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STEAM REPORT

FILLING THE NEED Morehouse Continues Legacy of Preparing African American STEAM Graduates By ADD SEYMOUR JR.

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ABEZ BEAZER ’16 loved being a member of the Morehouse tennis team, but for four years, he had something much more important on his mind – helping people. “I know what it’s like to be without health care,” said Beazer, who is now attending the Morehouse School of Medicine. “I wanted to be a professional tennis player, but then realized I didn’t have the passion or potential for it. I also realized that I liked biology a lot and I liked being able to relate to people and building a rapport with them. So I knew I was going into medicine. “Whatever I do in medicine, I want to have an emphasis on the underserved community because that was the community that raised me,” he said. Beazer’s story represents a lot of what Morehouse has and is producing in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields, known as STEM. Generations of Morehouse Men have used their STEM education to improve the lives of people worldwide. Among them are Samuel Nabrit ’25, a former member of the Atomic Energy Commission; Dr. Donald Hopkins ‘62, who helped kill smallpox and is now working to eradicate the Guinea worm; former U.S. Department of Health and Human Services secretary Dr. Louis Sullivan ’54; former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. David Satcher ’63, and Dr. Rod Pettigrew ’72, a physician and nuclear physicist. Even track and field legend Edwin Moses ’76 studied physics and industrial engineering and has been respected in those fields. As this listing illustrates, Morehouse has been a leader in preparing African American men for careers in the STEM disciplines. But, in today’s innovation market, the need for STEM graduates, particularly minority ones, is at an all-time high. It is estimated that by 2018, there will be more than 8.6 million STEMrelated jobs available across the nation.

MOREHOUSE MAGAZINE

24 WINTER 2017


Morehouse Magazine Winter 2017