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EVENT & PARTY PLANNING

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL VOLUME 9 ISSUE 6 / NOVEMBER 2017

MBJ

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

THE CAPITAL CITY’S BEST KEPT SECRET

GOOD DEEDS: RIVER REGION U N I T E D WAY

PLUS:

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

2018 EXCLUSIVE GUIDE


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK WILLIAMS

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CONTENTS NOVEMBER 2 0 17

THIS ISSUE: 10 51

TechMGM

CHAMBER NEWS

Event Planning Guide

08 Events 66 Connect 68 Connect Resource Guide

24 Powerhouse Q&A

70 Members on the Move

27 Member Profiles

72 Business Buzz

34 GiveBack

81 Members in the News

38 Regional Impact

86 Ribbon Cuttings

42 Small Business Briefcase

91 New Members

46 #MyMGM

94 Intel

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MBJ

THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT Randall L. George DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS Jina Miniard

EXPLORE MEDIA PUBLISHER Pam Mashburn

MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Stewart Kornegay

ART DIRECTOR Erika Rowe Tracy

DESIGN Emily Cobern, Heather Cooper, Shelby Berry

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORIAL Jennifer Kornegay, Wendi Lewis, Racheal Lunn PHOTOGRAPHERS Bryan Carter, Nick Drolette, Robert Fouts, Brooke Glassford, David Robertson Jr., Eric Salas, Frank Williams ON THE COVER Montgomery’s downtown skyline keeps getting brighter, as does the city’s future, thanks to the current tech boom. By Eric Salas / ESvignettes.com ADVERTISING exploreMedia / 334-578-7810 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Post Office Box 79, Montgomery, Alabama 36101 Telephone: 334-834-5200 • mbj@montgomerychamber.com © Copyright 2017 exploreMedia and the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved. MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MISSION STATEMENT

Committed to exceptional service, the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce works to improve the economic well-being of the business community and enhance the quality of life of the area through the creation and preservation of jobs. The Montgomery Business Journal (USPS NO. 025553) is published bi-monthly by exploreMedia for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334) 834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Periodicals Postage Paid at Montgomery Alabama, 36119+9998, USPS NO. 025553. Volume 9, Issue 6. POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 79, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36101, or email mbj@montgomerychamber.com. The Montgomery Business Journal welcomes story ideas from its readers. Email to: editor@montgomerychamber.com. Subscriptions are a part of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce dues structure. Subscriptions and bulk subscriptions can also be purchased per year at www.montgomerychamber.com/mbjsub.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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CHAMBER NEWS

Events +

MA RK YO UR C A L E NDAR S FOR THE SE UP COMING C HAMBE R E V E NTS

60 Minute Coffees & Business After Hours These popular networking events are the perfect place to exchange business cards and meet potential customers.

NOV

5-11

11/16

Military Appreciation Week

Business After Hours Sponsor and Location: Reinhardt Lexus

Every year, River Region businesses

take part in a public display of support for the Military, both active duty and retired. Held in

12/6

conjunction with Veterans Day, “Freedom Isn’t

60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: Henig Furs, Inc.

Free” is a regional media campaign that promotes special offers and discounts for military

1/10

personnel and families. Presenting Sponsor: Caddell Construction

NOV Eggs & Issues with Ronald Burgess,

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LT General, US Army, Retired,

60 Minute Coffee Sponsor: Agape of Central Alabama Location: The Family Life Center of Vaughn Road Church of Christ, 3800 Vaughn Road

7:30-9am at the RSA Activity Center Connect with local elected officials and the

1/25

business community and gain insight on the

Business After Hours

issues pertaining to cyber security.

Sponsor & Location: The Vance Law Firm

Presenting Sponsor: Gilpin Givhan

JAN Alabama Update with Governor Ivey at

145th Annual Meeting

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the RSA Activity Center Be informed! Engage with business leaders and elected officials during this highprofile event and gain important insight to key legislative initiatives and the challenges of the legislative session. Presenting Sponsor: Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C.

New Lunch Format December 7, 12-1:30pm

All Ears //

at the Renaissance Montgomery

BizTalk MGM -

Hotel and Convention Center

The Official Podcast for Small Business

Register now for the largest and most

in MGM Every Monday at 6pm on WVAS

anticipated business event of the year.

90.7FM, Montgomery Chamber staff plus

Presenting Sponsor:

host Melissa Johnson Warnke from the

Capell & Howard P.C. Attorneys at Law

Alabama Retail Association talk with business experts on topics that are important to small

www.montgomerychamber.com

businesses. Sponsor: MAX Credit Union

/145annualmeeting

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Upcoming Workshops

BUSINESS Resource Center

Business 101: Start it Up! December 5, 19; January 2, 26; from 8:30-9:30am at the Chamber’s BRC No registration required. $10 fee. Establish a strong foundation for your new or existing business. Topics covered include locating financing, writing a business plan and finding expert advice. Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC The 15 Invaluable Laws of Growth: Start Your New Year’s Resolutions NOW! December 13, 2017 from 11:30am-1pm at the Chamber’s BRC John Maxwell shares how to develop yourself and become the person you were created to be. Presented by Douglas Watson, Executive Director of Teach to Lead, a Certified Member of the The John Maxwell Team. Payroll Tax Update December 14 from 8:30-11:30am at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel $85 fee for members. Learn the latest on payroll tax filing requirements, 1099 reporting and more. In Partnership with Jackson Thornton John Maxwell’s 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership January 11 from 11:30am-1pm at the Chamber’s BRC This event will focus on three of the 21 leadership lessons from the corresponding book. Brought to you by: Teach To Lead LLC Cyber Forum January 31, 2018 from 7:30-9am at the Chamber’s BRC This quarterly business breakfast provides networking and information sharing within one of the region’s fastest growing economic sectors. Presenting Sponsor: Alabama Power Company


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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


T H E C I T Y ’ S B E S T- K E P T S E C R E T

Montgomery’s past is packed with world-changing events, and now, the city is making history again, this time in an unexpected way: Montgomery is quickly making a name for itself as one of the Southeast’s most vibrant and most strategic “cyber cities.” BY J E N N I F E R S T E WA R T KO R N E G AY

By leveraging its large collection

the world. It is also one of only two

of resources and pooling talent,

military cloud datacenters for all of

Montgomery is growing into a tech

the DoD,” Greene said. Plus, the

hub that will foster innovation and

Program Executive Office for Busi-

create jobs, Joe Greene, the Cham-

ness Enterprise Systems develops,

ber’s VP for Military and Innovative

acquires and sustains all of the ap-

Strategies, explained. “We have

plications for the Air Force globally,

unique assets here in the River

and the 26th Network Operations

Region,” he said. “There is no other

Squadron operates and defends the

place in the country that has all of

Air Force network worldwide. “With

the Department of Defense (DoD)

these missions combined with Air

assets we have located in one spot.

University and the recently estab-

That makes us the perfect location

lished Air Force Cyber College, you

to become a cyber leader for the

have a convergence of Air Force

Air Force and to create a common

tech and cyber talent from all over

DoD/commercial infrastructure that

the world gathering right here,”

becomes a virtual sandbox for cyber

Greene said.

innovation.”

“Bandwidth and IT INFRASTRUCTURE are

MORE THAN MILITARY Both Maxwell AFB and Gunter play major roles in the Air Force’s and

becoming THE FIFTH UTILITY, and Montgomery is

our entire military’s cyber defense and cyber strategies efforts, and the effects of this spill over the bases’ borders into the rest of the area. “The Defense Information Systems Agency datacenter, located on Maxwell-Gunter, stores all of the electronic medical records for the entire Department of Defense. It is the largest Oracle database in

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ready to meet that demand. Soon, ALL COMPANIES will be in the technology business, regardless of what they sell or the services they provide.” - Lora McClendon, Chamber Director, Military & Federal Strategies

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK WILLIAMS

TechMGM:


In the private sector, the new RSA Datacenter, which is one of the most sophisticated in the country, and

cording to Greene, in several ways.

the MGMix Internet Exchange are

“Because of groups like hackMGM,

crucial pieces of the equation. Plus,

we have the opportunity to develop

add the city’s five universities and a

these ideas into new businesses

strong city-county partnership, and

and new jobs,” he said. “And the

the stage is set for what Greene and

internet exchange aids current and

others believe will be some exciting

existing businesses by significantly

progress in the next few years,

reducing what they pay for internet

progress that will bring positives

services.” The internet exchange

part of the Chamber’s long-term

to everyone in the area. “All these

is already delivering cost savings.

strategy to strengthen the city’s

elements give us a huge knowledge

Several State of Alabama entities

future. Stay up to date with

base and a lot of capability, and

have connected to the exchange

the latest news in tech and find

put together, they create a pretty

and cut their spending by two-thirds,

powerful synergy in terms of cyber

translating into nearly $14,000 a

out how to connect with the

and technology,” said Carl Barranco,

month saved.

the City of Montgomery’s new Cyber Coordinator. “The way we are using

Jason Asbury, President of Warren

them will come into play for every

Averett Technology Group, shares

one of us, for all of our day-to-day

Greene’s sentiments on the

activities as it moves forward. It is

bottom-line benefits of MGMix. He

not just the military; it’s not just busi-

offered a few other positives too. “It

ness. It’s for everyone.”

has already brought more players to the area as it relates to carrier

THE BIG PICTURE

service options. More provid-

The picture Greene and Barranco

ers equal more competition and

paint is impressive, but how do all

lower prices with better and faster

these things bring new businesses

services. Big name providers like

and help existing companies? Ac-

Hurricane Electric and Akamai have

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

YO U A R E H E R E The growth of the tech industry and the advancement of Montgomery’s cyber capabilities for the benefit of both businesses and residents are

area’s tech community and tap into its many resources at

TECHMGM.COM.


seen the value of our exchange, and they

It’s about more than saving money.

have invested in our technical community.

Thanks to the exchange, the capacity for

This brings faster access to the rest of the

data transmission is higher too, since com-

world, and it better secures our Internet

panies and organizations are directly con-

experiences,” he said. “Additionally, as the

nected to the backbone of the internet.

exchange grows, there will be increased

“Your business can run faster, download

opportunities for low-cost data sharing

and upload information quicker, deliver

and storing of Open Source information.

content faster and therefore, be more

These benefits are the beginning of a new

efficient,” Greene said. In some instances,

era of IT jobs and services that the River

it offers increased security as well.

Region will have to offer to our residents and businesses. Our future is bright and

Intangibles like an improved image for

the MGMix is adding to the shine.”

the city can become tangible when that image bolsters economic development

Carl Barranco, City of Montgomery Cyber Coordinator

Tobias Mense, Chief Information Officer at

efforts. The ability for greater capacity

Auburn University at Montgomery, the first

should translate to new jobs. “That alone

university to join the internet exchange,

will help us attract companies in the

echoed Greene and Asbury as he outlined

advanced manufacturing industry here,”

why AUM connected. “We believe things

Greene said. Barranco agrees. He sees

like the exchange will positively impact the

MGMix and the city’s other tech resources

city, and we want to play a role in moving

as essential to the city and county’s con-

Montgomery forward,” he said. “We also

tinued success in wooing new businesses

wanted to take advantage of benefits it of-

here and spurring expansion in existing

experiences, so it helps tourism,

fers, like cost savings and faster speeds.”

industry. “If you aren’t attuned to what is

which brings in tax dollars.

AUM is now using Hurricane Electric, one

going on in technology, you are slipping

It really is a win-win for us all.”

of the new companies that came to Mont-

behind,” he said. “You have to stay ahead

gomery because of the internet exchange,

of this game, and it is changing fast. We

and has seen its costs go down by more

know that real economic impact and job

than 80 percent.

creation are based on us explaining and

“All of these advancements let us improve services that the state, county and city provide its residents. Things like open data, where the public has more access to information. It will also help us improve our visitors’

LIGHTNING SPEED AUM is already looking into upgrading from 1 gig to the MGMix’s 10-gig pipeline. “This move will upgrade our speed 10 fold, and our bill will still be 60 percent less than what we paid before the internet exchange,” said Tobias Mense, Chief Information Officer at AUM. The acceleration will let the university do so much more, including enhanced research. “It opens the door to more collaboration on research with Tobias Mense, Chief Information Officer at AUM

“We believe things like the exchange will positively impact the city, and we want to play a role in moving Montgomery forward.”

other universities that are heavily data driven, things we might not have been able to do before,” Mense said. And it’s not all work, no play, especially for AUM students. “If you stream movies or are into gaming, you now have better entertainment options on campus,” he said. “It’s a little thing in the big scheme of things, but it matters and affects our students in a good way.”

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


promoting the city’s tech resources. That’s how we’re making ‘TechMGM’ a reality.” The MGMix hit 100-gigabyte capacity in June; an impressive and important milestone. But Barranco stressed that there’s no time to rest. “We now need to attract more internet service providers, more content providers and then connect more businesses to the exchange,” he said. And while the initial focus has been on businesses, all the benefits trickle down. “All of these advancements let us improve services that the state, county and city provide its residents,” Barranco said. “Things like open data, where the public has more access to information. It will also help us improve our visitors’

Joe Greene, Chamber VP, Military and Innovative Strategies

“With Air University and the recently established Air Force Cyber College, you have a convergence of Air Force tech and cyber talent from all over the world gathering right here.”

experiences, so it helps tourism, which brings in tax dollars. It really is a

hackMGM: W H O / W H AT ?

hackMGM is a “community of creatives, makers, developers and doers, working together to build a better Montgomery.” Its more than 100 members and contributors are using technology to help the city and county reach its potential.

win-win for us all.”

we see your story 13

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

fifthadvertising.com


Cyber COLLEGE

With 90 percent of its personnel coming to study at Maxwell AFB’s Air University (AU) at some point, AU is

Maxwell-Gunter AFB carries a crucial IT workload

ing as weaponized cyber power. While there are no fulltime Cyber College students yet—its courses are

for the entire Air Force and

currently electives for ACSC and Air

The Department of Defense.

War College students—that will soon

Here are just a few of the

clearly the center of education for our

notable things going on

nation’s Air Force. It now has a new

behind Gunter’s gates:

tool to train our current and future air-

change. The students who’ve participated and are currently taking its courses spend a good percentage of their time doing research and getting papers published.

men: the Cyber College. In planning stages since 2014, and just becoming “official” this past June, the Cyber College is moving the Air Force from

Home to one of largest data

“Cyber [and cyber

the industrial age to the information

centers and the largest Oracle

age and equipping its students with

security] is a wicked

database in entire world, which

the operational knowledge and stra-

stores medical records

problem that can’t

tegic insights to fight potential cyber

for the entire DoD.

attacks.

be solved, but only made better.” - General

“Two and a half years ago, General Kwast had a vision for starting the Cyber College because while the

Only one of two military cloud

United States is a premier cyber

data centers for the entirety of

actor, it has been slow to integrate

the DoD and its functions and

cyber power into the national level of

handles highly classified data.

Steven L. Kwast

But the Cyber College isn’t only play-

thinking,” said Commandant Clinton

ing defense. The topics and ideas

Mixon, the College’s senior military

being studied there relate to and can

member. “Other countries like Russia

aid in the use of more technology

and China have put much more

for “smart cities,” things Montgomery

emphasis on cyber power,” added Dr.

officials and Chamber leaders are

Pano Yannakogeorgos, the dean of the Cyber College.

Home to the Business Enterprise Systems Directorate, which purchases and develops

Its reach already extends far beyond

all software used by

Maxwell. Yannakogeorgos and his

non-weapons-based functions

team instruct the air forces of other

and departments of the Air

countries—like the Royal Air Force—

Force, things like finance,

and global organizations like NATO.

medical and logistics.

pushing for like smart city vehicles, optimized trash collection and more. The city and county are also able to take advantage of relationships the Cyber College has formed with major tech players like AT&T, HP, Microsoft and Verizon. Simply the existence of the Cyber

With the realization that, as Kwast

College in Montgomery is a positive;

often says, “Cyber [and cyber secu-

its presence here contributes to the

rity] is a wicked problem that can’t

goal of being known as a “tech-hub,”

be solved, but only made better,” the

Home to the

Cyber College is doing more than

26th Network Operation

educating the military, it’s also trying

Squadron that manages

to teach our country in general how

the business side of the Air

industrial cyber processes can be

Force’s worldwide network.

hacked and how the results of such an attack would be just as devastat-

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

and its courses will bring external and internal expertise to Maxwell-Gunter. “We are advocates for the city and talk about its tech focus and capabilities everywhere we go,” Yannakogeorgos said.


“The cyber college is taking all of the educational brilliance that is out there [in the Commandant Clinton Mixon, Cyber College senior military member

Dr. Pano Yannakogeorgos, Dean of Cyber College

The college is currently working with academic institutions like Auburn University, Harvard, MIT, and NDU and wants to work with local schools like AUM and Alabama State University in future. “We’d like to send our students to local universities to take advantage of the expertise of instructors there and not have to offer duplicate courses,” Yannakogeorgos said. “And we’re brainstorming ways to allow university students, state and local government officials to come and participate in seminars on base, but it may not be possible to do so from a security perspective.”

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Air Force]. It is taking all that content, and it is knitting it together in a way where cyber education can come to every airman at the right time in their career with the right content for that individual.” - General Kwast touting Cyber College

in the October 2015 Montgomery Business Journal

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Training

Our Tech Workforce

I N N OVAT I O N DISTRICT

While connecting existing tech resources and

IT talent, and many times these jobs go unfilled.

creating the system needed to support their

“In the past, there have been jobs we have had

Several Montgomery

growth and expansion is important, as these

to recruit from outside

businesses are working

efforts create an economic catalyst and new

of the River Region for

together with the city to create

job opportunities follow, we’ll need more and

because we don’t have

an innovation district down-

more people to fill them. Building a qualified

enough people with the

town. “It’s a way to look at

tech workforce is a primary focus of the plan

right skill sets, certifica-

some of the problems we all

put into action by the city, county, The Chamber

tions and/or degrees to

face and how we can solve

and their partners. “We need to provide the

satisfy all the require-

them by bringing our local, re-

right education for this movement. What the

ments,” Stokes said.

gional and even national talent

city is doing now with Cyber Coordinator Carl

“We are fixing that.”

together,” said Joe Greene, VP

Barranco at the helm is bringing all of these

Military Affairs and Innovative

pieces together—all our tech businesses,

CYBER ACADEMY

Strategies at The Chamber.

other government entities, our universities and

According to Stokes, the solution is to com-

Maxwell-Gunter—and it’s putting us on the right

plement our education system by offering

track,” said Tobias Mense, Chief Information

additional certification courses and also offering

Officer at AUM. “These efforts are creating

continuing education within our current univer-

spaces for young people to hone their tech and

sities as well as with alternative methods. That’s

programming skills and that is really positive,”

exactly what the Cyber Innovation Academy,

he said. AUM is doing its part to get its students

which held its first classes last spring, is doing.

C OW E R X 4 6 ,

Charisse Stokes, President of Tidal IT Solutions

ready too. “We’re looking at our offerings to

Hosted by The Chamber, the Academy helps

a developer-centered

make sure we have the relevant degrees and

area companies get their employees up to

co-working space for the tech

ensuring our students have bright employment

speed on IT, which is continually changing. It

market, opened its doors on

prospects,” he said.

helps companies fill their IT needs, but also

Commerce Street this summer

helps workers advance in their careers, and

and is the cornerstone of the

FILLING A NEED

innovation district. Owned

Charisse Stokes, president of Tidal IT Solutions

a job gain the skills and certifications they need

by Boyd Stephens, who

and part of the Chamber cyber innovation team,

to compete. “We’re working closely with area

also owns Netelysis, a local

echoed Mense. “We need a better qualified IT

employers to find out what the demand is so we

network security services

workforce here,” she said. Some of the River

can teach what they need,” Stokes said.

company, it offers spaces for

Region’s largest companies, like healthcare

those working in the IT world

providers and Hyundai, are always looking for

helps its students who are currently looking for

The Academy has partnered with the Alabama

to rent. In addition, it’s hosting tech training classes and workshops in a “no pressure” environment. AS PART OF ITS

IMAGINE A GREATER MONTGOMERY INITIATIVE, The Chamber has joined forces with the city and county to put a “TechMGM/Cyber Strategy” into place. Like spokes on a wheel, every component is equally important to move the plan forward. Boyd Stephens, Owner of Netelysis

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Community College System and Trenholm State Community College, but is also looking to work with ASU, AUM and Troy University too and use those institutions’ expertise to help it teach coding and programming courses, software and app development, and networking courses. “Those could be taught to augment and supplement larger degree programs,” Stokes said.

“The collaboration within the River Region to include the city, county, chamber, universities, business entities and the DoD brings together opportunities and capabilities unlike any other areas of the country. The MGMix, Akamai

MAKING THE GRADE Currently, several different course structures are being offered, and

and RSA Data Center partnership provides the technology

Stokes pointed to the Academy’s flexibility. “We want to adapt to the

foundation for Cybersecurity companies to confidently

needs of the market and respond quickly to meet those needs,” she

move to Montgomery and know they will have always

said. In June, the first 15 Cyber Innovation Academy students finished

available, high-performance internet access.”

their first course, an eight-week CompTIA Security+ class. In July,

- MIKE MORDAS, MANAGING PARTNER AND

when Academy leaders went back to businesses and asked again

CHIEF RELATIONSHIP OFFICER, IPT ASSOCIATES

what they needed, they found that many didn’t want to wait eight weeks for employees to finish a course. “So now, we’re offering some four-week options,” she said.

coming available locally and helps businesses already here, hire here, The Academy is already seeing growth, and that’s good news, as

instead of bringing others in. Plus, when new businesses look to come

Stokes stressed. “It is a huge piece of the tech and cyber revolution

here or existing businesses get ready to grow here, we are a compo-

happening here,” she said. “It arms our workforce to get the jobs

nent they can look to for help in filling the jobs they need to fill.”

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


W H AT T H E T E C H S C E N E M E A N S TO YO U

OT H E R WAYS A DVA N C E S I N T E C H H E R E C A N H E L P YO U :

Small Biz Benefits The Air Force’s Cyber College is bringing its

1

message and expertise to area businesses and

3

D OW N TOW N , F R E E W I - F I I S N O W AVA I L A B L E , T H A N K S TO T H E

residents. Yannakogeorgos and Mixon often give presentations at local social clubs and are men-

R I V E R F R O N T D E V E LO P M E N T

COSTS FOR

toring high school students at The Montgomery

INTERNET SERVICES ARE

Academy, Saint James School and Wetumpka

G O I N G D OW N .

High School through the Cyber-Patriot Program that tests the students in hacking competitions. They have also partnered with the Chamber to

+

2

host a Cyber Opportunities Forum where they

F O U N DAT I O N ’ S PA R T N E R S H I P W I T H W I N D C R E E K M O N TG O M E R Y.

discussed topics like cyber security and how

Plus, businesses’ and the public’s

small- and medium-sized businesses in Montgomery can do more—and more lucrative— business with the government.

A S M O R E T E C H C O M PA N I E S

access to all kinds of information thanks

COME IN, THE DEMAND FOR

to improved “open data” will be faster

PRODUCTS AND EXPERTISE

and more accurate than ever before.

F R O M LO C A L S M A L L

THINK CONSTRUCTION PERMITS AND I N T E R AC T I V E C H A R T S .

B U S I N E S S E S TO S E R V E T H E M G O E S U P.

L A R G E S T I T E M P LOY E R IN OUR AREA: The Department of Defense

D llars and Sense H OW T E C H A D D S U P

5,000 Annual attendees at

Air Force Information Technology and Cyber Power Conference (AFITC) (the military’s largest IT conference)

$750 Million $5-7 Million Annual Economic impact of AFITC

19

1,825

Number of IT/cyber contract jobs supporting the IT missions at Gunter

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

Economic impact of IT/cyber jobs in the River Region associated with Gunter

Several State of Alabama entities have connected to the exchange and cut their spending by two-thirds, translating into nearly $14,000 a month saved.


S M A L L B U S I N E S S S O LU T I O N S :

IMAGE COURTESY OF RSA DATACENTER.

Safe

& Sound

With businesses’ increased reliance on

growing, but only those who truly have

technology, there are specific threats that

the needed expertise will continue

make IT security paramount. One major

to thrive. “The problem with properly

challenge is data loss. Nobody wants to

managing risk is that a vast array of tools

lose information, but for a small business,

and security layers are required to do the

a tech issue that destroys data can lead

job right,” he said. “Business communi-

to business interruption and revenue loss

ties have a real and urgent need for IT

that could prove catastrophic. Michael

service providers with the expertise to

Lange of ABS Technology, a local full-

secure systems and prevent data loss.”

range IT services company, offered this advice. “Small businesses need to have

SMALL BIZ—BIG TARGET

strong data backup procedures in place,”

Shaw Technology, a full-service man-

he said. “We strongly advocate for both

aged service provider with emphasis on

onsite and cloud-based backup process-

security, disaster recovery and long-term

es. Many customers we’ve worked with

infrastructure reliability, is currently the

learned too late that their backup was

largest privately owned IT firm in the

Information Transport Solutions is just

not working or was inadequate requiring

state. According to owner Brad Shaw, all

one example of a business that has

an attempt to recover critical business

businesses face tech challenges related

expanded here thanks to the MGMix

data. And it is important to have a plan

to security, but small businesses can be

and the RSA Datacenter. The full-ser-

in place so that if something happens to

at particular risk. “Most wouldn’t think

vice provider of technology solutions

the business’ physical building, the data

it, but small businesses are targeted by

is headquartered in Wetumpka and

is protected and recoverable enabling

hackers and ransomware more than any

opened an office in downtown Mont-

the business to resume operations in a

other businesses because the assump-

gomery last year, as president Quincy

reasonable time frame.”

tion is that they don’t have the correct

P OW E R F U L P R O O F

Minor explained. “We provide support

IT in place and for the most part, that is

for the MGMix, and that’s one of the

INCREASED THREATS

main reasons we opened our Montgom-

Jason Asbury, President of Montgom-

ery office,” he said. “All the connectivity

ery-based Warren Averett Technology

He stressed that this lack of prepared-

for the exchange goes through one

Group, pointed to how “security-cen-

ness is not due to incompetence. “Gen-

piece of equipment; we provide back-

tric” IT services for businesses have

erally, small businesses are formed by

end support for that equipment as a

become and outlined why. “Technology

entrepreneurs that specialize in a particu-

service to the City of Montgomery, one

has advanced so significantly with the

lar area. They are constantly making sure

of our clients. Equally as impressive

advent of virtualization and better public

to take care of their customers. But while

and important as the internet exchange

and private cloud offerings,” he said.

they’re handling all of that, the world

though is the RSA Datacenter. It is the

“Subsequently, more and more data is

continues to change and demands rise,”

first of its kind in the state, and that

being generated, and that has resulted in

he said. “The solution is having someone

is big deal for our area. Before it was

greater opportunities for the ‘bad guys’

take care of IT for you, so you can take

running, we had most of our equipment

to hack, steal and wreak havoc on oper-

care of your business. We secure the

in Atlanta, which was the closest. ITS

ations. Security and risk management are

network so they don’t have to worry with

was one of first to move into the new

at the forefront of concern for business

these things. It’s not like it used to be in

datacenter.”

leaders.”

the past where IT was a luxury. A strong

true,” he said.

IT group, these days, is the difference This is one reason companies like Warren Averett Technology Group are

20

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

between thriving and struggling.”


TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR ANY INDUSTRY ENCRYPTION INFORMATION SECURITY AGREEMENTS

INDUSTRY COMPLIANCE

SECURE INTERNET

VULNERABILITY SCANNING ENDPOINT MANAGEMENT

Don’t let your business be a statistic. To find out how we can bring technology solutions to your business, call us at 800.759.7857 or visit our website. Alabama | Florida | Georgia

| www.watechgroup.com 21

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

TECHNOLOGY GROUP


Integrated Computer Solutions staff (left to right): Thomas Brazil, Chief Digital Officer; Steve Goldsby, President & CEO; Chip Schuneman, Chief Operating Officer; Tyler Hedges, Chief Financial Officer

Air Force as well as many state

Maxwell-Gunter AFB.

governments and commercial

IMAGE COURTESY OF INTEGRATED COMPUTER SOLUTIONS.

“We are the prime contractor for a nearly $70 million contract in support of DISA,” Schuneman said.

enterprises throughout the

ICS will continue to grow and

country. “We were doing cyber

progress alongside the growth

security before it was cool,”

and changes of technolo-

joked Chip Schuneman, ICS’

gy in general. “Technology

Chief Operating Officer.

has evolved immensely,” Schuneman said. “Everyone

Keeping data and communica-

is connected all the time. That

tions confidential and safe is

was not the case 20 years ago,

how the Defense Information

so that has moved us from a

Systems Agency (DISA), one

centralized to a de-central-

of the key components at

ized approach to serving our

IT Success Story

Gunter, came into being, and

customers’ tech platform.” But

ICS was “intimately involved”

in the end, traditional business

in its founding and remains

wisdom still applies, even

Montgomery-based Integrat-

the Chamber’s Small Busi-

involved. In fact, DISA is one

for cutting-edge companies.

ed Computer Solutions (ICS)

ness Incubator. In the last two

of ICS’ largest clients. “We

“The fundamental thing about

celebrated 20 years last March,

decades, ICS has experienced

are the prime contractor for a

ICS is that we are a services

and this veteran-owned small

tremendous growth, bringing

nearly $70 million contract in

company, so the quality of the

business is one of the city’s

its IT consulting, application

support of DISA,” Schuneman

services we provide are what

brightest IT sector success

development and cyber secu-

said. The company also serves

matter, regardless of technol-

stories, a truly pioneering

rity services to its many clients,

Montgomery’s two largest em-

ogy and the tools we use,”

company that launched out of

including both the DoD and the

ployers, state government and

Schuneman said.

Contact Justin Gordon / 334-244-8700 / jgordon@cpctek.com 22

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


23

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


VESTOR IN

OFIL

Q&A

E

FOY TATUM Foy Tatum is carrying on a family tradition at Halstead Construction, the commercial construction company his grandfather founded and where he serves as managing member. The bulk of the company’s work is outside of the River Region, giving Tatum a different perspective on Montgomery’s strengths. When was Halstead started? My grandfather started

What do you love about what you do? It is reward-

the company in 1946, and my father bought the horizontal

ing to see something grow, see something build up out of

construction side of the company in 1976. My sister and I

the ground and become a building. I love finishing them and

bought dad out in 1998. We were a vertical [buildings and

seeing tenants get placed in them. I enjoy knowing that I’m

such] and horizontal [roads and bridges] construction compa-

giving my employees a living for them and their families. With

ny until my grandfather died, and dad started moving us into

our 15 employees, that probably represents approximately 45

real estate development as well as horizontal construction.

people that this business supports. That is important. And it is a family business, so I want to keep it going for that reason.

What are your principal duties? I am the day-to-

We have a great reputation that I want to keep and enhance.

day operations manager, and I really do a little bit of every-

Recently, we went back into Louisiana to do some work after

thing, including a lot of sales. I continue feeding the company

not having worked there in five years, but we were able to

with work. On the development side, I am the numbers guy.

very quickly pick up and open accounts with the same folks we’ve worked with in the past thanks to our reputation. That

What does Halstead build? Since the early 1970s,

is very gratifying.

we’ve been in a lot of repeat business. We work with fastgrowth companies all over the 14-state Sunbelt area, and

What are your interests outside of work? I hunt

these companies build multiple units a year. For example,

and fish and have a farm in Bullock County. I also have a

we’ve worked with CVS, building many of their stores, for

farm in Kentucky where I hunt. My wife and I like to travel,

the last 22 years. But that train is actually about to get to the

especially now that all of our kids are grown. Our greatest joy

station, so to speak, in our market. We are now changing our

is our grandchildren; we have eight. I’m also heavily involved

focus some. We’re doing a lot for Dollar Tree in the Carolinas;

with the Boy Scouts and with my church, Woodland United

they have just started a freestanding store program. We’re

Methodist.

also in the real estate development business, so we try to couple the development with our construction capabilities and build our own products.

What are your thoughts on the business climate in Montgomery? Very little of our business is actually in Montgomery; even though we built and developed

Number of employees: We have 15 in the company.

probably 130 CVS stores statewide, the bulk of that was out-

Nine are in this office, and others are outside personnel. We

side of the city. But we’re still based here, and I live here. I like

have an office in Charlotte, North Carolina, as well.

what is going on downtown. I like the fact that we have some amount of the population that wants to be urban; I think that

With your company doing work all over the Southeast, why stay based here? That’s easy. It’s

is healthy for any city. I credit our leadership in Montgomery

home. I was not born here, but I was raised here, and all my

We’re involved because it is so proactive. When you work in

family is here. Some of my kids work in the company. We are

as many different markets as we do, you see what a strong

probably, at most, a 12-hour drive from the farthest place we

chamber does versus a what a weak chamber does, and it’s

need to go for business or a short plane ride, so we don’t find

so clear that we have an amazing chamber here compared to

it hard having our central office here at all.

many other cities our size in the Sunbelt.

24

for making all of that happen. And that includes the Chamber.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

IMAGE BY ROBERT FOUTS

PR

PO W E RHOUSE


Sweet Home We are probably, at most, a 12-hour drive from the farthest place we need to go for business or a short plane ride, so we don’t find it hard having our central office here at all.

“I enjoy knowing that I’m giving my employees a living for them and their families. With our 15 employees, that probably represents approximately 45 people that this business supports. That is important.” - Foy Tatum

25

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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INDUSTRIAL 8/29/17 12:06 PM


M EM BER profile

TANYA MORGAN Outside the store:

An accident brought Tanya Morgan, owner of You and Me

I spend a good bit of my free time with

Boutique, home to Montgomery, and her son’s

family and friends. I try to visit my sons

encouragement prompted her to open her shop just a

when time allows and will soon be enjoying

year ago. Her quick success brought on another move,

both my daughters’ company at the

this time to a new location in Zelda Place, where she’s

boutique. I also have three grandchildren

excited to bring girls and women cute outfit and

I try and see as much as possible.

accessory options at an affordable price.

What are You and Me Boutique’s primary products? We offer boutique girls clothing as well as women’s plus-size clothing, which tend to be hard to find in this area. In addition to clothing, we carry custom jewelry, handbags, shoes and gift items. Of note is that we keep our clothing and accessories priced well. We want our customers to be able to come into the store and buy an outfit of quality without breaking the bank.

What inspired you to open your boutique? The opening of You and Me Boutique actually was my youngest son’s idea. I had always worked as a Human Resources Manager, and after my husband, who was active military, was killed in a car accident last year, I needed a change and decided to move from Fort Benning, Georgia, back to Montgomery. Once I moved back, I wasn’t sure what to do, so he suggested my daughter, who had just graduated from Troy University, and I open a boutique. My daughter and I have always loved shopping and felt like Montgomery could use a place to shop for items you just can’t find anywhere else.

To what to you attribute your success? I owe most of my success to a great group of girls who help run the day-to-day. They have fun, laidback personalities and love helping customers, which makes the shopping experience more enjoyable. We also have a rewards program that allows customers to build up points for future discounts.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? It allows me to either meet new people or catch up with PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

old friends on a daily basis. It’s a great feeling to know people enjoy coming into your boutique to find that outfit for either a special occasion or just to see what new items are available. OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2016 shopyouandmeboutique.com 27

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER profile

A special staff:

DR. SAMUEL BUSH

One way Dr. Bush helps to reduce children’s anxiety is with the office’s specially trained therapy dog, Poppy, an Australian

When Dr. Samuel Bush was looking to start his practice,

Labradoodle. Poppy is hypoallergenic, and she’s always either in

he considered locating in several cities. He and his wife

her office or on a leash with a trained staff member. If someone is

made a fact-finding visit to Montgomery and were quickly

afraid or does not want to be near Poppy due to allergy concerns, she happily hangs out in her office.

sold. Bush Pediatric Dentistry just opened in July.

What brought you to Montgomery? My wife and I are both from Andalusia, Alabama. After spending several years in Birmingham for school, we decided we would like to be closer to family. Something kept drawing us to investigate Montgomery, so we came down here to check out the city. Someone recommended we eat at Derk’s Filet and Vine, and we were sold. Everything has fallen into place better than we could have imagined.

What inspired you to become a dentist? I have always been familiar with dentistry because my uncle is a dentist. However, I grew up thinking that I wanted to be a lawyer and take over my dad’s practice in Andalusia. Prior to my senior year in high school, I went to a summer program at Samford in Birmingham that emulated law school. I hated it. As soon as I got back to Andalusia, I began dating a girl (now my wife) whose father is a dentist. He invited me to shadow him and from that point on, dentistry is what I have been doing.

What are Bush Pediatric Dentistry’s primary services? All types of pediatric dental services. We see children from birth all the way through high school. Our most common types of services are exams, cleanings, restorative procedures (fillings) and extractions. We are trained to treat any child, including those with special needs. As a pediatric dentist, I am also certified to perform more complex cases under general anesthesia.

What is your patient-care philosophy? The main goal is to build trust. People take their children’s health care seriously, and we want parents to feel comfortable when visiting. If a parent trusts us, their child will be able to sense that and it will help to alleviate anxiety.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

How fun it is. Most people have not had great dental experiences, so we try to make it as fun and as exciting as possible. However, the most rewarding thing is helping a child when they have been hurting. bushpediatricdentistry.com 29

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BE R profile

DR. DARREN WOODLING Using modern technology to enhance an old technique at his company iNFUSION Cryotherapy & Laser Center, Dr. Darren Woodling is helping folks of all ages and walks of life live a more comfortable life.

What is your background? I graduated from Auburn University then continued pursuing my degree at Life University where I got my Doctor of Chiropractic.

What is cryotherapy? The simplest explanation is it is a modern-day ice bath like athletes use to help reduce pain and inflammation. It is beneficial for just about everyone. We have a variety of people ranging from young athletes to retirees all looking for a non-surgical and natural way to cure their everyday aches and pains.

How did you get interested in cryotherapy?

Making Work Count: The best honor I can receive is seeing the difference we are making in people’s lives. We have patients with MS, fibromyalgia and arthritis that are desperate for relief from their constant pain and being able to provide that for them is truly a blessing.

A friend and colleague of mine in Florida introduced me to it. He had one in his practice and was explaining how beneficial it was as a standalone or being paired with other treatments we offer such as chiropractic adjustments or the MLS Laser Therapy. The more I researched it, the more I saw where colleagues all over the country are introducing it to their practices as another way to help people in a noninvasive manner.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? I love helping people; it really is such a joy. I am also extremely blessed with an amazing staff. We view each other as family, and we have a lot of fun at work. I know I couldn’t help the people I help without them, and I appreciate them every day.

What’s on the horizon for iNFUSION? We have already expanded to two locations, Montgomery and Troy, as well as a mobile unit that is available for events and gatherings. We also just added IV Therapy to our Montgomery location in September. This allows

What are your interests outside of work? I enjoy working out and spending time with my family at the lake. OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE JANUARY 2016 infusioncryoandlaser.com

30

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF INFUSION CRYOTHERAPY.

us to treat patients from the inside out.


31

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

THE DATA CLOUD GROUP The Data Cloud Group specializes in providing leading-edge technology solutions to transform business organizations into more efficient, effective and automated operations.

WHEN WAS THE DATA CLOUD GROUP FOUNDED? 2011 LEADERSHIP: Bill Kirkpatrick, Founder/Solutions Sales Architect and Scott Eastin, Principle Developer Architect

WHAT ARE THE DATA CLOUD GROUP’S PRIMARY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES? We specialize in solutions integration in the realm of automation, including Identity Management, which is the automation of the processes from human resources’ onboarding/off-boarding, application access, governance, active directory, email, self-service portals, single sign-on, managing employee entitlements and cloud solution synchronization. An example is: HR inputs a new employee, and a new employee username is created; the employee receives their user account, email address, badge access, application access, group memberships, etc. without any additional employee actions. Our partner products for this include Microsoft Identity Management Server and SailPoint. We are also focused in Robotics Processing

From left: Bill Kirkpatrick, Founder/Solutions Sales Architect and Scott Eastin, Principle Developer Architect

Automation (RPA) and integrated AI “Artificial Intelligence.” RPA provides the use of software robots/virtual robots to assume the manual labor of IT and business-tasked operations. As businesses embrace adopting RPA to handle processes, it allows them to not only transform their mode of repetitive tasks but also streamline their workflows.

HOW MUCH HAS THE NEED FOR YOUR SERVICES INCREASED OVER THE LAST 10 YEARS? The advancements of technology are increasing daily. In the past few years, the growth of our service opportunities has increased steadily as affordability has increased, and cloud integration has driven the need for automation and governance.

WHO ARE YOUR MAIN CLIENTS? A large segment of our clients comes from the U.S. government sector with an equal balance of end-customers in private-sector industries including health care, manufacturing, retail, finance and education. Data Cloud Group’s customers range in size from 3,000 employees to

WHAT MAKES THE DATA CLOUD GROUP STAND OUT FROM OTHER SIMILAR BUSINESSES?  When we first started, we were trying

well over 100,000 employees.

to compete against large, established consulting businesses and software

WHAT IS THE COMPANY’S BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY?

companies. What we learned is that their reach was greater than ours on

“Moving technology forward” is our mantra, and we are adept

certain solutions. What evolved was a focus on cutting-edge technologies

advisors who are here to help you transition to leading-edge

that were in demand but required scarce skill sets in coding and infra-

solutions without risk. We also aim to hire the smartest tech peo-

structure. That has been our key to success. Now those large partners

ple we know who have dynamic personalities.

call us.

678-458-7986 / DATACLOUDGROUP.COM 33

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack

ALL IN

/ by WENDI LEWIS

The River Region United Way is doing amazing work in our community,

IMAGES COURTESY OF RIVER REGION UNITED WAY

but they need help to keep making a difference. When it comes to bettering our area, it’s everybody’s job.

Last year, The River Region United Way raised almost $4.5 million to be distributed and used for the betterment of our community.

Ask anyone in the River Region, and they’re likely to be familiar

for senior citizens and counseling for abuse victims, sponsor

with the United Way. They probably have heard of the annual

at-risk youth to participate in after-school programs, or provide

campaign, and they know that the United Way raises money

shoes and a warm winter coat to those in need.

to help people in their community. But there’s a bigger picture, and the River Region United Way (RRUW) is constantly growing and changing to work more effectively. It’s about seeing a need, and making sure others see it, too. “It’s easy in today’s society to be apathetic about the things we’re oblivious to,” said Jimmy Hill, President and CEO of RRUW. “That’s what we’re doing – looking for the problems and the people who need help, and helping others see these needs. The

Additionally, the RRUW is actively involved

Helping One Another “People don’t give to the United Way – They give to help people.” - Jimmy Hill

in hands-on projects in River Region communities, primarily through the annual Day of Action. RRUW staff and community volunteers together assess what is needed and organize to address that need. In 2017, the Day of Action provided 150 volunteers to help 135 children improve reading skills through a summer reading program and provided 1,500 books. “We’re broader than just fundraisers,” Hill

mission of the United Way is not just our

said. “People don’t give to the United Way – They give to help

mission, it’s everyone’s mission. It is everybody’s job.”

people. We are trying to make that more visible, taking the Of course, one avenue to help is through financial contribu-

focus off a dollar number goal and instead, sharing with people

tions. The RRUW works with more than 40 affiliate agencies to

stories about how their contributions make a difference in the

address what Hill describes as the “basic building blocks for

individual lives of people who are their neighbors.”

good quality of life,” – health, education and financial stability. Donations support programs that provide hot, nutritious meals

34

In fact, the annual giving campaign no longer has a set financial

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


GIVEBACK

BRIEFS

goal. “We want to raise every dollar we can

community for a long time and they want to

to impact every life we can. That’s the goal,

give back. Younger people look for more

rather than a certain number,” Hill said.

immediate results. “They still want to make a

A Helping Hand

difference in their community; the way they

Women from the Junior League of

Anytime is a good time to give to the United

go about it is different, but a lot of these

Montgomery participated in a sum-

Way, said Jimmy Stubbs, President and CEO

problems take a long time. There’s not a

mer-long community house build with

of River Bank and Trust, who is serving as

quick fix for poverty,” Hill said. Hill says this

non-profit House to House (H2H), a

the 2017 Volunteer Campaign Chair. He has

increases the responsibility of the RRUW to

project that was finished in August.

been involved with the United Way since

be a good steward of the donations.

Beginning in June, members of the Junior League of Montgomery spent

1986, when he first became a giver after seeing a video about United Way at his

RRUW staff and community volunteers

their Saturdays helping construct a

job. “A person’s needs are not identified by

assess community needs. Volunteers go to

bunkhouse for large church groups

a particular month or particular day in the

the counties, interview agencies and find

that come to Montgomery to work

month,” Stubbs said. “Most of our affiliates

problems or areas that need help. Then

with House to House and Common

are assisting people 365 days a year. Cam-

the UW acquires the human and financial

Ground Montgomery. “Our volunteer

paign dollars allow them to help people 365

resources to address those needs. Next,

time and donations will make it pos-

days a year. Any time is a good time to give.”

the agency works to allocate the dollars

sible for others to give their time and

generated through donations. These funds

talents to our community,” said Jennifer

support 90-plus programs at more than 40

Rogers, the Chair of the Junior League

agencies. Finally, there is the accounting.

of Montgomery’s House to House

Each program is carefully reviewed for

volunteer group. “This is our first year

success of efforts.

working with the organization, but I hope we have laid the foundation for

United Way support and engagement

a long-term relationship.” In addition

varies from organization or business to

to the volunteer manpower, the Junior

business, Stubbs said. “Employers may ask

League of Montgomery also awarded

themselves, can I sacrifice my employee’s

House to House a $10,000 grant to

time as a volunteer? You may not be able

fund the construction.

to sacrifice those man-hours, but you can give your employees the opportunity to hear the United Way story and then let them

Back-to-School Benefit Capitol Hill Healthcare opened its

decide if they want to contribute some of

doors this past summer to help chil-

their money back to United Way,” he said.

dren get the school year off to a great

“From a monetary perspective, no gift is too

start. For the eighth year, the long-

The traditional United Way donor was

small,” Stubbs said. “When you contribute

term care facility gave away school

recruited through a workplace giving cam-

dollars back to the United

supplies and treated parents and kids

paign, like the one Stubbs first saw. Today,

Way, it doesn’t matter if

the workplace is more fluid. There are more

it’s $1 or $1,000, that

Be a part:

people who work remotely. People are more

dollar is going to be

Read on for more about

transient in the workforce, changing jobs

used. Beyond that,

RRUW’s Day of Action

more frequently.

you look at the 40

RRUW volunteer and a student working together.

agencies. There are The mindset of younger givers also is

literally hundreds of

different. Older people look at it as paying

ways to volunteer with

their “civic rent.” They’ve been part of a

them.”

or learn more about how you can help at riverregionunitedway.org.

to some family fun. Capitol Hill’s Back to School Bash provided 200 totes filled with age-specific school supplies to the children and grandchildren of employees. The bash featured games, balloon animals, face painting and crafts. “Our employees give so much of themselves to our residents. and we just want to give back to them in a meaningful way whenever we have the opportunity,”

The Chamber wants to share the good news of businesses doing good. Please send story ideas for Giveback to jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

35

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

said Capitol Hill administrator, Sharon Baker.


36

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


GiveBack Putting Plans Into Action Most people are familiar with the fundraising arm of the River Region United Way, but RRUW President and CEO Jimmy Hill says that’s only half the story. A critical part of the United Way’s mission is service in the community through its corps of volunteers. “People understand that we are a fundraiser for many other organizations, but we also do community impact projects, called the Day of Action,” Hill said. “These provide direct service in the community.” The Day of Action 2017, held in June, involved 150 volunteers who gave 2,336 hours to help 135 children with a summer reading program through the Community School Initiative in partnership with E.T. Davis Elementary School. The goal of the program was to provide

Donna Cooper volunteering during RRUW’s Day of Action 2017.

children with an opportunity to develop a love of reading, to foster

students. An additional 75 backpacks with books were donated to

parent-child interaction by encouraging parents to read with their

three other United Way agencies serving children.

children, and to improve reading retention for K-5 students returning Donna Cooper, Senior Vice President/Public Funds Manager for

to school after summer break.

BBVA Compass, participated in the Day of Action. She says she was Volunteers worked with school staff to provide a variety of children’s

particularly excited about partnering with Davis Elementary, as she

activities, including scavenger hunts for library treasures, charac-

was a student there 50 years ago. “Reading is fundamental,” she

ter parades, games like “Book BINGO,” and storytelling and craft

said. “It opens pathways to opportunity and learning, and inspires.

projects. In addition, each child received a backpack containing

What a great opportunity to partner with these children and keep

10 books of their very own. The project provided 1,500 books to

the pathway open to summer learning. I loved this project!”

37

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Regional Impact

WETUMPKA’S DOWNTOWN AWAKENING Following the lead of its neighboring cities and countless others around our region, Wetumpka has recently made some serious progress on its plan to restore and reinvigorate its quaint downtown.

The Coosa River is one of Wetumpka’s prettiest assets. Images courtesy of Carter Photo Design.

Wetumpka has been abundantly blessed by Mother Nature, both with natural beauty and with one of our region’s most interesting geological features, its massive and ancient meteor crater. But there’s more to this small city northeast of Montgomery than a bubbling, rocky river and tree-covered hills. Wetumpka’s historic and charming downtown is undergoing a revitalization

“Having the center of our city thriving is important for the rest of the city. The community pride and connection it fosters, as well as the economic impact, are positives everywhere.”

effort aimed at increasing the city center’s “economic vitality.” Main Street Wetumpka,

us a plan and invaluable resources to aid us

future. “Downtowns are places that cannot

a local chapter of the non-profit Main Street

in executing that plan. Using our remarkable

be replicated—not their historic nor their

Alabama organization, is spearheading the

stories, places and natural resources, we

cultural value. So we’re taking what used

work, and is marching forward with its mis-

are fashioning downtown’s identity by taking

to be, bringing it back to life and making it

sion to bring energy and investment back to

its historic charm and character and making

a vibrant, enjoyable space again,” she said.

the downtown business district.

it relevant to how today’s community works.

“And having the center of our city thriving is

It’s a comprehensive approach to revitalizing

important for the rest of the city. The com-

Main Street Wetumpka’s Executive Director

our downtown in a sustainable and practical

munity pride and connection it fosters, as

Jenny Stubbs explained how being a des-

way, yet one that’s our own.”

well as the economic impact of its business-

ignated Main Street community benefits the

es, are positives everywhere.”

city. “First, it means we have something spe-

She went on to outline why what she and

cial to work with,” she said. “Second, it gives

her team are doing is vital to Wetumpka’s 38

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

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Regional Impact Slow and Steady One point Main Street Wetumpka stresses is that implementing the right kind of improvement downtown takes time. It’s fitting then that one of its recent branding projects is focused on a snail. The new Tulotoma Snail Trail is the result of a crowd-funding challenge issued by the National Main Street organization. Wetumpka was one of only 15 Main Street groups out of five states chosen to participate. The idea was for each spot to motivate its residents to pitch in and donate the needed resources to conceptualize and produce a “cultivating place” project.

Image courtesy of Carter Photo & Design.

Tough Snail!

But prior to that, the city had already committed to downtown by commissioning a redevelopment plan for the area that included the public’s input and ideas on what they’d like to see. When Main Street Wetumpka got up and running, it began helping with the plan’s implementation. One piece calls for making the area more pedestrian friendly by adding crosswalks at intersections and planting trees along sidewalks.

freshwater snail living in the Coosa River and is the first mollusk ever to make a comeback from the brink of extinction.

Image courtesy of Main Street Wetumpka.

revamping one of the oldest areas of town; it was just founded in 2016.

Tulotoma magnifica is a

Corey Worden with Beneath the Bark created the 300-pound Tulotoma snail carving.

Improvements have already been made at Gold Star Park on the edge

The Snail Trail will be a series of “snail stops” at downtown

of downtown.

Wetumpka’s historic spots and sites. With enhanced signage and aesthetic improvements, the hope is that people will be

Additional pieces of the plan call for the rehab of the area’s old and

encouraged to linger and learn more about Wetumpka’s story.

historic buildings to make them usable again as well as helping further promote existing businesses and recruiting new ones.

The first “snail stop” on the Trail was completed in September 2017 and features a 300-pound, hand-carved wooden sculpture

It’s also got other projects in the works, things to better “brand” down-

of the Tulotoma snail placed at the Elmore County Museum, and

town and highlight the progress, but every step the organization takes

is dedicated to the history of the snail for which the project is

is rooted in Main Street Alabama’s proven, four-prong approach that’s

named: Tulotoma magnifica.

focused on sustainable, long-term solutions and growth instead of “quick fixes.”

Main Street Wetumpka raised more than $11,000 in just a few weeks to create the Trail, and Stubbs believes the project will

By focusing on organization, well thought-out design, promotion and

lead a deeper understanding of what Wetumpka offers by

economic vitality, Main Street is dedicated to preserving downtown’s

uncovering its interesting history and using art to share its story

heritage and existing architecture while walking it into the future. It has

while also adding to the downtown experience.

formed a separate committee for each aspect of its approach to ensure it carries out each facet of the master plan with careful consideration.

But what’s the significance of a snail? First described in 1834,

“A big part of what we are doing is giving our local businesses and res-

the same year the city of Wetumpka was founded, Tulotoma

idents the tools and encouragement they need to get involved in this

magnifica is a freshwater snail living in the Coosa River. Between

process and showing them how and why to work with us,” Stubbs said. 40

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


its discovery and more modern times, much of the snail’s habitat Image courtesy of Carter Photo & Design.

was destroyed, and in 1991, it was placed it on the endangered species list. To save the species, scientists recommended dams on the Coosa to increase water flow to create conditions more like the snails’ natural habitat. Once this was done, the snail’s population numbers went up, allowing it to move off the endangered list. The change in the dams benefited more than the snail. The extra water also made paddling on the Coosa more fun and led to an increase in river-based tourism for the area.

Always a Classic

This dual win for Wetumpka made the small aquatic animal an

Wetumpka’s Jasmine Hill Gardens is a profusion of sweet-smell-

easy choice when Stubbs and her team looked for an appropri-

ing, myriad-hued blooms almost all year long. For the last several

ate mascot. “The tale of the snail is just one of the things about

decades, it has invited visitors to explore its 20 acres on paved

Wetumpka’s past that has been hidden, and these are the things

trails set among hundreds of species of flowers, shrubs and trees,

we want to put in the spotlight to increase civic pride,” she said.

planned and planted to ensure a lovely show of nature each season. But there’s much more than garden greenery here. A bit of ancient

Be A Part of the Plan Want to learn more, stay up to date on progress and get involved with Main Street Wetumpka? Visit mainstreetwetumpka.com.

41

Greece shares space with the flora. The many stunning sculptures representing mythical gods and Olympic heroes sprinkled among the branches, leaves and petals include replicas of some of the most famous classical statuary like “The Dying Gaul” and “Venus de Milo.” Learn more and see what’s blooming when at jasminehill.org.

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Small Business Briefcase +

PACK ED WITH TIPS AN D TOOLS TO BEN EFIT YOUR BUSINESS

BIZ BLOGGING: STEPS TO GET STARTED IS CREATING CONTENT FOR YOUR BUSINESS’ AUDIENCE REALLY WORTH YOUR TIME? These days, plenty of businesses have a blog on their website, but all too often, its new posts are few and far between and when the content is there, it doesn’t provide any real “take-aways.” We asked David Allred, Agency Principal and Managing Director at Stamp, an advertising agency in Montgomery, how he and his company are doing biz blogging right and why content creation is a tool every business needs to be using.

IS “BUSINESS BLOGGING” OR DIGITAL CONTENT CREATION OF ANY KIND RELEVANT FOR SMALL BUSINESSES? Absolutely. The bottom line is that technology continues to disrupt how more and more products and services are

HOW CAN A BUSINESS GET STARTED?

You want to transform your position as a generalist in your work to that of a specialist. There has been a real shift to “specialist,” especially in professional service firms, but this move is also affecting retail and other industries. The first step in this process is to determine what you can be an expert at and then determine if there is enough demand for you to thrive as a specialist within that market. Think about a space where you have a body of work and a passion for that type of work. It’s important to look at your current client base to find what you’ve done the most of, and done well, so you have folks who will give you references.

being sourced and consumed. More people are searching for both on the internet. And with this change comes a generation of decision makers that will more easily find exactly what they need and in many cases for a better value. Getting your arms around this reality and harnessing it to your advantage vs. ignoring it will ultimately be the difference between your

EXPERT ADVICE:

DO IT RIGHT:

• Become a thought leader in your spe-

cialty by creating relevant content (often not about you, but presented by you). For instance, writing info-heavy articles.

organization thriving or dying.

• Publish the content on a website that “There has been a real shift to ‘specialist’ over generalist, especially in professional service firms, but this concept is also affecting retail and other industries. Every business should be figuring out how to deal with

reinforces you as an expert. For example, we created a separate website, stamp-

destinationmarketing.com, for our work with Destination Marketing Organizations where we publish articles with information relevant to that market.

• Develop a strategy to drive traffic to

with outbound emails, and we spent months creating the right database. The main goal is to create content that is not only relevant to the audience you are trying to reach but desired by that audience. And, by using email, you can check and see if you’re succeeding by checking analytics. Finally, you want to convert

that website by distributing the content

the inbound traffic you generate to your

you’ve created for it. We’re doing that

website to generate new business.

this shift.” – David Allred 42

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


EXPERT ADVICE:

WORTH THE EFFORT:

It takes a lot of time and work to do it right. You can’t

MAKING THE MOVE

just forward articles. You need to write/create your own original content and make sure you know what

As you begin to establish yourself as an expert, you will need to be able

audience you are writing for so your content reflects

to demonstrate that you have experience in this area. Having a passion for

that. It may be one audience, or it may be several

the type of work you are going to pursue is important too. You will do better

different ones. The process can be long, and again, it

work (and be happier in general) if you are passionate about that work. At

takes work, but now is the time to be proactive and get

Stamp, we’ve specialized in and positioned our team as experts for Desti-

ahead of all the changes happening and coming. The

nation Marketing Organizations (DMO), like convention and visitor bureaus.

longer you wait to start, the harder it will be for you to

We already had some large clients in this category, and we like that work, so

establish yourself and succeed as an expert/specialist.

that has become a focus, and we’re actively creating content that is of value to that audience to help us gain more DMO clients. It’s not all about new

OUR EXPERT:

business though. Specializing also makes you more valuable to this segment of your current clients because you better understand their industry and its specific challenges, issues, etc. It also makes you more efficient, since you

David Allred, is the

don’t have to learn the business of every new client in this segment. You just

managing partner of Stamp

have to learn their specific details. It is important (and reassuring for many)

Idea Group overseeing the

to understand that pursuing the “expert” or “specialist” label and marketing

marketing agency’s oper-

your expertise DOES NOT MEAN you will immediately stop doing or selling

ations as well as partici-

your current offerings. Especially as you begin this process and likely for a

pating in account planning

long time, it’s not necessarily “what you will do;” it’s “what you are going to

and the firm’s business

proactively say you do.”

development efforts.

43

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


44

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

INFORMATION TRANSPORT SOLUTIONS

One of the River Region’s most respected IT companies, Information Transport Solutions (ITS) is playing a key role in Montgomery’s burgeoning tech sector, as President Quincy Minor explained.

WHEN WAS ITS FOUNDED? ITS was founded in 1993 and incorporated as ITS in 1998.

WHAT ARE ITS PRIMARY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES? We are an IT solutions company. ITS provides services and products for wired and wireless networks, voice over IP, compute and storage platforms, disaster recovery solutions, engineering services, cabling services, network monitoring and much more.  

WHO ARE ITS’ MAIN CLIENTS? ITS is a diverse company servicing many markets. Our roots are in K-12 education, but we are on track to see half of our revenue come from state and local govern-

ITS President Quincy Minor.

ment, higher education and commercial customers.

HOW MANY EMPLOYEES DOES ITS HAVE? 95  

WHAT SETS ITS APART FROM SIMILAR COMPANIES? ITS is truly a customer service company. We have not changed and do not plan on changing our mission statement: “Customer service is our passion. Technology with integrity is our mission.” Combine this with a heavy focus on engineering, and some of the best engineers in the industry, and ITS is different from our competitors. Many of our customers have been with ITS for more than a decade.   

WHAT IS ITS’ “SECRET TO SUCCESS”? When your customer is happy and sees value in your service, they will continue to do business with you. ITS’ secret to success is to provide 100-percent customer satisfaction; they get what they pay for.  

IS ITS GROWING? We are, and we attribute this growth to diversification into other verticals. We are also expanding our business further into Florida and Georgia.   

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR ITS? Expansion of our solutions like WiFi-enabled school buses, small cell wireless solutions and expanded hosted solutions for wireless, voice, storage and compute. ITS is also interested in economic and community development. We believe technology is an equalizer. This assumes the infrastructure is in place to support these interests. ITS will continue to find ways to expand network offerings in Alabama and assist with projects like the Montgomery Internet Exchange.

335 JEANETTE BARRETT INDUSTRIAL BOULEVARD, WETUMPKA / 334-567-1993 / ITS-NETWORKS.COM 45

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MyMGM

COMING HOME

/ by WENDI LEWIS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BROOKE GLASSFORD

What makes a location “home?” For some, it means a place where they were born and raised; a place they might leave for a time but is always in their heart and on their mind. For others, home is a feeling and a revelation and about finding a way to make their mark. For these three young people, Montgomery is home in every sense, and they’re excited about making a life and a difference here.

her, but close enough to keep ties with family. She jumped in with both feet, participating in SGA, was selected for the homecoming court and joined Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. She majored in Human Resources with a minor in Spanish. Her plan was going perfectly. Until graduation. Unable to find a job in her chosen field, she returned home to Tuskegee and began working as a full-time nanny. For someone as driven and goal-oriented as Gandy, it was a shock. For maybe the first time, she wasn’t sure about her future. But an unexpected door was opened. In August 2014 she secured a position as an assistant to Gov. Robert Bentley. “I felt it was an honor and a privilege to work in the Governor’s office,” she said. “It was a special time, although unfortunately overcast by dark clouds. I’m not necessarily interested in ‘politics’ per se. I saw a lot of the ugly side of politics. But I worked with with some great people who gave me a chance and an opportunity. Sometimes that’s all young people need.” She became involved with Leadership Montgomery and EMERGE, both groups that she says helped her meet people in a variety of careers, from diverse backgrounds, people she might not otherwise have known. She is involved in community speaking, and is pursuing her Master’s Degree in Human Resources at Troy University Montgomery.

Rachel Gandy

In 2016, Gov. Bentley formed the Office on Minority Affairs, and

Executive Assistant / Public Information Officer

Gandy was selected as one of three staff for the new office. “Our

Governor’s Office of Minority Affairs

goal is to work for the inclusion of minorities and women and get information directly to the Governor about various issues impacting

From the age of 14, Rachel Gandy thought she had her future

these groups – employment, economic, social issues,” Gandy said.

mapped out when she scored an internship in her hometown of

“I’m interested in governmental relations – I’d really like to work to

Tuskegee’s Human Resources Department. She fell in love with the

help make good policies for people in rural communities and make

work and decided that would be her career one day.

sure their voices are heard.”

She attended Montgomery Academy, commuting to classes each

She said she feels Montgomery is where she is destined to make

day. She worked as a page in the Alabama State Legislature. She

her mark. “I really feel like the best connections are being made

competed in and won Alabama’s Junior Miss pageant, earning mon-

here because it’s the capital city. All roads lead back to Montgom-

ey for college. When she scouted schools, she says she fell in love

ery, the Capitol and the State House,” she said. “I hope to make

with the University of North Alabama. It was just far enough from

even a small mark on the community by being active and proactive.”

home to let her spread her wings, among people who didn’t know

46

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


with visitors nearly every day. “At that time, downtown was still ‘seedy,’ and just staring its renaissance, but it wasn’t really somewhere you wanted to be to hang out, to walk around a lot,” she said. “In my job at the box office, I was always talking to visitors who were sort of weary of Montgomery. They visited often to see the shows at ASF, but felt they had done all there was to do here. There was nothing more to see.” Leon loved ACSC and decided he would like to be an instructor there, so the couple moved to Kent, Ohio, in 2008 for Leon to complete a Ph.D. They returned in 2012, although Katie initially was still teaching at Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio, and not living here full time. But the couple had two children, and when it was time for her son to enter kindergarten, she knew she needed to make her move here permanent.

Katie Perkowski Marketing Director, Alabama Shakespeare Festival When Katie Perkowski and her husband, Leon, moved to Montgomery in 2005, the Ohio native had never lived in the South. She never imagined the capital city would one day become her new hometown. But it didn’t take on the first try.

Downtown has just enough

The timing worked out perfectly as the

of that big-city feel.

and she returned to the theater. “I have

Montgomery has so much going for it, and I really see it continuing on this trajectory for growth.”

She met her husband, who is in the Air

attend the Air Command and Staff Col-

Force, in Germany, where she was an op-

lege (ACSC) at Maxwell Air Force Base.

era singer and also handling marketing for

“Leon had lived in the South before, in

a management company. They married in

South Carolina. I had not at all,” Perkowski

2003 and moved to Cambridge, England,

said. “My sister-in-law had been here for

where she was a community programs

ACSC – she’s a pilot – and told me I could

director for the Air Force base, arranging

hide at Alabama Shakespeare Festival.

everything from carnivals to USO shows.

She said it was a magnificent theater. So

“It’s strange, because it seems every job

as soon as I got here I reached out to

I’ve had before came together to inform

them and began to volunteer and then of

the job I have now,” she said. “I was al-

course they eventually made me work for

ways involved somehow in marketing and

them,” she joked.

in some theatrical capacity.” She worked at ASF in the box office from They arrived in Montgomery for Leon to

2006-2008. In her job, she interacted

47

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

marketing director job opened up at ASF, such a different narrative to present now. Montgomery is charming. Downtown has just enough of that big-city feel without all the yucky parts. With the military, we lived in several states and a few different countries. Montgomery has so much going for it, and I really see it continuing on this trajectory for growth.” She is firmly behind her new home and overflowing with ideas to continue its positive progress. At the top of the list, she says she would like to see an expansion of public resources, moving away from the “pay to play” model. She lists some of her favorite amenities Montgomery currently has like Blount Cultural Park, the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, the Zoo and the splash pad downtown. “The more community resources there are just for the public to enjoy, the more growth you’re going to see in every sector,” she said.


MyMGM Brandon Stoudenmier Owner, River Paws Pet Resort If you had told him even two years ago that he would own his own business in his hometown at the age of 25, Brandon Stoudenmier says he isn’t sure he would have believed you. Yet almost exactly one year ago, he opened River Paws Pet Resort, a doggy daycare, boarding and grooming facility located on S. Hull Street in downtown Montgomery. Always interested in animals, Stoudenmier originally planned to become a veterinarian. After graduating from BTW Magnet school, he began pursuing a degree in biology at Troy University and working part time at Taylor Crossing Animal Hospital. At that time, a new trend was emerging – doggy daycare and specialized pet services. “Ten years ago, who would have thought that people would be interested in doggy daycare,” Stoudenmier said. “But now, the dog is part of the family. I started to realize that my real goal would be to run a pet boarding and daycare facility. I thought, why incur more student loans and debt for vet school, when I could focus on pet care?”

New Name. Familiar Faces.

Formerly 48Alfa Realty Team of Agents MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


He decided to finish his degree in biology and take some time

she began helping him fine-tune his business plan and apply for

to think about the future. He was approached by a non-profit

a loan through the Small Business Association (SBA). “Getting a

organization and offered a job in Indiana as a consultant, which

small business loan through the SBA takes work. Because it’s a

would allow him to do a lot of traveling in the area. “I had only

government loan, there are a lot of steps in the process and it

ever lived in Montgomery, and the farthest I had gone for any

takes a lot longer than you would think,” he said. Now, he works

period of time was Troy,” he said. “I decided to move, expe-

with the SBRC as a volunteer, talking to other young profession-

rience a new place, save some money and see if I still had a

als thinking about starting a business, sharing his experiences.

passion to open a pet care place after a bit of time passed.” About 80 percent of his clients work downtown. People also He did. And he knew he wanted to return to Montgomery to

bring their pets to him to board from out east, going out of their

establish his business. “It was hard being 10 hours away from

way to bring their pets to stay at River Paws. He has several

home and my family. Also it was scary thinking about opening

boarding areas for dogs of various sizes, as well as a large

a business someplace I didn’t know well. I knew Montgomery

outdoor play area where groups of dogs can play together. Most

when downtown was a scary place you didn’t visit after the

areas are equipped with cameras so pet owners can log onto

working hours were over. But with the revitalization, it presented

the River Paws website to check on their dog and enjoy seeing

an incredible opportunity.”

them. River Paws also has a separate area for boarding cats, with cat condos and an open play area.

He spent a year planning the business and began working with a local realtor to find a location. When he returned to Mont-

“The life of the city is in downtown,” Stoudenmier said. “Mont-

gomery in the fall, the realtor had four potential places lined up,

gomery is still very much an untapped market, especially down-

and the last one he toured is now the location of River Paws

town. It opens the doorway for young people to find opportunity.

Pet Resort. He began working with an architect to renovate the

Downtown has a lot of vacant buildings that are completely do-

building, and he connected with Lisa McGinty at the Chamber’s

able for someone my age. They may need a little TLC, but if you

Small Business Resource Center. Through the SBRC programs,

are willing to make the sacrifice you can realize a great reward.”

arcrealtycosouth.com 8191 Seaton Place Montgomery, AL 36116 334-213-2532

49

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


EXTRA! EXTRA!

OW EN IB CR BS SU

BRING YOUR

MEETING

HOME.

START HERE. request your meeting planner online at

MEETINMONTGOMERY.COM

MONTGOMERY MEETING PLANNER Are you involved in associations, conferences & meetings or participate in continuing education? Why not have those meetings right here, in your own backyard! We have a full staff that can help you plan it, get the best hotel rates, plan after hour activities for you and your attendees, help with registration and make the planning process as seamless as possible.

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READ ALL ABOUT IT . . . TOGETHER.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BUSINESS MEETINGS

& EVENTS PLANNING TIPS & RESOURCES

Learn the ins and outs of planning – and executing – effective business meetings and events in Montgomery.

2018 EXCLUSIVE GUIDE

ENTERTAINMENT / UNIQUE VENUES / CATERERS / HOTELS & MEETING SPACE


BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE

COME TOGETHER

If the idea of planning an event for your business has you stressed, read on for a list of tips and tools that will make it easier and ultimately, more successful.

THE BASICS

MAKE IT MEMORABLE

are a lot of things to consider. Answer these questions to

less than excited. But there are ways to make your event memorable.

get started.

• Don’t make it mandatory.

• What type of event are you after?

• Consider having a theme.

• What is the goal of the event?

• Talk it up around the office and give out plenty

When it comes to hosting an office party or meeting, there

When the words “office party” are mentioned, many employees are

• Will there be food?

of details so employees feel like they know

• How many people will attend?

what to expect. • Do a little research and find a day or evening

• What’s your budget? • Do your goals (and budget) call for renting an offsite venue or holding the event at your business?

52

that isn’t packed with other events or functions that could conflict.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE

CHOICES, CHOICES.

Different events call for different venues and vibes.

“END OF THE YEAR” AWARDS BANQUET

When it comes to recognizing your volunteers and employees for all their hard work, an award event is the first thing that comes to mind. These annual events encourage your staff to strive for excellence in areas you want to emphasize. You

TEAM-BUILDING PARTY

can pick an off-site location with a unique venue that

Think beyond the ropes

spurs memories like a farm

course, and consider

or historic venue. Make it

pure fun and games like a

an event that your team

bounce session at Rockin’

COMPANY LUNCHEON

CLIENT OR VOLUNTEER

Jump Trampoline Park or a

OR DINNER

APPRECIATION PARTY

really working together, try

Employees can interact with

Client or volunteer appreci-

Escapology or Breakout

one another over an activity

ation parties are a reward-

Games. This fast-paced fun

we all enjoy – eating. It’s a

ing way to say “thanks” to

pushes employees to pool

simple but appreciated way

your best clients for their

ideas and strategize to solve

to recognize employees

business or volunteers for

puzzles. This activity not

and give them a break from

their hard work. Whether it’s

only reinforces teamwork, it

the hectic atmosphere at

small and intimate or you’re

can make memories that will

the office. A tip for making

inviting a major crowd, many

positively impact working

the meal go smoother: Limit

area hotels have a wide

relationships.

the menu to three or four

range of meeting-space

entrées and coordinate this

options to choose from and

A FEW FAVES:

with your restaurant prior

lessen the stress of a party

ROCKIN’ JUMP

to arriving. Some restau-

by including on-site catering

TRAMPOLINE PARK

rants, like Central, will even

ANOTHER IDEA:

in their venue rental. These

print your special menu for

Consider making it a themed

events are also nice ways to

guests.

event that kicks off next

incorporate your employ-

year’s goals with party

ees’ families into business

favors that compliment the

festivities.

upcoming initiatives.

bowling outing. To get folks

montgomery.rockinjump.com ESCAPOLOGY

escapology.com BREAKOUT GAMES

breakoutgames.com

A LITTLE TREAT:

Organize a tailgate party at the office on the Friday

GET THE HOOK UP

before a big game (think Iron Bowl or Super Bowl)

Need a space that’s AV

to relieve stress and build

compatible? Check out our

common non-work interests

guide for meeting space that

(or rivalries!)

meets your tech needs too.

53

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

looks forward to each year. Many company banquets are formal, but they don’t have to be. You can easily put together a catered picnic. Casual events are more relaxed. And they give employees something to bring their families to as well. There is nothing wrong with the formal approach either. Presenting an award over a nice dinner gives extra meaning to the recognition.


54

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE

Featuring Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members

129 Coosa

334-517-1155

Alabama Activity Center

334-269-0222

Alabama State University

334-299-4100

Alabama Wildlife Federation AlleyBAR

800-822-9453

334-387-3333

Alley Station

130 Commerce Street 334-277-1077 www.alleystation.com

AUM Center for Lifelong Learning

334-244-3804

Auburn University at Montgomery 334-244-3000 Address Phone Capital City Club A201 Monroe Street, Suite 2100 Web Address 334-834-8920 www.clubcorp.com/Clubs/ Capital-City-Club-Montgomery

City of Montgomery - The Alley

334-625-2100

City of Montgomery - Riverwalk Amphitheater 334-625-2100

Commerce Center

Address Phone Dexter Avenue King MemorialWeb Address Legacy Center 334-239-9336 334-264-0829

Dream Field Farms

334-534-6976

F. Scott Fitzgerald Museum Hampstead

334-264- 4222

334-270- 6730

Hank Williams Museum 334-262-3600 The Mission House

461 South Court Street 334-356-3892 Facebook/Mission House.com

Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Multiplex at Cramton Bowl Pete Peterson Lodge

334-240-4333

334-625-3480

334-271-7013

Railyard Tavern & Porter Room 12 West Jefferson Street 334-262-0080 www.tavernandporterroom.com

RSA Plaza Terrace Troy University

334-264-0829

334-241-9500

Union Station Train Shed The Warehouse Young House

334-277-1077

334-264-7480

334-261-1106

NUMBER OF GUESTS

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>2 0 21 -5 0 50 -10 0 10 0+

UNIQUE VENUES

UNIQUE VENUES

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Mandatory Catering

. . .

AV Compatible

. .

Tables/ Chairs Included

.

. . .

. . . . . .

SPECIAL GUEST

Alley Station allows patrons to choose their own off-site caterer, so it’s easy to customize your event, whether it's a breakfast or a BBQ.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

A GREAT VIEW

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.

The Capital City Club boasts one of the best views in downtown Montgomery. Enjoy a holiday party, business event or a host a rooftop lunch with colleagues. It’s just one of the great amenities of a CCC annual membership.

INSIDE HISTORY

. . .

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.

.

The F. Scott Fitzgerald Museum is full of the elegance and charm of the Gatsby era. Enjoy its beautiful outdoor space in the heart of historic Old Cloverdale.


R E S TAU R A N T S

BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE

WITH MEETING SPACE

RESTAURANTS

NUMBER OF GUESTS

Featuring Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members

Blackfinn Ameripub

334-517-1760

Central

129 Coosa Street 334-517-1155 www.central129coosa.com

SPICE IT UP

City Grill

334-244-0960

Chappy’s Deli - Perry Hill

334-279-7477

Chappy’s Deli - Vaughn Road

334-279-1226

Chicken Salad Chick Vaughn Road 334-649-4828 Chick-fil-A - Downtown 334-293-4773

>2 0 21 -5 0 50 -10 0 10 0+

WITH MEETING SPACE

. .

Island Delights - Dexter Irish Bred Pub Jim N Nick’s La Jolla

SWEET RETREAT

334-593-0043

334-356-5641

334-834-7559

334-213-0046

334-356-2600

Magnolia’s Grill & Bar

334-288-3858

Newk’s Eatery 334-290-4955 Sinclair’s Taste

334-271-7654

334-676-4333

The Cork & Cleaver The Exchange

334-676-2260

334-481-5165

The House Restaurant at the Renaissance 334-481-5166

The Tipping Point

A round of cookie skillets at The Tipping Point or a sampling of desserts is a sweet reward for meeting goals or brainstorming together.

334-260-9110

Twin Peaks

6814 EastChase Parkway 334-513-1244 www.twinpeaksrestaurant.com

Vintage Year

334-819-7215

Yellowhammer Café

56

334-239-7758

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.

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. . . . .

. . . . . . . . .

.

. .

12 West Jefferson Street 334-273-7427 www.dreamlandbbq.com

Ginza Japanese & Korean

.

Rental Fee or Minimum Order

. . . .

Dreamland BBQ

Looking for laid-back fun? Dreamland BBQ in the office or served up in the Tavern or Porter House gives business gatherings a less-traditional vibe.

Outdoor Eating

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

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.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

. . . . . . . . . BONUS Twin Peaks offers a 20% discount to fellow Chamber members.

. .


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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


BEFORE CALLING THE MEETING, CALL EMBASSY SUITES BY HILTON

*Service of alcohol subject to state and local laws. Must be of legal drinking age. © Hilton Worldwide.

TM indicates

Embassy Suites by Hilton Montgomery Hilton & Conference Center 300 Tallapoosa Street / Montgomery, AL 36104

58

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

TM

a trademark of Hilton Worldwide.

/ 334-269-5055 / 800-Embassy / Embassy.com


BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE NUMBER OF GUESTS WITH MEETING SPACE

Featuring Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members

Comfort Inn & Suites Mitylene

334-532-4444

Comfort Suites Airport South

334-676-2576

Comfort Suites

334-387-2585

Country Inn & Suites

334-277-4142

Country Inn & Suites - Carmichael

334-270-3223

Courtyard by Marriott Montgomery 334-272-5533

Days Inn

334-356-3335

DoubleTree by Hilton

334-245-2320

Drury Inn & Suites Montgomery

334-273-1101

Embassy Suites Montgomery Hotel and Conference Center 300 Tallapoosa Street 334-269-5055 embassysuites3.hilton.com

Fairfield Inn & Suites Airport

334-281-6882

Fairfield Inn & Suites EastChase

334-260-8650

Hampton Inn & Suites EastChase Hampton Inn Airport

334-277-1818

334-280-9592

Hampton Inn & Suites Downtown Hilton Gardens Inn

334-265-1010

334-272-2225

Hilton Garden Inn EastChase Holiday Inn Airport South

334-244-0101

334-288-3858

Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites EastChase 334-271-5516 Home Inn & Suites

334-387-3016

Homewood Suites by Hilton Microtel Inn & Suites

334-272-3010

334-649-4465

Montgomery Inn & Suites Red Roof Inn

WITH MEETING SPACE

334-409-9999

334-269-9611

Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center 201 Tallapoosa Street 334-481-5000 www.marriott.com

Staybridge Suites by Marriot EastChase 334-277-9383 TownePlace Suites by Marriot EastChase 334-239-7110 Wind Creek Casino Montgomery Wingate by Wyndham

334-245-4684

866-946-3360

. . . . . . . . .

>2 0 21 -5 0 50 -10 0 10 0+

HOTELS

H OT E L S

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W H Y A H OT E L? • ONE-STOP SHOP They have employees, caterers and contractors in place to service any need. • ONE SIZE FITS ALL Most hotels have the flexibility to handle groups and events of all sizes. • EASY ACCESS AND PARKING Sufficient parking (even valet) and accommodations for any special needs are taken care of by most facilities. • PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENT Guests and team members are walking into a clean and well-equipped space prepped to be a productive environment. ANOTHER TIP: Guest rooms are the most profitable source of revenue for hotels. If you will also be reserving guest rooms, this may help lower meeting space costs.

D O W N TO B U S I N E S S Meeting spaces with computer labs or classroom space can make group learning easy. A FEW OPTIONS: Alabama State University Auburn University at Montgomery AUM Center for Lifelong Learning Troy University

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

GET TOGETHER Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center can host groups and activities of all sizes. Whether a convention hall or more structured meeting rooms are needed, spaces on-site at The House, the rooftop spa or the more casual Exchange Bar give you plenty of options.


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE

ENTERTAINMENT

NUMBER OF GUESTS

Alabama Shakespeare Festival

334-271-5353

Arrowhead Country Club 50 Ocala Drive 334-272-7180 *13

>2 0 21 -5 0 50 -10 0 10 0+

& ACTIVITY VENUES Featuring Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

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Mandatory Catering

.

.

AV Compatible

. .

Tables/ Chairs Included

WHY OFF-SITE?

.

www.arrowheadcountryclub.net

. .

Breakout Games 6715 Taylor Court 334-203-7868

breakoutgames.com

Capri Theatre

334-262-4858

City of Montgomery- Gateway Park Lodge Address and Golf Course 334-284-7920 Phone City of Web MontgomeryAddress Harriott II 334-625-2100 Cloverdale Playhouse

334-262-1530

Cottonwood Golf Club

334-281-3344

Escapology Montgomery 130 Commerce Street 334-523-1947 escapology.com

Grandma’s Home House Retreat Ice Palace at Eastdale Mall Jasmine Hill Gardens

334-207-8028

334-277-2088

334-567-6463

Lagoon Park Golf Course

334-240-4050

Mann Wildlife Learning Museum

334-240-4900

Montgomery Biscuits Baseball Riverwalk Stadium 200 Coosa Street 334-323-2255 biscuitsbaseball.com

Montgomery Performing Arts Centre 334-481-5100

ON A DEADLINE

• TEAM BUILDING Bring staff together with an off-site activity. • JUST FOR FUN A few laughs and time to enjoy each other’s company create good memories.

.

.

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.

• EMPLOYEE APPRECIATION Acknowledge hard work of staff or volunteers by treating them special.

.

. . .

• AWARDS BANQUET Hitting a big goal or marking a milestone is a reason to celebrate together.

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Test your staff’s teamwork and discover unknown strengths during Breakout Games’ fun, timed escape activities.

. . . . . . . . . . .

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.

ANOTHER TIP: Even teaming up to plan an off-site event can create more inner-office camaraderie.

HIT IT OFF RIGHT

.

PREP FOR SUCCESS Teams are more effective and collaborative when they "huddle." Communication, problem-solving and decision-making activities can bring bigger gains in the office.

PARTY HARD (NO, IT’S EASY!) Montgomery Biscuits Baseball has reserved areas in Riverwalk Stadium designed specifically for businesses and large group gatherings.


62

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE

NUMBER OF GUESTS >2 0 21 -5 0 50 -10 0 10 0+

ENTERTAINMENT Featuring Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members

Montgomery Zoo 2301 Coliseum Parkway 334-240-4900 montgomeryzoo.com

Old Alabama Town

334-240-4500

Robert Trent Jones Capitol Hill

334-285-1114

Rockin’ Jump Trampoline Park

334-239-2587

Rosa Parks Library & Museum

334-241-8615

Troy University’s Davis Theatre

334-241-9567

Address W.A. Gayle Planetarium 1010 Forest Avenue Phone 334-625-4799 Web Address www.troy.edu/planetarium

Wind Creek Casino & Hotel Montgomery 1801 Eddie L. Tullis Road 334-567-1283 windcreekmontgomery.com

Wynlakes Country Club

334-279-0297

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Mandatory Catering

AV Compatible

Tables/ Chairs Included

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GO WILD! The Montgomery Zoo offers both meeting spaces and unique entertainment options including behind-the-scenes tours and animal encounters.

B E S T T H E AT R E S Are bright lights and a big stage part of your event? Check out these local theatres for rental space or a great night in the audience. A FEW OPTIONS: Alabama Shakespeare Festival

asf.net

. . . . . . . .

63

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

. .

. .

Troy University Davis Theatre

troy.edu/davistheatre Montgomery Performing Arts Center

mpaconline.org


C AT E R I N G V E N D O R S

BUSINESS EVENT GUIDE

Featuring Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members

A Catered Affair, Inc. 334-281-4747

EAT UP

important aspects of any type or size event. Your event goal should help you decide on the amount and kind of food to serve. Casual? Go with finger

foods and light appetizers. Elegant banquet? Pick

ASE Cakes & Catering dba Courthouse Café

Chick-fil-A Downtown

334-265-7181

334-293-4773

Baumhower’s Eastern Blvd

Chick-fil-A EastChase

334-271-1831

334-271-1095

Baumhower’s S. Union Street

Chick-fil-A Eastdale Mall

334-263-8800

334-272-1411

334-517-1760

someone like Jennie Weller Catering or Carron Marrow Events. A BIT OF ADVICE:

Chicken Salad Chick Vaughn Rd 334-649-4828

Buffalo Rock Pepsi 334-395-7171

Carron Morrow Events

Jim N Nick’s

334-262-8463

334-213-0046

Full Moon Bar-B-Que

King’s Table Catering

334-676-5999

334-270-0200

Georgia Roussos Catering

La Jolla

Chris’s Hotdogs

334-279-6279

334-265-6850

Central

Cuco’s Downtown

334-517-1155

GiGi’s Fabulous Foods, LLC

Lek’s Railroad Thai at Union Station 334-269-0708

334-593-5623

Honey Baked Ham

Magnolia’s Grill & Bar

334-284-9100

334-288-3858

Irish Bred Pub

Island Delight @Dexter

Martha's Place

334-356-5641

7798 Atlanta Highway 334-356-7165

Ixtapa Mexican Restaurant 334-277-7600

334-832-0081

Chappy’s E. South Blvd

Dream Field Farms

334-286-9200

334-534-6976

Chappy’s Perry Hill Rd

Dreamland Bar-B-Que

334-279-7477

334-273-7427

But don’t forget your budget. Discuss this up front with any caterer and get cost estimates before making final decisions.

64

334-356-2600

251-666-1141

334-834-7559

Chicken Salad Chick Zelda Rd 334-517-1378

a caterer that has proven experience in this area,

Filet & Vine, Inc.

334-279-1226

Blackfinn Ameripub

Food is one of the most

Chappy’s Vaughn Rd

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Jason’s Deli

marthasplacebuffet.com

Moe's Original Bar-B-Que 334-676-1078

334-409-9890

Jennie Weller Catering 334-264-7480

Montgomery Catering 334-269-0222


Nancy’s Italian Ice

Texas Roadhouse

334-356-1403

334-396-7774

Newk’s Eatery

The Tipping Point

334-290-4955

334-260-9110

PepperTree Steaks & Wine

Urban Cookhouse 334-239-7801

334-532-8005

Sa Za’s

Wharf Casual Seafood

334-495-7292

334-676-3200

Scott Street Deli

Wishbone Café

334-264-9415

334-244-7270

Shashy’s Fine Foods, Inc.

Yellowhammer Café

334-263-7341

334-239-7758

Shrimp Basket

Zoe’s Kitchen EastChase

334-523-0466

334-270-9115

Sinclair’s 334-271-7654

Sol Restaurante Mexicano & Taqueria 334-593-8250

Sushi Café 334-819-7060

SweetCreek Farm Market 334-280-3276

Zoe’s Kitchen Zelda 334-395-4698


Connect +

CHAMBER NEWS

NEWS, R ESO U R C E S AN D A LOOK IN S IDE THE MAN Y WAYS YOUR CHAMBER WORKS FOR YOU

TEAM REPORT Military, Federal and Innovation Strategies The Military, Federal and Innovations Strategies Team at The Chamber, led by Vice President Joe Greene, has a combined 25 years of experience. By helping the area sustain and grow relationships with the military presence that’s so vital to our economy and quality of life, this wealth of expertise is priceless.

ADD IT UP These stats illustrate the important role Maxwell-Gunter AFB and local military units play in our community.

$2.6 billion: the annual economic impact of our area’s entire military complex

Left to right: Brenda King, Joe Greene, Lora McClendon and Amy Richardson.

Please explain what you and your team do.

68,473 people

• Sustain and grow all the military missions

Why is the military presence so important to our community, both from a business perspective and a quality of life perspective?

in the River Region

Montgomery boasts a large military

• Create an environment that more closely

presence that includes the many missions

links Maxwell-Gunter AFB, the Air Force

of Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base, the

Reserve and Alabama National Guard to the

Alabama National Guard (Air and Army Na-

River Region community

tional Guard units as well as the AL National

• Coordinate and oversee projects and

Guard headquarters), the Air Force Reserve,

events related to the military footprint in the

DoD contractors, and government civilians

River Region

that support military organizations. We are

• Coordinate and promote innovative

also home to tens of thousands of veterans

projects in Montgomery, with a focus on our

and military retirees. Because these popu-

From a quality of life perspective, they make

TechMGM initiatives, growing Montgomery’s

lations make up such a large percentage of

Montgomery a more cosmopolitan city, be-

tech sector, and looking ahead to provide

the Montgomery area’s overall population

cause they bring perspectives from all over

workforce training, technology, and infra-

and workforce, the Chamber sees them as

the nation and the globe. The active duty

structure for the military and business needs

critical to our success as a community. From

military, the reserve and guard components,

of the future

a business perspective, our military pres-

government civilians and contractors are

• Manage the Chamber’s federal outreach,

ence presents unique opportunities for our

active participants within our community and

to include communication with the Alabama

area to distinguish itself from other cities.

volunteer in our churches, school system,

Congressional delegation, Eggs and Issues

These individuals are interwoven into our

work with our youth sports activities and

Events and an annual Washington Fly-In for

workforce and are critical to our economy.

participate in City events.

Our team focuses on the following:

city, county and Chamber leadership. 66

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

(nearly 20 percent of our population): the number of active duty military and students in/at Air University, AF Reserve, National Guard, DoD civilians, military contractors, military retirees and all their family members in the greater Montgomery Metro Area.


How does the business community benefit from what you and your team do?

with the RSA Datacenter as a first step in

The local business community is intrinsically

which is part of our TechMGM initiative, and

tied to the military footprint in this area. If you

that’s a big accomplishment. Pursing the F-35

have employees in Montgomery, it is likely

aircraft for the 187th Fighter Wing is important

One highlight of November is the day

that at least one of your employees either

work. And we’re proud to have helped form

we set aside to celebrate the things

serves in the National Guard or the Air Force

partnerships between military, government,

we’re grateful for, so it’s extremely

Reserves, is the child of or is married to mili-

academia and business entities to spark

appropriate that November also

tary personnel or a government civilian, or is

innovation and revitalize the downtown area.

includes Military Appreciation Week

changing Montgomery’s tech landscape,

TRUE THANKSGIVING

(November 5-11), presented by the

a veteran. If you are a service-based industry,

Chamber and its Wright Flyers. The

You really can’t look at Montgomery’s military

What one thing would you like MBJ readers to know about what you and your team do?

community as being a separate entity – The

This is indeed a team effort. Our team coordi-

and the many women and men of our

military community in many ways is the Mont-

nates extensively with city, county, state and

armed forces around the world who

gomery community, and it is important for

military officials as well as our academic and

serve us and their country. Many area

business owners to understand that.

business leadership, and we do it well. Not

business are also showing their sup-

every community can say that. Our commu-

port by offering discounts on goods

What are some of your and your team’s most significant recent achievements?

nity works very well together, and we see

and services to military personnel,

this as a critical component of our continued

both active and retired, and their fami-

The establishment of the Montgomery

success.

lies. Find a full list of discounts and

likely one out of every five people that are your patrons will fall into these categories.

week is the Chamber’s way to say thanks to our local military community

specials at montgomerychamber.com

Internet Exchange (MGMix) in conjunction

67

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Connect CO NNEC T I NG YO U TO T H E M A N Y CHAMBER RES OURCES AN D S ERVICES AVAILABLE

GET CONNECTED

WHAT THEY SAY

CELE B RATE YOUR BU S I N ESS                           Ribbon cuttings, ground breakings and grand openings for your business: . . . . . . Kappes McGough, kmcgough@montgomerychamber.com Press releases and announcements: . . . . . . . . . . . Jina Miniard, jminiard@montgomerychamber.com

CHAMBER MEMBERS SPEAK OUT ON HOW THEIR MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS THEIR BUSINESS.

Event calendar: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/events SAV E MONE Y Member-to-Member discounts: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com Notary public service: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Paul Redhead, predhead@montgomerychamber.com Membership mailing lists and labels: . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com MEET MORE CLIENTS & VENDORS Networking events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com Ambassador program: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynn Norton, lnorton@montgomerychamber.com Online membership directory: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/directory Government contract resources: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com HIRE & TRAIN YOUR WORKFORCE Job board: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/jobboard Corporate recruitment: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Justice Smyth, jsmyth@montgomerychamber.com Corporate retention:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Horsley, jhorsley@montgomerychamber.com Workforce training:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constance Calambakas, ccalambakas@montgomerychamber.com

“We’ve been in business since 2008, cleaning windows for both residential and commercial buildings in the River Region. We’ve been a Chamber Member since 2014, and my business has exploded since we joined the Chamber. By being a member, we stay ahead of our competition because we know when a business is having their grand opening. That’s the perfect time

BUILD YOUR B USIN ESS Research information: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rachel Madore, rmadore@montgomerychamber.com

for us to present our services to

Small business counseling: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

them. Plus, we have met a lot of other business owners.

Diversity and inclusion programs: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

Those are always valuable con-

Entrepreneurial development: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

nections because often, they may

Seminars and training: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

struggles or facing the same

Co-working space: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

issues that you are.”

Office space to rent in the Chamber’s Business Resource Center: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com HOST MEE TINGS I N M O N TG O M ERY Meeting and event venue information: . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com Special hotel rates for meetings, events & sporting events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com

68

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

be going through the same

- VICTOR TURNQUEST NO STREAKS WINDOW CLEANING SERVICE

OUR CHAMBER. YOUR VOICE.


CHAMBER NEWS Connect A LO O K B AC K AT T H E FACES AN D PLACES OF RECEN T CHAMBER EVEN TS

MONTGOMERY WOMEN IN BUSINESS MEET-UP: LADIES WHO LUNCH, SEPTEMBER 7 at the Capital City Club Ladies Who Lunch is a monthly networking opportunity for professional and business women. July’s special guest was Joyce Loyd-Davis, owner of JDJ Consulting, LLC.

MEMBER EVENTS:

AUG Business After Hours at Moore Company Realty 24

Sponsored by Verizon

DIVERSITY SUMMIT, SEPTEMBER 26 at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel and Convention Center Presenting Sponsor Stivers Ford Lincoln

SEP 13

60 Minute Coffee at Faulkner University

OCT 60 Minute Coffee 11

at River Bank & Trust Sponsored by River Region United Way

More than 600 local business leaders attended the Diversity Summit this year. This highly anticipated annual event featured dynamic speakers from across the country and offered an intense, one-day agenda packed full of diversity and inclusion training that is crucial to any business model and size. This year’s keynote was Rosanna Durruthy, Head of Global Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging for LinkedIn. BUSINESS TAX UPDATE, OCTOBER 19 at the Alabama Department of Revenue Montgomery Taxpayer Service Center Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC

SEP Business After Hours at Lakeview Center 28

Sponsored by Gilpin Givhan and Goodwyn Mills & Cawood

69

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

The seminar helped business owners better understand business taxes and covered several business tax subjects: business income taxes, state and local sales taxes, property taxes and business license requirements.


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

NEW LEAD AT TRIUMPH

achieved National Council of Architectural Registration

Triumph Services announced Barbara von Gal as Ser-

Boards (NCARB) Certification upon completing all of the

vices Coordinator in Montgomery. Triumph, a nationally

requirements to become a registered architect. Airport

recognized non-profit headquartered in Birmingham pro-

planner Matt Thomason attained his professional engi-

vides community-based support

neering license upon passing the Principles and Practice

to individuals with developmental

of Engineering (PE) exam.

disabilities, like autism, who are trying to live independently. Von

NEW RUSSELL CONSTRUCTION TEAM MEMBERS

Gal is an Auburn graduate with a bachelor’s of science degree in special education and a minor in

Russell Construction of Ala-

psychology. She brings extensive

bama, Inc. named Samuel David

experience in education and in

Sutton, Jr. to be Vice President

adult services.

of Operations in August. Sutton started in construction at 21 years old as a superintendent

HIRELEVEL TEAM MEMBERS CERTIFIED Furthering its employees’ education continues to be a priority for WBE certified HireLevel powered by Extra

the hire of Josie Russell as Sales

women-owned employment,

and Marketing Manager. She

payroll and workforce services

graduated from Troy University

companies. It’s why three

in May 2017.

members of the HireLevel team received their Certified Staffing

Professional (CSP) certification

RIVER REGION UNITED WAY WELCOMES VP OF RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

Stephanie Stinson

Association (ASA) this past

River Region United Way announced that Brenda Robert-

summer. Tiffany Tolle, CSP joined

son Dennis will join its team as the new Vice President of

the HireLevel team in 2015. She

Resource Development. Dennis will direct the efforts of

works with its strategic accounts

the annual fundraising campaign, including The Tocque-

to ensure success with bulk hir-

ville Society, and will expand

ing for peak seasons. Stephanie

United Way’s reach throughout

Stinson, CSP joined the HireLevel team in 2016. She works as

agement for 15 years. The company also recently announced

Help, one of the region’s largest

from the American Staffing

and has been in project man-

the River Region with an empha-

Ashley Gregory

sis on establishing new employ-

part of its staffing development team, and her responsibilities including helping manage relationships with clients and applicants. Ashley Gregory, CSP joined the HireLevel team in 2014. She is an active member of its Centralized Recruiting Center (CRC) and

ee campaigns. Dennis worked as director of development for the Alabama Dance Theater for the past 15 years.

helps to support all nine HireLevel locations.

+ SUBM IT T IN G N E WS? Submit information to

GMC MONTGOMERY EMPLOYEES ATTAIN PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE

Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.

Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood (GMC) recently announced that Cameron Weldy, Susan McGallagher and Matt Thomason have attained professional licensure in their respective fields. Architects Weldy and McGallagher

70

com. Attach press releases as a Word document and include a high-resolution headshot (at least 300 dpi). An accompanying headshot is required for “Members on the Move” announcements.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

ASU NAMES NEW PRESIDENT The Alabama State University Board of Trustees

WANT YOUR NEWS IN THE MBJ?

has selected the Honorable Dr. Quinton T. Ross Jr. to serve as the 15th President of the University. The vote came during the Board’s meeting on September 8, and the final vote was unanimous. President-elect Ross was one of

Submit information for

four finalists who visited the campus in August,

consideration to Jina Miniard at

meeting with Board members, students, faculty,

jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

staff, alumni and members of the community.

Please attach press releases

“I am elated about the entire process,” said

as a Word document or a PDF

Alfreada Green, ASU Board of Trustees Chair-

(Word documents preferred), and

woman. “I think that the Presidential Search Committee did a great job in coming up with a

and said being united as “One-ASU” is essential

matrix and a process and executed that process

to the continuing success of the Hornet Nation’s

very well. They did very well coming up with the

University family. “Those nine free slaves (ASU’s

final four candidates that led to their successful

founders) had to make decisions that led to the

interviews, leading to our selecting Senator

first 113 students in 1867,” Brown-Hunter said.

Ross to be our new Alabama State University

“We likewise are doing this not for ourselves,

President.” ASU Trustee Brenda Brown-Hunter

but for the students and to preserve this historic

served on the Presidential Search Committee

institution.”

please include high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) photos with your press release if possible.

SUBMISSION DEADLINES: MARCH ISSUE: JAN 19 MAY ISSUE: MARCH 21

GOVERNOR IVEY TOURS MONTGOMERY The capital city welcomed Governor Kay

and prospects was followed by a working

Ivey in early September as she continued

lunch where Mayor Todd Strange and

her “Listen, Learn, Help and Lead Tour” of

County Commissioner Elton Dean called

Alabama cities. Montgomery city, coun-

upon Cyber Strategy Coordinator Carl

ty and Chamber of Commerce leaders

Barranco to highlight Montgomery’s unique

focused on education and technology

cyber partnerships. Afterward, the governor

with campus visits and a tour of the RSA

led a round table discussion of issues

Datacenter where the Montgomery Internet

including education, workforce develop-

Exchange is housed. The day culminat-

ment, technology, airport infrastructure and

ed with a whiteboard session led by the

the health, automotive and manufacturing

governor where leaders shared their ideas

industries. Governor Ivey said, “Effective

for a brighter future for Alabama. The gov-

leaders do four things. They listen, learn,

ernor received tours of Loveless Academic

help and lead. My passion is to listen and

Magnet Program High School (LAMP),

learn on these tours across the state, and

Montgomery Preparatory Academy for

today I was able to put my focus on the

Career Technologies (MPACT) and Valiant

successes and challenges of the capital

Cross Academy. Each school showcased

city of Montgomery. We all live in this

its unique approach, from academics at

great state together, so we must all work

LAMP and technical instruction at MPACT

together to continue to move our state and

to the holistic pursuit of lifelong learning,

our communities forward.” “We’re honored

successes for Montgomery and Alabama

character and community building at Valiant

to have Governor Ivey spend this time with

as a whole,” said David Reed, Chairman of

Cross. A brief windshield tour of Montgom-

us in Montgomery, working alongside local

the Montgomery Area Chamber of Com-

ery’s economic development successes

leaders for greater economic development

merce Board of Directors.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

HE LLO, GOVERNO R Governor Ivey met with several local business leaders during her tour at Montgomery Preparatory Academy for Career Technologies (MPACT).


M EM BER Spotlight

ESCAPOLOGY Designed to get your pulse pounding and brain clicking, the “escape” games offered at Escapology are fun but also functional.

WHEN WAS ESCAPOLOGY OPENED? May 2017 EXPLAIN WHAT ESCAPOLOGY OFFERS. We are Montgomery’s original, premium live-escape game and virtual reality experience located downtown. Intricately designed escape games challenge two to eight players to work together to find clues and then solve puzzles and riddles to earn their freedom.

WHAT MAKES THE ESCAPOLOGY EXPERIENCE SO MUCH FUN? We can take you around the world with our exciting range of games. We see a lot of double dates coming in. The setup is perfect. Grab some dinner, maybe a drink nearby and come see us. For employers, it is an easy way to build morale and communication skills among their staff. Sometimes, it takes a little puzzle solving to make reserved personalities come out and shine.

WHY DO YOU THINK IT IS POPULAR? Escape games are the fastest growing segment of the entertainment industry, and Escapology Montgomery is the leader with our quality experience.

WHO IS ESCAPOLOGY’S PRIMARY CUSTOMER? We find that there is no specific audience. People ages 8 to 88 can come enjoy the fun. We are a friendly venue for the whole family. This is for everyone, and once you’ve experienced the fun, you’re hooked.

ARE BUSINESSES USING ESCAPOLOGY? While we do have a broad audience, we also have a niche: corporate team building. The wide range of industries that come to Escapology all find the same thing. They find a safe, fun way to create things like goal orientation, conflict resolution and a sense of community. As an employer, you can step into our observation room to watch your group while they are attempting to escape.

WHAT MAKES ESCAPOLOGY UNIQUE? We are one of the nation’s largest escape attractions, as well as a virtual reality arcade, built inside a renovated downtown Montgomery warehouse. We have six games to choose from in our 8,000 square feet. And we display unique artwork from artists right here in Montgomery. Our virtual reality room is better than any in our area. We also have meeting space for parties and corporate functions.

WHAT’S ON THE HORIZON? We want to grow exponentially. Even if you don’t think you are “into this kind of stuff,” at least come by for a tour. You may be surprised at how exciting this place can be.

130 COMMERCE STREET, SUITE 700 / 334-523-1947 / ESCAPOLOGY.COM/EN/MONTGOMERY-AL 73

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

ITS AIDS LOCAL NON-PROFITS In August, Information Transport Solutions, Inc. awarded proceeds from its 11th Annual Charity Golf Tournament totaling $25,000 to four local charities. ITS employees organize the annual fundraiser as a fun way to bring customers, teammates and business partners together in a recreational environment with the common goal of giving back to the local community. This year, ITS raised $25,000 from the tournament and all proceeds from the event were donated to the following four charities: Jason Michael Hilty Memorial Scholarship, Imagination Library of Elmore County, Coosa Outdoor Worship Spot (COWS), and the Family Sunshine Center. “From the beginning, ITS has focused on giving back to our local community,” said ITS President Quincy Minor. “We donate proceeds to these local charities because we believe in the work they are doing and share their vision to make a positive difference in the lives of those living in the river region.”

ITS, INC. BRINGS ADDITIONAL FIBER OPTIONS Information Transport Solutions, Inc.

R E TA IL NEWS

recently announced its role in expanding Image courtesy of Carter Photo Design.

fiber availability in Elmore County. The fiber provided by ITS is used for internet access and wide area network (WAN) connectivity services and will offer an alternative for Elmore County businesses. ITS and its partners are increasing competition for fiber service in Elmore County delivering more bandwidth to customers while lowering prices for service. The serpredictable service with a simple price

GLOBAL FASHION RETAILER H&M OPENS AT EASTCHASE

and invoice. The ability to attract more

The Shoppes at EastChase announced in

with collections ranging from ladies’ and

service providers in Elmore County has a

August the anticipated opening of H&M,

mens’ to separate “store within a store”

direct impact on economic development

Hennes & Mauritz AB (H&M), one of the

sections for accessories, sports apparel and

by expanding the capabilities of existing

world’s largest fashion retailers. H&M is

its plus-sized line, H&M +. The Shoppes at

businesses and drawing in new business-

famous for offering fashion-forward apparel

EastChase location will also carry H&M’s

es to the area from a multitude of industry

at affordable prices for women, men,

children’s collection, from newborn to 14

sectors including retail, manufacturing

teenagers, and children. Measuring over

years.

technology and more. “ITS is headquar-

21,000 square feet, the new location at The

tered in Elmore County. We believe in the

Shoppes at EastChase opened in Septem-

tremendous opportunities for economic

ber. “We are beyond excited that H&M has

ALABAMA RETAIL DAY HONORS MONTGOMERY BUSINESS

growth here and are grateful to serve El-

chosen The Shoppes at EastChase to open

The Alabama Retail Association honored

more County by providing the technology

a new location in Alabama,” said Suzanna

20 retail businesses as Retailers of the Year

infrastructure needed to sustain industry

Wasserman, Marketing Manager of The

or Centennial Retailers during the 2017 Al-

in this area,” said Steve Meany, CEO of

Shoppes at EastChase. “We already have

abama Retail Day luncheon. Montgomery’s

ITS. The cities and communities included

a fantastic selection of apparel retailers at

Chris’ Hot Dogs was honored as one of six

in this expanded fiber footprint include:

The Shoppes and this store will add a new

Centennial Retailers. Alabama Retail has

Wetumpka, Tallassee, Eclectic, Millbrook,

dimension to our current tenant mix.” The

been presenting the Alabama Centennial

Redland, Coosada and Holtville.

new H&M location will offer Montgomery

Retailer awards since 2002.

vices from ITS will provide a reliable and

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

residents a one-stop shopping destination for quality clothing for the whole family,


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS & MINISTRY UNITE After Hurricane Harvey made landfall in August, thousands of people in Houston and along the Gulf Coast were displaced. Gathered by Grace united with a local business, Turenne PharMedCo, to reach out to Texans in need. “Before the storm, many children and families in the Houston area were already struggling.

TRUE

In 2012, nearly 30 percent of kids in Harris County lived below the federal poverty line,” said Rev. Tiffany C. Chaney, pastor of

Hospitality

The Chamber would like to say a HUGE “Thank You!” to the many local businesses and organizations that offered free or discounted products and services and helped make our city such a welcoming spot for evacuees of Hurricane Irma.

MONTGOMERY FIRE FIGHTERS RAISE FUNDS FOR MDA During the 2017 MDA Fill the Boot campaign, the dedicated members of Montgomery Fire and Rescue took to the streets to help kids and adults with muscular dystrophy,

Gathered by Grace, a

ALS and related life-threatening diseases live longer and grow stronger. From April to Au-

Montgomery-based minis-

gust, $65,900 was raised to benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association. “The fire fighters

try serving young adults. Gathered by Grace

of Montgomery Fire and Rescue have once again shown their immense dedication and

united with Turenne PharMedCo, a long-

care for MDA’s families during this year’s Fill the Boot campaign,” said MDA Executive

term healthcare business in Montgomery, to

Director, Angie Jordin. “This year’s Fill the Boot was a success and we are grateful for

purchase supplies. The community chose

the generosity of those in the Montgomery community who have helped individuals with

diapers as a focus after learning diapers

muscular dystrophy, ALS and related muscle-debilitating diseases truly live unlimited.”

and wipes are often not provided by disas-

Fire fighters have taken part in MDA’s Fill the Boot tradition for more than 60 years, asking

ter relief agencies. Gathered by Grace’s

pedestrians, motorists, customers and passersby to make a donation, joining the fight to

fundraising effort allowed for the purchase

find treatments and cures for devastating diseases that take away everyday abilities like

of 1,772 diapers and 68 packs of wipes from

walking, talking, hugging and even breathing. Funds raised help MDA’s efforts to fund

Turenne. Turenne also donated the shipping

groundbreaking research and life-enhancing programs such as state-of-the-art support

costs to transport the items.

groups and Care Centers, including the MDA Care Center at UAB in Birmingham.

BUCKMASTERS’ 24TH ANNUAL EXPO ANOTHER SUCCESS

to the homeless and poor. One of the Expo’s main attractions is the

Sweltering temperatures might turn Alabama’s capital city into a

Indoor World Champi-

convection oven in August, but deer hunters don’t seem to mind the

onship. Each year, the

heat. “For 24 years now, people from all over the country have made

country’s best archers

the summertime pilgrimage to Montgomery to attend the Buckmas-

converge to compete for

ters Expo,” said Jackie Bushman, the organization’s founder. “They

the prestigious title. Four

come regardless of the weather, in good and bad economic times,

days of intense compe-

and many walk through the doors all three days. I think it’s because

tition whittle down the

of the family-friendly atmosphere,” Thanks to the support of Buck-

shooters until two finalists

masters’ national and local sponsors, admission to the Expo is just

go head to head on Sunday afternoon. The 2017 Top Bow champion

a can of food, or a $1 donation, split between The Salvation Army

and $15,000 prize winner was Brandon Shehan of Atmore, Alabama.

and Friendship Mission. The food collected and money raised at the

Families at the Expo also enjoyed the Harriott II Riverboat attraction,

doors will allow these agencies to serve more than 150,000 meals

which gave free cruises to approximately 900 Expo attendees.

Buckmasters Top Bow

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CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

ASU’S COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION RENAMED In mid-September, Alabama State University’s College of Business Administration (COBA) hosted a renaming ceremony for its college. During the ceremony, it renamed the school the “Dr. Percy J. Vaughn, Jr. College of Business Administration,” which honors the college’s founding and most beloved dean. Dr. Vaughn and his family were present and, with others in attendance, enjoyed a banquet following the ceremony.  

Zoo supporters enjoy an evening under the stars.

A G REAT E VE NT

CADDELL CONSTRUCTION OPENS NEW OFFICE Caddell Construction Co. (DE), LLC is proud to announce the opening of a new office in historic downtown Bentonville, Arkansas. The Caddell Bentonville team hosted

ZOOBILATION WILDLY SUCCESSFUL Zoobilation, The Montgomery Zoo’s annual fundraiser, was held in mid-September. It drew great crowds ready to dance to live music as well as drink and eat food samplings provided by River Region restaurants all while perusing a vast array of silent auction items and placing bids on their favorites. Thanks to the attendees and major sponsors including Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama, Rita Sabel, Alfa Insurance, Sabel Steel Service Inc. and many others, the event raised more than $100,000 to help the Zoo continue providing the area its wonderful entertainment and education through its hundreds of animals.

a grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony in August, which was attended by local business leaders and four executives from Caddell Construction’s home office in Montgomery. Caddell’s Bentonville team is focused primarily on private, municipal, and federal construction markets in Arkansas and surrounding states, but will also be exploring opportunities nationwide. “We are very excited about increasing Caddell’s footprint in the rapidly growing economies of this region. It was a pleasure to meet members of the Bentonville business community and we look forward to working with local resources. This

EASTER SEALS GETS A NEW HOME

outstanding Bentonville team has the full confidence and

Easter Seals Central Alabama (ESCA), a collection of programs designed to

backing of the entire Caddell organization,” said. Mac

help individuals with physical and mental disabilities, broke ground in late

Caddell, Executive Vice President

August on a new facility set to open in 2018. Baptist Health purchased the property ESCA currently sits on and construction has already begun. The new building, which will be located directly behind the current building just

THE BARKERY EXPANDING

off Southern Boulevard, will offer 13 disability programs for children, adults

The Barkery announced in September the acquisition of

and seniors. “Easter Seals and Baptist Medical Center South have been cor-

Barks & Rec, a business in Wetumpka. “We have been

porate neighbors for more than 50 years,” said Peter Selman, Chief Executive

so blessed with growth and success at our Montgomery

Officer of Baptist Medical Center South. “Timing was opportune for both

location that we felt it was time to expand,” said owner

organizations to orchestrate a land swap that enables our hospital to expand

Michelle Reeder. Barks & Rec opened in Wetumpka a year

our campus footprint and offers Easter Seals a needed facility upgrade. On

ago and has enjoyed success providing daycare, board-

behalf of Baptist Health, we look forward to continuing to grow both organi-

ing and grooming. The Barkery plans to add its handmade

zations on the Southern Boulevard for the benefit of the community for many

dog treats and retail items to the shop. The Barkery also

decades to come.” Debbie Lynn, Executive Director of ESCA added, “Easter

plans to keep the affiliation with Dr. Amy Myers. “Clients

Seals Central Alabama will still offer the same quality disability services and

& their fur babies in Wetumpka have been receiving top

programs we are known for and we look forward to expanding our children’s

notch care from Dr. Myers and we want to continue that

services and serving the community from our new building.”

tradition,” said Reeder.

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CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

ARC REALTY COMES TO MONTGOMERY

GOLDEN SHEARS & MORE OPENS NEW LOCATION

ARC Realty, a full-service real estate brokerage firm,

Mayor Todd Strange was the first customer at Golden Shears & More’s new

announced that it is adding to its already successful

downtown location Grand Opening & Ribbon Cutting in September. The new

real estate operations by expanding into the Mont-

spot is the barbershop, salon and spa’s third location in the River Region. “I

gomery area. Norman Schlemmer from Alfa Realty,

started looking at the downtown market three or

the largest residential real estate brokerage firm in

four years ago,” said owner/operator Reginald

Montgomery, will serve as Managing Partner of ARC

Miller, who has a barbershop/salon on West 3rd

Realty Montgomery. Along with an established agent

Street and inside the Wind Creek Montgomery

force, managing nearly 300 current listings, ARC Realty

casino. “I studied the downtown area and saw

Montgomery will bring ARC’s industry leading practices

all the growth.” He will have six employees at

to the river region. ARC Realty Montgomery also will

the downtown location and four state-of-the-art

include New Waters Realty, the on-site management

barber chairs. He currently has 13 employees, in-

team for The Waters, a Pike Road community. “We are

cluding nine at the West 3rd Street site, which he

extremely excited about this new chapter for ARC,”

has operated since 2003. The downtown location

said ARC Realty Chairman, Tommy Brigham. “We look

will feature a variety of services: men’s and young

forward to expanding our footprint and serving the

men’s haircuts, mustache trim, clipper shave, hair color/hair dyeing and hair

Montgomery community, and we could not have found

tinting; beard tinting/dyeing; old-fashioned hot razor shaves; shampoo and

a better partner than Norman or a more talented team

scalp treatments; facials; manicures; pedicures; and shoe shines. One of the

of REALTORS®.” In four years, ARC Realty has become

featured services is a spa package, which includes haircut, facial, hot razor

one of the fastest-growing brokerage firms in Alabama,

shave, scalp treatment and a box lunch. Complimentary beer and wine will

generating a 2016 sales volume of $460 million and

be served with any service. The downtown site will also feature high-end,

attracting more than 200 top REALTORS®.

customized barber stations with televisions.

Bold Ideas for Rethinking Risk At Inspirien, we partner with doctors and hospitals to fundamentally change the way they think about risk management and the role it plays in their organizations. Our business may be risk financing, but our passion lies in empowering our clients to deliver quality, affordable patient care.

Professional Liability — Workers’ Compensation

inspirien.net 78

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

BERNEY OFFICE SOLUTIONS According to Ben Blakenship, President, Montgomery-based Berney Office Solutions may be an old company (founded in 1964), but it takes full advantage of the newest technology and helps its clients do the same.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES HERE: We have 185 total employees across our seven locations with 75 in Montgomery.

WHAT ARE THE COMPANY’S PRIMARY PRODUCTS AND/ OR SERVICES? Berney Office Solutions is the leader for Business-to-Business sales and service in Alabama and the Florida panhandle. In addition to world-class Xerox office equipment, we also sell and service equipment from leaders such as HP, Brother, Kip and Kyocera. Our services division specializes in Electronic Document Management (EDM), Authentication & Security, Net-

Left to right: Kevin Archer, Ben Blankenship and David Washington.

work Fax Server and Electronic Forms software deployments.

HOW HAS TECHNOLOGY CHANGED YOUR COMPANY? Long gone are the days of drowning in paper to drive progress. Over the past decade, the role of core office equipment has expanded greatly from simple paper output to providing a portal that allows office workers to easily and securely upload, download, process and alter content on the fly. Not only do employees need this functionality in the office, but workers are becoming more mobile, needing technological services while on the go.

WHAT IS THE COMPANY’S BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY? To build relationships with our customers based on helping them meet or exceed their goals and objectives. To do this, we have to be more than a vendor and be a trusted advisor and partner.

WHAT MAKES BERNEY OFFICE SOLUTIONS STAND OUT? Berney Office Solutions has the distinction of being a core dealership for Global Imaging Systems, a nationwide network of industry leaders in their respective markets. In 2007, GIS was acquired by Xerox Corporation bringing to bear one of the most innovative and progressive product lines on the planet. Through GIS’s nationwide (and Xerox’s worldwide) presence, Berney has the reach to provide services in any market while still maintaining local decision-making right here in the River Region.

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR THE COMPANY? We are growing. As we continue to refine the way that we deliver products and services in our current markets, we are finding opportunities in other markets. The work ethic and dedication of the team at Berney will allow us to reach those markets with the same impact that we have right here at home.

LOCATIONS: MONTGOMERY, HUNTSVILLE, BIRMINGHAM, AUBURN, MOBILE, DOTHAN, PENSACOLA, FLA. 866-9-BERNEY / BERNEY.COM 79

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION. REQUIRED FOR PUBLICATION.


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Community

Report ranked the AUM College of Business’s undergraduate program #216 and its part-time Master of Business Administration

MONTGOMERY COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COMPLETE TRAINING

program #143 among the country’s best. The undergraduate ranking was based solely on assessment surveys, and the graduate degree ranking was based in large part on peer assessment. The College of Public Policy and Justice graduate studies program tied for #96, based “solely on opinions of each program’s quality as rated by academic experts at peer institutions,” according to the rankings. “It is an honor for Auburn University at Montgomery and its academic programs to be recognized among the best in the South and in the country,” said AUM Chancellor, Carl A. Stockton, “particularly those programs ranked so highly by our peer institutions. As for our overall rankings, our faculty and staff have worked very hard to extend our reputation for excellence beyond the River Region while continuing to make our programs

2016-2017 ACCA President Bill Stricklend (left) presents a certificate to Montgomery County Commissioner Isaiah Sankey (right) for his completion of the ALGTI 50-hour professional development training program.

Montgomery County Commissioners Isaiah Sankey and Ronda Walker recently joined an elite group of Alabama county officials by each completing 50 hours of professional development train-

more accessible to students who call this region home and those coming to our campus from other parts of the state, the country and the world.”

Achievements BEASLEY ALLEN ATTORNEYS RECOGNIZED Twenty Beasley Allen lawyers were selected for inclusion in the

ing on the responsibilities of the county commission from the Al-

2018 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. Included on the

abama Local Government Training Institute (ALGTI). The commis-

list are the firm’s Principal and Founder, Jere L. Beasley, included

sioners were recognized for this achievement at the Association

since 1991, as well as Principals J. Greg Allen, Michael J. Crow,

of County Commissions of Alabama (ACCA) 89th Annual Conven-

Thomas J. Methvin, J. Cole Portis, W. Daniel “Dee” Miles III, Andy

tion held in August. Referred to as the Commissioner Education

D. Birchfield Jr., Rhon E. Jones, Benjamin E. Baker Jr., Julia Anne

Program, the 50-hour program emphasizes training on financial

Beasley, LaBarron N. Boone, David B. Byrne III, Kendall C. Dun-

management and planning, public works practices, ethical and

son, R. Graham Esdale Jr., Benjamin L. Locklar, P. Leigh O’Dell, W.

legal requirements, personnel administration, economic develop-

Roger Smith III, C. Gibson Vance, E. Frank Woodson, and Navan

ment and community leadership and the roles and responsibilities

Ward Jr.

of public service. “Continuing education for our county officials will always remain one of the association’s priorities for our membership,” said Sonny Brasfield, ACCA Executive Director. “As with any organization, sharing new ideas and information is the best way to grow and prosper. The involvement of county employees and officials only enhances our efforts to improve county govern-

IT CONSULTING FIRM FIRST TO CERTIFY INNOVATION PROFESSIONALS Integrated Computer Solutions, Inc. recently announced Rick Fleming, ICS Vice President, Federal Sales

ment and the services it provides at the local level.”

and Delivery, achieved the status

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT NAMES AUM A TOP UNIVERSITY

al. Fleming is the first person in

U.S. News & World Report recognized Auburn University at Mont-

the certification. “I am thrilled to

gomery’s undergraduate and graduate programs among its 2018

have the opportunity to help bring

regional and national rankings of top colleges and universities. In

additional value to our ICS clients

addition to being named among the top tier of Regional Universi-

in the form of Innovation Management,” said Fleming. “ICS has a

ties - South, AUM was also included (#37) among the Best Public

very strong culture of innovation, of idea creation and transform-

Regional Universities - South, making it the top-ranked university

ing those ideas into business value and revenue growth. ICS pro-

in the River Region. In its national rankings, U.S. News & World

vides training opportunities and formal certifications for multiple

of Certified Innovation Professionthe state of Alabama to achieve

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

members of our team to help our clients tie Innovation to strategy,

GILPIN GIVHAN ATTORNEYS RECEIVE RECOGNITION

quickly respond to rapidly changing markets for products and

Gilpin Givhan announced that three attorneys have been selected

services, while effectively managing investments in research and

for inclusion in the 2018 edition of The Best Lawyers in America,

development.” According to Tom Brazil, the ICS Chief Digital Offi-

one of the legal profession’s oldest and most respected peer-re-

cer, the company continues to evolve and expand its capacity to

view publications. The attorneys recognized are John Ward

provide structured Innovation Portfolio Management. Brazil said,

Weiss, Davis Smith and Robert Gilpin. Gregg B. Everett was again

“We make continuous investments in innovation infrastructure,

selected as a “Super Lawyer” in the area of Health Care Law.

innovation process enhancements, innovation training and certifications, research and idea-gathering tools, knowledge manage-

CADDELL CELEBRATES SAFETY

ment, innovation workshops and innovation reporting dashboards

Caddell recently marked two important safety milestones at

and analytics. ICS has an on-site Capabilities Integration Lab (CIL)

the Navy’s $154 million Nuclear Training Facility project at Joint

that team members are vigorously encouraged to use at will for

Base Charleston, South Carolina. The Caddell team celebrated

this purpose.” Steve Goldsby, ICS President and CEO, described

600,000-plus man-hours with zero OHSA Recordables since No-

ICS’ collaboration efforts that provide Innovation Management in

vember of 2016 and also officially logged more than a million to-

support of community and client objectives. “We work closely with

tal project man-hours since beginning work in August 2014. “This

the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, local colleges and

is a remarkable achievement for Caddell, the Navy and our

universities, federal, state and local governments to introduce,

excellent subcontractors. We have all shared a relentless focus

evaluate and qualify projects that provide growth for both our IT

on safety and the results are clear. Congratulations to the entire

community and our labor markets,” he said. “ICS, along with our

team,” said Mac Caddell, Caddell Construction Executive Vice

partners in our RedTeam Engineering (RTE) joint venture, provide

President. Caddell is building a new Nuclear Power Training

unparalleled expertise in cyber security, agile software develop-

Complex for submarine personnel that will be state-of-the-art

ment, systems engineering, technology, and innovation.”

when completed.

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CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U I C K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S ’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

BELL MEDIA ACHIEVES GOOGLE PREMIER PARTNER Alabama digital marketing agency Bell Media has been named an official Google Premier Partner. Google’s Premier Partner status is the highest level of Google’s Partner program that an agency can achieve and is designated for only a small percentage of the top performing Google Partners. Bell Media is the only locally owned digital marketing agency in Montgomery to earn this achievement. Clockwise from top left:

“Securing a Premier Partner badge isn’t an easy designation to

William C. McGowin,

accomplish in only a couple years,” said Scott Bell, company CEO.

Charles Stewart, W. Stanley Gregory, R. Parker, Robert Emmett Poundstone IV.

“It’s a true testament to the hard work and determination of the team. I’m proud of each and every one of us.” In order to qualify as a Premier Partner, an agency must continuously meet Google’s three requirements: certification, ad spend and performance. Bell Media currently has 26 Google Certified employees. As a Google

BRADLEY ARANT BOULT CUMMINGS ATTORNEYS RECOGNIZED

Premier Partner, Bell Media will receive additional resources,

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP announced that five of the

ter quality advertising campaigns for all of its clients. Bell Media

firm’s Montgomery attorneys have been listed in the 2018 edition

achieved Premier Partner Status in less than two years since it

of The Best Lawyers in America, one of the most highly regarded

was first designated Partner Status in December 2015. Bell Media

attorney referral publications. The following Bradley attorneys in

was also recently named to Inc. Magazine’s 2017 list of America’s

Montgomery were selected: William C. McGowin, Charles Stewart,

fastest-growing private companies, marking the third time the

W. Stanley Gregory, R. Parker, Robert Emmett Poundstone IV.

Company has been recognized for this achievement.

training and support with Google’s Partner team, resulting in bet-

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CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U I C K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S ’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

IVY LEAGUE SCHOOL TAPS ASU OFFICER

experience and by shadowing Air Force personnel. “Representing

Alabama State University’s (ASU) Vice President of Student Af-

Det 019 was truly an honor and privilege, especially being the

fairs was selected for the inaugural cohort of the Minority Serving

only one from my Detachment who experienced ‘Ops AF’ this

Institution’s (MSI) Aspiring Leaders

summer,” Watson said. “It’s a great feeling knowing that when

program at the Penn Center for

someone asks where I am from, I can always speak so highly of

Minority Serving Institutions (CMSI)

Alabama and the ROTC Program that I call home.” The cadets

at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr.

participated in the program at different Air Force bases around

Davida Haywood is one of 21 impres-

the country. Their placement was based on their career interests.

sive leaders from around the nation

Watson was placed at Moody AFB in Valdosta, Georgia, which

who will attend the first MSI Aspiring

specializes in special operations and combat rescue, which is

Leaders Forum in November.

where she wants to serve.

“I am quite honored to have been

Awards & Honors

selected for the program; and even more thrilled to do so as the Vice President of Student Affairs at Alabama State University,” said Haywood. “I look forward to engaging with other like-minded colleagues from around the nation who are committed to serving at and leading Minority Serving Institutions. I stand on the shoulders of many. I am excited about this opportunity and will represent ASU to the fullest.” During the three-day forum, Haywood will attend discussion/workshop sessions on topics such as the presidential nomination process, managing relationships with faculty, using data to make decisions, fiscal management, strategic fundraising, assessing student learning and navigating the media.

CADDELL CONSTRUCTION AWARDED SPECIAL TACTICS FACILITY Caddell has been awarded a contract for the construction of a new Special Tactics Facility for the elite Special Operations Forces at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The project consists of three separate buildings: a main headquarters building, a medical training facility, and a combat support training center. A varied project scope includes sophisticated command and operations suites; an auditorium; conference rooms; training centers for logistics, flight and trauma operations; a gym; an aquatic center; classrooms; and a parachute packing and drying tower. The project is scheduled to be completed by August 2019. Caddell has been building

STARKE AGENCY IN THE SPOTLIGHT Montgomery’s Starke Agency has been designated as one of the Top 10 Largest Commercial Insurance Agencies in Alabama for the 2016 fiscal year. This isn’t the first time the agency has ranked amongst the Top 10 Insurance agencies in the state. As the River

major projects at Fort Bragg for more than 28 years.

BEASLEY ALLEN LAWYER APPOINTED TO PLAINTIFFS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Beasley Allen lawyer Navan Ward Jr. has been appointed to the

Region grows, Starke Agency remains a cornerstone as a local,

Plaintiffs Executive Committee (PEC) for the multidistrict litigation

independently owned insurance agency. Trey Starke, CPCU, CIC,

(MDL) involving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drugs linked to kidney

President of Starke Agency, Inc. explained what the agency as a

damage. Ward is one of five attorneys appointed to the PEC. The

whole has done to keep Starke Agency one of Alabama’s largest

U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) granted the

insurance agencies. “We offer a multi-discipline approach in com-

plaintiffs’ motion to consolidate PPI in the U.S. District Court in the

mercial, contract surety/bonds, personal lines and benefits. Our

District of New Jersey under Judge Claire C. Cecchi. “I’m honored

unparalleled expertise in the region allows for one-stop service,

to be selected to work with this incredibly talented group of attor-

eliminating coverage gaps and duplication and allows for in-depth

neys to lead this nationwide litigation,” said Ward, who in January

risk management.”

helped open and began working from the firm’s new Atlanta

ASU ROTC CADET SELECTED FOR NATIONWIDE PROGRAM Alabama State University Air Force ROTC detachment 019 student

office. “The evidence of these products’ defect is very apparent in the early stages of this litigation, so I look forward to continuing our efforts to provide a successful resolution to these claims for all of our clients.”

Laken Watson was one of only 35 AFROTC cadets from across “Operations Air Force.” The two-week program is designed to

ASU RECEIVES AWARD FOR MENTOR-PROTÉGÉ EXCELLENCE

give cadets the opportunity to experience first-hand almost every-

Alabama State University’s (ASU) College of Business Adminis-

thing an operational Air Force base has to offer. Cadets experi-

tration (COBA) along with its Mentor-Protégé partners Certified

ence life on an Air Force base through the use of tours, hands-on

Technical Experts, Inc. (CTE) and Tec-Masters (TMI) are the recipi-

the country selected to participate in an Air Force program titled

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

ents of the U. S. Department of Defense’s prestigious Nunn-Perry Award. The award recognizes successful mentor-protégé teams that have excelled in technical developments, cost efficiencies

BUSI NE SS BUZ Z Focus

and increased business opportunities for small businesses. As the training arm of the program, ASU’s COBA partners with TMI to assist CTE in developing quality systems and to provide technical and marketing support. The prestigious Nunn-Perry Award,

MONTGOMERY COUNTY COMMISSIONER RECOGNIZED

named in honor of former Senator Sam Nunn and former Secre-

Montgomery County Commissioner Elton Dean Sr. was

tary of Defense William Perry, was first awarded in 1995.

recently presented with the Tenure in Office Award by

ARCHITECTS HONORED

the Association of County Commissions of Alabama (ACCA) for his 16 years of service to county government and the state of Alabama. The award was presented in August at the association’s 89th Annual Convention. “Commissioner Dean deserves the gratitude of all Alabamians for his dedication to public service and personal sacrifice,” said 2016-2017 ACCA President Bill Stricklend. “Considering the

Pictured left to right: Nick Vanysoc, Alex Reeves and Nick Bishop

extraordinary challenges county commissioners face every

Nick Vanysoc, Alex Reeves and Nick Bishop of Seay, Seay and

day, Commissioner Dean has continually served his constit-

Litchfield were presented with AIA medallions at the organiza-

uents with honor and pride, and he deserves a pat on the

tion’s August chapter meeting. The AIA medallion is awarded to

back from everyone in Montgomery County.” ACCA annu-

newly registered architects as a means of celebrating their hard

ally presents the Tenure in Office Award to honor commis-

work and achievement in the lengthy process of becoming a

sioners who have served for at least 16 years in office. The

registered architect. Seay, Seay and Litchfield now has a total of

award is given for four-year increments thereafter.

12 registered architects.

ASU STUDENT RECEIVES WHITE HOUSE HONOR A student at Alabama State University (ASU) was recently named

leadership and civic engagement. The position that King was

an HBCU White House All-Star

named to is considered by the federal government and White

by the White House Initiative

House to be among the highest-ranking student leader positions

on Historically Black Colleges

in the nation. King will serve as an ambassador and provide out-

and Universities (HBCUs). David

reach opportunities and communicate to other students the value

King, a native of Gary, Indiana, and

of receiving a good education. Through social media and his

a senior at ASU (who is majoring

relationships with community-based organizations, King will share

in political science with a minor in

proven practices that support opportunities for all young people

public administration), has been

to realize their educational and career potential. He will partici-

awarded this prestigious national

pate in the White House HBCU National Conference, national and

honor. “It is an honor to be select-

regional events and webinars on a wide range of disciplines that

ed as a 2017-2018 White House All-Star Student Ambassador, but

support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional de-

to me it’s not about the title, it’s about the impact and the need for

velopment. Dr. Davida Haywood, vice president of ASU’s Student

change,” King said. “I am going to use this position as yet another

Affairs division, said she is excited about this opportunity for yet

opportunity to influence change in the lives of my peers.” Com-

another one of the University’s students. “We are certainly proud

prised of undergraduate, graduate and professional students, the

of David King as he accepts this honor, not only for himself, but for

“All-Stars” are recognized for their accomplishments in academics,

the Hornet Nation,” Haywood said.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

HEALTH SERVICES, INC.

MONTGOMERY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

2905 East South Boulevard, Montgomery, AL 36111 334-288-0009 • www.healthcareservicesinc.org Gilbert Darrington-CEO / Health Care Services

3265 McGehee Road, Montgomery, AL 36111 334-386-1749 • www.montgomerychristianschool.org Kathi Atkins-Principal / Private Schools

ASPEN DENTAL

GOLDEN SHEARS & MORE

6941 EastChase Loop, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-530-5000 • www.aspendental.com Eddie Jackson-Dentist / Dentists

22 Monroe Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-7800 Reginald Miller-Owner/CEO / Beauty Salon/Spa/Barber

CHARLIE DAVIS MOTORZ, LLC

ALABAMA STEEL SUPPLY, INC

830 Coliseum Boulevard, Montgomery, AL 36109 334-356-0610 • www.charliedavismotorz.com Charlie Davis-Owner / Automobile Dealers-Used

P.O. Box 11251, Montgomery, AL 36111 334-834-1505 • www.alabamasteel.com Jerald Labovitz-President / Steel

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Central Alabama’s Best Business Source

Make Your Mark. MARKET DIRECTLY TO MONTGOMERY ’ S MOST INFLUENTIAL BUSINESS LEADERS TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL VOLUME 9 ISSUE 1 / JANUARY 2017

MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL V O L U M E 9 I S S U E 3 / M AY 2 0 1 7

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MBJ

WHY TOURISM=

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT F O R M O N T G O M E RY

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Small Biz, BIG Impact

EYES AHEAD:

WHAT SMALL BUSINESS LOOKS LIKE IN MONTGOMERY

CHAMBER’S HIGH I M PA C T P R I O R I T I E S

GOING UP

CHAMBER CHAIRMAN DAVID REED IS building ON A strong LEGACY

LANDING GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS F LY I N G H I G H : NEW F-35 FLEET KEEPS TUSKEGEE AIRMEN SOARING

BUILDING BACK:

G R O W I N G R E A L E S TAT E IN THE RIVER REGION

MB_JAN17_Issue1_FINAL.indd 1

//

R E S E R V E N O W.

PLUS:

HISTORIC HOT DOGS HOW TO HIRE AN INTERN

7/27/17 3:37 PM

Our Content

Our Readers

We Reach

IS CENTERED ON BUSINESS NEWS

ARE COMMUNITY-FOCUSED,

INDUSTRY STAKEHOLDERS,

AND PERSPECTIVES FROM

DIVERSE, EDUCATED, AFFLUENT

MILITARY, DECISION MAKERS

MEMBERS AND INDUSTRY LEADERS.

AND INFLUENTIAL.

AND SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS.

C O N TA C T S A L E S R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S AT 3 3 4 - 57 8 -7 8 1 0 .

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CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

THE MISSION HOUSE

SOL RESTAURANTE MEXICANO & TAQUERIA

461 Court Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-230-9676 Keary Foster-President / Event-Venue

3962 Atlanta Highway, Montgomery, AL 36109 334-592-8250 Josh Luna-Manager / Restaurants-Mexican

SERENITY COUNSELING PROFESSIONALS, LLP

BURN BOOT CAMP MONTGOMERY

8136 Old Federal Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-356-4272 Marion Johnson-CEO / Counseling

8888 Minnie Brown Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-676-2668 • www.burnbootcamp.com/montgomery Tabetha Daugherty-Owner, Kim Plourde-Owner Fitness Center / Health & Fitness

GUARDIAN CREDIT UNION

JES PHLEBOTOMY HEALTH SERVICES, LLC

700 Hyundai Boulevard, Montgomery, AL 36105 334-244-9999 • www.myguardiancu.com Charis Granthum-Branch Manager / Credit Unions

8416 Crossland Loop, Suite B, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-647-1183 Jessica Rogers-Director / Health Care Services

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS New Members W ELCOME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

ASSOC IATIONS / N ON -P R OF I T

D E L I V E RY S E RV IC E - FO O D

National Federation of the Blind Montgomery Chapter Robert Kelly P.O. Box 20463 Montgomery, AL 36120 334-224-2403 www.nfbal.org

WAITR Kevin Vancor 1100 Bertrand Drive Layfayette, LA 70506 334-669-5866 www.waitrapp.com D E N TISTS

BEAUT Y SALON S / S PAS

Warehouse 9013 Benji Valentina 9013 Wares Ferry Road Montgomery, AL 36117 334-239-9273 CHURCHES/M I N I STR I E S

Aldersgate United Methodist Church Richard Williams 6610 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-272-6152 www.aldersgateumc.org COFFEEBR EAK S E RV I C E / S UP P L I E S

Community Coffee Stacey Lancaster 340 Industrial Drive Birmingham, AL 35209 205-527-6275 www.communitycoffee.com COFFEE HOUSE & TE A R OOM

Prevail Union Montgomery Phillip Johns One Court Square, Suite 102 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-593-8816 www.prevailunionmgm.com COUNSELING

Serenity Counseling Professionals, LLP Marion Johnson 8136 Old Federal Road Montgomery, AL 36117 334-356-4272

Aspen Dental Melvin Phillips 6941 EastChase Loop Montgomery, AL 36117 334-530-5000 www.aspendental.com Willis Dental Care Pat Holt 8161 Seaton Place Montgomery, AL 36116 334-260-2929 www.willisdentalcare.com

NOVEMBER NEW MEMBERS F IN A N C IA L P L A N N E R /A DV ISOR

Edward Jones, Kenneth Davis Kenneth Davis 4822 Woods Crossing Montgomery, AL 36106 334-669-1712 www.edwardjones.com F IN A N C IA L S E RV IC E S

E M P LOYM E N T AG E N C IE S

Automation Personnel Services, Inc. Amanda Simpson 6983 Halcyon Park Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-274-1004 www.apstemps.com E V E N T-V E N U E

Dream Field Farms Cathy Ellis 6376 Highway 82 Fitzpatrick, AL 36029 334-534-6976 www.dreamfieldfarms.com FA B R IC AT E D M E TA L P R O D U C TS

Diversified Erecting Services Carey Dennis 174 Thompson Road Lapine, AL 36046 334-537-4622

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INTL FCStone Financial, Inc. David Langham 107 St. Francis Street, Suite 990 Mobile, AL 36602 251-295-9432 www.intlfcstone.com One Main Financial Jeffrey W. Key 1621 Perry Hill Road Montgomery, AL 36106 334-221-9380 www.onemainofficial.com F U R N IT U R E

Johnny Marvins Paint & Furniture Yancey Hutcheson 1914 Mulberry Street Montgomery, AL 36106 334-265-1933 H E A LT H & F IT N E SS

Asea Michelle Burgess 8213 Fairhaven Lane Montgomery, AL 36117 941-585-2377 www.amazingmolecules.com


CHAMBER NEWS New Members

H E A LT H C A R E S E RV IC E S

Jes Phlebotomy Health Services, LLC Jessica Rogers 8416 Crossland Loop, Suite B Montgomery, AL 36117 334-647-1183

Propelled Technologies LLC Anwar Shahid P.O. Box 11776 Montgomery, AL 36117 334-391-2226 www.propelledtechnologies. com

H E A R IN G A ID S /IN ST R U M E N TS

Sigmatech, Inc. Brian Simmons 4901-C Corporate Drive Huntsville, AL 35805 410-306-6608 www.sigmatech.com

Hearing Solutions of Alabama Beth Hoven 7940 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-521-7501 www.hearingsolutionsal.com H OT E L S /M OT E L S

H I B Lee Street, LLC Jon Deal 275 Lee Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-8859 www.kyserproperties.com IN D IV ID UA L S

Olan Waldrop Olan G. Waldrop P.O. Box 241394 Montgomery, AL 36124 334-538-3264 IN FO R M AT IO N T E C H N O LO GY F IR M S

Intrepid Ronald Betts 360 B Quality Circle, NW Suite 250 Huntsville, AL 35806 256-705-6800 www.intrepidinc.com Netelysis Boyd Stephens PO Box 230546 Montgomery, AL 36123 334-213-1128 www.netelysis.com

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

JE W E L E R S /JE W E L RY

Marquirette's Exquisite Jewelry Marguirette Fields 8163 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-270-0074 www.marquirettes.com L E G A L S E RV IC E S AT TO R N E YS

Fritz Law Firm Michael A. Fritz 25 South Court Street, Suite 200 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-230-9790 www.fritzlawalabama.com The Serious Injury Law Group, P.C. Charles James P.O. Box 781 Montgomery, AL 36101 334-832-1001 www.seriouslawyers.com LU M BE R /WO O D P R O D U C TS - M F R .

International Crating & Assembly Frazer McCurdy 2730 Gunter Park Drive, West Montgomery, AL 36109 334-271-5100 www.ica-corp.com


CHAMBER NEWS New Members

MACHINERY-M FR .

J & P Khamken Industries, Inc. Pat Khamken 3445 Lower Wetumpka Road Montgomery, AL 36110-1728 334-269-9427 www.jpkii.com

Taste Clint Hahn 5251 Hampstead High Street, Unit 100 Montgomery, AL 36116 334-676-4333 www.tastemgm.com

NU RS ING HOM ES/ASS I STE D LI VI NG

R E STAUR A N TS -FAST FO O D

Angels for the Elderly, Inc. Janice Lucas 40 Angels Court Montgomery, AL 36109 334-270-8050 www.angelsfortheelderly.com

Ameri-Foods Minesh Patel 23192 Troy Highway Ramer, AL 36069 334-584-7035 www.burgerim.com

P RI VATE SC HOOLS

R OOF I N G COM PA N I E S

Montgomery Christian School Christy Jarrett 3265 McGehee Road Montgomery, AL 36111 334-386-1749 montgomerychristianschool.org

Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing Natalie Sautter 14429 SW 2nd Place, Suite G30 Newberry, FL 32669 888-393-0335 www.gulfcoastsupply.com

RADI O & BR OADCASTI N G CO MPANIES

WTXK ESPN-The Ticket Al Stroh 1359 Carmichael Way Montgomery, AL 36106 334-517-1210 RE STAURANTS

TR AC TOR / TR A I L E R SA L E S & R E PA I R

Stone Equipment Company, Inc. Andy Huggins P.O. Box 241585 Montgomery, AL 36124 334-625-6585 www.stoneequipmentco.com

Full Moon Bar-B-Que Chris Woodward 7660 EastChase Parkway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-676-5999 www.fullmoonbbq.com Caribbean Island Delight @ Dexter Melissa Smith 36 Dexter Avenue Montgomery, AL 36104 334-356-5641

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Numbers reflect August 2017 over August 2016.

Economic Intel TOURISM

TRANSPORTATION 24,549 TOTAL PASSENGERS IN AUGUST 2017

+ 6.1%

Source: MGM-Montgomery Regional Airport

YTD REVPAR

OCCUPANCY RATE

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR SECTORS GOING UP

(REVENUE PER AVAILABLE ROOM) IS UP

+ 4.1%

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

+ 2.6%

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES EDUCATION &HEALTH SERVICES

+ 2.6% + 1.1%

MANUFACTURING

ROOM DEMAND

+ 7.7%

+10.7% OVER 2016

CONTINUES TO OUTPACE ROOM SUPPLY

+ 1.5%

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

HOUSING

$848,474.92

AUGUST 2017 LODGINGS TAX COLLECTIONS

AUGUST 2017 SALES

Source: Smith Travel Research Report, City of Montgomery

+ 5.8 AVERAGE SALE PRICE

$176,500 AVERAGE SALE PRICE

-10.7%

LABOR FORCE

TOTAL HOMES LISTED FOR SALE

+ 1.7%

= 2,289

EMPLOYED

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate MGM Area

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MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Post Office Box 79 Montgomery, AL 36101

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Profile for Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

Montgomery Business Journal - November 2017  

Montgomery Business Journal - November 2017