Page 1

FREE Dec-Jan 2010-2011 Volume 1, Issue 3

Feature:

Launch Party & Fashion Show Plus:

Making Your Finances Add Up Paper or Plastic Speak No Evil

Regular Departments:

Music, Sports, Dining, Arts, “U Said”, Coupons and More!


Camp Kesem Throws Kesemania For The Kids! What is Camp Kesem? Camp Kesem is a free one-week summer camp for children whose parents have or have had cancer. It is also a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

What is the purpose of Camp Kesem? The mission of Camp Kesem is to provide children whose parents have or have had cancer with a summer camp experience that gives them a chance to be children. The mission of Camp Kesem is also to allow college students to channel their passion for making a difference, while developing critical leadership skills for long term social impact.

Who runs Camp Kesem North Carolina?

The camp is completely run year-round by student volunteers from Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill.

UNC-CHAPEL HILL STUDENTS BELLY BUMP IT OUT DURHAM, N.C. – From left, UNC-Chapel Hill juniors Laken Rush and Spencer Bridgers attempt sumo wrestling. “Those suits are really hard to move in,” Bridgers said. “Sumo wrestling was exhausting, but it was so fun.”

Who can go to Camp Kesem North Carolina?

Camp Kesem is open to children ages six through 16 in the North Carolina and southern Virginia area who have a parent who has or had cancer. Last year 117 campers attended camp.

Where is Camp Kesem North Carolina?

Camp Kesem North Carolina is held at the Keyauwee Program Center south of Greensboro in Sophia, North Carolina. Keyauwee is owned and operated by the Girl Scouts of America and offers a variety of wonderful activities and facilities.

UPPERCLASSMEN ACT LIKE KIDS

DURHAM, N.C. – From left UNC-Chapel Hill junior Spencer Bridgers and Duke University senior Jack Fitzgibbons attach themselves to the Velcro wall. The two competed to see who could stick themselves the highest on the wall.

How much money does it take to run Camp Kesem North Carolina?

Every year, the staff of Camp Kesem North Carolina raises over $45,000 to hold the camp.

CAMP KESEM RAFFLES OFF DUKE PRIZES

DURHAM, N.C. – Camp Kesem Co-Chair Jessica Chang, left, sells raffle tickets to Duke University students at KESEMania. Raffle items included Duke merchandise, iTunes credit and restaurant gift cards.

Camp Kesem North Carolina • 770.401.0472 • laken.rush@gmail.com


Happiness Starts Here... VillageofPickwickapts.com

Apartment Features

4016 Twickenham Court Raleigh, NC Office Hours: M-F 8:30-5:30, Sat 10-4 Sun Closed

• Balcony/Patio • Kitchen & Serving Bar • Ceiling Fans • Large Walk-in Closets • Washer/Dryer Connections • Fireplace in Select Homes

919.787.8014

Home Designs • Studio • One-Bedroom • Two-Bedroom • Garden Style • Lofts • Townhomes

See CouPoN oN PAge 29 FoR

$100 off

Community Features

1ST MoNTH’S ReNT!

• Clubhouse • Junior Olympic Pool • Fitness Center • Tot Lot • Clothes Care Center • Emergency Maintenance Full Service Property Management Company Since 1984 Portfolio Includes: Single and Multi Family Homes, Apartment Communities, and Affordable Housing

TradeMark Residential

1001 Wade Avenue • Raleigh, NC 27605 • 919.510.4010 • Fax: 919.510.4009

www.TradeMarkResidential.com


Contents Table of Contents

Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill December-January 2010-2011 Volume 1, Issue 3 Publishers Moonstone Studio, LLC Cindy M. Nitschke, partner Pamela K. Marsh, partner Advertising Cindy M. Nitschke, Advertising Director Ashley Taylor, Account Executive Design & Website Pamela K. Marsh, Art Director Photography Ashley Taylor Beci Markijohn Writers “JD” Jeremy Davis, Emily Erdman Christie Hadden, Lamar Hill Lindsey Johnson, Dana Magliola Qiara McCain, Tina Moss

uthemagazine.com

Features Cocktails & Couture Fashion Show...................................................6 How to Make Your Finances Add Up..............................................12 Paper or Plastic?..............................................................................14 Speak No Evil–A Lesson in Free Speech.........................................16

DEPARTMENTS SPORTS: Taking it “Pro”– Perspectives on Careers in Sports........19 MUSIC: A Family Affair–Meet Delta Rae.......................................22 Movies: Waiting for Superman....................................................23 ARTS: Another Side of Andy............................................................23 DINING: Not Your Ordinary Bar Food.............................................24 “U Said”...........................................................................................26

PO Box 33531 Raleigh, NC 27536 Phone: 919-815-6019

For information: publisher@uthemagazine

Find us on: www.uthemagazine.com U the Magazine is published five times a year by Moonstone Studio, LLC. All editorial contained within is the sole property of the publisher and cannot be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written permission of Moonstone Studio, LLC. The publisher accepts no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the writers or advertisers. The opinions ofthe writer’s is not necessarily the opinion of Moonstone Studio, LLC.

©2010 Moonstone Studio, LLC

4

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

On the Cover: Models from U the Magazine’s “Cocktails and Couture” launch party, show off some of the exciting designs from the runway.


Lindsey Johnson is majoring in Spanish language, literature and Spanish education at North Carolina State University.

Emily Erdman is a French major at the University of North Carolina with minors in English and creative writing.

Tina Moss is majoring in Africana studies at North Carolina State University.

Jeremy Davis is a contributing music writer for U the Magazine and plays in 80s rock cover band, Aftershock.

Dana Magliola is a graduate student at North Carolina State University.

Lamar Hill is an English major at North Carolina State University.

Qiara McCain is majoring in English with a film concentration at North Carolina State University.

Christie Hadden is a world traveling food fanatic and founder of My Restaurant Guru, a Triangle-based Web site: www.MyRestaurantGuru.com.

CHECK IT OUT!

WRITERS

Writers

U the Magazine is also online: www.uthemagazine.com There you can find our Blog, links to advertisers, printable coupons and information links to job opportunities. In addition, you can link to an electronic version of the magazine, lookup archive issues, as well as read all the content in the current issue. If you are interested in writing or have an idea for an article, email us at: publisher@uthemagazine.com

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

5


Photo by Beci Markijohn

Photo by Beci Markijohn

Ciao Bella

From the Graylee Collection by Amy Gray Jewelry by Grateful Gems Photo by Beci Markijohn

6

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

Grateful Gems by Claire


Cocktails & Couture A Fashion Extravaganza

in September. The show was produced by Raleigh designer Amy Gray and featured 41 looks, from seven different collections, some were even constructed from recycled materials. Who would have thought that fashion would become so environmentally conscious! Among the night’s collections were: Francesca’s Collections, Ciao Bella from Alison Szatek, Fab’rik Clothing, Katelyn Sexton from Jewelry by Ashe, Fedora Boutique, The Graylee Collection by Amy Gray, and School House Apparel. Francesca’s Collections, with locations all throughout North Carolina, including Cameron Village and Crabtree, had plenty of looks for the fall season that could go from day to night by adding a cute jacket, a necklace and some heels. Their color pallet included: brown, black, gray, and neutral tones. Each item was paired with bold accessories. The two items that stuck

Photo by Ashley Taylor

Photo by Beci Markijohn

Fedora Boutique

Photo by Ashley Taylor

When I think of fashion there is only one phrase that comes to mind and Supermodel RuPaul said it best, “You better work, sashay chantey!” The models did just that at U the Magazine’s Launch Party and Fashion Show held at Ruckus Pizza, in Cary early

Fab’rik

Photo by Ashley Taylor

Amy Gray

Photo by Ashley Taylor

Photo by Ashley Taylor

By Qiara McCain

out the most was their fur vest and their orange satin dress. Overall, the day-tonight idea is very convenient for today’s woman because it takes little to no effort to change one’s look from work to play. For more information check out their website at www.francescascollection.com. Ciao Bella used recycled pieces of upholstery that gave each piece structure. Their dresses were very form fitting and very structured with a very “understated elegance.” “Rocker chic” would describe the clothes at Fab’rik, located in Raleigh and Chapel Hill. They showed a few denim outfits complimented with vests or blazers. The also previewed a few embellished blouses—some were off the shoulder— and some off the shoulder dresses as well. Feel free to look at their website www. fabrikstyle.com.

Jewelry by Ashe Collection from Katelyn Sexton Amy Gray, the producer of the show, previewed her collection at the event— a look I think is very chic. She mixed pantsuits in a very fashionable way, and her collection had multiple two-tone block pattern designs on the dresses and shorts. Speaking of dresses, Amy re-invented the little black dress. continued on next page

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

7


Photos by Beci Markijohn

continued from page 7

Photo by Ashley Taylor

Oana Dinca, makeup artist at Natural Look Salon & Spa does model Becky Grzesik’s makeup for the show.

Swag bags filled with gifts, samples and special offers were handed out to the first 100 attendees.

Special Thanks Ciao Bella Cruzan Rum Fab’rik Fedora Francesca’s Grateful Gems Graylee Designs Hair and Face Lounge Jewelry by Ashe Nativa Boutique Natural Look Salon and Spa Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits School House Tent and Event

8

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

To learn more about designer Amy Gray, here’s the interview I did with her. U the Magazine: “How long have you been designing clothes?” Amy Gray: “For about 4 ½ years now. I started as a freshman at NC State when I majored in textiles.” U the Magazine: “What is your goal for designing clothes?” Amy Gray: “To make people happy and feel good about themselves.” U the Magazine: “What’s your inspiration behind the pieces that you make?” Amy Gray: “I like to make readyto-wear pieces that are for everyday attire and are flattering to the body.” U the Magazine: “Do you have a piece that is special to you?” Amy Gray: “I had to do a showcase last December that really

made me focus on construction due to multiple cocktail dresses that I was designing, and, because of it, I became a much better seamstress and pattern maker.” U the Magazine: “Who are some of your favorite designers, and why?” Amy Gray: “I love Issac Mizrahi, who has a line at Target. His clothes aren’t too basic but at the same time they’re very fashion forward, and more importantly affordable.” U the Magazine: “What advice would you offer an aspiring designer?” Amy Gray: “Learn how to sew as soon as possible…after that then the sky’s the limit!” U the Magazine: “Which celebrity do you want to see wear your clothes?” Amy Gray: “Ali Fedotowsy, from


Francesca’s

Francesca’s

Ciao Bella

Ciao Bella

Fab’rik

Fab’rik

Photos by Beci Markijohn

The Bachelorette, because she is really fashion forward.” U the Magazine: “Where do you see yourself in the next five years?” Amy Gray: “Well I’m in the process of working on my clothing line, and then I want to open up a specialty boutique somewhere in the South. I want to reach an older target market, between the ages of 28-35 years old, because I feel like that bracket gets missed a lot of the time. I am definitely trying to keep a moderate price point.” For more information regarding designs by Amy Gray, look for her website coming soon! Located in Cameron Village, the assortment of designs at Fedora Boutique included a few three-quarter length jackets, white and black trench coats, a nice black jumpsuit, a unique tribal pattern dress, and a nice twist on the ultimate red dress. Their collection was definitely Gossip Girl inspired! See more at www.Fedoraboutique.com. “Fashionable school spirit” is the only way to describe School House Apparel. Their collection consisted of logo tees, hoodies, and the classic jersey dress paired with trendy parachute pants, the short but cute ruffle skirt and shorts with suspenders. With School House Apparel, one can certainly represent their college or university loud and proud. For more information check out their website at www.shopsschoolhouse.com. There’s only one phrase to describe Katelyn Sexton’s collection from Jewelry by Ashe and that is “bold beading”. Personally, I’m not a fan of a lot of beads on my clothes; however the bead work that this designer incorporates into her designs transforms beading into the hot new accessory. Her collection included shawls and very experimental dress designs in neutral and black tones. To learn more about Katelyn Sexton here’s the interview she did with me. U the Magazine: How long have you been designing jewelry? Katelyn Sexton: “I’ve been working on jewelry since my sophomore year of college.” U the Magazine: “What materials do you work with?” Katelyn Sexton: “I like working with felt and burlap. In addition to those, for the fashion show, I also worked with and pretty much anything that will allow me to give new pieces new life.” U the Magazine: “Why did you choose

9


Photos by Ashley Taylor

Runway shots from the Fedora Collection

have to be the beaded collar I made for the showcase.” U the Magazine: “Who would be your dream celebrity to work with and why?” Katelyn Sexton: “Someone with a big name, like Catherine Zeta Jones, because she’s really beautiful and seems really down to earth.” U the Magazine: “Is there another aspect of designing that you are interested in pursuing?” Katelyn Sexton: “Definitely, I really would like to expand into interior design or textile design.” U the Magazine: “What advice would you offer an aspiring designer?” Katelyn Sexton: “The best advice I

can give is that you should always go with your gut instinct.” U the Magazine: “Where do you see yourself in the next five years?” Katelyn Sexton: “Well I’m working on my own jewelry line now, and in addition to that I can definitely see myself doing something creative, like being an assistant designer.” For more information on Katelyn Sexton, you can check out her website at www.katelynasexton.carbonmade. com. Also, her jewelry is available at www.jewelrybyashe.etsy.com. The great Coco Chanel said, “Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street;

Photos by Ashley Taylor

jewelry and not a different medium?” Katelyn Sexton: “I feel like you can be more creative and open with jewelry. You don’t have to worry about the structure of it as much. You can go further with it because you can unite it with clothing and other garments, and it can be worn with more than one outfit.” U the Magazine: “What’s your inspiration behind the pieces that you make?” Katelyn Sexton: “It depends on the materials, but I pretty much pull inspiration from past experiences and trips that I’ve taken. For instance, I went to Prague and really drew influence from there.” U the Magazine: “Do you have a piece that is special to you?” Katelyn Sexton: “It would definitely

At the Hair and Face Lounge, Maryam does make up while owner, Karen Parsons does hair styles for the show.

10

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11


Photos by Beci Markijohn

The School House Collection incorporates your favorite team logo with fashionable styes.

fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.” It’s important to understand and appreciate that each collection was different and unique in its own right, but the common underlying goal for each was to push style to the next level and that they did, because fashion is not just about clothing, it’s a lifestyle. __________________________________ Qiara McCain is majoring in English with a film concentration at North Carolina State University.

,

n an pt Salo Conce

We fix box color!

Thank you to attendees who brought canned food that was donated to the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina. The donation of 138 pounds of food and $52.00 will help to provide 337 nutritious meals to those in need!

919.380.2029

145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary http://www.thehairandfacelounge.com/

“We also offer Mullet removal.” U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

11


How to Make your Finances Add Up

The first in a series on managing your personal finances. By Lamar Hill Here is the scenario. It is a simple one. It is November 27th, you are flat broke, and you do not get paid for another two weeks. You are tearing apart your sofa trying to scrounge up a dollar for a burger so you can eat tonight. When that fails, you run home crying, begging mom and dad to loan you a few hundred dollars because you messed up. It is pathetic, and how did it happen? Well, my friend, it happened because you never learned about the most important six-letter word there is: budget. Do not worry, though; it will be okay. You see, you can quickly get on the responsible track, and all you have to do is pick up a magazine and let your dear old pal Lamar tell you about your budget. Simply put, a budget is a summary of how much you have to spend on what you need and want. This way, you know how much you do not have to spend on what you need and want, which is much more impor12

tant. A budget is an equation, all the money coming in to your bank account minus all the money going out. Income minus expenses. The number you end up with is what you have to spend on nonnecessities like new shoes, your hair and nails, movies, and other forms of entertainment. Please reread the last line if you have trouble distinguishing between a need and a want. Gas is a need. New rims are a want. Books are a need. An iPod touch is a want. While a more advanced budget should include the things you want in your expenses, it is simpler to make a budget based solely on expenses you are required to include. Once you understand these things, you are ready to make your budget. To successfully create a useful budget, you will need an exhaustive list of all sources of income and all expenses you can imagine in the foreseeable future. Budgets for the unforeseeable future are necessary as well,

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

but that is an advanced topic. Anyway, this sounds a bit tedious, but it really is not. Actually, there are websites you can go to where you can enter your expenses and income, and they will churn out your budget for you! A very thorough one is on BB&T’s website under the “Learn and Plan” subheading. BB&T’s budget planners allow you to enter your expenses and income for a whopping eight-month period. That is the entire school year! It allows you to enter detailed descriptions of your expenses under the following categories: school expenses, food and groceries, living expenses, professional fees, clothing expenses, loan payments, contributions and gifts, savings and investments, personal toiletries, transportation, and miscellaneous expenses. If you are scratching your head and frowning, take it easy. Below this list is a list of definitions so you know exactly what goes where. Do not worry if


you do not have expenses in every category. Most of us students do not have many savings and investment plans. Focus on what you do have, and make sure your data is as accurate as possible. The last point I cannot stress enough. If your budget is inaccurate, it is useless. At BB&T’s website, they recommend going through your bank statements, credit card statements, pay stubs and any receipts you have for about a month. This way you get a clear snapshot of what you are both spending and earning. Also, if you do not understand your budget, it is useless. You need to know what you have in your checking and savings accounts, and you need to know how money leaves these accounts. Work with your banks if you are even slightly confused! Contrary to popular belief, your bank wants to help you become financially stable. I talked with Scott Greene, BB&T’s Senior Vice President Regional Retail Banking Manager, and he implores you, “Don’t hesitate to come in and talk to us. Our employees are trained very well and would be glad to help you. If you want to know how a debit card works, we’ll explain how a debit card works.”

He went on to explain that when you use your debit card, the money is gone immediately. You cannot use your debit card for six dollars and expect to run to the bank and deposit a check before the money is taken. The money is already gone. Understanding this will save you money in overdraft fees. Trust me; I learned this lesson the hard way. Now, you have figured out what a budget is, you have made your budget, and you totally understand it. Are you done? No. The next step is to drill into your head the fact that a budget is rendered useless yet again if you do not follow it. You cannot make your budget, drive over to the mall, say f*** it, and buy up everything. You are back to the original scenario begging your parents for cash. If you want to be a responsible adult, you need to cultivate the willpower to stick to a financial program. That in mind, realize that a budget is not set in stone; it can change. Make sure your changes take everything into account, though! You cannot add on expenses if your income is not increasing. I recently fell in love with Planet Smoothie. I drink smoothies frequently, so I added them to my expenses. Since my income did

not increase, I had to scale back a different expense to accommodate the new one. Understand? A smoothie every three days is about seventy dollars a month. It adds up, and those seventy dollars have to come from somewhere. Keep aware of things like this, and you will not remember the last time you went broke. Feeling confident? Well, you should be. If you understand and are willing to apply everything you have read, your budget will be a piece of cake. You will probably even impress your parents, and they might just give you that couple hundred dollars anyway! That is what we call a win-win. Do not be too confident, though; your budget is only one facet of your financial health. There are several others! In our next issue, we will tackle the lean, mean credit monster. Did you just cringe? Well, you probably need to read the next issue. __________________________________ Lamar Hill is an English major at North Carolina State University.

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

13


Paper or Plastic? Will digital books replace the hardback? By Emily Erdman I used to think that loving to read meant loving books. I do love books. I love the way they smell. I love the way the thick cover of a hardback feels in my hands, underneath the loose paper sleeve. I love the way a brand new book cracks open. I love the way a paperback’s spine shows just how many times that story has been loved and read and pored over. Bookstores are my safe place. I feel most comfortable surrounded by rows and shelves of stories I’ve yet to know. There is something so serene about pacing the shelves, pausing occasionally to read a back cover or a first chapter. Although I am sure it is some sort of cardinal sin for a book lover to adore a megastore like Borders, I still do. Since I was little, it’s been my favorite bookstore. I used to ask my mother for special trips to Borders, simply to get lost in a sea of more books than I had ever seen. I adore the crisp clean look and smell of a brand new book. Despite my established love for real books made of paper and glue, I know that there are other—greener—ways to enjoy reading. Google books, the Internet, the iPad…there are endless options. One of the most popular gadgets on the market is the Kindle by Amazon. In reviews, it even beats out the iPad when it comes to screen visibility and screen contrast. The Kindle allows readers to download books from the Internet for a fraction of the price of a store-bought book onto a small portable device. It also has the unique benefit of being the first of this type of product especially designed to make reading easier and more practical. In my opinion, there are a lot of benefits to the Kindle. First, it’s tiny. The Kindle is as narrow as a pencil, it weighs

14

merely 8.5 ounces, and the reading area is just six inches when measured diagonally. Its size makes the Kindle portable and practical for travel. Honestly, for an avid reader and traveler, I think that there is no better invention than the Kindle. Not only is it small, but with the Kindle you can bring up to 3,500 books with you wherever you go without bringing ten extra—and undoubtedly overweight—suitcases. Second, the Kindle is affordable. With the Kindle, each book costs just three or four dollars, while a book at

Not only is it small, but with the Kindle you can bring up to 3,500 books with you wherever you go without bringing ten extra—and undoubtedly overweight—suitcases.

Borders or Barnes and Noble could run the customer anywhere between eight and thirty dollars. The basic Kindle, after being on the market for two years, costs just $139, about the price of four hardback copies of Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol. Once the initial purchase has been made, almost every book bought through the Kindle costs fewer than ten dollars, and hundreds of books can be downloaded for free. Any book that is out of copyright is free with the Kindle. This means books such as Pride and Prejudice, and The Scarlet Letter. I am currently enrolled in a Shakespeare class and the mere thought of the Kindle gives my right shoulder, habitually weighed

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

down by my four-thousand-page Norton Anthology, a whole new range of motion. Travel aside, the Kindle would also be great to take to class. Third, the Kindle and the Kindle 3G are both Wi-Fi compatible, meaning you can purchase books anywhere that you have access to a wireless connection. Cooler than that, the Kindle 3G uses both wireless and 3G, the same internet connection as a Blackberry or iPhone, making it possible to purchase books almost anywhere that you would normally have a cell phone signal. The newest model is called the Kindle DX. While it does not have access to Wi-Fi, it does have 3G, and also boasts a screen almost four centimeters larger than the original Kindle and Kindle 3G. Despite how simply cool the Kindle is, it is still an electronic device. Like a laptop, Mac, iPod, or cell phone, it can mess up. The Kindle’s screen can freeze. The battery life might not turn out to be as lengthy as advertised. The reader’s ability to see the screen depends on the quality of light. Also, although the Kindle boasts over 500,000 books to choose from in the Kindle store, there are plenty of books that it does not yet offer. Perhaps you enjoy reading obscure Russian literature in translation…you might not be able to find your favorite novel in the Kindle store, making the Kindle impractical for you. It isn’t a perfect device, and I wonder if the drawbacks are worth the frustration. A good ‘ole hardback or paperback never lets you down or runs out of energy. However, as practical, fun, and affordable as the Kindle might be, I cannot bring myself to pursue my love of reading through technology. Reading has been a part of our world as far back as conversation has allowed it to be, and


Photo Courtesy of Amazon

only within the past few years has there been any other way to find information other than in a good solid book. When I think about reading, I can’t help but think about the first novel I ever truly loved: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, by J.K. Rowling. I’ve read it too many times to count. I’ve turned the pages over and over again until they’ve turned soft between my index finger and thumb. The front cover is hanging on by a few threads and the tattered spine is scarred by seven deep gouges. Seven, the most powerfully magical number— each line evidence of my seven favorite sections, the seven sections I turn to when everything else in my life seems to be slipping away. I love flipping though this book. I love feeling the worn pages and remembering a time when they were crisp and new, a time before I had

been forever changed by reading. Since there are pros and cons to both books and the Kindle, it can be difficult to decide which side to choose. I have outlined what I believe to be the good and bad. Kindle pros: one single device that holds up to 3,500 books, lightweight, has the ability to connect to Wi-Fi and/or 3G, excellent prices on over 500,000 books, the “cool” factor, better for the environment Kindle cons: battery life, screen visibility, limited book selection, susceptible to normal electronic device bugs and glitches Book pros: reliable, useful anywhere and everywhere, unlimited selection, you can write in the margins/highlight/underline Book cons: heavy, expensive, take up a lot of space, kills trees Using the above pro/con list, the answer is very simple. Choose both. The

Kindle is incredibly useful for travel and class because it is extremely portable and lightweight. Books are sentimental objects, not only soothing but also incredibly reliable. A book will never let you down, so choosing a book over the Kindle cannot ever be the wrong decision. In the world we live in, we don’t have to choose. For now, we can have both. However, if forced to choose one, paper or plastic, I know I would think of my worn out Harry Potter, and would always choose paper. _________________________________ Emily Erdman loves to write, read and travel. She is a French major at the University of North Carolina with minors in English and creative writing.

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

15


Speak No Evil–A Lesson in Free Speech By Lindsey Johnson In early October, those questioning whether or not information shared online can remain private received their answer. Karen Owen, a Duke University student, sent a mock thesis documenting intimate details of her sexual conquests to friends via the Internet. According to WRAL news, the e-mail soon went public. The student– and the sexual partners named in the publication–may never live down what began as a harmless prank. Stories like that of Karen Owen are not new, nor are they rare in this new technology-savvy era we live in today. In fact, it seems that every time we watch the news or listen to public radio, another person is seeing the consequences of posting information online. In August of this year, a teacher in Massachusetts lost her job because of comments she posted on her personal Facebook page, according to WCVB News Boston. The Washington Post reported that CNN Mideast Affairs Editor, Octavia Nasr, lost her position in July after posting on Twitter her respect for a militant cleric. It seems that there is no longer a question about whether or not there is privacy online. The fact is, there is none. This does not necessarily come as a surprise, considering how important communication via the Internet has become in the 21st century. Social networks have become the new easiest way to share information among groups of friends. Employer/employee correspondence is more often via e-mail than phone or face-to-face conversation. Even college professors use Internet sites such as Blackboard, Moodle, and Wikispace for assignments, exams, and student communication. Let’s face it. We talk via the written word more often 16

than by spoken banter. We must accept the consequence that this information is not private, given that any information published on the Internet never really goes away. But should we be persecuted for the information we post? According to the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, every American citizen has the right to Freedom of Speech. This has been one of the most controversial topics in society today. At first glance, it would seem very black-and-white; however, there are two sides to every issue. Where is the line between freedom of speech and inappropriate behavior? Who decides if is it ever crossed? Will there ever be a clear-cut answer? I investigated two very different stories related to freedom of speech, and then attempted to argue both sides. What I found, is that in attempting to unlock the secret behind what is in violation of the First Amendment and what is not, I became even more intertwined in the very hazy lines that define free speech in the United States.

Technology Blurs the Line The newest hot issue in education continues to revolve around social networking. Teachers are told, point-blank, to avoid social networking websites. If they are used, teachers are advised to keep everything private, and make sure that interaction between teacher and student never occurs online. There have even been instances where, although a teacher has been doing everything in his or her power to avoid inappropriate behavior online, he or she is still punished because someone else found a photo of that individual in a

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

bar or holding an alcoholic beverage and posted it without the teacher’s consent. Can a teacher be fired for what he or she writes on the Internet? The obvious answer is yes. Teachers are, in fact, penalized for social networking and e-mail correspondence. Simply do a Google search, and 355,000 results appear in an instant. But should this be the case? Looking back at the example of the teacher from Cohasset, Massachusetts, both sides can be argued.

BACKGROUND: According to WCVB News in Boston, Dr. June Talviti-Siple, was forced to resign after parents discovered Facebook postings made by the supervisor of the math and science program indicating her displeasure in the residents of Cohasset and expressing her dread of working in the system another year. While she had not meant for these comments to go public (assuming that her comments would remain private when, in fact, she had not updated her privacy settings as such), she did say that she would not apologize for her comments.

YES: The side of the parent Why would parents want someone teaching their students that seemingly hated her job? It is inappropriate to allow someone with such a negative perception of the students and parents to continue educating children. She did not want to continue working in the school system. She made that abundantly clear. It was her own fault for saying such things, and now she has to face the consequences.


NO: Freedom of Speech advocate

BACKGROUND

Though her comments may have been inappropriate, she has every right to make them. As a citizen of the United States, it is her right to speak freely on her opinions, and it is unconstitutional to persecute her for them. Perhaps a reprimand would have been sufficient, but to lose her job, her career? It is outrageous. What is obvious is that we have not caught up with the technology of our age, but until we do so, we must assume the same rights and privileges as set forth by our constitution. She had a right to make her comments; we did NOT have the right to terminate her job.

In Topeka, Kansas, a pastor and his congregation held a demonstration at a gay soldier’s funeral in 2006, protesting the army’s tolerance of homosexuality. The family of 20-year-old Matthew Snyder sued and won $5 million in damages after a federal judge upheld the original jury verdict. However, a federal appeals court quickly reversed the decision, stating that the actions of the pastor and his congregation were well within the bounds of Freedom of Speech as protected by the First Amendment. According to the court, the signs saying things like “Thank God for dead soldiers” and “God hates fags” were nothing more than “rhetoric hyperbole.” Now, in 2010, the case has gone all the way to the Supreme Court, and a decision has yet to be reached.

Conclusion There is no way to win either side of the argument, because both sides make valid points. As a parent, would I want my child to be taught by someone that obviously does not appreciate working with my child or any of the students and parents in the community? But as someone that feels it is very important to maintain the First Amendment, I do not see how terminating someone for her words is constitutional. She did not slander; she gave her opinion. She did not use “fighting words” or threaten anyone. Her comments clearly fell within the realm of what is acceptable under Freedom of Speech as protected by the First Amendment.

Take out the technology factor; this issue is still a hot one The Internet has definitely taken fights about Freedom of Speech to a whole new level, but what about something that is not technology-related? Recently, I learned about a controversial situation that had been taking place since 2005. And as someone that thought I could always argue in favor of the First Amendment, this story has my head reeling. I have no idea which direction I would go. Should the pastor win his case? Is this really nothing more than an exercise in Freedom of Speech?

1, 2 & 3-bedroom units available NC State student specials 2 Wolfline bus stops on property Newly renovated on-site laundry facility Pool and lounge area Private clubhouse Major appliances included Wall-to-wall carpeting Less than 1 mile from NCSU campus

YES: The side of the pastor This group is simply invoking their right to free speech. Cemeteries are public places, and under the law, there is nothing prohibiting the protestors from being there. It is no different from having picketers in front of an abortion clinic with signs that say “Murderer” and “Thou shall not kill.” They are, under the law, legally entitled to express their beliefs without fear of persecution or retaliation. If we do not like it, then we should amend the Constitution; not mistreat the U.S. citizens that are simply honoring their afforded rights.

NO: The side of the family There is a difference between Freedom of Speech and harassment. The last day that the family has with their son has to be remembered as a day when he was condemned to Hell. Perhaps a cemetery is a public place, but the funeral itself is private. The protestors were not exercising their right to free speech; they were harassing a grieving family of a U.S. soldier. I would also argue that the words used in the demonstration should be considered “fighting words” or words that are used to inflict pain or incite a violent response from the target. These types of words are continued on next page

www.parkwoodvillageapts.com

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

17


continued from page 17

Log In. Dine Out. My Restaurant Guru is a website that connects you to local restaurants in your quest for great food and great values. View the largest database of menus, reviews and individual dish ratings of every restaurant in the triangle. Earn karma points when you use the site to receive free food, cool swag and invitations to private events.

generally excluded from protection under Freedom of Speech. I doubt any retalliation was expected from the family.

privacy. There was no reason for him to be there to begin with. Freedom of speech, maybe, but it is a funeral.

Conclusion

Kirstin (UNC):

In this age of technology, we should assume that privacy no longer exists. A frightening truth, perhaps, but the real debate is how to handle all of this public information. Freedom of Speech is no longer so cut-and-dry. There are new situations that are beyond the realm of the guidelines set forth when the Constitution was amended in 1791. Our society has come a long way in two centuries. Things have changed. Perhaps the rules that define how we function as a society need a little updating.

Morally, it is wrong. But according to the law, the pastor will most likely win the case. According to the Constitution as it is written and followed now, you can’t persecute someone for their thoughts. Even if it is morally wrong, he was in a public place, and had a right to congregate and say what he wanted.

Your Thoughts: From the Mouths of the Readers 1. Should the teacher have lost her job? Jack (Wake Tech): I don’t think she should have lost her job. Freedom of Speech is a right in the United States and the internet is the new way to have conversations, so it should be protected just the same as if she had said it to one of her friends over coffee. And it also makes a difference if she was a good teacher. Why would you get rid of someone that helps the students, regardless of their opinion? It is hard to find good teachers. Throwing one away for a Facebook comment just seems stupid.

Terra (NCSU):

What are You Hungry For?

Taking the side of a parent, I wouldn’t want a teacher that didn’t want to be there teaching my kids. If she was really a good teacher, she would not have posted comments, private or not, that would jeopardize her credibility as an educator. She said she wasn’t looking forward to teaching there another year; guess she got what she wanted.

2. Should the preacher win his case?

MyRestaurantGuru.com

Sam (NCSU): There is a line that is crossed. How do you have a right to protest at a grieving family’s funeral? There is no justification in protesting a funeral. Out of respect for the family and because there are certain exceptions that are made when you protest. Funerals have a reasonable expectation of

18

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

Emily (Meredith): As horrible as it may be, I guess he should win considering there is no amendment that necessarily defends one’s right to be open with their sexual orientation or demands tolerance for it. In my opinion, this case definitely points out an obvious hole in the constitution that does not support the mature 21st century view that we should be accepting of all people, no matter what their sexual orientation may be. Such a shame!

Lesley (NCSU): I think it depends on what kind of demonstration it was. If he was outside demonstrating without disrupting the service then I don’t think he should be sued...although I think it’s really immature and rude what he did. But if his demonstration was disrupting the funeral service I think he should definately be sued because those are private services and everyone should be able to have a respectable and decent service for someone they love who died. ___________________________________ Lindsey Johnson is majoring in Spanish language, literature and Spanish education at North Carolina State University.


SPORTS: Taking It “Pro”—Perspectives on Careers in Sports Photo Courtesy of Jeffrey A. Camarati, UNC Athletic Communications

By Dana Magliola

University of North Carolina head athletic trainer for football, Scott Trulock and his team attend to Tar Heel quarterback T.J. Yates following an especially hard hit. Always ready on the sidelines, Trulock says being a part of an athlete’s recovery is amongst his most rewarding experiences.

SPORTS We camp out in the cold for days in advance of basketball and football ticket sales. We paint our faces and bodies in team colors as no subtle reminder of our affiliations. Posters, stickers, license plates, t-shirts, jackets, and hats adorn our dorm rooms, cover our cars and fill our closets; all reminders of our commitment to serious fandom. There is no doubt that we, as a society, are passionate about sports. But what about taking our love of athletics to the next level? Going “pro” on the field or court is an option reserved for only a select few, but there are many other ways in which professionals of various fields work in and around athletics. U The Magazine spoke recently with several Triangle sports professionals working in college athletics and each has an interesting story – and good advice for any aspiring “pro”. From prep stardom on the basketball courts of the Hoosier State to a national

championship as a member of the 1993 North Carolina Tar Heels to the hallowed hardwood of the Boston Garden as a member of the Boston Celtics, Eric Montross knows what it’s like to be in the spotlight. Now in his fourth year of broadcasting for the Tar Heel Sports Network beside legendary broadcaster Woody Durham, Montross has a unique perspective on what it’s like to be on both sides of the ball. He’s also learned that, just like in basketball, it’s practice and preparation that help to shape your skills on air. “Broadcasting is not always glitz and glamour,” says Montross. “Preparation and work done, even at the mundane level, are two keys to success both on and off the court. For a sportscaster, production, sponsorships, the dynamics of sound and the different aspects of a broadcast are all important to understand so that you will have some experience if your opportunity arises.”

Even modestly speaking, Montross has seen his fair share of glitz during his time in Chapel Hill and the NBA. When asked about his most memorable experiences, his answer is quick and unequivocal. “Winning the National Championship in 1993, being a part of that team, and then to see it in 2009 from the announcer’s perspective was exciting. It was great to see young student-athletes walk the walk.” Woody Durham wore Carolina Blue long before he became the Voice of the Tar Heels. As a child, the Mebane native attended games at Chapel Hill with his father. As a young man, he also developed an interest in broadcasting, securing his first radio gig at age sixteen on a local AM station in Albemarle, North Carolina. From that point, he was hooked. With dreams of a career in broadcasting, most specifically in television, Durham attended and graduated from UNC with a communications degree. continued on next page

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

19


SPORTS: Taking It “Pro”—Perspectives on Careers in Sports

continued

SPORTS ers. At his direction they pursued internships in promotions and sales long before their first opportunities on air. “If you’re going to work around college athletics, you need to know about promotions and sales,” says Durham. “And be aware of how much preparation goes into doing games. You don’t just show up at the games and have fun,” he continues. “It’s a lot of work before and after.” “Hard work and paying your dues to get practical experience” sounds familiar doesn’t it? Perhaps it’s this shared ethic that makes Durham and Montross a great broadcasting team. As early as his sophomore year in college at Valdosta State University in Georgia, Scott Trulock had chosen a career path that would enable him to remain involved with athletics long after his playing days were over. “I knew I loved sports, but I didn’t think becoming a coach was for me, and I was also interested in medicine. Deciding on sports medicine was an easy combination,” says Trulock, now head athletic trainer for football at UNC. Though he was studying sports medicine and athletic training as an undergraduate, he knew that he would have to gain experience outside of the classroom. Following his sophomore

Photo courtesy of Brian M.K. Allen

Yet, as it has been know to do, fate intervened leaving countless Tar Heel fans as the benefactors. In 1971, Durham was asked to interview for the play-by-play position for UNC football and basketball on the radio. The opportunity to return to his alma mater and call Tar Heel games was just convincing enough for him to put his television ambitions on hold. They’ve remained on hold now for almost thirty years, sixteen Final Fours and four national championships. Ironically, some Tar Heel fans have been known to watch the televised basketball games on mute, deferring to Durham’s radio call for the true measure of what’s going on at center court at the Dean Dome. Today, Durham is well-known as a legendary broadcaster, but as he readily points out, he started by learning the trade at the lowest levels of the profession. “Take a good look at what you need to do to get practical experience,” advises Durham when asked what young students might do to achieve success in broadcasting. “Ask yourself, what have you done that makes you think you can do the job you’re trying to get?” This advice was the same Durham gave to his own two sons, now both broadcast-

year, Trulock wrote letters to every single National Football League team in hopes of securing an internship during the summer. The Denver Broncos answered and, well, the rest is history. Trulock, a Florida native, first came to Chapel Hill in 1994, earning his masters degree in athletic training by 1996. But this stint in a college town would give way quickly to a return to the NFL where Trulock would spend the next eleven years. From Philadelphia to San Diego to Tampa Bay and finally returning to Denver, Trulock even earned a Super Bowl ring with the 2002 Super Bowl Champion Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Being a part of this championship, Trulock describes as “something you carry with you for life.” “I would not have left [the NFL] if not for the opportunity at UNC,” explains Trulock. With a community of over 1,000 student-athletes competing in 28 varsity and numerous other intramural sports, there is no shortage of focus on athletics at UNC. Having first built a bond with the school during his masters studies, Trulock now heads a team of football athletic trainers and is a part of a talented professional staff that makes up UNC Sports Medicine. The challenges—and rewards—of

Tar Heel forward Tyler Hansbrough takes a moment to check in with UNC broadcasters Eric Montross and Woody Durham (white shirts/ headsets) during a 2009 game. From courtside vantage as a color commentator, Montross tells U The Magazine that he enjoys seeing current Tar Heel student-athletes “walk the walk.”

20

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11


Photo courtesy of UNC Athletic Communications

S

Rally Point Sport Grill 1837 N. Harrison Avenue 919.678.1088 www.RallyPointSportGrill.com Join us on

Thursday Corn Hole

Night in and night out, the Tar Heels broadcast team brings Carolina basketball to fans all over North Carolina. Former Tar Heel star Eric Montross serves as the color commentary analyst for hall-of-fame Carolina broadcaster Woody Durham.

$200 1st Place $100 2nd Place Bud Light Buckets

Tuesday

$2.50 Pint Night and Half Price Wings

Live Bands Every Weekend Most UFC Fights on 30ft. Screen

And NFL Ticket I-4 0 EXI T2 87

Wes to

n Pa rkw ay

N

3.9 miles from RBC Center

Ave on rris Ha

AS

S

being an athletic trainer are readily apparent in a story Trulock told U The Magazine. During a 2008 UNC victory over Notre Dame–a significant win for the program at the time—Trulock was called into action when star kick returner and wide receiver Brandon Tate suffered a major knee injury. With this athlete’s future in the balance, the situation was devastating. Longtime Tar Heel team physician Dr. Tim Taft, Trulock and his staff were in the locker room to share the bad news with Tate and his parents. Juxtaposed against the backdrop of a jubilant win, this was a dark day for not only Tate, but Trulock, as well. Yet, with his experience as an athletic trainer, Trulock and his team were able to rehabilitate Tate back to health, and he was eventually drafted by the New England Patriots. “And now he’s returning kickoffs in the NFL. Helping student-athletes recover, that’s what our profession is all about,” explains Trulock triumphantly. So far during the 2010 season, Tate has scored three Patriots touchdowns on kickoffs averaging 99 yards on the return. Triumph indeed. Be sure to visit the U The Magazine website and blog for additional resources on how you might secure an internship or first step in your sports career: www.uthemagazine.com _________________________________________________ Dana Magliola is a graduate student at North Carolina State University, part-time sports broadcast statistician and fulltime sports fan.

Tournament 7:00 pm

EX IT 2 87 Ca mp us D riv e

I-4

0

See coupon on page 27 U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

21


MUSIC: A Family Affair–Meet Delta Rae Photo Courtesy of Delta Rae

By Jeremy Davis

MUSIC From a house they share somewhere in the woods outside Durham comes powerhouse vocal group, Delta Rae. Comprised of siblings Brittany, Eric and Ian Hölljes along with childhood friend Liz Hopkins (who they say is as close as family), Delta Rae delivers amazing four-part harmonies, meaningful lyrics that don’t waste a word, and instrumental talent to which any musician would aspire. And they’re just in their twenties. As a band, Delta Rae draws inspiration from legendary harmony-strong bands like Fleetwood Mac and the Mamas and the Papas. Individual influences range from Billy Joel to Aretha Franklin, Jeff Buckley to Sweet Honey in the Rock. Bring this diversity together and out

22

comes a distinct, folk-rock sound with very broad appeal. “As a recent college grad, I want music with a bold sound, great melodies, and lyrics with enough depth that I can dig into them,” states Ian who shares songwriting duties with Eric. “That’s the type of music we try to write, and our four singers are among the most passionate vocalists I know.” I first heard Delta Rae when they opened for Edwin McCain at Cat’s Cradle in Carrboro, NC. They caught McCain’s attention performing as passengers on a cruise where McCain was the headliner. “It’s hard to deny when the real deal shows up, and they’re the real deal,” says McCain in a video clip on YouTube. Strength in song writing is undeni-

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

able. In addition to writing for Delta Rae, Eric and Ian collaborate as The Hölljes Brothers with more than 100 songs in their catalog, some of which are being pitched to other top artists. Eric also co-wrote Top-Ten hit, “Cooler Than Me” with Mike Posner who he met and collaborated with while in school at Duke. You can find Delta Rae’s debut EP on iTunes and Amazon, and they will be releasing a 12-track mix-tape in winter 2010 that they will offer for free on their website: www.deltarae.com. _________________________________ Jeremy Davis is a contributing music writer for U the Magazine and plays in 80s rock cover band Aftershock. www.aftershocknc.com


By Lamar Hill

Our failing schools. It is a huge problem and one on which you are probably poorly informed….unless, of course, you have seen Waiting for Superman. This independent documentary follows the lives of five bright children who simply want a good education. How hard is that to come by? Well, if the film’s depictions are accurate, it’s damn near impossible. Between bad teachers and a stifling public school bureaucracy, it’s not surprising that kids have not gotten any smarter since 1971. While the adults bicker and fuss over how to do this and that, it is the children who are suffering, and this movie portrays that crucial point brilliantly. Daisy is a 5th grader who will become a nurse, doctor, AND veterinarian no matter what it takes. Francisco is a 1st grader who is the only one of his friends who likes math. Anthony is a 5th grader who truly enjoys learning and understands the importance of a good education. Emily is an 8th grader who desperately wants to go to college, and poor little Bianca is a kindergartener who just wants to graduate. All of these kids are at a precipice in their education. Either for financial reasons or simple geography, they all risk being sent to “dropout factories,” schools that routinely fail to graduate 40% or more of its entering freshman. It seems the only hope these kids have is being admitted to various charter schools with proven methods for excellence. However, space is extremely limited, and chances are slim that these kids will make it past the random selection. If they do not make it in, it is likely they will not graduate or go to college. They will be stuck waiting for “Superman.” This powerful film illuminates the plight of our public school children and will, without a doubt, inspire you to seek change. If you have yet to see this film, get moving. I deem it a national necessity of paramount importance. Keep a tissue handy; you’re going to need it. _____________________________________________ Lamar Hill is an English major at North Carolina State University.

Arts: Another Side of Andy By Tina Moss

ARTS

MOVIES

MOVIE REVIEW: Waiting for Superman

Andy Warhol was undoubtedly one of the most controversial figures the art world has ever encountered. One cannot mention pop art without discussing the overwhelming influence he had on the genre. His photography however, is something that I was not at all familiar with until I saw the Big Shots: Andy Warhol Polaroids exhibit at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke back in January. I got a chance to experience the collection again at the Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill recently, and I was just as mesmerized as the time before. I became infatuated with Andy Warhol when I saw a film called Factory Girl a few years ago. While I had studied him in my high school art classes, this film showed a completely different aspect of his life. To be honest, I found him to be incredibly intriguing and creepy at the same time. For me this exhibit was an opportunity to look into his world through the lens of his camera, and I loved what I saw. The collection is entitled Big Shots because most of the photos featured were taken with a large 35mm Polaroid camera, one that was kept in production especially for Mr. Warhol himself. All of the polaroids and gelatin silver prints were taken between 1970 and 1987, at the height of Warhol’s career. The photos were of celebrities as well as regular people, and they ranged from candid to very “warholesque” type shots. Some of the celebrities included Carly Simon, Andre Leon Talley, Desi Arnaz Jr., Jean-Michel Basquiat, Mick and Bianca Jagger, Grace Jones, a young Tracee Ellis Ross (daughter of Diana Ross), Jack Nicklaus, Truman Capote, and Dorothy Hamill. A very striking Diane Lane was pictured in a gelatin silver print as well as a candid of Ryan O’Neal, who apparently used to be a major hottie. The most striking photo was of Grace Jones wearing a deep purple fur, golden scarf, and black and purple leather gloves; she looked absolutely stunning. There were also a few screen prints in the collection which featured Elizabeth Taylor and former communist leader Mao Zedong. Several copies of Warhol’s magazine Interview were on display for visitors to view as well. Big Shots is on display through January 2, 2011 at the Ackland Art Museum, so there’s still plenty of time to check it out if you haven’t already. For hours and general information you can visit their website at: www.ackland.org. ________________________________________________ Tina Moss is majoring in Africana Studies at North Carolina State University.

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

23


DININ DINING: “Not your ordinary bar food.”

Photo by Ashley Taylor

By Christie Hadden, founder www.MyRestaurantGuru.com

The neighborhood college bar is about as American as apple pie. It’s an institution, a place to meet up with friends or unwind by chatting up your favorite bartender. Wings, burgers and cheese sticks are the usual suspects found on any given bar menu and have a time and place. But sometimes this can be predictable, even B-o-r-i-n-g. What if you wanted to nosh on something more creative? What if your palette calls for something more sophisticated? Surprisingly, there are a few college bars that think outside the bun. If you are ready to stretch your taste buds and not your wallet, then I have created the list for you.

Raleigh Porters 2412 Hillsborough Street Raleigh, NC
 919-821-2133 Hours: Mon - Th 11:00am–10:00pm
 Fri 11:00am–11:00pm 
 Sat 5:00pm–11:00pm
 Sun 11:00am–2:30pm/5:00pm–9:00pm Located on Hillsborough Street directly across from NCSU, Porters has positioned itself to be an approachable bar with a vast North Carolina beer selection and affordable menu. You can get a nice cold one for $3 or the bigger 20oz pour for $6. If you are vegetarian you’ll be pleased to know that there are a good sampling of items in each of the restaurants menu categories. They use fresh ingredients from local sources/farms. For some great eats their menu has many un-bar treats that include: Tempura Battered Fried Green Beans served with chipotle aioli and the Short Rib Quesadilla

24

with roasted poblanos, grilled spring onions and jalapeño cream. In addition to their big burger menu, Porters mixes it up with an expansive taco selection with options like Fish Taco, Roasted Poblano/Black Bean, Crispy Shrimp, Grilled Steak and Smoked Chicken. Every Monday, you can enjoy any burger and any beer for only $10.

Durham Tobacco Road Sports Café 280 S. Mangum Street #100 Durham, NC 27701 919-937-9909 222 Glenwood Avenue Raleigh, NC 919-832-3688 Open Daily 11:00am–2:00am Welcome to a new classification of sports bar where the food is as good as the entertainment. Tobacco Road puts the spotlight on its food, all produce is

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

purchased locally and everything made in-house. And with an entire wall of flat screen TV’s you can catch any and every game from football to cricket without skipping a beat. Tobacco Road’s creative menu includes un-bar samplings like the Lettuce Wraps with lemongrass chicken or shrimp and the Buffalo Chicken Egg Rolls served with sun dried tomato blue cheese. If you are looking for something a little more substantial, then try the Fish or Lamb Gorditas. They are served on three flour tortillas with roasted corn and ancho slaw, avocado lime aioli, pico de gallo, and served with black beans and rice. Every Monday to Friday from 4:30 to 5:30 Tobacco Road has Happy Hour specials where various food items are $2.94 like the nachos, black eye pea cakes, Buffalo wings, and pulled pork sandwich. Full menu served until 2am.


100 East Franklin Street Third Floor Chapel Hill, NC 919-929-8676 Hours: Mon-Sat 11:00am–2:00am Sun 11:30am–2:00am

Located at the social crossroads of Columbia and Franklin Streets, Top of the Hill Restaurant is not just an iconic restaurant but also a brewery. Serving up seven styles of house made brews, it’s a great place to watch a game, impress a first date or grab a bite on the patio overlooking Franklin Street. The food is inventive and the menu includes un-bar items like the Lizard Chips, which are sliced dill pickle & jalapeño chips fried in beer batter and served with chipotle ranch. And for the sophisticated palate check out the Plum BBQ Seared Tuna with wasabi cream, plum barbecue sauce, hoisin sauce, black truffle oiled baby greens, frizzled onions, honey roasted nuts & sesame seeds. On Mondays: Drain The Tank... Win A T-Shirt! $3 Selected 20 Oz Imperial Pints ______________________________ Christie Hadden is a world traveling food fanatic and founder of myrestaurantguru.com, a Triangle-based Web site that connects people to the areas best restaurants. To learn more, visit: www.MyRestaurantGuru.com.

Full Bar Daily Drink Specials Dine-In or Take-Out Big Screen TVs for Sports Fans! Hwy 55

NG Chapel Hill Top of the Hill

S aTion 8 Loc S ThE S acro gLE a i r T n

N I-40 Hwy 54

ParkWest Shopping Center

BEST Marga riTa in Tow ’S n!

ElDoradomexicanrestaurant.com 4900 Hwy 55 South, Ste. 140 Durham, NC 27713 919-361-0302

M-Sat 11am-10pm, Sun 11am-9pm 5 min. from NCCU • 15 min. from UNC/DUKE See coupon on page 27

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

25


U SAID

“U Said”: Q: Have you been naughty or nice this year? What are your New Year’s Resolutions?

Photos by Ashley Taylor

Dine-In • Take-Out Delivery • Catering

Upcoming Event? We Cater! RGER U B F EST

B

O BEST NGLE A TRI THE

20de1nt0Weekly

en m Indep yweek.co d In

BEST BU

RGER

CAROLI NA’ FINEST S

2009 & 2 010 Daily Ta

r Heel

www.BunsofChapelHill.com 107 N. Columbia Street Chapel Hill, NC 919-240-4746

26

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

Will: NC State University “Naughty–no need to make resoultions, I never follow through.”

Phillip: NC State University “Naughty–no beer.”

Robby: Duke University “Nice–focusing on life after graduation.”

Alicia: Duke University “Nice–not much of a resolution maker. “

Meredith: UNC “Always naughty– I want to be able to do three chin-ups by the end of the year.”

Krysta & Jesse: UNC “We’ve both been nice. We resolve to lift weights for Rugby.


$$$

COUPONS

$$$

COUPONS

$$$

FREE WINGS

$5 OFF any $20 purchase

With Purchase of Equal Value Regular Price Wings

PICK-UP OR DINE-IN ONLY

$$$

Expires January 31, 2011

$$$

$89

145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary

919.380.2029

New guest only

10% off

your AVEDA purchase of $25 or more 145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary

919.380.2029 Expires January 31, 2011

Expires January 31, 2011

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

VISIT uthemagazine.com for additional savings!

$100

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

$$$

$100

COUPONS

COUPONS

Expires January 31, 2011

Hair Cut, Partial Highlight and STYLE.

COUPONS

COUPONS

Expires January 31, 2011

Expires January 31, 2011

#

$$$

BUY ONE GET ONE FREE Lunch or Dinner Up to $5 Value

Dine in Only

$$$

COUPONS

COUPONS

COUPONS

COUPONS

27


COUPONS

$$$

COUPONS

$$$

COUPONS

I-40

#

Hwy 55

COUPONS $$$

N

$$$

ParkWest Shopping Center

Hwy 54

COUPONS

Expires January 31, 2011

Expires January 31, 2011

Great Drink Specials OPEN 11 am to 2 am 7 Days a week

I-4 0

EXI T2 87

$$$

Expires January 31, 2011

COUPONS

AS

EX IT 2 87 Ca mp us D riv e

I-4

0

Kitchen open until 2 am! Expires January 31, 2011

$89

your AVEDA purchase of $25 or more 145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary

145 W. Chatham Street, Historic Downtown Cary

919.380.2029

Expires January 31, 2011

New guest only

Expires January 31, 2011

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

$100

$$$

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

$100

$$$

Ave on rris Ha

Hair Cut, Partial Highlight and STYLE.

919.380.2029

28

N

COUPONS

10% off

n Pa rkw ay

$$$

www. AlfredosPizzaNC.com

Wes to

S

University Mall 201 S. Estes Drive Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919-968-3424

COUPONS

ElDoradomexicanrestaurant.com 919-361-0302

Hope Valley Commons 1125 W. NC 54, Suite 301 Durham, NC 27707 919-490-3200

COUPONS

COUPONS

VISIT uthemagazine.com for additional savings!


$$$

COUPONS

$$$

Main: 919.510.4010 • Fax: 919.510.4009 www.TradeMarkResidential.com

COUPONS

in place of security deposit and administration fees www.parkwoodvillageapts.com Expires January 31, 2011

free photo CD

Coupon Good With Face Painting Event or Body Art Session

For More Details - Contact Revonne Carter 919.522.5880 or revonne@bellsouth.net Expires January 31, 2011

Call 919-610-2191 • MagicRoman.com Must present Coupon on First Call or Email Expires January 31, 2011

Session Fee Expires January 31, 2011

Present Coupon

And Pay No Admin or Application Fee.

(Total Value $150)

919-861-8342 Expires January 31, 2011

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

VISIT uthemagazine.com for additional savings!

$100

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

$$$

$100

COUPONS

$50 OFF

50% OFF

$$$

$$$

$99 move-in special

COUPONS

Expires January 31, 2011

#

$$$

Residential

$100 OFF First Month’s Rent

COUPONS

COUPONS

COUPONS TradeMark

$$$

$$$

COUPONS

COUPONS

COUPONS

29


COUPONS

$$$

COUPONS

$$$

COUPONS

#

COUPONS $$$

in place of security deposit and administration fees

COUPONS

Expires January 31, 2011

Residential

Main: 919.510.4010 • Fax: 919.510.4009 www.TradeMarkResidential.com

$100 OFF First Month’s Rent Expires January 31, 2011

free photo CD

Coupon Good With Face Painting Event or Body Art Session

50% OFF

For More Details - Contact Revonne Carter 919.522.5880 or revonne@bellsouth.net

$$$

Expires January 31, 2011

COUPONS

(Total Value $150)

Call 919-610-2191 • MagicRoman.com

919-861-8342

Must present Coupon on First Call or Email Expires January 31, 2011

Expires January 31, 2011

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

This Coupon Space is YOURS for

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

To advertise contact Cindy Nitschke 919.815.6019

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

$$$

$100

VISIT uthemagazine.com for additional savings!

$$$

30

$50 OFF

COUPONS

Present Coupon

And Pay No Admin or Application Fee.

$$$

Session Fee

Expires January 31, 2011

$100

COUPONS

www.parkwoodvillageapts.com

TradeMark $$$

$99 move-in special

COUPONS

COUPONS


In the February/March 2011 Issue: Features:

Regular Departments:

Finances: Part 2

SPORTS BOOKS/Movies ARTS MUSIC DINING “U SAID”

Freshman 15 How NOT to get kicked out of college

If you are interested in writing or have an idea for an article topic, we’d love to hear from you. Send to: publisher@uthemagazine.com

Or if your organization wants to announce an event: events@uthemagazine.com

U the Magazine | December-January 2010-11

31


U the Magazine  
U the Magazine  

December/ January issue

Advertisement