton was nearly a second in arrears despite setting a personal best of 22.77. Nevertheless, don’t count against Singleton defying the odds over the longer distance. After all, he’s

Jerome Singleton ’11 and Oscar Pistorius (right) will race to earn the title of the fastest amputee on the planet.

been doing it for much of his life. “I hope, through my actions, I can inspire others to push themselves to greater heights. I may not have a foot, but I do have a desire to succeed and help as many people as I can in the process,” said Singleton recently. His desire turned a crushing 200 meters loss at the World Championships into victory when he raced Pistorius again a few days later and Singleton has been working hard since to improve in his second event. There are similarities about the routes that Singleton and Pistorius took to the top. Singleton grew up in Irmo, S.C., but, having been born without a fibula in his right leg, doctors amputated that limb below the knee when he was 18 months old. The parents of Pistorius, who hails from near Johannesburg, faced a similar situation, the only difference being that he had to undergo a double amputation at 11 months as neither leg had a lower-leg bone. Despite their disadvantages, both men held their own with their ablebodied counterparts in high school sport. Singleton excelled at football and basketball while Pistorius was a star at rugby and tennis. The pair then, continents apart, decided during their early days at university that track was their future. Now their parallel paths are set to converge once again in London. n Singleton was a triple major in math, physics and industrial engineering at Morehouse and attended the University of Michigan as part of the College’s Dual Degree Engineering program. While at Morehouse, he discovered the Paralympic movement as he researched trends in biomedical engineering.

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TIGERS vs. BISON

2nd Annual AT&T Nation’s Football Classic on Sept. 1

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ast year, the Morehouse football team lost a close game to Howard University. This year the Maroon Tigers are out to avenge that defeat in the 2nd Annual AT&T Nation’s Football Classic. This year’s game takes place on Sept. 1 at 3:30 p.m. in Washington, D.C.’s RFK Stadium. At least 40,000 fans are again expected to fill the stands of RFK Stadium, where Howard narrowly defeated Morehouse 30-27 last year.

But the Labor Day weekend matchup will not be only about football. A number of events will be held, including the Morehouse and Howard debate teams in their second annual debate on Friday, Aug. 31. An HBCU alumni networking reception and an official Welcome Party will be held that evening. The Pepsi Max Fan Festival takes place before the game kicks off on Sept. 1, while an official After Party allows fans to come together after the game. The weekend closes with a Chapel Service at Howard University. n

For a full schedule of events, information about tickets and hotel accommodations, go to www.nationsfootballclassic.com.

2012 MOREHOUSE MAROON TIGERS FOOTBALL SCHEDULE SEPTEMBER 1 8 15 22 29

Howard University (AT&T Nation’s Football Classic) Edward Waters College Winston Salem State University (2nd Annual Cleveland Classic) Lane College Clark Atlanta University

Washington, D.C. Jacksonville, Fla. Cleveland, Ohio B.T. Harvey Stadium Atlanta, Ga.

3:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

Columbus, Ga. B.T. Harvey Stadium Columbia, S.C. B.T. Harvey Stadium

2 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 2 p.m.

B.T. Harvey Stadium

2 p.m.

OCTOBER 6 13 20 27

Tuskegee University (77th Annual Tuskegee-Morehouse Classic) Albany State University Benedict College Fort Valley State University (Homecoming 2012)

NOVEMBER 3

Kentucky State University

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ontheshelf Hello, Maroon Tiger!

WRITTEN BY EARL COOPER ’11 AND ILLUSTRATED BY CHASE MCKESSON ‘13 PUBLISHED BY MASCOT BOOKS EARL COOPER’S AUNT once saw a children’s book about Penn State University. She asked Cooper, a member of the class of 2011, why there wasn’t one about Morehouse. “So I contacted the publishing company and we ended up working on it,” he said. The result is Hello, Maroon Tiger!, an illustrated children’s book that follows a day in the life of the Maroon Tiger mascot as he walks through campus on his way to a football game. Along the way, he introduces young readers to campus landmarks, buildings and historic areas. Cooper wrote the text while junior Chase McKesson illustrated the book. “I like the book because it’s teaching kids at a young age about Morehouse,” Cooper said. “It’s planting the seed. It’s also a recruiting tool. I have a 7-year-old nephew that I can’t wait to see read the book. “Morehouse is such a unique and wonderful place,” he said. “Now I feel like that’s my job – to tell the youth about it and let them know there is a great place in Atlanta and [the College is] doing wonderful things and its geared towards black men.” Cooper said Morehouse was instrumental in his goal of becoming a professional golfer. He was a member of the Maroon Tiger golf team that won consecutive Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference titles from 2009 to 2011. “Morehouse has helped me tremendously,” he said. “I really appreciate Morehouse.” Hello, Maroon Tiger! is available at www.mascotbook.com and in the Morehouse College bookstore.

Sweet Sixteen: Great Colleges of the South BY JOHN PULLEY PUBLISHED BY THE ASSOCIATED COLLEGES OF THE SOUTH   The Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) has recently published Sweet Sixteen: Great Colleges of the South, a book featuring the distinctive characteristics of the 16 colleges and universities that are members of the ACS. The book is written by veteran journalist John Pulley. The chapter on Morehouse highlights both the College’s past—saying that Morehouse is a “singularly historic institution”—and its future. It focused on the ideals of President Robert M. Franklin’s Renaissance Men, including his vision. “In the age of globalization, Morehouse has evolved to broaden students’ international perspectives, their appreciation of other cultures, a keen understanding of geopolitics and insights into the new ways in which businesses operate across borders,” it states. In 1991, these premier Southern liberal arts colleges and universities collaborated in an effort to strengthen their programs and have now enhanced opportunities for 30,000 students on their campuses, offered numerous professional development programs for 3,000 faculty in the association and assisted staff by bringing them together to share valuable lessons form their campus experiences. The book gives the reader an up-close and personal look at each member institution.

Editor’s Note: This column is open to Morehouse alumni, faculty and staff who have recently published books. Please contact Add Seymour Jr. at aseymour@morehouse.edu to submit your work. MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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developmentnews Wisconsin Scholars Program to Address Low Black Male Achievement Rate

I Robert Youngjohns, president of Microsoft North America, talks to Morehouse students.

Morehouse Builds Alliance with Microsoft

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lready a national leader in producing black males in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), Morehouse is currently negotiating an education alliance agreement with Microsoft that is sure to increase the pipeline of Morehouse students pursuing STEM and business careers. As part of the leadership lecture series, Robert Youngjohns, president of Microsoft North America, visited campus on February 2, 2012, to talk with the top 50 STEM students about how they can prepare for careers in the technology industry. His impressions of Morehouse students underscore Microsoft’s decision to select Morehouse as the first HBCU participant in this alliance opportunity. “These students are among the best and brightest in the nation,” he said. “I hope to one day transition these bright young minds into Microsoft careers.” “I hope to one day Several students have been invited to interview for the 2012 Microsoft Academy transition these for College Hires Program (MACH), a bright young highly selective, accelerated career-developminds into ment program for new hires at Microsoft. Microsoft careers.” As part of the emerging alliance, -Robert Youngjohns Microsoft hosted Morehouse STEM students, including John Hopps Research Scholars, in its headquarters in Washington, D.C., and Paris, France. In 2011, two teams of Morehouse STEM students advanced to the second round of Microsoft’s Imagine Cup, an international student competition where students create technology solutions to help solve some of the world’s toughest problems. Devon Nicholson ’13, an English major and Japanese minor, was selected to serve as a Morehouse ambassador for the company, introducing the campus and surrounding community to the latest in Microsoft technology. n –KJI

n Wisconsin, where black male educational achievement ranks among the lowest in the nation, key members of the state’s corporate and foundation community have partnered with Morehouse to create the Wisconsin Scholars Program. Beginning in 2012, up to 20 young men from the state will receive a $25,000 scholarship to attend “It will Morehouse and to participate in change this leadership development and summer community by college preparatory opportunities. The program stands to have a great bringing strong, impact on Milwaukee, where the well-educated high school graduation rate for black young African males is only 31 percent, compared to American 66 percent of white males. “So many of our young men work men back to hard and need just that one opportunity Milwaukee.” for success to keep moving their lives for-Gregory Thornton ward in a positive direction,” said Gregory Thornton, superintendent of Milwaukee Public Schools. “The Morehouse Wisconsin Scholars Program offers them that chance.” “We believe this will be a life-changing experience for our students who are selected to participate in this program.  It will change this community, as well, by bringing strong, well-educated young African American men back to Milwaukee where their success will continue and influence others,” he said. Baseball hall of fame legend Hank Aaron and his wife, Billye, both longtime supporters of Morehouse and former Milwaukee residents, played a key role in the development of the program. Mrs. Aaron is also a member of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees. The Aarons, together with their close friend John Daniels, a Milwaukee businessman and attorney, helped introduce members of the Morehouse College fundraising team to key players in Milwaukee’s business and leadership community. Morehouse’s vision is to increase educational opportunities for black males from underserved areas across the nation. “The Wisconsin program is a pilot initiative that we hope to roll out to other cities with low black male achievement rates,” said Julie Sills, director of Corporate and Foundation Relations at Morehouse. n –KJI S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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developmentnews

First Lady’s Scholarship Fund Establishes a Legacy that Ensures a Healthier Future

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ver the past five years, the Dr. Cheryl G. Franklin Health Professions Scholarship Fund has raised $392,853 and supported the education of 52 students who have demonstrated a commitment to the health professions. It is a legacy of support and encouragement that the College’s first lady can be proud of as her husband, President Robert M. Franklin ’75, prepares to step down after five years at the helm of Morehouse. First Lady Cheryl Franklin, a practicing OB/GYN physician, has used her medical expertise and passion to not only help deserving men of Morehouse finance their education, but also by participating in the annual Morehouse College Breast Cancer Awareness Walk. The scholarship—which is targeted toward juniors and seniors who have an interest in pursuing health-related professional careers—has had a lasting impact on the education of future health professionals during a critical point in their studies, offering some an avenue to completing their Morehouse degrees without distraction, as well as rewarding scholars for their high academic standing and strong potential for significant contribution to healthcare. This year’s 11 new scholars have aspirations that range from pursuing dentistry to pediatrics, and from stem cell research to cardiothoracic surgery. Despite the different areas of study, the scholars share a common goal: to bring quality healthcare to underserved communities. “I eventually want to build and run a hospital in an area that has a high need for it,” said junior Matthew Ellis. “I am focusing on building it in Africa. To me, health has to be a

Dr. Cheryl G. Franklin receives flowers of appreciation from her scholars.

holistic concept, and one has to treat mind, body and spirit with not just medicines, but also through the basic necessities of life.” Sophomore Kadar Vannoy, who received the Dr. Warner E. Meadows Jr. ’52 and Dr. Calvin A. Brown Jr. ’52 Memorial Scholarship, plans to become a pediatrician because he believes in early healthcare intervention. “It is my aspiration to serve underrepresented communities by providing efficient, dedicated and affordable service,” he said. “As a young boy, I was responsible for caring for my younger siblings and as a result, I acknowledge the fervency of helping others early in life.” n –VGH 2012 DR. CHERYL G. FRANKLIN HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARS Qaadir King-McAlpin Jamaji Nwanaji-Enwerem Brandon Lynch Adam Lawrence Johnson Isaac Maison Matthew Ellis Jason Gaines James Evan Bailey

The Franklins with the 2012 Dr. Cheryl G. Franklin Health Professions Scholars. MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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Aaron-Albert Hargrove Bryan K. McElderry Dr. Warner E. Meadows Jr. ’52 and Dr. Calvin A. Brown Jr. ’52 Memorial Scholarship Kadar Vannoy


developmentnews 2012 SCHOLARSHIP DONORS Mrs. Billye Aaron and Mr. Henry Aaron Ms. Diane Alexander Atty. Avarita Hanson and Dr. William A. Alexander Mr. Joseph Arrington Mrs. Mary Bailey and Dr. Angelo Bailey Mrs. Jessica Barber Mrs. Kathleen Bertrand Dr. Juliet D. Blackburn-Beamon The Rev. Dr. Timothy T. Boddie Mrs. Mildred Brickler and Mr. Alexander Brickler Mr. James Burks Mrs. Joy San W. Brown Mrs. Susan Carmen and Dr. Darrell Carmen Mrs. Tiffani Carter Mrs. Marianne Clarke Mrs. Verna Jennings Cleveland Mrs. Tanya Coleman Dr. Millard Collier, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Dubois Cook Dr. and Mrs. William Cooper Dr. Kaneta Lott Cuffie and Atty. Thomas Cuffie Mrs. Juliette Rhodes-Cummings Mrs. Ruth Crawford Dr. Yvette Crossing Dr. Truddie Edwards Darden and Atty. Alvin Darden Dr. Michael Darden Mrs. Cheryl D’Auria and Mr. Thomas D’Auria Dr. and Mrs. Francis D. Davis Mrs. Jea Delsarte and Mr. Louis Delsarte Dr. and Mrs. James F. Densler Mr. George Akin Doe Mrs. Hillary Dunson and Dr. Bernee Dunson Mrs. Jo Roberson Edwards Mr. Norman Elliot Mrs. Hazel Ellison Mrs. Delores Epps Drs. Robert and Cheryl Goffney Franklin Drs. Gregory Gibson and Michelle Nichols Mrs. Yvonne King Gloster Mrs. Maxine Goosby Ms. Anita S. Gordon, DDS Mrs. Rose Green

Dr. Billie Greer Mrs. Patricia Greer and Mr. Ernest Greer Drs. Nick and Kyra Harvey Mrs. Marjorie Harvey and Mr. Steve Harvey Mrs. Muriel Hepburn Mrs. Patsy Jo Hilliard Mrs. Audrey Hines and Mr. Ernie Hines Drs. Lynn and Carol Hogue Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Hollis, Jr. Mrs. Sylvia Hutchins Mrs. Sally Jobe Mrs. Joyce Finch-Johnson Mrs. Sondra Rhodes-Johnson and Atty. Charles Johnson III Dr. Sylvia C. Johnson Drs. Herbert and Bess Jones Mrs. Marian Smith Jordan Mrs. Desiree McCarthy-Keith Mr. and Mrs. Warren Lee Mrs. Lorna Lindsay and Dr. Michael Lindsay Mrs. Su So Longman Ms. Wonya Lucas Mr. Robert Mallett Dr. and Mrs. John Maupin Dr. and Mrs. Calvin McLarin Mrs. Aissa Holliday McDaniel and Mr. Brian McDaniel Mrs. Linda Kenney-Miller and Mr. Dennis Miller Dr. and Mrs. Terry Mills Mrs. Prentice Monroe and Mr. Henry Monroe Mrs. Cynthia Moreland and Mr. Ira Moreland Mrs. Marlene Moss and Mr. Jim Moss Drs. Chamberlain and Elizabeth Obialo Mrs. Rose Palmer Mrs. Vicki Palmer Mrs. Loretta Parham Mrs. Patricia Pattillo and Dr. Roland Pattillo Mrs. Mary Peters and Mr. Ronald Peters Mrs. Rosemary B. Phillips Mrs. Valerie Price and Dr. McKinley Price Ms. Ruth Ramsey Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice and Mr. Melvin Rice Ms. Violet T. Ricks, Esq. Mr. Thomas G. Sampson, Esq.

Dr. and Mrs. David Satcher Mr. Jack Sawyer Mrs. Barbara Scarlett and Mr. Earle Scarlett Mrs. Delores Shelton and Dr. Lee Shelton Mrs. Fawn Shelton Drs. W. Bruce and Marian Shropshire Drs. DeRoyce and Kimberly Simmons Dr. Harvey B. Smith Dr. Jane E. Smith Mrs. Lynore H. Stewart Mrs. Ginger Sullivan and Dr. Louis Sullivan Mrs. Nedra Farrar-Swift Drs. Ava Bell and Eldred Taylor Mrs. Cecilia Houston-Torrence Mrs. Janet Turner and Dr. Dennis Turner Mrs. Denise Tyson and Mr. Bernard Tyson Mr. Emmanuel Walker Dr. Jacqueline Washington Mrs. Karon Williams and Mr. Jerome Williams Dr. Phillip C. Williams Mrs. Deirdre Woods and Mr. Eddie Woods Mrs. Sandra Woods Ms. Sabrina Shannon and Mr. Christopher Womack Dr. Asa G. Yancey, Jr. Mrs. Laurel Yancey and Dr. Arthur Yancey Dr. Carolyn L. Yancey Mrs. Evonne Yancey Mrs. Harriette Yancey CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION DONORS Advanced Healthcare Leaders Grady Health Foundation Taylor Medical Group The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Kaiser Permanente of Georgia W3 Busines and Tax Consultants, Inc. Delta Air Lines, Inc. Jackmont Hospitality

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Sons

of Oprah 300 Morehouse Men raise $378,000 to pay forward Winfrey’s generosity By Kai Jackson-Issa

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developmentnews

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f all the moments in the farewell spectacular to her show last year, Oprah Winfrey called the Morehouse segment “my all-time favorite moment of all time.” For the 300 Morehouse Men who streamed down the aisles of Chicago’s United Center—each bearing a lit candle in tribute to the woman who made their dreams of a college education possible—the experience was unforgettable. “It was amazing to me that Oprah cared enough about me as an individual, someone she didn’t know, to help me get through school and accomplish my dreams, and it was absolutely amazing that I had the chance to meet her in person and tell her thank you,” said Van Adamson ’01, who is now a cardiologist and major in the U.S. Air Force. “To be in Chicago and honor this great woman who performed this great act of generosity toward us, it was absolutely amazing—it was indescribable,” said Rob Eskridge ’02, an Ohio assistant attorney general who graduated with a degree in sociology and mathematics. After his first year at Morehouse, Eskridge

ran out of funds and was on the verge of leaving school. The school’s financial aid director, who recognized his drive and determination, handed him a letter. “And I looked at the letter and it said I was awarded a scholarship, paid for retroactive. It took care of loans taken out my first year, paid for by Oprah Winfrey,” Eskridge said. “[It said] that I was an Oprah Winfrey Scholar, and it blew my mind.” The Oprah Scholars decided to honor Oprah’s legacy of giving by paying it forward. The newly christened Sons of Oprah pledged to raise $300,000 in scholarship funds. By July 2011, the scholars had raised $350,000 for the Oprah Winfrey Endowed Scholarship Fund—$50,000 above their goal. Winfrey is currently the College’s top donor, having given a total of $12 million since she instituted the fund in 1989. She has educated 415 Morehouse Men, a number that surprised her. “I didn’t know I had educated that many Morehouse Men. When people talk about it, I always say, ‘I have one hundred men at Morehouse,’” she said, reflecting on the farewell spectacular in Season 25: Oprah Behind the Scenes that aired on OWN (Oprah Winfrey Network). >

When you empower a black man...

You light up the world. ” -Oprah Winfrey

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developmentnews While a fitting tribute to Oprah’s generosity, paying it forward is deeply embedded in the Morehouse tradition, said President Robert M. Franklin ’75. “Central to the Morehouse ethos is the notion of lifting others as you climb,” he said during a CNN interview. Speaking to some of the scholars who gathered in Chicago for the Oprah event, he commended the men for passing on Oprah’s gift. “You are doing something extraordinary with your presence and generosity to another scholarship fund inspired by Oprah,” he said. “This is a ‘generative’ form of philanthropy. Oprah has educated more than 400 Morehouse Men, and now you will help educate a new generation of men.” The December 2011 issue of O Magazine featured an article on how Oprah Scholars are “Paying it Forward” in their lives and professions. “I have the awesome responsibility of knowing that Oprah made a sacrifice for me, so, in turn, I had to be about the business of doing that in my life,” said Shaka Rasheed ’93, one of the first Oprah Scholars. Rasheed came to Morehouse with a father in prison and a mother raising three sisters in the inner city. He was a struggling sophomore holding two summer jobs when he received his Oprah Scholarship. Today, he is a senior hedge fund manager for J.P. Morgan. Along with Rasheed, Imar Hutchins ’92, an attorney in New York, and E. Robbie Robinson ’98, a Chicago investment firm executive, made up the small band of brothers who spearheaded the “Sons of Oprah” Campaign. As of March 2011, the Sons of Oprah fund has grown to $378,000, with a goal of contributing $1.2 million by 2014. Combined with the Oprah Scholars fund, 71 promising students are currently receiving the funds they need to complete their Morehouse education. Every year, Morehouse loses students because they fall short on their tuition by an average of $8,000. “Fourteen hundred dollars almost kept me from staying at Morehouse,” said Rasheed. “I want other alumni to know that little gifts matter, and big gifts help; that we can help provide a life-changing experience in young men’s lives.” n MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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What Oprah Scholars are doing today

Ashley B. Stewart ’03

Baltimore, Maryland Director of the Baltimore City Comprehensive Community Initiative to Advance Summer Learning

Todd L. Campbell ’95

Atlanta, Georgia Compliance Officer at Herndon Capital Management

E. Robbie Robinson ’98

Oluwabusayo “Tope” Folarin ’04

Kevin R. Johnson ’96

Shaka Ameen Amir Rasheed ’93

Chicago, Illinois Founding Principal of BDT Capital Partners

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The fifth senior pastor of the nationally renowned Bright Hope Baptist Church

Imar L. Hutchins ’92

Washington, D.C. Real estate developer, entrepreneur, artist and attorney

London, England The College’s third Rhodes Scholar, which allowed him to earn two master’s degrees from England’s Oxford University

Chicago, Illinois Manager of a multi-billion-dollar hedge fund

Brandon L. Douglas ‘09

New York, New York Co-founder of Bridging the Gap, a scholarship fund that has helped 45 South African students pay their $150 yearly tuition


developmentnews Reuben Cannon Encourages Aspiring Filmmaker to ‘Perfect Craft’

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tephen Love’s future plans to become a filmmaker is coming into focus. Love, a senior, helped found the Morehouse Filmmakers Association (MFA) in 2010. Not long after, the College launched its Cinema, Television and Emerging Media Studies program (CTEMS). The association now has nearly 100 members, many of whom are enrolled in CTEMS. Then in October 2011, MFA and CTEMS collaborated to bring legendary casting director and producer Reuben Cannon to campus for the inaugural master class for CTEMS. Held at the Executive Conference Center in the Bank of America Auditorium, the aptly titled “Candid with Cannon” conversation offered Love and his classmates an up-close and personal opportunity to engage with one of Hollywood’s most revered and respected industry titans. Cannon shared his insights on how to get discovered in one of the most lucrative, yet elusive of career fields – the film and television industry.

“Being discovered is simply expanding the light on someone who was doing it all along,” he said. “Perfect your craft,” he said, stressing that “being good at what you do” paves the true road to success. Love was able to talk personally with Cannon about his future aspirations in film. Cannon urged him to consider applying to the prestigious Peter Stark Producing Program at the University of Southern California. Love applied and was admitted to the selective program, which only admits 25 students per year. He is the first Morehouse student to be accepted into the program. According to Terry Mills, the CTEMS program administrator who wrote the grant to the Mellon Foundation that yielded $450,000 to plan and implement CTEMS, this type of aspiration is behind the program’s creation. “Considering the impact and direction of cinema, television and media within society in general, it is important to have CTEMS as a major because it helps us to influence a conversation of who and how we are across mediums

Reuben Cannon and Stephen Love ’12

that still have problems in considering us as whole persons,” said Mills. David Wall Rice ’95, assistant professor of psychology who co-directs CTEMS with Stephane Dunn, assistant professor of English, concurs: “CTEMS allows us to establish conversations and paradigms that contribute to the story and fabric of who ‘we’ are, however we might define ‘we’ to be,” he said. The next phase of development for CTEMS, slated for fall 2012, is Studio M, a sound stage and digital media editing facility that will be located in Brawley Hall. n

The Follett Higher Education Group Donates $125,000 The Follett Higher Education Group, which runs the Morehouse College Bookstore, has donated a total of $125,000 to the Morehouse College Renaissance Now campaign for student scholarships. On Feb. 2, Follett presented Morehouse with a check for $25,000. Pictured from left to right: Follett Regional Manager Jim Cope; Julie Sills, Morehouse’s director of Corporate and Foundation Relations; Steve Pribyl, Follett executive vice president; Ralph Johnson, Morehouse’s chief procurement officer and associate vice president for Procurement and Contracts; Follett President Tom Christopher; Phillip Howard ‘87, Morheouse’s vice president for Institutional Advancement; Howard Taylor, Follett vice president-Eastern Region; and Cedric Hughes, manager of the Morehouse College Bookstore. One month later on March 15, Follett’s Cope, Taylor, Hughes and Jennifer Hatton, group vice president-Eastern Region presented President Robert M. Franklin ‘75, Johnson and vendor specialist Clayton Monroe with a $100,000 check for the campaign.

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Renaissance Legacy

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Valedictorian Camron Yarber ’11 said first class of Renaissance Men will change the world.

Class of 2011 is First to Matriculate All Four Years Under President Franklin By VICKIE G. HAMPTON

If Camron Yarber, valedictorian for the Class of 2011, has it right, then President

Graduates

Robert M. Franklin ’75 will consider this year’s graduating class—the first class to matriculate all four years under his tutelage—a personal success.

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commencement 2011

“I’ve been privileged to share your company, stand shoulder to shoulder to share your dreams and your hopes,” –President Robert M. Franklin ’75

“We assure our family, our friends, teachers, administrators, mentors, our president that we as godly men, we as Renaissance Men, will change this world for the better forever,” said Yarber during his valedictory. Four years ago, this class entered Morehouse with an inaugural speech from a new president that was resonating throughout campus. In a speech titled “Let Us Make Men,” President Franklin shared his vision of a Morehouse Renaissance where students would be “broadly educated and conversant with the classic texts and the large questions that define the disciplines in the arts and sciences.” From fresh-

men to seniors, they have been steeped in what has become popularized as The Five Wells: well-spoken, well-read, welltraveled, well-dressed and wellbalanced. Yarber is a fine example of the Renaissance Man Franklin called for them to become. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and Beta Gama Sigma International Honor Society. He also received the E.B. Williams Award as the top business administration major. In 2013, he will work toward an MBA in the Harvard Business School 2+2 Program. Meanwhile, many of his classmates are headed to top institutions like Stanford,

The portrait unveiling of The Rev. W. Franklin Richardson, senior pastor of Grace Baptist Church in Mount Vernon, N.Y., during the Baccalaureate service. MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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Columbia and Harvard. “I’ve been privileged to share your company, stand shoulder to shoulder to share your dreams and your hopes,” said President Franklin. “Together we have discovered Mother Morehouse, enjoyed Morehouse and raged at her, sometimes all in the same day. We will cherish for the rest of our lives these Renaissance years that we have shared together.” Morehouse brought two veteran professionals to the Commencement podium this year: Gwen Ifill, moderator/managing editor of PBS’s “Washington Week,” and Charles J. Ogletree, the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law at the Harvard Law School. Both speakers reminded the freshly minted Morehouse Men of the responsibilities they had inherited. “[Previous generations] have sacrificed for us,” Ogletree said. “It’s up to the men of Morehouse, the class of 2011, to stand up and sacrifice for those who follow.” Ifill, who became the first black woman to host a vice presidential debate, said Morehouse men must illuminate societal ills. “It’s your responsibility to shine a light, the light of justice, the light of understanding, in the world. And it’s as necessary as it can be satisfying. That’s what we expect of Morehouse Men.” Ifill and Morehouse College trustee Billye Aaron (wife of baseball Hall of Famer Hank Aaron) were each given an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, while Ogletree and board chairman Willie “Flash” Davis ’56 were both presented the honorary Doctor of Laws. n –Add Seymour Jr. reported for this article

Last Female Graduate is Proud to be a Morehouse Woman

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ary Robinson Spivey is proud to tell anyone that she is a 1933 graduate of Morehouse College. Yes, she. Spivey is the last of 33 women who entered and graduated from the College between 1929 and 1933 (no women have been admitted since then). She briefly attended Atlanta University, but wanted to go to Morehouse, where her mother had taken a few first-aid and nursing courses around 1909. “I told my mother, ‘I just got to go to [Morehouse]’” Spivey said. “So she talked to President Samuel Archer. He knew her. After she talked with him about it, he said, ‘Let me think about it.’ He thought about it and let me go there. I was kind of scared when I first went, but everybody was so nice. I had no problems.” Nearly all of the women who attended Morehouse back then took evening classes. The only one who didn’t was Spivey, who back then was Mary Cecelia Robinson. And she gave the men a run for their money. “[A statistics teacher put a problem] on the board and told us to work it out. I said ‘Oh, I got this.’ He came back and said, ‘Men, you all should be ashamed of yourselves. You let this lady come in here and just run rings around you.’ They couldn’t do anything but look at me and shake their heads.” After graduation, Spivey went to graduate school at Atlanta University and also did graduate work at Peabody College, the University of Chicago and Western Reserve University (now Case Western Reserve University). She had a long career in education. Among her accomplishments, Spivey was named Teacher of the Year by the Atlanta Public Schools. She was Dr. Marcellus Barksdale ’65 escorts Mary Robinson Spivey ’33, the College’s sole living lauded at Selma College as one of the teachers female graduate on stage. who gave her time to help Selma get certified to go from being a junior college to a four-year institution. Along with being the College’s sole living female graduate, Spivey also was the oldest graduate attending Commencement. Since her original diploma was lost, the College presented her with a replacement. “Morehouse is a place that gave you drive,” Spivey said. “Nobody had to drive you to do it. You did it on your own. And I got that at Morehouse. They taught you at Morehouse and I think they are still doing the same thing today, because the College has turned out a lot of good men.” And a few good women, too. –Add Seymour Jr.

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commencement 2011 With the turn of a tassel, a man of Morehouse becomes a Morehouse Man...

Baccalaureate speaker The Rev. Frederick Douglas Haynes III, senior pastor of Friendship-West Baptist Church of Dallas, Texas.

Baccalaureate Speaker Tells Class of 2011 to ‘Defy the Concrete’ DURING THE BACCALAUREATE address, The Rev. Frederick Douglas Haynes III, senior pastor of Friendship-West Baptist Church in Dallas, Texas, drew inspiration from rapper Tupac Shakur’s poem, “A Rose Out of Concrete.” “As [Tupac] was making his way through the heart of the hood in East Oakland and came across a rose, it was blossoming out of the sidewalk, out of the concrete,” Haynes said. “This rose was blossoming where it should not have been. It was an impossible situation, but the rose stood there declaring, ‘I’m going to blossom anyhow because what God put in me is greater than the concrete slab that was above me.’ “So I say to every Morehouse brother, as you move across the stage tomorrow, there are some concrete circumstances trying to tell you what you cannot do. But if the God above you is within you, you can handle the concrete that comes at you.” “The Baccalaureate service allows seniors to recognize spirituality as a fundamental enterprise in the liberal arts education,” said Lawrence E. Carter Sr., dean of the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel. “Religion and faith play integral roles in adding meaningful depth to the human experience. What you are, the world is. And without your transformation there can be no transformation of the world.” (Starting at top left) Commencement speakers Gwen Ifill, moderator/managing editor of PBS’s “Washington Week,” Charles J. Ogletree, the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law at the Harvard Law School; Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters recipient Billye Aaron, member of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees; Honorary Doctor of Laws recipient Willie “Flash” Davis ‘56; Exuberant family members applaud their son’s success. S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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Photo used with permission from The Sphinx, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

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KING A mong Presidents

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Not far from where he delivered the iconic “I Have a Dream” speech, the powerful likeness of Martin Luther King Jr. ’48 towers toward the sky over the mall on Washington. There on a warm September Saturday, surrounded by hundreds of maroon-clad Morehouse alumni and friends, President Robert M. Franklin ’75 pointed to the crossed arms of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial.

By ADD SEYMOUR JR.

“A King among presidents,” Franklin said. “One who learned this stance that we see, singing (“Dear Old Morehouse”) in Sale Hall. So…[we] know where he learned to cross his arms this way. All he needs is two brothers on either side to hook it up.” Proud smiles shot across the faces of the Morehouse family. “This is a monument to peace and justice and an affirmation of the Morehouse leadership tradition that goes back to 1867. And now all of America participates in this moment and this great tradition,” Franklin said. The inspiring scene of black men locked arm in arm was one of two in which the Morehouse community commemorated the historic unveiling of the $120-million monument – the first for an African American or a private citizen – after decades of planning, fund raising and work. King’s Alpha Phi Alpha Inc., fraternity brothers first suggested a King

statue on the mall days after the Atlanta native was slain in 1968. The idea didn’t gain traction again until 1986 when several Alpha men sat around a table and dedicated themselves to making the King Memorial a reality. They garnered political and corporate support, as well as support from everyday Americans, to raise the money that got dirt turning for the project in 2009. “Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity members joined with communities across the country, federal and local governments and other hard working people around the world on a common goal – to build a memorial celebrating and honoring our brother and the world’s civil rights icon, Dr. King, and the ideas he upheld,” said Morehouse archivist Herman “Skip” Mason to a national audience on the day the monument was dedicated. Mason is general president of Alpha Phi Alpha, Fraternity, Inc. >

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Morehouse’s tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. ‘48 was a concert featuring Timeless Voices: Eddie Levert, Dennis Edwards and Johnny Gill.

Stevie Wonder performs during Morehouse’s concert and tribute to King in Washington, D.C.

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Morehouse College Glee Club greets King monument sculptor Lei Yixin.


king memorial dedication ‘Who Are Those Guys?’ The Morehouse family journeyed to Washington, D.C., on Sept. 10, 2011 for the inaugural AT&T Nation’s Football Classic, which pitted Morehouse against longtime rival, Howard University (Howard won a close game, 30-27). Hours before kickoff, hundreds of alumni, students, faculty, staff and friends were summoned to the foot of the King Memorial to pay homage to one of the College’s greatest graduates and the world’s drum major for peace. Word of the impromptu gathering spread quickly through email, social media and by word of mouth. By 11 a.m., cars, vans and buses were dropping off Morehouse Men. The National Park Service gave Morehouse a short amount of time to pay tribute to the one of the College’s most honored sons. Then, Morehouse Men stood at the foot of the Memorial’s Stone of Hope, locked arms and sang “Dear Old Morehouse.” “Holy spirit,” they sang as they bowed their heads together. Curious onlookers stopped taking photos of the King Memorial and began snapping photos of the sea of proud black men, locked arm-in-arm, singing loud and proud. “Who are those guys?” one couple asked. “They really seem close.”

‘Quite a wonderful sight’ Two weeks before the Nation’s Football Classic was to be played, one week of ceremonies were scheduled to precede the late August national unveiling and dedication of the King Memorial. Performing at some of those functions would be The Morehouse College Glee Club, which boarded a bus midweek for the long ride to D.C. But also headed towards D.C. was Hurricane Irene, a category 3 storm that packed winds of up to 120 miles per

Stevie Wonder (left) and Congressman John Conyers (D.-Mich.) were presented the Presidential Renaissance Medallion by the College for their work to honor King.

hour. The storm ended up killing 56 people throughout the Caribbean and eastern United States, leaving more than $10 billion in damage in its wake. The storm forced the postponement of the weekend of activities on the mall and left the Glee Club—which arrived in Washington, D.C., safely and performed at one function—without a dedication to attend. Before the storm was set to hit D.C. that Saturday evening, Glee Club Director David Morrow ’80 saw a window of opportunity for his group to hold its own ceremony. “I decided that I should at least allow the Glee Club members to see the King Memorial before we headed out of town in trying to beat the storm,” he said. “We stopped by the Memorial to visit for about 30 minutes and then got back on the bus. But then we decided to sing ‘Dear Old Morehouse’ in front of the Memorial. “Before we could finish the final verse, several other Morehouse Men who were also visiting rushed over, locked arms with us and joined in singing. By the time we got to verse three, it was quite a wonderful sight to see. We ended up singing something else because people had gathered.”

‘What a Tribute’ The leaves started to change and the evening fall chill began to set in on the D.C. area by the time the rescheduled King Memorial dedication weekend was to take place in mid-October. The hurricane that delayed the weekend of activities for the August statue unveiling also meant that a small army of Morehouse personnel in Washington preparing for the tribute concert in the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts had to postpone the show. With the unveiling activities rescheduled for October 14, scheduling conflicts forced the show to be moved to the beautiful Music Center at the Strathmore in suburban D.C. Befitting King, who loved music, a tribute to his work would come in song during The Morehouse College Memorial Concert and Tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. ’48. King’s legacy was lifted in song by R&B stalwarts Eddie Levert, Johnny Gill and Dennis Edwards—a threesome now known as Timeless Voices. The three had people singing and dancing in the aisles to songs such as “Just My Imagination” (Edwards was lead singer of The Temptations), Levert’s “Baby Hold Onto Me,” and Gill’s “Rub You the Right Way.”

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king memorial dedication

The King family includes (front row) Christine King Farris; Isaac Newton Farris Sr.; Naomi King; (back row) Jennifer Beal; Alveda King; Bernice King; Martin King III; Angela Watkins; and Farris Watkins

“I am honored to be part of this event,” Gill said afterwards. “Dr. King’s work has brought us this far, but there is still more to do. We hope and pray everyone can stand and work together along with those who are taking advantage of that great Morehouse education who are going to be on the forefront of continuing to carry on King’s legacy and opening the doors for generation to come.” The main purpose for the elegant affair, which was presented by the Northwestern Mutual Foundation, was to honor music legend Stevie Wonder and former Congressman John Conyers (D-Mich.). Both were given the Presidential Renaissance Medallion, the highest honor a Morehouse president can give, for their continuing work in honoring King. The award is presented to individuals who have proven their commitment to uplifting humanity and demonstrated excellence in all they do. Days after King’s 1968 death, Conyers filed a bill in Congress to make King’s birthday a federal holiday. The bill went nowhere. He and King’s wife, the late Coretta Scott King, continued to push for the holiday. He pulled together enough support so that by 1983, Congress passed the bill and President Ronald Reagan signed it into law. “This is a validation of all of the energy, the struggle, the resources, the commitment, the good days and those not so good that went into accomplishing a public holiday for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,” Conyers said MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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Greg Jones and Kimberley Goode of Northwestern Mutual Foundation, which sponsored the concert, honoree Congressman John Conyers, Morehouse Chairman of the Board of Trustees Bob Davidson’67 and master of ceremonies Avery Brooks

during the concert. “It became clear that this man deserved the first national holiday for an African American…and we succeeded. We got a holiday for Martin Luther King Jr. What a tribute. Now he stands in that sacred place in Washington, D.C. This great monument between [the] Washington and Lincoln [memorials] is for Martin Luther King Jr. What a tribute.” Wonder was one of the most vocal supporters for the idea of the King Holiday. The song he released in 1981 to commemorate the day, “Happy Birthday,” has become a January staple. “We could see the vision for the King Holiday, the King Monument and now we must have a vision for the future,” Wonder said. “Let’s remember Dr. King’s dreams of peace and solidarity among all peoples…Let’s put our best foot forward and then we will remember. And if we can remember, we can imagine and then we can touch and make the dream real.”

‘Let Us Not Forget’ By the end of the weekend, the crowd gathered at the King Memorial for the dedication was smaller than what was expected in August. But a number of dignitaries, including President Barack Obama, all spoke of King’s importance. Fittingly, a Morehouse Man, Martin Luther King III ’79, ended the day by urging people to focus on King’s dreams of social justice for all.

“We’ve come to participate in this unveiling ceremony to my father and celebrate his legacy. Let us not forget that he paid the ultimate price for our civil rights,” King said. He then repeated some of his father’s speech in 1963 during the historic March on Washington that took place just a few yards from where he stood. “I repeat his words because I believe that it is important to realize that while I think it’s great that we have this memorial to his memory and it’s great to have a national holiday and streets and schools and hospitals in his honor all over our nation and world, it is also important to not place too much emphasis on Martin Luther King Jr. the idol and not enough emphasis on the ideas of Martin Luther King Jr.,” he said. “So while we commemorate his memory today with this great monument, let us not forget or be confused about what he stood for and died for.” Not only was the concert a musical triumph, it turned out to be a huge financial success as the event grossed $550,000 for the Morehouse College General Scholarship Fund. The Morehouse production team and staff was led by six executive producers: trustees Jim Moss ’70, Robert Levin and Dale Jones ’82; Phillip Howard ‘87, vice president for Institutional Advancement; Christopher Cowan ’87; and Lamell McMorris ‘95. n


Renaissance Legacy

Help Save Black Boys Morehouse Works with Los Angeles Groups to

By ADD SEYMOUR JR.

Palm trees pointing deep into the sky are like natural exclamation points for beauty in the south central Los Angeles neighborhood surrounding Crenshaw High School. They stand near neat, ranch homes with manicured lawns. Add the comfortable weather and it seems a great place for a leisurely stroll. >

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Tyrone Howard, director of the University of California Los Angeles’ Black Male Institute (right) explains what life is like for Crenshaw High School students to (from left to right) Charles Boyd of the Los Angeles Area Urban League, Bryant Marks ’94, director of the Morehouse Male Institute and Melvinia King, interim director of the Leadership Center at Morehouse College.

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T’S NOT. “It is a gang-infested neighborhood and you may never know it because it’s so beautiful,” said Adrian Sears of the Los Angeles Urban League. “Crenshaw High School is in the middle of several different gang territories. You have the Rollin’ 60s, which is a Crip gang. And then you have the Rollin’ 40s and that’s a Crip gang. But then you have the neighboring Pirus, which is a Blood gang located not too far away. So they are surrounded by gang activity, certainly by drugs and other kinds of crime and drive-bys.” That’s the daily reality for the 2,600 students, mostly black and Latino, who navigate gang turf to and from school. It forces many to either join a gang or become gang-affiliated just to stay safe. The Crenshaw scene is a microcosm of life for black males in greater south central L.A. Community organizations point to crime, poverty, drugs and broken families as reasons young black males face a darker future than other groups. Mark Ridley Thomas, Los Angeles County’s 2nd District supervisor, and Morehouse President Robert M. Franklin ’75 believe one solution is 2,184 miles away at Morehouse. The two conceptualized the Empowering Leadership in Local

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Communities (ELLC) Initiative. Supported by The California Endowment, a private health foundation providing grants to California organizations, the ELLC will bring the ethical leadership model taught to Morehouse students directly to the L.A. streets through local organizations. Using the ethical leadership model, organizations can build on their own expertise and use it to help grow a new generation of morally and socially responsible black male leaders. ELLC leaders also hope to engage at least 100 public policy officials and stakeholders, with the goal of taking the program nationally. “Morehouse College represents something unique,” Thomas said. “The investment that it has made in this construct of leadership is quite promising as it relates to what can and should happen in the greater Los Angeles area.”

All have made a mark in their general communities, but the ELLC became an opportunity for them to focus on black boys. “All we’re doing is enhancing something that is already great,” said Melvinia King, interim director of the Leadership Center at Morehouse College. King heads the ELLC effort. “You’ve got some outstanding organizations here with some excellent leadership abilities,” she said. “They reflect the Five Wells and they are addressing the work that Dr. Franklin is doing with the College and what our alumni are doing all around the world. What they have done is intentionally uplift these communities and Morehouse is partnering with someone who is doing that intentional lift.” For eight days, the community organizers learned about the ethical leadership model. For many of them, it was their first time at a historically black college. “Initially, just the opportunity to come to Morehouse was a big draw for me because, as a black woman growing up in Inglewood and then going to school at the University of Southern California…, I’ve always just been really appreciative and curious about historically black colleges and universities,” said Leslie Cooper, development director for The Community Coalition. Their days were long and full of ritualistic training, much deeper than classroom study. Early mornings started with tai chi. Mask-making taught authenticity. They walked blindfolded behind others, following

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RGANIZATIONS FIRST had to come to Morehouse to learn how Morehouse Men are made. Seven were chosen: the Community Coalition, the Los Angeles Urban League, The Brotherhood Coalition, To Help Everybody (T.H.E.) Clinic, Watts Healthcare, West Angeles Community Development and SEIU – United Long Term Care Workers.

Charisse Bremond Weaver, president of the Brotherhood Crusade, stands in front of the organization’s building.


S Walter E. Fluker, executive director of Vision Quest International, leads L.A. community organizers through an ethical leadership workshop.

through trust. There were exercises exploring the basic tenants of community, civility and character. Their days ended around 11 p.m. with journaling and reflection. “I fully expected to get state-of-the-art methodology and technology around leadership…but I had no idea of the power of ritual,” said Charles Boyd of the Los Angeles Urban League. “Something is calling me forward and it has something to do with the daily opportunity to be meditative, to be quiet and still, and be reflective and then hear the hearts and souls around me.”

feature

O IT IS THAT RESPONSE that goes to the heart of the ethical leadership model, said Walter Fluker, executive director of Vision Quest International, which led the training. Fluker is a professor of ethical leadership at Boston University. He spent 12 years as the executive director of the Leadership Center at Morehouse College. Fluker said the model could address some of the needs of young black men and help create an environment that produces leaders. “The essence of the model is how we do address their needs and how we do cultivate certain habits and practices first in these individuals that conspire towards civility, community, character and the attendant values we teach – justice, compassion, empathy, integrity, hope and courage,” he said. “It’s a model we plan to replicate, as we’ve done here at Morehouse for 12 years,” Fluker said. “We want to replicate that in local communities. I think the brand itself will inspire individuals to reach their highest.” Cooper said that’s what she looked for from the intense days at Morehouse.

“Dr. Fluker talks about the image of the spiral, and that’s been impactful for me because I feel like sometimes we are operating more in a circle instead of spiraling down and getting deeper,” she said. “I feel like there’s not a strategic transfer of knowledge from the older generation to the younger.” She looked around the room at the other participants, many of whom worked just a few miles from each other in L.A., but never really got to know one another until coming to Morehouse. “It’s interesting that there are a lot more women here than men,” Cooper said. “Black men aren’t represented in certain areas as they should be and that’s because the way they have been oppressed and attacked. I think that definitely speaks to the larger context we are trying to address.”

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MBOLDENED BY their Morehouse experience, each group headed back to California ready to form its own plans with the ethical leadership model as a base. King, along with Morehouse Male Initiative director Bryant Marks ’94, will continue to work with them. Sears hopes the Los Angeles Urban League can teach 25 freshmen boys at Crenshaw the Five Wells and ultimately produce an annual pipeline of students to Morehouse. More importantly, she was glad Morehouse brought the organizations together. “I have thoroughly enjoyed this experience,” Sears said. “It’s been like none other in the sense that we have a built a community. We’ve built some momentum. The challenge is building on this momentum and creating something. In other words, come up with a common goal and to work towards that goal together.” n Christopher Ifekwungwe , director of Clinical Support Services for T.H.E. Clinic, shows off the mask he made during a training seminar.

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founder’s day observance

145 Years ofLeadership By ADD SEYMOUR JR. NEARLY 40 STUDENTS were eager to take classes at the Augusta Institute in 1867. The Rev. William Jefferson White, with help from former slave Richard Coulter and the Rev. Edmund Turney, had successfully orchestrated the beginning of a place of higher learning for blacks in Georgia. One hundred and forty-five years later, the Institute, now known as Morehouse College, has grown from those humble beginnings to become one of the nation’s most renowned institutions with more than 16,000 graduates. This year, the College celebrated that history of excellence with the 145th Founder’s Day Observance through a number of events that included a Convocation speech that focused on giving back, a summit on the issues in educating black boys and the honoring of five men who have achieved excellence in their careers. The celebration started with the unveiling of the United States Postal Service’s latest Black Heritage Series stamp, honoring the late journalist, John H. Johnson. Then Donald Hense ’70, founder of Friendship Charter Schools in Washington, D.C., urged men of Morehouse to remember to go back to their schools and communities and help where they are needed. “Somewhere during these intervening years, we forgot that a person who strives to build his own community has power, wealth and influence beyond measure,” Hense said. “I am proud when our sons and daughters come back home and make their mark serving our children and our communities.”

The Rev. Amos C. Brown ’64, Worship Service speaker

Herman F. Bostic ’49, the Bennie Leadership honoree, during Reflections of Excellence discussion

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The Rev. Calvin Butts III ’72 and his wife flank his newly unveiled oil portrait during the Founder’s Day Convocation. MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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Renaissance Legacy

and Excellence Convocation speaker Donald Hense ’70

President Robert M. Franklin ’75 visits the gravesite of Morehouse founder William Jefferson White.

The Morehouse College Glee Club leaves Springfield Baptist Church in Augusta, where Morehouse was founded. S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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founder’s day observance The conversation turned to the education of the nation’s black boys as some of the nation’s top education experts met during the 2nd Annual Black Male Summit. Moderated by Bryant Marks ’94, director of the Morehouse Male Institute, and English professor Stephane Dunn, the summit featured a panel of academicians and another of practitioners. “What’s happening is all over this world, young people are getting up and they are running faster than our best young people,” said panelist Howard Fuller of the Institute for the Transformation of Learning at Marquette University. “If they are running faster than our best young people, what chance do our kids have in Atlanta who can’t read, can’t write, can’t think, can’t analyze, can’t compute?” David Jernigan, executive director of KIPP Atlanta, added, “It’s about building a culture of high expectations.” That evening, music took center stage as R&B superstar Musiq Soulchild and guest Avery Sunshine thrilled a near-capacity audience during the Founder’s Day Concert.

The next morning, the 2012 Bennie and Candle awardees spoke about their careers during Reflections of Excellence. Those honorees were Herman Bostick ’49, Bennie Leadership; Earl Hilliard ’64, Bennie Service; Dr. Calvin McLaurin ’68, Bennie Achievement; Earl Stafford, Candle in Humanitarian Service and Business; and President Robert Franklin ’75, Candle in Education. “Sometimes there are people who are going to want to discourage you from doing things,” said McLaurin. “You need to make up your mind about what you want to do, decide which way you want to do things and stick to that.” The College community and supporters were out in their finest for the elegant “A Candle in the Dark” Gala. A sold-out audience watched as the Bennie and Candle honorees were presented their awards and later filled the floor as they danced the night away. The week ended with the annual Founder’s Day Worship Service, where the Rev. Amos Brown ’64 of First Baptist Church of San Francisco delivered the sermon and the Morehouse College Glee Club’s Founder’s Day Concert. n

Left: Shaun Harper, associate professor, University of Pennsylvania (left), and David Wall Rice ’95, associate professor, Morehouse College, at the fourth Annual Black Male Summit. Bottom: Moderators, college administrators and panel members after the fourth Annual Black Male Summit

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Top: Herman F. Bostic ‘49 (Bennie Leadership); Earl Hilliard Sr. ‘64 (Bennie Service); Anthony Mackie (master of ceremonies); President Franklin (Candle in Education); Cheryl G. Franklin; Robert Davidson ’67; Calvin McLarin ‘68 (Bennie Achievement); and Earl Stafford (Candle in Humanitarian Service and Business)

HERMAN BOSTICK ’49 Bennie Leadership For Herman F. Bostick ’49, teaching French involves more than explaining the language’s tedious grammar and syntax. The study of French offers captivating lessons on the history of the French-speaking Africans of the diaspora, which became a passion for Bostick. Bostick, an author and professor of French at Howard University, believes the study of French helps the dispersed French-speaking Africans of the diaspora reconnect and “recreate, via literature, a sense of ethnic identity and unity.” He formed the Southern Conference on Language Teaching in the early 1960s; headed one of the first united statewide professional associations dedicated to both black and white foreign language teachers; and has been the foreign language consultant for the Georgia. Along with heading foreign language departments at Morehouse and Texas Southern University, Bostick founded the Morehouse Torchbearers, which is composed of alumni committed to financially supporting the Morehouse

EARL HILLIARD SR. ’64 Bennie Service Growing up in Birmingham, Alabama, the segregated seat of racial strife, and meeting Martin Luther King Jr. ’48, Earl Hilliard ’64 knew his life would be dedicated to bettering his community and his country. Hilliard was a civil rights protester as a teenager, worked as a respected attorney and then took his experiences to the halls of government as a state and federal legislator representing his home state. He worked tirelessly on behalf of the poor and underserved and kept his promise to King to become a foot soldier in the civil rights movement through politics. Hilliard served in the Alabama legislature, first as a representative and then as a state senator. He went on to become the first

African American to represent Alabama in Congress since Reconstruction. Two of his accomplishments: getting a tiny black town’s needed ferry restarted again after angry whites shut it down in the 1960s and working with Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) to get a 54-mile Selma-to-Montgomery highway designated a National Historic Trail to commemorate the Edmund Pettus Bridge civil rights protests in 1965.

PRESIDENT ROBERT M. FRANKLIN JR. ’75 Candle in Education Robert Michael Franklin Jr. ’75 is a renowned educator, speaker, administrator, author and theologian who has made it his life’s calling to enlighten the future of the nation’s black boys. The author of three books, Franklin has led Morehouse for the past five years. He garnered national acclaim for his vision of the “Morehouse Renaissance” and establishing the concept of the “Five Wells,” an idea to cultivate men of Morehouse as “Renaissance men with social conscience and global perspective.” During his tenure, the College has generated in excess of $68 million in institutional funds and $60 million in restricted funds from Federal sources. Alumni giving increased to 26 percent. In 2008 and 2009, President Barack Obama invited Franklin to be a mentor during the National Dialogue on Fatherhood and Personal Responsibility at the White House.

DR. CALVIN MCLARIN ’68 Bennie Achievement “Service to Humankind” is the motto for Dr. Calvin McLarin’s office, Metropolitan Atlanta Cardiology Consultants, which he started the day after he became the first African American to graduate from the Invasive Cardiology Program at Emory University School of Medicine. Since then, he has devoted his career to the intricacies of mankind’s most vital organ: the heart. He

also has devoted his energy and talent teaching future physicians, as well as pumping vital scholarship dollars toward their education. McLarin has been honored with numerous awards and accolades such as being named Young Physician of the Year, Physician of the Year and the winner of the Nash Carter Award, all by the Heritage Fund of Atlanta Medical Association, which has provided more than $400,000 in scholarships for medical students since 1995. In honor of his dedication and service to the Association, the Heritage Fund’s Calvin Wayne McLarin Award was established in his honor.

EARL STAFFORD Candle in Humanitarian Service and Business Earl W. Stafford grew up without much materially, but his hard-working, blue-collar parents, the Rev. Robert and Mable Stafford, made sure their family was rich in faith, perseverance and generosity. Those qualities became the guiding virtues for Stafford’s stellar life and career. After college and 20 years in the military, he began a firm that became a world leader in manufacturing and providing a complete portfolio in laser engagement simulation systems. He eventually sold the company and started the Stafford Foundation, a faith-based, not-for-profit organization that connecting those who wanted to do good with opportunities to help those in need. One of the results was his three-day party for 400 people during President Barack Obama’s inauguration. The historic People’s Inaugural Project became philanthropic history and was a catalyst for generosity. The member of Ebony magazine’s Power 150 honored his parents with The Rev. Robert W. and Mabel E. Stafford Center, a project in the African nation of Burkina Faso that will include a church, two orphanages, a primary school and an adult training center.

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founder’s day observance

President Robert M. Franklin ’75 confers honorary degrees to former trustee J. Douglas Holladay, founder/CEO of PathNorth; Donald Hense ’70, cofounder and board chair of Friendship Public Charter Schools in Washington, D.C.; and Monica Pearson, longtime anchor of WSB-TV in Atlanta.

Middle: Avery*Sunshine, accompanied by Dana Johnson ‘95 (left), performs during the Founder’s Day Concert Right: Musiq Soulchild headlines the Founder’s Day Concert

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brothertobrother

‘We Are Only As Strong As The Men We Produce’ By CARLTON R. COLLINS ’11

“So I began thinking about what we, Morehouse Men, have to offer these boys. The answer I came upon was hope and options.”

Greetings Fellow Morehouse Men, …During my rebirth at Morehouse College, I took time to reflect upon what had happened in my life over the past four years. For months I thought about how much my story could be a blessing to thousands. The second day of New Student Orientation, I was informed that my son, Elijah, was to be born into this world. Four years and nearly 80,000 miles later, I graduated on time, founded an organization—Morehouse Education Association—and have made plans for my son to live with me. Anything is possible. … We as black men, regardless of biological origin, are responsible for our boys. It is our duty to train up the next generation, yet we have cashed in our obligation for the burden of lost souls and a wayward generation. Black boys nationwide graduate at 47 percent, but we only represent 2 percent of the teacher population. There is a clear understanding that we, the affluent black male role model, have allowed others to control our fate. While matriculating, I realized that no matter how grand our alumni are or the amount of accolades that are acquired, we are only as strong as the men we attract and the men we produce. For the sons of Mother Morehouse to turn their backs on their little brothers is contemptuous, to say the least. To think that all of these stars in various fields have forgotten the most important part of the Morehouse pedigree: “I’ve got my brother’s back.” Our sixth president, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, is quoted saying, “It isn’t a disgrace not to reach the stars, it is a disgrace to have no stars to reach for.” Our boys are watching the stars, but they are all hip-hop artists, entertainers, and drug dealers. We should be ashamed of ourselves for watching this occur and turning a blind eye. Does an entertainer have greater influence than you? Is his fictional message of unadulterated indulgence more persuasive than a man who extends himself to love a child? I refuse to believe so. I cannot accept that from my elder brothers whom I admire so much. So I began thinking about what we, Morehouse Men, have to offer these boys. The answer I came upon was hope and options. We all decided upon different routes to achieve success, but it is not often we pass this message on. I want to launch a campaign called “A Black Man Can.” Through video we compile a roll of Morehouse Men who have achieved success and have them state their profession i.e. Shelton “Spike” Lee ’79 “A black man can become a world-class filmmaker.” With this campaign we can produce an array of positive black male images that have never been seen before in this country. Morehouse College is the light of the world, and we wholeheartedly believe that. It is our time to give our boys stars to reach for. It is time to shine our light on the masses…. There is no shortage of stars in the sky, but there are very few directions on how to reach them. “Et facta est lux.” n

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alumninews national alumni association president’s message The Road Ahead

“Alumni must challenge themselves and the institution to take bold steps that clearly define and distinguish us from an increasingly ambiguous landscape as it relates to the education of African American males.”

NOTE: MCNAA is an independent 501c3 organization.

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Greetings Brethren, As we end this year and my first term, I want to extend my gratitude to alumni, family and friends who have been supportive of the Association. It has been my pleasure to serve you for the past two years, and I look forward to continuing to work with the Alumni Board as we begin the second stage of Rebuilding the Association. It has also been my pleasure to work with President Robert Franklin ‘75 to further the cause of the Association and our alumni. The Association has developed a good rapport with President Franklin and has been appreciative of his openness towards our concerns. As he embarks on the next chapter of his life, we wish him God’s speed and good success. PLEASED—BUT NOT COMPLACENT The past two years have been a great learning experience and I have enjoyed the opportunity to re-engage alumni from across the country. Some of the highlights have been the regular distribution of our monthly electronic newsletter that keeps alumni informed. We began the 300 Campaign that allows alumni to directly assist senior students with graduation expenses. We have partnered with chapters across the country to promote social events for alumni. But, most importantly, we have begun to have more of an impact with current students, who will one day become alumni. I am pleased with the progress that we have made--but not complacent. There are still significant challenges before us as. We still have too many alumni who are observing from the sidelines and need to get in the game. Our alumni giving is up, but it is still far short of where we need to be to provide resources at the level that our alma mater needs. The customer service culture of the College as perceived by alumni has improved, but we still have challenges that can only be overcome by a consistent and concerted effort between the College and the Association. WE WILL DEPEND ON YOU As we prepare for the next era of our alma mater’s leadership, we will depend on you. We will depend on alumni more than ever to help us achieve

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reclamation of graduates who are not involved in the association. We will depend on you to work with the Office of Admissions to recruit young men who will benefit from what Morehouse College has to offer and, at the same time, be of benefit to our dear alma mater. We will depend upon alumni to increase their tangible show of support and give more; but, with those gifts we must also ensure accountability for the dollars we give. We will depend upon alumni to serve as mentors to our students and share their much needed perspective and wisdom. Alumni must challenge themselves and the institution to take bold steps that clearly define and distinguish us from an increasingly ambiguous landscape as it relates to the education of African American males. To make this distinction, we must build ourselves up and “hit the gym,” so to speak. Let me clarify the analogy. Top athletes will tell you that the way to increase one’s performance is through consistent and increasing levels of exercise. The more you use your body, the better it performs. There is even a newly emerging theory of muscle confusion that states that a body adapts very quickly to whatever stress is placed on it and ultimately begins to become complacent. By changing around the exercises — so that the body does not become accustomed to the same routine — you can prevent the body from adapting and, as a result, avoid complacency, which ultimately leads to the reverse of muscle build up or deterioration. So, as we move forward, the Association must change up the routine and take some unconventional actions. If we are to be the type of Association that vigorously supports our school, mentors our students and future alumni, and increase the value of the Morehouse brand, we must resolve to strengthen our minds and collective body of brotherhood. Sincerely,

Kevin R. McGee ’93 President MCNAA


alumninews Walter E. Massey ’58 Presidency at SAIC Extended

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ary McMillan, chairman of the Board of Governors of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), announced in April 2012 that the Board of Trustees of the Art Institute of Chicago voted unanimously to extend through the end of the 2015–16 academic year the appointment of Walter E. Massey ‘58 as SAIC president. The news comes as SAIC celebrates several milestones enhancing its position of international leadership and strength among independent colleges of art and design.

Massey, who became SAIC president in September 2010, has been leading SAIC through a period marked by a number of influential achievements. U.S. News and World Report recently announced that SAIC’s Master of Fine Arts program rose to the nation’s second rank among 220 peer institutions. Four alumni won Fulbright awards this academic year, the largest number of Fulbright recipients from a single U.S. college of art and design in 2011–12. In August, SAIC’s Master of Architecture degree became its newest professionally accredited graduate curriculum, becoming one of just five accredited March degrees among all those granted by the 41 members of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design. On May 7, SAIC will open its LeRoy Neiman Center, a two-

story, 14,000-square-foot gathering space for students, alumni, faculty and staff in SAIC’s historic John B. and Alice R. Sharp Building. 

 “During his tenure, President Massey has fortified SAIC’s strategic planning and advancement efforts and set a vision for SAIC to remain a leader in art and design education,” says Tom Pritzker, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, the Art Institute of Chicago. 

 Walter E. Massey ’58 Throughout his academic career, Massey, who is president emeritus of Morehouse, has been an advocate for issues surrounding minority students and education. He developed and directed the Inner City Teachers of Science Program while he was dean of the college at Brown University, and was a founding trustee of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. Recently, Massey was recognized by Crain’s Chicago Business as one of 7 Over Seventy: Leaders After Decades of Public Life. n

Said Sewell ’92 Joins Kent State as Dean of Undergraduate Studies

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aid Sewell ’92 has joined Kent State University as dean of undergraduate studies. In this new position, Sewell will administer and provide leadership in pre-college preparation, transition to college, academic advising, student retention issues and undecided/undeclared students. He will oversee the Exploratory Advising Center, Academic Success Center, Student Success Programs and Dual Enrollment/PSEOP. Said Sewell ’92 “I come to Kent State because I believe in the mission and vision of the university,” Sewell said. “I share the institution’s values toward education and its commitment to moving our students to higher heights. I am committed to leading the college in a very collaborative, energetic and strategic manner.” Before joining Kent State, Sewell served as executive director of the Academic Success Center and associate professor of political science at Fort Valley State University since December 2009. Prior to working at Fort Valley State, he was an associate professor of political science and planning at the University of West Georgia from 2000 to 2009. Sewell was the founding executive director of the Center for African American Males: Research, Success and Leadership in Atlanta

from 2004 to 2009. The center, which is the first of its kind in Georgia, addresses the challenges faced by African American men in the academy by focusing on research, modeling and training, and programming.  He also has taught in the public administration and political science departments at Albany State University and Georgia Institute of Technology; in the social science departments at Georgia Perimeter College and Dekalb College; and in the political science departments at Clark Atlanta University and Morehouse College. Sewell has authored several articles on faith-based initiatives, community and economic development, religion and politics, and juvenile issues. He is currently completing work on two forthcoming books titled Empowering Black Male Students to Greatness and Let Us Make Man: A Conversation with Black Men on Saving Black Boys. He is co-author of Georgia State Politics and the editor of two American government readers: Conflicting Democracy: A Critical Analysis of America’s Political Process and We the People: Reflections on American Politics. Sewell received his master of public administration in public policy from Texas Southern University at the age of 21, becoming the youngest person in the program’s history to complete all the requirements for the degree in a year and a half. He earned a Ph.D. in political science from Clark Atlanta University in 2001, and has done post-graduate work at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and School of Divinity. n S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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chapternews Huntsville/North Alabama FOR THE FIRST TIME, the Huntsville/ North Alabama Morehouse Alumni Chapter, and the Spelman Colllege Huntsville Alumnae Chapter held a joint Recognition Tea for 2011 graduates and incoming freshmen. The July 2011 tea was an opportunity to recognize recent graduates as they prepare for the next phase of their life; and incoming students as they prepared to embark on their journey to Morehouse and Spelman. Many parents also attended and expressed joy and thanks to the alumni chapters for their dedication to students from the Huntsville/North Alabama Area. n

Charlotte-Metro THE CHARLOTTE-METRO Chapter of the Morehouse College National Alumni Association had a very active late summer and early fall. Spirits were high once again during the Annual Morehouse/ Spelman picnic, held August 6, 2011. The family-oriented style picnic was heavily attended by alumni, enrolled students from the local area currently matriculating, newly accepted students entering in the fall, and their parents, family members and well-wishers. In keeping with the traditions of years past, the new students were showcased and showered with gifts, tokens and words of wisdom. Seven new freshmen attended the event, half of whom are on academic scholarships. The Charlotte Chapter and Alumni Region engaged in creative MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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Huntsville/North Alabama chapter members Dr. Emanuel Waddell ’90, Christopher Lee ’05, Lamont Redrick ’93 and Guy Ginn ’80 with Morehouse freshmen.

endeavors to further build capacity and relationships, while increasing brand identity. Activities included: • supporting a Spelman Glee Club Concert in Charlotte • engaging the leadership of Charlotte-area members of the HBCU Alliance and drawing best practices from representatives from the Atlanta HBCU Alliance visiting Charlotte as a resource in late September • kicking off October with a fall networking/happy hour event on the 5th at Bask • sponsoring an African American music seminar conducted by Morehouse alumni James Abbington ’83 and Daniel Heath ’03 on October 29, and a post meridian concert of the Morehouse College Glee Club at Covenant Presbyterian Church. n

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MOREHOUSE EVENTS 2012-13 HOMECOMING October 27, 2012 FOUNDER’S DAY CONVOCATION February 14, 2013 King Chapel REFLECTIONS OF EXCELLENCE February 16, 2013 King Chapel A CANDLE IN THE DARK GALA February 16, 2013 Hyatt Regency

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Share news about your chapter by e-mailing us at morehousemageditor@morehouse.edu


chapternews

The Morehouse College Glee Club at NASDAQ closing bell.

New York Chapter ON SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, The Maroon & White Fund, Inc., and The Morehouse College Glee Club visited the NASDAQ MarketSite in New York City’s Times Square. In honor of the centennial celebration of the Morehouse College Glee Club, David Morrow ‘80, director of the Morehouse College Glee Club, and Adair Johnson ‘90, president/CEO of The Maroon & White Fund, officially rang The NASDAQ Stock Market closing bell. The Maroon & White Fund is a non-profit alumni, family and friends organization devoted to supporting the educational mission, vision, fiscal goals and objectives of the College. It was established to augment the annual fundraising efforts of the College through social, cultural and educational events. The Fund chose the Glee Club’s centennial milestone as the catalyst to launch the “Power of Ten” national fundraising initiative, which is an appeal for contributions of $10 per 10 decades ($100) in celebration of the Morehouse College Glee Club’s 100 years in song. Additional events that weekend included a New York preview performance by and conversation with the Morehouse College Glee Club at The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space at WNYC and WQXR. The evening was hosted by award- winning WQXR host and former Morehouse Glee Club member Terrance McKnight on Sept. 30; The Maroon & White

Fund Inaugural Reception and Centennial Dance at Harlem’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture on Oct. 1; and the Centennial Benefit Concert on October 2 at Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center with special performances by the Spelman College Glee Club and Tuskegee University Golden Voices Choir. Filmmaker Spike Lee ‘79 and Spelman graduate and actress Cassi Davis were among the presenters. n

Spike Lee ’79 and Adair Johnson ’90 For more information about The Maroon & White Fund and the “Power of Ten,” visit (http://www.themwf.org). Follow The Maroon & White Fund on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=114896661919626) and Twitter (http://twitter .com/#!/mandwfund). S P R I N G / S U M M E R

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classnotes

1980s Edward Hills DDS ’82 was recently named chief operating officer for The MetroHealth System. He will supervise the Patient Care Unit that includes physician executive directors and administrative directors, as well as the vice presidents of ambulatory operations, inpatient operations, integrated operations and nursing. Hills also was accepted for fellowship into the American College of Dentists (ACD), comprised of dentists who have exemplified excellence through their outstanding leadership and exceptional contributions to dentistry and society. Nationwide, only 3.5 percent of dentists are named fellows. Perry E. Thurston Jr. ’82 was recently elected by members of the Florida House Democratic Caucus to serve as the Democratic leader for the 2012-2014 legislative term.

1990s David Jones has been promoted to vice president of human resources at Stanford University. He previously served as associate vice president for employee and management services. Jones also holds law degrees from Howard University and the Georgetown University Law Center. MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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Cassius Butts ’94 was recently appointed by the U.S. Small Business Administration as the regional administrator for Region IV to oversee the SBA’s programs and services in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. Cedric Richmond ’95, freshman congressman from New Orleans, led his Democratic team members to an 8-2 victory over the Republicans in the 50th Annual Congressional Baseball Game. Richmond, whose pitching and hitting helped the Democrats rout the Republican team for the third year in a row, threw fastballs that looked to reach speeds of 80 miles per hour. He is a former varsity pitcher for the Maroon Tigers Baseball Team. Gregory T. Burrell ‘90 was recently installed as president of the Association of African-American Funeral Home Directors and Morticians. The installation ceremony took place during the organization’s 74th Annual Convention held in Atlanta. He is president and CEO of Terry Funeral Home, Inc., in West Philadelphia.

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2000s Derick Pearson ’06 and his wife Felecia Hatcher are owners of Feverish Ice Cream, a new boutique ice cream business. They recently taped a show to promote

their business for the Food Network. Feverish is an ecofriendly ice cream company that specializes in providing unique ice cream through their mini ice cream truck, carts and upscale ice cream catering service. The couple also was recently featured in Black Enterprise’s Wealth for Life in its “Super Savers” online column.

THE POWER OF GIVING BACK Resource the Renaissance Give online at giving.morehouse.edu

Office of Alumni Relations at (404) 215-2658


classnotes Passages Stanford Marcellus Smith ‘46 passed away at Emory Midtown Hospital. Smith was an All-Conference center on the 1942 Maroon Tigers Football Team. For several years, he served as the president of the Chicago Morehouse Club and was a vice president of the Morehouse National Alumni Association. He retired as a teacher and administrator in the Chicago Public School System. Callixtus E. Ita ‘64 passed in New Brunswick, N.J. Ita was born in Calabar, Nigeria, and came to the United States in 1960, eventually settling in Atlanta. He earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and mathematics from Morehouse, and later received a master’s in analytical chemistry from Tuskegee University. Ita was employed as a research scientist specializing in drug metabolism with Bristol-Myers Squibb in North Brunswick for 30 years until his retirement in 2000. Edward Garnes ’71 passed away in Atlanta. Garnes retired from Fulton County Juvenile Court in 2007 after 30 years of service.   Lloyd G. George ’52, died on February 6, 2011, in Fayetteville, N. C. Interment followed at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. George was a lifetime member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity and a member of Kindah Temple #62.

Profilesin Leadership Morehouse Senior is Quintessential Renaissance Legacy Renaissance Man Marquez Hughley ’12 MARZQUEZ HUGHLEY could very well be the poster child for President Franklin’s Morehouse Renaissance Man. The senior finance major from Opelika, Alabama, is well-read: he published the second of two books this year and launched an e-magazine; well-spoken, he’s a motivation speaker; well-traveled, while serving in the U.S. Army, he spent five years in Kitzingen, Germany; welldressed, he has built a business on the classic business accoutrement, the tie; and well-rounded, which obviously goes without saying. When you consider the fact that the 30-year-old is also a full-time student, well, it makes you wonder how he does it all. But his secret to success is no secret at all. He’s written about it in Keys to the Kingdom, published in 2005, and Little Book, BIG RESULTS published in January 2012. As a motivational speaker, he encourages people to live a “C.R.O.W.N.” life—Crown being an acronym for champion, release, operate, worth and never accepting mediocrity. “Because I’m a minister, I’m able to bridge the gap and talk to people on the practical side about what they can do for personal growth as they encompass their spiritual faith,” said Hughley, who holds a bachelor’s degree in theology from Minnesota Graduate School of Theology. Hughley has had to prac-

tice what he preaches. After being honorably discharged from the military as a sergeant, he came to suburban Atlanta and found work as a paralegal. His plan was to complete his degree by attending a night program at Georgia Statue University, which would allow him to work full time. But he felt pulled in a different direction. “God put it in my head to apply to Morehouse. I did so by faith. Morehouse was a dream school to go to,” he said. “I got accepted, then the challenge was to find a job.” He landed a job at a call center working from 2 to 11 p.m. It allowed him to enroll at Morehouse, but Hughley describes it as “an incredibly challenging” situation. It was between calls that Hughley had an idea for his first start-up, Gigaré King Collection, a line of ties. The name, he explained, is a conflation of giga—which means gillion—and the prefix re, meaning regarding, that he affixed to the end of giga. Together, he said, the name connotes a higher standard of life. In between calls, he sketched out patterns. “I’m not a designer, I did the best I could. I was more focused on the brand’s image.” The line launched in December 2011 with 30 designs. He’s given his ties to several men of distinction, from Morehouse President Robert M. Franklin ‘75 to NFL

Hall of Famer Deion Sanders. Today, Hughley has a “dream” team of seven—five of whom are military veterans. Gigare is expanding to include polo shirts, belts and women attire. “It started from notebook paper…nothing. Now the company is growing, the fans, the brand loyalty, the product line are growing.” Hughley credits Morehouse for giving him three foundational blocks for building his life’s goals: global leadership, service and a standard of excellence. “It has been an honor to be groomed in a place where so many people have come through here and gone on to do great things,” he said. n –Vickie G. Hampton

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classnotes Roland Boyd Grant Jr. ‘74 succumbed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) on May 10, 2011, at his home in Chantilly, Va.

While at Morehouse, Grant was a member of the Morehouse College Glee Club. He earned a master’s in social work from Atlanta University. As a social

worker, he provided supportive psychotherapy to severely disturbed urban populations in inpatient and outpatient settings in Daytona Beach, Fla., and

in Chicago at Michael Reese Hospital. He also studied at the Institut fur Europaische Studien in Vienna, Austria, where he enriched his love of history and art.

Profilesin Leadership Living the “Global Perspective, Social Conscience” Model

Renaissance Legacy

Dionte Driskell ’10 WHEN DIONTE DRISKELL ‘10 learned that his Peace Corps assignment would be in Rwanda, he was understandably apprehensive. Who could forget the images of the atrocities of genocide as depicted in the blockbuster film “Hotel Rwanda”? But after more than nine months in the “great country with many magnificent sceneries and beautiful landscapes,” not only has he acclimated to the culture, but, as a secondary school teacher in Kabarondo, Kayonza, he is leaving several marks of improvement that he hopes will be indelible. Driskell, a sociology major from East Point, Ga., has picked up on the native language, Kinyarwanda, as well as Swahili, the most spoken language throughout all of Africa. But it is his native tongue, English, that makes him a treasured import. In 2009, Rwanda switched its Francophone and Kinyarwanda-speaking educational instruction to English. The change forced teachers, students and administrative staff to learn the English language. “Students struggle with studies, obviously, because of the abrupt change and the challenges of the language MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

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barriers,” said Driskell. “The students who understand and have a grasp of the English language fear or fail to use their English because they have no medium to practice – or they fear ridicule of other students.” The language barrier ran both ways: he first had to learn to understand his students, and his students had to learn to understand him. “My students have understood my language (American accent) and I feel I am making a difference. As the students say, ‘we will learn slow by slow.’” With one impediment to learning being addressed, Driskell tackled another one head-on: hunger. “It is difficult for my students to learn effectively when they are walking very far to come to school and remaining in school for eight hours with no lunch or breakfast, coupled with their many other hardships. My endeavor is to feed all the students with pourage (oatmeal) and develop this into a sustainable program.” Besides a meal program, Driskell has helped established a counseling program to help with school or nonschool related problems (many of his students are orphans and struggle with the

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responsibilities as parents for their families) and established an English Club. His next aspiration is to create an educational program for homeless children by getting homeless shelters to collaborate with schools and other community development programs. “My preparation at Morehouse College has truly prepared me for the journey ahead,” he said, explaining that his days as a sociology major and leadership studies minor helped him understand social norms and constructs, identify disparities within a community and embody the true meaning of a global citizen. “I am able to bring different people together, bridge and forge relationships in a foreign land with little language skills, but great net-

working and persistent social exchanges,” he said. Driskell was also a scholar in the Bonner Office of Community Service Program, which provides community service and empowerment to Atlanta-area communities. He coordinated monthly meetings, prepared agendas and helped to organize community projects from organizations ranging from homeless shelters to community development programs. The experience, he said, deepened his love for community service. “This program provided key practical and life skills, which I use every day in my endeavors abroad. This program provided essential groundwork for such a Peace Corps experience.” n –VGH


classnotes . Ryan Jordan ’01 recently passed away as the result of a motorcycle accident in his hometown of Kansas City, Missouri. Jordan was a former Maroon Tigers football player. n

Take a minute to drop us a note! Help Morehouse and your classmates keep up with what’s happening in your life—both personally and professionally—by sending in your Class Notes items. We’d like to share the good news about everyone’s accomplishments. Quickest way to send Class Notes: http://giving.morehouse.edu/NetCommunity

Arthur J. McClung Jr. ’66 Was A Top Alumni Donor ‘Giving Back Was the Least I Could Do’ By VICKIE G. HAMPTON

RETIRED BUSINESSMAN Arthur J. McClung Jr. ’66 built his life around community service and love for his alma mater, which garnered him awards and recognition. He died Feb. 6, 2012, at Hospice Atlanta at age 66. McClung graduated from Morehouse with a degree in business administration. Then-President Benjamin E. Mays inspired what became a lifetime of involvement and generosity toward Morehouse. “We were taught to give back with our time, with our talents and our resources, and I’m being an obedient son of Morehouse,” said McClung as he accepted recognition as Morehouse’s top alumni donor in 2004 during a major donors reception of the Kresge Foundation HBCU Initiative. “This is something I’ve given out of my heart.” After Morehouse, McClung completed the

Program for Management Development at Harvard Business School and, in 1982, he joined the Georgia Power Company as a consumer affairs representative. When he retired in 2008, he was serving as director for the City of Atlanta Operations. Throughout the decades, McClung was an active member of the Morehouse College National Alumni Association and served the College as a member of the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel Advisory Board. In 1996, he was inducted into the Martin Luther King Jr. International Board of Sponsors. In 2000, he was awarded the Alumni Award for Public Service. The Kresge recognition was for his donation of $187,500 to Morehouse. McClung also served on the board of the College’s previous capital campaign, Campaign for a New

Century. Most recently, during the 2011 Founder’s Day Observance, McClung was presented the Presidential Award of Distinction. His involvement with the College mirrored his other civic involvement, including with Atlanta Habitat for Humanity; Georgia Perimeter College Foundation; the Boy Scouts of America; the American Association of Blacks in Energy; Kiwanis International, Georgia District; the MARTA Board of Directors; the Fulton County Development Authority; Georgia Citizens for the Arts; United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta; and the Atlanta Branch of the NAACP, among others. Back at Morehouse, McClung also started a fiveyear gift of $2,000 for the endowed chair campaign and created a book scholarship in honor of his mother, Helen C. McClung. The

Arthur J. McClung Jr. ‘66

scholarship goes to a chapel assistant who, like his mother, demonstrates the “greatest degree of kindness and gentleness.” McClung—whose son, Art McClung III, is also a Morehouse graduate—said the College had given him so much that giving money was the least he could do. “It’s very difficult for me to talk about being recognized for doing what’s right—and this is the right thing to do,” he said. n

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TheRoadTaken “I began to realize that ministers could be intellectually stimulating while providing personally useful insight, support, therapy and inspiration to hungry souls.” By ROBERT M. FRANKLIN ‘75

Driven to Help W hen I departed Morehouse in 1975, I headed to the Harvard Divinity School to pursue academic preparation as a minister. I found myself strongly driven to help and to heal the wounded souls in my community and wanted the best possible theological, pastoral, social scientific and clinical skills to do so. I had two ministry role models: my grandmother, Martha McCann, and my pastor, Bishop Louis Ford (who later became the presiding bishop of the Churches of God in Christ). Both of them were amazing with people and helped masses of people to live better lives. Both were great listeners, compelling speakers, and had a special ability to identify and cultivate the positive potential in every person they met. Harvard was a perfect place for ministry studies because I was not a traditional seminarybound student. I had majored in political science and was interested in teaching, preaching, ideas and counseling for a broad, diverse public—not simply a local congregation. Harvard appealed to my omnivorous and naive intellect by allowing me to take courses throughout the university, reinforcing my conviction that ministers should be acquainted with knowledge outside the traditional disciplines of religion. I audited a course at the law, medical and business schools. I also undertook clini-

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cal training at Boston State Hospital and worked as a chaplain during my studies.

ASKING THE BIG QUESTIONS I was drawn to ministry because I recognized the enormous influence of the black church in the African American community. But also, I was intellectually stimulated by the questions that stand at the center of religious studies—questions such as ‘What is the purpose of

Renaissance Legacy

leading discussions and that students felt I was helpful to them. I also learned that Professor Rogers and Don Browning were both educated at the University of Chicago. So, I applied and was admitted to Chicago. The day I received my letter of admission, I joyously celebrated by leaping up and down inside my apartment. My downstairs neighbor came up to check on me and he was the first person to learn that I was admitted to the Ph.D. program.

The research I will advance in the coming years will take a deeper dive into the problems of post-modern men (high incarceration,

and Heal Wounded Souls human existence?’ ‘How does one live a life of meaning and value?’ ‘What is the nature of the human soul, mind and inner world?’ ‘And, how do we know what we are supposed to do with our brief lives?’ ‘Why do people in different cultures embrace different perspectives on ultimate truth?’ ‘And, what do the major religious traditions have in common?’ I found that no other academic discipline pursued these questions or provided satisfying tentative answers as did religion, theology and philosophy. During my final year at the Divinity School, I knew that I wanted to return home to Chicago. Initially, my reasons were very personal. My mother was ill and, as the oldest of six children, I wanted to be closer to home. But, one of my final courses at Harvard gave me an academic reason to head back to Chicago to attend the University of Chicago. As a senior seminarian, I enrolled in a course titled “The Dialogue Between Theology and Psychology.” We read classic texts by psychological theorists like Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Erik Erikson, Victor Frankl, B.F. Skinner and William James. The course also covered theologians like Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, Martin Luther King Jr. and Don Browning. The course was taught by a brilliant, engaging and charismatic professor named Dr. William Rogers. Rogers asked me to serve as a tutor (discussion leader) in one of the many small groups that met after the large lecture course. I found that I enjoyed

While at Chicago, I accepted my call as a teacher and began the process of synthesizing my identity as a teacher and a minister. I drew upon my great professors at Morehouse, including Robert Brisbane (political science), Edward A. Jones (French), Alton Hornsby (history), E.B. Williams (economics) and Jeanette Hume (English). Also, I drew inspiration and vocational clues from ministry role models like Benjamin E. Mays, Howard Thurman, Dr. King and Morehouse religion professors Sam Williams, William Guy and G. Murray Branch. Soon, I began to realize that ministers could be intellectually stimulating while providing personally useful insight, support, therapy and inspiration to hungry souls.

DIVING DEEPER INTO PLIGHT OF BLACK MEN Today, I am worried about the hundreds of thousands of young African American men who are incarcerated. Michelle Alexander’s book, The New Jim Crow, has placed the plight of these young men on my agenda in a new way. These are young brothers who probably will never attend Morehouse, but who would benefit from what I call the “genius” of Morehouse College. I am worried because the institutions and people who interact with those young men are largely clueless about what makes them tick and how they might be redirected for their own good and for the public good.

homicide and suicide, as well as low rates of marriage, voting and community engagement) and will explore comparisons between African American men and men in various international contexts that interest me, including South Africa, Brazil, the Middle East and Asia. I look forward to immersing myself in this work that will enable me to explore six elements of the genius of Morehouse. It includes at least six concepts that I am calling the Six M’s. They are Messaging (communicating high expectations), Mentoring (providing personalized guidance and support), Monitoring (tracking progress according to plans), Ministering (therapeutic interventions into emotional, relational and spiritual crises), Money (investments that facilitate progress to graduation and minimize distractions) and Mapping (developing a rational life plan or map to guide a good life). During my sabbatical at Stanford, I also look forward to interacting with masters of innovation, those people who are leading disruptive change in various industries. The Silicon Valley around Stanford was the incubator for Facebook, Google, Twitter and various revolutionary technologies and products. As these innovations grow in prominence and dominate (if not distort) our lives, we need to hold them accountable to ethical principles and the humanistic values that have been central to the Morehouse value proposition. n

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Taking some of the work out of networking

Experience Alumni! OFFERS MOREHOUSE MEN A NEW NETWORKING TOOL FOR JOB HUNTING For more information contact: Valeria Wyatt Career Planning and Placement Non Business Majors Morehouse College 404-215-2703 vwyatt@morehouse.edu Douglas Cooper Career Planning and Placement Business Majors Morehouse College 404-681-2800 x2644 dcooper@morehouse.edu

The Morehouse College’s Career Planning and Placement Office is excited to unveil its latest service, designed with Morehouse College alumni in mind: Experience Alumni! EXPERIENCE REQUIRED eRecruiting is the system currently used to coordinate all job postings and interview schedules for students. Now, Experience Alumni! offers a similar service designed specifically with more experienced candidates in mind. Experience Alumni! gives Morehouse alumni a safe, secure place to look for employment opportunities by providing job postings from companies looking to recruit experienced Morehouse Men. Job opportunities from sites such as CareerBuilder, DICE and HotJobs are also posted. BROTHER TO BROTHER If you know of positions within your own company that you want other alumni to know about, you can post them directly into the system yourself. It is a great system for recruiting other Morehouse Men!

Log in and check out Experience Alumni! at http://morehouse.experience.com.


Morehouse Magazine 2012 Readership Survey Morehouse Magazine is dedicated to promoting news, information and the many accomplishments of morehouse college students, faculty and staff. To make sure that we are properly meeting that goal, we invite you to take a short survey about Morehouse Magazine. Your responses, opinions, and suggestions will be used to improve the publication. Which best describes your affiliation to Morehouse College? (Please check all that apply) q Current student q Alumnus q Faculty q Staff q Prospective student q Parent q Donor q Former faculty/staff q Former student q Other _______________________________________________________ What is your age? q Under 25

q 25 to 34

q 65 and over

q 40 to 64

q 35 to 49

How do you generally acquire information (main source) about Morehouse College? q Morehouse Magazine q E-mails from the College q Morehouse College Website q Other College publications q Local or national media q Word of mouth / other alumni (alumni groups) q Other _________________________________________________________ How often do you typically read Morehouse Magazine? q Every issue q Most issues q Occasional issues q Never read an issue

Which items / topics do you most enjoy seeing most in Morehouse Magazine and/or would be interested in knowing more about? (Check all that apply) q Alumni profiles q Alumni activities and achievements q Alumni chapter activities q Athletics q Class notes/Obituaries q Campus facilities growth/improvement q College Events q College Financial status q Donor stories q College history and traditions q Faculty/Staff profiles q Fund-raising efforts q Faculty/Staff changes, promotions, retirements q Issues facing black male education q Issues facing higher education q q q q q

Issues facing local community Message from the Morehouse College President Strategic plans of the college Student activities and achievements Letters to the editor

Please identify the ways in which Morehouse Magazine does not enhance your connection to the institution. (Please check all that apply) q The magazine does not address topics of interest to me q The magazine does not reflect my experience(s) at the college q The magazine is not an objective source of information about the college q The magazine if primarily a fund-raising tool q Other

How much of Morehouse Magazine do you read? q 100 percent q About 75 percent q About 50 percent q About 25 percent q None How long do you typically keep an issue of Morehouse Magazine? q More than a month q About one month q About one week q Less than a week q Discard immediately Which version of Morehouse Magazine do you prefer to read? q Print q Online q Both q Do not read it Would the addition of paid advertisement add or detract from Morehouse Magazine’s appeal/credibility? q Add q Detract q Make no diference To what degree do you consider Morehouse Magazine to be a credible source of information about the institution? q Consistently portrays the college accurately and objectively q Contains some “spin” but is generally accurate and objective q Usually portrays the institution only in a positive light q Is not a good source of objective information q No opinion Please identify the ways in which Morehouse Magazine strengthens your connection to the institution. (Please check all that apply) q Reminds me of my experience(s) at the college q Encourages me to volunteer my time to the college q Encourages me to support the college financially q Helps me feel more in touch with my graduating class q Provides useful career and networking information q Other

What actions have you taken as a result of reading Morehouse Magazine? (Please check all that apply) q Attended a college event q Contacted a classmate or friend q Discussed or forwarded a magazine article or issue q Made a donation to the college q No action taken q Recommended financial support of the college to a potential donor q Recommended the college to a potential student q Saved a magazine article or issue q Submitted a class note q Visited the magazine’s and / or college’s website q Volunteered for a college activity q Written a letter or e-mail to the editor or college q Other How many times per year would you like to receive Morehouse Magazine? q Once a year (Annually) q Twice a year (Semesterly) q Three times a year (Triannually) q Four times a year (Quarterly) q Not at all What other changes/improvements (e.g., content, kind of stories) from Morehouse Magazine would you like to see or suggest? (Please comment) ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

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Morehouse Memories

Renaissance Legacy

Robert M. Franklin graduated from Morehouse in 1975 with bachelor of arts degrees in philosophy and religion. “I arrived on Day One at Morehouse serious and ready to go. I was ready to learn,” he said. He initially wanted to study law, but eventually chose divinity school instead. “Theology and religion meshed who I was evolving into and led me to philosophical and religious pursuits.”


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Morehouse Magazine Spring/Summer 2012