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FREE Premier Issue FALL 2010 Volume 1, Issue 1

Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill

Feature:

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To Tat or Not to Tat Help Wanted Mr. Right Gone Wrong

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Contents Table of Contents

Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill August/September 2010 Volume 1, Issue 1 Publishers Moonstone Studio, LLC Cindy M. Nitschke, partner Pamela K. Marsh, partner Advertising Sales Cindy M. Nitschke Ashley Taylor

Features In a World of Camembert Cheese and Muscadet Wine..........................................................................6 To Tat or Not to Tat..........................................................................10 Help Wanted....................................................................................13 The Fact and Fiction of Breaking Up...............................................20

Photography Ashley Taylor Interns/Writers “JD” Jeremy Davis , Emily Erdman Christie Hadden, Lamar Hill Lindsey Johnson, Susannah Long Amanda MacLaren, Dana Magliola, Qiara McCain Tina Moss Printing FreeportPress® uthemagazine.com PO Box 33531 Raleigh, NC 27536 Phone 919-815-6019 For information: cindy@moonstone-studio.com pam@moonstone-studio.com www.uthemagazine.com

DEPARTMENTS SPORTS: Student-Athletes: Perceptions on Campus.....................16 BOOKS: The Help.............................................................................19 MUSIC: “tha Lyracist”..................................................................................22 “Cover Bands Suck”.......................................................................23 ARTS: Golden Belt: A Mecca for Artists and Art Lovers................24 DINING: The Tastiest Campus Burgers...........................................26 “U Said”...........................................................................................30

FOR One Year SUBSCRIPTIONS Send your check for $10 to the above address along with subscriber’s name and address. U the Magazine is published six times a year by Moonstone Studio, LLC. All editorial contained within is the sole property of the publisher and cannot be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written permission of Moonstone Studio, LLC. The publisher accepts no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the writers or advertisers.

FRee Premier Issue FALL 2010 Volume 1, Issue 1

Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill

Feature:

Franklin Street in France? Plus:

To Tat or Not to Tat Help Wanted Mr. Right Gone Wrong

©2010 Moonstone Studio, LLC ReguLAR DePARtments:

music, sports, Dining, Arts, “u said”, Coupons and more!

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U the Magazine | August-September 2010

On the Cover: One of our student interns, Emily Erdman, visited this lake while studying abroad. Called Lake Thun, it is one of the two lakes that surround Interlaken, Switzerland. “The water was freezing, but it was so beautiful!” says Emily.


Lindsey Johnson is majoring in Spanish language and Literature and Spanish education at NC State University.

Tina Moss is majoring in Africana Studies at NC State University.

Susannah Long is an English and Creative writing major at UNC.

Lamar Hill is an English major at NC State University.

Jeremy Davis is a contributing music writer for U Magazine and plays in 80s rock cover band, Aftershock.

Qiara McCain is majoring in English with a film concentration at NC State University.

Christie Hadden is a world traveling food fanatic and founder of My Restaurant Guru, a Triangle-based Web site: www.MyRestaurantGuru.com.

Dana Magliola is doing Graduate Studies at UNC.

Amanda MacLaren is a student at UNC, majoring in Journalism and Mass Communication Reporting.

Emily Erdman is a French major at UNC with minors in English and creative writing.

WRITERS

Writers

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

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In a World of Camembert Cheese and Musca det Win e By Emily Erdman Photos courtesy of Emily Erdman

The “Franklin Street” of Nantes

S

Nantes soccer game with IES friends

Studying abroad has always been part of my life plan…for at least as long as I have had a life plan, anyway. I have not always been so organized. When I was a sophomore in high school, my English teacher began our first class with a goal exercise. We were to write down our life goals, as many as we could think of. My list was long, and included a visit to all seven continents and the creation of the newest and most original Ben and Jerry’s flavor. The next part of the exercise was to narrow down the list of goals to ten. It was difficult, but I managed to keep my aspiring career as a Ben and Jerry’s “creative director” in my top ten…I can’t pretend to be overly ambitious. However, when asked to narrow my list down to three goals, I was stumped. With room for only three, I had to cut out unrealistic

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aspirations such as learning to pilot an airplane, and yes, Ben and Jerry’s. My three goals remained as thus: to marry happily, to write a book, and to live abroad. I even went as far as to remove attending college from my list. Of course I wanted to go to college, but the aforementioned three were even more important. And so began my life as a person who has a plan. As time wore on, I did not simply keep those three goals; I allowed myself many others, college and graduate school being two of them, but I kept the original three at the top. Happily I did enter college in 2007, as a freshman at UNC Chapel Hill. It was my opinion at the time, and is still today, that UNC is the best university in the country. I am biased, of that I am positive, but I have my reasons. UNC is a place where I believe any student can find his

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

Place Royale, Nantes niche, if only he is willing to look. I hope that I can find as much happiness in what I choose to do after graduation as I have found in UNC—always the undergraduate’s dream! As a freshman I decided to become a French major. If I am being honest, I chose to become a French major because I had few other options. Creative Writing is more of a passion of mine and always has been, but UNC does not offer a Creative Writing major…simply a minor. In this, perhaps, I have found UNC’s only flaw! Duke students can rest easy at night knowing that UNC has at least one flaw. So I chose French as my major, a subject in which I made good grades, and something that I realized could be essential to one of my top three life goals: to live and study abroad. Being a French major meant I could study abroad and still get


My fa vorite boulangerie (bakery) in Nantes

Hanging out on the Erdre River

class credit, the best of both worlds. The choice to study abroad is not an easy one. It is four months of your life, which in an eighty year life is just a small portion, four out of 960 months, which does not sound like much. But when you are twenty-one years old, four months is a huge chunk of your time on earth, not to mention an eighth of your college career. However, I decided that the spring semester of 2010 was the only time in my life that I could do what I did—live in France. Yes, I could have chosen to live abroad after I graduated from UNC so as to not miss one second with my friends here, but after college I know that I will have to work, I will no longer be supported in any way by my parents, and a program like International Education of Students (IES) will not be available to me. Yes, to live abroad has always been part of my life plan, but when it came to decision time, I was scared. I graduated from a K-12 school in Charlotte, NC and many of my childhood friends moved with me to UNC in the fall of 2007. You could say that I have honestly not been forced to make new friends since I was five years old. While choosing to study abroad I was terrified that I would fail miserably at every aspect of the experience. I was worried that I would be awkward. I was worried that I didn’t speak French nearly as well as I had previously thought. I was worried that I would make jokes that are funny to my friends at home, but might be lame to people I had just met. I feared that maybe I had lost the raw ability to make new friends. That being said, I am so happy and pleased with my decision to study abroad. I cannot begin to explain the effect that it has had on me. Yes, for a while it was tough. It was strange and

a little uncomfortable to be surrounded by sixty people I had never met. It was strange to move into a house of French people who spoke too fast for me to comprehend and who ate foods I had never heard of. But it was worth it. I hope that everyone with any desire to have a similar experience will seriously consider the opportunity. And if you get a chance, Nantes is a beautiful place to visit. Inevitably, my study abroad experience taught me an infinite amount about myself, but also about study abroad in general. During my four months in France I learned three things about study abroad that I believe can translate to nearly every study abroad program. First, learn simple phrases first. Second, embrace the strongest aspects of the host culture. Third, if you are with a host family, make an effort to truly integrate yourself into their lifestyle as a family different from your own. Due to a minor error in translation on my part, I started the semester insisting that I was good in bed whenever asked how I was or if I needed more green beans with dinner. After my host mother was forced to ask me to refrain from saying “je suis bonne,” learning common French phrases became most important to my life in France. Direct translation is a dangerous habit to form when moving from English to French. Very little is translated word for word, verb tense for verb tense. “Je suis bonne” does not simply translate to “I’m good,” as the phrase “I’m good” is used in English. As I traveled to Italy, Spain, Greece, and Switzerland, I began to truly appreciate how far I had come in my French studies. I had learned to take for granted being able to say, “Where is the bathroom,” and “I would like some water, please” in French.

Cathédrale Saint-Pierre et Saint-Paul, Nantes

My host family’s house

Place Royale, Nantes

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

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My wonderful host family.

It is the simplest of phrases that are most vital to the study of a foreign language because they are the words that will get you farthest. France is a country known for many things—weak army, coups d’état, and berets. However, one of the strongest aspects of French culture is food. Smelly cheese, fine wine, creamy butter, frog legs, snails, and those excellent pastries called croissants are just a few of the items that define the true France. Food is

a huge part of La France, more so than most would probably even imagine. Honestly, how much can food define a country? Amazingly, a whole lot. Beaucoup, in fact. Meals are the most important times of the day. My host mother makes a home cooked meal for both lunch and dinner seven days a week. The entire family comes home from work or school to sit down at the table and eat

My bedroom in Nantes what my host mother prepares. Even on weekends, the meals are eaten at home. Restaurants are saved for eighteenth birthdays and anniversaries. Each meal usually begins with a soup, followed by the main meal, and ends with a salad and of course, cheese. Cheese is always the last course of the meal, right before dessert.

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U the Magazine | August-September 2010


I promise the taste is better than the smell would suggest. Occasionally my host mother would prepare a dish that I had never heard of and the entire family would wait with bated breath as I took my first bite, hoping that I would be pleased. I continually looked forward to meal times because they were the moments during which I was able to get to know my family best. All host families vary. Each study abroad location and country functions differently and all families will have a different reaction to outsiders living in their homes. My experience was excellent because my host family was truly lovely and welcoming. I was placed with a family consisting of a mother, father, two daughters, and three sons. The children are aged 23, 19, 18, 12, and 7, and just the youngest three live at home. My host father works as a landscape gardener, and owns his own company. My host mother stays home to take care of the family. Since meals were the easiest way to spend time

with my family, I had to look for other occasions to really get to know them outside of the house. They were very hospitable and continually invited me on Sunday afternoon walks and to their beach house. I was able to help out with the birthday party when the six year old turned seven. It is not always this easy to find ways to truly integrate yourself into the life of your family, so I was lucky. I was closest with my host mother. She was the one at the house when I got home in the afternoons. She was the one who cooked tomato crumble for dinner simply because she knew it was my favorite dish. By allowing myself to open up to her, I found my first friend in Nantes. This was invaluable to my experience in France. Any way you choose to look at it, no matter the school or foreign location, study abroad is a wonderful program. It gives you the opportunity to experience a lifestyle completely different from your own. I chose France, but I could have studied in Spain, Israel, the United King-

dom, or even Rwanda. I believe that there is a study abroad location for anyone who wants one. Every program is different. My program was through the Institute for the International Education of Students, or IES, but there are programs through UNC and many other organizations. Remember to learn simple phrases first, embrace the strongest parts of the host culture, and become an integral part of your host family if not living in a dorm and the study abroad experience will be more than worthwhile. Having crossed “living abroad� off of my life goals list is a good feeling, but if given the chance to go back after college, I would not let such a chance pass me by. _________________________________ Emily Erdman loves to write, read and travel. She is a French major at UNC with minors in English and creative writing.

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

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A closer look at the decision to sport ink By Amanda MacLaren

Photo by Ashley Taylor

Samantha is a tattoo artist at Warlocks in Raleigh. She has been doing this for four years and says 50% of their clientelle are college age.

Tattoos have been around for thousands of years, yet a social stigma still remains attached to the art of placing permanent ink on the body. Some people see it as desecration of the body, an act that makes the person sporting ink less pure than those who forego the procedure. Indeed, tattoos have been linked for generations to people who have committed criminal acts or belong in gangs. But, generally, the tattoos in Western society today are not so menacing. Sure, gangs and prisoners do still use tattoos to identify with their particular criminal association or symbolize the types of criminal acts they have committed, but most tattoos in society today are for decora10

tive or spiritual purposes. These reasons are the most common influences in the average college student’s decision to get a tattoo. Tattoos are popular right now, not just among the general college population, but in the media as well. As shows like A&E’s Inked and TLC’s Miami Ink and LA Ink give insight into the culture behind tattooing, they provide a window into a world that generations past have turned a blind eye to. Also, celebrities like Angelina Jolie, Megan Fox, Colin Farrell and many others all display personal ink, as do the some of the characters they portray in movies or on TV. If celebrities, some of the most beautiful people in the world, have tattoos, then there must be some-

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

thing that makes tattoos so alluring that they are becoming symbols of attractiveness in Western society. These representations of tattoos can translate easily to college students since most of the media that targets the college age groups are shows on MTV, movies with young celebrities, teen magazines and so on. In the June 2010 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine, for instance, Lea Michele, one of the actresses on the hit Fox TV show Glee, said that “Tattoos are really accepted in my family. We all have them and think they’re beautiful.” Many families nowadays are much more receptive to the idea of tattoos, as Michele’s family demonstrates. College students are also seeing more positive


Photo by Amanda MacLaren

reception from their relatives as well, which makes having a tattoo much easier. “My mom took me to get my first one so she’s obviously okay with me having them,” Joseph Currin, a 20-yearold sophomore at Mars Hill College, NC says. “She even wants to get a matching one with me.” Not all families have such open minds, however. When some college students get tattoos, they are met with disappointment or scorn from their family members. “When I got my tattoo, my mom told me that I had desecrated my own body,” says Alyssa Griffith, a 21-year-old senior at UNC-Chapel Hill, says. “She said that I was damaged and that she was disappointed in me, but we just don’t talk about it now.” Griffith has received criticism not only from her own family, but also from the families of her friends. “Sometimes I do feel judged,” Griffith says. “Like when I was wearing a bikini at the lake, my friend’s mom definitely eyed my tattoo in a disapproving manner.” Despite judgments passed by individuals, most college students simply ignore negative opinions in favor of having body art. Stephanie Curtis is a junior at Meredith College. She has a grand total of 11 tattoos, the first two of which she received on her 18th birthday. “I think of tattoos like I think of a scar from falling when you were a little kid,” Curtis says. “This scar, although ruining your otherwise ‘perfect’ skin, comes with a story. What is wrong with putting a mark on your skin that isn’t just the consequence of being klutzy, but the product of a conscious decision to add inked style into your body?” Many college students don’t see a problem with getting a tattoo, especially if it has personal significance to them. The reason could be religious, decorative or even in memory of a loved one who has passed. No matter the reason, most college students who have tattoos agree that having body art is a way that they express themselves and their feelings. “I think tattoos are a wonderful

I have a three-legged, purple, leopard print elephant on my back,” Curtis says. “If that doesn’t fully describe my regrets, I don’t know what could.

form of self expression,” Currin says. “I’d tell anyone that really wants one to consider why you’re getting it and what it really means to you.” Currin stresses that it is important for anyone considering a tattoo to realize the ramifications of getting inked. Specifically, to make sure it’s something that they will want to have on their skin forever. “Don’t go into a shop and look at the work of others and pick something from there,” Currin says. “That shows no originality and you’re going to be stuck with it for the rest of your life, so get something that means something to you and that you won’t regret.” Regret can play a big part in having a tattoo. Although Curtis loves her tattoos, she admits she has some that are poorly done, and others that she is unhappy about. “I have a three-legged, purple, leopard print elephant on my back,” Curtis says. “If that doesn’t fully describe my regrets, I don’t know what could.” Another major consideration before jumping into a tattoo artist’s chair is thinking about just where the tattoo is going to be on your body. Although tattoos are definitely becoming less stigmatized in the general population, certain employers might still frown upon continued on next page U the Magazine | August-September 2010

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continued from page 11 Nicknames are often the embellished subject of many tattoos.

have to live with. Just remember, others, such as employers, friends, or parents, might have concerns about your tattoo. So if you are thinking about it, take that into consideration when you are choosing what your tattoo will be, and where it will be on your body. Again, the decision is yours, but with ink this permanent, its best not to be taken lightly. ________________________________ Amanda MacLaren is a student at UNC, majoring in Journalism and Mass Communication Reporting.

Photo by Ashley Taylor

unconcealed tattoos. Many college students try to get tattoos where they can be hidden by clothes, and suggest to others considering tattoos they should do the same. “I covered [my tattoo] when I was a beginning teacher,” says Abbie Sudimack, a 27-year-old elementary school teacher at Ballentyne Elementary School in Charlotte, North Carolina. She has the Chinese symbol for ‘luck’ on her ankle and another tattoo on her shoulder. “Now I don’t care what people think. I used to in college and in high school. But no one says much except students. I just tell them it’s a tattoo and move on.” In the end, the decision to tat up lies only with the person considering getting inked. After all, it is your body you will

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U the Magazine | August-September 2010

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d e t n a W p l e H By Susannah Long Photos by Susannah Long

I

I got my first real job when I was sixteen. It was at an ice cream shop. I mean, what could be better than working at an ice cream shop? Four days a week, I’d scoop and mop and restock rainbow sprinkles and get verbally abused by parents with unhappy children. The schedule was always mixed up, my shifts were always too long, and even though we weren’t technically allowed to eat the ice cream, I gained about fifteen pounds. After three months, just the sight of whipped cream made me queasy. So I packed up my sticky apron and went home and watched “Little House On The Prairie” reruns instead. But this isn’t high school anymore. We’re adults. We pay bills and wash laundry and make our own tea when we catch a cold. Getting a job isn’t so you can fund your video game habit, it’s so you can do things like eat and pay student loans. Scary.

So you need to find a job…

Ga Ming Gao Production Intern UNC-TV

Don’t let anybody tell you that there are no jobs because of “THE ECONOMY”, like it’s kryptonite to your potential, or something. If you want to work, you can find work. And it can be a job that you actually want. Before starting your job hunt, make a list of your goals. How much money do you want to make? How many hours can you feasibly work? Do you want to develop any specific skills? Is there anything you aren’t willing to do? Then identify what type of work you want.

and local businesses to connect students with the right employer. It’s an easy way to plug into a professional network while getting feedback from an advisor. Then check the school newspaper, the local newspaper, and Craigslist (though, be discerning when setting up your interviews). Talk to your friends. Are their employers hiring? Or walk into your favorite businesses and just ask. You can even send unsolicited applications to companies where you’d like to work for, even if you know it’s a long shot. When searching for the right job, tenacity is your best friend.

But where do I look?

Getting the Job.

There’s no shortage of resources for the serious job hunter. A good place to start is with your college’s campus career services. They deal primarily with alumni

Start by looking good on paper. Clean up your résumé. That’s another thing your campus career center can help with, they offer online résumé builders and will even

review your paperwork and give feedback. Also, get in touch with your references and let them know that they may be contacted. It gives them a chance to prepare and you may find out that they didn’t like you quite as much as you thought (oops). Then clean up your public image. Google yourself and make sure there’s nothing out in cyberspace that you don’t want a prospective employer to see. Every boss I’ve ever had has a funny story about searching an applicant on the Internet and finding something outrageous or compromising. Don’t let it happen to you. Then, make sure you look good in person. Shower. Comb your hair. Dress for the position you’re applying for. There are a million reasons a person may decide not to hire you, just don’t let it be something continued on next page

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Brittany Price Gulf Rim Cafe Waitress and Bartender

William Cole Ram Book & Supply Cashier

d e t n a W p l e H

Continued from page 13 preventable, like mismatched socks or bad breath. At the same time, don’t lie about who you are. If you have piercings or tattoos that will be visible at work, don’t cover them up in the interview. It’s best that your potential employer has a clear view of who he or she is hiring. Which brings me to the number one rule of a good interview: Be Honest. You’re trying to enter into a business relationship with this person–emphasis on the word relationship–so act accordingly. Decide early the minimum and maximum hours you’re willing to work and be firm. Bring a copy of your school schedule and any extra-curriculars you’re not willing to give up. Don’t use the words “always” or “never” unless you really mean it. It’s easy to become so absorbed in pleasing the interviewer that you fail to say, “No, I can’t work seventy hours a week.” And if you’ve left a job for a specific reason, speak up. That way you won’t enter a work environment that you already know you hate. After the interview, send a thank you note, or email. If you don’t hear anything in five to seven days, shoot an email or call. It’s not over-bearing; it just shows you’re interested and proactive.

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There are four basic types of student jobs: On-campus, Off-campus, Seasonal, and Internships. Here are some examples:

On-Campus

Name: Bill Kumpf Employer: Memorial Hall Box Office Job Title: Customer Service Associate Job Description: Selling tickets, answering phones, assisting with events. The Perk: A central location and an employer who understands that you’re a student first. “I’m never late to class and I’m always the first to know about events on campus.”

Off-Campus: Name: Brittany Price Employer: Gulf Rim Cafe Job Title: Waitress and Bartender Job Description: Taking orders, serving food, busing tables, cleaning, and tending bar. The Perk: It’s a good chance to get off campus and there’s always the option of getting more hours. “I’ve made great friends, learned a lot about the community, and the money’s not bad either.”

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

Seasonal:

Name: William Cole Employer: Ram Book & Supply Job Title: Cashier Job Description: Support staff for a student bookstore at the beginning and end of each semester. The Perk: You can have a steady job and make money without having to work through the year. “It gives me time to focus on school during the semester.”

Internship: Name: Ga Ming Gao Employer: UNC-TV Job Title: Production Intern Job Description: Dubbing, queuing tapes for recording, assisting during broadcasts. The Perk: Internships may not always be paid, but it’s a chance to network and develop new skills. “You can read about it all you want, but hands-on is the best way to learn things like this.” __________________________________ Susannah Long is an English and Creative writing major at UNC.


CAREER FAIRS NCSU Job Fairs information link: http://www.ncsu.edu/career/students/ quicklinks/careerfairs.php

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SPO

SPORTS:

Student Athletes: Perceptions on Campus By Dana Magliola

Photo courtesy of Peyton Williams

Wolfpack senior, Nate Irving shares his perspective after a game. “After a win, everybody is happy and strangers come up and congratulate you. After a loss, it’s almost like people are afraid to speak. I’m not sure if it’s a negative feeling towards me as an athlete, or just them not knowing how to approach somebody after a loss.”

C

Collegiate athletes are perceived in many different ways. Although each school and athlete is different, some are viewed by their peers as stereotypical jocks, others are respected as accomplished student leaders, and in some cases, revered as celebrities. After speaking with fellow students at several Triangle universities, this author has found that there is no shortage of opinions on campus about our athletes. North Carolina State University student athletes treasure every opportunity to compete with their Triangle rivals. Whether it’s against Duke or UNC, competitive pressure is intense yet they must balance the demands of sports with those of the classroom. In the shadow of the iconic Memorial Bell Tower, senior and Shelby, North Carolina native, Holly Currie speaks about her perception of student athletes prior to coming to Raleigh. “I expected them to be smug and cliquish, and it’s true that there are some athletes on campus like that, but overall I am impressed by their drive to get an education,” says Currie. “Most of the athletes I know are good students and take it 16

seriously. In class, I’m often impressed by their contributions.” Only a few miles away in Durham, North Carolina Central University sophomores Britney Jackson and Susan Russell walk down the red brick steps towards the library. Jackson is studying Physical Education and is quick to offer an informed opinion about athletes at NCCU. “I see a lot of our athletes through my classes,” she volunteers, “and they’re serious about their work. You can tell that, as athletes, they feel a passion for our major.” Russell, a Computer Science major, suggests that the perception of athletes at NCCU depends on how popular their sport is. She points out that football and basketball players are the most recognizable student athletes on campus. “You can tell who they are, dressed in team sweats or jackets – or spandex, too,” she continues, laughing. “It seems that a lot of the time people’s perceptions about student athletes depends on if they’re winning or not.” Across town, students pass through the Duke University athletics quad, affectionately labeled Krzyzewskiville

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

after their long-time basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski. As this year’s NCAA Division I men’s basketball national champions, sports remain a popular conversation topic on the campus, but winning a championship takes hard work and sacrifice. This fact does not go unnoticed by Duke junior political science-major Paul Clayton who is reading on a bench outside of Cameron Indoor Stadium. “It has to be tough to be both a student and athlete. I hardly have time to get my work done for class and try to have a social life. Athletes have class, games and training and I’m sure they make sacrifices to do it all. I respect that. It’s tough,” he adds.

Statue of N C Central University founder, Dr. James E. Shepard, who often explained the NCCU mascot to his students, “the Eagle is no common, ordinary barnyard fowl. While a Sparrow clings to its flock, an Eagle soars alone.”


ORTS Questions & Answers from Student Athletes Q Do athletes feel any additional as student leaders so often, because they A

“I might not need to be a leader, but always know that I’m representing more than myself so I have to conduct myself as such.” —Nate Irving, NC State Football Senior; Wallace, North Carolina

A “I think they do. Especially here

because the population is so small so you can pick athletes out pretty easily. Everyone is looking at you and the example you set, especially when you are bigger than everyone like I am.” —Brandon Harper, Duke Football Senior; Alpharetta, Georgia

A

“As student athletes, I believe we have the responsibility of representing ourselves, our teams, and most importantly, our institutions both on and off campus. Being an athlete and a member of a team fosters the development of many important skills that I believe can be important qualities in a good leader such as a strong work ethic and good communication skills. Because of our higher visibility on campus, we are put into a position to lead whether we want to or not and, to me, the most important part of that is leading by example. Yes, it would be easier to skate by, but I think that we owe it to everyone to be positive representatives of Duke University.” —Kellie Catanach, Duke Volleyball Junior; Tampa, Florida

A

“I don’t necessarily feel pressure to be a student leader on campus, but I do feel that by being a student athlete, I have the characteristics and predispositions to be a student leader very easily. This is perhaps why student athletes are viewed

fit into the role very easily.” —Becci Burling, Duke Volleyball Senior; Monument, Colorado

Q

Do they feel they are perceived positively or negatively?

Photo courtesy of the Duke University Athletics Association

responsibility or accountability to be student leaders due to their higher visibility on campus?

A

“Positively—always positively.” —Nate Irving, NC State Football

A

“I think that for the most part student athletes are perceived in a positive light, especially at Duke where athletics are such a large part of the culture. Of course there are those people who think that we all have it easy or this, that, and the other thing, but most people seem to respect the fact that we work hard both on the court (or field) and in the classroom, and I think that they appreciate that.” —Kellie Catanach, Duke Volleyball

A A little of both … I think it is differ-

ent here than a lot of places because it is such an academic school. Some think that athletes here are the typical stereotype, that they take all of the easy classes or don’t have to do any of the work. On the other hand a lot of the students like being around us, are friends with us and want to know what happened in the game on Saturday so all of those are positives. Because the school is so small and you are under the scope I think they see how hard we work academically and athletically though. —Brandon Harper, Duke Football

Duke University senior Becci Burling jumps to block a spike on the volleyball court, but says that the demands of the court are often transferable to campus. “I have the characteristics and predispositions to be a student leader,” says Burling. “This is perhaps why student athletes are viewed as student leaders so often, because they fit into the role very easily.”

Q

Do they feel any resentment or do they feel that other students express positive—or negative—attitudes or opinions towards them?

—continued on next page U the Magazine | August-September 2010

17


SPORTS:

Questions & Answers

Photo courtesy of Peyton Williams

continued

Photo courtesy of the Duke University Athletics Association

Left: North Carolina State senior Nate Irving recognizes that his position on the field has its implications on campus. He says, “I might not need to be a leader, but always know that I’m representing more than myself so I have to conduct myself as such.”

A

“You get the vibe sometimes that other students don’t like the athletes, but I don’t get that very often.” —Nate Irving, NC State Football

A

“Overall, I feel that other students express very positive attitudes towards student athletes. A great example of this positive attitude is when our men’s basketball team won the National Championship this year. The entire campus was united through their success, and everyone enjoyed being associated with them and Duke University.” —Becci Burling, Duke Volleyball

A

“Mostly positive attitudes, not too many negative that I have seen…especially now since I have been here for awhile I can see the difference in how students think of our football team from how they did my freshman year.” —Brandon Harper, Duke Football

Q

Is their perception on campus affected positively or negatively by their performance in competition?

A “Yes. After a win, everybody is happy

and strangers come up and congratulate you. After a loss, it’s almost like people are afraid to speak. I’m not sure if it’s a negative feeling towards me as an athlete, or just them not knowing how to approach somebody after a loss.” —Nate Irving, NC State Football

18

With rabid fans like these, Duke University junior volleyball player Kellie Catanach tells U The Magazine that being a student-athlete has a great upside, “It’s nice to know that every time you put on that Duke jersey, you have an entire school behind you that wants you to succeed and cares about what you do.”

A

“Here at Duke, as with any place, when a team is extremely successful, students perceive those student athletes in a more positive light. The nice thing about Duke, though, is that many students are die-hard Duke fans and will love you no matter the outcome of the previous weekend’s game. Sure, students may express frustration that the men’s basketball team lost a game, but if they see one of the players on campus they would still rather shake their hand and meet them than remind them what they did wrong in that loss. It’s nice to know that every time you put on that Duke jersey, you have an entire school behind you that wants you to succeed and cares about what you do.” —Kellie Catanach, Duke Volleyball

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

A

“As a volleyball player at Duke, I feel that our performance in competition can only positively affect our image on campus. Our image wouldn’t be negatively affected if we performed worse; in fact I feel that we get more support after a tough loss.” —Becci Burling, Duke Volleyball

A

“It is positive because we have proved that we didn’t get lucky in a couple of games. It looks like we are getting better and starting to turn things around. We want to show all the hard work we have put in.” —Brandon Harper, Duke Football ________________________________ Dana Magliola is doing Graduate Studies at UNC.


BOOKS

BOOK REVIEW:

The Help By Lamar Hill

I

Isn’t reading great? I think so. No, I know so. I also know that the average student has about 1,000,000 pages of such-and-such to read and almost no time to read for pleasure. Even if a bit of free time can be spared, it is too troublesome to sort through all the novels available and find a book worth reading. That’s where I come in! This time around, I am pointing you towards an extremely well-received and controversial first novel called The Help by Kathryn Stockett. Born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, this Southern white woman has skillfully walked the line between daring and reckless. Complete with dialect, Stockett’s novel relates the struggles of Aibileen and Minny, two fiery personalities and black house servants in the 1960s south. Aibileen gives and gives to her friends and the households she cares for, particularly the children, although she could use a bit of nurturing herself. Minny is very bold and outspoken; unfortunately, those are horrible qualities for a maid. While caring for white families for little respect or pay, their struggles collide with the ideals of Miss Skeeter, a white woman with very unorthodox opinions. Miss Skeeter is an aspiring writer whose secret subject matter inevitably causes trouble: the rough and tough life of black maids. Set in the high point of the Civil Rights Movement, the novel flashes between perspectives of these three women in the midst of the turmoil.

As the trio gets mixed up with new acquaintances and pursue Skeeter’s book idea, a cascade of secrets and trouble begin to fall. Aibileen, Minny, and Skeeter fight Jim Crow laws, outdoor toilets, and the down-right cruelty of the world they live in. Though the novel will mostly appeal to women, even you tough guys will find yourselves admiring the trio’s love, sassiness, and tenacity and hoping Miss Hilly falls under a bus. Witness the girl power of three women who are ordinary only on the outside and the triumph of their will. Stockett hints that empathy not colorcoded and ambition can truly be noble. With a message and the courage to speak out, Aibileen, Miss Skeeter, and Minny achieve much. Whether you buy it from Barnes and Noble, borrow it from a library, or steal it from a friend, make sure you get your hands on this highly recommended read. _________________________________ Lamar Hill is an English major at NC State University.

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U the Magazine | August-September 2010

19


The Fact and Fiction of

By Lindsey Johnson

I

Is it a bowl full of full-fat ice cream covered in chocolate syrup and whipped cream? Maybe it’s a hot bath with the latest Nicholas Sparks page-turner. Or could it be the night out with friends and great cocktails? With all of the self-help books out there today, it would seem that the perfect solution to a break-up is easy to find. But is that really true? What do we do to get over the relationship that we ultimately believed to be the last one we’d ever have? What works? I decided, after having recently experienced a brutal end to what seemed a perfect relationship, that I would investigate break-up remedies and then test each possible solution. But in order to put these methods to the test, I first had to determine the top break-up cures out there today. I interviewed a variety of students from various universities in and around the Triangle. (And don’t think this is one-sided, gents. I asked for your input, too!) Here are a few suggestions I got. Jessica (UNC): “Getting rid of things that reminded me of my ex helped a lot.”

AJ (NCSU): “I usually go straight to my drums or some athletic activity to take my mind off of it. I try to hang out with friends more, as well.” Joseph (Wake Tech): “Sometimes you can’t help but think about them. So I try to think about them without make-up. Then I laugh. Then I feel better.” Megan (Meredith): “The best way to get over a break-up is to surround yourself with your friends so they can not only distract you from your heartbreak but also remind you that you are better off anyway.” Lesley (NCSU): “It has always helped me to go out with my friends, order something that I know is bad for me, and vent. Margaritas don’t hurt either.” Kirstin (UNC): “When I go through a breakup, I like to avoid thinking about yesterday and move on to tomorrow.” Laura (NCSU): “Hanging out with “friends, pigging out, and watching sappy movies is my go-to after a break-up, but I would love to do that most days anyway!” After figuring out what it is that we do to get over these now-ended rela tionships, I braced myself for a wild ride through each of the items on my “Breakup remedy list.”

1) Binge-eating 2) Self-pampering 3) Going out with non-mutual friends 4) Deleting his/her number The ultimate goal: to get over “Mr. Right— turned Wrong.”

STEP ONE—Binge-eating:

I have to admit, it is tempting to kill the calorie-count and indulge in something decadent after a relationship ends. After all, we deserve it, right? So I loaded up on all of the comfort food I could find. In front of me sat a pint of Rocky Road, a bag of Doritos, and a package of Twizzlers. I admit the initial goal of being “comforted” seemed to be met with success by my pile of junk-food. An hour later; however, I felt more guilt than I did relief.

Conclusion?

It definitely helps short-term to have a little comfort food. But instead of having an entire pint of Ben and Jerry’s, keep it down to just a serving. That way, you can still get your fix without feeling remorseful. After all, these activities are supposed to make you feel better, not worse!

STEP TWO—Self-pampering: I was excited about trying this one out. I decided that a shopping spree followed by a visit to the spa was exactly what I needed to get out of my “funk”. After a three-hour visit to Crabtree Valley Mall, I took myself to the spa for a massage and facial. I came home feeling refreshed and beautiful…until I looked at my bank statement. Ouch!

Conclusion?

Mr. Right Turned Wrong

20

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

The pampering thing was great. Unfortunately, my wallet did not agree with me. Sometimes I forget that I am a poor college student, and I definitely end up paying for it later. However, the pampering did wonders for my self-esteem and I really did feel much better about the break-up. Perhaps there is a way to split the difference. Instead of going on


Breaking Up a shopping spree, pick your favorite store and allow yourself one “treat” with a pre-set spending limit. And at-home spas can be just as much fun as the real thing. Oatmeal and honey makes an excellent paste for a facial, and used tea-bags over the eyes pull out toxins and take away any break-up related puffiness. Invite some friends and make it a party!

Going out with my old girlfriends that I had been neglecting during my period of short-lived romance was an excellent remedy to my break-up blues. We went to Ben’s Place on Glenwood Avenue for cocktails and conversation. Not once did “his” name come up, because these girls were my friends, not his.

Photo by Ashley Taylor

STEP THREE—Going out with non-mutual friends:

Conclusion?

Though some of my best friends are mutual ones that have known him as long if not longer than me, it was important to my recovery process that the friends were mine and mine alone. (This is one of those times when it is perfectly acceptable to be selfish and not want to share.)

STEP FOUR—Deleting his/ her number:

Another ouch! This was hard. The one step that was essential to my battle with break-up recovery was the most difficult of all. If the relationship is really over, it is absolutely necessary to separate from the significant other, even if it means…yes, that’s right…deleting his/ her phone number! Gasp! It took a lot of support from my friends (see step 3), but I did manage to delete his number. After that, the rest was easy. I deleted him from my Facebook with (almost) no hesitation.

Conclusion?

After I deleted that number, I became almost liberated. I grabbed a shoebox from the bottom of my closet and quickly hid any memorabilia (pictures, love letters,

even that napkin with the month and day of our first date scribbled on it in red ink) of the relationship that might remind me of him later. Though I haven’t brought myself to actually throw the box away yet, I consider it an important step just having it buried in the back of my closet.

Is it really as easy as that?

Of course not. I am still recovering with my relationship coming to an end. I heard once (I think it was on Sex and the City) that it takes half as long as the relationship was to get over it. But again, these are all just stereotypes and generalizations, and it really comes down to what works for you. Every relationship is different, which means every break-up will be equally diverse. Just know you are not alone! ________________________________ Lindsey Johnson is a student at NCSU. She is majoring in Spanish language and Literature and Spanish education.

Need Advice? Like to Write? Have you gone through a breakup and need help moving on? How about an upcoming job interview that you just aren’t sure how to prep for, or need help reading signals that you are sure that guy/girl next door seems to be sending? Sometimes the best person to ask is an outside party. Just shoot us an email, and we will offer some advice at: publisher@uthemagazine.com Are you a student who likes to write? Would you like to write for U the Magazine? If you have an interesting story about a local event or topic you’d like us to consider, send us an email: publisher@uthemagazine.com

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

21


MUSIC:

“tha Lyracist” By Qiara McCain

I get to talk about the things I love, the people I love and the things I can envision. —Keyuntae Ward

Photo by Ashley Taylor

A

A Junior and Communica tion Media major at NC State University, 21-year-old Keyuntae Ward, is a lyricist and not a rapper. He says, “A rapper can rap about anything…very obvious things. For instance, Soulja Boy is an example of a rapper. Whereas a lyricist requires more thinking and is a much harder skill to craft, because one has to be able to manipulate the mind with words.” Some well-known artists that he feels have crafted this skill are Drake and Lil’ Wayne, who he also considers to be musical geniuses. With the stage name “Killa Key… tha Lyricist”, he has a passion for words which originated from another love of poetry writing. When asked to describe his thought process every time he’s

Keyuntae Ward given a beat, it depends on the rhythm of the track that determines the subject matter of the song and how he will approach it. From there he zones out to the music with his pad and pen. He has been writing music for nine years now, and has recently been working hard with his team, Da Realest and Most Anticipated (DRAMA) Squad, on new material. The group consists of eight members, who all grew up together in their hometown of Enfield, NC. Most of their songs are a reflection of their lives back in their hometown of Enfield, and deal with such topics as being raised in single-parent homes, while other songs attest to their future goals and aspirations. His music is universal, and when asked what he hopes listeners will gain from his music, he says,

“A sense of identity, and to never undermine where you come from.” When asked to explain this passion for music, he concludes by saying, “I get to talk about the things I love, the people I love and the things I can envision.” For Killa Key, music has a way of sparking the imagination and is so broad, that people love it. For more information on Killa Key… tha Lyricist and Drama Squad, check out their web pages on Myspace at www. myspace.com/dramasquiddy or www. myspace.com/dramasquadhb. ________________________________ Qiara McCain is majoring in English with a film concentration at NC State University.

MUSI 22

U the Magazine | August-September 2010


MUSIC:

“Cover Bands Suck” By Jeremy Davis

T

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That seems to be the common thinking, that only original artists are “real” musicians who produce good music. Cover bands lack the ability or creativity to create anything of their own that’s worth listening to. That may be true in many cases—we’ve all heard terrible cover bands—but I would argue there is a ton of fun to be had with both kinds. It’s really all about your intentions for the night. Are you looking for a concert, or are you looking for a party? Original artists are playing out in order to sell CDs and get their music heard. The most successful venues for these artists are music halls where all the focus is on the stage. These are concerts and are all about the music. Cover bands aren’t (usually) looking to sell music. Instead, the purpose of a cover band gig is to provide entertainment for the venue. It isn’t about the music but more about generating a party atmosphere for the bar. That’s why cover bands are so pervasive in the nightlife scene. It’s all about the bar. So what are you looking to do? Are you looking to find new music or see a favorite band whose music burns up your iPod? Or are you looking to hang out, eat, drink and dance to live music at your favorite club? In the interest of full disclosure, I play in an 80s rock cover band called Aftershock. We play local bars and clubs to entertain the crowd while they party. We know our place…we’re just part of the scene, not the focus of it. So, do cover bands suck? Many do. But the good ones will help make your favorite bar “JD” (Jeremy) Davis that much more of a cool party spot. And remember, today’s killer original songs are tomorrow’s guilty pleasure covers. _________________________________________________ Jeremy Davis is a contributing music writer for U Magazine and plays in 80s rock cover band, Aftershock. (www.aftershocknc.com)

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23


ART ARTS:

Golden Belt: A Mecca for Artists and Art Lovers

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Photo courtesy of Scientific Properties and Durham Convention & Visitors Bureau

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U the Magazine | August-September 2010

E

Experiencing the work of many artists all in one space is something I have always enjoyed. So when I discovered the Golden Belt website, I knew that I had found something special. In the heart of downtown Durham, at the corner of Main and Elizabeth Streets, sits an art lover’s dream and my latest love affair. Golden Belt consists of artists’ lofts, galleries, and boutiques, with restaurants and a yoga studio to come in the near future. Currently over 40 artists create and showcase their art on the Golden Belt campus. There are several events held at GB each month, including First Wednesday, Second Saturday, and Third Friday. These events provide the public with an opportunity to meet the artists and watch them work while enjoying a more social setting, and it’s a great chance for the artists to sell their pieces. I had the pleasure of attending Third Friday in May, and it was an amazing experience. Walking in, you can

immediately sense the festive atmosphere and everyone has either a drink or a plate in their hands. There are two major hallways of individual and shared studios, and each one offers a completely unique artistic perspective. Traditional, contemporary, photography, jewelry, clothing, ceramics, you name it, it’s there. The night I visited was also a fashion show that used all eco-friendly materials and a mixed media exhibition entitled Necessary Fictions which featured the work of six Latino artists. If the social events don’t appeal to you, the artists’ studios and the galleries are open to the public throughout the week. The weekly visiting hours and plenty of other in-


TS Left: Thirty-five artist studios wrap around a central gallery space in Building 3 of Golden Belt’s campus, blending jewelry makers, mixed media artists, photographers, painters and more in a collaborative, sky-lit space that spills into a central gallery.

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formation, including upcoming events and artist information are available at their website www.goldenbeltarts.com. So do yourself a favor and pay them a visit, because as far as I’m concerned Golden Belt is the belle of the Durham art scene. __________________________________ Tina Moss is majoring in Africana Studies at NC State University.

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DINING:

DIN

The Tastiest Campus Burgers By Christie Hadden, MyRestaurantGuru.com Photos by Christie Hadden

BUNS

26

U the Magazine | August-September 2010


NING W

When it comes to

classic campus burgers, the rules are: it’s gotta

be cheap and it has gotta be good.

Armed with my notepad and a camera, I gallivanted all over each of the

CLOOS

Triangle’s major campuses for three

days eating burger after burger. T’was

no easy task as every burger was select-

ed from the most notable restaurants, all of which have won various “best burger” awards. I ate with fervor. It didn’t take long before realizing that there are two distinct college genres of burgers: Old Skool and New School. When you break it down, Old

Raleigh OLD SKOOL: CLOO’s CONEY ISLAND

Mission Valley Shopping Center 2233 Avent Ferry Road 919-834-3354

more options such as whole-wheat

The black and white checkered tile is reminiscent of a classic diner. I ran into Coach Tarantini while noshing, so I suspect this is a regular place for NCSU heavy hitters. Be prepared for lines. Since everything here is made to order, be prepared to wait. But it is definitely worth it!

buns, turkey or veggie patties and

Single Cheeseburger: $3.80

Skool styled burgers encompass a thin layer of beef on plain white bun cooked on the grill. They are simple, greasy and classic. New School burgers include

expanded toppings. Both style of

NEW SCHOOL: MOJOE’S BURGER JOINT

burgers belong in their own category and taste great in their own right.

620 Glenwood Avenue intersection of Peace Street 919-832-6799

Fair is fair, and as much as I wanted to load on the toppings I restrained myself for a real contest of beef and cheese; therefore all judgments are based on the classic cheeseburger. So here it is folks: the list of only the tastiest campus burgers all under five dollars. These burgers are juicy, fresh and so scrumptious you’ll want to lick the foil.

Perched on the corner of Peace and Glenwood this burger joint is home to the Classic Hall of Fame. If you are mad enough to devour their 1 lb. burger, your photo will be featured on the wall of shame…er I mean fame. Open late night with $2 burgers after 10pm. If you don’t want beef, you can substitute chicken, turkey and veggie burgers for the same price. Single Cheeseburger: $4.49

—continued on next page U the Magazine | August-September 2010

27


Happiness Starts Here

DINING:

The Tastiest Campus Burgers continued

DURHAM OLD SKOOL: WIMPY’S GRILL Corner of Hillsborough & Hicks 919-286-4380 Hours: 7 am to 2 pm M-F closed Sat/Sun

ht Spotlig nity u Comm

Village of Pickwick

A fair example of why you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. Wimpy’s, is located just west of East Campus specializes in old-fashioned burgers that are ground fresh daily. Everything is made to order. Don’t go here if you are in a hurry unless you call ahead first, as the lines can get as long as the ladies room cue at a rock concert. And much like tailgating, everything is carryout. There is no place to sit, so many patrons will eat out of their car in the parking lot. CASH ONLY.

DIN Single Cheeseburger: $3.09

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NEW SCHOOL: ONLY BURGER Twitter.com/OnlyBurger

Mobile burger truck with newly opened (July) brick and mortar store located at Hope Valley Square 3710 Shannon Road, Suite 118 919-724-1622

While technically an old skool classic burger, this mobile tin can gets categorized for new school because of its “foodloose” and fancy-free approach to classic dining. The Only Burger truck posts its location on Twitter and people flood from all points to nosh on fresh ingredients, daily ground beef and hand cut fries. It gets even better when it motors onto Duke campus because Only Burger accepts Duke Points when on campus. Single Cheeseburger: $4.75

TradeMark Residential

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SUTTON’S 28

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

WIMPY’S


MoJOe’s

Dine-In • Take-Out Delivery • Catering

Chapel Hill

NING

Upcoming Event? We Cater!

OLD SKOOL: SUTTON’S PHARMACY

159 East Franklin Street 919-942-5161

Sutton’s is like going back in time. Serving UNC & Chapel Hill since 1923, this pharmacy/soda fountain/lunch counter has award winning burgers, hot dogs, fries, & shakes. I recommend the Carolina burger with chili, cheese and slaw. It’s the bomb. Expect to see UNC royalty if not in person then from overtly displayed photos hanging from the ceilings and walls. And because it’s a pharmacy, you can grab Tums and breath mints on the way out.

Single Cheeseburger: $4.39

NEW SCHOOL: BUNS

107 North Columbia Street 919-240-4746 M-W, 11 am-10 pm Th-Sat, 11 am-3 am Sunday, 11 am - 9 pm

Buns is outta control! With 18 no-charge toppings like caramelized onions, sautéed mushrooms, chipotle mayo, jalapeños and more, one can purchase a gourmet burger for under $5. Your choice of freshly baked white or wheat buns, hand-pattied 100% Angus beef, turkey and homemade veggie patties are offered at the same price. In addition to hand-cut french fries, Buns offers sweet potato fries for that additional boost of Vitamin C.

R

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B

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20de1nt0Weekly

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2009 & 2 010 Daily Ta

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Single Cheeseburger: $4.99 _______________________________________________________________ Christie Hadden is a world traveling food fanatic and founder of myrestaurantguru.com, a Triangle-based Web site that connects people to the areas best restaurants. To learn more, visit: www.MyRestaurantGuru.com.

www.BunsofChapelHill.com 107 N. Columbia Street Chapel Hill, NC

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

29


U SAID

“U Said”:

Q: What do you think about legalizing Marijuana in NC? Photos by Ashley Taylor

Bennett: NCSU Senior “Good idea, I’m from Massachusetts, where they already decriminalized it. If caught with it you get a ticket vs. a criminal charge.”

Marian: NCSU Graduate “I don’t really care if they do or don’t, because it won’t affect me.”

K.P.: UNC Senior (no photo) “Yes, since a lot of people do it. More healthy than cigarettes, manageable high, non-addictive. The government can tax versus being sold on the black market.”

Demetrius: NCCU Junior “I don’t smoke cause I’m on the track team. Legalize it so you could tax it , to fund programs, not just for medicinal purposes.”

Annette: NCCU Junior “It’s a good idea for taxes like on tobacco and alcohol. It could help fund health programs etc.”

30

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

Blake: UNC Senior (no photo) “As a biology student, I say NO. There are significantly more receptors for marijuana in the brain. Research hasn’t quite figured out the evolutionary aspects. You lose motivation to do anything so no good can come of it. People who had direction in their lives lose that drive.”

Carrie Ann: ASU Sophomore “It’s a tough issue, but it would be a bad idea in our culture that we are in now. A process would be needed or I think chaos would ensue!”

Keri: UNC Junior “I’m divided, yes, people do it anyway so we may as well get the tax dollars. No, not to encourage use of it and it would be too easy to get.”

Terry: UNC Senior (no photo) “Divided, it’s a personal choice that does affect legislation. Legalization supposedly would stop violence in the drug world, but not proven. The tobacco industry would take over growth. Lots of factors and ways it would affect societygood and bad. Medicinal qualities can be beneficial.


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a p a r t m e n t

h o mes

$99 Admin Fee with coupon

919.380.2029

New guest only Expires September 30, 2010

COUPONS

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COUPONS

COUPONS Dine in Only

(Regularly $250) Expires September 30, 2010

Bring this in for

10% off

your AVEDA purchase of $25 or more 145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary

919.380.2029 Expires September 30, 2010

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your order!

JAXsportsgrill.com 919-233-7226

$$$

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COUPONS

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Not to be combined with any other offers or daily specials.

Expires September 30, 2010 U the Magazine | August-September 2010

31


COUPONS

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COUPONS

$$$

COUPONS

#

COUPONS $$$

I-40

$$$

Hwy 55

N

Hwy 54

ParkWest Shopping Center

COUPONS

Expires September 30, 2010

free photo CD

Coupon Good With Face Painting Event or Body Art Session

Expires September 30, 2010

Great Drink Specials OPEN 11 am to 2 am 7 Days a week

I-4 0

EXI T2 87

Wes to

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For More Details - Contact Revonne Carter 919.522.5880 or revonne@bellsouth.net

EX IT 2 87 Ca mp us D riv e

I-4

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trinity| par k

$99 Admin Fee with coupon (Regularly $250) Expires September 30, 2010

$89

Hair Cut, Partial Highlight and STYLE. 145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary

919.380.2029

New guest only

Expires September 30, 2010

Bring this in for

10% OFF

$$$

JAXsportsgrill.com 919-233-7226 Not to be combined with any other offers or daily specials.

Expires September 30, 2010 32

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

your AVEDA purchase of $25 or more 145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary

$$$

10% off

your order!

COUPONS

COUPONS

h o m e s

Expires September 30, 2010

$$$

Kitchen open until 2 am! Expires September 30, 2010

COUPONS

ElDoradomexicanrestaurant.com 919-361-0302

a p a rt m e n t

COUPONS

COUPONS

919.380.2029 Expires September 30, 2010

VISIT uthemagazine.com for additional savings!


$$$

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TradeMark Residential

Main: 919.510.4010 • Fax: 919.510.4009 www.TradeMarkResidential.com

Magic Roman

$50 OFF

Call 919-610-2191 • MagicRoman.com

$100 OFF First Month’s Rent

Must present Coupon on First Call or Email

Expires September 30, 2010

Expires September 30, 2010

FREE Garlic Knots

With the purchase of any pizza Mon-Sun 11am-2am

851-3999

20% OFF Entire Purchase

Limit One Per Customer Must Present at time of Purchase

One coupon per table. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

Expires September 30, 2010

Bring this Coupon For

Catering Over $100

Mon-Sun 11am-2am www.ruckuspizza.com

Cannot be combined with any other offer.

Expires September 30, 2010

Expires September 30, 2010

$5.00 OFF

ANY 18” or 24” Pizza Mon-Sun 11am-2am

851-3999

www.ruckuspizza.com One coupon per table. Cannot be combined with any other offer.

Expires September 30, 2010

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

VISIT uthemagazine.com for additional savings!

$100

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

$$$

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#

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33


COUPONS

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COUPONS

$$$

COUPONS

COUPONS

#

$$$

$50 OFF

Call 919-610-2191 • MagicRoman.com Expires September 30, 2010

FREE Garlic Knots

With the purchase of any pizza Mon-Sun 11am-2am

851-3999

www.ruckuspizza.com

One coupon per table. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

Expires September 30, 2010

Expires September 30, 2010

Mon-Sun 11am-2am

Catering Over $100

851-3999

www.ruckuspizza.com

One coupon per table. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

10% OFF

Mon-Sun 11am-2am www.ruckuspizza.com Cannot be combined with any other offer.

Expires September 30, 2010

Expires September 30, 2010

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

$100

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

$100

VISIT uthemagazine.com for additional savings!

$$$

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

COUPONS

$5.00 OFF

Bring this Coupon For

ANY 18” or 24” Pizza

COUPONS

$100 OFF First Month’s Rent

$$$

$$$

Limit One Per Customer Must Present at time of Purchase

$$$

Main: 919.510.4010 • Fax: 919.510.4009 www.TradeMarkResidential.com

Expires September 30, 2010

20% OFF Entire Purchase

34

Residential

COUPONS

COUPONS

Must present Coupon on First Call or Email

TradeMark $$$

Magic Roman

COUPONS

COUPONS


In the Next Issue: Features:

S aTion 8 Loc S ThE S acro gLE a i Tr n

Four Internet Sites You MUST Know About Meet the Parents... A Survival Guide A Vampire Empire

Full Bar Daily Drink Specials Dine-In or Take-Out Big Screen TV’s for Sports Fans!

SPORTS BOOKS ARTS MUSIC DINING “U SAID”

Hwy 55

And Our Regular Departments:

ElDoradomexicanrestaurant.com 4900 Hwy 55 South, Ste. 140 Durham, NC 27713 919-361-0302

N I-40 Hwy 54

ParkWest Shopping Center

BEST Marga riTa in Tow ’S n!

M-Sat 11am-10pm, Sun 11am-9pm 5 min. from NCCU • 15 min. from UNC/DUKE See coupon on page 31

YOU A Re A StRAN GeR heRe ONCe!

If you are interested in writing or have an idea for an article topic, we’d love to hear from you. Send to: publisher@uthemagazine.com

Or if your organization wants to announce an event: events@uthemagazine.com

Students do you own a business and want to get the word out to other students? Contact for special pricing: Cindy@moonstone-studio.com

Your Sports Headquarters! Good Food - Great Drink Specials Inviting Atmosphere Go to our website for daily specials and events.

BRiNG Ad fOR iS h t YOUR 20% OvfiSfit! 1St

JAXsportsgrill.com Join Us On

2300 Gorman Street • Raleigh, NC 27606 • 919-233-7226 Not to be combined with any other offers or daily specials.

U the Magazine | August-September 2010

35


U the Magazine  

Student publication for Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill. Written by students for students.

U the Magazine  

Student publication for Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill. Written by students for students.

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