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ITOR

BALL ED E I L A T NA


CONTENTS

RAVE Old and New FABRIC In the Know JYLLE NAVARRO Interview LFW Report Get rave savy with our pick of the best collections EDITORIAL KATIE EARY Interview and Illustrations ART ATTACK Artists making a break and the exhibits to be seeing DIRT CHEEP Get the raver look for a less than lavish lifestyle LUCY LOVE Interview LINEUPS Festival season guide


RAVE

OLD NEW The 90’s saw the height of the rave scene but it was never about the fashion or what looks good- music and estacy came first. People collaborated together to heighten their experience of life and generations have taken this way of life to an extreme, ravers have

become creative and diverse. Sportswear and simple T’s have turned into fluffy boots and neon outfits. Fashion today has taken a little ecstasy pill itself and is now influenced by this era. Once upon a time 90’s fashion was all about the reverse-able bandanna style peck caps

and over sized bomber jacket. Adidas and Puma was a real hit for the youngest as they thrived off the adrenaline of being free. Now Fashion concious teens want to be apart of this free spirit but this time around the generation have money and want style.

We will start in IBIZA Summer 1987, as the island’s celebrated Amnesia club, many party goers took a new drug called ecstasy for the first time. Its euphoric properties chimed with the playful strand of dance music that the DJ’s were spinning. Unknown to everyone they had stumbled upon the ingredients that turned into acid house, the UK’s last great youth subculture. Upon their return to the UK the revellers were determined to keep the party going. By the following summer, acid house dominated clubland.

In stark contrast to the dour music scene of the time, acid house was colourful, bold and fresh. A fascinating combination of Detroit techno, New York disco, Chicago house , European electropop and whatever other curious accoutrements it happened to pick up along the way, it was a complete break with what had gone before. At its heart it had a collectivist zeal that marked it apart from the snooty London West End club scene. It had its own fashions - baggy, loose fitting clothing, perfect for dancing the night, and dawn, away, plus other

key signifiers such as the iconic yellow smiley face. And in ecstasy it had its own drug. Originally used as an appetite suppressant during the First World War, ecstasy enabled people who wouldn’t normally do so to hit the dancefloor with unfettered abandon. In today’s media savvy days, it’s doubtful anything like acid house could happen on such a scale or cause such mayhem again . And while the spuriously titled new rave phenomenon makes for a neat cyclical accompaniment to acid house’s big bang, you can enjoy the 90’s all over again.


C I R

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B A

“Fabric is now the cornerstone in British clubbing for great music.” - Shy FX Fabric Night Club London first opened in 29th October 1999 the club is located on Charterhouse Street opposite Smithfield meat market. The club is known for its purpose built, three room layout and worldclass sound systems. Its playlists are dedicated to cutting-edge house, techno, electro, disco, dub-techno…and anything else that fits within the confines of the night’s future-forward and ever-evolving Fabric operates a casual dress code so jeans and trainers are allowed; they do not allow fancy dress, business suits or any day glow wear. The club opens 10pm on Fridays Saturdays/Sundays 11pm-6am.

hear the Plump DJs’ bleeps and beats; The Filthy Duke’s trashy electro rock; Sinden’s bassheavy bumps; Caspa, Skream and Benga’s throttling dubstep and the Perverts’ tricks and cuts, alongside the blistering drum & bass of Andy C, High Contrast, Noisia and Goldie et al; next to the future bass explorations from the likes of Ramadanman, Ben UFO and Breakage, often all in the same night fabric’s Saturday nights showcase underground DJ talent, internationally-renowned electronic music legends, and accomplished live acts. Its playlists are dedicated to cutting-edge house, techno, electro, disco, dub-techno… Launched in 2005 by original ‘90s and anything else that fits within Jungle pioneer, Shy FX, Digital the confines of the night’s futureforward and ever-evolving Soundboy quickly established programming. itself as one of the UK’s most exciting labels, its quality over quantity ethos making it a standard bearer for the UK’s world leading bass music scene. FABRICLIVE is a Friday night soundclash, touring all tempos from hip hop through dubstep and drum & bass to indie and electro. Here’s where you’ll


@MOOSED When and why did you want to open fabric? Cameron Leslie It was probably 1990 or 1991 that I decided to open a nightclub. It was a question of musical freedom. Throughout all of the '90s, you couldn't really get a venue in London unless it was playing happy house/ cheesy house/handbag house or another of those ghastly names that they managed to concoct for it. The London clubbing scene was desperate for somewhere new and exciting to hear music and to dance at the time.


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Cameron Leslie is the man behind legendary FABRIC nightclub, read on to find out how the club came about and what the 90’s ment to him.

@MOOSED Why did you pick the destination and building? Cameron Leslie I took me about 9 years to find the right building. The first few times I visited the club, it was still a dank Victorian underworld, a series of dripping tunnels previously used to store meat. It certainly didn't resemble a nightclub. It would have been The Arches or The Vault—or something blindingly obvious like that. I wanted something that had no prior connotations or associations with any other club.

@MOOSED How is fabric changed from when it first started? Cameron Leslie Well, we’ve got more well known from when we first started, so we’ve had the money to make the club better and improved the sound system. We get more mainstream DJ’s some nights as well. @MOOSED What music do you play in fabric? Cameron Leslie FABRICLIVE at fabric, on Fridays is normally drum and bass, dubstep and other base heavy sounds. Fabric on Saturdays is House, Tech House and Electronica & Techno.

WetYourself at fabric on Sunday’s is House, Tech House and Electronica & Techno. @MOOSED What do people wear when they come to fabric? Cameron Leslie Pretty much anything, people just come in casual wear such as jeans and trainers because they’re allowed. We do not allow fancy dress, business suits or any day glow wear.


JYLLE NAVARRO

Name: Jylle Navarro Age: 23 Profession: Designer University: Graduate from Middlesex Universirty, London @MOODSED Inspiration for Graduate collection? Jylle Navarro I was inspired by a lot of old school horror films mainly like frankenstein but then looked at all the grind house horror from around the 60’s and earlier.. like even the black and white ones had these really luminous posters. really cool. @MOOSED What have you previously been inspired by? Jylle Navarro I’ve also always been really inspired by films, a lot of

John Walters films like Pink Flamingos. Also Hedwig and the Angry Inch and Party Monsters are really inspiring. @MOOSED What have you been doing since graduation? Jylle NavarroIve Ive been doing a number of different shows to get my clothes out into the world, I am also involved in Alternative Fashion Week on the 27th April. @MOOSED How long does it take you to make your clothes? Jylle Navarro As they are all hand made

an average garment takes up to about 4 days straight however I do have interns to help me. @MOOSED Who’s your target market? Jylle Navarro My clothes are pretty alternative, so they are universal. @MOOSED What’s been the highlight of your design career so far? Jylle Navarro When Sydeney Jo Jackson modelled one of my dress’s for a photo shoot.


AW12

N O D LON N O I FASH K E E W

Into front rows we slipped trying to grab a glance of the action. We had our eyes open backstage and at the shows looking for cotemporary takes on this months favourite sub culture Rave, and look who we’ve found.


ROKSANDA ILLINIC

ASHISH 2012 A/W collection consisted of sequined blazers, tie-dye prints Joggers and Jeans. The Designer explained that “I see those Hare Krishnas on Oxford Street in their kurtas and then a hoodie, so I took that and mixed it with memories of my raving days”. This led to smiley faces and leopard print among the Buddhas.

Illincic mixed up her classic cocktail dresses with intriguing colour combinations of claret and turquoise. Key pieces included luxe sweatshirt hoodies in the softest jersey and silk, duffle bags with thick rope cords and oversized sporty parkas for day and night. These street influences were blended seamlessly with an elegant long silhouette and a colour

palette of navy, violet, and turquoise was finished with canary yellow shoes- the perfect statement look. Her move into a sporty silhouette was received well, due to her signature glamour still present in the bold and bright separates. A nod to 90’s hip-hop. Popularity has risen in the recent years making Illincic a go to designer for the most lavish of occasions.

Her pure silk gowns go for £900+ and an Oscar worthy dress can be custom made for £1500+, and you’ll find a selection of her best designers every season at Browns, Selfridges, Matches and Net a Porter. A slice of contemporary designer heaven can be yours, so start saving because luxury silk-crepe gowns in turquoise and hot pink don’t come cheap.


MEADHAM KIRCHOFF They never fail; performing yet again another spectacular show from Edward Meadham and Benjamin Kirchhoff. It was a funkadelic, psychedelic extravaganza that set the audience into a trance of excitement. Disco and rave originally create subversive groups together that brought

along a sense of celebration. The mash up between the intruding bright colour combinations combined with extravagant prints and tartan. Under the chiffon dresses was appliquĂŠd silk flowers, and excessive layered fabrics.


JEREMEY SCOTT

Competition in the race for the best tribal street wear brand is Jeremy Scott. Best known for dressing the likes of Rhianna and Kayne West, his Adidas collaboration bought winged high tops and leopard print sportswear to the masses. As well as citing nu rave, and street culture among his top inspirations he is heavily influenced by Studio 54 and pop artists such as Andy Warhol. Working closely with the foundation for the late artist Keith Haring, Scott created a shoe and track suit bearing Haring's graphic art—a special project known as AdiColor, another collaborative venture with Adidas. His clothing celebrates

street wear and oozes cool, expressing the wearer’s life and stories through Scott’s effortlessly cool and colourful clothing. For his latest AW 12/13 collection he bought back the best of the 90’s for everyone who grew up in them. A touch of nostalgia in the form of Bart and Lisa printed jumpers and trousers and winky, smiley and happy faces wearable for only the most outrageous and confident well off customer. Scott’s clothing isn’t cheapmarketing at about £500 + for a whole tracksuit, but well worth the investment if you’re looking to show you’re status in the streets of New York.


ARE YOU REACHING THE CLUB TONIGHT STYLING AND CREATIVE DIRECTION KYLE ADAMS AND NATALIE BALL


Clothing byJylle Navarro, Katie Eary and Stylists own


Ka

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@MOOSED What’s your design signature? @KATIEEARY When I first started designing it was all glamorous street wear but recently I would say just couture Eary designs would sum me up perfectly, HAHA!

@MOOSED Has the recession had an impact in the way you work? @KATIEEARY No chance, fashion is all about having fun and taking chances and that’s what my clothing is all about really. Money is an issue as everything seems to get more expensive over the seasons but we mange to push through and come out on top. @MOOSED Has the 90’s ever been the centre of your reference? @KATIEEARY I try not to steer towards older fashion I tend to think out of the box and go with much crazier new fashion that I can really stick my teeth into. Don’t get me wrong 90’s fashion is amazing but its been done and it should be what’s next?


Yayoi Kusama

ART ATTACK Will be showing her exhibition in the Tate Modern this is worth a view, as there has never been an exhibition of this size of her work in the UK. Her work ranges from pieces on paper to large sculptures; her work can be displayed in various medias. She is well known for her signature repetitive dot

patterns seen almost on every piece she creates, the colours used are very bright and the pieces she creates are very playful, which are often related to hallucinatory visions. The Yayoi Kusama retrospective is sponsored by Louis Vuitton is on at the Tate Modern until the 5th of June 2012. ÂŁ10, concessions available


Scott Alger is one to watch. t t o American photographer Sc r An based in London, ‘emotion e g l A through the speed of light’ is the name of given by the photographer to describe his work. He has worked on

various fashion campaigns such as Ray-Ban and Marie Claire Combined, his work is exciting and the everyday figure is infused with the speed of light.


Josiah McElheny

The Past Was A Mirage I Had Left Far Behind Is the exhibition name by McElhney an American sculptor who has transformed the White Chapel Gallery into a kaleidoscopic hall of mirrors. Where abstract images are reflected onto each screen. This Exhibition is worth a glance as you are visually captivated. The exhibition is on until the 20th July 2012.

Michael Bosanko

If you were lucky enough to see the Arc show, in London, then you would have sighted the vibrant photography by Michael Bosanko, his light sculptures are better known as light graffiti and are really worth going to see. This welsh photographer creates the amazing light graffiti effect using only five coloured torches and by leaving his digital Canon camera on a long exposure. He uses torches like paintbrushes to create his artwork.


Be inspired by our pick of the seasons best trend SPORT LUXE, and you’ll soon be Rave ready for a festival packed summer.


DIRT CHEAP THE RAVER LOOK FOR LESS


WE LOVE LUCY DO YOU! We had the chance to interview LOVE LUCY heres what she said about her music.

@MOOSED Describe your music. LOVE LUCY Grime, got a lot of influence from Dubstep, rave, drum and bass, electro. Music with a lot of heart, a lot of bass and a lot of energy. @MOOSED Who are your icons? LOVE LUCY Grace Jones and Lady Gaga @MOOSED What designer designs the clothes you wear at your concerts? LOVE LUCY We make our own costumes. We use a lot of visuals like dots, lines and squares for inspiration.

@MOOSED What work were you doing in the 90’s? Were you studying or working on your music? LOVE LUCY I wanted to be a painter. I was studying and graduated from Art School in Denmark before I went into my music career. I nearly quit after four years of studying but I stuck with it and I’m so happy that I graduated. My last year at art school turned out to be my most progressive and the most fun. I started my music around 5 years ago; I started writing my own lyrics because I wanted to become a rapper. I started by taking other peoples lyrics and mixing it with club music. But now I write my own stuff.


CREAMFIELDS

FRIDAY 24th AUGUST

BROOKES BROTHERS, TRUE TIGERS, THE PROTOTYPES, MIXMAG ALL STARS KISSY SELL OUT, UNION, ENGINE-EARZ EXPERIMENT, RIVA STARR, KIM FAI, THE JAPANESE POPSTARS, JET PROJECT

SATURDAY 25th AUGUST

AVICII, SEBASTIAN INGROSSO, DAVID GUETTA, EXAMPLE ARFO JACK, THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS (DJ SET) ANNIE MAC, BENNIE BENASSI, ERCI PRYDZ, SKRILLEX, SKREAM, CASPA, FLUX PAVILLION, STEVE ANGELLO

SUNDAY 26th AUGUST

DEADMAU5, CALVIN HARRIS, ZANE LOWE, TIESTO, AXWELL, PAUL VAN DYKE, LAIDBACK LUKE, GROOVE ARMADA, SUBFOCUS, SHY FX, MISTA JAM, STEVE AOKI, HARDWELL

E N I L GET

UE Q IN


GLOBAL GATHERING

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L A V I EST

FRIDAY 27th JULY

CHASE AND STATUS (LIVE), FRIENDLY FIRES (LIVE), ARMIN VAN BUUREN, MARKUS SCHULZ, SKRILLEX, KNIFE PARTY, NERO (LIVE), SUB FOCUS (LIVE), TINIE TEMPAH (LIVE), AFROJACK, MAGNETIC MAN, LOADSTAR FT. MC TEXAS, FEED ME

SATURDAY 28th JULY

MAVERICK SABRE (LIVE), DJ FRESH PRESENTS, THE JAPANESE POPSTAR, BENJA FT YOUNGMAN, ZANE LOWE, JAGULAR SKILLS, BOY BETTER KNOW, MS DYNAMITE, VISIONQUEST, TYDI, LEE CURTIS

WHETHER YOU GO TO GLOBAL GATHERING OR CREAMFIELDS YOU ARE SURE TO CATCH SOME GREAT MUSIC, FROM DRUM AND BASS TO TRANCE. BIG NAMES LIKE SUB FOCUS, FLUX PAVILLION AND AFROJACK WILL BE PERFORIMING AT BOTH EVENTS AND THEY ARE BOTH HAPPENING AT THE PEEK OF SUMMER.

GLOBAL GATHERING


CREATED BY NATALIE BALL KYLE ADAMS NICOLE EDWARDS ZIANNE CODNER LEAH BENNETT SOPHIE BAILEY

EDITOR IN CHIEF FASHION BLOGGER MUSIC CULTURAL ARTS ART DIRECTION

MOOSED Magazine Issue 1 Rave  

MOOSED is a fashion, lifestyle, music and culture magazine that give you the low down on specially selected themes for each issue. Our first...

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