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Brand Guidelines


Table of Contents 07

How to Use

09

Mission

14

Consumer Segmentation

17

Moovit's Voice

19

Brand Character

21

Equity Pyramid

23

Color

29

Typography

39

Photography

81

Graphics

93

Layout

95

Logo

103

Copywriting Guidelines


How to use Countless studies through decades of marketing prove that consistency is paramount for branding. Thus, this brand book is our north star, a beacon that will guide us to an emotionally evocative and psychologically resonant brand, synonymous with smooth travels across local transit, worldwide. To use this book, simply follow the guidelines provided for any individual design task. The key word is guidelines: part of what makes Moovit so powerful is the continual evolution, kaizen style. This book is intended to be a set of guidelines to ensure consistency, and importantly to encourage creativity. Nothing in here is a hard and fast rule, but rather should be taken as the baseline with which to communicate our brand tone of voice & key messages to our consumers. When you have a creative idea that stretches the guidelines, or that incorporates concepts not found within this book, propose it for discussion and if it works, it might become the new guideline.

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Mission What We Believe Everyone knows life is a journey, we believe you should have total peace of mind throughout yours. That’s why we make every effort to make your local journeys smooth, so you can spend your time creating memories along the way, not worrying how to get around your city, wherever you are located.

Our Mission Our mission is simple: Make every local journey smooth.

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Consumer Segmentation Consumer Segments Segmented based on needs from public transportation

Two primary segments each sub-divided into two prime prospect groups

HAVE to take public transit These people use public transportation because they do not have a car, either through a life choice or because of monetary reasons.

Strapped for Cash Have no car Walk whenever possible Maximize tasks when out and about, especially if from lower pop area Geography & Income Mostly urban, but also include rural or suburban area Low income Need State Most efficient way to get from A to B to C to X and back to A

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Carless lifestylers Don’t have a car, but could afford one, likely would come at the expense of something else in life More frequent trips Geography & Income More urban with ready access to convenient public transit Employed, but not high income Need State Smooth travels, fast info for rapid travel decisions


CHOOSE to take public transit These people use public transportation because they choose to for trip specific purposes, typically emotionally driven.

Convenience Commuters Dont want the hassle of driving Do something else with their time on commute Regular routes, few transfers or modes Middle aged to older Geography & Income Suburban or just on urban outskirts Mid to higher income Need State Avoid anything that would interrupt their routine

Get Around Townies Varied routes, frequent transfers Mixed modal trips Have a car but choose public transit either for convenience or emotional reasons Geography & Income Likely Urban Mid to higher income Need State Not having to think about how to get where they’re going

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Moovit's Voice Authentic We Are: Thoughtful Extroverted Empathetic

We Are Not: Taciturn Overbearing Sympathetic

Creative We Are: Clever Witty Imaginative

We Are Not: Sarcastic Comical Whimsical

Trustworthy We Are: Approchable Supportive Empathetic

We Are Not: Chatty Appeasing Sympathetic

Confident We Are: Arresting Modest Intelligent

We Are Not: Ostentatious Meek Intellectual

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Brand Character Our local transit advisor Our local transit advisor is a trusted confidant. An expert in getting around the local area, our advisor knows where to go and also what to avoid. Our advisor knows you, what you need, and as such, always offers the information you need, sometimes with a little nudge as to the best option, so you can make fast decisions and always have piece of mind that you are going to travel smoothly to your destination.

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Overall Equity

Points of Differentiation

Points of Parity


Equity Pyramid Overall Equity A certainly smooth journey

Points of Differentiation Size of our users: Evidence of trust Quantity of alerts Data quality Preciseness of schedule Reliability of information Design Look & feel, in & out of app Ease of use Multi-modal True integration vs. substitution

Points of Parity App features (trip plan, ride & line alerts, etc)

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Color Color is one of our primary branding cues. When you look across the transit app space, everyone looks the same. They all use similar shades, hues, saturation of the same color combinations, and while some may have different primary vs secondary color palettes, if you put them all together on one sheet, you couldn’t tell who was who. Moovit is different. To start, our primary colors are orange & blue. No other app in our space uses these colors heavily. Second, but perhaps more importantly, we use powerful colors—with high saturation, high luminance—to evoke emotions, and to stimulate the human psyche through the visual system. We compliment our bright color palette with heavy use of pure white, both in color and space. While the bright pops of color stimulate our consumers, the use of white color and space provides a sense of calmness, not sedentary nor passive calmness, but rather balance & peace of mind—our use of colors evokes a sense of control & harmony.

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RGB Primary Colors RGB: 240/99/52 HEX: #f06334

RGB: 226/59/3 HEX: ##E23B03

RGB: 255/255/255 HEX: #ffffff

RGB: 15/112/209 HEX: #0f70d1

RGB: 2/186/246 HEX: #02baf6

RGB: 255/12/50 HEX: #e10c32

RGB: 199/8/35 HEX: #C70823

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RGB Secondary Colors RBG: 0/0/0

RGB: 0/191/174

HEX: #000000

HEX: #00bfae

RGB: 41/42/48 HEX: #292a30

RGB Tertiary Colors RGB: 82/83/87 HEX: #525357

RGB: 11/89/185 HEX: #0B59B9

RGB: 247/162/12 HEX: #f7a20c

RGB: 122/124/127 HEX: #7a7c7f

RGB: 0/149/215 HEX: #0095D7

RGB: 224/132/8 HEX: #E08408

RGB: 189/195/199 HEX: #bdc3c7

RGB: 0/162/145 HEX: #00A291

RGB: 236/240/241 HEX: #ecf0f1

RGB: 6/156/77 HEX: #069C4D

RGB: 222/242/230 HEX: #def2e6

RGB: 10/186/102 HEX: #0aba66

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CMYK Primary Colors CMYK: 0/88/100/0 HEX: #ef4723

CMYK: 0/81/98/0 HEX: #f15825

CMYK: 100/93/5/0 HEX: #283c91

CMYK: 100/95/0/25 HEX: #1f2878

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CMYK Secondary Colors CMYK: 61/0/0/0 HEX: #40c7f4

CMYK: 72/65/63/68

CMYK: 0/100/74/0 HEX: #f00040

CMYK: 0/0/0/100 HEX: #000000

CMYK: 59/0/100/0 HEX: #75c043

CMYK: 0/0/0/0 HEX: #ffffff

HEX: #262728

CMYK: 27/100/43/7 HEX: #b0025a

CMYK: 7/5/2/0 HEX: #eaeaf1

CMYK: 25/21/12/0 HEX: #bdbdca

CMYK: 71/64/60/57 HEX: #323335

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Typography If our words manifest our personality, and convey who we are on the inside, then our typography is the outfit we wear to the party. Because people would think something different of us if we showed up to a black tie event in a bathing suit & sandals, we want to make sure we dress properly for the occasion. We have 2 fonts, each with multiple weights: Montserrat & Aleo. Each font is specifically chosen to reflect our brand tone of voice, as they both evoke a sense of authority & credibility while also being open and approachable. Both have beautiful design, while also having unique characteristics that you won’t find in other fonts. They can be used on their own, or in combination, but like we mentioned about the dress for the party, you should always choose the right weight & combination of weights for the occasion.

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Montserrat

Aa Aa

Our primary typeface was inspired by the beauty of urban typography and the typeface Gotham, designed for GQ Magazine. The open, round, geometric letterforms show friendliness, approachability, and ease.

Aleo

Our secondary typeface was designed with semi-rounded details and a sleek structure, giving it a strong personality while still keeping the legibility high. The semi-rounded letterforms are a great contrast to Montserrat’s geometric letterforms. This serifed typeface demonstrates trustworthiness, intelligence, and is even a bit imaginative with its semi-rounded forms.

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Typography sizing Display Text Should usually be Montserrat. You can use Aleo if the there is a valid reason based on style of the composition. Choose a big bold size and approriate weight, typically bold or semi-bold for display text.

Subhead Text Can be either Aleo or Montserrat depending on the composition and message of the deliverable. As a general rule, when using display text, subhead text, & body copy use the golden ratio's 2nd order of 2.6:1 to size the display text to the subhead text. If using only display and subhead text, size fonts based on the golden ratio of 1.6:1. Use only full integer point settings in type.

Body Copy For shorter body copy, prioritize Montserrat. For longer body copy, use Aleo. Aleo typically allows for more words, works better for latin languages that usually have longer word and line length, and is less expensive for printing. The target size for body copy is 16 pt & the minimum size for body copy is 13 pt at 72 PPI. Adjust accordingly for different resolutions. In general, use the golden ratio of 1.6:1 to size the subhead text to the body copy. Use only full integer point settings in type.

Gestault Box When laying out type sometimes it is best to align it justified in a gestault box. You may need to alter the tracking and sizes of the different lines of type in order for this to work.

Leading Leading should be +4 points of the font size. For example, if font size is 30 pt, leading would be 34 pt.

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An example of a gestault box, this particular example uses both of our typefaces. The top line is Montserrat Bold 45pt/49pt with +20 tracking. The bottom line is Aleo Regular 29pt/33pt with +11 tracking. This line began at +20 tracking and then was tracked in at one increment at a time to line up perfectly with the top line so that both lines of type are justified.

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Display Text Usually the headline or display text is in Montserrat but on special occasions Aleo functions better. In this particular case because the text is a quote Aleo adds a historical and trustworthy feel that a reader would not get from a sans serif typeface. Almost brings back the nostalgia of books.

Subhead Text In this particular ad, Aleo is used as the Subhead and follows the rules of typography size of being 1.61 larger than the body copy.

Body Copy The questions in this ad would be considered body copy. Following the rule that it is a shorter amount of copy it is in Montserrat typeface in a light weight. It also shows contrast to the headline and subhead which are set inAleo in heavier weights. It also follows the rules of type sizing and is at the minimum of 16 pt.

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Display Text Following the brand guidelines for display text, this headline is set in Montserrat in a bold weight and appropriate height for the composition.

Subhead Text Following the subhead text brand guidelines, this particular subhead is in Aleo and is in a bold weight but at a smaller size which is 2.61 times smaller than the headline.

Body Copy Also following the body copy brand guidelines by being set in Montserrat for short amounts of type at the correct size according to the golden ratio.

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Photography Like color, photography will be one of our primary branding cues. When people today see an epic, intimate, almost cinematic shot of sports, who do they think of first? Nike. We are going to use photography in the same manner to position ourselves as the leading transit app worlwide. In general, our photos will be high resolution, high contrast, and should have a cinematic feel. We will eschew the current hackneyed trends such as straight overhead shots, auto-filitered “instagrammy” photos, and overtly staged “slice of life” smartphone camera snaps. Instead, we will use photography that is, in the literal sense of the word, marvelous. Our photos will live at the intersection of empathetic & majestic. Viewers should know that we know it’s like to ride public transit. That we know the daily drudgery of the frequently crowded, mostly uncomfortable, often less than olfactory pleasing journey throughout the city. But rather than bemoaning this reality, our photography will evoke a sense of pride, leaving our viewers kvelling at the nostalgic beauty inherent in their local tranist, interwoven in the fabric of their local community. Following is a series of guidelines for selecting and editing photography. Classic photography principles are paramount in image selection, and we will make liberal use of photoshop techniques to create a consistent look and feel for our brand.

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Accents The accent color should be no more than 20% of the photo Use bright pops of color with high contrast to the overall photo The accent color should be similar to one of our brand colors The accent color should be used for 1 of 2 purposes: Draw attention to the primary subject of the photo Draw the eye in a specific direction or create movement within the photo

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Angles There is no single angle we will use. Rather, to evoke a cinematic feeling, our angles should feel like they come straight from a James Cameron or Michael Bay movie Following are some examples: Use low perspective, sweeping, almost awe evoking angles that make you feel like you’re on the ground, vulnerable to the action & movement in the shot Use intimate, straight from the eyes perspective that make you feel you’re literally seeing the scene through your own eyes. Employ plenty of open space and sky when outside Use soaring, bird’s eye angles to elicit feelings of flying & being above the fray. These shots should elicit feelings fusing peace of mind with overt exploratory control

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Color As already mentioned we should use highly saturated, bright colors in our photography, but we should pay special attention to the color balance in our photos to ensure consistency Remove any color casts from photos & adjust color balance to be as natural as possible Adjust color balances to achieve a cinematic feel. Backgrounds and the overall tone should be slightly cool, but showcase bright pops of soft/warm colors within the image Adjust for (very) slightly bluish greys Adjust for pure whites and pure blacks

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Composition Composition should work together with angles to create a sense of place and movement within the photos In general, we’ll follow classical photography principles, specifically using leading lines and the rule of thirds When selecting and cropping photos for compostition, the most important rule is to create a sense of movement for the viewer. Our photos should never feel like they are standing still

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Cropping Not to be confused with cropping a photo for purposes of composition, we will use photos where elements of the image are specifically cropped to create visual intrigue The subject of the photo should be cropped so that the cropped element is still recognizable, but because of the cropping, creates a sense of curiosity about what is happening in the non-visable frame of the photograph

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Faces In general we should avoid using faces of people in photos; however, when we do use faces, they should be looking direct to camera and/or it should be obvious that the person in the photo is interacting with the viewer, as if the image was being seen through the viewer's eyes

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Juxtaposition In certain photos, justaposition creates intrigue, sometimes obviously and sometimes subtly. Use juxtaposition either to draw attention to a specific part of the image, or to emphasize the message you are communicating to the viewer

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Graphics The most important criteria for our graphical elements is that they draw inspiration form the world of public transit. They should evoke a sense of familiarity with transit imagery people encounter every day: Soft curves and criss crossing, multicolored lines Circles, rounded rectangles, dotted lines Highlights and shading to draw attention to specific attention areas While we want to draw the inspiration from everyday public transit, we also want to apply our brand character & tone of voice and do something out of the ordinary that, while emblematic of what people see every day, compliments our marvelous photography.

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Line segments Use to direct the eye, typically in conjunction with text or specific page elements. Use these to show sequences of steps or as presentation bullets. Lastly they are used to show movement vertically or horizontally across the composition

The connector Use for our logo lockup with partnerships or transit icons. Ensure the connector is secondary to the logos. Typically use black, white, or grey and do not use our primary colors for the connector

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Callouts Use to bring attention to small graphical details and to explain in more detail about particular elements of the design

Transit Lines Use as a key category marker and to create movement throughout the composition. When white space doesn't work, you can use transit lines as design cues to fill blank space and move the reader through the composition


Transit Icons Use as when needed to communicate multiple forms of transit in Moovit. Use a circle around the icon. Prioritize unfilled backgrounds unless the legibility suffers (most often when used on photography)

Phones Depending on the composition and key message of the design, use either a real phone image or a line drawn outline to frame screen shots. Always use the most recent model of Android or iPhone. If using a line drawn phone, use grey or white stroke colors. Do not use black stroke color

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Maps Use maps as neutrals and backgrounds. The three types of maps we use are bitmap, localized light map and the bright satellite map

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Layout Before designing layout grids, start with the message, required assets for the piece of creative and their respective priorities of communication. Then, design your grid from the largest to the smallest elements. Use fibonnaci ratios as much as possible, but remember that communicating the message and evoking emotion are paramount: the most thoughtfully detailed layout grid that fails get the viewer to remember our message does just that: fails.

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Logo Our logo is truly distinct. No one else in our space smiles at their users. Because it is distinct, we must be strict in its usage. The logo should only appear with the wordmark in black (when on light backgrounds) or white (on dark backgrounds). The "dude" will always be orange. Follow these rules when using the logo: Never us the "dude" alone. It should always appear with the wordmark Legibility of the logo is paramount. Because we will employ heavy photography use, ensure the image is edited in a way that allows for the logo to be easily identified and read when overlaid on an image When overlaid on color, the logo should only be placed as follows (a) over primary blue colors, (b) secondary grey colors, (c) black or white Maintain clear space equal to at least 50% the height of the dude around the logo When locking up with partner logos, the Moovit logo will always take priority as the left most, top, or largest logo When placing partner logos on the same creative, but not in a lock up, the Moovit logo will always take priority as the largest logo, or in a placement of higher communication priority according to the following order of placements: top left, bottom right, bottom left, top right

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What Not to Do

Don't place the logo on pure orange.

Don't place the logo on any of our secondary colors (greys are OK)

Do not place the logo on top of photography that hurts the legibility of the wordmark

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Do not use the "dude" without the wordmark

Do not separate the dude and the wordmark from their original relationship

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Never use a stretched logo, always scale it proportionally

Never use the entire logo in all black or all white

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What to Do

The space above, below, or on either side of the logo should be at least half the height of the dude.

6px/2px=3px

Use the correct logo for the coloring behind it. If it is a dark background, use the white wordmark with orange "dude"

If it is a light background, use the black wordmark with orange "dude"

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Copywriting Guidelines Overall Communication Rules Never communicate with a user unless you are adding value for the user. In other words, whatever we say should benefit the user. Do not communicate if the value of the communication is only for us (ex. Say "We've updated the schedules for the busses you used to ride" and do not say "Come back to Moovit, we haven't seen you in a while.") Think beyond the push (or pop up, or other channel). Start with the answer to the question: what do we want the user to understand? Then plan the best combination of pieces of communication to do this. Remember that the average person sees thousands of marketing messages a day. Why should they take any action becasue of ours? Double check spelling & grammar, and then have someone else read it before sending. Remember that simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. Edit and re-edit. Draft, delete, and restart. Rewrite phrases until you've removed everything you can without losing the intended feeling.

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Branding Always capitalize "Moovit" outside of the logo. Never use the "Dude" except for inside the Moovit logo. Avoid divisive topics like religion, politics, sports and unless you previously have approval from the Brand Director.

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Structure Always design and write for mobile, then make sure it looks good on the desktop. Not the other way around. You can use mulitple calls to action depending on type of communication. For simple pushes/pop ups, use only one CTA. When needed, use interactive (rich) pushes with multiple CTAs. Whenever using a CTA, ensure it leads to an obvious and relevant location (not necessarily a landing page, for example, pushes can lead to pop ups.) Never use emojis unless previously discussed with and approved by brand director. For titles and headers, use sentence case (capitalize first word only) when writing conversational sentences or fragments. Use title case (capitalize each word except words like "the" "in" "a" "on" etc) for labeled headers.

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Tone Use rich, colorful words. Dont be generic ( ex. Don't say "awesome," say "magical." Don't say "beautiful," say "breath taking.") Use active verbs (ex. say "View" not "See" and "Get" not "Have") Write in the active voice and not the passive voice (ex say "We removed closed lines from trip planner this weekend" and no "Closed lines have been removed.") Give the user the credit whenever possible (ex. you found a way around the congestion downtown.) No texting acronyms, ever (ex. LOL, TTYL, ROTFL, etc) Rarely use ellipses "..." and never use them unless approved by marketing. Rarely use exclamation marks, and only use them for things that somebody is likely to share with their friends (ex. Say "System free rides today for Earth Day!" and not "The new Moovit version comes out today!") Rarely use questions. Only use questions in copy when purposely wanting to create a sense of doubt in the mind of the reader or legitimately asking a question to which you need an answer from the reader (ex. When no transit lines are running and we want to suggest a taxi, say "May we offer you a ride?" As another example, say "Are you sure you want to remove this line as a favorite?" and do not say "Are you tired of waiting for the bus?") Use cultural idioms that fit with the tone of voice (ex. The moment you light a cigarette, the bus will arrive.) Do not use slang idioms (got 99 problems but public transportation ain't one.) Be iconic in the use cultural references. Do not use soley pop/cult-ish references (ex. Reference Star Wars, not Mean Grils. Reference Taylor Swift, not Pitbull.

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Word Usage Only when absolutely necessary, abbreviate or contract words are not meant to be contractions (ex. info, reco, demo, int'l.) Be collective using "we" or "us" (ex. "we'd be delighted to hear your thoughts" or "let us know what's happening around town.") Be inclusive using "we" or "us" (ex "we want to thank the men and women behind the seat that keep the busses running" or "Transit strikes affect all of us.") Do not use "we" or "us" when it could be confused for bragging (ex. "we're making public transportation more fun.") Make sure you are using the proper spelling of words that sound the same and that automatic spell checkers won't catch. (ex. There vs their) Avoid saying "click here" "learn more" and other similar phrases when the assumed behavior is that a user will click, tap, or if there is a separate button contianing a call to action, even if that CTA is "Yes" or "No.") When asking the use to perform and app function, use singular verbs without modifiers. (ex. Say "Find" "Upgrade" or "Favorite" vs "Find More" "Upgrade Now" or "Favorite Here") Use simpler words with fewer syllables when possible. (ex. Say "Get there" instead of Navigate") Use contactions (ex. Say can't instead of cannot.) Do not use slang contractions. (ex. Ain't, c'mon) Never say "a lot" unless you are talking about real estate. In pushes and social media, you do not have to use a period at the end of the final sentence. When creating a list in sentence form, use a comma after every item in the list. (ex. Say "Take the train, bus, or ferry" and do not say "Take the train, bus, or ferry") When using a combination inside of a list, use an "&" sign for the combination (ex. "The train is not stopping at the corners of 4th & Main, 6th & Townsend, or 9th & Market")

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Examples Old: Instead of "Expected bus strike tomorrow. Plan a trip with Moovit for alternative routes..." This only gives the user an instruction without helping them understand the benefit of the app (cognitively, the user hs to make the connection between planning a trip and the fact that the strike will interrupt their usual plans.) The ellipses "..." subconsciously communicate that we are not confident in out statement. New (Good): You could say "Find your way around the expected bus strike tomorrow with alternative routes from Moovit." This option is a single sentence that communicates the benefit for the user. New (Better): But it's even better to say "Stay in control during tomorrow's expected strike. Find a different route with Moovit." Stay in control is an even more powerful benefit than "find your way around" "different route" is better and more familiar than "alternative route." Using "tomorrow's expected" instead of "the expected...tomorrow" saves characters and flows better. Saying "strike" instead of "bus" creates urgency for all users, not just bus users.

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Examples Old: Instead of "Several weekend service changes. Check "Service Alerts" for more..." This communicates that there are changes, but also communicates that we didn't take the time to figure out if they were relevant for our user. It also creates a feeling in the user that there are several, so it is (a) going to be a task for them to figure out if one of several applies to them, and (b) unlikely that if one applies to them, they will be able to do something about it since there are several others in the city. New (Good): You could say "Weekend Service changes shouldn't change your plans. Know exactly how to get where you're going this weekend." This option shows the user the benefit Moovit provides beyond just giving them information that there are changes. You do not even need to say "with Moovit" since (a) this is assumed because this is a push from Moovit and (b) the statement "know exactly how to get where you're going the weekend" creates subconscious curiosity where the user will think "how?" Hence leading to more opens. New (Better): But it's even better to say "These service changes won't change you plans. Know exactly how to get where you're going this weekend" Saying "these service changes" creates an a psychological gap theory effect that creates curiosity in the reader. This is the same technique buzzfeed and others use when writing headlines for Facebook, etc. Using "won't" in this instance indicates the user has more certainty over their journey and aligns with our overall brand equity of "a certainly cmooth journey."

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Examples Old: "Schedules are now updated. Check Moovit to see if this affects you." This makes the user think "why weren't they updated before?" and creates doubt that Moovit is the most accurate and trustworthy app. "New alert for lines 22,23 -" The "-" at the end looks sloppy and is grammatically incorrect. The push gives no context as to why someone recieved the alert, what the alert is about, or why they should care enough to click through, especially if they are not immediately about to ride. New (Good): "San Francisco buses just changed schedules-Moovit makes sure you're always up to date." Shows that we are the most accurate since the word "just" indicates that it just happened and we reacted quickly. Reinforces our value to useres that they have peace of mind by using Moovit since they know they'll always have up to date schedules. "Something happened on your favorite lines - 22, 23 - Moovit will help find a way around delays if needed." Indicates why the user is getting the message. Reinforces the benefit that we get you to your destination in the smoothest way possible.

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Moovit Brand Guidelines