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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL VOLUME 10 ISSUE 6 / NOVEMBER 2018

MBJ

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MGM

BETTER BY DESIGN ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

Featuring: MGM IMPACT MAKER FINALISTS

12

APPEALING ART STOPS

PROVEN PR TIPS

1 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR MEETING

W

hen you decide to hold a meeting off-site, you want more than just a meeting. You want your team to have fun. You want their full attention. You want to wow them. You want to bring them to Wind Creek Montgomery!

RAMBLIN’ HALL

5,800 sq. ft. holds up to: • 150 Classroom Style • 400 Theater Style • 250 Banquet Style • 300 Reception Style

Sure, we offer all of the amenities you would expect, but we offer much more. We offer an experience, complete with amazing accommodations, delicious dining options, entertainment, team building activities, and great gaming excitement!

CROSSROADS

So call us at (334) 567-1283 or send an email to sales@windcreekmontgomery.com, and get the most out of your next meeting!

• 40 Banquet Style

900 sq. ft. holds up to: • 30 Classroom Style • 40 Theater Style • 40 Reception Style

1801 Eddie L. Tullis Rd., Montgomery, AL | WindCreekMontgomery.com | ©2018 Wind Creek Hospitality


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CONTENTS N OV 2 0 1 8

THIS ISSUE: 10 40 50

By Design: Archite ct u re

& E n gin e e r ing Overview

MGM Impact Makers MPS Report Card

32 Powerhouse Q&A: Lt . Ge n . An t hony Cotton 35 Member Profiles: Mia Mot he rs he d, Mike Hicks , Ra n dy Thomp son

52 Regional Impact: Tr oy 56 GiveBack: B ra n t wood C hildre n ’s H ome 60 #MyMGM: Mon t gome r y Are a Ar t S ce n e 64 Small Business Briefcase: A S u cce ss ful Story

334-277-7749

CHAMBER NEWS:

08 Events 66 Connect: Chamber News 70 Connect: Member FAQ 71 Connect: Past Events 73 Members on the Move 75 Members in the News 80 Business Buzz 87 Ribbon Cuttings 91 New Members 94 Intel


S


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MBJ

THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT Randall L. George DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS Jina Miniard

EXPLORE MEDIA PUBLISHER Pam Mashburn

MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Stewart Kornegay

ART DIRECTOR Erika Rowe Tracy

DESIGN Heather Cooper, Shelby Berry Shubird

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORIAL Jennifer Kornegay, Minnie Lamberth, Savanna Pruitt, Melissa Warnke PHOTOGRAPHERS Bryan Carter, Nick Drollette, Robert Fouts, David Robertson Jr., Eric Salas, Donna Wallace King

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ON THE COVER RSA Dexter Building designed by JMH+R Architecture. Photography by Robert Fouts ADVERTISING Kristina Boddie and Christina Bennett / exploreMedia / 334-578-7810 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Post Office Box 79, Montgomery, Alabama 36101 Telephone: 334-834-5200 • mbj@montgomerychamber.com © Copyright 2018 exploreMedia and the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved.

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MISSION STATEMENT

Committed to exceptional service, the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce works to improve the economic well-being of the business community and enhance the quality of life of the area through the creation and preservation of jobs. The Montgomery Business Journal (USPS NO. 025553) is published bi-monthly by exploreMedia for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334)

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834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Periodicals Postage Paid at Montgomery Alabama, 36119+9998, USPS NO. 025553. Volume 10, Issue3. POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery

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CHAMBER NEWS

NOV

08

Events +

MA RK YO UR CALENDAR S FOR THE SE UP COMING C HAMB E R E V E NTS

Governmental Affairs Reception 5-6:30 pm at Union Station Meet, engage and connect with

governmental officials who represent you and your business. Join the Chamber for a reception honoring the region’s governmental leadership, bringing together municipal leaders, members of county government, the area’s legislative delegation, education leaders and top-level stakeholders from the River Region’s business community. Presenting Sponsor: Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood, Inc.

NOV

11

Military Appreciation Week

Upcoming Workshops

60 Minute Coffees & Business After Hours These popular networking events are the perfect place to exchange business cards and meet potential customers.

Every year, River Region businesses

rally together and show support for our local military community, both active duty and retired. “Freedom Isn’t Free” is a regional media campaign that promotes special offers and discounts

11/15 Business After Hours Sponsor: D.R. Horton Homes; Location: Taylor Lakes Clubhouse

for military personnel and families. Presenting Sponsor: Caddell Construction

12/5 60 Minute Coffee Sponsor: Montgomery Biscuits; Location: Riverwalk Stadium

12/13 Business After Hours Sponsor & Location: Tile & More Warehouse

This is the largest and most anticipated business event of the year, with close to 800 community and business leaders attending. This signature event celebrates

1/9 60 Minute Coffee Sponsor: AALOS; Location: Montgomery Antiques & Interiors

the Chamber’s rich 146-year history, the economic development milestones of the year and the installation of the new Chairman. Presenting Sponsor: Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood, Inc

Resource Center

Business 101: Start it Up! November 20; December 4, 18; January 15; from 8:30-9:30 am, the Chamber’s BRC No registration required. $10 fee. Establish a strong foundation for your new or existing business. Topics covered include locating financing, writing a business plan and finding expert advice. Payroll Tax Update December 14, 8:30-11:30 am, at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel   Registration fee is $85 for members and $105 for non-members. Learn the latest on payroll tax filing requirements, 1099 reporting, company vehicles, worker classification -9/E, expense reimbursements, cafeteria plans and much more. Contact Dava Hornbeak at dhornbeak@montgomerychamber.com or register online. In Partnership with Jackson Thornton 

146th Annual Meeting • December 11 11:30-1:30 pm, Renaissance Montgomery Hotel

BUSINESS

+

Register online

Register online for Business Resource Center events and webinars at montgomerychamber.com/events

1/24 Business After Hours Sponsor & Location: Staybridge Suites Downtown

BizTalk MGM

Look for these upcoming events: Alabama Update with the Governor

State of the City & County

Engage with business leaders and elected

Join community and business leaders, elected

officials at this high-profile event and stay

officials and military leaders during this annual

informed as the Governor presents an update

breakfast event and hear from Mayor Todd

on Alabama’s major initiatives and issues. Also

Strange and County Commission Chairman

gain valuable insight on key legislative projects

Elton Dean Sr. as they give a comprehensive

and challenges affecting state government.

update on the State of the City and County.

Presenting Sponsor: Beasley, Allen, Crow,

Presenting Sponsor: Baptist Health

Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C.

8 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

- The Official Podcast for Small Business in MGM Every month, on the second Tuesday, at 6 pm on WVAS 90.7 FM, Montgomery Chamber staff, plus host Tonya Scott Williams, talk with business experts on topics that are important to small businesses.


9 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


BY DESIGN

MGM’s architecture and engineering industry brings the region (and beyond) the tangible places and spaces in which we all live, work and play, using a combo of raw talent and sophisticated tools to marry form and function.

From idea spark to full-fledged vision, from blueprint to actual bridge, road or building, at every step of planning and creating the spaces that shelter us and the infrastructure elements that connect us, there are architects and engineers at work. Without them, our ability to do business and our quality of life would — both literally and figuratively — crumble. BY JENNIFER STEWART KORNEGAY

PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM TAKE AN ARCHITECTURAL TOUR VIA SOME MGM FIRMS' NOTABLE PROJECTS

While it may seem obvious that the architec-

assets is our expertise,” said Jack Daniels,

of time. It packs a pretty sizable econom-

ture and engineering industry has and will

President of structural engineering firm

ic-impact punch too, according to Dr. Keivan

continue to play essential roles in the River

Blackburn Daniels O’Barr, Inc. “We are able

Deravi, Dean of AUM’s College of Public

Region, Don Brown, FAIA, founder of Brown

to provide highly complex designs for a

Policy and Justice. “The architecture and

Studio Architecture elaborated on the point.

multitude of projects.”

engineering industry, statewide, has a payroll of $2.2 billion and a total employment

“We create things that matter and that bring pleasure and usefulness to people,” he said.

Some firms, like JMR+H and Goodwyn, Mills

of 26,000 employees,” he said. “I believe

Vice President at JMR+H Architecture Tim

and Cawood, Inc. (GMC), cover multiple bas-

the River Region’s share of the industry is

Holmes, AIA, echoed Brown. “Good archi-

es in one office. “Our practice is diversified

approximately 6 percent of the state figures.

tectural solutions equal productive office en-

and spread over many areas, including com-

That means a payroll of $100 million and

vironments, pleasurable retail opportunities

mercial, governmental, military, educational,

employment of 1,500.”

and cultural gathering spaces that enhance

retail and coastal resort work,” Holmes

our daily lives,” he said. “The influence this

said. “So our beneficial influence sweeps a

GMC alone employs more than 400 profes-

has on creating positive experiences for all

wide path: whether it’s a student sitting in a

sionals companywide, with approximately

we do is undeniable.”

classroom at Carver High School, a patient

120 of those in the River Region. “Architec-

having surgery at a local clinic, a family

ture and engineering are major sources

Knowing that our area’s architecture and

going to the movies or a soldier receiving

of employment for an educated workforce

engineering firms are foundational to con-

training or a professional practicing in an

here,” said David Reed, PE, PLS, Executive

tinued growth and progress, it’s comforting

office environment.”

Vice President and Board Chairman at

to also understand the depth and breadth of options that the large number of firms in the River Region provides. “Our area architects

ECONOMIC ENERGY

GMC. “That’s a big positive.”

But the industry brings more to our commu-

Simply having so many architects and engi-

and engineers are some of the best in the

nity than interesting, usable buildings and

neers living alongside us is a plus. “Because

United States. One of the industry’s greatest

transportation systems that stand the tests

the Alabama Department of Transportation

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ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING

CIVIL RIGHTS MEMORIAL CENTER

SUPER SIZE

“The architecture and engineering

industry is currently experiencing rapid growth. Mergers and acquisitions are at an all-time high, with many giant firms combining to form mega-giant firms. As part of our strategic

(ALDOT) is here, there are a lot of engineers here,” said Pep Pilgreen, President of Pilgreen Engineering, a civil engineering firm. “And having a lot of engineers here means a lot of well educated folks here." Reed agreed. “Having a large number of architects and engineers in a community helps cultivate interest in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math,” he said. “Development of STEM in education and the workforce of the River Region is vital to the community’s future success in attracting new commerce and industries.” Brown offered a wider perspective on his profession’s role. “During the recession, we lost a greater percentage of our profession than any of the others in this country. Conversely, when we are busy, as we are now, the economy is strong. We are the canary in the mine shaft.”

TOOLS & TRENDS Even as advances in technology bring multiple changes to the way work gets done in the industry, the higher education that

growth strategy, GMC has acquired several smaller firms over the last few years, and we are currently engaged

Pilgreen mentioned is still integral. “Now,

in the M&A process

almost everything we do is measured and

with two other firms.”

drawn on computers; nothing, other than

- David Reed,

some preliminary design work, is done by

Goodwyn Mills

hand anymore, and computers are faster, so that’s good,” he said. But the amount of

and Cawood, Inc.

automation is not without issues. “We, as engineers, still have to have the knowledge.

in 3D,” he said. “Calculations of complex sys-

Computers can spit out an error, especially

tems that once took days and reams of pa-

when changes are made, so you have to

per are now done by importing the data and

understand what you are looking at,” he

criteria and letting the computer do its work.

said. “It can also give false confidence and

Technology has completely transformed our

cause some to not check their work as much

industry, and it is wonderful; however, I do

as they should,” Pilgreen said.

miss some of the old, hands-on experience that was necessary to complete a project.”

Reed also praised the efficiency of modern times but admitted he sometimes misses the

Brown believes the same is true in his

“old ways.” “Today, we use drones to con-

profession and offered a caveat similar to

duct topographic surveys. Plans are drawn

Pilgreen’s. “All of us use current-generation

using design software on a computer, often

digital tools today, which enable small firms

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RSA TOWER

DID YOU KNOW? Many of the architectural elements of RSA buildings around the state have been inspired by iconic structures in other areas. The pinnacle of the RSA Tower in downtown Montgomery pays homage to the top of JP Morgan’s headquarters in New York City. The banquet facility at the peak of the RSA Plaza building is identical (its glass exterior) to the famed Tavern on the Green restaurant in NYC’s Central Park. The Marriott Shoals Hotel and Spa in Florence takes design cues from a resort in

like us to perform more comprehen-

industry,” he said. “I worry a bit that

sively and large teams to connect

we will become too dependent on

Alberta, Canada.

across platforms,” Brown said. “But

technology. You should use technol-

the aspects that the owner wants to

what really matters is the intellectual

ogy as a tool, but don’t let it drive

have,” said Holmes. Brown added,

capacity, education and training that

your creativity.”

“The pace of work has accelerated. The components of buildings have

we as architects employ to be the trusted advisor. It’s not about the

Technology is also presenting other

become more complicated. Recent

tool. It’s about judgment.”

challenges. By speeding up the

economic recovery has released

work on projects with software and

pent-up demand for development

Wilbur Hill, AIA, an architect at

modeling that allows for increased

and construction. But our profession

Brown Studio Architecture, still puts

collaboration across disciplines and

can’t turn out results overnight.”

pencil to paper at the beginning of

trades, it is elevating clients’ expec-

most projects but employs digital

tations, often to unrealistic levels.

One big benefit of technology is its

devices too. He expressed some

“The faster pace that technology

ability to aid today’s architects and

concern about the profession’s

has afforded us has also created

engineers in designing and building

reliance on technology. “The ability

expedited schedules that some-

“greener” structures, according to

to be able to communicate with a

times don’t give enough time for

Barry Robinson, owner and CEO of

pen is still very important to this

the design team to integrate all of

Robinson and Associates ArchitecContinued on page 14

TECH-SAVY

“Detection limits for environmental analytical capability have vastly improved. Back in the early to mid-1970s, we were fortunate to analyze soil and water contaminants to the levels measured in just a few parts per million (ppm). Today, contaminants can be detected in parts per trillion (ppt) and beyond. As a practical matter, contaminant cleanup capabilities and standards today allow scientists and engineers to find contaminants left as undetected during earlier days of environmental regulation.”

- Dan Cooper, TTL, Inc

12 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

NOTABLE QUOTE

We, as engineers, still have to have the knowledge. Computers

PILGREEN ENGINEERING

can spit out an error, especially

MONTGOMERY MULTIPLEX AND CRAMTON BOWL EXPANSION

when changes are made, so you

We worked on the Multiplex building at Cramton Bowl and drainage needed

have to understand what you are looking at.

- Pep Pilgreen, Pilgreen Engineering

when re-doing the west stands of the bowl. This project stands out because we found some interesting things underground at Cramton Bowl. Where the press box is now is where they used to work on trolley cars a long time ago. We uncovered railroad tracks that no one knew were there. We found a huge culvert running under the football field, made of solid concrete. There are rooms under the main entrance that were covered up.

13 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING

RIVER REGION IMPACT:

ture, Inc. “Repurposing old materials like tim-

Holmes. “One of the biggest challenges to our

ber elements, recycled glass and aluminum to

industry would have to be the myriad project

be more environmentally friendly is currently a

delivery methods now being employed in the

trend,” he said.

construction industry,” he said. “Construction management represents a relatively popular

Brown sees the same thing. “Energy efficiency

form of delivery that relies on a management

and sustainability are priorities for more and

firm to organize, manage and deliver projects

more clients and more of our colleagues, and

for an owner. As such, the architect is a mem-

we now have the tools to design and build

ber of a team controlled by a manager and not

this way,” he said. Holmes also sees a lot of

the lead professional of the project. It works

movement in this direction. “Responding to re-

well with the right team but can certainly be a

newable energy resources with smart design

challenge in the wrong hands.”

solutions is the latest in design and construction trends,” he said.

While the focus on designs and methods that conserve both natural and personnel resourc-

On the engineering side, Dan Cooper, Senior

ESTIMATED

ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING INDUSTRY IMPACT:

1,500 JOBS WITH A PAYROLL OF

$100M

PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

es isn’t likely to go out of fashion Continued on page 16

Client Manager with TTL, Inc., explained how technology has greatly enhanced his ability to protect the environment in his work as a chemical engineer. “Detection limits for environmental analytical capability have vastly improved,” he said. “Back in the early to mid1970s, we were fortunate to analyze soil and water contaminants to the levels measured in just a few parts per million (ppm). Today, contaminants can be detected in parts per trillion (ppt) and beyond. As a practical matter, contaminant cleanup capabilities and standards today allow scientists and engineers to find contaminants left as undetected during earlier days of environmental regulation.” Another trend, one aimed at the efficient use of time, can sometimes present a problem for the architecture industry, according to

“What really matters is the intellectual capacity,

Montgomery’s Riverwalk

education and training that we

Stadium had significant

as architects employ to be the

geotechnical and historical

trusted advisor. It’s not about

challenges that required

the tool. It’s about judgment.”

innovative construction tech-

- Don Brown, Brown Studio Architecture

niques and foundation design

PROJECT OF NOTE BROWN STUDIO ARCHITECTURE RIVER REGION HEALTH CENTER

DAN COOPER, TTL, INC. RIVERWALK STADIUM

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

types to overcome potentially expensive problems. The use of several foundation systems that allowed the project to fit within the geometry of the site and be completed on April 9, 2004, (one week ahead of schedule) resulted in the cost

This center is an effective delivery

of the project matching the

mechanism for health care, and the

$26.5 million budget.

building is extraordinarily flexible and patient-friendly, so much so, that other areas have used it as a model. It’s also the most energy-efficient building in Montgomery.

14 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

CHAMBLESS KING ARCHITECTS Chambless King is a team of highly creative architects and designers that blend passion and energy in an innovative approach to design. WHEN WAS CHAMBLESS KING FOUNDED? John Chambless and Stephen King came together in 2012 to form Chambless King Architects. This extension of the firm founded by Rock Chambless in 1961 now includes two new partners, Mike Shows, AIA and Nick Henninger, AIA.

Advanced Structural Testing Lab, Auburn University. Schematic Design Studies.

WHAT ARE CK’S PRIMARY SERVICES? Chambless King provides a variety of services related to architecture, interior design, project management, master planning/urban planning, project feasibility studies, project cost and schedule management. WHAT (IN THE FIRM’ S OPINION) IS THE FOUNDATION OF GOOD ARCHITECTURE? Relationships are first and foremost. Understanding the client’s needs and having the tools and design talent available to not only creatively interpret those needs but to also clearly communicate a design’s intent is paramount. Construction is always an expensive endeavor, and it is vital to us that every client fully understands and approves each aspect of a project’s design before it is constructed. HOW DOES TECHNOLOGY AFFECT THE WAY YOU APPROACH DESIGN? CK has found that traditional architectural and engineering drawings and presentations can be difficult for our clients to understand. It is challenging to represent many aspects of a design such as scale, texture and daylighting. CK utilizes virtual reality and other digital technology as a tool to create and communicate accurate studies of our projects. Our utilization of this powerful visual technology helps make presentations more interactive and memorable, while assuring us that our clients fully understand our designs. WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR THE FIRM? CK is excited to be opening its first branch of the firm in Birmingham this fall. Upcoming work includes a mixed-use resort development on Lake Guntersville, a 125-acre sports and amphitheater development for the City of Albertville and completion of Auburn University’s Advanced Structural Testing Laboratory.

Montgomery Interpretive Center in Montgomery. 2018 Honor Award by Alabama Council AIA.

AwardWinning Work

Chambless King Office, Montgomery. 2016 Honorable Mention Award by AIA; 2015 Honorable Mention Award By Alabama Council AIA.

The American Institute of Architects has regularly recognized CK for outstanding design, a highly competitive distinction that has been awarded to CK for each of the past six years.

Logicore Corporate Headquarters, Huntsville , AL. 2017 Merit Award By Alabama Council AIA.

12 W JEFFERSON STREET, SUITE 300, MONTGOMERY, AL 36104 | 334.272.0029 | CHAMBLESSKING.COM

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ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING

anytime soon, Brown is hopeful that another current trend will soon reverse course. “There is a shortage of skilled architects,” he said. “Many of the 5,000 graduates annually in profes-

factors to attracting top talent.”

PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

FOR THE LOVE Despite hurdles like these, many architects and engineers in the River

sional architecture programs had to

Region see a bright future for their

find other careers for five years due

industry and are fully enjoying the

to the deep recession recently. Now

attributes of their profession that first

there is a shortage in a career area

drew them to their careers.

that takes many years to matriculate.”

Robinson, who’s been in architecture

Reed identified the same dilemma.

for more than four decades, still loves creating something he can touch. “We get to physically see our work come to fruition,” he said. Hill appreciates this, as well as his job’s collaborative elements. “It’s BLACKBURN DANIELS O'BARR, INC. ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL STADIUM

We get to physically see

We worked with multiple firms in

our work come to fruition.

the River Region and also nation-

Barry Robinson, Robinson and Associates Architecture, Inc.

“One challenge our industry is facing is attracting and retaining high-quality engineers and architects,” he said. “Not only is there a shortage of qualified individuals,

ally known engineering firms to complete the stadium project. It

fun to watch something you’ve been drawing and then working on for months actually materialize," he said. “And I love working with a client to find solutions to their problems and to create something that works for them and the wider community.”

seats 26,500 fans and was built

Reed is living his childhood dream and

to allow for future expansion to

finds satisfaction in every facet of his

up to 55,000-seat capacity. The

work. “I grew up wanting to be an engi-

structural system for the stadium

neer, and I love that I am. To me, the most

consists of steel, concrete and masonry. What makes it notable is that it changed the face of the

but firms have to be located somewhere

I-85 corridor; it was completed on

people want to bring their families to live

a fast-track schedule; and it was a

and work. Housing, education, safety,

collaboration of several firms.

important part of this job is building the relationships required to succeed. The people I work with every day all allow me to accomplish the greatest joy of being an engineer: building something that lasts.”

recreation and opportunities are all key

PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

WIBLE BARBER AUBURN UNIVERSITY’S LARGE ANIMAL TEACHING HOSPITAL We started Wible Barber Architects a year ago, and our firm’s ability to successfully complete complex projects using teams of specialists is illustrated by the design approach to The Large Animal Teaching Hospital at Auburn University. The project included Dr. Temple Grandin, a renowned animal behaviorist from Colorado State University, who consulted on the project’s design.

16 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


I ND U ST RY Leader | Architecture & Engineering

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M EMBE R Spotlight

BROWN STUDIO ARCHITECTURE WHEN WAS YOUR COMPANY FOUNDED? Brown Studio Architecture has delivered a 40-year legacy of impactful work in Montgomery. WHAT ARE YOUR PRIMARY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES? We work with our clients to provide valued solutions, one project at a time. We work to provide solutions that work for them today and as they grow into the future. Brown Studio is a full-service architectural firm with a broad range of experience including medical, educational, multi-family residential, commercial, retail, hospitality, mixed-use, athletic facilities, urban planning and master planning. We offer a broad range of services beginning as early as site selection and programming through the development of construction documents, construction administration and beyond. WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART? As our clients’ needs grow and change, we believe good design allows them the ability to take advantage of emerging opportunities. We also believe that every project is part of a community, and we believe a successful project is sensitive to the existing community fabric. Brown Studio Architecture also has legacy of civic engagement, community service and philanthropy. Throughout its history, the team at Brown Studio has worked both professionally and personally to make the River Region a better place to live, work and play. Our professional efforts have helped transform the riverfront and the entertainment district including more than 50 projects in downtown Montgomery. AWARDS & ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Brown Studio and our team members have received AIA design awards and other recognitions from the American Institute of Architects for professional leadership. We have projects that have received up to LEED Gold certification; and we have been awarded a National Preservation Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation for the Revitalization and Preservation of Moton Field, the Tuskegee Airmen flight training base in Tuskegee, Alabama, which is now a museum and National Historic Site.

401 MADISON AVENUE / 334-834-8340 / BROWNSTUDIO.COM 18 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


I ND U ST RY Leader | Architecture & Engineering

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PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

GOODWYN MILLS AND CAWOOD, INC. DEXTER AVENUE STREETSCAPE RENOVATION The Dexter Avenue streetscape renovation was a

BORDEN MORRIS GARNER CONSULTING ENGINEERS, LLP

project 12 years in the making. The State originally

LAMP HIGH SCHOOL We designed the mechanical, plumbing and fire protection, as well

received federal funding for the project with the intent to

as the audiovisual, structural cabling, security system and site

enhance the landscape around the Capitol, emphasizing

utilities for the construction and modification of the old

the historical elements; however, the money was tabled

Montgomery Mall for the new two-story LAMP High School

as a result of political changes at the State House. Later,

(Loveless Academic Magnet Program) with a gymnasium, a parking lot and roadway. The total finished space was 73,950 square feet. The existing commercial structure was renovated into

a study of downtown Montgomery prepared for the city identified the need to renew Dexter Avenue while preserving its historic context. The project was finally green-light-

a new educational building, which was designed with state-of-the-

ed in 2014. GMC designed the streetscape to conform

art and current trend upgrades throughout. This reuse of space

to Dexter Avenue’s rich history. We also performed the construction inspections, testing and engineering. The

makes the project interesting, but working with the existing space

results were a serviceable corridor that preserved history

was also a challenge.

and enhanced the city and State Capitol.

PROJECT OF NOTE CHAMBLESS KING AUBURN UNIVERSITY BROUN HALL Broun Hall is home to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Auburn University. The renovation of Broun Hall included the addition of the Davidson Pavilion. The original design and layout of Broun Hall limited the ability and willingness for students to interact with each other. The exterior of the building was a traditional “brutalist” aesthetic common to the 1970s and '80s and lacked an identity to associate it with the rest of campus. Further, it did not openly address the student traffic coming off of the adjacent Ginn Concourse or provide exterior spaces for the engineering students. Once hallmarked by dark and uninspired spaces, our design for the new Broun Hall features a light-filled glass entry, spanning two floors and includes a new study lounge and study spaces, new skylighting, an updated conference and office area for faculty and staff and updated classrooms and conference areas. Continued on page 24

20 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM


I ND U ST RY Leader | Architecture & Engineering

21 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


I N D USTRY Leader | Architecture & Engineering

22 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight Prattville High School Lobby Enclosure

WIBLE • BARBER ARCHITECTS The team at Wible Barber Architects knows that good architecture not only functions well for the end user, but positively contributes to their well being as well as to the community and its surroundings. WHAT ARE WIBLE BARBER’S PRIMARY SERVICES AND HOW ARE THEY EXECUTED? The firm can provide architectural and interior design services, space planning, master planning and construction contract administration services. We are able to achieve these services using Revit, a three-dimensional modeling software. Building modeling is used from project inception through the end of construction. It gives architects and clients a more accurate picture of what is happening spatially and materially, both inside and outside the building.

Priester’s Pecans

WHAT IS WIBLE BARBER’S CLIENT-SERVICE PHILOSOPHY? Wible Barber Architects strives to design buildings that can most importantly function as required by the owner, be completed on time and within budget and give the user a place where they will enjoy spending time. WHAT SETS THE FIRM APART? Our goal for all projects is to provide great attention to detail so that we produce not just a well-designed and constructed building but one that the owners and end users will love as much as we do.

Lowndes County Courthouse Restoration and Addition

Biggin Hall Renovation, Auburn University

Huntingdon Library Addition

529 S PERRY STREET, SUITE 16 / 334-657-2535 / WIBLEBARBERARCHITECTS.COM

23 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


In d ust ry O verv i ew

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ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING

BIG BANG

CREATIVE PLANNING

“I wanted to preserve the history associated

When the Retirement Systems of

with rulings that came from the building, but

Alabama added the former State of

its physical structure was not that impres-

Alabama Judicial Building on Dexter

sive. My job is to make money, so I had to

Avenue to its real estate portfolio, it

figure out how to do both. I remembered a

faced an immediate obstacle. How to

skyscraper that went up in New York, and

take a small, dated structure that had been abandoned for more than 15 years and fill it with tenants to turn a profit.

one building in its way wouldn’t sell, so the developer bought the air rights above it, and built right over it.”

And there was another consideration.

- Dr. David Bronner, RSA CEO

While the building had no real architectural interest, through the years, the judges that presided there delivered

went up in New York, and one building

some far-reaching, monumental rulings,

in its way wouldn’t sell, so the developer

so razing it or stripping it down to bare

bought the air rights above it, and built

bones to start over weren’t viable op-

right over it.”

tions. But RSA’s CEO Dr. David Bronner saw an alternative that could renovate,

He had the idea, and he used a local

enhance and preserve all at once: build

architecture firm to bring it to fruition.

a new structure over and around the

“JMR+H had a real challenge to make

existing one and refurbish it as well.

something that did what it needed to and was also visually interesting,” he

Bronner has long been known for his

said. The design called for 25,000

vision; RSA buildings in downtown

tons of steel trusses to hold the new

Montgomery developed and erected

construction over the old building. It

under his watch have defined the capital

also added space behind the judicial

city skyline. But this plan was innovative

building.

even for him. He didn’t pull it from thin air though; it was inspired by a situation

The result is certainly architectural-

he saw unfold in New York City. “I want-

ly significant, but what’s inside it is

ed to preserve the history associated

equally important: the RSA Datacenter,

with rulings that came from the building,

which is the backbone of the MGMix

but its physical structure was not that

and a cornerstone of the city, county

impressive,” he said. “My job is to make

and Chamber’s TechMGM initiative in

money, so I had to figure out how to do

partnership with Maxwell-Gunter AFB.

both. I remembered a skyscraper that

“It’s the smartest thing we did in that Continued on page 26

JMR+H ARCHITECTURE / RSA DEXTER BUILDING

The highlight of this 525,000-square-foot project is the fully restored historic Alabama Judicial Building, which is embraced by the 50-foot-high structural glazed grand vestibule. The restored portions of the project have been adapted for premium executive office space and a multi-purpose center, which features the original Supreme Court chamber and lobby. The interior combines the finest woods, limestone, granite, marble and stainless steel. Visitors are awed by the dramatic four-story lobby/atrium, which features high limestone walls and a grand staircase.

24 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PROJECT OF NOTE

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM


I ND U ST RY Leader | Architecture & Engineering

25 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


with other RSA buildings around the city and state; they each include a feature everyone occupying the building can use. At RSA Dexter, common meeting space is provided in the meticulously restored judges’ chamber. “The chamber is historically preserved down to the last detail, but the technology is there too,” Bronner said. “It’s pretty amazing and really beneficial to our “Good architectural solutions

small tenants because this shared space

equal productive office

lets them maximize their square footage.”

environments, pleasurable retail opportunities and cultural gathering spaces that enhance our daily lives,”

- Tim Holmes, JMR+ H Architecture

Another architectural hallmark of all RSA buildings is ease of maintenance, as Bronner explained. “I was a janitor in high school and college and that taught me the importance of being able to keep a space clean,” he said. “Ensuring our designs are

building,” Bronner said. “The Datacenter is

workable for maintenance staff is key; we

more profitable than any office leasing, and

work with all of our architects to make sure

it is almost at full capacity. We’re completing

that is reflected in their designs. What a

a new room now to add more space.”

space looks like matters, but if you can’t maintain it and keep it looking good, it actu-

RSA Dexter is unique, but it shares a bond

ally doesn’t matter.”

26 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOTABLE QUOTE

One of the industry’s greatest assets is our expertise. We are able to provide highly complex designs for a multitude of projects.

- Jack Daniels, Blackburn Daniels O’Barr, Inc.


27 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


In d ustry O verv iew

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ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING

HOLDING ONTO HISTORY/

ONE OF THE RIVER REGION’S MOST EXPERIENCED REALTORS EXPLAINS WHY OLDER ARCHITECTURE MATTERS.

Sandra Nickel, founder and CEO of The Hat Team Realtors, has been selling real estate with a focus on historic properties

GOING GREEN:

for 37 years, 25 of them in Montgomery,

“Renovating an existing structure is a very ‘green’

and she admits part of her longstand-

approach to housing folks; it’s far less wasteful than

ing passion for historic preservation

tearing a structure down, filling landfills with good stuff,

is based on personal feelings. “I grew up in a really small bungalow with five

materials often better than those produced today.”

siblings, so it got pretty cozy at home,”

- Sandra Nickel

she said. “But my grandparents lived in this magnificent 1890s Queen Anne house, and I still remember how I would feel when I walked into that house with its tall ceilings and windows bigger than the doors at my house. I’d exhale, and stretch, and it felt so good. That’s where my love for old houses began.” She’s not alone. Many are equally moved by the design and craftsmanship of old homes. “You can’t quantify it, but there is something awe-inspiring about looking at an old building or home that has stood the test of time with the details and work we can’t afford to repeat today,” she said. Nickel also made the case for the educational value of historic structures. “I remember being taken to house museums, like Lincoln’s birthplace, and the history I was learning in books became much more meaningful when I could tie it to a life experience,” she said. “When I’m down at Old Alabama Town, when kids are there, I can see the lights coming on in their eyes when what they have read and heard all of a sudden becomes more real.” She pointed to how the purchase and use of historic structures brings tangible benefits to our area too. “Renovating an existing structure is a very ‘green’ approach to housing folks; it’s far less wasteful than tearing a structure down, filling landfills with good stuff, materials often better than those produced

today,” she said. Preservation has positive economic impacts as well, thanks to the tourism draw of historic structures and their stories. “Montgomery gets hundreds of millions of dollars a year from the tourism industry through lodging taxes and other activities, and of those travel dollars, roughly 20 percent is strictly leisure travel, and a significant percentage of that tourism money is heritage tourism,” Nickel said. “Many studies show

PROJECT OF NOTE

that heritage tourists [those interested in history] stay longer and spend more

PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM

money than people coming here to do other things.” Designated historic districts in Montgomery (and nationwide) also tend to hold their property values better. “Higher property values mean more property taxes coming in for the city and its services,” Nickel said.

GRANT ENGINEERING, LLC DOWNTOWN HOTELS We have two projects that will add lodging options to the city. The first encompasses the renovation of the old Bishop Parker furniture building downtown and its transformation into a 100room hotel, a space that includes

Nickel is known for her promotion of

a new full-height atrium. Also, the

preservation and her willingness to

second hotel, on Coosa Street,

explain the ways it can enhance our area, and she sees an additional plus that Montgomery is not yet taking full advantage of. “Historic preservation is an incredibly effective tool for neighborhood revitalization,” she said. “We’ve not been great so far at doing that here, but I believe we’re on that track, and I believe we’ll see some great results.” 28 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

is in the design phase. It will involve the renovation of the two waterworks warehouses and the Murphy House into a 112-room Marriott Autograph hotel. This project will have an atrium and a rooftop bar.


HERE AT HOME

Todd Strange said. “Testing RoadBotics’

The City of Montgomery is taking some

throughout our city could lead to safer,

proactive action on infrastructure with an

smoother travel and newfound cost savings

improvement program that’s using the

for our city organization thanks to smarter

latest tech to do it right.

decision making.”

RoadBotics, one of the country’s leading

In late July, RoadBotics deployed a team

road monitoring technology companies,

of its certified operation technicians to

recently did a pilot scan to assess Mont-

Montgomery. Over the course of one week,

gomery’s road conditions with its AI-based,

the technicians drove a designated portion

cutting-edge proprietary program. City of

of the city’s road network, collecting

Montgomery officials anticipate using this

image data of the roads using a wind-

assessment to adopt a data-driven ap-

shield-mounted smartphone.

effectiveness in optimizing infrastructure

proach to future paving projects that could result in bigger taxpayer savings, increased

The team will then upload the data to

efficiencies and longer-lasting roads.

RoadBotics’ secure cloud where it will be analyzed using machine-learning tech-

“As Montgomery continues our journey to

nology. RoadBotics’ assessments of this

becoming a leader among America’s Smart

data are giving the City of Montgomery

Cities, we must explore new technologies

up-to-date information about its infrastruc-

that benefit our residents and preserve

ture at an unprecedented speed, while also

our resources,” Montgomery Mayor

offering precision and affordability.

29 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

NOTABLE QUOTE

The ability to be able to communicate with a pen is still very important to this industry. You should use technology as a tool, but don’t let it drive your creativity.

- Wilbur Hill, AIA, Brown Studio Architecture


In d us try O verv i ew

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ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING

NEEDED NOW /

INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS ARE CRUCIAL FOR CONTINUED ECONOMIC GROWTH.

Alabama is at a critical crossroads. While our state has achieved

usage. Alabama roads and bridges are supported by the gasoline

multiple economic development wins in the last decade, to keep

tax ($.18 per gallon from the state and $.18 per gallon from the

that momentum going, transportation infra-

federal government). After factoring in inflation,

structure issues around Alabama have to be

Alabama’s funding level has stayed relatively flat

addressed and addressed soon. According to

since 1992. Yet, due to a rise in population and

leaders at The University of Alabama’s Alabama

a higher number of vehicle miles being driven

Transportation Institute, the ability to attract new

across the state, the number of tires traveling the

industries will be negatively impacted by our failing roadways. “When businesses are expanding or locating in a new area, the site selection process looks at three main areas: business climate, workforce and transportation infrastructure,” said Justice Smyth, Outreach Director, Alabama Transportation Institute. To drive the point home, Smyth suggested considering Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama and its hourly “just-in-time deliveries” from nearby supplier plants, which are integral to its efficient production. “A car or truck accident can cost them as much as a $10,000-per-minute penalty because the manufacturing line is shut down,” he

roads has increased. There are other factors too.

THE ALABAMA ROAD

Fuel efficiency has decreased the revenue while

NETWORK ENCOMPASSES

increasing the wear and tear on roadways, and

213,127 MILES

electric and hybrid vehicles aren’t buying as much

OF ROADWAYS AND

gas, so no taxes are collected from them.

PER THE ESTIMATED

Upcoming technologies like automated vehicles

15,954 BRIDGES.

will further widen the funding-usage gap, as will

ROADWAY MAINTENANCE

strategies like the trucking industry implementing

AND DEVELOPMENT,

“platooning” technology that allows trucks to

EACH ALABAMA

decrease the distance between them to increase

RESIDENT ESSENTIALLY HOLDS AN

fuel efficiency by lessening drag (much like race

$81,176

cars that “draft” off of the car in front of them).

INVESTMENT IN

OUR ROAD NETWORK.

said.

Our neighboring states already understand how

having the right infrastructure not only keeps its residents and visitors safe but is also a key waypoint on the road to a robust econ-

But our infrastructure woes aren’t only costing us opportunities in economic development. Safety and quality of life are suffering too. There were more than 1,100 roadway fatalities in 2016 in Alabama. “These are our friends and families that are being killed on our roadways — It’s important that we improve them,” said Smyth. These findings are just pieces of the more complete information coming out in October in the first report of the AL 2040 Infrastructure Study. The 20-year study, conducted in partnership with the Alabama Transportation Policy Research Center, is examining the numbers and conditions of our state’s roads, bridges and harbors; determining how city, county and ALDOT funds are allocated for them; and creating forecasts and recommendations for restorative, preventive and capacity enhancements.

ROBINSON & ASSOCIATES ALDOT I-10 EAST WELCOME CENTER (MOBILE COUNTY) The purpose was to transform Alabama’s image by designing a building and surrounding grounds that highlight the local architecture and create an atmosphere that makes visitors excited to be in Alabama. The exterior contains a lighthouse element that extends into the interior of the building, letting visitors see up into the structure. The building’s exterior walls are

And time is of the essence; none of the problems get better with a wait. If nothing happens or changes, congestion, safety and commute times will all get worse. Currently, Alabama has more than 5,700 bridges maintained by ALDOT. More than half of these are more than 50 years old, and that’s the total life span of a bridge. According to Dr. Shashi Nambisan, Executive Director of The Alabama Transportation Institute, adequate funding is lagging behind

inlaid with sculptured brick that replicates the natural seascape. Access to the facility is through wide vistas and verandas to display our Southern hospitality. The building’s floor allows visitors to feel as if they are in the Gulf of Mexico with native fish and sea creatures inlaid into the terrazzo.

30 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PROJECT OF NOTE PRIDE IN WORK FOR A LOCAL FIRM


omy. Many of them have been investing in infrastructure to attract larger companies. To stay competitive, Alabama has to step up.

We want to thank our clients, our industry partners, and our friends for the strong support, and for allowing us the opportunity to earn your trust, and your business.

With a 20-year view into the future, this study and series of reports hopes to show elected officials and residents where the greatest threats lie and by so doing, promote action. “The federal government under President Trump has proposed a substantial investment of matching funds for transportation infrastructure; it actually bonuses those funds that are recurring yearly maintenance,” said Nambisan. “Our business community and citizens need to contact the State House and encourage an increased investment to capitalize on these upcoming federal funds. With wise infrastructure investment, Alabama residents

AT WORK Curious about current and upcoming infrastructure improvements in our area? One major ongoing project involves Eastern Boulevard around Interstate 85 and includes the interstate resurfacing. Learn more and find updates on ALDOT’s website dedicated to the project: rp.dot.state.al.us/EBI/.

will receive the maximum economic return on their tax dollars.” Article sources: The University of Alabama’s Alabama Transportation Institute in partnership with the Alabama Transportation Policy Research Center.

Blackburn Daniels O’Barr has faithfully served the Architecture and Construction Community in and around Montgomery for more than 35 years. • • • •

Full service structural engineering services BIM capable Registered in 9 states Backed by over 80 years of combined engineering experience

www.blackburneng.com 334-265-0206


VESTOR IN

OFIL

Q&A

E

LT. GEN. ANTHONY COTTON Born on the U.S. Air Force Base in Tachikawa, Japan, where his father was stationed, Lt. Gen. Anthony Cotton likes to say he came out of the womb a member of the military. For decades, his service has taken him all over the country, and in February, it landed him in Montgomery as Commander and President of Air University at Maxwell-Gunter AFB. MBJ asked him to talk about the “unrivaled hospitality” he and his wife have received, why that means so much, plus his hopes and goals for Air University. Question? Answer. What do you hope to accomplish during your time leading Air University?

center for the entire Air Force, so what we do here in terms

Air University (AU) is filled with talented faculty and staff, and

now working closely with the Air Force Academy and its

its portfolio and reach is really large. I didn’t realize just how

CyberWORX program. And MGMWERX is very, very exciting.

large even when I took this job, and that’s really interest-

What makes that so neat is the way it and all the “Werx” con-

ing to me that I, as a senior Air Force officer, didn’t know it

structs go about solving problems. It gives us the opportunity

and that a lot of my peers don’t know it either. So, one of

to take the thought pieces, the papers and such, that AU’s

my goals is to get the word out, to better brand AU so that

students produce in their time here, share them with this

airmen across the country really know and respect all that is

incubation/innovation center outside of the base gates and

done here. I want to ensure we have curriculum and teaching

see if they are workable and viable in real-world settings.

methodologies that rival the best universities in the nation.

And these ideas are not just shared with the River Region,

We also want to continue to add to AU’s world-renowned fac-

but with the country and the world through the network that

ulty and staff, and we want to bring more top-notch speakers

DEFENSEWERX has established.

of cyber is key. We have the Cyber College here, and we’re

here for our students. We also need to do some collaborative branding with Montgomery and the River Region to help get

How has Montgomery treated you so far?

the word out about all the recent progress here, things like

This is my seventh command in a row and there is something

the revitalized downtown area and the moving Legacy Muse-

different about Southern hospitality. When my wife and I

um and National Memorial for Peace and Justice.

arrived here, we were greeted with open arms, and we’ve quickly established friendships. But more importantly is the

What is the current focus of Air University?

welcome I see this community extending to the base and

One of my marching orders from my boss is that we need

everyone here. The patriotism here is overwhelming. I don’t

airmen, whether they are active duty, guard reserve or folks

think you’ll ever hear someone talk about their Maxwell as-

from sister services, to be able to walk away from their time

signment and not say they experienced the same thing.

here with a sense of critical thinking and strategic thinking. At The folks that come here are in the top 15 percent of their

Why are Montgomery’s public schools important?

peers; they are the future leaders of the Air Force, so we

Not having good public schools adds a burden for the air-

will always emphasize leadership training. Our Secretary of

men here who have school-age children. It can affect wheth-

Defense wants to ensure we have a ready force and a lethal

er or not they accept the assignment here. Air University is

force, and the education here anchors that.

a flagship institution. We have the best here now; I want to

the same time, we will always cherish and teach leadership.

keep the best coming, both faculty and students, and that

What are your thoughts on Air University’s collaboration with the city, county and Chamber, particularly in terms of cyber and innovation?

depends on good public schools.. The good news is, we see

Cyber is important, and it’s more than just a buzzword. When

and seeing folks caring so much is amazing. We are part of

we talk about cyber here, it runs through all the veins of all

the community. Quality education should be foundational;

the schools, plus the Curtis E. LeMay Center, our doctrine

with it, everyone rises; everyone wins!

city leadership and the community at large working hard on this. Hearing what is being done to improve the local schools

32 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT FOUTS

PR

PO WERHOUSE


All For One “The patriotism here is overwhelming. I don’t think you’ll ever hear someone talk about their Maxwell assignment and not say they experienced the same thing.”

33 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BER profile

MIA MOTHERSHED As Jackson Hospital’s Marketing Director, Chair of the Chamber’s Ambassador Program this year and a mom, Mia Mothershed has a lot on her plate. But she’s never too busy to find enjoyment under every hat she wears.

What does your job at Jackson Hospital entail? I oversee internal and external communications, media relations, digital marketing and reputation management for the hospital.

What is your marketing philosophy? To always know what business your client is really in. That may sound strange, but success usually is in the story behind the brand. Instead of marketing a product or service, a client’s niche can sometimes be found in the experience their brand produces.

What’s your favorite thing about your work? I live by the motto of engage, enlighten and empower. I love the fact that whether it’s meeting new people, creating awareness of what our hospital has to offer or teaching my staff something new, I get to live out that motto every day at Jackson.

How long have you been a Chamber Ambassador? I have lost count. The old cliché holds true: Time flies when you are having fun. I can say it has been at least seven years.

What would you say to encourage others to get involved in the Chamber (as an Ambassador or otherwise)? The Chamber is a great way to grow your network, stay informed and gain knowledge of River Region industries and increase visibility and exposure for your business. Our Chamber always says, “People do business with people they know.” The more you participate, the more relationships you build. The more relationships

Honors All Around

you build, the more trust and confidence you create toward

Our marketing team has received

your brand.

many accolades this year. We have been awarded one Silver and

IMAGE COURTESY OF JACKSON HOSPITAL

What are your interests outside of work?

two Gold American Advertising

I love to sew. And I am completely smitten by my family. My

Awards. And my team published

firefighter husband, Erik and our two children, Roman and

an article about the diagnosis and

Carter Symone’ are proof that divine favor exists. Nothing

successful surgery performed by

compares to the gratefulness I have for them.

three of our physicians that was picked up by global outlets includ-

jackson.org

ing Fox News, CNN and People.

35 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BE R profile

MIKE HICKS After years in the insurance industry, Montgomery native Mike Hicks started Alliance Insurance Group in 2002. He now serves as the company’s President and oversees his team as they work to exceed client expectations every day.

What is your background? Prior to founding Alliance, I spent five years working with Jinright-Turner Insurance in Montgomery.

What are the company’s primary products/ services? We are a full-service employee-benefit consulting firm. We work with companies on self-funded medical, group life and disability insurance. We also administer flexible spending and health reimbursement accounts for companies.  

Who are your primary clients? We work with around 20 municipalities throughout the state and some of the top construction-related businesses in Alabama.

What does your job entail? I work closely with our producers and our marketing team.

What is your business philosophy? Doing everything with honesty, integrity and providing great customer service.

What’s your favorite thing about your work? I really enjoy working with clients in so many different industries. You learn so many things about how business in Alabama is done.

By Leaps & Bounds Hicks proudly noted that Alliance Insurance has doubled its revenue in the past five years.

What are your interests outside of work? Spending time at Lake Martin with my family and wing shooting.

daughter is a senior in high school this year; it’s been fun to see the college process with her. And my son is a high school freshman. FOUNDED 2002 allianceinsgroup.com

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

What’s an accomplishment that you are particularly proud of? Raising my children. My


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M EM BER profile

RANDY THOMPSON CEO of Encompass Health Rehabilitation Hospital of Montgomery Randy Thompson is proud to help ensure his company lives out its philosophy of elevating expectations and outcomes for River Region patients.

When was Encompass Health founded? It was originally founded in 1984 as HealthSouth Corporation and changed its name to Encompass Health Corporation on January 2, 2018.

How long have you been with Encompass Health? I joined the organization in May 2016 as part of the Developing Future CEO program and was promoted to CEO here in August 2017.

What are the company’s primary services? Inpatient rehabilitation, home health services and hospice services.

Who are your primary clients? Patients suffering from neurologic, orthopedic, and/or other debilitating injuries or illness who require an intensive, multi-disciplinary approach to rehabilitation in order to return home independently.

What does your job entail? Oversight of strategic initiatives, operational readiness and fiduciary expectations.

Are you from Montgomery? I am originally from Oregon but have lived along both coasts and a number of places in between. I moved to Montgomery from Pensacola, Florida, for my current role as CEO.

What’s your favorite part of your job? Working with local health-care providers and community PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

leaders to improve the health and wellbeing of those who reside here.

What are your interests outside of work?

Leading the Way

Being physically active and spending time with family.

I was recently selected

encompasshealth.com/montgomeryrehab

to be a part of Leadership Montgomery’s Legacy Class XXXV.


EVERY COMMUNITY HAS THEM: the people and groups who change something for the better. They have innovative ideas, fresh perspectives and new ways to tackle challenges, and they don’t keep them to themselves or simply post them on a social media

Meet the businesses, organizations and individuals making meaningful differences in Montgomery and

PROOF POSITIVE proving that actions speak louder than words.

40 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

comment thread. They share them, explain them, fight for them and roll up their sleeves to make them happen. Montgomery’s got plenty of these people; when we asked the city to let us know who they were for the inaugural MGM Impact Maker awards, we got scores of names across multiple categories. Each and every one of the nominees is worthy of inclusion, but we had to narrow it down. So meet the finalists for the 2018 MGM Impact Maker awards. With their attitudes and through their actions, these people, businesses and organizations have had multiple powerful and positive effects on the capital city and the River Region beyond.


I N D I V I D UA L

Bob Parker, Dreamland BBQ & Railyard Brewery

Kim Traff, RSVP magazine

Dr. Katherine Webb, Wynwood Consulting

As one of the first to invest in

Fueled by her passion for all

For the last two decades, Webb used her

downtown and relocate a busi-

things social and for the bet-

position at AUM to improve the region’s

ness in the heart of the city as

terment of her city, Traff is a

non-profit landscape and its public

well as bringing microbrewing

vocal and vibrant cheerleader

education offerings. She and her team

to Montgomery, Parker can be

for Montgomery. By spear-

have consistently provided exceptional

credited with greatly improving

heading events like the Pub

consulting and training programs, includ-

the quality of place in the capital

Crawl that brought thousands

ing the Educational Leaders Conference,

city, a benefit to both residents

of folks downtown and local

Boardrooms to Classrooms (a collabo-

and visitors.

businesses together and

ration with Montgomery Public Schools

through her magazine, RSVP,

and local business leaders,) and other

she’s made MGM cool. She’s

strategic planning and employee selec-

also helped the city attract

tion programs. She’s also the immediate

and keep young profession-

past president of the board of the River

als here by highlighting their

Region United Way and is currently pres-

accomplishments in The List,

ident of the board of Medical Outreach

featured in each issue of

Ministries. She recently retired from AUM.

RSVP.

MORE THAN

Tammy Knight Fleming, Montgomery Airport Authority

VOTES WERE CAST.

Suzanna Wasserman, The Shoppes at EastChase Showing leadership and vision beyond her years, Was-

Through tireless work and

serman has transformed The Shoppes at EastChase into

outspoken advocacy, this Mont-

more than just a shopping destination. The young profes-

gomery native and ASU grad

sional has enhanced the sense of community on the east

has been a driving force pushing

side of town, improving the quality of place with multiple

Montgomery’s airport to new

diverse events that connect residents, visitors and small

heights, which in turn has greatly

businesses. And that’s just her day job. She’s also been

bolstered the area’s economic

heavily involved with the good work of Junior League

development efforts.

and Child Protect.

41 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


SMALL BUSINESS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JONATHON KOHN

INDIVIDUALS, BUSINESSES AND ORGANIZATIONS WERE NOMINATED.

ELSAJA for Kress Putting its considerable energy and effort behind the renova-

Brown Studio Architecture

tion and transformation of the abandoned Kress department

Brown Studio Architecture has a 40-year legacy of meaningful

store to Kress on Dexter, ELSAJA has already racked up a long

work in Montgomery, including pro bono civic engagement,

list of honors, including the 2018 ABC Award for Best Historical

community service and philanthropy. Its work transformed the

Restoration In America. In bringing one of the city’s historical

redevelopment of the riverfront and the entertainment areas

gems back to life, it has created an entrepreneurship incuba-

with more than 50 projects downtown, including the Downtown

tor, as home to Prevail Union Coffee (recently awarded Best

Master Plan, Riverwalk, the Amphitheatre, Riverwalk Stadium,

Coffee in Alabama by Food & Wine), the Chop Shop and I Am

Alley restaurants, streetscapes, signage and landmark historic

More than Tours. The spot is also a platform for community

renovations. Team members have headed historic neighbor-

engagement and educa-

hood associations, organized the effective Cloverdale design

tion with its Remembering

charrettes, developed ordinances for historic designation,

Monroe Project, its “This

designed the Bark Park, developed E.A.T South structures and

is Where You’ll Find Me”

designed and built the Air Corps Tactical School Memorial as

art exhibition and its story

well as other projects at Maxwell-Gunter AFB.

booth and podcast studio.

42 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


JDB Hospitality In just a short time, JDB Hospitality has made a noticeable positive mark on Montgomery’s hospitality industry. The public relations company has trained restaurants, tourist attractions and event venues on branding, audience development and social media marketing. And the company recently brought a nationally recognized culinary competition, Culinary Fight Club, to Montgomery, which qualified locally owned restaurants to compete in the World Food Championships. This win for the city’s culinary scene is only one example of JDB Hospitality’s dedication to boosting Montgomery’s tourism image and appeal.

Fleet Feet Montgomery This locally owned store does what you think: It sells running shoes, clothing and other gear, but it does so much more too. Its team works to build personal confidence, self-esteem and community by partnering with local non-profits and charities for fund raising; providing walking and running programs for all ages through programs like Girls on the Run; and investing in the community through shoe collection drives and providing the shoes to the needy.

Sandra Nickel Hat Team Realtors Goat Haus Biergarten

This longstanding business has been practicing what it preaches

Housed in the 1888 Victorian era “Mills House” on Clay Street,

for decades. All of its actions stem from one core belief: When

this business boasts an alluring exterior, but its purpose is

we all take a vested interest in the community, and neighbors

equally impressive. Goat Haus Biergarten is on a mission to bring

work diligently to make it the very best it can be, then Mont-

to market local art, music, food and beer. In addition to reviving

gomery reaps the benefit and becomes more than just a place

three historic homes, establishing a new business district on Clay

on a map, but a place that people are proud to call home. Since

Street, and creating several new

1993, the Hat Team has committed to

jobs, the business has helped

community revitalization through both

dozens of entrepreneurs and

fair housing-based home sales and pro-

emerging artists, musicians, chefs

motion of an area the media once called

and brewers.

“the Inner City,” giving residents pride and strengthening property values.

43 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MID-SIZE BUSINESS Jerry Kyser Builder, Inc. For more than 50 years, Jerry Kyser Builder, Inc. has been one of the area’s leading contractors, helping both small businesses and large corporations design and build their ideal storefront. In addition, JKB has proven its commitment to the growth and progress of Montgomery through various developments, including shopping centers leased to mainly locally owned businesses, and by being one of the first developers working in the revitalization of the Downtown Alley Entertainment District. Its latest project includes a 100-plusroom hotel, Staybridge Suites, in downtown Montgomery.

Partners Realty Partners Realty has grown from a tiny two-man team in 2008

The Waters - New Waters Realty

to a 30-person agency in a mere 10 years and while it has

This company doesn’t just sell real estate; it puts time and

grown, so has its dedication to bettering the River Region.

energy behind building up its community too. Starting out

The company has broadened the area’s horizons by help-

as a small boutique real estate agency, it is now one of the

ing Montgomery families buy and sell homes, by drawing

premier real estate agencies in the River Region. It continually

businesses to downtown, and by taking on HOA management

uses the opportunities its success provides to further invest

and fostering the beautification of many neighborhoods. This

in the area through both volunteerism and its philosophy of

multi-disciplined firm manages more than 1,000 units and

kindness and always going the extra mile.

nearly two million square feet, as well as marketing and selling untold acres of recreational and industrial property.

For years, the Chamber has been striving to make significant impacts in the region through its Imagine

a Greater

Montgomery strategy. With the

Impact Maker Awards, the Chamber is recognizing and honoring member individuals, businesses and organiza-

TALENT

ECONOMY

IMAGE Transforming Montgomery’s

Education, workforce

Creating and

development, recruiting

preserving jobs, small

image and quality of

and maintaining

business development,

place for locals, business

young talent

economic development and

owners and visitors

corporate recruitment

tions in the community who are also making an impact in the following areas:

CHECK OUT PAGE 47 44 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Faulkner University Jones School of Law In addition to producing practice-ready attorneys, Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law molds its students to serve in the spirit of Isaiah 1:17, to yearn to serve their neighbor and seek justice for the most vulnerable among us. Its students take advantage of Faulkner Law’s nationally ranked advocacy program and its annual Mockingbird Challenge, a national invitational mock trial tournament, plus three award-winning legal clinics that provide legal services at no cost to those in need in the River Region. Faulkner Law students also show their commitment to community throughout the year by providing thousands of volunteer service hours.

Faulkner University A

C H R I S T I A N

MILITARY

U N I V E R S I T Y

COMMUNITY

Making Montgomery the Best

Fostering collaboration

Hometown in the Air Force by

among elected leadership

supporting military neighbors

and engaging business

and families and helping

stakeholders and business

develop new industry verticals

owners to increase

that sustain Maxwell-Gunter

community capacity

Air Force Base while enriching the entire River Region


LARGE BUSINESS

Beasley Allen Law Firm Beasley Allen Law Firm (BA) has long been a key booster of the local economy and downtown revitalization efforts. For 11 years, BA has hosted the state’s largest legal conference, bringing in an estimated $1 million each time. The firm’s revitalization efforts total multiple millions of dollars, including three office buildings located at 218, 234 and 272 Commerce Street; partial ownership of the West Jefferson “T-warehouse” (home to AL.com and Dreamland Bar-B-Que); public parking; Alley Station (home to the three entertainment venues and two

Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood, Inc.

restaurants); and Escapology.

Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood, Inc. (GMC) is one of the largest architecture and engi-

BA also serves on the Chamber

neering firms in the Southeast, with more than 375 employees in offices throughout

board and supports numerous

the five-state region. Whether designing schools, parks, hospitals and other commer-

local philanthropic and nonprofit

cial developments, or providing clean water, safe streets and protecting endan-

organizations.

gered environments, GMC takes great pride in serving its communities through the transformative work it does. Every project is guided by the foundational concept that communities are built by people, not companies, and the company strives to serve its communities with quality, integrity, creativity and care.

46 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Wind Creek Montgomery Wind Creek Montgomery (WCM) has been a member of the local business community since 1985. Recent additions have enabled WCM to contribute to more than entertainment, and the property’s impact now encompasses diverse job creation (it paid $25 million in salaries and wages to 529-plus employees in myriad industries); attracting visitors to help make MGM a vibrant tourist destination; and giving back

SEE FOR YO U R S E L F !

in the form of more than $950,000 awarded to local organizations and events through sponsorships and Make A Change programs.

WANNA KNOW WHO THE BIG WINNERS ARE? Reserve your seat at the

Chamber’s Annual Meeting Luncheon on December 11, 2018 from 11:30 am – 1:00 pm to see the announcement of the winners for each category in the 2018 MGM Impact Maker Awards. www.montgomerychamber.com/events 47 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


NONPROFIT Brantwood Children's Home Since 1917, Brantwood Children’s Home has been providing a safe, stable, structured environment for abused, neglected and other “at-risk” children. Brantwood serves children and youth ages 10-21 by providing for their needs in education, health, communication and social adjustments to help them cope with and succeed in society. By protecting children from traumas of the past; providing a place conducive to emotional growth; and through counseling, spiritual direction,

Catholic Social Services

instructional support and love, Brantwood

CSS is an organized expression of the Church’s concern for social justice and

creates an environment in which the heart

wellbeing, extended to all, regardless of one’s race, creed or background. Its

can heal and

ministries include Direct Aid to the needy, St. Margaret’s

important rela-

Services for the elderly, immigration assistance, prison

tionships can

ministry and adoption services. In 2017 alone, the orga-

blossom.

nization provided assistance to more than 3,100 clients, making a significant difference in their lives.

Health Services, Inc.

Triumph Services

No one needing care is turned

Triumph Services provides

away by Health Services,

a holistic approach to life

Inc. (HSI), a Federally Qual-

after high school for youth

ified Health Center (FQHC)

with disabilities, while also

providing access to affordable

promoting independence

and comprehensive preven-

with its transition program.

tative and primary healthcare

For adults with disabilities, it

services to residents in the

provides weekly outings and

River Region. Recently cele-

social events to encourage

brating 50 years of service, HSI

active socialization and fun.

currently operates 10 clinical

Its life skills program teaches

The Family Sunshine Center

facilities in five counties in Cen-

The Family Sunshine Center offers the communities it serves im-

tral Alabama, along with two

executive functions. And its

Wellness Centers and a mobile

employment program helps

mediate response and a safe haven by providing 24-hour access to information through its crisis line and emergency shelter for victims of family violence and/or sexual assault. It also offers crisis intervention services in partnership with legal services; advocacy, counseling and support; trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy to children; outreach services to increase awareness; prevention education; and empowerment so clients can lead safe and violence-free lives.

participants important

unit. Its services are offered

these individuals use their

to patients who have medical

unique talents and gifts to

insurance, are underinsured or uninsured. In 2017, HSI provided outpatient services to more than 34,731 patients.

48 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

gain employment.


49 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


How is progress measuring up?

1/

What is the current status of MPS accreditation?

The easiest thing to do

MPS is accredited by AdvancED. We are under

is to go to your

review. The AdvancED team will be back in December to look at our progress. We have been working very hard to address the issues

neighborhood school - Dr. Ann Moore, Superintendent of MPS

focused on, and we are working daily to meet

REPORT

CARD Study up on the latest updates from Montgomery Public Schools.

Montgomery Public Schools have been under a microscope in recent months. And with good reason. The system’s past poor performance across a range of categories has put the futures of area students at risk. Plus, the plight of Montgomery’s public education is tied to the progress and prosperity of the entire capital city, making education news and business news one and the same.

MBJ asked Dr. Ann Moore, Superintendent of MPS for a snapshot of where things stand now as well as future plans.

and say ‘how can I help?’

they presented. We have six priorities we are

MPS

We always need more

volunteers and partners.

the requirements and ensure we pass our

We make that easy with the MPS Parent Portal.

review. We will continue our efforts, and I am

They can see their child’s grades and other

confident we will not only meet the required

important information online. They should also

progress in December, but we will have our

be in communication with teachers and school

accreditation renewed in the spring.

administration. And they should be members

of the school’s PTA/PTSA and attend meetings.

What steps have been taken to make and show the improvements needed to better the

accreditation situation?

That was especially evident during the days

2/

We have incredible support from many community members and business leaders.

Each priority identified by AdvancED has a

immediately following the BTW fire. We always

team dedicated to ensuring we will meet the

need more volunteers and partners. The eas-

associated standard. Many of the items were

iest thing to do is to go to your neighborhood

actually already done, the issue was that we

school and say “how can I help?”

had not properly documented it. We are now

keeping careful records.  

3/

How can MPS ensure quality instruction in all of its schools?

5/

What is needed to ensure future financial stability for the system?

We hope that the community and business leaders will get behind the work the Montgom-

There are basically four parts to that answer.

ery County Commission is considering that

We have to work with colleges and universities

would allow for a vote to raise the ad valorem

to ensure the graduates from their teacher

taxes to support schools. We are at the state

programs are prepared to go directly in the

minimum of 10 mills – the lowest of any school

classroom. We have to do an excellent job of

system our size in the state.

providing additional professional development

in both the areas of subject matter and teach-

6/

are productive and help each person discover

What is currently being done to enact and show fiscal responsibility (cutting waste, apply staff reductions to reflect loss of students, etc.)?

strengths and weaknesses and correct the

Our finances are literally open books. Anyone

latter. And we must be sure certain curriculum

can come and look at the “books.” Much of our

is aligned with state standards.

information is online, including our checkbook.

Many people think we are top heavy in the

What can concerned parents, community members and business leaders do to help?

central office, but that is not true. In fact, the

Parental involvement is critical. Students need

are under 4 percent. We need to cut approxi-

to know that parents see education as import-

mately $9 million out of our 2018-2019 budget

ant, and that parents have expectations they

to maintain our state mandated reserve of

have to meet. Parents should keep up with

about $19 million. We are working on ways to

student grades and assignments.

do that.

ing/classroom management skills. We have to work to ensure that our evaluations of teachers

4/

50 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

state says that 5 percent or less of a system’s budget should go to central administration. We


51 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Regional Impact

TROY TRENDING / by MINNIE LAMBERTH The city of Troy is experiencing some exciting progress, due in no small part to the efforts of Troy University. But the educational institution’s promotion of economic growth doesn’t stop at the

IMAGES COURTESY OF TROY UNIVERSITY / KEVIN GLACKMEYER

Troy city limits; it continues throughout the region.

B

ringing new businesses to the Troy area and encouraging

“These close connections

entrepreneurial innovation among students are part of

to industries are important

Walter Givhan’s role at Troy University. Named Senior Vice

to us, but it goes deeper

Chancellor for Advancement and Economic Development in 2014, his duties incorporate a variety of development and outreach re-

than that.”

sponsibilities, including leading the university’s efforts to promote

-Walter Givhan

economic development across the state and region. Givhan, who retired from a 33-year career in the U.S. Air Force

he added. These include the planned relocation of Conecuh Ridge

prior to joining Troy, said, “We take a very deliberate approach to

Distillery to the area. “We got pulled in early as part of the presen-

being part of the economic development efforts here in the city

tation to that company.” His team prepared a promotional video for

and the county and the region.” He serves on the Pike County

the makers of Clyde Mays Alabama-style whiskey, which had its

Economic Development Corporation Board of Directors and works

origins in a moonshine still not far from the city. The theme of the

closely with the board and the Pike County Chamber of Com-

video was about coming home to Troy.

merce. “When the people at Conecuh Ridge saw that, they just said, “We have been an integral part in some of the recent successes

‘Yes, that’s us.’" Though that was not the only factor that landed

that we’ve had in bringing new industries to Troy and Pike County,”

the company, Givhan said, “It was a big part of it. They also were

52 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


IMAGES COURTESY OF TROY UNIVERSITY / MARK MOSELEY

East meets West in the Janice Hawkins Cultural Arts Park at Troy University, which includes 200 replica terracotta warriors by the artist Huo Bao Zhu that represent the famous excavations in China.

impressed with the fact that we as a university showed our commit-

“IDEA is an acronym that stands for innovation, design and entrepre-

ment to the project and to being a partner with them.”

neurship accelerator. This is a very exciting initiative,” Givhan said. A cohort of students who have a business idea or have already begun

Troy University was also part of the team that landed Kimber Man-

a business will be selected for this opportunity. “You’ll be amazed at

ufacturing, the firearms maker, which announced in the early part

how many students already begin businesses while they’re in col-

of 2018 that it will open a $38 million production facility in Troy and

lege. We discovered that, and that’s why we came up with this IDEA

create 366 jobs.

Bank concept to really foster that entrepreneurship and that creativity.” The program is expected to be up and running by next fall.

The possibility of internships and student projects figure into the university’s desire to support business and industry. “These close

“Long-term we think it would be neat to have a residential compo-

connections to industries are important to us,” Givhan said, “but

nent,” Givhan added. Noting that entrepreneurs feed off each other

it goes deeper than that.” He noted that KW Plastics, the world’s

creatively, he said, “It’s about collaboration too.” The students can

largest plastics recycling firm, is headquartered in Troy, as is HB&G

also have a storefront if they have products to sell.

Building Products. Along with Kimber, these are companies that work with composite materials and polymer. “We looked at that, and we

Givhan sees a connection between the growth in Pike County and

said, ‘We’d really like our labs to be extensions of their labs.’”

in the Montgomery area, and the role of Troy University. “We work closely with the Chamber of Commerce in Montgomery, and of

As a result, the development of a new center is underway. “We’ve

course we have a Montgomery campus. I’d really like to see ele-

been working for a while now, establishing a Center for Material and

ments of the IDEA Bank – and we’ve talked about this – extending

Manufacturing Science here at Troy. We’ll actually work with these

into Montgomery.”

plastics and polymers.” Givhan added, “That way the university will be an integral part of development with them, and I think also it will

He also cited the university’s partnership with the Alabama World

add to attracting other industries.”

Affairs Council as well the university’s emphasis on international business and international focus. “We’re fond of calling ourselves

The IDEA Bank is another significant undertaking that could have

Alabama’s international university because of our commitment to

far-reaching impact. Programmatically, it will be housed within the

that,” he said. Given the number of international businesses locating

Troy University Sorrell College of Business. The location, however,

in and around the capital city, he said, “We think that’s another thing

will be in a former Regions Bank building on the square in downtown

we bring to the Montgomery area.”

Troy. 53 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Regional Impact Troy Conecuh Ridge Distillery to Break Ground Groundbreaking is planned for late this year on a 76-acre site in Troy for the Conecuh Ridge Distillery LLC. The $13.6 million project was announced in 2017 after a search

Clyde May’s

for an Alabama location to consolidate

Alabama-style

operations for the makers of Clyde May’s

whiskey will soon

Alabama-style whiskey. When completed,

once again be made in the state where it

the facilities will include an artisan distillery

all began.

to make the whiskey, rack houses for the multi-year aging process and a bottling hub to make the products available for the marketplace. The site will also feature a museum to honor the whiskey’s unique – and

expansion, it could look to Alabama for its

to where my grandfather was making his

illegal – heritage.

new home. “Our roots are here, our heart

moonshine,” May said.

is here. It was a matter of deciding where Conecuh Ridge Distillery was established

in Alabama,” said L.C. May, the company’s

Conecuh Ridge Distillery is now an inde-

by Kenny May in 2001 as an out-of-state

U.S. Brand Ambassador and Clyde May’s

pendent company run by a group of inves-

whiskey-making operation that was based

grandson. After a two-year process, he said,

tors. L.C. May is the only family member

on his father Clyde May’s moonshine

“We felt that Troy was the best fit for us.”

still involved on a day-to-day basis, though

recipe. In 2013, distillation became legal in

This new location also made sense from a

others, including several of Clyde’s children,

Alabama, and as the company planned an

historical perspective. “Troy was very close

actively support the brand.

54 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

TROY CABLE Troy Cable has spent more than three decades providing the best in communications technology to the populations of southeastern Alabama, stretching up to Montgomery. Today, the company is ready to meet the next challenges of a fast-changing communications world. WHEN WAS TROY CABLE FOUNDED? Visionary Harold Freeman started Troy Cablevision in 1973 to service Troy and Pike County before a buyout to TCI of Alabama. After a noncompete agreement expired, Freeman started Troy Cable in 1986 to bring cable services — and later, broadband, phone and security — to underserved areas in Alabama.

Keeping Folks Connected Fiber optic communications are essential to making a city or town sustainable. It’s critical to infrastructure, education and business in today’s world. We’re proud to have made investments in rural

WHERE IS TROY CABLE BASED? Our headquarters are in Troy, but we have a regional reach. We have offices in Enterprise, Luverne, Ozark, Dothan and Montgomery. And, our fiber network extends through Pike, Crenshaw, Coffee, Covington, Dale, Geneva, Houston and Montgomery counties. We currently have 113 miles of fiber in Montgomery County alone.

and more populated areas.

Network Engineer Chris Smith keeps things running at Troy Cable.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES? 140 WHAT ARE THE COMPANY’S PRIMARY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES? We provide internet, voice, transport, video, security and home-automation services. WHAT MAKES TROY CABLE STAND OUT? “Vision.” Our founder has always been referred to as a person ahead of his time. Our business, due in great part to leadership that is now four generations strong, has always been at the forefront of technology. It started with Community Antenna Television or CATV systems in the 1970s. We have evolved with fiber optic technology. Today, our fiber network is available to homes and businesses, with speeds up to a gigabit per second.

Troy Cable was proud to receive the “Red Ribbon Award” from Walker & Associates earlier this year.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF USING A LOCALLY BASED CABLE AND INTERNET COMPANY? We are local and agile. We can start up your service much faster. Once in place, changes and additions to service are typically completed within 24 hours or less. Also, all of our employees are based in Alabama. We are local people who care about you and your business. Our Troy call center is available around the clock. WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON? We’ll soon have a 10 Gbps native capacity on all of our enterprise and business connections.

Troy Cable crews work hard to keep you connected.

1006 S. BRUNDIDGE ST. TROY, AL / 1-800-735-9546 / TROYCABLE.NET

55 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack

A HAVEN OF HOPE

/ by MELISSA JOHNSON WARNKE

Brantwood Children’s Home provides a safe space and healing for hurting children, victims of abuse and neglect, in the River Region. It provides the basics — food, shelter and clothing — but it also instills a sense of

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE MONTGOMERY ACADEMY.

normalcy and fosters trust in the lives of the children under its care.

Middle and Upper School students from The Montgomery Academy have donated Christmas presents to the residents of Brantwood for the past eight years.

“When you see a child — a child who’s been through the

there is. We see it as our responsibility to help these kids heal

unimaginable — start to smile and speak. When you see things

and be made whole again — to normalize their environments,”

beginning to change for them, that’s

said Jones. “It truly changes their lives

when you know the work you’re doing

and gives them the emotional and ed-

is so worthwhile,” said Gerald Jones, executive director of Brantwood Children’s Home. Brantwood Children’s Home was founded in 1917 by the Federation of Women’s Club. The original idea was to care for and house children of in-

A New Start For many children,

ucational skills to be successful, good citizens.” It does this transformative work by ensuring its kids have necessities like food, shelter and clothing.

Brantwood is a place for “firsts.”

But it also goes far beyond these

- Gerald Jones, executive director

basics. Brantwood staff members

of Brantwood Children’s Home

carcerated parents. Today, it’s evolved

supervise the children’s education, health and social adjustments into the community. They encourage them to

to also provide a home for children

participate in chores, family meals and

or teens who have been abused, neglected or abandoned.

extracurricular activities.

Jones, who’s been at the helm of the nonprofit for more than 24 years, has seen hundreds of children come up through the

But raising children is expensive. While Brantwood receives

organization, and currently, Brantwood has 25 children, teens

about $11 to $14 per day in state funds for each child, that

and adults ages 10 to 21 under its care.

amount barely covers the basics, let alone the extras. “It is important for the community to realize how much money it

“We wish there wasn’t a need for our program. Unfortunately,

takes to meet the needs and some of the wants for the kids.

56 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


GIVEBACK

BRIEFS IMAGES COURTESY OF BRANTWOOD CHILDREN’S HOME.

In Memory of the Great Rememberer Montgomery and the River Region lost one of their brightest lights in August when local historian Mary Ann Neeley passed away. For decades, she’s been the foremost authority on area history and has spent countless astically sharing Multiple fundraisers including an annual golf tournament help Brantwood Children’s Home continue its good and important work.

every facet of Montgomery’s story — warts

There is such a need for support; financially,

into our company’s mission and our duty as

and all — by

emotionally and spiritually. We appreciate

citizens of Montgomery.”

writing books and articles,

the many private and corporate donors we have. They allow us to keep doing what

In addition to monetary donations, Brant-

leading tours

we’re doing,” said Jones.

wood also accepts in-kind gifts and

and more. She

IMAGE COURTESY OF BROOKE GLASSFORD/COLORBOX

hours enthusi-

donations of clothing, shoes, toiletries and

made people

Robby Brantley, the Vice President of Cap-

furniture, all of which are tax-deductible. Its

care about the things that came before and

itol Container, is not only invested in Brant-

annual “For the Love of Our Children” golf

helped us understood why that caring and

wood’s work as a donor, he also serves on

tournament is one of its largest fundraisers

why understanding our past is so important

the program’s board of directors. He grew

of the year. “These children desperately

to present and future progress. Her encyclo-

up watching his mother volunteer with

need every opportunity you can help us

pedia-like knowledge and deep repository

“When you see a child — a child who’s been through the unimaginable — start to smile and speak. When you see things beginning to change for them, that’s when you know the work you’re doing is so worthwhile.”

provide,” said Jones.

of River Region memories will be sorely

“For many children,

missed, as will Neeley’s warm personality,

Brantwood is a place

a welcoming nature that made her such an

for ‘firsts’ — the first

effective preserver and promoter of history.

time they’ve received something brand new of their own; the first time they’ve slept with sheets on their bed; the first time they’ve received a Christmas gift.”

Brantwood. Brantley volunteered himself as

In more than two decades leading the

a child. “Brantwood is an organization that’s

organization, Jones says it’s the little mo-

always been very dear to our hearts,” Brant-

ments that remind him that this is what he

ley said. “Anytime you can support such an

was called to do. One of those moments

important organization for our community, it

sticks out — when he installed a new board

becomes a very easy decision.”

member who came to Brantwood as a child. “That’s one of the joys of being here so

Archie Grubb, a Principal with Beasley Allen,

long; seeing those kids, now with their own

is another dedicated volunteer and board

families and careers, wanting to come and

member. “We have been privileged to part-

give back,” Jones added. “That’s why we do

ner with Brantwood for more than a quar-

what we do.”

ter-century,” he said. “Brantwood’s legacy of caring for hurting children fits squarely 57 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

Local Business Helps Homeless Veterans A local company is lending its support to help homeless veterans. Turenne PharMedCo, a Montgomery pharmacy and medical supply business, donated personal hygiene goods and daily necessities to help a project organized by Junhyung Park, a Boy Scout and student at LAMP. Park collected these items to fill bags to give to homeless veterans. The bags were distributed during an early September event aimed at helping the veterans with health screenings, jobs and more. When people at Turenne PharMedCo heard about Park’s project, they decided to help the young man. The company’s employees donated about 1,000 items such as nonperishable food and hygiene products.


GiveBack GIVEBACK

BRIEFS

Dementia Friendly Alabama Joins Forces with Whole Foods Every three seconds, a new case of Alzheimer’s is diagnosed in the world, and more than 91,000 Alabamians live with Alzheimer’s. To foster increased awareness and encourage dementia friendliness in the state of Alabama, The Central Alabama Aging Consortium, the local Area Agency on Aging, founded its Dementia Friendly Alabama (DFA) initiative in January of 2016. Earlier this year, DFA partnered with Whole Foods to host its first Memory Café, now held every second Friday of the month. Memory Cafés are social engagement opportunities for those living with dementia and their caregivers and give participants an opportunity to take a sensory tour of different sights, smells, sounds and tastes while in a safe and caring environment. There are different areas of focus for each Memory Café, but the common thread is ensuring attendees are not focused on the disease, but on having a good time. And Memory Cafes are only one

facet of DFA’s services and resources. In addition, the organization offers dementia resource guides, matter of balance classes, memory screenings, Project LifeSaver (tracking device for loved-ones) and virtual dementia tours.

The Chamber wants to share the good news of businesses doing good. Please send story ideas to jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

58 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


GiveBack

LOOK TO THE SKIES by SAVANNA PRUITT IMAGES COURTESY OF 187TH FIGHTER WING, PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE.

Montgomery’s 187th Fighter Wing recently gave a gift to the community — the Red Tails Over Montgomery Air Show.

Montgomery’s Dannelly Field hosted the Red Tails Over Montgomery Air Show in September. Festivities for the more than 20,000 guests included aerial demonstrations from the Air Combat Command F-22 Demonstration Team and Heritage Flight along with an on-ground display of the F-35, the aircraft that will soon call Montgomery its home. Lt. Col. Charles P. Griggs, director of September’s show, reflected on the event.

Proud Partners. #SerquestMBJ Serquest partnered with the 187th Fighter Wing to provide a VIP ticketing platform through its event ticketing website. Numerous guests purchased tickets through this online platform, which greatly enhanced our service delivery to the customer. Serquest was instrumental in helping bring financial sponsors to the table, ensuring a successful event.

How long did the air show take to plan? Intense planning and coordination started in April, with meetings that included our wing leadership, as well as external agencies

In what ways did the event give back to the community?

such as the Montgomery Airport Authority, the Montgomery Police

One of the purposes of the air show was to give the community a

Department, and the City of Montgomery. It was incredible to see

glimpse of the past, present and future of the Alabama Air Nation-

thousands of hours of hard work culminate into one day.

al Guard. They helped us celebrate the legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen “Red Tails,” which we are very proud to honor. By creating

What stood out at the show?

awareness of the overall mission of the Alabama Air National

The F-22 Demonstration Team did not disappoint! They are

Guard, we hope to provide more opportunities in aviation career

always a crowd pleaser with their breathtaking display of the

fields for potential new members.

capabilities of pilots and jets. I’ll add that our unit members were stars throughout the day. We had more than 750 workers— I was

What feedback have you received?

very honored to be a small part of a great team effort.

I’ve had countless retirees, wing members and civilian guests tell me it was a great event. We actually ran a post-event survey on

What role did the Montgomery community play?

the day following the show to gather feedback. On a scale of 1-5,

The community was so supportive of us during the run up to the

no area was rated less than a 4. We have some great information

decision to award the F-35 back in December. It was a true com-

going forward that will help us improve. We will probably have our

munity effort, and the decision makers certainly got the message

next full show in 2021.

loud and clear before making their decision to award the jet to the 187th Fighter Wing. We also had tremendous support from River

P OW E R E D B Y

Region partners, including the City of Montgomery, the County, Montgomery PD and more than 30 sponsors.

59 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MyMGM

A LEADING ROLE / by MELISSA JOHNSON WARNKE Montgomery’s arts organizations play a key role in our city’s success and quality of life. With an economic impact well into the tens of millions of dollars, the arts are uniquely intertwined in our development, vibrancy and future growth.

Amber Ivey Bostwick, MABCA 2017 Awards Artist, and Tina Brown at the MABCA Cocktail Party at Kress on Dexter.

Every year, thousands of people in Mont-

“Our 30 plus organizations encompass all

that, it builds bridges within our community.

gomery gather on the lush, green lawn

kinds of performing, visual and literary arts.

It adds vibrancy and culture. It improves

outside the Alabama Shakespeare Festival

There is truly something for everyone,”

educational experiences, and it leads to

to enjoy a night of “Broadway Under the

she said, mentioning newer groups like

a more creative and engaged workforce,”

Stars.” The Montgomery Symphony Orches-

21 Dreams: Arts and Culture in addition to

said Ledbetter.

tra’s annual outdoor concert is equally as

the long-standing Alabama Writers Forum,

spectacular as the venue itself, the pictur-

which began in the 1950s.

esque Blount Cultural Park. Adjacent to the

The Arts Mean Business Community leaders understand the star-

concert stage is the Montgomery Museum

MABCA was the first affiliate of the National

ring role that arts play in our community,

of Fine Arts, another jewel in Montgomery’s

Business Committee for the Arts. The late

frequently mentioning the arts alongside

artistic crown.

Wynton M. “Red” Blount, a Montgomery

topics like job creation, attracting new busi-

businessman and arts philanthropist,

ness, downtown revitalization and employ-

The experience is uniquely Montgomery,

brought the program to his hometown

ment. And when it comes to direct econom-

and for those in attendance, it’s a remind-

after receiving a National Business in the

ic impact, the most recent studies estimate

er of the abundance and accessibility of

Arts Award. Blount formed the group in

it well beyond the $50 million mark for the

arts and culture in our city. “For a city our

1979 with help from Bobby Weil Sr. and the

tri-county area. Combine that with its ability

size and really any size, the depth and

late Frank Plummer. Today, it continues to

to help recruit new companies, and its value

diversity of our arts organizations is just

develop strategic alliances within the art

climbs even higher. “The strength of the arts

remarkable,” said Ashley Ledbetter, the

and business communities. “The reason

in a community goes a long way to heighten

Executive Director of the Montgomery Area

businesses support the arts is simple — it

the perception of a particular place, and it

Business Council for the Arts (MABCA).

enhances our city’s quality of life. Beyond

really makes Montgomery desirable,” said

60 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


TAKE a

Walk Jere Beasley, Greg Allen and Tom Methvin of the Beasley Allen Law Firm, the Frank Plummer Award Recipient at the MABCA 31st Annual Business in the Arts Awards.

Eve Loeb, the longtime director of development for the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. With a 100,000-square-foot theater, ASF is the largest

Arts Add Up

EXPLORE MONTGOMERY'S ABUNDANT PUBLIC ART

stbeyp step

Photography by Bryan Carter / Carter Photo Design

Learn more about the amazing effects the arts have on every aspect of our community and how your business can support our arts organizations at mabca.org.

and only fully professional theater in Alabama and one of the largest Shakespeare festivals in the world. The facility is often a must-see stop for economic recruitment visits and tourists alike. City leaders credit ASF, along with MMFA, for helping seal Hyundai’s decision to bring its facility to the capital city. “Business and the arts have a very symbiotic relationship,” Loeb added. “People who come to Montgomery are wowed by the level of arts we have here.”

Celebrating Corporate Alliances “The arts help stitch and bind the community together. No other sector is able to have such an impact on the fabric of our city,” said John Foshee of Foshee Architecture LLC. “We feel it’s our role to invest in the arts for future generations.” Foshee, who serves on the board of directors of MABCA, was the 2017 winner of a

A STARTING POINT

Business in the Arts Award for his company’s ardent support of the arts. Each year, the organization honors small, medium and large businesses, as well as individuals and educational groups, who carry on their founding members’ philanthropic legacy of contributing to the arts. Foshee Architecture won the small business category

Selma to Montgomery Trail Sculpture

while Alabama Power won the large business award.

Cottage Hill, Montgomery Street Artists / Jon Cook, Barrett Bailey, Robert Minervini

Leslie Sanders, Vice President of the Southern Division of Alabama Power, said, “Whether it’s supporting children learning to play an instrument or supporting our Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Alabama Power views the arts as a direct investment to better the places in which we live.” As the MABCA prepares for its 32nd presentation of the awards this year, Ledbetter describes the event as a time to remember what makes our community special.

y another stop

“This year, and every year, we have so much to be proud of,” she said. “Montgomery had some great visionaries in the arts and philanthropy towards arts. That foundation and longevity of the business community’s support sets us apart.”

61 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

Rosa Parks Museum Rondels Rosa Park Museum, 252 Montgomery Street Bronze Reliefs Artist / Winifred Hawkins


Selma to Montgomery Mural

MyMGM

Downtown, Lee Street Artist / Sunny Paulk

AROUND DOWNTOWN

y another stop

Selma to Montgomery Mural 3905 Mobile Hwy, Rufus A Lewis Library Artist / Bill Ford

Hank Williams, Sr. Statue Downtown, 100 N. Perry Street Bronze Statue Artists / Doug and Sandra McDonald

Education Downtown, 200 Monroe Street Bronze Statue Artist / Casey Downing, 1997

Commerce Downtown, 200 Monroe Street Bronze Statue Artist / Casey Downing, 1997

62 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


A PARK y TO SEE

/ Blount Cultural Park

John & Joyce Caddell Sculpture Garden Montgomery Museum of FIne Arts Artists / Various Work shown: Isbelle, 2001, Cast Bronze, lent by artist: Deborah Butterfield

BRINGING HISTORY

TO LIFE

y

another stop

Wright Flyer Cottage Hill, 604 Maxwell Blvd Stainless Steel Artist / Burt Steel

Rainbow Soldier Downtown, 300 Water Street Bronze Statue Artist / Jim Butler

Selma to Montgomery Trail Sculpture

St. Jude, W. Fairview Avenue Artists / Jon Cook, Barrett Bailey, Robert Minervini

Wynton "Red" M. Blount Wynton M. Blount Cultural Park, Alabama Shakespeare Festival Bronze statue replica Artist / Charles Cropper Parks

63 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Small Business Briefcase +

PACK ED WITH TIPS AN D TOOLS TO BEN EFIT YOUR BUSINESS

YOUR STORY = SUCCESS

/ BY VALORIE LAWSON

Everyone has a story, but what is your story to win business? Whether you are closing a deal with a client or communicating a new company strategy, your story could become your biggest asset.

GET STARTED:

As a journalist, I write and read a lot of news stories, and I know most people prefer stories they can identify with or that

5

inspire them. A good reporter knows that the secret ingredient to storytelling is to prove to your audience how a story affects them.  

STEPS ON HOW TO TELL YOUR STORY FOR BUSINESS

If you’re looking for some good examples of how this works, look no further than your TV. Television commercials have become essential ways to tell memorable stories for businesses. Companies are cleverly engaging customers with information, education and entertainment in 60 seconds or less.  If the story is told well, we crave their products, and we believe we can’t live without them,

1. KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE: You don’t have to know exactly who’s in the room but you must know the common factor that brings you together. What is their challenge? How can you help? 

all while feeling this isn’t something we’re being actively “sold,” but something that could change our life. In the same way, a relatable story can sell your business. Think about this: You are sitting in a conference room and you have to

2. DEFINE YOUR PURPOSE: Once you know who’s in the room, define your why. What is your message and why should they listen?  What is your expertise?  How can you use it to reach your audience?     

chose between the old PowerPoint presentation filled with facts

3. CONNECT:

and statistics on drug addiction or hearing from a parent who almost lost her child to an overdose and how a company’s program or product saved their child’s life. The choice if pretty obvious, and it proves stories matter.        But not just any story. People gravitate toward stories that are

Get to the heart of your audience by sharing a personal story.  You don’t have to get graphic or go overboard with “TMI,” but you should be personal. The more people connect to your story, the more they begin to know, like and trust you. They invited you to address their audience for a reason. 

authentic. For example, on the popular show “American Idol,” the producers write stories that introduce you to the contestants. Each Idol becomes a character and their circumstance becomes relatable. By the time the performances start, you’re cheering for your favorite Idol to win. The same technique could help you win new clients and customers.

GET REAL

MEET THE EXPERT:

“ People gravitate toward

stories that are authentic.”

4. LEAD THEM TO THE NEXT STEP:

Valorie Lawson is a television news anchor with a passion for news and telling good stories. She’s also the creator of Newsmakers Academy, an online platform that teaches you how to get media coverage through storytelling.    

Now that your audience is on the edge of their seats, give them a call to action. By now, they should be ready to buy your product or buy into your idea and write the check!

5. THE BOTTOM LINE IS “FACTS TELL, STORIES SELL." Ditch the old PowerPoint presentations filled with company jargon and connect your passion to your purpose. Engage your audience by sharing your story.   

64 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


65 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS

Connect +

T H E L AT EST H EADLIN ES , UPDATES AN D IN S IDER IN FO FROM YOUR CHAMBER

THE LATEST BUZZ: MONTGOMERY CHAMBER HOSTED MGMWERX INNOVATION CENTER PREVIEW; SECAF HEATHER WILSON VISITS

THOUSANDS OF MILITARY & IT LEADERS ATTENDED AFITC 2018 In August, more than 6,500 military and IT professionals were in Montgomery for the Annual AFITC Conference, which generates about $4 million in economic impact for the region. “AFITC brings together Air Force cyber and IT experts with The Montgomery Area Chamber of Com-

a city known for being the epicenter of

merce, The City of Montgomery, Montgom-

world-changing history. Today, the city is

ery County and Air University hosted a press

making history again – but this time through

conference to announce the new home of

technology,” said Anna Buckalew, Executive

MGMWERX. This collaborative public-pri-

Vice President of the Chamber.

vate partnership will leverage “outside-thegate” thinking and ideas to facilitate and

INNOVATEAFITC CYBER CHALLENGE IS

accelerate experimentation with emerging

NOW OFFICIAL USAF SANCTIONED EVENT

technologies and solve real-world prob-

As Montgomery hosted AFITC, the largest

lems for the Air Force, while also creating business opportunity for the private sector. MGMWERX aims to leverage Montgomery’s growing tech-related assets by opening a permanent innovation center in the city’s emerging innovation district to address key issues facing the Air Force. The highly anticipated launch of MGMWERX was a significant step in Montgomery’s technology-based economic development strategy. During the Air Force Information

technology conference in the U.S. Air Force, some of the city’s best tech talent joined the brightest minds in the Air Force to compete in the 2018 InnovateAFITC Cyber Challenge. The co-sponsored Air Force event was held in conjunction with AFITC and challenged participants to create innovative solutions

commercial partners and thought leaders in academia to understand current and innovative technologies and form future strategy,” said Richard Aldridge, director, AFPEO-BES. The Chamber took this opportunity to network and position Montgomery’s emerging technology ecosystem through a variety of initiatives.

Stay Connected Remember to stay up to date on the River Region’s latest tech, innovation and cyber news by visiting techmgm.com.

to significant cyber obstacles and threats as part of Montgomery’s ongoing effort to grow

this event brings technology experts of all

and leverage the city’s technology-related

skill levels together.

assets. Designed to model collaborative problem

Technology and Cyberpower Conference

Diverse, multi-skilled teams from the Air

solving that will take place at the MGM-

(AFITC), Secretary of the Air Force Heather

Force and region were invited to compete.

WERX innovation hub, InnovateAFITC was

Wilson toured the MGMWERX innovation

From robust local tech talent employed by

hosted in the space where MGMWERX

hub in Montgomery for a sneak peek of

Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base and local

offices were temporarily housed. The MG-

the new center and to learn more about

defense contractors to area students and

MWERX are located at 41 Commerce Street

the types of projects that will emerge for

participants in the Air Force’s National Youth

in a space donated as part of a community

our country’s warfighter. “Montgomery is

Cyber Education Program, CyberPatriots,

partnership with the Chamber.

66 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Connect A LO O K B AC K AT T H E FACES AN D PLACES OF RECEN T CHAMBER EVEN TS

TECHMGM POISED FOR GROWTH WITH STRONG LEADERSHIP Montgomery leaders recently announced

Charisse Stokes,

Lora McClendon, Vice President of Strategic

a pioneering move for the city’s economic

Executive Director TechMGM

Initiatives & Federal Affairs

development future. The Chamber, along

Charisse Stokes has been named Executive

Lora McClendon has been named Vice

with Mayor Todd Strange and County Com-

Director of TechMGM, the collaboration of

President of Strategic Initiatives & Fed-

mission Chairman Elton Dean, announced

local, industry, educational and governmen-

eral Affairs for the Chamber. McClendon

that the TechMGM initiative has been for-

tal entities working

will spearhead the economic strategy for

mally organized. The initiative will be led by

to leverage

technology and innovation, two sectors with

recently named Executive Director Charisse

Montgomery’s

a significant impact

Stokes and the Chamber’s Vice President

technology assets

on Montgomery’s

of Strategic Initiatives and Federal Affairs,

to focus on eco-

economy. In addi-

Lora McClendon. TechMGM is a Chamber

nomic, workforce

tion, McClendon will

initiative focused on growing Montgomery’s

and community

lead the Chamber’s

distinct economy by leveraging its local and

development. In

federal affairs

regional industry and resources, cultural

this role, Stokes will

program, where she

attributes and talent to pursue and promote

further expand the

will work closely

technology advancements, inclusive growth

program to maximize the community’s

with the congressio-

and to enhance access to capital.

diverse talent pipeline and promote Mont-

nal delegation and staff on projects that will

gomery as an emerging innovation hub to

drive growth for Montgomery. McClendon

both enhance the workforce and grow the

previously served as the Director of Military

regional economy.

and Federal Strategies at the Chamber.

More info: Get the latest on all things TechMGM at www.techmgm.com.

.

67 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Connect CON N E CT I N G YO U TO T H E M ANY C H AM B ER R ESO U R CES AN D S ERVICES AVAILABLE

MONTGOMERY HOSPITALITY ACADEMY: TAKING TOURISM HIGHER BE OUR GUEST, Y’ALL!

OUR CITY’S NEWEST STARS:

2018 MONTGOMERY HOSPITALITY ACADEMY PARTICIPATING BUSINESSES Wind Creek Montgomery Vintage Hospitality IMAGE BY BRYAN CARTER / CARTER PHOTO DESIGN.

Montgomery Zoo Montgomery Biscuits Midtown Pizza Leroy Lounge Embassy Suites Dreamland Bar-B-Que Cork and Cleaver

challenges, while the staff track is designed

Montgomery’s economy has benefitted tre-

the City of Montgomery and Montgomery

mendously from a substantial boom in tour-

County to create the Montgomery Hospitali-

ism. Every day, more than $1.4 million and

ty Academy. The inaugural classes launched

annually more than $511 million in revenue

this summer, producing 56 graduates repre-

is generated by visitors, and for four years,

senting nine different hospitality businesses

the city has led the state in hotel occupan-

in the River Region.

Attendees who participate in the required

or under construction, and well more than

The Montgomery Hospitality Academy

ation ceremony along with their supervisors

100,000 visitors attending the new Memo-

curriculum serves both managers and

rial to Peace since it opened this past April,

front line staff, and topics covered include

Montgomery is preparing to welcome un-

managing the overall customer service

precedented numbers in the coming years.

function, modeling interactions in service

for the delivery of service and interpersonal communication with customers, locals and tourists.

number of seminars are invited to a gradu-

cy rates. With four new hotels announced

delivery, responding to the difficult customer,

and receive a certificate from Troy University Continuing Education and Outreach identifying them as a graduate of the Montgomery Hospitality Academy. Matt Mulvanny, Corporate Partnerships

Thanks to the national media coverage the

the value and promise of customer service

Chamber has earned from outlets like The

and interpersonal relationships in service

New York Times, Travel + Leisure and CNN

delivery, and much more.

expressed his excitement about the pro-

ing experiences in Montgomery, along with

Each track focuses on the needs and

customer service,” he said. “It’s something

a heaping helping of our world-renowned

experiences of the employee level; the

Southern hospitality. Hotels, restaurants,

management track is designed to prepare

attractions and tourism-related services have

attendees to better manage and super-

to be proactive to ensure guests are receiv-

vise performance, work habits and service

Travel, visitors expect compelling, life-chang-

Executive for the Montgomery Biscuits gram: “It’s a fresh take on the full cycle of the industry needs and something we can definitely bring back to our guest services staff and the people who interact with our fans at the Biscuits.”

ing the best experience possible to keep those positive reviews coming. To prepare our hospitality workforce for this great opportunity, The Chamber has partnered with Troy University’s Continuing Education and Outreach department,

Join In

The Chamber and Troy University will announce dates for the 2019 Acade-

mies soon. Registration is $137 per attendee and includes all seminars, instructors and supplies. For information on dates, registration or ways to support this initiative, contact Laura Chambliss with Troy University’s Continuing Education and Outreach department at lhchambliss@troy.edu. 68 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Bradley congratulates Stan Gregory, Bill McGowin, George Parker, Bobby Poundstone and Chuck Stewart on being listed in The Best Lawyers in America®, 2019 edition

At Bradley, our attorneys understand that legal matters are more than contests of critical thought; they have real-world implications, which is why we prioritize integrity. It is this integrity that inspires all of us to go above and beyond our clients’ expectations by providing innovative solutions, dependable responsiveness and a deep commitment to success.

bradley.com

No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Contact: Robert Emmett Poundstone IV, Esq., 334.956.7645, bpoundstone@bradley.com, Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP, RSA Dexter Avenue Building, 445 Dexter Avenue, Suite 9075, Montgomery, AL 36104 © 2018

69 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Member FAQs D ISCOV ER W H AT YO U R C H AMBER CAN DO FOR YOU AN D YOUR BUS IN ESS .

Q: Why Should I Become a Chamber Ambassador (and How)?

A: It’s a fabulous

networking opportunity offering multiple benefits to you and your business, but it’s also a concrete way to get more involved in your city and region while assisting the Chamber in its mission.

FROM AN AMBASSADOR: HEAR ALL ABOUT IT

The Real Deal

Manager at Woodforest

7 GREAT BENEFITS: The opportunity to make valuable contacts with business leaders throughout the Montgomery area and the River Region. Recognition at Chamber events, Board meetings and in Chamber publications. Networking opportunities with representatives from a wide variety of businesses and organizations.

What Ambassadors Are:

Recognition among peers as a community leader,

Ambassadors are a prestigious

both individually and for the business or organization

group of volunteers who work

you represent.

for Chamber member organizations, believe in the Chamber’s mission and support their community. Ambassadors have an opportunity to not only represent and promote

An opportunity to work “behind the scenes” on behalf of the Chamber at important events and activities that define the future of Montgomery and the River Region. Learning more about the growth and development of Montgomery and the River Region.

the Chamber, but to meet and engage with other members, elected officials, key business stakeholders and promote

Personal satisfaction plus the opportunity to meet new people and make new connections and friends.

their own business at various Chamber events.

LaTisha Simpson, Retail Branch National Bank, has been a Chamber Ambassador for five years and shared what she enjoys about the experience, both personally and professionally. “Being an Ambassador has awarded me unlimited networking opportunities. But it’s not just about the networking, it’s about building relationships, gaining new friends and associates. It has also brought brand awareness for the bank. Nothing sells your business better than being in front of people face to face. The Business After Hours and 60-Minute Coffee events give you that contact with

Ambassador Events & Occasions:

future clients.”

• Quarterly Meetings

Ambassador Requirements: The term of an Ambassador is one calendar year from

Show Off! Chamber Ambassadors have a unique opportunity to share in the community.

February to January. Your firm or business must  be a Chamber member, and in good standing.

• Scheduled Monthly Networking Events (60-Minute Coffees/Business After Hours)

• Ribbon Cuttings: All Ambassadors will be required to assist with New Member deliveries, Ribbon Cutting photo deliveries, retention deliveries and mentor initiatives.

LOOKIN’ GOOD: Ambassadors are required to dress in business attire at all events and Chamber-provided name badges must be worn.

70 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

MEET THE STAFF

Lynn Norton, Senior Manager, Member and Investor Relations


CHAMBER NEWS Connect A LO O K B AC K AT T H E FACES AN D PLACES OF RECEN T CHAMBER EVEN TS

MEMBER EVENTS:

AUG 60 Minute Coffee at Drury Hotels 15

MONTGOMERY WOMEN IN

GRANT WRITING 101, AUGUST 30

BUSINESS MEET-UP:

at the Chamber’s BRC

BUSINESS AND BASEBALL,

Grant writing is hard and the process

AUGUST 9 at Riverwalk Stadium

can be daunting, so the Chamber

Sponsored by: Baker Realtime Worldwide

teamed up with SCORE and the River

Court Reporting and Video

Region United Way to present a “Where

This Women in Business special net-

to Begin” workshop that outlined prepa-

working event provided a laid-back,

rations for the grant writing process, dis-

casual atmosphere over cocktails and

cussed how your organization can find

baseball.

grants and included tips for success.

Sponsor & Location: Drury Hotels

SMALL BUSINESS DIVERSITY WORKSHOP SERIES, OCTOBER 2 at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel Workshop Sponsor: ADAM Synergy & KALM Services

This year’s Chamber’s Diversity Summit Small Business Workshop Series, Strategies to Diversify Your Business, was facilitated by Tonya Scott Williams

SEPT 60 Minute Coffee 12

at Landmarks Foundation Sponsor: River Region United Way

EGGS & ISSUES WITH

and featured innovative and motivating

SENATOR DOUG JONES, AUGUST 24

speakers:

at the RSA Activity Center

• Dr. Chris Jones – Diversity: Talent &

Presenting Sponsor: Guardian Credit Union

Innovation – Looking for Opportunities

This exclusive and popular Eggs

in All the Wrong Places

& Issues breakfast event featured

• Michael Brathwaite – Your Business

Senator Doug Jones as he discussed

and You: Golden Rules for Becoming

issues impacting our region from a local,

Financially Independent

national and international perspective.

SEPT 27

Business After Hours at Rehab Select Sponsor: Rehab Select at Hillview Terrace

DIVERSITY SUMMIT, OCTOBER 3 at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel and Convention Center Reception Host: Alabama State University

More than 600 local business leaders attended the highly anticipated Diversity

OCT 60 Minute Coffee at MAX 10

Sponsor: Hospice of Montgomery

Summit this year, which featured dynamic speakers from across the country and offered an intense one-day agenda packed full of diversity and inclusion training that is crucial to any business model and size. This year’s keynote was Essye B. Miller, Department of Defense Principal Deputy, Chief Information Officer.

71 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


72 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

Regions Bank Announces Montgomery Market Executive

New MMFA Director

Regions Bank announced the return of Arthur DuCote to

Arts (MMFA) announced the ap-

serve as Market Executive for the

pointment of accomplished museum

bank in Montgomery and the River Re-

professional and leader Angie Dodson

gion. DuCote previously led Regions’

as MMFA’s new Director. Dodson will

Montgomery-area teams from 2001

manage the museum and oversee all

to 2013, when he moved to Jackson,

activities related to collections, exhi-

Mississippi, to serve as Regions’ Mis-

bitions, programs, education, special

sissippi Area President. In addition to

events and fundraising. Dodson spent

his role as Montgomery Market Execu-

the past 19 years of her career at the

tive, DuCote will
serve as Commercial Banking Leader for Regions in the Montgomery area, overseeing the bank’s array of customized financial solutions for large companies and major employers in Central Alabama.

Caddell Names New Vice President Angela Crosby has been promoted to Vice President of Compliance & Ethics. Crosby has been with Caddell since 2011 with primary responsibility for enhancing Caddell Construction’s reputation as an industry leader in business ethics. She has also been spearheading Caddell’s risk management program which will continue to be one of her primary responsibilities in her new role. 

The Board of Trustees of the Montgomery Museum of Fine

Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, Washington, D.C., where she has served as the Director of Learning & Engagement, Director of Interpretation & Visitor Services and COO.

Bradley Names New Managing Partner and Chairman of the Board and New Birmingham Office Managing Partner Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP announced that Jonathan M. Skeeters, a partner in the firm’s Nashville, Tennessee, office has been selected by the firm’s board as the new Chairman and Managing Partner. In addition, Dawn Helms Sharff, who has been serving as interim chair, was named Office

Jackson Thornton Announces Promotions

Managing Partner for the firm’s Birmingham office.

Jackson Thornton announced several recent promotions. Sarah Chandler has been promoted to Senior Manager. Chandler, who joined the firm in 2011, specializes in consulting, financial forecasting and rate design within the utilities industry.  Daniel Tew, CPA, has been promoted to Senior Manager. Tew joined the firm in 2009 and specializes in the construction and agriculture industries as well as employee benefit plan audits. Jackson Thornton also pro-

Ainsworth Joins Partners Realty Partners Realty new agent Avery Ainsworth is a known leader in the community and is passionate about helping people. He brings with him diverse business and entrepreneurial experiences. Ainsworth graduated from Mississippi State University where he earned a degree in Civil Engineering. He is also an accomplished triathlete and outdoor enthusiast.

moted Mark Barnett, CPA and Ryan McGowin, CPA to Manager. 

73 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

Faculty Join Huntingdon Teaching Team

Rev. Dr. Diana Abernethy

Huntingdon College welcomed six teaching professionals to the full-time faculty as classes opened for the fall semester: The Rev. Dr. Diana Abernethy, Assistant Professor of Religion, Department of Religion; Dr. Kyle Christensen, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, Department of Communication Studies and Psychology; Dr. Emily

Dr. Kyle Christensen

Dr. Emily Hare

Dr. Michele Scharff Olson

Dr. Kristin Zimbelman

Hare, Assistant Professor of Biology, Department of Biology; Ms. Laryne Monte, Instructor of Piano, Department of Fine Arts; Dr. Michele Scharff Olson, Huntingdon Class of 1986, Senior Clinical Professor, Department of Sport Science and Physical Education; Director, Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects Research; and Dr. Kristin Zimbelman, Ms. Laryne Monte

Assistant Professor of Teacher Education (Reading Specialist), Department of Teacher Education.

+ S U B M IT T I NG NEWS ? Submit information to Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com. Attach press releases as a Word document and include a high-resolution headshot (at least 300 dpi). An accompanying headshot is required

for “Members on the Move� announcements.

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74 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

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CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Community

don continues to climb in the annual U.S. News ranking,” said Huntingdon President J. Cameron West. “We are thrilled that Huntingdon’s strengths and academic reputation are confirmed not just by those of us who are part of this great college, but also by data that compares us with colleges and universities across America.”

Auburn University at Montgomery College of Education Earns Great Grades IMAGE COURTESY OF AUM / FRANK WILLIAMS.

Graduates of Auburn University at Montgomery’s College of

AUM Among South’s Top Regional Universities U.S. News & World Report recognized Auburn University at Montgomery among its top regional universities in the South in its annual survey of the nation’s best educational institutions. Among regional universities in the South, AUM ranked 22nd for the quality of its undergraduate teaching program and 38th among public institutions. AUM’s College of Business also ranked among the business schools nationally. “We are delighted that Auburn University at Montgomery’s academic programs have once again been recognized for their high level of quality,” said AUM Chancellor Dr. Carl A. Stockton.

Education earned high marks on the recent Alabama State Department of Education Educator Preparation Report Card. AUM students performed well above the state average on two components of the Alabama Educator Certification Assessment Program, with 100 percent passing the Principles of Learning and Teaching test component on the first try and 89 percent passing the Multiple Subjects portion on the first try. The state first-time average pass rate for both sections is 94 percent and 82 percent, respectively. Employers offered highly favorable ratings of the strength and effectiveness of AUM graduates in a multitude of areas, including their ability to “engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication to address authentic local and global issues” and “manage the learning environment to engage learners actively.” New classroom teachers from AUM scored 15 percentage points above the state average in both categories and 14 points above the state average in communicating with students, parents, and the public school

Huntingdon Named to College Consensus Top 5 Huntingdon College has been named among the best colleges and universities in Alabama by College Consensus, a new college aggregator. The ranking shows that Huntingdon achieved the highest student consensus of any college in the state and ranks overall in the top five colleges and universities. “What is most important to me about this ranking,” said Huntingdon College president J. Cameron West, “is that students are independently reporting their satisfaction with the Huntingdon College experience. We work hard to make sure students know they are valued members of this learning community.”

about Alabama’s assessment system and Alabama educational improvement initiatives.

Retail Businesses Recognized The Alabama Retail Association honored 15 retail businesses with stores in 78 Alabama cities as Retailers of the Year and Centennial Retailers in mid-October during the 2018 Alabama Retail Day luncheon. Local retailers and Chamber members honored were: Theo Katechis and Costas “Gus” Katechis, Owner and Manager of Chris’ Famous Hot Dogs, the team at Renfroe’s Market and Owner Robert Renfroe and Vice President Rob Renfroe, and George R. Wilder, owner and CEO of The Locker Room stores in Montgomery and Auburn.

Huntingdon Shines in 2019 Ranking With the release of the 2019 U.S. News & World Report America’s Best Colleges ranking list, Huntingdon College has climbed

Achievements

two spots to No. 11 among Regional Colleges-South, and is

Troy University Program Honored

ranked sixth among Best Values in the region. With an over-

Troy University’s Risk Management and Insurance Program has

all score of 69, Huntingdon places third among colleges and

been recognized by the A.M. Best Company as one of the top

universities in Alabama and in the top 16 percent of all four-year

20 RMI programs in the country. “Best’s Review” wanted to see

colleges and universities reported in the magazine. “Hunting-

which college programs were preparing students for a career

75 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

in the industry. The company solicited responses from readers and

A longtime member, Ward has served

industry professionals, who named 272 collegiate programs, and in-

on the AAJ Executive Committee for

terviewed hiring managers and human resources professionals at 28

several terms including as Treasurer

of the largest insurance carriers and brokerages. In those responses,

last year and Parliamentarian during

100 universities stood out, but 20 were singled out. Troy University

the 2016-2017 term. He also chairs the

was one of just five schools to make the survey’s “Contenders” list

Leaders Forum Advisory Committee,

and one of just two in the Southeastern United States to be included.

the DePuy Metal on Metal and Biomet

Local Lawyer Serving on AAJ Executive Committee Beasley Allen principal Navan Ward has been elected to serve as Secretary of the American Association for Justice (AAJ). Each year at the annual convention, members elect six officers to help lead the professional organization. Ward and his fellow 2018-2019 officers were elected during the group’s convention in Denver, Colorado. The AAJ provides trial attorneys with information, professional support and a nationwide network that enables them to most effectively and expertly represent clients. It works to promote a fair and effective justice system—and to support the work of attorneys in their efforts to ensure that any person who is injured by the misconduct or negligence of others can obtain justice in America’s courtrooms, even when taking on the most powerful interests.

Metal on Metal Litigation Groups, and is the past chair of the Minority Caucus and the Diversity Committee. He has also served on AAJ’s Board of Governors, Convention Planning Committee, National Finance Council, and PAC Task Force.

Beasley Allen Scores Long List of “Best Lawyers” Nineteen lawyers from Beasley Allen were recognized in The Best Lawyers in America 2019. Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence. Included on the list are the firm’s Principal & Founder, Jere L. Beasley, as well as J. Greg Allen, Michael J. Crow, Thomas J. Methvin, J. Cole Portis, W. Daniel “Dee” Miles III, Andy D. Birchfield

76 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Jr., Rhon E. Jones, Benjamin E. Baker Jr., LaBarron N. Boone, David B. Byrne III, Kendall C. Dunson, R. Graham Esdale Jr., Benjamin L. Locklar, P. Leigh O’Dell, W. Roger Smith III, C. Gibson Vance, Navan Ward Jr. and E. Frank Woodson. Beasley Allen lawyers were also recognized for their successes and named “Lawyer of IMAGE COURTESY OF CADDELL CONSTRUCTION.

the Year” in three categories: C. Gibson Vance was named the Best Lawyers 2019 Mass Tort Litigation/Class Actions – Plaintiffs “Lawyer of the Year” in Montgomery. Rhon E. Jones was named the Best Lawyers® 2019 Litigation – Environmental “Lawyer of the Year” in Montgomery. W. Roger Smith, III was named the Best Lawyers 2019 Product Liability Litigation – Plaintiffs “Lawyer of the Year” in Montgomery.

Caddell Construction Earns High Ranking Business Alabama has recognized Caddell Construction Co. as one of 2018’s Best Companies to Work for in Alabama. Caddell was selected as the best large construction/engineering company in the state and ranked No. 6 among all large Alabama businesses and government entities based on employee satisfaction as well as workplace policies, practices, philosophy, systems and demographics. Business Alabama used Best Companies Group, based in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to conduct the survey and evaluate

the data. The anonymous employee survey was 75 percent of the point total and by far the most important metric.

Gilpin Givhan Attorneys Receive Recognition The Gilpin Givhan law firm is listed in the 25th Edition of The Best Lawyers in America as well as four of its attorneys. A fifth attorney is listed in The National Law Journal’s 2018 Elite Lawyer of the South edition. John Ward Weiss is not only in the Best Lawyers in America but is also being recognized as the 2019 Lawyer of the

BIG NE WS: Alabama Power & PowerSouth Named to Select List The Alabama Power Compa-

its work are known by many,

ny and PowerSouth Energy

PowerSouth’s well-deserved

Cooperative were both recently

recognition has come from

named on Site Selection’s

its efforts in rural areas of the

annual list of “Top Utilities in

state. Based in Andalusia,

Economic Development” that

PowerSouth is an energy coop-

recognizes a very select group

erative that serves consumers

of utilities across the United

in 39 Alabama and 10 Florida

States. “Dependable and

counties through its 20 distri-

affordable power still lies at the

bution members — 16 electric

root” of site selection, the publi-

cooperatives and four munic-

Nimrod Frazer was recently bestowed the Daughters of the

cation said about the honorees.

ipal electric systems. “We are

American Revolution’s Medal of Honor, a prestigious honor that

The write-up also praised the

proud to receive recognition as

he received at the DAR Continental Congress event in Washing-

companies’ tremendous impact

a Top Utility in Economic De-

ton, D.C. Frazer was recognized for his “incredible contributions

on their respective local com-

velopment,” PowerSouth Vice

to our nation.” The DAR Medal of Honor recognizes an individual

munities, saying, “Utilities’ own

President of External Affairs

who has shown extraordinary qualities of leadership, trustworthi-

operations do their part too,

Horace Horn said. “We have a

ness, service and patriotism. DAR pointed to Frazer’s exemplary

with the power company con-

dedicated team that strives to

career, active civic involvement and commitment to patriotism as

tributing to overall community

be a sought after resource for

perfect examples of one individual's ability to make a difference

welfare in a multitude of ways

our electric cooperative mem-

and noted his remarkable dedication to American history, espe-

from job creation to taxes.”

bers and our local economic

cially the little known story of the Rainbow Division.

While Alabama Power and

development organizations.

Montgomerian Receives DAR Medal of Honor

77 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Year in healthcare law. The Lawyer of the Year award is presented to only one attorney in each practice area and community. Other Gilpin Givhan attorneys in Best Lawyers in America are Robert E.L. Gilpin, Davis H. Smith and Robert Ritchey. Gregg B. Everett appears in The National Law Journal’s 2018 Elite Lawyer of the South

the practice of law.

Starke Agency, Inc. Included in Best Practices Study Starke Agency, Inc. retains its Best Practices status, once again becoming a part of an elite group of independent insurance agen-

for his work in health care law.

cies around the United States. This status comes by participating

Felicia Smith New President Montgomery NAWIC

or the Big “I”) Best Practices Study group. The annual survey and

Felicia Smith, Caddell’s Contract Insurance Supervisor, was in-

study of leading independent insurance agencies documents the

stalled on September 11 as the new President of the Montgomery

business practices of the “best” agencies and urges others to

Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction

adopt similar practices. “We are humbled to again be awarded the

(NAWIC). NAWIC is a 55-year-old organization dedicated to the

Best Practice Award for the twelfth consecutive year,” said Bolling

advancement and training of women for leadership positions in

P. (Trey) Starke, III, President and CEO of Starke Agency, Inc. “We

the construction industry, with the Montgomery Chapter one of its

continue to invest in people, value-added services and customer

most active and distinguished nationwide. “I am excited about this

friendly technology to position us for the future.”

in the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America (IIABA

opportunity to give back to an industry that has meant so much to me and my family. Women have dramatically increased their role and influence in construction over the past two decades and

Awards & Honors

NAWIC has been an important part of that success,” Smith said.

Five Bradley Arant Boult Cummings Attorneys Honored Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP announced that five of the firm’s Montgomery attorneys have been listed in the 2019 edition of The Best Lawyers in America, one of the most highly regarded attorney referral publications. “We congratulate the Bradley attorneys who have been recognized in the 2019 edition of The Best Lawyers in America as among the top attorneys in their practice areas,” said Managing Partner Dawn Helms Sharff. The Montgomery attorneys selected are W. Stanley Gregory, William C. McGowin, George R. Parker, Robert Emmett Poundstone IV and Charles Stewart.

Neighborhood Receives 2018 Reader’s Choice 1st Place

Rushton Stakely Lawyers Named Best Lawyers 2019 Rushton Stakely announced that 17 of its attorneys were chosen for the 2019 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. The selected lawyers are: Dennis R. Bailey, Jeffrey W. Blitz, L. Peyton Chapman, William I. Eskridge, Alan T. Hargrove, William S. Haynes, R. Austin Huffaker Jr., J. Theodore Jackson Jr., Paul M. James Jr., Thomas H. Keene, Daniel L. Lindsey, Patrick M. Shegon, Christopher S. Simmons, Frank J. Stakely, Fred W. Tyson, Helen Crump Wells and Benjamin C. Wilson.

The Waters in Pike Road was named the 2018 Montgomery Advertiser Reader’s Choice Best New Home Community/Development in Montgomery County. “We are honored that the River Region has selected us for this award many years over,” said Jennifer Atkins, Vice President of The Waters and Qualifying Broker of New Waters Realty. “It’s our goal to continue to provide a unique new home product and outstanding amenities to our current and future residents.” The Waters offers stunning new homes and home sites in Pike Road and has consistently rated as a top Traditional Neighborhood Design (“TND”) Community.

Rushton Stakely Attorney President of ADLA Rushton Stakely announced that shareholder Dennis R. Bailey was elected 2018-2019 President of the Alabama Defense Lawyers Association (ADLA) during the 2018 Annual Meeting. Bailey has been a long-standing member of ADLA, serving in various capacities, including his most recent position of President-Elect 2017-2018. ADLA is a professional organization that is committed to improving

C2 Technologies, Inc. Wins U.S. Air Force Contract C2 Technologies, Inc. recently announced the award of U.S. Air Force’s C-17 Training Systems contract as part of the Boeing Global Services Team. The overall value of the 6.5-year contract is up to $986 million to “operate, sustain, modify and upgrade” the USAF’s C-17 Globemaster III aircrew and maintenance training systems at 14 air bases nationwide. C2 will provide system training

78 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

courseware and simulator maintenance support.

merce Street. Beasley Allen has invested millions in historic preservation and revitalization of downtown Montgomery, including purchasing

Pate Landscape Co. Recognizes Rising Star Pate Landscape Co., Inc. has announced that Sam McCaskey is being recognized for his high level of leadership from the Alabama Associated General Contractors (AGC) and Business Alabama. McCaskey will be

and renovating historic buildings along Commerce Street, a jewel of downtown, that was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, with boundary expansions in 1982 and 1987. “Our law firm was honored to have been selected for this award,”

inducted into the inaugural class of the

said founder Jere Beasley. “It is very important to preserve buildings,

Top 40 Under 40 in commercial con-

monuments and other physical locations from earlier times because

struction. McCaskey has proven himself

they bring life to a shared history that we can reflect on with fondness,

with his commitment to excellence and

and remember lessons learned from past mistakes. Beasley Allen has

his commitment to the construction

been blessed with resources that have allowed us to restore tangible

industry. McCaskey has just completed

connections to Montgomery’s past.”

a high-profile landscape project for the new sculpture garden at the Montgom-

Bradley Named Product Liability Firm of the Year

ery Museum of Fine Arts.

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP announced that the firm has been named the Product Liability Firm of the Year by the LMG Life Sciences

Landmarks Foundation Honors Firm Beasley Allen Law Firm was presented with the annual James L. Loeb Preservation Award by the Landmarks Foundation of Montgomery on September 6. The award recognizes the firm’s contributions to preserving Montgomery’s historic resources and heritage, specifically capitalizing on the distinctive architectural character of lower Com-

Awards 2018. Bradley garnered the top spot in the Product Liability category among a group of seven other nominated law firms. The firm was formally recognized September 12 at LMG’s Annual Awards Ceremony in New York City. Now in its sixth year, the awards recognize the year’s top firms and legal professionals operating in the life sciences sector.

www.gotscrap.com 334-272-0767 430 Air Base Blvd. Montgomery, AL 36108

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79 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

ALUMN I SUPPOR T

Faulkner University Welcomes Elementary Students The energy soared inside the halls of Montgomery Public School’s Davis Elementary in August as about 300 Faulkner University athletes welcomed Davis students back to school on

Alumni donate $1.5 Million to Troy University Troy University’s New Hall, the residence hall that opened in 2015 at the Troy Campus, will have a new name thanks to a $1.5 million donation from alumni Sue and Lewis Rushing. The Board of Trustees voted unanimously to rename the residence hall Rushing Hall in honor of the alumni couple, who are both 1965 graduates. Rushing Hall is Troy University’s newest state-of-the-art residence hall, featuring 280 single-bed suites, 68 double occupancy suites and 12 handicapped suites on four floors totaling 118,754 square feet. In addition to the residential rooms, Rushing Hall includes 1,400 square feet of common areas, 2,600 square feet of safe space that double as class and meeting rooms, a convenience store, technology areas, laundry areas and study rooms.

players, soccer players, basketball teams, volleyball and golf teams stood shoulder-to-shoulder along the sidewalks and hallways as they highfived, clapped and welcomed students back on their first day back to school. Even Faulkner Eagles’ mascot, Baldwin pictures.

Perry O. Hooper Jr., former state represen-

for America and also a win for the state

tative and a current member of the State

since Alabama industries like aerospace,

Republican Executive Committee, is praising

aviation, agriculture, automotive manufactur-

President Donald Trump’s recently signed

ing, maritime manufacturing, cybersecurity,

executive order that establishes a new,

internal technology, health sciences and

nationwide workforce initiative. This initiative

construction need employees. He pointed

is complete with an advisory board aimed

to The Economic Development Association

at improving educational opportunities for

of Alabama’s push of community colleges

high school students who find themselves

toward career pathways. “Thanks to Presi-

without a post secondary plan.

dent Trump, we now have an opportunity to serve our own high schools with the same successful solution,” Hooper said.

American industry by providing students an opportunity to learn the skills necessary for

Students won’t be tracked toward a tech-

gainful employment once their high school

nical field only — they will still earn a high

career closes. Students can earn a high

school diploma, and they will still be held to

school diploma while also earning a profes-

the required academic state standards. But

sional certificate toward an available job.

they will earn an opportunity for workforce exposure as well as opportunities for intern-

According to Hooper, the initiative is a win

Faulkner Eagle cheerleaders, football

came out to hug students and pose for

Local Touts Trump’s New Workforce Initiative

The workforce strategy will help protect the

their first day with smiles and cheers.

ships and mentoring from local industries.

80 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

WANT YOUR NEWS IN THE MBJ? Submit information for consideration to Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com. Please attach press releases as a Word document or a PDF (Word documents preferred), and please include high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) photos with your press release if possible.

SUBMISSION DEADLINES: JANUARY ISSUE: NOV. 27 MARCH ISSUE: JAN. 21


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

Local Architecture Firm Hits a Milestone Architects Bill Wible and Jennifer Barber along with interior designer Jessica Mims and office manager/field inspector James Wible celebrated the one-year anniversary of Wible Barber Architects in September. This team designs all types of projects: renovations and new facilities for schools, apartments and commercial spaces. The firm produces its designs by combining the many years of experience of its architects with an innovative technology, Revit, which allows clients to view their projects three-di-

R OCK O N:

mensionally throughout the design process.

Ozzy Osbourne Visits ASU The Alabama State University Mighty Marching Hornets Band performed for rock 'n' roll legend and reality TV star Ozzy Osbourne during a segment of A&E's show, “Ozzy & Jack’s World Detour” that aired in August. Osbourne, famed lead singer of Black Sabbath, and his son Jack came to Montgomery and filmed part of their show on the campus of ASU because of their desire to hear ASU’s nationally acclaimed band perform under the direction of Dr. James Oliver. The band performed several Black Sabbath songs, including “Iron Man.” After the performance, Ozzy and Jack spent time speaking to students and staff, stopping frequently for photos and autographs.

ASPCA Partners with ALABAMA 200 As part of the Alabama bicentennial celebration and the Alabama Society of CPA’s

The toolkit is available to members of the

The Family Sunshine Center Partners with Shop Focused on Local Creatives

public through the ALABAMA 200 web-

Product of Montgomery, a downtown store

site and by request through the ASCPA.

promoting local artists and creatives by selling their works, and The Family Sunshine Center joined forces and hosted the first

ALABAMA 200 have created a co-brand-

Palomar Insurance Unveils New Online Technology

ed financial literacy toolkit for high school

Palomar Insurance recently announced

20. The event featured a trunk showing

teachers. The resource was presented

the addition of new website technology –

of Artistry by Aleah, music, drinks, hors

on July 30 to more than 1,200 educators

PalomarOnline – that offers easy access

d’oeuvres by D’Road Café and sweet treats

at the annual CTE conference of the Ala-

to policy information along with the abili-

by Alanna’s Gourmet Treats. All proceeds

bama State Department of Education.

ty for customers to make online premium

benefited The Family Sunshine Center.

own 100th anniversary, the ASCPA and

Sunshine Spotlight event on September

payments using E-pay. “We are thrilled to ASCPA President and CEO Jeannine

offer this service to our customers,” said

Product of Montgomery will be an on-going

Birmingham said, “It is such a natural

Justin Smitherman, Information Technolo-

partner with the Family Sunshine Center

partnership, and we were flattered when

gy Director. “The website will allow easy

through the sales of its newly designed

the ALABAMA 200 asked us to build a

access to download automobile identifi-

Sunshine Boxes, hand-painted boxes that

tool for students and teachers. Having a

cation, policy information, certificates of

include a stainless necklace, a woodcut

workforce that exercises sound money

insurance and report claims. This service

magnet, a handmade card, a vinyl decal

management will benefit our state for the

will be extremely useful to our clients in

and a joy button. The Sunshine Boxes are a

next 100 years. It’s what the ASCPA and

the transportation industry whose drivers

perfect gift idea, with proceeds benefiting

the accounting profession are built on.”

need access routinely.”

The Family Sunshine Center.

81 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

Local Real Estate Company Participates in Trendsetters “Brainstorm” With an eye on finding innovative products, services and systems to improve broker profitability and the real estate process, The Trendsetters Group recently held its inaugural Developer Services Meeting in St. Petersburg, Florida. Discussion centered on how to work more closely with new home builders and developers and build relationships through innovative marketing. Montgomery’s New Waters Realty was among the attend-

Caddell Construction To Build New Medical Facility

ees that took part in brainstorming and idea sharing on

The Caddell-Nan Joint Venture has been awarded a $56.7 million contract

some of the hot topics of Developer Services. “New home

for construction of a new outpatient medical/dental facility at Apra Harbor

construction is a highly sought-after market for real estate

on U.S. Naval Base Guam. The Caddell-Nan JV was selected to build a new

resale experts, and improved relationships with developers

cutting-edge medical/dental clinic at one of the most remote U.S. Naval facilities

and builders can only provide value to consumers,” said

in the world. The project consists of a new single-level outpatient facility and

Jennifer Atkins, Vice President and Qualifying Broker. “The

includes administrative offices, a primary care and family practice section, an op-

ability to share ideas with some of the sharpest minds in

tometry clinic, a physical therapy area, industrial hygiene/preventative medicine

this segment of our business was invaluable,” said Atkins.

services, a dental clinic, and logistics and common areas. The contract is funded

“I look forward to implementing some of these ideas to

by the Government of Japan as part of a U.S./Japanese agreement that involves

enhance what we offer to our buyers and customers.”

moving U.S. Naval operations from Okinawa to Guam.

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82 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

Huntingdon Announces Presidential Fellows Program

AKEEP Receives Prestigious Grant For the first time in the Southeast, a

ing and dynamic language learning

Huntingdon College President J. Cameron West

nonprofit organization was awarded

experiences for students and create

recently announced the formation of a Presiden-

the prestigious STARTALK grant in the

a pathway for certification in critical

tial Fellows program for new students entering

Korean Category. With Korean lan-

need languages that are not common-

the College in fall 2019. An initiative identified in

guage programs in New York and Cali-

ly taught for teachers in the United

the College’s strategic plan, Building Great Lives,

fornia, Montgomery’s own Alabama-Ko-

States.

the Presidential Fellows program was designed to

rea Education & Economic Partnership

attract high-achieving student-leaders who want to

(AKEEP) is the fifth Korean language

Upon completion of the program stu-

become engaged fully in their college experience

recipient to be recognized for the 11-

dents received graduation certificates

and who are not involved in other campus teams.

year existence of the program.

and were recognized by Dr. Jim Purcell

The program aimed to deliver engag-

of the Alabama Commission on Higher The Presidential Fellowship carries a $5,000 stack-

The grant allowed AKEEP to operate

Education and Dr. Jeffery Langham

able scholarship that may be awarded in addition

a 15-day, non-residential summer pro-

of the Alabama State Department of

to selected Huntingdon Honors Scholarships and

gram titled AKEEP-TROY STARTALK:

Education. Due to the success of the

financial aid. To apply to the program, prospective

Cultural Treasure Hunters. Hosted by

Cultural Treasure Hunters program and

students will complete a Presidential Fellows appli-

Troy University Montgomery, Cultural

incorporation of special needs learn-

cation in addition to their Application for Admission

Treasure Hunters recruited 24 elemen-

ers, AKEEP was also selected to speak

to the College. The first round of Fellows will be

tary and middle school students from

at the STARTALK Fall conference.

selected after December 1.

Montgomery and Pike Road schools.

83 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

Baptist South Now Offering Highly Advanced Surgery System

Pharmacy Program Helps Increase Medication Safety

New Family Sunshine Center Awareness & Fundraising Campaign

Baptist Medical Center South is the first

Turenne PharMedCo is stepping up to

During domestic violence awareness month in

hospital in the River Region and the

give the state’s long-term care facili-

October, the Family Sunshine

third in the state to offer robotic-arm as-

ties the tools they need to keep their

Center launched iCare, its

sisted total knee, partial knee and total

residents safe.

fall fundraiser and awareness

hip replacements with Stryker’s Mako

campaign. The campaign

System. This highly advanced robotic

The Montgomery-based long-term care

asked the business commu-

technology transforms the way joint

pharmacy has launched Triage 365, a

nity to help drive awareness

replacement surgery is performed,

resident drug regimen review program

of domestic violence issues

for nursing homes and assisted living

as well as where victims can

The demand for joint replacements is

facilities. Using big data analytics, the

go for help.

expected to rise in the next decade.

Triage 365 program helps facilities con-

With Mako, the hospital can provide

tinuously review more residents’ med-

The goal was to recruit 200

each patient with a personalized surgi-

ication records and identify potential

businesses to support the initiative. Businesses

cal experience based on their specific

problems such as adverse drug interac-

were asked to make a minimum donation of $150

diagnosis and anatomy. Using a virtual

tions and high-risk medications. Triage

to FSC and host a mini-fundraiser for the agency.

3D model, Mako allows surgeons to

365 also gives the facilities’ pharmacist

The campaign culminated on October 26 with

create each patient’s surgical plan

earlier access to information that allows

employees of participating businesses wearing a

pre-operatively before entering the

them to make changes or recommenda-

symbolic “black eye” sticker and lapel sticker that

operating room.

tions to a resident’s drug regimen.

read, “Ask Me Why I Care.”

84 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

WELCO M E HOPE Opens Branch in Alabama

improved mood and a higher self-esteem. The Serenity

Hope Credit Union (HOPE), one

Place therapy also helps the

of the nation’s leading com-

community’s lower functioning

munity development financial

residents.

institutions (CDFIs), held a open house on September 13

Jackson Thornton Acquires Company

for its first Alabama branch and

Jackson Thornton recently an-

announced plans to partner with

nounced the acquisition of Kan-

Regions Bank to open a second

sas City-based Kevin S. Kelso,

Must-See Exhibit at MMFA

branch in early 2019. The

CPA, PC, PA, effective September 1, 2018. This addition brings

The artwork on view in For

how art possesses the power

branch was the result of a merg-

to address cultural issues, to

er between HOPE and Tri-Rivers

Jackson Thornton to more than

Freedoms: Citizenship in Art

enlighten and to reflect on

Federal Credit Union. Regions

200 employees, serving clients

(on display at The Mont-

shared values.

has agreed to donate the bank’s

from seven offices in Alabama,

gomery Museum of Fine

former McGehee Road branch

Tennessee and Kansas. The

to help HOPE expand its pres-

merger will offer Kelso’s clients

ence in Montgomery. HOPE’s

expanded depth of services

expansion into Alabama allows

while maintaining the personal-

the CDFI to broaden access to

ized service for which the firm

critical financial tools in under-

is known.

ribbon-cutting ceremony and

served communities – work that won HOPE the 2018 Wall Street Journal Financial Inclusion Challenge.

Tile & More Warehouse Celebrates Grand Opening Known most recently as Restore

Country Cottage Opens New Therapy Room

N Decor, Tile & More Warehouse represents a partnership

Arts through November 18) explores four fundamental

The exhibit is in conjunction

and essential rights, the free-

with a larger program, For

dom of speech and freedom

Freedoms | The 50 State

of worship, both protected

Initiative, which hopes to gen-

in the First Amendment of

erate greater participation in

our Constitution, along with

our American democracy by

freedom from want and

examining the various points

freedom from fear. Drawn

of view that different artists

from the MMFA Permanent

bring to each of these “Four

Collection, the art included in

Freedoms.” As a part of this

For Freedoms: Citizenship in

initiative, MMFA is partici-

Art continues to explore the

pating in one of the largest

“Four Freedoms” listed above.

creative collaborations in U.S.

These works depict various

history.

Country Cottage Assisted Living

between the local owners who

& Memory Care in Montgomery

have served the community for

recently opened Serenity Place,

more than 14 years with another

a multisensory therapy room

long-tenured flooring enterprise

for those living with Alzheimer’s

to deliver first quality flooring

ASU Celebrates “50 Under 50”

and other forms of dementia.

at incredibly low prices for

Alabama State Universi-

Director of Development and

The Serenity Place therapy

consumers in Montgomery and

ty celebrated a group of

Executive Director of the ASU

room incorporates all senses

surrounding areas.

distinguished alumni recent-

Foundation. “The awardees

ly in a gala event. The “50

were selected based on their

except taste through soothing

interpretations, demonstrating

music, water bubbles, lights,

Tile & More Warehouse, based

Under 50” Class for 2018 was

professional accomplishments

aromas, different textures

in Montgomery, sells first quality

presented awards before a

and/or their support of their

and speakers, which create

and in-stock ceramic and porce-

cheering crowd. “We are so

alma mater. The awards are

vibrations inside a couch, chair,

lain tile, stone, mosaics, luxury

excited to present this new

a means of honoring them as

bench and sitting area.

vinyl tile (LVT), laminate, engi-

class and to welcome back

ambassadors of the University

neered wood, cabinetry, and

those who were a part of

and recognizing their accom-

It creates a sense of tranquility.

countertop design services with

the first class last year,” said

plishments in their chosen

Some of the benefits include an

quick fulfillment at great values.

Jennifer Anderson, ASU’s

professions.”

85 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

The Jackson Clinic Adds Rheumatology to Specialties The Jackson Clinic recently added rheumatology to its already extensive lists of specialties. Jacquelin Chua, M.D. is now accepting patients in her office at 1722 Pine Street, Suite 801. Rheumatology is concerned with the evaluation and treatment of patients with autoimmune conditions and diseases of the joints. Because many of these conditions can be painful, it is important to work with a dedicated specialist to help diagnosis and treat

Balch & Bingham’s Dishes Out “Drumstickpalooza” In late August, Balch & Bingham hosted Drum-

chicken recipe based upon criteria ranging

stickpalooza, a friendly competition between

from crispiness to the “Did you want seconds?”

local fried chicken restaurants benefiting the

factor. Event attendees also weighed in to vote

Montgomery Area Food Bank. The event in-

on the “crowd favorite.” As part of the event,

cluded a blind tasting of five of Montgomery’s

Balch & Bingham made a contribution to The

favorite fried chicken eateries. Judges (in-

Montgomery Area Food Bank.

cluding a professional chef) ranked each fried

rheumatic diseases. Some of the most common diseases Dr. Chua treats include rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, lupus, Lyme disease, gout and fibromyalgia.

AUM Offering New Study Abroad Program Auburn University at Montgomery and the Organization for Tropical Stud-

Huntingdon Offers Evening Degree Programs Through the Huntingdon College Evening

training program in the state that is tuition free;

ies have partnered to provide students

prospective candidates are only required to

with semester-long study abroad pro-

pay a $50 application fee.

grams in Costa Rica and South Africa. AUM will offer five programs in collab-

Bachelor’s Degree program, students can now earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Business

With the energy surrounding Montgomery’s

oration with OTS. “AUM is excited to

Management, available at all sites, or Criminal

downtown Innovation District, the coming MG-

be the new U.S. academic home for

Justice, available at selected sites. Because

MWERX Innovation Hub and more, the capital

the Organization for Tropical Studies.

the classes meet only one night a week in five-

city’s presence in the tech sector continues to

This opens up so many opportunities

week sessions, the accelerated course format

grow, and this partnership is further proof of

for our students to study biology,

requires student preparation and work outside

the city’s increasing role in cyber innovation.

environmental science, GIS and lan-

of the formal course structure. Class size is

Led by Rod Frazer, former CEO of Enstar and

guage and culture in Costa Rica and

kept small, ranging from 12 to 20 students, and

co-founder of The Frazer Lanier Company,

South Africa,” said Dr. Chelsea Ward,

the personalized attention and teaching for

CodingSolutions was born from a passion to

Distinguished Teaching Professor and

which Huntingdon College is known are part

encourage and retain new programming talent

Head of the Department of Biology

of the Evening Studies programs as well as the

in the state of Alabama and in his hometown

and Environmental Science at Auburn

traditional day program.

of Montgomery. Before the first cohort even

University at Montgomery.

started training, CodingSolutions already had

Partnership Launches Tuition-free Training for Software Developers

partnerships to train top talent and connect

Under the new AUM/OTS partnership,

them with forward-thinking companies looking

the programs will offer a compre-

Montgomery-based startup CodingSolutions

to hire engineers in the state. Due to the

hensive introduction to field biology,

has partnered with MotionMobs to launch a

numerous development preferences among

conservation policy and global health

brand new training program to prepare top

companies, CodingSolutions accepts program-

in a diversity of ecosystems. The

development talent from Alabama universities

mers with backgrounds in various program-

partnership builds on OTS’s more than

for career positions with innovative compa-

ming languages and frames.

50 years of excellence in graduate education.

nies across the state. It is the first developer 86 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT ING N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

SERENITY APARTMENTS AT BELL OAKS

THE GARDENS OF WATERFORD

3160 Bell Oaks Circle, Montgomery, AL 36116 334-281-4523, www.serenityapartmentsatbelloaks.com Sybil Herod, Property Manager Apartments; Retirement Communities

3920 Antoinette Dr., Montgomery, AL 36117 334-288-2444, www.affinitylivinggroup.com Ms. Coretha Slayton, Administrator Nursing Homes/Assisted Living

GRANT JOY LEARNING

JUICY SEAFOOD

7010 Fulton Court, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-452-5151, www.grantjoylearning.com Ms. Kelley Maltby, Director Tutoring Services

2690 Eastern Boulevard, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-676-2202 Mr. Ken Chen, Owner Restaurants; Restaurants-Seafood

PYE BAR & TAMMY’S MARKET

EASTERSEALS CENTRAL ALABAMA

9559 Vaughn Road, Pike Road, Alabama 36064 334-676-3711 Jessica Griffin and Tammy Griffin, Owners Catering; Foods-Specialized; Restaurants

2185 Normandie Drive, Montgomery, AL 36111 334-387-3256, www.easter-seals.org Ms. Debbie Lynn, Executive Director Community Services; Agencies 87 MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

COSA HOPE RECOVERY COMMUNITY CENTER

HOPE CREDIT UNION

3447 McGehee Road, Suite F, Montgomery, AL 36111 334-262-1629, www.cosancadd.org Shereda Finch, Executive Director Associations/Non-Profit; Community Services/Agencies

400 Arba Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-834-7483, www.hopecu.org James Dill, Manager Credit Union

J.W. BEVERETTE’S SOUL FOOD

PHOENIX REHABILITATION & HEALTH SERVICES

1172 South Decatur Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-313-2457 Teresa Jackson, Owner Restaurants-Southern

1615 Windsor Hill Court, Montgomery, AL 36016 334-239-9316, www.phoenixrehab.com Robert Kohn, Executive VP Operations, SE Physical Therapists

CHILD PROTECT, JEANNE L. DRUMMOND CHILD PROTECT ANNEX

STRAYER UNIVERSITY

935 S. Perry St., Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-1220, www.childprotect.org Jannah Bailey, Executive Director Associations/Non-Profit

79 Commerce Street, Suite C, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-523-3670, www.strayer.edu Eric Walker, Associate Campus Director Colleges & Universities 88 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


89 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


90 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS New Members W ELCO ME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

ADVER TISING-OUT D OOR

Mashburn Outdoor Nate Slota 2555 Marietta Highway, Suite 102 Canton, Georgia 30114 877-413-3683 www.mashburnoutdoor.com

BU S IN E SS BR O K E R S , C L E A N IN G S E RV IC E S , CO N S U LT IN G , FAC IL IT Y M A IN T E N A N C E / S E RV IC E S , IN V E ST M E N T A DV IS O R S /BR O K E R S , JA N ITORI AL S E RV IC E /S U P P L IE S

APART M ENTS

Elevate 50/50 Anna Peak 5050 Bell Road Montgomery, Alabama 36116 334-288-5655 www.elevate5050.com

NOVEMBER NEW MEMBERS

Office Pride Commercial Cleaning Services Brandon Wilson 2905 Westcorp Blvd, Suite 211 Huntsville, AL 35805 334-513-1610 www.ad.officepridefranchise.com/area-developer-troy-hopkins-team/ C H IL D C A R E C E N T E R S

ARC HITEC TS

Wible Barber Architects Jennifer Barber 529 South Perry Street Montgomery, Alabama 36104 334-819-6461 www.wiblebarberarchitects.com ASSOCIAT IONS/NO N -P R OF I T

Friendship Mission, Inc. Lawana Hawkins 312 Chisholm Street Montgomery, Alabama 36110 334-356-6412 www.friendshipmission.org Gathering of Eagles Foundation Chris Dauer 225 Chennault Circle Maxwell AFB, Alabama 36112 817-692-6880 www.goefoundation.org Mercy House Ken Austin 2412 Council St. Montgomery, Alabama 36108 334-398-0467 Service Dogs Alabama Frances McGowin 8365 Mobile Highway Hope Hull, Alabama 36043 334-676-3733 www.ServiceDogsAlabama.org

ASS OCIAT IO N S /N O N - P R O F IT, COM M U N IT Y S E RV IC E S / AG E N C IE S

COSA Hope Recovery Community Center Shereda Finch 3447 McGehee Road Montgomery, Alabama 36111 334-262-1629 www.cosancadd.org B A N KS

ServisFirst Bank-Peppertree W. Bradley Armagost 7256 Halcyon Park Drive Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-223-5600 www.servisfirstbank.com Woodforest National Bank #8125 Shawn Daley 6495 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-279-7341 www.woodforest.com B OUTI Q U E & SA LO N , G IF TS & S P E CIA LT Y- R E TA IL

Vivian O’Nay Charla Baumgardner 3500 Wetumpka Highway Montgomery, AL 36110 334-290-5268

91 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Academy of Early Learning Montgomery Daina Galloway 4453 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, Alabama 36109 334-356-0016 www.theacademyofearlylearning.com/ montgomery CO N S U LT IN G S E RV IC E S

Pruett, LLC Michael Pruett 182 Boykin Lakes Loop Pike Road, AL 36064 334-590-6696 www.pruettllc.com E V E N T-V E N U E

The Elms of Coosada Janet Waldo 360 Lindsey Road Coosada, AL 36020 334-285-3567 www.elmsevents.com F IN A N C IA L S E RV IC E S , M O R TG AG E O R IG IN ATO R , M O R TG AG E /F IN A N C E

American Mortgage Service Company Kelley Hall 3576 Quad Parkway Montgomery, AL 36116 334-603-8082 www.kelleyhall.americanmortgage.com


CHAMBER NEWS New Members W ELCO ME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

NEW MEMBER?

NOW WHAT?

Being a member of the

FOO D S - S P E C IA L IZE D, R E STAU R A N TS , C AT E R IN G S E RV IC E S

PYE Bar Jessica Griffin 9559 Vaughn Road Pike Road, Alabama 36064 334-676-3711 H OT E L S /M OT E L S

IN T E R IO R D E CO R ATO R S , F U R N IT U R E , G IF TS & S P E C IA LT Y- R E TA IL ,

Best Western Nicole Grant 5225 Carmichael Road Montgomery, Alabama 36106 334-277-6000 www.bestwestern.com

Peridot Home Emelyn Sullivan 1041 East Fairview Avenue Montgomery, AL 36106 334-356-3191 www.shopperidothome.com

CON S U LT IN G , CO N S U LT IN G S E RV IC E S

L E G A L S E RV IC E S - AT TO R N EYS

Wynwood Consulting Katherine Webb P.O. Box 240186 Montgomery, AL 36117 334-324-6816

Jackson and Scott, LLC Mark Scott 6737 Taylor Circle Montgomery, AL 36117 334-244-1934

Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce is more than just paying dues and getting a decal. We provide connections, resources and solutions that help you grow your business and help grow Montgomery’s economy! GET CONNECTED TODAY. www.montgomerychamber.com/events

Cornerstone Managing General Agency, Inc. Greg Wren 4209 Carmichael Road Montgomery, AL 36106 334-356-1502 www.cornerstonemga.com

I N FO R M AT IO N TE CH N O LO GY F IR M S

DSD Laboratories, Inc. John Edwards 60 Commerce Street, Suite 850 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-491-4030 www.dsdlabs.com Wireless Internet Solutions Experts, LLC Joseph Woolard 60 Commerce Street, Suite R 100 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-452-3636 www.wisebroadband.com I N S U R A N C E CO M PA N IE S / S E RV IC E S

AIMS Ashley Aaron 4240 Carmichael Road Montgomery AL 36106 334-272-4409

92 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

M AC H IN E RY- M F R .

Premier Tech Chronos Phillip Edwards 3101 Hayneville Road Montgomery, AL 36108 334-261-2700 www.ptchronos.com P H YS IC IA N S - P H YS IC IA N S, FAC IA L CO S M E T IC S U R G ERY

Alabama Surgical Arts Sami Nizam 4590 Woodmere Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36106 334-271-2002 www.alabamasurgicalarts.com P H YS IC IA N S - S P E C IA L IZE D, P SYC H IAT R ISTS

River Region Psychiatry, LLC Kristy Savage 7085 Sydney Curve Montgomery, AL 36117 334-270-5502 www.riverregionpsychiatry.com


PR OPER TY M A N AG E M E N T

River Region Rentals, LLC Lydia Taylor 8329 Crossland Loop Montgomery, AL 36117 334-625-0677 www.riverregionrental.com R EAL ESTATE-I N V E STM E N TS

Massey Properties, LLC Jim Massey 531 E. South Street Montgomery, AL 36101 334-481-1919 R EHABILITATION S E RV I C E S , SPEEC H THER A P Y

We Care Therapy Services Dana Johnson 1286 Perry Hill Road Montgomery, AL 36109 601-543-8457 R ESTAURANTS , A M E R I C A N , R ESTAURANTS -S OUTH E R N , C ATER ING SERV I C E S

Potz and Panz Gourmet Cafe Demonica Pugh 2547 Lower Wetumpka Road Montgomery, AL 36110 334-676-3343 R ESTAURANTS , R ESTAURANTS -P I Z Z A

Cicis-Atlanta Highway Mike Hassel 6633 Atlanta Highway Montgomery , AL 36117 334-230-7990 www.cicis.com R ESTAURANTS -S OUTH E R N

J.W. Beverette’s Soul Food Teresa Jackson 1172 South Decatur Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-313-2457


Numbers reflect August 2018 over 2017.

Economic Intel TOURISM LODGING TAX

#1

AL METRO CITY YTD in occupancy percentage

+ 1%

SUPPLY

DID IT AGAIN!

MGM LODGINGS

OCCUPANCY RATE

+ 8%

DEMAND

TAX COLLECTIO

OV E R $ 1 M

EACH MON

68%

+25%

NS

OVER AUGUST 2017 Source: Smith Travel Research Report, City of Montgomery

HOUSING

ONTHS TH THE LAST 5 M

AUGUST 2018

WINGS UP!

+ 15%

LOTS OF FULL SEATS!

TOTAL HOME SALES

30,922

WAY + 26% U P

PASSENGERS

$168,237 AVERAGE SALE PRICE

OVER AUGUST 2017

2,076 TOTAL HOMES LISTED FOR SALE Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate, Montgomery Area

Source: MGM (Montgomery Regional Airport)

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR

+ 1.6% CIVILIAN

LABOR FORCE

173,831

+ 1.6% EMPLOYED

LABOR FORCE

4.2%

166,593 UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

SECTORS GOING UP

LABOR FORCE

INFORMATION

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

+ 4.5% + 3.9%

MINING, LODGING & CONSTRUCTION

+ 1.6%

TRADE, TRANSPORTATION, WAREHOUSING & UTILITIES

+ 1.4%

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

94 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Post Office Box 79 Montgomery, AL 36101

96 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Montgomery Business Journal - November 2018  
Montgomery Business Journal - November 2018