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American Revolution on Oct. 9, 1779. On that day, more than 8,000 troops clashed for control of the city of Savannah and a combined French and American force failed to extract it from British control.The society offers two different educational programs that focus on the American Revolution. During the “American Revolution In Savannah” program, students participate in a multi-site visit that begins at Fort Jackson and ends at the site of the Battle of Savannah.They are introduced to the causes of the American Revolution and its impact on Georgia. The second program is the “Siege of Savannah.” Students are provided an indepth view of the 1779 Battle of Savannah. Soldiers from what are now eight modern countries participated in this pivotal event. In both programs, they experience the impact of Great Britain’s southern strategy as well as the military

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tactics and weapons employed. The Georgia State Railroad Museum is located on the site of the former Central of Georgia Savannah Shops, a major repair facility for the Central of Georgia Railroad and a vibrant part of Savannah’s industrial heritage. Construction began on the site in 1851 and the shops soon flourished as engines and rolling stock were built and repaired on site.The Civil War brought damage and destruction to the Central of Georgia Railroad, but by 1866 rail service had been restored and the Central was making a profit transporting cotton to the port of Savannah. The Central continued expanding and reached its peak in the 1920s. For over 100 years it was the largest employer in Savannah. Here students discover the importance of railroads to the state of Georgia and the United States.They learn how steam power effected the industrialization of American life and why the Central of Georgia was established.The Savannah History Museum is housed in the old Central of Georgia Railroad train shed built in 1860.The

building was used by the railroad until 1972. In 1984, a historical attraction called The Great Savannah Exposition opened in the building.The Coastal Heritage Society took over what had become the Savannah History Museum in 1990.The museum is now home to more than 10,000 artifacts — the largest collection of artifacts in the entire coastal community. Here our educational programs focus on the diverse history of Savannah: the Native Americans living in the area, the city’s role in the American Revolution; the impact of the Eli Whitney’s cotton gin, which was developed within 10 miles of this site; the importance of railroads to the growth of the country; the impact of the Civil War on Savannah. We invite you and your students to visit our sites and participate in the field trip programs of the Coastal Heritage Society! John A. Caramia, Jr. is the Director of Interpretive Programs for the Coastal Heritage Society. Visit www.chsgeorgia.org for more details and to make reservations.

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Seen 15 2  

Southeast Education Network issue 15.2

Seen 15 2  

Southeast Education Network issue 15.2