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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL V O L U M E 9 I S S U E 3 / M AY 2 0 1 7

MBJ

WHY TOURISM=

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT F O R M O N T G O M E RY

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Small Biz, BIG Impact WHAT SMALL BUSINESS LOOKS LIKE IN MONTGOMERY

BUILDING BACK:

G R O W I N G R E A L E S TAT E IN THE RIVER REGION

PLUS:

HISTORIC HOT DOGS HOW TO HIRE AN INTERN


I CARE

about my community.

So should my bank.

I could have opened a drugstore anywhere in Montgomery, but I picked a neighborhood that needed it. River Bank made borrowing the money easy when other banks didn’t. They offer something you just won’t find at those big banks–respect.

That’s how I treat my customers. And that’s how the folks at River Bank treat me. James Jones, RPh, Owner, Jones Drugs

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and

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10

30

CONTENTS MAY 2017

THIS ISSUE: 10 16 30 35

Small Business in Montgomery Greetings from Montgomery

CHAMBER NEWS

Building Back

08 Events

Franchise Facts

48 Connect 50 Connect Resource Guide 18 #MyMGM

54 Members on the Move

22 Powerhouse Q&A

60 Business Buzz

25 Member Profiles

66 Members in the News

44 Regional Impact

70 Ribbon Cuttings

46 GiveBack

75 New Members

52 Small Business Briefcase

78 Intel

4

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


S


GIVE mom A GIFT SHE WILL LOVE.

MBJ

THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT Randall L. George DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS Jina Miniard

EXPLORE MEDIA

Everyone can appreciate a thorough clean from The Maids.

PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

Pam Mashburn

Jennifer Stewart Kornegay

ART DIRECTOR

DESIGN

Erika Rowe Tracy

Heather Cooper, Shelby Berry

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORIAL Jennifer Kornegay, Wendi Lewis PHOTOGRAPHERS Josh Moates/Kim Box Photography, Robert Fouts, David Robertson Jr., Bryan Carter, Shelby Berry ON THE COVER Montgomery Small Business owners Lee Drumheller,

Fred and Nita Johnson, Sieu Tang Wood, Kym Darveau and Ashley Jernigan. / By Josh Moates/Kim Box Photography ADVERTISING exploreMedia / 334-578-7810 / pam@exploremedia.org MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Post Office Box 79, Montgomery, Alabama 36101

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277-7749 www.MAIDS.com

Telephone: 334-834-5200 • mbj@montgomerychamber.com © Copyright 2017 exploreMedia and the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved. MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MISSION STATEMENT

Committed to exceptional service, the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce works to improve the economic well-being of the business community and enhance the quality of life of the area through the creation and preservation of jobs. The Montgomery Business Journal (USPS NO. 025553) is published bi-monthly by exploreMedia for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334) 834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Periodicals Postage Paid at Montgomery Alabama, 36119+9998, USPS NO. 025553. Volume 9, Issue 3. POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 79, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36101, or email mbj@montgomerychamber.com. The Montgomery Business Journal welcomes sto-

Referred for a reason.

ry ideas from its readers. Email to: editor@montgomerychamber.com. Subscriptions are a part of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce dues structure. Subscriptions and bulk subscriptions can also be purchased per year at www.montgomerychamber.com/mbjsub.


CHAMBER NEWS

Events +

MA RK YO UR C A L E NDAR S FOR THE SE UP COMING C HAMBE R E V E NTS

60 Minute Coffees & Business After Hours

MAY Chamber Golf Classic

11

RTJ Golf Trail at Capitol Hill

The Chamber Golf Classic is the River

These popular networking events are the perfect place to exchange business cards and meet potential customers.

Region’s premier business golf tournament. Golfers network on a beautiful golf course with Chamber members, elected officials, community leaders and potential clients.

05/25

Presenting Sponsor: Kalm Services, LLC

Chamber Member Orientation May 17 and August 2 from 8 - 9 am at the Chamber of Commerce Join other members for this informal orientation and get an overview of the Chamber’s mission and history from the Chamber President. You’ll also have an opportunity to sell your business and network. Sponsor: CharterHR

Business After Hours Sponsor & Location: Answered Prayer Home Care Services

06/14 60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: Brantwood Children’s Home

06/29 Business After Hours Sponsor & Location: Larkspur Management, LLC

07/12 60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: Troy University

07/27 Business After Hours Sponsor & Location: JMR&H Architecture

JUN Military Appreciation Day

15

08/9

9 am - 5 pm, Montgomery Zoo

The Chamber’s Military Appreciation Day at the Zoo is a fun day for all military personnel

60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: Montgomery Regional Airport

08/24

and their families. With a valid military ID (active duty & retired), the entire family can enjoy

Business After Hours Sponsor: Verizon; Location: Moore Company Realty

a great day at the Montgomery Zoo with FREE lunch and admission. Presenting Sponsor: Guardian Credit Union

All Ears

Upcoming Workshops

BUSINESS Resource Center

Business 101: Start it Up! March 7, 21; April 4, 18; May 2, 16, from 4 - 6 pm at the BRC No registration required. $10 fee. Establish a strong foundation for your new or existing business. Topics covered include locating financing, writing a business plan and finding expert advice. Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC Business Tax Update July 13, 11 am - 1 pm at the Alabama Department of Revenue The seminar covers business income taxes, state and local sales taxes, property taxes and business license requirements. Registration is required. Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC

+

//

BizTalk MGM - The Official Podcast for Small Business in MGM Every Monday at 6 pm on WVAS 90.7FM, Montgomery Chamber staff plus host Melissa Johnson Warnke from the Alabama Retail Association will talk with business experts on topics that are important to small businesses.

Sponsor: MAX

8

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Register online

Register online for Business Resource Center events and webinars at montgomerychamber.com/events


MONTGOMERY AREA C HAM BE R OF COM M E RC E

TROY U N IVE RSITY

OUR TROJAN WARRIOR SPIRIT Monica S., Graduate Student Computer Science. Hyderabad, India.

TROY University is a proud partner of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. Chamber members are eligible for 10% tuition scholarships and application fee waivers. For more information, visit troy.edu/Montgomery or call 1-800-414-5756.

MONTGOMERY

© 2017 Troy University

Now more than ever, Troy Montgomery is fueling success. At our state university, working professionals are getting the degrees they need to not only seize opportunities but to also create them. That’s progress. That’s the Trojan Warrior Spirit, and it’s alive and well at Troy University. 9

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


WHY IT MATTERS THESE ARE THE PLACES OWNED AND RUN BY FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS

SMALL BUSINESS IMPACT

SMALL BUSINESS IS A KEY COMPONENT OF THE CHAMBER’S BUSINESS STRATEGY AND FOR GOOD REASON by JENNIFER S. KORNEGAY

+

MORE THAN

12,000

ENTREPRENEURS AND SMALL BUSINESSES MENTORED, COUNSELED AND TRAINED

+

MEET LOCALS THAT ARE MEMBERS, OLD AND NEW, OF MONTGOMERY’S SMALL BUSINESS COMMUNITY.

AT THE CHAMBER’S BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTER


Around 100,000

“OUT OF 150,000 JOBS IN THE TRI-COUNTY AREA,

TRI-COUNTY JOBS COME FROM SMALL BUSINESSES

T

THE TOP 10 BIGGEST COMPANIES COMBINED ARE ONLY RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT 40,000 TO 50,000 OF THEM. THE REST COME FROM SMALL BUSINESS.”

They may not generate billions of dollars in

bigger businesses need to operate. “They

revenue, but small businesses are the engine

are

complementary,

really,”

Deravi

said.

that drives our economy forward. Whether they have five, 50 or 500 employees, small

Plus, small businesses don’t always stay that

businesses account for the majority of new

way. Most successful mega-corporations be-

employment. According to the Small Business

gan as a small business, proving that small

Administration, they have generated more than

businesses are a crucial hub of innovation.

60 percent of all new jobs in our country since 1995 and paid 44 percent of private payroll in

But the ability to survive, thrive and grow can

the United States.

be hindered by challenges, many that are specific to small businesses, as Deravi explained.

NOT SMALL NUMBERS The SBA defines

They are equally important in Montgomery, ac-

“The amount of regulatory requirements, from

cording to Dr. Keivan Deravi, economics pro-

permits to safety and healthcare rules, can be

fessor at AUM and Dean of its College of Pub-

overwhelming for a small business, especially

lic Policy & Justice. “Small businesses are the

any business with fewer than 25 employees,”

foundation of our economy. They generate the

he said. “Larger businesses can afford to hire

bulk of job creation and income here,” he said.

the manpower to deal with these things.” Hav-

“Out of 150,000 jobs in the tri-county area, the

ing enough cash flow can prove difficult too.

top 10 biggest companies combined are only

“Matching Social Security for employees is a

responsible for about 40,000 to 50,000 of

big drain on cash flow, and that can be a hur-

them. The rest come from small business.”

dle,” Deravi said.

In this way, they form the backbone of our

These and other issues show why govern-

making up 99.7 percent

communities. They are the places owned

ment leadership that understands the value of

of all business in the

and run by our friends and neighbors: our

small businesses is vital for a healthy econo-

country. Source: U.S. Small

restaurants, clothing stores, dry cleaners,

my. “There’s just no question about it, without

Business Administration

accountants, the people and places who

small businesses our economy can’t function,”

provide many products and services that

Deravi said.

a small business as ONE

WITH FEWER THAN 500 EMPLOYEES, and there are approximately

28.8 million small businesses in the United States,

“While economic impact numbers are dominated by large businesses, small businesses have a huge impact in the number of employees they have collectively, and therefore, the payroll dollars that they circulate.” -DR. KEIVAN DERAVI

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE TOOLS

The Chamber’s Business Resource

Center connects you to the tools and resources you need to start a business or grow your

business. The BRC offers one-on-one counseling and a small business resource guide, along with some specific webinars, workshops and events tailored to grow your business and help it thrive.

11

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


LOVING LOCAL THESE SMALL BUSINESSES ARE COMMITTED TO MONTGOMERY. CONSIDER SHOWING THEM—AND OTHER LOCALLY OWNED SMALL BUSINESSES—SOME LOVE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSH MOATES/KIM BOX PHOTOGRAPHY

WOMEN WORKING TOGETHER Getting down to business and

YELLOWHAMMER CAFE

leading change was on the

OWNER: KYM DARVEAU OPENED: SEPTEMBER 2016

agenda at the Montgomery

While helping a friend manage a few

first-ever Women in Business

of his restaurants, Kym Darveau put a

Breakfast held on February

few of her grandmother’s and mother’s

10, just one of the many

recipes on the menus, and they got rave

small-business-benefitting

reviews. “Folks loved them,” she said.

events that the Chamber sup-

Sieu Tang Wood first came to Montgom-

So when her friend closed his eateries,

ports each year. More than

ery in 1985 after starting her alterations

Darveau remembered how well her fam-

50 women entrepreneurs,

businesses in Alaska in 1975. A contract

ily’s food had been received. “I thought

undergraduate business

to do alterations with Gunter Air Force

maybe I should try my own place,” she

students and area profession-

Base that soon expanded to include

said. The Prattville native served in the

als were drawn to the event,

contracts with other area military bases

Air Force but ended up back in the

which provided insight from

brought her to the River Region, but in

River Region and knew it was where

a panel of the communi-

the 1990s, she shut down her military

she ought to base her business. “I love

ty’s leading business women,

business and opened her first Tang’s

seeing people love my food, and this is

including Lisa McGinty,

Alterations shop to serve the public. She

home to me, so I opened Yellowhammer

Executive Director Entre-

now has four locations of Tang’s in Mont-

Café here,” she said. “It’s also special

preneurial Development &

gomery and one in Prattville. Wood has

for me to be so close to Maxwell Air

Acceleration at the Chamber’s

stepped back a bit, retaining ownership

Force Base. I feel a real kinship with

Business Resource Center.

of her stores but letting her employees

others in the military and enjoy serving

Topics included Overcom-

manage and make most of the decisions,

them.” Yellowhammer Café serves them,

ing Challenges to Starting a

although she is always paying close

and others, classic comfort food like

Business, Unique Challenges

attention. “I want to ensure the quality of

meat-n-three lunches and hearty break-

to Women in the Workplace,

the brand I worked hard to create,” she

fast items like French-toast-wrapped

The Critical Role of Network-

said. And she stressed why she chose

Conecuh Sausage and other twists on

ing and What is Needed to

to build that brand here. “I’ve been to

traditional Southern-food favorites.

Encourage Entrepreneurship

so many places, beautiful places, like

Among Women.

California, Alaska, Hawaii, but when I first

Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.’s

+

BE PART OF THE ACTION

FIND A FULL LIST OF WEBINARS AND WORKSHOPS AT MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM/ EVENTS

12

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

TANG’S ALTERATIONS OWNER: SIEU TANG WOOD OPENED: 1990s

came to Montgomery, I knew I wanted to stay here and do business here,” she said. “I like the small, comfortable, friendly feeling here and the wonderful support I’ve gotten from my customers here. I can travel to all those other places, but here is where I want to live and work.”


13

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


ONE TO WATCH

“Montgomery small businesses are the heartbeat of our community.

90%

of Chamber members are small businesses with less than

100

LITTLE RED CUPCAKE OWNERS: FRED AND NITA JOHNSON

OPENED: SEPTEMBER 2014 When co-owner of Little Red Cupcake Nita Jonson’s brother-in-

employees. In addition, these small businesses are major supporters of our

law was traveling for work, he tried a

local schools and non-profit

cupcake at a big-city bakery that was

organizations. The

doing lots of business. He was less than impressed. “He told Nita her cupcakes were way better and that she should

Chamber works continuously to support the

UNTETHERED DRONE WORKS

OWNER: LEE DRUMHELLER OPENED: JANUARY 2017 When licensed pilot and plane salesman Lee Drumheller saw an opportunity to turn a hobby into a business, he didn’t hesitate, opening Untethered Drone Works only a few months ago. “I got into flying drones for fun but then saw the chance to use them to provide a service not many are offering here,” he said. The company offers aerial photography and videography captured using a drone aircraft. “We are cost effective, and can do

open a shop,” said Nita’s husband Fred.

needs of our small business

“That’s how it started.” The Montgomery

community by creating

since a drone can get closer and hover,

programs and initiatives

and it is less limited by weather,” he said.

natives were high-school sweethearts and came back home after Fred retired from the military. He told her if she wanted to have a shop, he would help. She did and he did, and they dubbed

designed to foster business growth and development, which ultimately creates

their place Little Red Cupcake in honor

jobs for our citizens.”

of Nita’s red velvet cake that Fred and

things that other aerial photography can’t,

Plus, the company’s DJI Phantom 4 drone is capable of shooting high-resolution 4k still images as well as 4k video. Customers range from companies looking to add something new to their advertising efforts and wedding photographers ready to

many others loved. Today, the

give their clients something special to

business is mostly a family affair with

commercial developers in need of map-

Nita’s mother and the couple’s two

ping and pre-site surveys for construction

nieces on the payroll. They all get a

projects. Drumheller stressed why his

kick out of watching people eat Nita’s

pilot background is crucial. “Safety is important,” he said. “That’s where my

sweet treats. “They take a bite and their eyes roll back in their heads,” Fred said. “We love that look; we love giving joy through cupcakes.”

- TEMISHA MITCHELL YOUNG, DIRECTOR,

knowledge and experience give me an

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION, MONTGOMERY

advantage.” While advances in technolo-

AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

gy have made his business possible, he knows old adages still matter. “It’s a new idea using new technology, but great customer service is still key.”

14

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


15

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS

FRAN CHISING

FACTS by WENDI LEWIS

Franchising provides opportunities for business ownership and growth. Starting a small business is a dream for entrepreneurs, but it can be a daunting prospect involving a huge investment of time and resources. On the flip side, a successful small business owner may find her products or services in

WHO REGULATES FRANCHISES?

high demand, and want to take advantage of

In the United States, franchises are regulated

that popularity to grow the business. In both

by law at the state level. There also is one

cases, franchising may provide a viable path.

federal regulation established in 1979 by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The Fran-

WHAT IS A FRANCHISE?

chise Rule requires franchisers to provide all potential franchisees with a disclosure docu-

A franchise is a type of license that allows one

ment containing 23 specific items of informa-

party to have access to a business’ propri-

tion about the offered franchise, its officers and

etary knowledge and procedures for doing

other franchisees.

business. An example most people are readily familiar with is the fast food industry. A customer can visit a Burger King in Colorado and have

Should you franchise?

WHO CAN FRANCHISE?

PROS OF FRANCHISING YOUR BUSINESS: • Expand your established brand across different markets • Passively earn good revenues

CONS

OF FRANCHISING YOUR BUSINESS:

almost exactly the same experience if they visit

Selling a franchise is not limited to big busi-

• More staff needed to support

a Burger King in Alabama. Standards apply to

nesses like fast food giants. Franchising is

franchisees

provide a consistent menu and environment

also a good opportunity for a small locally

• Investment of time and money

that meets an expectation.

owned business to expand regionally or even

needed to complete franchise legal

nationally.

paperwork

By purchasing a franchise license, the fran-

• Discrepancies in service or bad

chisee has rights to use the business’s name,

press can affect the franchise as

logo, trademarks and established business system to follow in operation of the business. The franchisee generally pays the franchisor an initial start-up fee for these rights, and an annual licensing fee. A franchise contract is similar to a lease or rental agreement. The

NOT JUST BURGERS.

Read on for a personal story by business owner Pam Martin detailing her experience with franchising a local business.

well as the overall brand • A badly run franchise can negatively affect public perception of the entire brand in general • Bad performance of one franchise can negatively affect the franchise’s financial performance

franchisee does not own the business.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


It’s business. It’s personal.

THEINS &OUTS ADVANTAGES TO BUYING A FRANCHISE:

In 1999, Pam Martin and her husband

• Buying a well known brand;

J.T. purchased Peaches & Clean carpet

instant name recognition

cleaning company from two of their

• Buying an established business system

business colleagues who had started

to follow in operations of the business

it. The original owners had been toying

• Prices for equipment and supplies are

with the idea of franchising the compa-

typically lower than starting a business alone

ny, and Pam had helped draw up the federal paperwork in preparation. When

DISADVANTAGES TO BUYING A FRANCHISE:

the owners decided to sell instead, Pam and her husband bought the company

• Having to share financial information

to franchise it regionally. PAM MARTIN details her experience in

Pam took on the day-to-day operation

franchising Peaches N’ Clean carpet

and management for about three years

cleaning service. Pictured: Pam Martin (left)

while finishing work on the federal

with her sales manager Tim Lawrence (middle)

requirements. During that time, she

and crew manager Chris Lewis (right) in 2011.

devoted herself to creating a step-

• Having to conform to uniform procedures • Expensive start-up costs and annual licensing fees • Ongoing royalty fees generally 4-8 percent of sales revenue • Reliance on the support of the franchiser

by-step business operations plan and

Birmingham franchisee decided to sell

materials for future franchisees to follow.

the business, and the new owner was

She standardized everything from

even more successful, but began to

brand colors to the logo and created

stray from the approved business mod-

trademarked materials. “You have to

el, and the Montgomery location had to

assume your franchisee knows nothing.

resume operation of that franchise. She

From getting in the van and cranking it

was the only person able to train new

Even if you don’t have plans to franchise

to going to the job and so on, I got the

franchisees, and she just didn’t have the

your business, it’s smart to document all of

business systems into writing,” she said.

time or resources. “We didn’t really have

your business procedures. Here are a few

enough professional staff to buy into the

reasons why:

“It ended up being a good thing that we were franchised, and it helped us when we were ready to sell.”

training and oversight that was needed,” Pam said. “That was all falling on me. I had nobody to help me train franchisees properly and provide the oversight to the franchises. We think we should have sought some financing or outside revenue sources, so we weren’t limited

The first franchise opened in Auburn

by revenue and personnel we needed. I

around 2002 and was immediately very

think our business model was good and

successful. In about 2006, Peaches &

the product was good.”

Clean had its second franchise in Bir-

WRITE

IT DOWN. • As your company, grows, it will minimize chaos. People can go on vacation, get sick, etc. and the business can still function properly • Impact from employee turnover will be minimized since training will be easier • You can only sell a business that can run without the current business owner • You can hire someone who makes less

mingham. They were in talks with a pro-

In 2013, she and J.T. decided to sell the

spective franchisee in Dothan in 2008,

business. Although the franchise didn’t

but the economy took a downturn, and

work out as planned, Pam said she feels

• Documenting tasks highlights what is

they had to pull the plug on that.

there were a lot of positives in the expe-

important; improves communication

rience. “It ended up being a good thing

between employees and boosts productivity

Things began to snowball, and Pam said

that we were franchised, and it helped

she began to get overwhelmed. The

us when we were ready to sell.”

money than you to handle many tasks

SOME

ADVICE


MyMGM

A CENTURY OF BUSINESS / by JENNIFER S. KORNEGAY Chris’ Hot Dogs turned 100 years old on May 1; the milestone birthday marks a century of tasty business in downtown Montgomery. er service high,” he said. “We have good food, but if we didn’t treat people right, that wouldn’t matter. We have many regulars, and we know many of them by name.” Hard work plays a big role too. “It’s like anything. You get out what you put in,” Gus said. “My only day off is Sunday, and, many times, I end up back at Chris’ doing something. You

IMAGES BY BRYAN CARTER / CARTER PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN

have to stay hands-on.”

Gus Katechis and his dad, Theo.

Gus is more than happy to do just that since he’s carrying on a family legacy. He’s also

If you ask Costas “Gus” Katechis, current

before making his way south to the heart of

proud to still be downtown, where it all be-

owner of Chris’ Hot Dogs and grandson of its

Dixie and all the way down to Montgomery.

gan. “People always came downtown for us, but now that there’s been a revival, our busi-

founder, how many hot dogs the restaurant sells in a day, he’ll tell you, “If we had time

He got to work in his new hometown quickly,

ness has definitely increased,” he said. “I’ve

to count, we wouldn’t be here!” But if you’ve

founding Chris’ Hot Dogs in 1917 on a corner

been really impressed with our city govern-

ever visited, especially around lunch, you

of Dexter Avenue downtown. In the begin-

ment. Our mayor has the right attitude about

know they stay busy, so the number is prob-

ning, he sold fruit and produce along with hot

making downtown a place to be proud of.”

ably up there. And it needs to be, as Gus

dogs, but as it became evident that his hot

points out. “We don’t make a lot of money

dogs, smothered in a thin, spicy and tangy

And Gus believes the city’s commitment to

per hot dog, so we have to sell a lot of them

red chili sauce, were more popular than the

downtown is reaping benefits that go beyond

just to pay the power bill in our old building,”

produce, he made them the focal point of the

his business. “I’m 35, and many in my gener-

he joked.

restaurant and stopped selling the produce.

ation left and went to Birmingham or Atlanta

They do sell a lot of their now-famous dogs

A century later, Chris’ Hot Dogs is still going

ing that educated and talented youth back

dripping with the “secret sauce,” and they

strong, and Gus shared his thoughts on why.

home because there is a vibrant downtown

have been since founder Chris Katechis left

“We are always paying attention to every-

with things to do and more culture. And it’s

his home in Greece bound for America at the

thing. You can never get complacent,” he

not just nightlife. There are more options for

beginning of the 20th century. Like so many

said. “Watch out for waste. Ensure there is

young families with kids too. That’s how you

immigrants, he came through Ellis Island

consistency. And keep the level of custom-

get and keep people here.”

or Charlotte,” he said. “But now we are bring-

18

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


HISTORIC HOT DOGS If Chris’ Hot Dogs’ booth-lined walls could talk, they’d have some interesting tales to tell. Hollywood starlets, country music icons, literary luminaries, political power players and even U.S. presidents have made their way to Chris’ and bellied up to the lunch counter or slid onto one of its vinyl bench The pork-based frank underneath all the ac-

through Montgomery on a train many times,

companiments (the same basic wiener used

both during his campaign and on his way to and from his place in Warm Springs, Ga.,” Gus said. “Every time he did, he’d send porters to get him a box of our hot dogs.” Presidents Harry Truman and Ronald Regan have both stopped by for a dog or two, and George H. Bush got a box to go. “When Elvis played Montgomery in the

IMAGE COURTESY OF DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY

seats in the last 10 decades. “FDR came

since Chris’ opened) is just as important, so important that when Chris faced a supply problem and almost ran out of dogs in the 1960s, Governor Wallace sent an Air National Guard airplane to get them from Chicago. The devotion that Chris’ Hot Dogs inspires is not limited to its customers; through the years, Chris’ has had a long list of loyal em-

1960s, he ordered close to 100 dogs to feed

Hank Williams ate there often, sitting at the

ployees too. “We have two servers who’ve

his crew after a show,” Gus said. “One of his

counter and writing song lyrics on napkins.

been with us 40 years. A lady named Miss

guards told my dad he saw the king eat at

Lucy made our sauce for us for 65 years,” They were no doubt all drawn to the unas-

Gus said. “My granddad worked until three

suming spot by the secret hot dog sauce,

months before he died at 92 years old,

Every Alabama governor since Chris’ has

just one component topping Chris’ most-or-

and my dad, Theo, has always been here,

been open has treated themself to a meal

dered item, a hot dog “all the way.” “The

running things after his dad.” Now Gus is

there. “One of our biggest orders ever came

‘all the way’ has mustard, fresh-chopped

keeping the tradition alive, modernizing

from George Wallace,” Gus said.

onions, kraut and the chili sauce,” Gus said.

operations some, but leaving the key things

And what’s in that famous sauce? What’s

alone, including the sauce. “It’s what we’re

Tallulah Bankhead mentioned Chris’ dogs as

really behind the slightly sweet, heat-laced

known for, and it’s been the same for almost

the “thing she missed most about the South”

kick? “I’ll never tell,” Gus said. “The recipe

100 years. We’re not messing with that!” he

in a national radio interview, and a young

isn’t even written down anywhere.”

said.

least seven himself.”

FANS FOR DECADES IMAGES COURTESY OF DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY

Faces and fans that frequented Chris’ for a regular dose of hot dog goodness.

A FEW (more) FAMOUS

HANK WILLIAMS

GEORGE WALLACE

ate there often,

ordered 2,000 hot

sitting at the

dogs once. The

counter and

biggest order, for the

writing song lyrics

USS Montgomery

on napkins.

commissioning was

Whoopi Goldberg, Elvis Presley and

2,600 hot dogs.

every Alabama Governor since 1917.

19

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

CUSTOMERS: Get in the radius of Montgomery and you too run the risk of being charmed by Chris’ delish dogs, like these folks: Martin Luther King, Jr.;


MyMGM

Standing the

TEST OF TIME

The Montgomery area has a long list of businesses and organizations that have been operating for decades, a few for more than 150 years, and many more that have hit 100-plus years.

More than 150 Years First Baptist Church 1829

100+

GOING STRONG

Saint John’s Episcopal Church 1834 Norfolk Southern Corporation 1840 New York Life Insurance 1841 Northwestern Mutual Wealth Management Company 1857

More than 100 Years YMCA of Greater Montgomery 1868 Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce 1872 Water Works & Sanitary Sewer Board 1874 Medical Society of Montgomery County 1878 J. M. Garrett & Son, LLC 1888 AT&T Alabama 1890 Coosa-Alabama River Improvement Association, Inc. 1890 American Red Cross of Central Alabama 1891 Belk 1891 Rushton, Stakely, Johnston & Garrett, P.A. 1891 Frazer United Methodist Church 1893 Moore Company Realty 1894 Medical Association of the State of Alabama 1896 Alabama Power Company 1900 White Chapel/Greenwood Serenity Funeral Home & Cemetery 1901 Baptist Medical Center South 1902 Acme Brick Tile & Stone Granite & Limestone Plant 1905 Capitol Hill Healthcare & Rehab First 1905 Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. 1905 Whitfield Foods 1906 Dixie Electric Company 1908 Haigler Auto Service 1908 Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama Inc. 1912 Brantwood Children’s Home 1917

If you’re celebrating a milestone or major anniversary, let us know. Send info to jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.


21

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


VESTOR IN

OFIL

Q&A

E

QUINCY MINOR Information Transport Solutions could operate anywhere, but it has chosen to keep its corporate headquarters in Wetumpka and open an office in downtown Montgomery. President and COO Quincy Minor explained why and shared his thoughts on our connection to technology, the importance of the MGMix and the growing need for IT services. What does ITS do? The company was founded in 1993 by Tomi Selby. We are a solutions company that integrates

What role does ITS play in the Montgomery Internet Exchange (MGMix)? We actually provide

voice, video and data to make organizations more profit-

support for MGMix, and that’s one of the main reasons we

able and productive. We provide internet access, managed

opened a new office in downtown Montgomery last year.

hosting, connectivity, structured cabling, wireless networks,

All the connectivity for MGMix goes through one piece of

managed voice over IP, video conferencing, networking

equipment; we provide back-end support for that equipment

and a host of other IT services as well as comprehensive IT

as a service to the City of Montgomery, one of our clients.

support.

Equally as impressive and important as the internet exchange, though, is the RSA Datacenter. It is the first of its kind in the

Who are your primary clients? Our core competen-

state, and that is big deal for our area. Before it was running,

cy is serving education clients in the K-12 environment. We

we had most of our equipment in Atlanta, which was the clos-

manage and support roughly 70 percent of the schools sys-

est. ITS was one of first to move into the new datacenter.

tems in the state, including the Montgomery Public Schools facilitate 21st century classroom learning, but we also work

Why keep your headquarters in Wetumpka and the River Region? Our owner is from here, and we like

to set up filters that protect kids from accessing things they

to keep the family feel of our company intact, even as we

shouldn’t on the internet.

continue to grow. Plus, it’s not where you are, it is what you

system. For 2016, 69 percent of our business was K-12. We

Municipalities are also a large part of our customer base,

do and the services you provide, that matter.

and we serve financial institutions and the healthcare sector as well. We just entered a new contract with the State of

What challenges are facing ITS? We have a really

Alabama and are providing connectivity for all of its almost

positive business environment in Montgomery and the

200 sites, throughout the state. And we did the hardware

surrounding areas with good leadership, but we do struggle

installation for the Airbus facility in Mobile and continue to

some to find qualified personnel.

provide onsite support for that facility.

What is your business philosophy? Customer serHow did you get into this business? I got my

vice is our passion; technology with integrity is our mission.

undergrad degree from Alabama State University in computer

We want to make sure every client gets what they pay for.

information systems and then my master’s in technology man-

We work to go above and beyond to make them happy and

agement from Auburn University. I came to ITS in 2003 from

to make their lives easier. We don’t want to just be a vendor

the IT department at Alfa Insurance headquarters.

but to be trusted advisors to them. And we treat every size customer the same. Everyone has my business card with my

Do you see the need for IT services increasing?

email and number, so they can come directly to me if needed.

Yes. Everything is digital now. Everyone stays so connected, and we need to be on the internet for so much of what we do every day. Everything is going wireless, and the more things

What, outside of work, gets your time and attention? My family. I’m tying to be the best husband and

that go digital, the more bandwidth we need. It’s all growing,

dad I can be. I also love speaking to and encouraging stu-

and so does the need for management and support for it.

dents and being a positive role model to the next generation.

22

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

IMAGE BY ROBERT FOUTS

PR

PO W E RHOUSE


Looking GOOD ITS made Inc. Magazine’s 5,000 fastest growing private companies in the United States list from 2007 through 2011.

“Equally as impressive and important as the internet exchange, though, is the RSA Datacenter. It is the first of its kind in the state, and that is a big deal for our area.” - Quincy Minor

23

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


w

Professional Clerical (334) 265-4100

WorkForce Walker Personnel, LLC “Since 1957” Celebrating

60 Years

of serving in the River Region!

Industrial (334) 265-0100

Call us for all your staffing needs!

300 Arba Street Montgomery, AL 36104 www.walkerworkforce.com

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CLERICAL

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

INDUSTRIAL


M EM BER profile

ASHLEY JERNIGAN She may have just founded her new company JDB Hospitality, but Ashley Jernigan is already a familiar— and friendly—face around Montgomery. Her belief in the power of public relations and a commitment to her adopted home community are driving her latest venture.

What does JDB stand for? Jernigan. Dias. Brandle. The J is my married last name, the D is my mother’s maiden name, and the B is my father’s last name.  

What is your background? I have nearly a decade of experience in hospitality marketing and events. I started my career at the Capital City Club holding titles such as Assistant Membership/Private Event Director, Member Relations Director and Private Event Director. Then, I became the Marketing and Client Relations Director for Jerry Kyser Builder, Inc. and Central Restaurant.  

What brought you to Montgomery? I am from Richmond, California. Alabama State University’s Admissions Director gave a presentation at my high school. She reviewed my transcripts and told me I could receive an academic scholarship. She spoke to me like a mother and made me feel comfortable enough to attend a university sight unseen. I have lived here ever since.

What are JDB Hospitality’s services? I specialize in helping businesses in the food and beverage, travel and tourism, and venue and accommodations industry develop and execute a marketing and public relations plan to reach their target market.  

Why are branding and public relations so important? Good branding is more than a memo-

Make it Count:

rable logo; it provides employees with direction and motivation, increases the value of a company and makes

Plan the work and work the plan.

acquiring new customers easier. Public relations is im-

So many people think marketing

portant because no matter how much you tell someone

and PR are like throwing things at a

your business is awesome, getting someone else talking

wall to see what sticks. They’re not.

about how awesome it is carries much more weight.

I help businesses understand their

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

internal and external target markets

What’s your favorite thing about your job?

and develop a strategic plan to reach

Helping my clients get immersed in the their community

them so they can start to see growth

and get featured in media.

in their business.

COMPANY FOUNDED NOVEMBER 2016 jdbhospitality.com

25

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Halcyon Pointe

Executive Class “A” Office Space I-8 5 (Exit 9 ) & Taylor Road Montgomery, AL

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2/7/17 4:55 PM

26

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER profile

JANETT M. MALPARTIDA Owner of downtown’s popular D’Road Café, Janett Malpartida is serving diners international flavors with a side of homey hospitality.

Are you originally from Montgomery? I’m an American citizen from Venezuela, married to Jose

The Long Road:

Malpartida, who is from Peru. I came to Montgomery when I married Jose in 2004.

Our customers come as strangers and leave as friends. I’d love for more

Where did the name “D’Road Cafe” come from? When I went to reserve the name

restaurants to come to the downtown area, so citizens of Montgomery have

at the Secretary of State Office, I really wanted The

the opportunity to share the beauty

Street Café, but there was already one. So then I tried

of this renovation in every way. I am

Down the Street Café, but it was also taken. As my

happy that I contribute a little to make

dad is of Italian descendent, I adopted the D’ then

this possible, together with the very

added Road and finally Café.

many young people who are working so hard and who, like me, want

Describe the kind of food you serve. We

downtown to be a busy and

do a lot of Venezuelan dishes at lunch, and on Friday

fascinating area for locals and tourists.

nights, we focus on a different international cuisine, like Cuban, Italian, French and Turkish. Our main ingredient is the passion, love and care we put in our cooking, but I also use a lot of garlic, onions, peppers and herbs.

What are some of your most popular dishes? For breakfast, our omelets, empanadas and arepas (rounds of cornmeal-based bread stuffed with cheese, eggs, ham, chicken or beef). At lunch, our Venezuelan meatballs and the Venezuelan street burger. At dinner, our paella and chicken parrilla.

Why do you like about being downtown? In my original location, I realized most of my clientele were from downtown, so I love being closer to a lot of them and also more people like them, people who love to try a new culture’s cuisine.

What do you hope diners experience? Definitely the home atmosphere and the homecooking but the unique flavors too. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? The opportunity that God gives me to make someone happy with my food style. COMPANY FOUNDED AUGUST 2011 droadcafe.com 27

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BE R profile

RICK WILSON For close to a century, Wilson & Wilson, Inc. has been serving the capital city, outfitting businesses large and small with the things they need to operate, everything from paperclips and pens to entire suites of desks and chairs. But third generation owner Rick Wilson knows it’s not what they sell, it’s how they sell it that has kept this family tradition going for 98 years.

Number of employees: 12  

How long have you worked for Wilson & Wilson? 52 years  

What are your primary products? We sell office and industrial supplies, furniture, break room coffee and snacks, janitorial supplies, marketing and promotional items, and we offer printing services.  

What’s the secret to your business’ longevity? I have to thank the loyalty of our local community as well as our efforts to continuously redefine the marketplace and stay relevant to our clients, plus our hard work while also making every day fun for our great employees.  

What makes a family business like yours special? We have a shared trust and a commitment to our mission to lower the overhead of Ala-

Recent awards and honors:

bama companies and help them promote their brand for growth in their respective industries. When they

We are a FEMA Procurement Specialist for the State of Alabama, we’ve earned a 100-percent rating by the Department of Defense Contractor (over multiple years), and we’ve gotten The Montgomery Advertiser’s Reader’s Choice Award multiple years.

succeed, we succeed too.

What sets Wilson & Wilson apart from other similar businesses and “big box” office supply stores? We’re faster, and we care because we are serving our friends and neighbors in a city and state we all love. And we do it while saving our clients money.

Wilson, Inc. always works to increase each client’s productivity, and I enjoy seeing how we’ve earned our clients’ respect along the way. OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1919 wilsonandwilsoninc.com 28

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? I love knowing that our team at Wilson &


we see your story

29

fifthadvertising.com

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Montgomery from

The Chamber’s Convention and Visitor Bureau is working hard to draw both leisure and business travelers to Montgomery, and their efforts are getting noticed. So what does the warm welcome it provides visitors mean to you and your business? Read on and find out. The city has been garnering more and more positive press and accolades in the last few years, earning titles like “best value destination” and “most historic city” and getting noticed by USA Today and other regional and national media. And it’s not just headlines and hoopla; the proof is in the steadily rising numbers.

MONTGOMERY’S 2016 LODGING TAX REVENUE HIT $9.4 MILLION, UP $400,000 FROM THE YEAR BEFORE. But for the average resident or business owner in Montgomery, what do these tourism stats really add up to? A lot. Dawn Hathcock, vice president of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce’s Convention and Visitors Bureau explained. “There’s a quote I love: ‘If it’s a good place to live, it’s a good place to visit.’ The opposite is equally true,” she said. “The things we want as residents for quality of life, our everyday enhancements here, those are the things that people are looking for when they visit, and more visitors often leads to more entertainment and dining options, more shops and other businesses opening here.” While one major tourism draw—our history—is a unique experience that no CVB can create, our present is just as important to continue bringing in visitors. “We focus on our Civil War, Civil Rights and air power heritage, but we also keep looking ahead,” Hathcock said. Montgomery was recently ranked the No. 1 value destination featuring African-American history and ranked the No. 2 overall best value destination by popular trip-planning website, trivago.com. “That shows how much history plays a role in our appeal, but it is not all we are,” she said.

30

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

NO. 1 SPOT Best Value Destination for travelers looking to explore Black History


2002

IN 2016,

The EastChase Retail District opens

Montgomery sold

51,000 MORE hotel room nights than it did in 2015, representing a

3.6 PERCENT uptick in demand. Thanks to this growth, more hotels opened

2003

and even more are

Riverfront Amphitheatre opens

planned.

2004

Montgomery Biscuits’ first season

2006

Gateway Park opens

KEEP THE GOOD GOING Dawn Hathcock shared her vision for future tourism efforts.

“We have numbers

“To keep tourism growing, over the

showing that state

more of what has worked so far. When

next five years, I think we need to see

tourism saves each

you look at downtown, it gives visitors a walkable area with so much to eat,

household in Alabama

drink, see and do. And there’s so much

$405 tax dollars each

more than downtown, The Alabama

year. We see similar

ping in east Montgomery. With Uber

Shakespeare Festival, the Zoo, shop-

savings on a local level

here, that is all so easily accessible now.

thanks to Montgomery

these things and add to them.”

We need to continue to capitalize on all

tourism.” 31

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


2006

Riverfront Park opens

2010

2008

Airport renovation starts 20-year, $98 million dollar master plan

Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa and the Montgomery Convention Center opens

2015

Hampstead Recognized as Southern Living Inspired Community

2011

2009

YMCA Emory Folmar Soccer complex opens

The Harriott II starts Riverboat cruises

2011

Cramton Bowl gets a $25 million renovation

2009 The Alley Entertainment District opens

2012

2012

2017

Montgomery Zoo celebrates 40 years at N. Boulevard location

2013

ESPN’s Raycom Media Camellia Bowl Inaugural Game

The Multiplex at Cramton Bowl opens

Lower Dexter opens

2015

City commemorates the 60th Anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott & 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery Voting Rights March

Many of the exciting things downtown, like the

BENEFITTING BUSINESS Owner of Dreamland BBQ downtown, Bob Parker knows firsthand how increasing tourism can translate into increasing profits. “When folks travel, the expectation is that they will eat out, so we have seen a direct benefit from that,” he said, “but for the entire business community in Montgomery, more visitors here is a positive.”

By increasing tax revenues with lodging taxes and sales taxes (on gas, food and other entertainment), visitors to our city add to the coffers, giving city leaders more money to provide more services without taking more from citizens through higher taxes. “That is a big deal for

Biscuits and The Alley and soon, the new Lower Dexter District, are here because of the convention business downtown and our efforts to be a true destination for meetings and events. “You can look at the infrastructure we put in place for Cramton Bowl, and how that scored us the Camellia Bowl,” Hathcock said. “That event brings national exposure, which brings more tourism, and residents love it too. It becomes a cycle.”

dents will enjoy as much as – and certainly more

EXPLORE CIVIL HERITAGE

often – than visitors. “The new virtual experi-

The capital city’s rich

ence that will be downtown is going to be great

history is one of its biggest

for young people here,” Hathcock said.

assets and not just for

And there’s more fun coming, more that resi-

visitors. Montgomery But tourism brings us more than cool bars or ex-

residents should take the

panded entertainment options. It brings money,

time to remind themselves

funds that trickle down through the economy

of and possibly learn

and affect every business here. “Visitors eat out

something new about our

here; they shop here; they buy gas here,” Hath-

city’s storied past. Take the

cock said. “But even if they don’t spend money

Civil Heritage Trail guided

at your business, you still reap rewards from

tour (find details at The

them being here, and it affects non-business

Montgomery Area Visitor

owners too. It’s good for every resident. We

Center), or pick up a copy

have numbers showing that state tourism saves

of the new “Montgomery’s

everyone, business owners and

each household in Alabama $405 tax dollars

Civil Heritage Trail” book

every resident,” Parker said.

each year. We see similar savings on a local

(complete with a lovely

level thanks to Montgomery tourism.”

watercolor map) to explore significant sites and spots on your own.

32

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


IN THE DETAILS The Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center believes in creating an entire experience for you and your event attendees. Located in downtown Montgomery, this Four Diamond-AAA hotel offers meticulous service, a unique atmosphere, and 140,000 square feet of meeting space, including a 14,000 square-foot Grand Ballroom and an 1,800-seat Level 1 Performing Arts Centre. Once the work is over, take advantage of the 9,000 square-foot European-style spa, access to three Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail courses, and 346 luxurious rooms and suites. To book your next meeting, call 338.481.5000 or visit renaissancemontgomery.com.

RENAISSANCE MONTGOMERY HOTEL & SPA AT THE CONVENTION CENTER 201 Tallapoosa Street Montgomery, AL 36104 t: 338.481.5000 renaissancemontgomery.com

33 PCH2984MONT_MontgomeryBusinessJournal.indd 1

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BUILDING BACK Montgomery’s real estate and construction industries are still in recovery mode but looking healthier and more robust than ever. In the early 2000s, you couldn’t look anywhere without seeing something being built, a new row of retail spots under construction, a field full of framed up houses soon to be filled with families. When the recession hit in 2008, the number of new construction projects as well as prices on existing properties in the River Region – and

“Commercial follows residential, and residential is back on track now, so we are seeing the commercial real estate arena follow suit,” -Eric Higgins, president of Colonial Commercial Realty, Inc.

beyond – fell hard and fell fast. But figures from the last few years show a steady rise, and most experts agree

echoed Rutland. “Underlying market fundamentals over-

that both the construction and real estate industries are

all have gradually continued to improve,” he said. In real

well on their way to recovery.

estate, local markets are either moving toward or away from a balanced market where buyers/tenants and sell-

That’s certainly the opinion of Jimmy Rutland, president

ers/landlords enjoy equal bargaining power. “Real estate

of Lowder New Homes in Montgomery, board member

professionals sometimes refer to a balanced market as

of the Greater Montgomery Home Builders Association

a healthy market,” Glaze said. “During the most recent

and current vice president of the Home Builders Asso-

downturn, every market in Alabama, including Montgom-

ciation of Alabama. “We hit our peak for the residential

ery, experienced an oversupply as demand waned—a

industry and market here in 2004,” he said. “We had al-

byproduct of the great recession.”

most 1,300 single-family residential permits pulled in the Montgomery/Prattville/Pike Road area. Then, in 2009,

In 2016, residential sales had improved 52.5 percent

we saw the big dip. There were only 300 permits.”

from the trough but remained 31.4 percent below the last peak. Still, the gradually rising demand has eaten

Fast forward to 2016, and close to 600 permits were is-

away at housing inventory, which has dropped 26.2

sued, putting the market in double digits off the bottom.

percent from its 2008 highest numbers, according to

“That’s great news,” Rutland said. “And it’s in keeping

ACRE’s research.

with what other areas of the state and our region are seeing. In general, most of us are in the same place, and

Carol Andrews, president of the Montgomery Area

that’s been seeing good increases over the last three

Association of REALTORS®, concurred with both Rutland

years.”

and Glaze, noting that she and her colleagues feel positive. “There is a lot of optimism in the industry right now,”

Grayson Glaze, executive director of the Alabama Cen-

she said. “New Realtors are joining our association and

ter for Real Estate (ACRE) at The University of Alabama,

the stats are up.” She also pointed to inventory being

BY JENNIFER STEWART KORNEGAY

35

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


36

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


MEET THE EXPERTS ACRE’s core purpose is to

The Montgomery Area Association of

advance the profession of real

REALTORS®, a member-driven organization

estate in Alabama by providing

that adheres to a strict Code of Ethics, is

relevant resources in the area

helping its members become more

of research, education and

profitable and successful through educa-

outreach.

tion, technology and professionalism and by providing industry technology that helps

Visit acre.cba.ua.edu to learn Grayson Glaze, executive director of the Alabama Center

them service their clients and customers.

more and access a wealth of Carol Andrews, president of

information.

Learn more at maarmlsonline.com.

the Montgomery Area Association

for Real Estate (ACRE) at

of REALTORS®

The University of Alabama

an issue. “Inventory could be a little better, but new

Rutland agreed, and added a plug for his industry.

construction is coming on every day. We also need

“The general economy picking up overall helps.

to see inventories increase at all price points and

People who got hurt, got their credit damaged

home sizes. We are moving in the right direction, but

in recession, have gotten that repaired and have

it will take more inventory to get back to a strong

accumulated the needed cash to buy a home,” he

balanced market.”

said. “And I’m a big believer that the home-building

AL LO C LEDGE

W K NO

business is a driver of the economy too, not just an

Still Room to Improve Last year ended with some promising figures, but permits were actually down slightly when compared to 2015. “It was such a small percentage, it’s basically flat,” Rutland said. The reason, according to Rutland, is fewer developable lots currently in the marketplace. ACRE’s findings show the same thing. “According to our intel from active market participants, the limited supply of residential lots in good areas available for builders is a challenge right now,” Glaze said. “The market is generally at the end of the foreclosed lot inventory typically bought from banks. The market is having to adjust to the pricing dynamics of new lot development not only in Montgomery but across the country.”

indicator.” While the overall improvement in the economy is a positive thing for almost all businesses, real estate and construction included, it is important to note the

David McClinton, president of McClinton Commercial Real Estate

different factors that affect the different sectors of the industry. “The multi-family housing industry did huge the last five years, when the people who got foreclosed on had to move into apartments,” Rutland said. “But those folks are now getting back on their financial feet, and many are ready and able to get back into a home they own.”

Commercial Growth There’s also the commercial side of these industries, and things are looking up there too, according

A healthier economy has been a major factor in the

to Eric Higgins, president of Colonial Commercial

gains seen in the last few years, as Glaze pointed

Realty, Inc. “Commercial follows residential, and

out. “The solid improvement and growth across the

residential is back on track now, so we are seeing

board in economic indicators that drive real estate

the commercial real estate arena follow suit,” he

—population, employment, and per capita income

said. “East Montgomery is adding retailers, and

—are behind the progress,” he said. Andrews also

downtown and the central business core are seeing

credits overall progress in the economy for recent

further development. And Montgomery’s big catalyst

growth. “Buyers are coming back to the market in all

continues to be the government here, the state and

our areas. With an improved economy, I think our

our military bases.”

numbers will continue to trend up,” she said. 37

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

Eric Higgins, president of Colonial Commercial Realty, Inc.


He pointed to President Trump’s plans to

“One example is the office market,” he

boost defense spending. “I would think

said. “In the old days, companies needed

Maxwell AFB and Gunter would benefit

more equipment and more staff to do

from that,” he said. “Montgomery has

their work and so, more space. But now

pockets of opportunity everywhere and

everyone has cell phones, iPads, and

smart local developers are always going

laptops. Not everyone needs an assistant

to make the most of them.”

to handle daily tasks. The office market is

Morgan Bell,

getting beat up pretty good by that.”

manager at Montgomery’s Bell & Corwin Realtors

David McClinton, president of McClinton Commercial Real Estate, has been in

Technology and the internet are hurting

this industry since 1999, and he shares

brick and mortar retail too. “You can

Higgins’ bullish outlook. “There is a good

hardly find a music or book store any-

bit of optimism now, where just a few

more,” Wilson said. “So many people,

years ago, the attitude was still one of

even older people who once didn’t ‘get’

‘What’s the next shoe to drop?’” he said.

online shopping, are buying a lot online.”

“There’s really been a lot of improvement

He stressed how this currently hits more

in perception.”

than his industry. It’s lowered the state’s

While perception may be slightly outpac-

tax revenues too. “We are a sales-tax

REALTORS’ REALITIES Morgan Bell, manager at Montgomery’s Bell & Corwin Realtors, has been in the real estate business for 20 years. He outlined a few of the ways technology, including the rise of social media, has changed how brokers and realtors do their jobs. “There have been some major changes in our industry. One of the biggest is the switch from

“Most of us are in the same place, and that’s been seeing good increases over the last three years.”

MLS (multiple listing) books to a web-based MLS system. Another is using Bluetooth entry instead of key boxes to gain access to properties. This provides much better security for homeowners.”

Jimmy Rutland, president of Lowder New Homes

He listed others including:

in Montgomery and current vice president

• Buyers don’t look at as many homes. They

of the Home Builders Association of Alabama

spend more time online and narrow down their list before they ever tour. • Buyers from out of town can do a lot of shopping ing reality, McClinton still believes busi-

based state, and the loss of sales taxes

ness is and will continue to increase. “In

from internet sales is one reason we

terms of actual deals, I wouldn’t say it’s

have a hole in our general fund budget,”

wide open yet, but we are seeing activity

he said.

• With the popularity of social media, we now have a new form of advertising that is more up-to-date than previous print-media-only marketing. • Carol Andrews, president of he Montgomery

in most sectors,” he said. “Overall, things are definitely feeling and looking better.”

from home.

In line with this information, he offered a word of warning. “Any new retail and

Just like commercial real estate seems

commercial real estate has to take into

to follow residential real estate’s ups

consideration the ease of getting to it,”

and downs, it too is being affected by

he said. “We have to be very aware of

technical innovations, something Jim Wil-

the road systems and traffic to and from.

son III, chairman and CEO of Jim Wilson

The time it takes someone to get in and

& Associates, knows plenty about. He

out of somewhere is really key. People

explained how technology is changing

are so busy.”

the commercial segment of his business.

38

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Area Association of REALTORS®stressed the need for accurate information. “The consumer now has a lot of information at their fingertips but not all the information is accurate. If you really want to know home values and market-driven statistics, the best place to go is a local realtor.”


39

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


BUILD UP:

A PROMISING 2017

“The age 55-plus housing market and products to serve it, like neighborhoods where all yard work is handled and

ACRE’S FORECASTS FOR THE FUTURE OF

other offerings, will grow

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE

in the next five years.”

IN MONTGOMERY ARE ROSY. New home sales as a sub-component could see double-digit growth in 2017.

“From strictly a volume perspective, the Center’s overall residential forecast ‘model’ for Montgomery sales tracks closely with last year’s market performance, but we’re cautiously optimistic that the local market will out-perform these projections. New home sales as a sub-component could see double-digit growth in 2017. As the real estate market enters the prime home buying season, the Alabama (and Montgomery) real estate community is more

TECHNOLOGY & FUTURE TRENDS

optimistic according to the Alabama Center for Real Estate’s Alabama Real Estate Confidence Index. The

IN RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE, ESPECIALLY NEW CONSTRUCTION, ADVANCES IN TECHNOLOGY ARE CHANGING HOW HOUSES ARE BUILT AND BRINGING

South Central Region’s (which includes Montgomery) overall score improved by 5 points to 59 from last year, up by 10 from last quarter. The outlook for sales improved by 6 points from last year, and up by 13 from last quarter to 63. Credit improved by 6 from last year to 51, up by 6 from last year.”

NEW FEATURES TO THE

- Grayson Glaze, executive director of the Alabama

FOREFRONT.

Center for Real Estate at The University of Alabama

HVAC systems, extra insulation and more aren’t only based on consumer demand. Many of these “green” concepts are now required by energy codes that went into effect in some areas in 2012 and are now in place in Montgomery. “This is one of biggest changes in our industry in the last five years,” said Rutland. “As builders, we’ve had to implement these things that add considerable cost to the house, but it has been hard to get the appraisal to show that value. Both state and local Home Builders Association Boards are working right now to find a middle ground on this.”

1,000

BY THE NUMBERS RESIDENTIAL PERMITS I S S U E D A N N UA L LY

NUMBER OF PERMITS

“Smart homes” keep gaining popularity, but the addition of energy-efficient

456

2007

Rutland also mentioned a trend gaining steam as baby boomers hit their golden years. “The age 55-plus housing market and products to serve it, like neighborhoods where all yard work is handled and other offerings, will grow in the next five years,” he said. “I don’t see much of that here yet, but it’s coming.”

40

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

2016


AL LO C LEDGE

W K NO

MONEY TALKS Jim Wilson III, chairman and CEO of Jim Wilson & Associates

The ability to get a mortgage is one facet of

tion and current vice president of the Alabama

on corporations and brings that money back

real estate that really matters, and with the

Home Builders Association. He’s hoping

here, which grows jobs, and folks can borrow

rule changes and higher standards required

there’s a middle ground, and that we’re head-

money in more efficient manner, obviously

to quality for a home loan put in place in re-

ed toward it.

those things in tandem will help everyone and

sponse to the recession, it’s harder than ever

the housing market here,” Wilson said.

before to borrow money. But some believe

Developer Jim Wilson III has the same

President Trump’s policies may change things

thoughts. “I hope President Trump relieves

Grayson Glaze, executive director of the

for the better.

some of the stigma on banks, and they can

Alabama Center for Real Estate (ACRE) at The

get out from under some of the regulations

University of Alabama, outlined the predomi-

“It went from basically if you could fog a mirror,

on mortgages,” he said. “We can’t go back

nant opinion among those in the industry. “The

your loan was approved, to now, where you

to what it was, but it needs to be a bit more

sentiment at this moment within real estate

have to provide a huge amount of paperwork

realistic. Any time you give more free flowing

circles is that Trump’s pro-business policies

and have a substantial cash down payment,”

capital to market, it helps growth.”

should favorably impact our industry starting with greater confidence among small business

said Jimmy Rutland, president of Lowder New Homes in Montgomery, board member of the And he’s looking forward to the specifics of River Region Living_HP_Layout 1 12/14/15 1:11 PM Page tax 1 policy too. “If he lowers tax rates Greater Montgomery Home Builders AssociaTrump’s

And suddenly there it was. Home. I WAS A LITTLE NERVOUS BUT THEY TOLD ME I’D LOVE IT – EVEN MORE THAN WHERE WE’D LIVED BEFORE. SOON WE TURNED IN AND I SAW THE LAKE, A SWIMMING POOL AND KIDS PLAYING EVERYWHERE. OUR HOUSE WAS GREAT, BUT EVEN BEFORE I SAW IT, I KNEW IT WAS HOME.

owners and the consumers they serve.

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42

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

COLONIAL COMMERCIAL REALTY, INC. With almost two decades of commercial real estate experience and a commitment to client satisfaction and success, Colonial Commercial Realty is ready and able to assist with almost any commercial real estate need.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 5  WHAT SERVICES DOES YOUR COMPANY PROVIDE? We provide a comprehensive team approach for all aspects of real estate including sales, leasing (owners and tenants), property management, development and asset management. We are experienced in all areas of commercial real estate. In sales, we assist both buyers and sellers with commercial real estate, which includes both raw land and improved properties. In leasing, we advise owners leasing their commercial spaces (office, industrial, and retail). We also offer tenant representation, which helps tenants identify and negotiate with prospective landlords for their places of business. With our property management services, we help owners manage properties of all types and sizes. In terms of development, we manage the process of ground-up construction for retail, office, mixed-use, industrial and apartment projects. And for asset management, we evaluate real estate for owners or tenants and show how it affects their overall ownership to achieve maximum benefit.  

WHAT IS THE COMPANY’S BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY?  We are client focused and provide in-depth expertise on all aspects of commercial real estate.   

WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY AND PEOPLE APART?  Our experience across a range of sectors within the real estate industry is a strength. Our team’s collective accreditations and memberships

Pictured above: Eric Higgins, Casey Williams, Jim Farrior, Emmanuel Harvey, Josh Lowder, David Peden

(CCIM, Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, etc.) bring a reputation of professionalism to our clients. And perhaps most importantly, our team’s commitment to client satisfaction sets us apart.

HOW HAVE CHANGES IN TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED THE WAY COLONIAL COMMERCIAL REALTY DOES BUSINESS? Technology has made the world “smaller” in a figurative sense in providing tools to assist us with guiding our clients to maximize their real estate objectives.  There is an abundance of software that allows our company to provide a wealth of information to our clients, allowing them to make decisions that fit their goals.  

MILESTONES: In the coming year, our company will be celebrating 20 years in the Montgomery region and beyond. We are honored to have played an essential role in the growth of the Montgomery region, and look to the future to continue growing with the city.

5251 HAMPSTEAD HIGH STREET, UNIT 205 / 334-270-6700 / COLONIALCOMMERCIAL.NET 43

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Regional Impact

THE WHEEL WORKS / by WENDI LEWIS By using a “hub and spoke” approach, tourism in our area operates like a wheel,

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benefitting each community and the region as a whole and moving them all forward.

TR AI L CI VI L RI GH TS

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A LM TE T S IN S T IT U R IG H

cities share significant events, including the ST

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The National Park Service manages the and the Lowndes Interpretive Center. The

AL

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the cities at each end serve as trailheads. Selma to Montgomery national Historic Trail

ON

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SEE SELMA gomery, is a part of the Civil Rights Trail, and

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Selma, located about 50 miles from Mont-

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TUSKEGE

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MI 50

MONTGOMERY

Selma to Montgomery Voting Rights March. Selma also offers Black History Month tours each February, geared toward students and educators, and hosts annual events to

Alabama’s capital city is geographically

the lens to provide a more complete picture

located centrally in the state, making it

and a richer experience for visitors.

the ideal home base for regional travel.

commemorate Bloody Sunday. Apart from its rich Civil Rights history, Selma

Montgomery has an economic impact from

“When you look at Montgomery’s geo-

is developing tourism activities around its

tourism of $1,351,055 in visitor spending

graphic location, you can stay in Montgom-

outdoor recreation. Selma is on the Ala-

every day, and for the fourth year in a row is

ery and by traveling 45 minutes to an hour,

bama Scenic River Trail, which is part of the

leading the state in hotel occupancy.

you can be in Selma or Tuskegee, which,

National Water Trails System, and is actively

combined with what we offer here, allows

working on bike paths not only for tourism,

Montgomery can obviously stand alone

you to see and experience events that

but also for residents who prefer to use

as a travel destination, but by widening

changed the world,” said Meg Lewis, Direc-

bikes for their daily commute and activities.

its efforts to market Montgomery and the

tor Brand Development & Special Projects

River Region to visitors, the Montgomery

for the Chamber’s Convention & Visitor Bu-

Additionally, Selma is looking forward to

Area Chamber of Commerce Convention &

reau. “Plus, there are a number of communi-

taking an active role in the state’s Bicenten-

Visitor Bureau demonstrates a successful

ties around us that offer other things unique

nial celebration in 2019. Celebrations have

“hub and spoke” approach that proves the

to their area that we don’t have, so it makes

already begun and will continue through

whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

sense to include them in our picture.”

Alabama Day, Dec. 14, 2019.

By taking a broader view, the CVB widens

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


“When you look at Montgomery’s geographic location, you can stay in Montgomery and by traveling 45 minutes to an hour, you can be in Selma or Y

Tuskegee, which, combined with what we offer here, allows you to see and experience events that changed the world. It makes sense to use Montgomery as a home base for the region since we have almost double the number of hotels to choose from all the other areas combined.” - Meg Lewis, Director Brand Development & Special Projects for the Chamber’s Convention & Visitor Bureau

“Selma and Dallas County feature an all-inclusive historical experience,” said Landon Lee Nichols, Jr., Destination/Marketing Coordinator for The Selma and Dallas County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Information. “In one day, in one location, you can experience a thread of history that weaves together our Native American Heritage, frontier Alabama and early statehood, the Civil War, the Reconstruction Era, the Women’s Suffrage Movement, our nation’s military superiority, the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Movements, adaptive reuse of historic structures and 21st century Alabama.”

PLAY IN PRATTVILLE Prattville is located just 15 minutes north on I-85. It is the home of Capitol Hill, a part of the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, a dazzling collection of public golf courses in Alabama under the management of the Retirement Systems of Alabama. Capitol Hill boasts three of arguably the most challenging courses on the trail, named with a nod toward Montgomery’s role as the

TOUR TUSKEGEE

center of state government: The Judge, The

Tuskegee is located only about 40 minutes to the northeast of Mont-

Senator, and The Legislator. “People can

gomery and has connections to the capital city related to Civil Rights

stay in Montgomery and within a 45-minute

history, as well as aviation and military history and education. At the

drive, they can play Auburn, Prattville and

Tuskegee History Center, visitors can learn about significant black his-

Greenville on the RTJ Trail,” Lewis said.

tory events ranging from the Syphilis Study, which used black men as guinea pigs for medical experiments, to significant legal battles at the

Patty VanderWal, President of the Prattville

center of the Civil Rights Movement, and the development of African

Area Chamber of Commerce, says the area

American aviation.

is developing its reputation as a stop as visitors travel throughout the region. In fact,

“We know there are lots of great things around us. Together, we have a lot to offer.” - Patty VanderWal, President of the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce

The Tuskegee Airmen became the first African Americans to be pilots,

the Prattville Chamber has established a

and they became an elite force helping to ensure an American victory

“Snowbirds Club” for travelers fleeing ice

in World War II. The Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site is located in

and snow to warm sunshine in the Southern states. Travelers who sign

Tuskegee and operated by the National Park Service

up will receive discounts from area businesses, hotels and attractions.

Additionally, Tuskegee is home to Tuskegee University, founded in

VanderWal says she sees tourism between Montgomery and Prattville

1881 as Tuskegee Institute, and today one of the premier Historically

as a two-way street, with each community helping the other. “We’d love

Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the nation. Its historic rival,

it if people come and stay in Prattville and spend all their time with us,

Alabama State University, is located in Montgomery.

but we know there are lots of great things around us. Together, we have a lot to offer,” she said.

45

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack

BEAUTY & BUSINESS / by WENDI LEWIS It’s been said that art adds meaning to our lives, but without support, a lot of art would never happen. Many Montgomery businesses continually provide needed funds and services to keep the arts alive in the capital city, and The Montgomery Area Business Committee for the Arts works to foster these relationships

IMAGES COURTESY OF MABCA

as well as recognize their efforts.

Al Steineker, King’s Table Catering, with Janet McQueen, Jackson Hospital for the Helen Steineker Community Award 2016

For nearly 40 years, the Montgomery Area Business Commit-

Blount returned to Montgomery and, along with Bobby Weil

tee for the Arts has been working to bring businesses of all

Sr. and Frank Plummer, founded the local MABCA. The stated

sizes together with artists and art organizations in our commu-

mission of the organization is “to provide businesses with the

nity. Although ostensibly the businesses

One size fits all.

provide support to the arts, it’s actually a mutually beneficial relationship. “Involvement in the arts promotes creativity and good community citizenship in the business community, and the arts creates millions of dollars in economic opportunity,” said Ashley DuBose Ledbetter, who has been Executive Director of the MABCA since 2003. “It’s good for the community and good for the soul.”

“It’s the small business community, many times, that creates the backbone of support for the arts.” - Jim Leonard

services needed to develop strategic alliances with the arts and arts education that would meet business objectives, foster creativity in the arts and the workplace and enhance the quality of life for the community.” The MABCA is a membership organization made up of both large companies and smaller companies and start-ups. There is an annual membership fee based on the number of employees in

The MABCA is an affiliate of the National Business Committee

a company. “One of the things I’m proud of that we do is that

for the Arts, which was established in 1967 by David Rockefel-

we emphasize that businesses and individuals from all walks of

ler, who at the time was president of Chase Manhattan Bank.

life can get involved with supporting the arts,” Ledbetter said.

MABCA was the very first affiliate created in the United States,

“Small businesses are the lifeblood of a community, but they of-

in 1979, after Montgomery businessman and philanthropist

ten think maybe they don’t have the resources to get involved.

Wynton M. “Red” Blount was awarded a National Business in

But they often support the arts in ways people don’t realize by

the Arts Award.

providing services and support. Montgomery is very fortunate, 46

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


GIVEBACK

BRIEFS

MAX Continues to Invest in Community In early March, MAX announced it will once again support eight local non-profit organizations in 2017, both through financial contributions and hands-on volunteer work by its associates. MAX will invest in these Hyundai President J.H. Kim; Mayor Todd Strange; Rick Neal, HHMA for the 2014 MABCA Awards-Frank Plummer Award

and the River Region, to have so many arts opportunities. There’s something for everyone and every size.” Activities for members include seminars that bring together businesses and arts organizations to collaborate and network and to establish contacts between artists and businesses that are interested in getting involved. Businesses also enjoy exclusive behind-the-scenes tours that let them see what it takes to put on a play at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, or to stage a Montgomery Symphony concert. For 30 years, the MABCA has also hosted an annual awards luncheon that allows artists and arts organizations to thank businesses that have shown exceptional support. “In many small communities, large philanthropic

IN HER HONOR In 2016, the MABCA established the Helen Steineker Community Award, named in honor of the Montgomery Symphony Orchestra’s longtime manager, who passed away in 2013. During her time leading the MSO, Steineker proposed that the

many times, that creates the backbone of support for the arts,” said Jim Leonard, partner, Stamp Idea Group. His business, which at that time was known as LWT Communications, won a Business in the Arts Award in 2004 and 2008, and the Frank Plummer Memorial Arts Award, recognizing consis-

in Lee County: The Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, M.A.N.E, E.A.T. South, the Prattville Y Field of Dreams, the Alabama Wildlife Federation Lanark, BigHouse Foundation and Storybook Farm. Each of these eight organizations will be given a donation of $5,000 to support educational initiatives and local events designed to further their causes.

annual Business in the Arts Awards include an honor for an organization that may not qualify as a traditional business but that goes above and beyond to help the arts environment. It has been called the Community Award but in 2016 was renamed in her honor. Jackson Hospital Foundation was the first recipient, in recognition

Hearts for Children co-chairs Greg Cochran & Linda Browder

of its efforts to incorporate local

IMAGE BY JENNIFER GARCIN PHOTOGRAPHY

artwork throughout the hospital.

Hearts for Children

corporate contributions are not always available. So it’s the small business community,

non-profits located in the River Region and

Businesses from around Alabama celebratthrough volunteer efforts, pro-bono work, promotional tie-ins and other partnerships.” After three decades since its founding, many things have changed, but MABCA’s commitment to bringing businesses and the arts community together has remained.

tent excellence in support of the arts com-

Do your part:

munity, in 2011. The agency also was a Busi-

If your business would like to join MAB-

ness in the Arts Award finalist in 2003. “That

CA and get involved in the capital city’s

support can go beyond monetary contribu-

thriving arts community, visit mabca.org to

tions—small businesses can support the arts

learn more and find membership details.

ed this past Valentine’s Day by making a difference in the lives of local young people. The Montgomery Capital Rotary Club held its Hearts for Children Valentine Gala on February 11, and Capitol Hill Healthcare & Rehab First, a five-star long-term care facility and rehabilitation center in Montgomery, was a Gold Sponsor for the event, which benefitted the Boys & Girls Clubs of the River Region. Capitol Hill Healthcare & Rehab First contributions will help support the organization, which serves more than 1,300 children in the surrounding area. “We are so pleased to be able to help young people have access to positive opportunities and life-changing ex-

The Chamber wants to share the good news of businesses doing good. Please send story ideas for Giveback to jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

47

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

periences,” said Sharon Baker, administrator of Capitol Hill Healthcare & Rehab First.


CHAMBER NEWS

Connect +

NEWS, R ESO U R C E S AN D A LOOK IN S IDE THE MAN Y WAYS YOUR CHAMBER WORKS FOR YOU

TEAM REPORT Destination MGM

ADD IT UP

Dawn Hathcock has been at the Chamber for 16 years and leads its convention and visitor bureau team now called Destination MGM. It works to showcase Montgomery as a great place to visit, both for business events like conferences and trade shows and for pleasure. She outlined how the team does its job.

75 HOTELS = 6,291 Rooms Each Night

64.1% Occupancy = 4,033 Rooms Sold Each Night 4,033 Rooms Sold at $95 =

$383,135

Destination MGM Team / Image by Shelby Berry

Explain what you and the Destination MGM team do. Destination MGM’s

How does the community in general benefit? Tourism is economic develop-

overall mission is to promote the long-term

ment, so the money that comes from events

development and marketing of the city as

we recruit puts more tax revenue into the

a destination. By creating a brand for the

city, county and state general funds. On any

Daily Hotel Revenue Two People Per Travel Party = 8,066 Travelers Each Night

entire community and all of its tourism-relat-

given night in Montgomery, approximately

ed entities, we get the destination into the

$1.3 million dollars is spent on lodging, din-

public’s consciousness, creating a contin-

ing, entertainment and shopping by visitors.

uous awareness of and demand for the

“product.” That demand comes in the form of business travelers, convention attend-

What are your team's most significant achievements? Montgomery has led the

ees, leisure visitors and residents. Our new

state in hotel occupancy for the last four

brand development team is charged with

years, and because of that, we are seeing a

promoting Montgomery and the Chamber

new interest in our city by hotel developers.

as a whole, whether it is to a visitor, local,

We have been named the best CVB in the

$564,620

economic development prospect, a small

Southeast by Southeastern Tourism Society

business owner, a large corporation or a

twice in the last 10 years.

Daily Dining Revenue

8,066 People Dining Daily $70 =

Shopping, fuel, activities

convention or event planner.

What is your favorite thing about your job? We are selling and marketing a city

per travel party at $100 =

How does the business community benefit from what your team does?

that literally changed the world. To see the

The conventions and events that our team

growth and the changes that have taken

helps bring to Montgomery generate tax

place over the last five, 10 and 15 years and

dollars to the local economy, and these vis-

knowing there are great things on the hori-

$1,351,055

itors patronize and spend money with local

zon is fun. Honoring our history and being a

Visitor Spending Everyday

businesses.

part of the new Montgomery is an honor. 48

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

$403,300 Daily Expense Revenue


We’re sending money

back to you. We are proud to return a record $7.8 million in patronage to our customers, based on our 2016 earnings. This year’s payment benefits you by giving you cash, and by lowering your overall cost of borrowing — a big reason to do business with Alabama Ag Credit! Since 2006, Alabama Ag Credit has returned more than $59 million in stock reductions, dividends and patronage distributions to our borrowers. So spread the word about the benefits of becoming an Alabama Ag Credit customer. Thank you for your business and for helping us to have another great year!

www.AlabamaAgCredit.com (800) 579-5471

Part of the Farm Credit System

49

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Connect CO NNEC T I NG YO U TO T H E M A N Y CHAMBER RES OURCES AN D S ERVICES AVAILABLE

GET CONNECTED

WHAT THEY SAY

CELE B RATE YOUR BU S I N ESS                           Ribbon cuttings, ground breakings and grand openings for your business: . . . . . . Kappes McGough, kmcgough@montgomerychamber.com Press releases and announcements: . . . . . . . . . . . Jina Miniard, jminiard@montgomerychamber.com

CHAMBER MEMBERS SPEAK OUT ON HOW THEIR MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS THEIR BUSINESS.

Event calendar: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/events SAV E MONE Y Member-to-Member discounts: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com Notary public service: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Paul Redhead, predhead@montgomerychamber.com Membership mailing lists and labels: . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com MEET MORE CLIENTS & VENDORS Networking events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com

“As a member of the Chamber

Ambassador program: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynn Norton, lnorton@montgomerychamber.com

with many more businesses and

Online membership directory: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/directory Government contract resources: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com HIRE & TRAIN YOUR WORKFORCE Job board: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/jobboard Corporate recruitment: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Justice Smyth, jsmyth@montgomerychamber.com Corporate retention:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Horsley, jhorsley@montgomerychamber.com Workforce training:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constance Calambakas, ccalambakas@montgomerychamber.com

I have been able to connect organizations in one spot than I ever could going door-to-door on appointments. The networking events such as the 60 Minute Coffees and the Business After Hours offer the opportunity to meet the people you need to meet in order to offer your goods or services to their business. I have found that meeting people

BUILD YOUR B USIN ESS Research information: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rachel Madore, rmadore@montgomerychamber.com

at these events makes it easier

Small business counseling: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

tion into establishing a contact

Diversity and inclusion programs: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

Also, attending the many events

Entrepreneurial development: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

they offer helps me keep up with

Seminars and training: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

well as what is planned for the

Co-working space: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

future. Joining the Chamber has

to transition a casual conversafor potential future business.

Office space to rent in the Chamber’s Business Resource Center: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

what is going on in the city as

been one of the best business decisions we have made.” - RAY BROWN

HOST MEE TINGS I N M O N TG O M ERY Meeting and event venue information: . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com Special hotel rates for meetings, events & sporting events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com

DIRECTOR OF SALES HOMEWOOD SUITES BY HILTON MONTGOMERY

OUR CHAMBER. YOUR VOICE. 50

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Connect A LO O K B AC K AT T H E FACES AN D PLACES OF RECEN T CHAMBER EVEN TS

MEMBER EVENTS: HOW TO USE VIDEO TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS MARCH 9, 2017 at the BRC Presented by: STAMP Idea Group

FEB 08

FEB 23

David Allred, Agency Principal at STAMP Idea Group, presented a workshop on ways to market your business with video. Attendees learned about topics including: the ideal length for your video; iPhone/Android vs the Pros; Social channels – Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Vimeo; and the importance of metadata.

60 Minute Coffee at Capitol Hyundai Sponsored by Capitol Hyundai

AL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE FEBRUARY 15, 2017 at the RSA Activity Center Business leaders and elected officials presented an update on Alabama’s issues, offering important insight to key legislative initiatives and the challenges of the legislative session. Business After Hours at Health Star Clinic Sponsored by ASE Credit Union

CYBER FORUM: OPEN DATA MONTGOMERY – WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME? MARCH 22, 2017 at the BRC

& Health Star Clinic

Presenting Sponsor: Troy University

at Capitol Chevrolet

WOMEN IN BUSINESS WORKSHOP SERIES: Building Self Confidence to make the pitch FEBRUARY 16, 2017 at the Capital City Club

Sponsored by Capitol Chevrolet

In Partnership with ASU SBDC

MAR 60 Minute Coffee 08

MAR Business After Hours at 30

Montgomery Regional Airport Sponsored by

Workshop participants learned valuable skills like how to grow business by building confidence and how to reduce the business pitch anxiety.

Montgomery Regional Airport

51

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

Boyd Stephens, founder of Netelysis, shared a few perspectives on Open Data Montgomery during the recent Cyber Forum. Topics touched on included improvement of the public’s understanding of the City’s operations concerning its respective communities; economic opportunities for individuals and private/ public firms and organizations; empowering the City to be more effective, better coordinated internally, and able to identify opportunities to better serve the public; and fostering the development of innovative technology solutions that improve overall quality of life.


Small Business Briefcase +

PACK ED WITH TIPS AN D TOOLS TO BEN EFIT YOUR BUSINESS

INTERNS: TO HAVE OR NOT TO HAVE?

3

THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN DECIDING

That is the question. Having an intern can be beneficial to both your business and to the young person you hire. Or it can end up being a hassle and leave everyone dissatisfied with the experience. Read on to learn the ins and outs of internships and how to do it right.

HOW IT HELPS STUDENTS

BANG FOR YOUR BUCK?

According to Sherry Leigh Lacey, the director

In many cases, as Lacey pointed out, hiring

at Huntingdon College’s Center for Career and

an intern and paying them (see Paid or Not?)

Vocation, internships are not only valuable for

pays off big for both parties. Most interns are

students, they’re vital. “Internships are a crucial

ready to work hard and understand they may

part of professional growth in college, allowing

be asked to do “grunt” work in addition to other

students the opportunity to truly discern their

work in return for valuable experience and

vocation,” she said. “The new skills and abilities

networking. In some cases, though, the cons

discovered during an internship are major ben-

outweigh the pros for the business owner, espe-

efits to college students; however, one of the

cially if you have to spend a lot of time training

most advantageous aspects

your interns or micro-managing

is definitely the connections that are made.”

HOW IT CAN BENEFIT YOUR BUSINESS Lacey also believes that internships can be good for

an unmotivated one. So even if

A WELL-DEFINED PROGRAM CAN SERVE AS A PIPELINE FOR FUTURE LONGTERM EMPLOYEES.

from the ground up to an intern can help an employer or owner rediscover a passion for their own business, and build on their own teaching and leadership skills.” And while she discouraged viewing interns as cheap or free labor she did stress this: “Start-up companies and businesses on a tight budget can certainly benefit by hiring an intern for specific projects related to the student’s major or field of interest.”

your bottom line. It depends on your business model and the quality of each individual intern. The ways needs new employees. If so,

ployer will have as much to the student,” she said. “Teaching your business

wage, an intern may actually hurt

exception is if your business al-

businesses. “Ideally, an emgain from a successful internship experience as

you’re only paying them minimum

running a well-defined internship program can serve as a pipeline for future longterm employees who understand and know your business. “The access to talented future college graduates to fill open positions within their company – interns who have already had training and now have a working knowledge of their business – is the biggest advantage in my opinion for the employer or business owner,” Lacey said. Your personal motivation also comes into play. Some businesses know that having an internship program doesn’t really do much for them. Instead, it’s part of a commitment to give back.

HOW TO DO IT RIGHT

Sherry Leigh Lacey, the director at Huntingdon College’s Center for Career and Vocation, offered this wisdom:

EXPERT ADVICE:

DO THIS:

• Make it a valuable experience

on both ends, and be hands on.

• Hire an individual you could see yourself hiring fulltime.

• Make sure to have professional development opportunities available to your intern.

NOT THIS: • Don’t be too flexible. Allow

flexibility and be understanding, but not so flexible that they think that is how the “real world” is.

• Don’t use an intern for “free” or “cheap” labor. It must be a professional development experience.

• Don’t be inaccessible to college faculty advisors who are

requesting student evaluations.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


WORKING PROOF Zoo Deputy Director Marcia Woodard explained how interns at The Montgomery Zoo & Mann Wildlife Learning Museum benefit operations and what she believes interns gain in return.

Interns provide additional manpower, thus allowing us to accomplish projects such as visitor surveys and creative design projects that may not be completed with regular staffing. The interns receive real-life experiences by being hands-on at the zoo. It brings to life experiences that they have only studied in the classroom. Our internships also help the interns build their resumes.

PAID OR NOT?

Make the first

STEPS EASIER!

KNOW THE LAW

If you’re thinking adding an unpaid intern to your business is a great way to take advantage of free labor, think again. In the last few years, several interns who were paid little to nothing while working

With an Associate Degree from Trenholm State,

for large companies filed lawsuits for back wages and won. The

transferring to a 4-year college or university is

new normal when it comes to internships is that in most cases,

easy and affordable. www.trenholmstate.edu

for-profit companies have to pay their interns if they want to comply with labor laws, and minimum wage is the lowest you should pay. The Department of Labor uses the below points to determine whether or not an internship can be unpaid and be legal. If an internship meets all six criteria, it can be unpaid.

• The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training that would be given in an educational environment; 

• The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern; • The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff; 

• The employer that provides the training derives no immediate

advantage from the activities of the intern, and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded;

• The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and

• The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.

NOTE: Nonprofits and government sectors are automatically exempt from the rules governing internships and pay.

The College for Real Careers


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

NEW WATERS REALTY ADDS TEAM MEMBER

the state. At Chambless King Architects, Archie will utilize

New Waters Realty Company recently announced the

his skills in keeping with the firm’s commitment to being a

addition of Realtor® Laura Walter

full-service architecture firm that protects its clients’ inter-

to the Sales and Marketing team.

ests through the design as well as construction phase.

Walter joins the team at New Waters Realty with 20-plus years

BEASLEY ALLEN WELCOMES NEW ATTORNEY

of experience in sales, marketing,

Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C.

public relations and customer

announced the addition of Dr. Margaret M. Thompson,

service. She has also embedded

Of Counsel, in the firm’s Mass Torts Section, where she

herself in the Central Alabama

primarily focuses on the talcum powder litigation. More

community through numerous volunteer organizations. “I strive to always be involved with the ‘best of the best’ in every aspect of my life, and joining The Waters New Home Team with New Waters Realty is an honor. I look forward to helping my clients find their dream home, or homesite in Pike Road,” said Walter.

than 27 studies have shown that the genital use of talc significantly increases the risk of ovarian cancer. Thousands of cases are filed in federal and state courts around the country with the number expected to grow.

BELL MEDIA INTRODUCES VP

As a former OBGYN with more

Casey Pilgrim has been named Vice President, Corporate

than 25 years of experience,

Training at Bell Media. Pilgrim has

Dr. Thompson incorporates her

been in the digital space since

clinical experience and medical expertise in her legal

1998 when he started as an In-

practice. Dr. Thompson joined the firm in December 2016.

ternet Sales Manager for various

After leaving her private medical practice in 2008, she

franchised automotive dealer-

began her legal career in transvaginal mesh litigation. Dr.

ships in Alabama. Casey spent

Thompson has also worked as a medical and legal con-

13 years with The Cobalt Group

sultant, focusing on obstetrics and gynecology; reproduc-

(now CDK Global) in roles

tive law and policy; and the regulation of medical devices.

including Account Executive, National Accounts Manager and Director of Sales before serving as a Senior Consultant and Sales Manager with Alabama Media Group. Pilgrim has been with Bell Media for the past two years as the Vice President of Business Development.

AUBURN MONTGOMERY NAMES NEW PROVOST Chancellor Carl A. Stockton has named Dr. Mrinal Mugdh Varma as the new Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at Auburn University at Montgomery. Varma took over the post on February 1, 2017. He comes to AUM from the University of Houston-Clear Lake,

CHAMBLESS KING ANNOUNCES NEW HIRE

where he made great strides

Chambless King Architects announced that Eric Archie

in the areas of institutional effec-

has joined the firm as Contract Administrator. A native of

tiveness, student enrollment and

Birmingham, Archie has lived in Montgomery for the past

student success. While at Hous-

25 years. He brings his more

ton-Clear Lake, Varma helped

than 30 years combined expe-

guide the university to record

rience in contract management

enrollment, assisting in the

and quality control in the con-

development and implementa-

struction industry to the position.

tion of a strategic plan for expanding academic program

He has worked as quality control

offerings, creating a culture of evidence, and increasing

manager on numerous Corps of

student enrollment through innovative recruitment and

Engineers projects throughout

retention programs. Critical to that success were the

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

collaborative relationships Varma cultivated on and off

the community, including serving on the Advisory Board

campus. Dr. Varma secured nearly $2 million in grant

of Auburn University at Montgomery College of Business

funding for the university’s student success center and

and as a member of the Executive Board of Directors for

campus learning communities, and the delivery of effec-

the Landmarks Foundation/Old Alabama Town.

tive advising and career counseling services to students.

LEDIC REALTY COMPANY, LLC (LEDIC) ANNOUNCES NEW HIRE

AUM HIRES ALUMNA TO LEAD ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT

Charles “Charlie” B. Paterson

Auburn University at Montgomery Chancellor Carl A.

has joined LEDIC Realty Com-

Stockton has named Jessie Rosa Director of Athletics,

pany, LLC (LEDIC) as General

effective March 1, 2017. Rosa previously served as the

Counsel. Paterson comes with

department’s Associate Athletics Director and Senior

a wealth of experience, having

Woman Administrator (SWA). She has served as interim

served as Partner at Balch and

AD since the departure of Jim Herlihy. Rosa, an AUM

Bingham LLP in the Birming-

alumna and former student-athlete, has spent 10 years

ham and Montgomery offices.

working within AUM Athletics.

Paterson’s counseling and

Following her career in women’s

litigation experience extends to many industries, includ-

soccer, Rosa spent two years

ing architectural, daycare, engineering, financial services

as a graduate assistant before

and solid waste. As former General Counsel to a publicly

beginning her steady ascent

traded company, Paterson has experience regarding

through the ranks, including time

corporate governance and general corporate matters.

as Senior Program Associate and Assistant Athletics Director for Finance. Beginning Gulf South Conference play for the 2017–18 season, AUM currently sponsors 11 sports, with its newest sport, volleyball, launching in the fall of 2017. Rosa takes the helm at a critical time for the program, currently in Provisional Year One of the NCAA Division II membership process and working toward full membership in 2019–20.

HIRELEVEL PROMOTES NEW RISK CONTROL SPECIALIST HireLevel powered by Extra Help, one of the region’s largest women-owned employment, payroll and workforce management companies, has promoted Shaunda Mohme, CSP to Risk Control Specialist.

TRUSTMARK NAMES NEW COMMERCIAL RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Mohme will work closely with

Scott Killman has joined Trustmark as a Senior Vice

accident prevention procedures and safety programs for

President and Commercial Relationship Manager in the

HireLevel and its clients. She will also be the driving force

Montgomery market. Killman, a

in coordinating and implementing the timely execution of

Certified Treasury Professional®

the risk management program within and across the lines

(CTP), has over 15 years of com-

of business and office locations.

the company to evolve the

bined commercial real estate and commercial and industrial

+ SUBM IT T IN G N E WS? Submit information to Jina

banking experience. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Busi-

Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com. Attach press

ness Administration degree with

releases as a Word document and include a high-resolution

concentrations in Economics and Accounting from Auburn University at Montgomery. Killman is involved in various leadership positions within

55

headshot (at least 300 dpi). An accompanying headshot is required for “Members on the Move” announcements.

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


56

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

WSFA-TV From its first telecast on Christmas Day in 1954 all the way to today, WSFA-TV has been serving our area, becoming a trusted source for both hyper-local and broad news, as well as weather and sports coverage delivered with cutting-edge technology.

HISTORY: WSFA-TV signed on the air on December 25, 1954. But before it was a television station, the call letters W-S-F-A were familiar in Montgomery. Gordon Persons (who went on to become an Alabama governor) opened Alabama’s fourth radio station in 1930, locating it at what was then the city’s airport. He publicized the station with the slogan, “With the South’s Finest Airport,” hence, WSFA. Raycom Media, headquartered in Montgomery, has owned WSFA since January 2006. In August 2006, WSFA was the first television station in Alabama to upgrade to digital, non-linear video news gathering equipment, and it was the first television station in Montgomery

Shown below, left to right: Jennifer Horton (Anchor/Reporter), Vernon Turner (Meteorologist), Valorie Lawson (Anchor), Kacey Drescher (Anchor/Reporter), Lindsey Rogers (Reporter), Mark Bullock (Anchor), Josh Johnson (Chief Meteorologist), Stephen Gunter (Sports Director) and Morgan Young (Reporter)

to begin broadcasting in high-definition in 2008.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 108  

WHAT SERVICES DOES WSFA PROVIDE THE RIVER REGION COMMUNITY? Local news, weather and sports coverage, NBC news, entertainment and sports programming and syndicated entertainment programs. Via digital platforms, local news, weather and sports as well as weather-focused content on the WSFA First Alert Weather app. And on social media, all of the above.   

WHAT IS WSFA’S ROLE IN THE COMMUNITY? To serve as the information source during breaking news and breaking weather. WSFA has also made it a goal to be involved in the community by bringing awareness to events and causes that shape who we are.   

WHAT SETS WSFA’S NEWS AND WEATHER TEAM APART? Our people. For more than 60 years, WSFA 12 News has employed the right people at the right time to do the job needed to share the stories, happenings and document history in central and south Alabama. We are journalists who love to share and tell the stories of people who we serve. Our team is driven by the fact that we never want to let down our viewers.

HOW HAVE CHANGES IN TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED WSFA? Consumers have the ability to get our news when they want it, how they want it and where they want it. Our deadline in 2017 is “NOW.”  

RECENT AWARDS: Through the years, WSFA has been honored with hundreds of Associated Press Awards, numerous community awards and was named the Alabama Broadcasters Station of the Year in 2010 and 2012.

12 EAST DELANO AVENUE / MONTGOMERY / 334-288-1212 / WSFA.COM 57

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

BELL MEDIA HIRES ACCOUNTING MANAGER

TAYLORCHANDLER ADDS TO ITS PROFESSIONAL STAFF

Bell Media announced the hire of Judson Ricks as Accounting

TaylorChandler CPAs announced changes in its professional

Manager. Ricks comes to Bell Media

staff. Stefanie Chandler was recently promoted to Partner in the

following four years as an Assurance

firm. Chandler joined TaylorChandler in 2006 and has more than

and Tax Associate with Jackson

15 years of experience in the accounting profession. Matt Binns

Thornton and Co. He is a graduate

joined the firm as Senior Auditor. He has more than 18 years of

of Troy University, earning his Bach-

experience in public accounting and is a leader in several areas

elors of Science in Business Admin-

of the profession. Jerry Weisenfeld was recently hired as Director

istration in 2011 and completing his

of Marketing and Business Development. He brings more than

Masters of Business Administration

16 years of experience in the professional services marketing in-

in 2012.

dustry and is responsible for developing and executing the firm’s marketing, communications and business development strategies

HOUSE AND HOME REAL ESTATE ADDS TEAM MEMBER

for its offices in Alabama, Georgia and Florida.

House and Home Real Estate recently announced the addition of Leslie Zeanah to its team. Zeanah joins House and Home with 15 years of experience in the Commercial Real Estate industry successfully marketing and leasing shopping

FROM LEFT: Stefanie Chandler, Matt Binns and Jerry Weisenfeld.

centers across the Southeast.

IT’S A WASTE TO WASTE MONEY ON WASTE. No business can afford to waste money on waste. Sadly, many businesses don’t know what they’re actually paying, or who is even in charge of it. Someone signed a contract long ago, the bills keep coming and nobody worries about it. But most companies’ contracts have built in rate increases. So you may be paying a lot more than you should. At Alabama Dumpster Service, we have the dumpster or roll-off container that’s right for your business and your budget. Our customer service is unsurpassed and you can trust us for timely delivery and pick-up. So take a second look at your trash removal costs and call us. We’ll make sure you’re not wasting money on waste.

FRONT LOADS | ROLL-OFFS | COMPACTORS | PORTABLE RESTROOMS AlabamaDumpster.com | 334-288-1500 follow us on facebook 58

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

ALABAMA ORTHOPAEDIC SPECIALISTS For almost 40 years, Alabama Orthopaedic Specialists has been providing the River Region with precise, professional and compassionate orthopaedic care.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 47  

DOCTORS: Steven A. Barrington, MD, Total Joint Surgery; Erwin Bennett MD, Foot & Ankle Surgery; Michael E. Davis MD, Spine Surgery; Charles W. Hartzog Jr. MD, Sports Medicine; Donald D. Thornbury MD, Foot and Ankle Surgery; Hussein W. Turki MD, Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery; George D. Walcott Jr. MD, Sports Medicine.

WHAT ARE AOS’ PRIMARY SERVICES? Diagnostic and corrective surgical services for orthopaedic problems. We offer a full range of operative and non-operative treatments for sports medicine, orthopaedic spine issues, hand and upper extremity (including shoulder

Standing Left to right: Michael Davis, Erwin Bennett, Dexter Walcott Sitting left to right: Dave Thornbury, Steve Barrington, Hussein Turki and Charles Hartzog

issues), foot and ankle issues, total joint replacement, arthritis, injuries and all musculoskeletal problems. We also have on-site whole body MRI and physical therapy services.

WHAT IS AOS’ PATIENT-CARE PHILOSOPHY? Our mission is to provide a full range of orthopaedic specialty care to our patients and to remain at the forefront of orthopaedic advancements and techniques. We strive to provide each patient with precise, cost-effective and respectful care with the ultimate goal of improving our patients’ quality of life. We always strive to treat our patients, their families, our community and each other with respect, compassion and discretion.

HOW HAVE CHANGES IN TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED THE WAY AOS APPROACHES PATIENT CARE? AOS was an early adopter of the EHR (Electronic Health Record) and has been using it for nine years. This has allowed for a more complete and accessible patient record. AOS also uses digital x-ray images, making them instantly available to the doctor and allowing for quick retrieval of previous images for comparison.

WHAT SETS AOS APART? We are a sub-specialized orthopaedic practice where each physician has completed a fellowship (extra training following the residency) in a specialized area of the musculoskeletal system. We are a one-stop orthopaedic campus for most orthopaedic problems. There is little reason to travel to Birmingham for orthopaedic care when we have this caliber of expertise here. And we’ve simplified the process. At our Montgomery location, we have an orthopaedic campus with two clinic buildings, AOS Physical Therapy Center and a MRI facility, so there is no need to bounce between multiple offices for the care you need. AOS also sees patients by appointment in Greenville, as well as Prattville and Wetumpka.

4294 LOMAC STREET / 334-274-9000 / AOSONLINE.NET 59

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

CE LE BRAT IN G GO O D N E SS

WANT YOUR NEWS IN THE MBJ? Submit information for consideration to Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com. Please attach press releases as a Word document or a PDF (Word documents preferred), and please include high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) photos with your press release if possible.

LOCAL LAW FIRM CREATES MAGIC Magic Moments and Hill Hill Carter Franco Cole & Black, PC surprised 16-year-old Marquisha Jones with the news of her “magic moment” – receiving a computer and iPad with voice adaptive technology along with mounting equipment for her wheelchair. Jones has dreams of be-

SUBMISSION DEADLINES: AUGUST ISSUE - JUNE 20 SEPTEMBER ISSUE - AUG 1

coming a lawyer. Hill, Hill, Carter and Magic Moments teamed up to help her better pursue her the lawyers would be speaking with her about their profession to encourage her to continue to

Prattville Baptist Hospital CEO Leads March of Dimes Effort

pursue law as her career choice after hearing about her story. “We were very moved by Marqui-

More than 10,000 Alabama babies will be

sha’s story, the tragedy that happened in her life and her positive attitude. Despite her setbacks,

born premature this year, and Eric Morgan

we know that with determination, the right resources and encouragement from her community,

is working with the March of Dimes to

she can reach any goal she sets her mind to. We hope her new computer equipment will assist

change this. As the Chief Executive Officer

her in furthering her education and reaching her full potential. Montgomery is blessed with a

Prattville Baptist Hospital, he knows how

legal community that is involved in charitable organizations such as Magic Moments. This is

important the March of Dimes mission is

just a small representation of what our legal community does,” said Spud Seale, Shareholder at

to families all over the state. As a father of

Hill Hill Carter Franco Cole & Black, PC. Magic Moments is the only wish-granting organization

two, he has taken on the role of the 2017

dedicated exclusively to children in Alabama suffering with chronic life threatening diseases.

March for Babies Chair to raise awareness

dreams after suffering a spinal cord injury in 2015 that left her a quadriplegic. Marquisha thought

and grow funding to help babies born preterm or with birth defects. Morgan has

AUM RENEWS SHRM ALIGNMENT

made the commitment to lead the effort to

Auburn University at Montgomery’s College of Business has announced that its BSBA in Hu-

raise $290,000 for the overall campaign

man Resource Management curriculum has been recognized for its alignment with the Society

goal. March for Babies, the March of Dimes’

for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM) Curriculum Guidebook and Templates. SHRM is

largest fundraiser, funds research and

the world’s largest HR professional society, representing 285,000 members in more than 165

educational programs aimed at helping

countries. “One key impact of the renewed alignment is that SHRM will allow college seniors

moms have healthy babies. Last year in

with at least 500 hours of internship or practical HR experience to take the professional certi-

the River Region, more than $277,000 was

fication exam (SHRM-CP) beginning next December,” said Dr. Ed Arnold, professor of Human

raised. This year, Morgan and his Executive

Resource Management. “But, to qualify, they have to be in a college where the curriculum has

Leadership Team will focus on recruiting

been approved.” As an SHRM-certified college, AUM’s College of Business is listed on the

new companies to participate and lead

society’s website, which is visited daily by thousands of managers in industry. “That means

the community in making a difference for

executives and hiring managers will be familiar with AUM when they see it on candidates’

the health of moms and babies. Central

resumes,” Arnold added. Worldwide, only 440 programs in 330 educational institutions have

Alabama residents can sign up at www.

been acknowledged by SHRM as being in alignment with its suggested guides and templates.

marchforbabies.org.

60

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

IMAGE BY GRACE O’CONNOR I GRACE PHOTOGRAPHY

HAMPSTEAD HOSTS “TASTE & TOUR” BENEFIT The Samaritan Counseling Center hosted a fundraising “Taste & Tour” event in early April at the Hampstead community. The event gave attendees the opportunity to take guided tours of more than 15 decorated homes with food and drink tastings throughout, then enjoy more food and refreshments at The Tipping Point in Hampstead’s Town Center. The “Taste & Tour” also featured live music and prize drawings. All proceeds from ticket sales went to The Samaritan Counseling Center, which provides counseling and mental health services to thousands of individuals and families in the River Region.

LOCAL BUSINESS MARKS SIX DECADES WorkForce Walker Personnel, LLC, a locally, women-owned staffing agency, celebrated its 60th anniversary in April. WorkForce Walker Personnel, LLC, was founded by the Walker Family in 1957. In the beginning, they were located over another well-known Montgomery establishment, Chris’ Hot Dogs on Dexter Avenue. At that time, staffing consisted of permanent placements only. The Walkers’ success was swift, and their growth necessitated the need to include temp-to-hire and temporary

ALABAMA WORLD TRAVEL CELEBRATES ANNIVERSARY

placement services. In 1979,

Alabama World Travel in Mont-

ories that last a lifetime. It’s also a

WorkForce,

gomery has reached an exciting

“family” of people who look forward

the company’s

milestone: 45 years in the highly

to coming to work every day, engag-

industrial staffing division, was established. As their business

competitive travel agency business.

ing with each other professionally

continued to grow in size and services offered, the company

Founded in 1971, Alabama World

and personally. AWT celebrated its

expanded to several locations throughout the River Region

Travel (AWT) has grown to become

45 Year Anniversary on January 31

before returning their operations to downtown Montgomery

a trusted travel planning resource

with an Open House at its location

in 1995. WorkForce Walker Personnel is co-owned by Found-

for its growing clientele. AWT’s

on Taylor Road. Long-time clients

er and President, Mavis Walker, along with her daughter, Beth

team of 13 employees possesses

and friends, former employees,

Walker McBride, who serves as the company’s Vice President

more than 150 combined years of

travel partners from near and far and

and oversees the daily operations. “It is very exciting to look

personal travel and travel planning

service partners in the community

back at all that my mother has accomplished in the 60 years

experience, a passion for travel, a

came and enjoyed a grand reunion.

since she founded the company. It is a true honor to be a

commitment to excellence and gen-

Mayor Todd Strange presented Liz

part of this legacy,” Walker McBride said. As their company

uine care for other people. They see

Sutton with a Key to the City.

has evolved, services now include professional, clerical and

Mavis Walker, President

Beth Walker McBride, Vice President

AWT as more than a business; it’s a

industrial staffing resources in the River Region and profes-

place they help people create mem-

sional placement services across the country.

61

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

ZOO WEEKEND OFFERS FAMILY FUN The City of Montgomery and the Montgomery Area Zoological Society invited all to the 41st annual Zoo Weekend in mid March. The two-day event featured a festival-style environment with live entertainment, rides, games, inflatables, animal presentations and tasty treats. The family friendly event also featured a rock-climbing wall and the Jo Don Petting Zoo, where guests were able to touch and feed animals as well as ride ponies and camels. Started in 1976 to raise funds to support capital improvement projects, Zoo Weekend is a cherished tradition in the River Region. Throughout the years, proceeds from this event have supported the construction of new habitats for African elephants, American alligators and North American river otters. The event also serves as a membership drive for the zoo, with discounted annual membership rates.

LOCAL RESTAURANT GM APPOINTED TO HOSPITALITY BOARD The Vintage Year’s General Manager Chase

Richard Deems. “This will enable this effective organization to be more effective to touch those that’s in a greater need in the local community,”

RETA IL NEWS

Brown was recently appointed to serve on the

said Publix Media and Community Relations Man-

board for the Alabama Restaurant and Hospi-

ager Dwaine Stevens.

KIRKLAND’S JOINS EASTCHASE CENTRAL

EMPLOYEES NOW OWN INFORMATION TRANSPORT SOLUTIONS

Jim Wilson & Associates, LLC

Information Transport Solutions, Inc. (ITS), a lead-

7,500 square feet, to the store

ing provider of broadband and network services

line-up for Eastchase Central,

to education, govern-

the new shopping center de-

ment and industry in the

velopment under construction

Southeast, announced

and located at the mid-point of

that its Employee Stock

Eastchase Parkway. Kirkland’s

Ownership Plan (ESOP)

is a well-known name in the

Trust has acquired 100

Southeast and will join Mar-

percent of the outstand-

shalls/HomeGoods and Five

ing shares of company.

Below in this new shopping

This was made possible

venue at Eastchase. “As the

by founder Tomi Selby selling her remaining

developer of Eastchase, Jim

company stock to the employees of ITS, effective

Wilson & Associates looks

March 6, 2017. “Employee ownership was one of

forward to the addition of

The Montgomery Area Food Bank got a huge

the main reasons I originally joined ITS. This im-

Kirkland’s, an outstanding

portant step further ensures that employees can

retailer, to our new shopping

share in the company’s success,” said Jeff Drury,

center project, Eastchase

CFO. “I thank Tomi for her leadership and vision in

Central, opening in the Fall

making the ESOP a reality.” Selby founded ITS in

of this year,” said Will Wilson,

1998 and it has grown - because of its employees

President of Jim Wilson &

and leadership - to become a leading information

Associates.

tality Association. The Alabama Restaurant and Hospitality Association is a non-profit corporation, dedicated to serve the needs of the foodservice hospitality industry in the state of Alabama. The Association provides educational programs, membership services, legislative and government relations, informational services, and promotes the industry for its members. “It’s an honor to be selected to the Alabama Restaurant & Hospitality Association Board of Directors for a two-year term. I plan on using this platform to help our youth in the culinary field through demonstrations, career days and many other engagements that give vision and hope. I feel it is our responsibility to teach these kids about the skills and abilities that will attribute to a more prosperous career,” said Brown.

FOOD BANK DONATION boost in its ability to get food to people across the state recently thanks to a generous donation from Publix Super Markets. Publix donated a new refrigerated food truck to the Food Bank, a gift valued at $150,000. The truck will help ensure that many residents get healthy foods like fruits and vegetables that need refrigerating during shipment. “If we didn’t have these refrigerated trucks, it would hinder our mission and ultimately

technology firm in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi. The full-employee ownership of ITS will fuel further expansion efforts.

it would affect the people,” said food bank CEO 62

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

(JWA) has added the specialty retailer Kirkland’s, with over


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

BAPTIST HEALTH & MONTGOMERY CANCER CENTER OPEN RENOVATED CLINIC Montgomery Cancer Center Prattville recently opened its newly renovated 15,000-square-foot space at Prattville Medical Park. The facility is located in the Prattville Medical Park and will deliver cutting-edge cancer care, a team of board-certified oncologists and highly trained oncology nurses. The space holds 24 infusion bays for patients undergoing chemotherapy and immunotherapy along with 10 exam rooms, conference areas and support facilities. “For more than two decades, the Montgomery Cancer Center has provided support, hope and healing to its patients,”

B IR T H DAY C E LEB R AT I O N AT R O SA PARKS MUS E UM

said Susan Reed, administrator of the Montgomery Cancer Center. “Bringing this convenience to our patients in

Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum celebrated what would have been

Prattville is truly a better service to our community’s future

Mrs. Parks’ 104th birthday in February with free tours, musical and theat-

needs.

rical performances and birthday cake. The celebration took place at the museum, located on the Troy University Montgomery Campus downtown. University Montgomery is so excited to celebrate her legacy of courage on

CADDELL CONSTRUCTION CO. TO BUILD EMBASSY

her birthday,” said Dr. Felicia Bell, the museum’s director. Constructed on the

Caddell Construction Co., an international construction firm

site of the Empire Theatre where Parks was famously arrested for refusing

headquartered in Montgomery, was awarded a construc-

to give up her seat on a Montgomery Bus, the Rosa Parks Museum opened

tion contract by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of

in December 2000 with the mission of preserving and interpreting the story

Overseas Buildings Operations for the new U.S. Embassy

and lasting legacy of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

in Asuncion, Paraguay. The multi-building complex will

“Mrs. Parks was an American hero and the Rosa Parks Museum at Troy

be situated on a 14-acre site at the same location as the

NEW PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY IMPROVES SAFETY

existing embassy. The project will include a New Office Building, U.S. Marine residence, entry pavilion, facilities for

As more and more Americans enter their senior years, the struggle to keep

the community, support annex and a parking structure. The

up with medications increases. Turenne PharMedCo, a pharmacy and medical

award of the new embassy in Asuncion is Caddell’s 28th

supply distributor based in Montgomery, is working to help make medication

diplomatic facility contract since 2000, and Caddell’s first

distribution easier and safer. The company has committed to enhancing their

embassy project in South America. Construction will com-

services to provide more simplified and user-friendly medication packaging. In

mence in 2017 with project completion anticipated in 2021.

addition to providing a number of different packaging options such as blister packs, the pharmacy has invested more than $500,000 to upgrade to the latest in automated drug packaging machines and inspection technology. For

HEALTH SERVICES ADDS CLINIC

hundreds of pills at a time, the new ATP2 machines not only sort each med-

Montgomery’s Health Services, Inc. began offering adult

ication into individual prescriptions but also packages them in personalized

walk-in care on weekdays at its River Region Health Center

imprinted pouches that inform caregivers and patients about the contents.

Location in early March. Now, both new and existing pa-

Clear on one side, the pouches have the barcodes, names and dosages of

tients experiencing acute symptoms of minor illnesses and

each prescription on the other side so patients know exactly what medicines

injuries can “walk in” to the clinic, Monday through Friday,

they are taking and when they should be taken. Turenne PharMedCo, which

from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. With many providers and 10

serves healthcare facilities throughout Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky and

locations, HSI specializes in providing personalized care for

fills tens of thousands of prescriptions a week, also invested in an extra layer

every stage of life.

of protection for customers by upgrading its inspection technology to a more advanced InspectRx machine to help validate prescriptions. 65

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Achievements

Community MONTGOMERY BISCUITS FEATURED IN NEW BOOK As major and minor league teams prepare for the upcoming baseball season, travel writer Josh Pahigian has released a new book titled “The Amazing Baseball Adventure.” The book includes two chapters on Montgomery Riverwalk Stadium – one on the Biscuits’ namesake concession item and the other on the historic train shed

BEASLEY ALLEN LAWYER JOINS “DISTINGUISHED FELLOWS” Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis and Miles, P.C. lawyer, C. Gibson Vance has joined the Fellows of the Alabama Law Foundation. The Alabama Law Foundation established its Fellows program in 1993 to honor lawyers who have been members of the bar at least 10 years and who have demonstrated outstanding dedication to their profession and to their community.  Election

that graces the park’s

to the Fellows is limited to one percent of bar membership. “I am

first base line. Both

honored to be selected as a member of the Fellows of the Ala-

include beautiful

bama Law Foundation,” said Vance. “I understand the importance

color photos. A visu-

of their work and I look forward to contributing.” Fellows commit

ally stunning road-trip

to a financial contribution that is devoted to the foundation’s mis-

through pro baseball’s

sion of providing access to justice. The Alabama Law Foundation

wacky, wondrous

has awarded $18 million in grants since it was established in 1987.

and revered ballpark attractions, “The

HUNTINGDON PRESIDENT NAMED TO NAICU BOARD

Amazing Baseball Ad-

Huntingdon College President J. Cameron West has been

venture” details more

appointed to serve on the board of the National Association of

than 100 ballpark eccentricities that make attending games extra special for fans. Pahigian writes, “The Biscuits do well to offer fans a trademark concession that they can eat in the shadows of one of the minor leagues’ best examples of a pre-existing structure integrated into a ballpark design.” The Biscuits are one of only a handful of minor league teams to earn multiple chapters in the book.

Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). He is one of 14 new board members who assumed their responsibilities during the 2017 NAICU Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in February. West represents Region VI for NAICU, which encompasses independent colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. NAICU board members set the association’s agenda on federal higher

YMCA OF GREATER MONTGOMERY SOCCER PLAYER HONORED

education policy; actively encourage support of association

The YMCA of Greater

administration. Members serve three-year terms. “It is both a

Montgomery announced

privilege and an honor to represent the independent institutions

recently that Kobey Stoup,

of this region on the NAICU board,” said West. West has served as

a 13-year-old player for

president of Huntingdon College since 2003.

priorities and initiatives; and oversee the organization’s financial

the 2001 YMCA of Greater

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT RECOGNIZES AUM

Montgomery Capital City

U.S. News & World Report recently released its rankings of top

Streaks Boys Elite team

business schools across the nation and recognized the Auburn

was selected and invited

University at Montgomery College of Business for its part-time

by the United States Soc-

Master of Business Administration program. “It is an honor to be

cer Federation to attend

recognized among the top programs in the country by U.S. News

the United States Under

& World Report,” said Dr. Rhea Ingram, dean of the AUM College

14 National Team Camp held in California in mid-February. In addition, he was invited to the Region III ODP Team International Tour in Cosa Rica. Manny Sanchez, Vice President of the Emory Folmar YMCA Soccer Complex said, “This is an incredible accomplishment. There is not a harder working and more deserving player in the club. We all wish Kobey the best as he represents the Club, CCS ‘01 Elite,

of Business. “It speaks volumes to the dedication of our faculty, staff and students. Our reputation for excellence comes from putting students first, with faculty who bring in real-world experiences and strong connections to the business community, both local and global.” U.S. News & World Report evaluated programs for its rankings based on reputation data.

YMCA and Alabama.”

66

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

PHOENIX REHABILITATION AND HEALTH SERVICES, INC. This company has brought its brand of cost-effective and “patient-first” care to the River Region.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES (IN THE RIVER REGION): 23 and growing

WHAT SERVICES DOES PHOENIX PROVIDE THE RIVER REGION? Physical and Occupational Therapy along with Industrial Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine and Dry Needling.

WHAT BROUGHT PHOENIX TO THE RIVER REGION? PHOENIX opened clinics in the River Region when local leadership decided to partner with PHOENIX Rehabilitation in a very unique, private practice model. PHOENIX has allowed local physical therapists with significant clinical and operational experience to start a new option for physical therapy in the River Region that focuses on one-on-one patient care. “Being locally owned and operated allows PHOENIX to really get entrenched

Robert Kohn, PT works with patient Caroline Kirkham

in the community, provide excellent patient outcomes, and give back to the community in many ways,” said Robert Kohn, director of clinical operations.

PLEASE OUTLINE PHOENIX’S PATIENT CARE PHILOSOPHY. PHOENIX believes that patient care should be efficient, purposeful and cost effective guided by the principles of employee satisfaction and quality clinical outcomes delivered in a customer friendly and professional healthcare environment. Our local professional staff has combined clinical experience of over 150 years in physical therapy, occupational therapy, sports medicine and Industrial Rehabilitation. “We really want to put the patient first. We take pride in providing one-on-one time with our patients, establishing a relationship and building trust that will allow them the best opportunity to return to their daily activities,” said Jason Harris, facility director in Montgomery.

WHAT SETS PHOENIX AND ITS EMPLOYEES APART?

Back row: Matt Kilpatrick, PTA; Freddie Smith, PTA; Jason Peavy, ATC; Brent Vinson, PT, ATC; Jo Ellen Kelly, Facility Secretary; Conan Brooks, PT;. Middle row: Wykein Dean, Rehab Aide; Lauren Talley, Secretary Trainer; Nancy Alexander, PTA; Dianna Church, Facility Secretary; Kristy McGehee, PT; Jason Harris, PT; Angie Rush, Marketing and Sales. Front row: Lauren Skipper, PT; Robert Kohn, PT, ATC; Kiah Madison, Rehab Aide; Erin Ainsworth, OT. Not pictured: Tony Bridges, Rachel Anderson, Facility Secretary; Blake Dandridge, PTA.

PHOENIX truly is a company that is very family oriented in its structure from top to bottom. Local employees have been working together for more than 20 years. “The family atmosphere allows an environment for the patients and employees that is comfortable, non-threatening, and enjoyable,” said Conan Brooks, facility director in Wetumpka. PHOENIX was created to be a better and different kind of physical therapy company, different in how we treat patients, different in the way we work with each other, and different in the way we partner with our referral sources, insurers and community members.

ALL PHOENIX LOCATIONS 4810 Woods Crossing Drive / 334-239-9316 74186 Tallassee Highway-B / Wetumpka / 334-478-3543 323 Greenville Bypass, Suite C / Greenville /334-665-4368 2408 East University Drive, Suite 106 / Auburn / 334-275-4636 ALABAMA ORTHOPAEDIC SPECIALISTS P.A. DRIVEN BY PHOENIX / 4294 Lomac Street / Montgomery / 334-274-9000 NEUROLOGY CONSULTANTS OF MONTGOMERY DRIVEN BY PHOENIX / 1725 Pine Street / Montgomery / 334-834-1300

4810 WOODS CROSSING DRIVE / 334-239-9316 / PHOENIXREHAB.COM 67

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Awards & Honors

taining and operating some of the military’s most sophisticated unmanned aircraft systems. The scope of work included a

STERLING/SYNOVUS WINS MULTIPLE AWARDS Sterling/Synovus won 28 awards in the 2016 Greenwich Excellence Awards for Small Business Banking and Middle Market Banking. Among more than 600 U.S. banks evaluated by Greenwich Associates, 30 received awards for small business banking and 37 for middle market banking. Only one bank won more awards than Sterling/Synovus. “This year’s Greenwich Excellence Awards demonstrate our continued focus on client relationships and providing individualized financial advice and services,” said Kessel D. Stelling, chairman and CEO of Sterling/Synovus. “As the vital small business and middle market segments become increasingly competitive, Sterling/Synovus’ culture, people, and our focus on consultative relationships continue to make the difference. We are proud and honored to be recognized by Greenwich Associates for providing such exceptional service.” The Greenwich Excellence Awards recognize exceptional service quality to small and middle market businesses. To determine the winners, Greenwich Associates interviewed nearly 15,000 small businesses with sales of $1-$10 million and 15,000 middle-market firms with sales of $10-$500 million across the country.

56,250-square-foot hangar; a new 5,000-foot reinforced concrete runway; 4.5 miles of security perimeter fencing; five ground data terminal platforms; and six air landing systems. Despite significant late design modifications and expansions of the original scope, Caddell completed this high-priority project on time and to a very high level of satisfaction among numerous project stakeholders. There was not a single safety incident, and the work was performed while critical training for the Army Special Operations Forces continued uninterrupted on two adjacent runways.  

CHAMBLESS KING HONORED Chambless King Architects was recently honored with an Award of Merit by the Alabama Council of the American Institute of Architects for the LogiCore Headquarters in Huntsville. The award was presented to Chambless King at the Council’s annual design award dinner held at the Grand Bohemian Hotel in Mountain Brook. The headquarters for LogiCore, a logistics defense contractor, includes a new 40,000-square-foot facility located on more than 9 acres of waterfront property in Cummings Research

CADDELL CONSTRUCTION TAKES TOP NATIONAL HONORS

Park. “We are honored to receive recognition for this project that we feel closely represents our approach to design,” said John Chambless, Principal of Chambless King Architects. The Alabama Council AIA is a non-profit professional association for architects that recognizes the exceptional design work of its members through its annual Design Awards program.

BEASLEY ALLEN LAWYER & FIRM RECEIVE GIRL SCOUTS HONOR A Caddell Construction Company project has won top honors in the construction industry’s two most prestigious national project excellence competitions. The Design-Build Unmanned Aircraft Vehicle (drone) Hangar Complex at Camp Mackall-Fort Bragg, N.C., won the AGC (Associated General Contractors) Build America Award for best project in the nation, Category Federal & Heavy Construction. This same project was selected as winner of the National ABC (Associated Builders & Contractors) Eagle Award for best project, nationwide, in the category Pre-Engineered Buildings. This rare double win was recognized at each association’s respective national convention in March.

Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama (GSSA) in mid-March as the group celebrated the impact of women leaders in the community and applauded organizations and businesses that support girls’ and women’s leadership and success. Danielle Ward Mason, a lawyer in the firm’s Mass Torts Section, was presented with the inaugural GSSA Leading Lady award, and Beasley Allen was named the Leading Workplace for Women. The award recognizes the accomplishments of women leaders and celebrates them for being outstanding role models in their local community. In addition to honoring Mason, the Girl Scouts also selected Beasley Allen as the Leading Workplace for Women, recognizing its culture of

Caddell Construction Company managed the design and construction of a new $32 million complex for housing, main-

68

Beasley Allen received a double helping of recognition from the

promoting leadership and success among girls and women. The firm was among four area businesses nominated for the award.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


My heirloom quilt’s worst enemy. Home Pickup & Delivery

EG AL

ACY

OF CL EAN

1941 SINCE

TWELVE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS WITH FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY TUXEDO AND SUIT RENTALS / TEL: 334-262-8852 / JIMMASSEY.COM

69

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT IN G N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

ALABAMA WORLD TRAVEL/SUTTON & ASSOCIATES

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT-MONTGOMERY

2225 Taylor Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-279-8720 • www.awtinc.com Liz Sutton-President / Travel Agencies/Services

5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-272-5533 • www.marriott.com/mgmch Teyonna Olds-General Manager / Hotels/Motels

DIVERSICARE OF MONTGOMERY

SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS OF ALABAMA

2020 North Country Club Drive, Montgomery, AL 36106 334-263-1643 • www.DVCR.com Dennis Davis-Administrator / Nursing Homes/Assisted Living

534 Adams Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-0014 • www.ssaonline.org Eric Makey-Executive Director / Associations/Non-Profit

LIBERTY LEARNING FOUNDATION

SOUTHEAST GAS

9730 Bent Brook Drive, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-301-0418 • www.libertyslegacy.com Becky Saunders-Regional Development Director Associations/Non-Profits

10567 Vaughn Road, Pike Road, AL 334-488-5147 • www.seagd.com J Gregory Henderson-President/CEO Mitch Thorn-Marketing & Communications Coordinator / Utilities

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

RIVER REGION DERMATOLOGY & LASER

WOODFOREST NATIONAL BANK

2060 Berryhill Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-676-3366 • www.rrdermatologylaser.com Porcia B. Love-Founder/Dermatologist Physicians-Dermatology

851 Ann Street, Montgomery, AL 36107 334-261-1774 • www.woodforest.com Latisha Simpson-Retail Branch Manager / Banks

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MILITARY Appreciation Day at the Zoo THURSDAY JUNE 15TH 9AMM5PM Come join the Chamber and enjoy a great day at the Montgomery Zoo and Mann Museum with lunch served from 11:45 to 2:00.

* FREE WITH A VALID MILITARY ID 72

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Presenting Sponsor:


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

GUILD MORTGAGE

BLP MOBILE PAINT CENTER

6719 Taylor Circle, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-513-8113 • www.switchtoguild.com Barry Carroll-Area Sales Manager / Mortgage/Finance

177B Eastern Boulevard, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-263-5507 • www.blpmobilepaint.com Hal Coats-Store Manager / Paint & Painting Supplies

HONEA INSURANCE & FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.

MONTGOMERY ZOO (Ground Breaking for Stingray Bay Exhibit)

9100 EastChase Parkway, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-272-8423 • www.breckhonea.com Breck Honea-Agent / Insurance Companies/Services

2301 Coliseum Parkway, Montgomery, AL 36110 334-625-4959 • www.montgomeryzoo.com Doug Goode-Director; Marcia Woodard-Deputy Zoo Director / Zoo

TAKE 5 OIL CHANGE

UNTETHERED DRONE WORKS, LLC

5540 Atlanta Highway, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-649-4527 • www.take5oilchange.com Jesse Goirl-Store Manager / Automobile Repair Services

241 Holly Brook Drive, Montgomery, AL 36109 334-663-3151 • www.flyuntethered.com Lee Drumheller-Owner/Pilot, Video Production/ Photographers / Drone Services

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

AT HOME-THE HOME DÉCOR SUPERSTORE

STATE FARM INSURANCE, MICKEY WATSON

1500 Eastdale Mall, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-694-6964 • www.athome.com Jeremy Arnold-Store Director / Department Stores

6146 Atlanta Highway, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-244-0000 • www.mickeywatson.com Mickey Watson-Agent / Insurance Companies/Services

MULBERRY MEDICAL, LLC

RALPH SMITH MOTOR COMPANY

2100 Chestnut Street, Montgomery, AL 36106 334-676-4090 Kynard Adams-Physician/Owner / Physicians-Family Practice

427 East Jefferson Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-263-1123 • www.ralphsmithmotors.com Joe Smith-President / Automobile-Dealers-Used

MONTGOMERY ARTS ACADEMY

RESULTS PHYSIOTHERAPY

1803 West Third Street, Montgomery, AL 36106 334-593-3419 •www.montgomeryartsacademy.com Diana S. Gray-Owner / Music-Piano & Vocal Instruction

6071 Eastchase Loop, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-721-6500 • www.resultsphysiotherapy.com Lane Blondheim-Lead Physical Therapist / Physical Therapists

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS New Members W ELCO ME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

ADVER TISING SPECIALT IES

AUTOMO BIL E D E A L E R S - U S E D

Untethered Drone Works, LLC Lee Drumheller 241 Holly Brook Drive Montgomery, AL 36109 334-663-3151

Charlie Davis Motorz, LLC Charlie Davis 830 Coliseum Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36109 334-356-0610

ADVER TISINGCABLE TELEVISI ON

Viamedia Pamela Pruitt 4137 Carmichael Road, Suite 120-B Montgomery, AL 36106 334-356-4136

AUTOMO BIL E R E PA IR S E RV I C E S

Take 5 Oil Change Melissa Castillo 5540 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-649-4527

APAR TM ENTS

B A N KS

Columbus Square Apartments Kimberly Bullock 432 N Union Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-261-4114

PNC Bank Hadley Hudnall 2710 Taylor Road Montgomery, AL 36117 334-240-8463

ASSOC IATIONS / N ON -P R OF I T

AGAPE Jimmy Dobbs P.O. Box 230472 Montgomery, AL 36123 334-272-9466

PNC Bank Lamonica Collins 5375 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, AL 36109 334-240-8629

Phoenix Salon and Spa Linda Echols 6311 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-272-4247

Lending Families A Hand Horace Lewis P.O. Box 640522 Pike Road, AL 36064 334-398-4900

B UI L D E R S - CO M M E R C IA L

That’s My Child Charles Lee 2235 West Fairview Avenue Montgomery, AL 36108 850-386-2378

C E L LU L A R /W IR E L E SS P H O N E S E RV IC E S

SouthernLINC Wireless Michael Smith 7088 Sydney Curve Montgomery, AL 36117 334-832-3937 CO M P U T E R S - CO N S U LT IN G

Application Innovations, LLC Joy Zakaria 103 Rosewood Drive Prattville, AL 36066 334-351-9624 CO N S U LT IN G S E RV IC E S

B E AUTY SA LO N S /S PAS

Council for Leaders in Alabama Schools Earl Franks P. O. Box 428 Montgomery, AL 36101 334-265-3610

Serquest Hammond Cobb 260 Commerce Street, Suite 310 Montgomery, AL 36104 205-566-7257

MAY NEW MEMBERS

Lucida Construction Company, LLC Mike Addison 63A Bridge Street Pike Road, AL 36064 334-356-0905 C A R WAS H & D E TA IL

Rich’s Car Wash Shayne Wasden 101 Perry Hill Road Montgomery, AL 36109 334-372-7054

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

JDB Hospitality LLC Ashley Jernigan 4393 Wares Ferry Road Montgomery, AL 36109 510-812-5728 LLBurge & Associates Legand Burge P.O. Box 242143 Montgomery, AL 36124 334-220-9640 CO N S U LT IN G S E RV IC E S / E D U C AT IO N

Troy University Continuing Education & Outreach Sharleen Smith 2721 Fair Oaks Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-220-7464


CHAMBER NEWS New Members

D E N T ISTS - S P E C IA L IZE D

Trulove & Foy Orthodontics, PC Tim S. Trulove 4164 Carmichael Road Montgomery, AL 3610 334-277-2980 D E PA R T M E N T STO R E S

At Home-The Home Decor Superstore Jeremy Arnold 1500 Eastdale Mall Montgomery, AL 36117 334-694-6964 E M P LOYM E N T AG E N C IE S

Labor Finders Kenneth Wilkinson 1405 Federal Drive Montgomery, AL 36107 334-264-4506 EVENT PLANNER

Carron Morrow Events Carron Morrow 9920 Wares Ferry Road Montgomery, AL 36117 334-279-6279 E V E N T-V E N U E

The Mission House, LLC Keary L. Foster 461 South Court Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-230-9676 G O L F CO U R S E S

Cottonwood Golf Club, LLC John Garner 7160 Byron Nelson Blvd. Montgomery, AL 36116 334-281-3344 G R O C E R IE S - R E TA IL

Hmart Companies Inc. Sam Q. Kim 2747 Bell Road Montgomery, AL 36117 201-507-9900

H O M E H E A LTH SERVI CES

ABLE Home Care Services/ Medical Courier Lamar Barber 600 South Court Street, Suite 310 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-617-6453 IN FO R M AT ION T E C H N O LO GY FI RMS

Program Management and Technology Services, Inc. Ruby Tuck 60 Commerce Street, Suite 330 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-241-0768 ZealRiver Technologies, Inc. Cheryl Brown 600 South Court Street, Suite 324 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-221-4567 IN S U R A N C E CO M PA N IE S / SERVI CES

State Farm Insurance, Tyna Carter-Agent Tyna Carter 5343 Young Barn Road Montgomery, AL 36106 334-272-5433 L A N D S C A P E & PEST CO N T R O L S U PPLY D IST R IBU TOR

SiteOne Landscape Supply Darrell Pylant 700 Enterprise Court Montgomery, AL 36117 334-395-8080 L E D SA L E S

Green Is Better, Inc. Rodney Hartley 1721 Gloria Court Montgomery, AL 36110 334-625-0440


Medical Necessities Kevin Bradley 1305 Mulberry Street Montgomery, AL 36106 334-265-5337

P H YS I C I A N S FA M I LY P R AC TI C E

Mulberry Medical, LLC Jimmie Horton 2100 Chestnut Street Montgomery, AL 36106 334-676-4090

MO RTGAGE/FINANCE

Bay Equity Home Loans Jennifer Johnston 7030 Fain Park Drive, Suite 10 Montgomery, AL 36117 334-549-2445 Caliber Home Loans, Inc. Becky Cox 7515 Halcyon Summit Drive, Suite 301 Montgomery, AL 36117 334-777-1507 Guild Mortgage Jimmy Parsons 6719 Taylor Circle Montgomery, AL 36117 334-513-8113 O F F I CE EQUIPM ENT / S U P PLIES

Cartridge World of Montgomery Wiley Dempsey 6383 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-819-8797 P E ST CONTR OL

Absolute Termite and Pest Control, LLC Eric Batrez 6009 B Monticello Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-239-7317 P E T BOAR DING/ G ROOM ING/DAYC AR E

pawsTHRIVE, LLC Cynthia Albritton P.O. Box 100 Shorter, AL 36075 334-799-0478

P R I VATE S C H OOL S

Valiant Cross Academy Anthony Brock 301 Dexter Avenue Montgomery, AL 36104 334-657-8429 P R OJ E C T M A N AG E M E N T

Hunt Military CommunitiesMaxwell Family Housing Joe Johnson 400 E. Maxwell Blvd Montgomery, AL 36113 334-262-1630 STOR AG E

Compass Self StorageArrowhead Drive Amanda Horian 200 South Arrowhead Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-356-5395 Compass Self StorageTroy Highway Amanda Horian 4220 Troy Highway Montgomery, AL 36116 334-281-4446 UTI L I TI E S

Southeast Gas Gregory Henderson 10567 Vaughn Road Pike Road, AL 36064 334-488-5147

THANK YOU TO OUR TOP CORPORATE PARTNERS

ME D IC AL EQUIPM EN T/ S U P PLIES

Together, we are making life better for everyone in the River Region, through our work in the areas of Education, Income Stability and Health. Alfa Insurance Companies Publix Super Markets Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama Alabama Power Regions Bank United Parcel Service The Colonial Company International Paper City of Montgomery Caddell Construction Company SABIC Innovative Plastics Jackson Thornton Montgomery Water Works & Sanitary Sewer Board Warren Averett Stifel Nicolaus Rushton Stakely River Bank & Trust Beasley Allen Law Firm Aldridge, Borden & Company Se ServisFirst Bank Rheem Montgomery Public Schools Aronov Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alabama Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood Raymond James Morgan Keegan Jim Wilson & Associates Enterprise Holdings RAYCOM Media BB&T Capell & Howard, P.C. Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce UBS Financial Services, Inc. Starke Agency, Inc. Hyundai Power Transformers Baptist Health Montgomery County MAX Credit Union This listing reflects our Top Corporate Partners and includes corporate contributions pledged for the corpo 2016 Campaign, as well as support from employees through workplace giving campaigns.

RiverRegionUnitedWay.org


Numbers reflect February 2017 over February 2016.

Economic Intel TRANSPORTATION 22,394 TOTAL PASSENGERS IN FEBRUARY 2017

CHECK OUT THE COST CALCULATOR ON FLYMGM.COM TO COMPARE FLIGHT COSTS.

TOURISM

Source: MGM-Montgomery Regional Airport

+ .20%

SECTORS GOING UP

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

+ 6.7%

EDUCATION &HEALTH SERVICES

+ 1.6%

SUPPLYROOMS AVAILABLE

+ 7%

+ 1.6% + 1.3%

GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

$649,842

LODGINGS TAX COLLECTIONS

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

Source: Smith Travel Research Report, City of Montgomery

LABOR FORCE HOUSING

- 3.39% UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

+ 1.5%

EMPLOYED

MGM IS CURRENTLY EXPERIENCING

POSITIVE

JOB GROWTH

CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE

+ 1.3%

+ 4.1%

-11.8%

-22.5%

AVERAGE SALES PRICE

TOTAL HOMES LISTED FOR SALE

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET

= $155K

= 2,201

Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate MGM Area

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

78

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

= 110 days


MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Post Office Box 79 Montgomery, AL 36101

Montgomery Business Journal - May 2017  

Volume 9 / Issue 3