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JUNE2010

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Contents

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Executive Editor’s Column

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Calendar

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Investor Profile: Baptist Health

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Q&A with Alabama Tourism Department’s Lee Sentell

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Entrepreneurial University

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Member Profile: Jenkins Brick & Tile

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Regions Financial Corp. Economic Impact

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Member Profile: Copperwing Design

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Hyundai Shatters Sales Records

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Town of Hampstead: Something Fresh on the Urban Farm

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Chamber News: International Baccalureate Program

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Guest Commentary: Eric Lewis

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Guest Commentary: Scott McNelley

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UA Economists Revise Economic Forecast

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Business Buzz

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Ribbon Cuttings and Ground Breakings

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New Members

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Members on the Move

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Economic Intel

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION PUBLISHER

Randall L. George EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Tina McManama MANAGING EDITOR

David Zaslawsky COPY EDITOR

Michelle Jones DESIGN

Copperwing Design PHOTOGRAPHY

Jamie Martin ADVERTISING:

Robert Edmonds 334-221-7948 mbjsales@montgomerychamber.com ON THE COVER:

Anna Lowder and Harvi Sahota, directors of design and develoment for The Town of Hampstead

Montgomery Business Journal c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Post OfďŹ ce Box 79 41 Commerce Street Montgomery, Alabama 36101 Telephone: 334-834-5200 Fax: 334-265-4745 Email: mbj@montgomerychamber.com www.montgomerychamber.com/mbj The Montgomery Business Journal is published monthly except for the combined issue of November/December, by the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334) 834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Rates is Pending at Montgomery, Alabama. POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 79, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36101, or email mbj@montgomerychamber.com. The Montgomery Business Journal welcomes story ideas from its readers. Email to: editor@montgomerychamber.com. Subscriptions are a part of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce dues structure. Subscriptions can also be purchased for $30

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June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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EXECUTIVE EDITOR’S COLUMN Summer is a time for vacations, relaxing in the sun and slowing things down ... unless you work at the Chamber. Summer is the time we prepare for your favorite Chamber events: August 5: Chamber Open Golf Tournament – This may look like a day of “putting around,” but it really is the perfect place to meet the River Region’s movers and shakers in a fun atmosphere. Flag me down at the Open - I’ll take your photo and make sure you get 15 minutes of Facebook fame! If you don’t golf – keep the site up all day to keep up on the action. To register, visit www.montgomerychamber.com/open. September 16: Diversity Summit - Explore how diversity affects value judgments in the workplace, discover how to move from tolerance to appreciation, and find out which workplace behaviors can limit success. The keynote speaker is a diversity MONSTER! Really. Stephen Pemberton is Chief Diversity Officer for Monster Worldwide, Inc., the parent company of Monster.com, the leading global online careers property. This day-long Summit offers you a forum to discuss and understand diversity, inclusion, and engagement within the workplace. The Diversity Summit sells out fast. Register NOW (before you go on vacation) to ensure your spot! For updates, visit www.montgomerychamber.com/dsupdates. To register, visit www.montogmerychamber.com/diversity. For more information, contact Heidi Ellis at 334-240-6863 or hellis@montgomerychamber.com. November 4: Women in Business Forum Annual Gathering - Your opportunity to network, build relationships and develop leadership opportunities with other businesswomen. NEW- the prestigious Athena Award will be presented to a woman for professional excellence, community service and mentoring. Nominations accepted until July 16. Contact Lisa McGinty at 334-240-6865 or lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com for details. To register for the event, visit www.montgomerychamber.com/women. While you’re relaxing on the beach, at the lake, amusement park or a golf resort, remember your friends at the Chamber are hard at work, making sure your fall business events are all Monsters!

Tina McManama, EXECUTIVE EDITOR VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Business Journal June 2010

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Calendar Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Events

JUNE

JULY

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EGGS & ISSUES Presenting Sponsor: Brown Chambless Architects 7:30 AM @ RSA Activity Center 201 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery Registration: www.montgomerychamber.com/rogers CHAMBER 101 Sponsored by Heartsill Payroll Professionals 8 AM @ Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce 41 Commerce Street Free. Reservations required. Register at 240-9298 or dpope@montgomerychamber.com 60 MINUTE COFFEE Sponsored by Alfa Properties 8 AM @ Sturbridge Shopping Village, Corner of Taylor and Vaughn Roads. Free event, exclusively for Chamber Members MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY AT THE ZOO Sponsored by Dreamland Bar-B-Que 11 AM-4 PM @ Montgomery Zoo, 2301 Coliseum Boulevard. Free with a valid military ID. Lunch provided. Details: bking@montgomerychamber.com

12 17 23 24 29

MILITARY APPRECIATION SALUTE Presenting Sponsor ITT Systems Division 7 PM @ Riverwalk Stadium Details: bking@montgomerychamber.com CHAMBER CLASSIC SPORTSMAN SHOOT 2 PM @ Lower Wetumpka Shotgun Sports Club 4758 Lower Wetumpka Road, Montgomery Registration: www.montgomerychamber.com/shoot LUNCHWORKS ETIQUETTE SERIES Noon @ The Small Business Resource Center 600 South Court Street, Montgomery. Registration: www.montgomerychamber.com/dress4success BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Sponsored by Alabama Shakespeare Festival 5 PM @ Alabama Shakespeare Festival 1 Festival Drive, Montgomery Free event, exclusively for Chamber Members BUSINESS TAXATION WORKSHOP Two sessions: 3 PM & 6 PM @ The Small Business Resource Center 600 South Court Street, Montgomery Registration: www.montgomerychamber.com/taxworkshop

21 29

60 MINUTE COFFEE Sponsored by Alabama ArtiďŹ cial Limb & Orthopedic Service, Inc. 8 AM @ Fire Station #3 4010 Carmichael Road, Montgomery Free event, exclusively for Chamber Members LUNCHWORKS Noon @ The Small Business Resource Center 600 South Court Street, Montgomery Registration: www.montgomerychamber.com/lunchworks BACK TO SCHOOL BREAKFAST Presenting Sponsor: Information Transport Solutions 8 AM @ RSA Activity Center 201 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery Registration: www.montgomerychamber.com/breakfast BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Sponsored by Alley Bar 5 PM @ Alley Bar 166 Commerce Street, Montgomery Free event, exclusively for Chamber Members

Convention Calendar compiled by the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Convention & Visitor Bureau

JUNE 2-4 3-5 8-11 17-19

Alabama FFA 81st Annual State FFA Convention

27-31

9th District AME Christian Education Congress

Alabama Postal Workers Union State Convention ASTA Summer Conference Alabama A&M Alumni Association Conference

JULY

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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Investor Profile

MEDICAL

Russ Tyner, president and chief executive officer of Baptist Health.

PRACTICE Baptist Health enhances care with training facility, curriculum by David Zaslawsky

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When a nurse at one of Baptist Health’s three hospitals uses a computerized medication dispensing unit, she stands inside an area marked with red stripes. That area is called a quiet zone “so that when I’m in that red stripe area working on that medication for that patient, you’re not allowed to talk to me; you can’t distract me – I need to be focused on what I’m doing right there, right now,” said Russ Tyner, president and chief executive officer of Baptist Health. “That’s not all that brilliant or technical – it’s like blocking and tackling.” That process was developed from a pilot program at the company’s Institute for Patient Safety & Medical Simulation, a 22,500square-foot facility with state-of-the-art technology, including dozens of computerized mannequins that mimic real-life patients. It is a facility that gives new meaning to the term “do-over.” You could call the Institute for Patient Safety & Medical Simulation, which was once the home of the Montgomery Surgery Center, a training facility on steroids. All types of health care professionals and would-be health professionals – from nurses to physicians, first responders to first-graders, high school students to medical students – receive hands-on training there. More than 6,000 have visited or trained at the facility. It contains just about every venue a health care provider might use, including treating patients in their homes. That’s right: Some of the rooms at the facility resemble bedrooms. “It’s saving us money, but we think it has increased geometrically the quality of care we provide, and we’re just getting started,” Tyner said. “We’ve been doing this for 2 to 2 ½ years in a big way, and we’re beginning to see it pay dividends and get recognized on a national basis for the quality and safety we provide,” he said.

The Institute also is fertile recruiting territory. More than 600 nurses have trained there, and Baptist has hired a number of them.

BAPTIST HEALTH

New nurses who have been through the training come out with a higher degree of “capacity” and a higher degree of confidence, Tyner said.

BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER SOUTH:

“It used to be you could take a young nurse and put them into a group of nurses who run a unit and you could pick them out rather easily. After about six months now, you can’t tell the veterans from the new (nurses) because the training is that intense, that functional and it works that well.” Baptist Health invested about $1 million in converting the facility. It spends about $800,000 per year to operate it.

FACILITIES

454-BED, ACUTE CARE HOSPITAL

BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER EAST: 150-BED HOSPITAL

PRATTVILLE BAPTIST HOSPITAL: 85-BED HOSPITAL

MONTGOMERY SURGICAL CENTER FOUR IMAGING CENTERS NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

3,558

But the investment would be worthless without a top-of-the-line curriculum, and that’s where the SMART training program comes in. The SMART (Synergistic Medical and Resource Team) training program was created in partnership with Auburn University.

AFFILIATED PHYSICIANS

It marries the clinical safety techniques with training techniques used by the aviation industry, such as simulations. This led Baptist to change the way it responds to traumas.

45,296

“The first thing we do is stop,” Tyner said. “We take a timeout. The most important thing is we decide what we’re going to do; how we’re going to do it; who’s going to do it. It takes 10 seconds to say you’re the physician in charge. You’re the single voice. Only one person shouts orders and if you have a role, you begin to execute it. If you don’t have a role, you get out of the room.”

NUMBER OF INPATIENT/OUTPATIENT SURGERIES

Baptist Health, which has two training programs – University of AlabamaBirmingham Internal Medicine Residency Program and Montgomery Family Medicine Residency Program – also works with the Montgomery Public Schools’ health science/ medical Career Academy at Jefferson Davis High School.

OUTPATIENT VISITS

Students come to the Institute for Patient Safety & Medical Simulation for hands-on training. Tyner said four of his staff members at the institute received teaching certification so they could teach the students.

“We can develop the health care leaders for our community now,” Tyner said. “Give them the skill sets, identify their interests and help them through the process. That will pay huge dividends for this community down the road.”•

488

IN 2009: NUMBER OF PATIENTS TREATED NUMBER OF BABIES DELIVERED

4,461

19,931

NUMBER OF SURGERIES AT MONTGOMERY SURGICAL CENTER

12,041

TOTAL NUMBER OF SURGERIES

31,972

320,946

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT VISITS

113,887

Source: Baptist Health

Baptist Medical Center East recently was named to a Top 5 percent list for patient safety nationwide. It is also ranked in the top 100 hospitals nationwide.

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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TOURISM MAKES WELCOME IMPACT Q&A WITH LEE SENTELL Lee Sentell, director of the Alabama Tourism Department, was recently interviewed by Montgomery Business Journal Managing Editor David Zaslawsky. Montgomery Business Journal: I hate to ask this, but because I’ve seen different listings, what is the official name of the state’s tourism agency? Sentell: We changed our name so that’s why you should be confused. It’s the Alabama Tourism Department.

Lee Sentell oversees a $13 million operating budget as director of the Alabama Tourism Department.

MBJ: What are your responsibilities as the director of the Alabama Tourism Department? Sentell: It’s my job to help position the state as a tourist destination and give people in Alabama enough information about their state so that they will be tourism ambassadors for Alabama. MBJ: You just talked about positioning the state as a tourist destination. Has Montgomery transformed itself from a stop on trip to a tourist destination with all the riverfront and downtown development in the last five years? Sentell: I’ll put it in perspective. I’ve been in Montgomery nearly eight years and Montgomery is a much more significant international tourism destination than it used to be for a number of reasons. And they are all good reasons. Montgomery is becoming known as the hub of the Civil Rights Trail of Alabama because of the number of museums that have been opened in the last dozen years.

What Montgomery does better than any other city destination that I’m aware of is it tells the stories of the city’s Civil War connections and civil rights connections. I would have to stop and count the number of civil rights museums that Montgomery has because there are so many. It’s almost like one a year opens and some southern states have virtually no civil rights museums. The world is much more interested in civil rights history now that there has been almost 50 years’ distance. The milestones are in school books and history books and it’s not as much emotional conflict with people who are in leadership positions today. People think of civil rights achievements today as something that people take for granted. MBJ: You mentioned that you have been in Montgomery for about eight years. During that time, Montgomery has added Riverwalk Stadium, home of the Montgomery Biscuits; Riverwalk Amphitheater; Riverwalk; Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center; Montgomery Performing Arts Centre; The Alley; and the intermodal. Sentell: Downtown has become a very significant destination because of choices that the community’s leadership has made in what to invest in. MBJ: Now, Montgomery is a tourist destination instead of a stop on the way to the beach. Sentell: It’s amazing how much difference the Renaissance hotel has made. MBJ: Please elaborate. Sentell: It’s the big magnet for conventions, meetings, events and as a place for tourists to congregate. The restaurants, and in particular The Alley, I think have been an immediate success. It’s exciting to go to Montgomery on a Friday or Saturday night when some meeting or convention is in town and there are a lot of people walking the streets, going into the restaurants and sometimes even standing in line outside the restaurants.

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Sentell: There are 44. Raycom reaches half of the television audience in the South and 13 percent of all of the American television audience. Raycom is very aggressive about owning the No. 1 station in the market. MBJ: And years ago downtown and the riverfront were empty. Sentell: Eight years ago, there was no place for people to congregate. MBJ: What is the size staff you have? Sentell: We have 65 people. MBJ: What is the agency’s annual operating budget? Sentell: Our budget is approximately $13 million. MBJ: How much does the state receive from lodging taxes that help fund the tourism agency? Sentell: There is a 4 percent state lodging tax and we get one-quarter of that. The other 75 percent goes to state’s General Fund that funds things like Medicaid, prisons and state troopers. MBJ: How much does the agency spend on promoting tourism? Sentell: That’s a good question. There is not a real simple answer. The state retirement system (Retirement Systems of Alabama) is the major investor in Raycom Media television company. Raycom gives anywhere between $10 million and $11 million worth of free television ads.

MBJ: How much is your marketing budget? Sentell: Our marketing budget is between $3 million and $4 million a year and that would include magazine ads, posters, the production of TV commercials, brochure printing and the like. MBJ: On the agency’s website, there are two brochures for 2010: “The Great Alabama Homecoming for Small Towns and Downtowns” and “100 Dishes to Eat Before You Die.” What are the goals of each of the campaigns? Sentell: When we do campaigns, we are speaking to people in Alabama as well as out of state. I think we’ve been successful in making Alabamians feel proud about their state. When we did the campaign on the Year of Alabama Food – frankly that was initially about Birmingham because Birmingham doesn’t have a state capital, a rocket, a battleship or a beach, but it was known for fine dining. We very quickly broadened the topic to include meat-and-three, cafes in small towns, barbecue, and seafood because virtually every town had one or more places that would fit in one of those four categories. MBJ: How successful was that campaign? Sentell: The 100 dishes brochure is the most popular brochure in our agency’s 60-year history.

MBJ: Is that to promote the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail?

MBJ: How many brochures have been picked up?

Sentell: No. Raycom gives (RSA) $30 million of air time a year. Twenty million dollars go to promote the golf trail. The additional $10 million to $11 million helps promote the rest of Alabama’s tourism assets. That is a relationship that is unique in American tourism marketing. When a new tourism director in another southern state comes in and finds out about Alabama’s support from its state pension fund, they are floored.

Sentell: We go through 200,000 copies of that brochure a year because when you travel, you generally know where you are going to stay. The first question is always, “Where are we going to eat?” By putting a list of recommended places to eat that includes more than 90 towns, in effect the State of Alabama is certifying that this town has places worthy of being recommended. When the State of Alabama says, “You need to pay attention to this restaurant” – it makes people in that town very proud.

MBJ: How many different TV stations does Raycom own?

amazing. When I put them on the 100 dishes brochure… the next time I had lunch there, the owner came out of the kitchen and said her business had tripled. I said, ‘How can you tell?’ She said by the numbers of pans of cornbread they serve a day. MBJ: You’re saying the campaigns can have a dramatic impact. Sentell: I was thrilled to hear that because that’s exactly what we wanted to accomplish – is to make people in those small towns aware that they have something special. MBJ: Are you planning to launch any other brochures this year to complement a new campaign? Sentell: We are already working on next year’s campaign. MBJ: What are those plans? Sentell: It’s the Year of Alabama Music. MBJ: How do you promote that? Sentell: We are going to be promoting destinations like museums that are open every day. We are going to be promoting festivals that include music and we will be celebrating personalities that people may not know that have an Alabama connection. MBJ: What does a typical campaign cost? Sentell: The Year of Small Towns and Downtowns is unique. When the governor appointed me to this job, he asked me to do campaigns that small towns could do that would not cost them a lot of money. We started doing Saturday walking tours in June. We have about 30 towns that do those Saturday tours. When we came up with the Year of Small Towns and Downtowns, we said we would donate a $2,500 historic marker to each town that had a homecoming event. I thought we would have about the same 30 towns. We have 215 towns participating. CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

MBJ: Is there any way to track the results of those campaigns – any hard numbers? Sentell: I’ll give you an example. My favorite restaurant in Alabama is G’s Country Kitchen in Huntsville. Their fried corn is

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ANNUAL TRAVEL EXPENDITURES

1998: $5.4 BILLION 1999: $5.7 BILLION 2000: $6.1 BILLION 2001: $6.1 BILLION 2002: $6.6 BILLION 2003: $6.8 BILLION 2004: $7.4 BILLION 2005: $7.5 BILLION 2006: $8.5 BILLION 2007: $9.3 BILLION 2008: $9.6 BILLION 2009 TOURISM HIGHLIGHTS

NEARLY 21 MILLION PEOPLE VISITED THE STATE. TRAVELERS SPENT ABOUT $9.3 BILLION. TRAVEL INDUSTRY SPENDING REPRESENTED 5.5 PERCENT OF THE STATE’S GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT. EVERY $85,050 OF TRAVEL-RELATED SPENDING CREATED ONE DIRECT JOB. TRAVEL EARNINGS BY COUNTY IN 2008 (DIRECT AND INDIRECT)

AUTAUGA $15.7 MILLION ELMORE $42.8 MILLION MONTGOMERY $255.8 MILLION Source: Alabama Tourism Department

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

That’s a half-million dollars worth of historic markers. We (typically) spend somewhere close to a million dollars for each campaign. MBJ: From 1998 to 2008, travel expenditures have increased 77 percent from $5.4 billion to $9.6 billion. What do you expect to see in the next 10 years – from 2008 to 2018? Sentell: I don’t know if I’m smart enough to do a 10-year (projection). We are up about 1 percent from last year. I hope that we can reach $10 billion in the next three years. MBJ: How did the recession impact the travel and tourism industry? Sentell: Almost 30 percent of all travel dollars in Alabama are spent in Gulf Shores and Orange Beach. The beach is a very strong family destination with loyal customers. During the recession, people negotiated lower rental rates because of the oversupply of condos. This past year, more people went to the beach and spent slightly less money. It shows people were more careful with their money last year and that was a national trend. But national surveys show that people are loosening up their purse strings this year during spring and summer because people are more confident about the economy. MBJ: An economic impact study on travel in 2008 showed the following: > Annual travel spending: $9.6 billion. > Annual travel-related payroll: $3.7 billion. > Employment: Nearly 170,000 jobs. > State and local taxes generated by the travel sector: $702 million. > State lodging tax: $46.8 million. For every $1 in travel-related spending – workers earn 39 cents; state government collects 5 cents and local governments collect 2 cents. These are very impressive numbers. Please elaborate on how important the travel industry is to the state. Sentell: In a sense, travel is almost an invisible industry. When you drive by the parking lots at the State Capitol, you can see how big state government is to the economy of Montgomery, but you can’t see in one place how big the travel industry is in any

town because it is segmented. People spend a night in a hotel; they drive to a restaurant and eat; and then they drive to Old Alabama Town and park. The travel industry – and I make a distinction between tourism and travel. MBJ: What is that distinction? Sentell: Travel is anytime you go 50 miles away and shop or… We call tourism when you spend a night away from your hometown to do something. Travel is all of it – tourism is a segment of it and business travel is a segment. The tourism part is more important than ever because business travel has dropped during the recession. Our job has become even more important in marketing the state to keep people employed in the hospitality industry and 5.5 percent of the state’s economy is the hospitality or the travel industry. Without the travel industry, each household in Alabama would pay almost $400 more a year. MBJ: Is that almost $400 a year more in taxes? Sentell: When you travel and spend the night or you stop at a mall and shop, you pay taxes. If people didn’t travel – for your town to have the same level of services for police, fire, water departments – the average family would pay $391 a year more in taxes. So tourists help pay for police, fire protection and other things that a community needs in order to have services for its people. MBJ: Do you have annual goals, such as the number of visitors or dollars spent, etc.? Sentell: Each year we would like to see a 5 percent growth – some years we’ve made that. Last year we didn’t. It was the tail end of the recession and we were down 3 percent for the year. MBJ: What’s your goal for this year? Sentell: Since Oct. 1 through March, we are a little over 1 percent vs. the previous year. The recession within the travel industry has bottomed out and turned into positive territory. I would hope that we would be at 5 percent above where we were last year. Mainly because – as I mentioned – more people are confident about the economy and families that denied themselves a vacation last year are not going to do that a second year. Families feel like a vacation is one of the benefits of being an American. •


Running a Business Starts with the Right Steps Entrepreneurial University provides tools, know-how to students by David Zaslawsky

As a licensed counselor in Wetumpka, Greg Snider knows the ins and outs of treating patients. When the licensed counselor opened his office on U.S. Highway 231, he became a small business owner. But he didn’t know all the nuances of operating a business so he enrolled in the Entrepreneurial University (EU), which is taught at the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce’s Small Business Resource Center. He graduated in May. “One of the EU instructors talked about wearing different hats,” said Snider. “For me, I knew how to wear the counselor hat, but the business manager and investor hats and thinking in those terms were some of the things I got out of the EU course. What the course has done is help me see the big picture.” Taking the 13-week course, Snider learned everything from A to Z when it comes to running a business. Although Snider opened his business about eight months before he enrolled in EU, the courses reinforced what he was already doing, including keeping overhead costs low. “The Entrepreneurial University helped me feel more confident that I’m heading in the right direction and I’m doing well managing my business,” Snider said. He retooled his business plan after feedback from the EU staff, which

Graduates from the Entrepreneurial University.

included being more specific and working on his financials. “It’s abundantly evident that while someone may be expertly proficient in their chosen field, they need entrepreneurial training on how best to operate a business,” said Douglas Jones, vice president, Business Services for the Montgomery Area Chamber Commerce, and one of EU’s certified instructors. Snider, who has about 20 patients, said it’s easier to be a successful small business owner after attending EU. The course costs $200 and that includes a textbook, workbook, all course materials and in-class expenses. “Entrepreneurial University is for any would-be or existing entrepreneur who wants to strengthen their business – grow their business,” said Lisa McGinty, director of Small Business Programs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce and a certified EU instructor.

“We have some people who have been in business a year to two years who really don’t have technical knowledge and kind of went out there and hung their shingle out without getting any assistance or training beforehand – all the way up to people who have been in business for many years and either want to come for some more formalized training or are looking at expanding their business.” McGinty said that one time a company’s entire senior staff except for the founder and chief executive officer took the EU classes as the firm prepared for an expansion. She said another student ran a carpet cleaning business for 13 years. “He came to us because he never had formal training,” McGinty said. “He didn’t know what he didn’t know and he came to us.” The EU uses NXLevel, a curriculum designed by the University of Colorado. CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

Greg Snider

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

Harold Boone, one of the certified instructors and vice president of Minority Business Development & Leadership Programs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, said, “As new material emerges in terms of best practices in entrepreneurism, the curriculum changes – it’s revised. We are kept abreast about the most current information that we can pass on to our clients and students.” Those students have ranged in age from 14 to an 80-year-old. Some students come to EU with post-graduate degrees and others arrive without a high school diploma. But they all learn about becoming a business owner or growing their business in a very structured, orderly fashion. It’s so orderly that one student – Dorie Autry – immediately implemented what she learned in her own business.

THE REGISTRATION DEADLINE FOR THE FALL ENTREPRENEURIAL UNIVERSITY IS JULY 21. ALL CLASSES ARE HELD AT THE SMALL BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTER AT 600 S. COURT ST. FOR INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM/EU OR CALL (334) 832-4790.

BUSINESS CLASS:

JUST THE TICKET FOR BUDDING ENTREPRENEURS by David Zaslawsky Now that you have paid $200 to attend the 13-week Entrepreneurial University (EU) you will learn the ABCs of owning a business. There are two EU sessions annually, with one starting the first Tuesday in August and the other session beginning the first Tuesday in February. Each session usually has 30-plus students. Each class, held 6 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, features a lecture and lesson. There are guest speakers who are experts from the business community, including attorneys, accountants and bankers. This year, there are 11 off-site activities, said Lisa McGinty, director, Small Business Programs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. Those activities include Chamber functions and events. “The purpose behind that was – we took a look and said what else can we do for the students above and beyond?” McGinty said. “Give them an opportunity to practice their networking skills; give them an opportunity to get some enhanced training through some of the seminars and workshops.”

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Some sessions have in-class exercises. Harold Boone, vice president, Minority Business Development & Leadership Programs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, said he likes the small-group exercises. “Say you have 40 people in the class and you break them down into groups of five or six; and then give them a business scenario and they have to come up with a negotiation technique,” he said. “We teach them how to negotiate in business, selling products or services. What’s the best outcome for your gadget or widget?” Entrepreneurial University graduates are allowed to audit classes when space is available. “We have had prior graduates return and bring two or three staff members with them to work on growth and other strategies,” said Douglas Jones, vice president, Business Services for the Montgomery Area Chamber Commerce.


Autry, who owns Nancy’s Italian Ice at Sturbridge Village, graduated from EU last year. She signed a three-year lease while attending the fall EU session. After an EU class featured an attorney discussing the various options for establishing a business, Autry sought an attorney to set up her business. At the university, she learned about funding sources. She learned the various people she needed to talk to about payroll taxes, city and county taxes as well as city and county business licenses. “They (EU instructors and speakers) gave you an exact recipe that you needed to open a business,” said Autry, who is seriously considering opening a second site at The Alley depending on financing. She opened Nancy’s Italian Ice in February and was hoping to get 50 to 75 people a day. She is getting between 200 and 250 customers daily. “One of the things that I find important in terms of what the EU graduates take away is their confidence level,” Boone said. “That I can really do this and it adds to the economic base of this community. We have a direct

impact on them by how we teach and what we teach to help them either sustain a certain level of business or to grow that business. That’s part of EU’s challenge that we take very seriously.” More than 350 people have graduated from EU. To receive a completion certificate, EU students must attend a required number of classes and submit a “reasonably viable business plan,” according to McGinty. That completion certificate means a lot and opens some important doors. “It has an impact here in the community because we have such a strong network of banks and other institutions that support our small business entrepreneurs and who recognize the value of the course and the level at which it’s taught,” McGinty said. “The EU graduates are being supported by us; they are being mentored by us; and again, they’ve gotten the training – technical assistance of being exposed to good, basic entrepreneurial skills. That certificate means more to them consequently than someone who may come into a (financial) institution who has not had that technical training.” •

Dorie Autry

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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Member Profile

Mike Jenkins IV, CEO and Chairman of the Board for Jenkins Brick & Tile.

Built to Last Jenkins Brick & Tile poised for housing recovery by Tom Ensey

It’s hard to imagine a more durable commodity than brick. Buildings, sidewalks and chimneys made of brick can last for centuries. And it’s hard to imagine a more durable family business than Jenkins Brick & Tile.

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JENKINS BRICK & TILE THE COMPANY HAS DRAWN PRAISE FROM ENVIRONMENTALISTS FOR ITS INNOVATIVE USE OF LANDFILL GAS – METHANE – TO FUEL ITS KILNS. THE GREEN ADVANTAGES OF BUILDING WITH THEIR BRICK:

Founded in the late 19th century, the company has been passed down through five generations and has endured the sting of an economic recession and a burst housing bubble. It is resilient and innovative and hearty – just like the man who founded the company. Jenkins Brick & Tile is one of only a few brick manufacturers and suppliers in the entire U.S.; most bricks are now imported from overseas. Its plants are still running at full capacity, while most American brick makers are at just 25 percent. The company is either the “first, second or third” largest brick manufacturer in the country, said CEO and Chairman of the Board Mike Jenkins IV. “But what difference does that make?” Eighty percent of the company’s business is supplying material for residential housing. As the housing industry goes, so goes the brick industry. Its work force is about half the 652 employees who worked in 28 locations in five states when the company was at its peak in 2007, Jenkins said.

> USING LANDFILL GAS RESULTS IN A TOTAL ANNUAL REDUCTION IN GREENHOUSE EMISSIONS EQUIVALENT TO PLANTING 45,600 TREES. > BRICK IS TERMITE-RESISTANT, AND BECAUSE IT CONTAINS NO ORGANIC MATERIAL, BRICK RESISTS MOLD AND INSECTS. NO CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ARE NECESSARY. > BRICK IS RECYCLABLE. BRICK FROM ONE PROJECT SITE CAN BE USED TO MAKE NEW BUILDINGS, OR MAY BE USED AS RAW MATERIAL TO MAKE MORE BRICK. BRICK CAN BE CRUSHED OR RECYCLED TO MAKE ROAD BEDS OR AS BRICK CHIPS FOR LANDSCAPING. > BRICK IS MADE FROM NATURAL, ABUNDANT RESOURCES, SHALE AND CLAY.

Jenkins is not discouraged by that. “It will be a glorious day,” he said, “when we start to bring those (customers) back.” The company had humble beginnings for sure. Jenkins’ great-great grandfather retired from L&N railroad after losing a leg, and started keeping bees. He invented a new kind of beehive that sold like gangbusters all over the South. Demand grew so fast that a new factory needed to be built. But the right kind of brick was scarce. Not one to sit back and accept defeat, he made the bricks himself. Over time, the brick business netted sweeter returns than the beehives, and the company moved from Wetumpka to Montgomery in 1908. The old kilns, which resemble huge, crumbling hives with 3-foot thick walls, are still standing near the new plant in north Montgomery.

Now, the company is headed by Jenkins’ son, Mike Jenkins V, who took over about two years ago. “He’s doing a much better job than I ever did,” Jenkins IV said. “He’s leading the company through a tough time.” Though it is impossible to know when the construction business will rebound, some forecasts optimistically predict a sizeable increase in housing construction in the near future. And when it does, Jenkins said, the company will be ready to produce the brick, tile, granite, keystones and fireplaces – whatever is called for – as fast as demand will have it.

“I haven’t had the heart to tear them down,” Jenkins said. Beginning in 1985 the company experienced a boom. Jenkins began returning all the revenue to the company instead of paying dividends. He won’t say how much the company grew, but it was “a lot,” he said, smiling. The family business has been passed down through five generations. Jenkins IV’s own father didn’t survive WWII, so he took over the company from his grandfather, whom he deeply admired.

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Take that to the bank Study: Regions boasts $12.7 billion economic impact in Alabama Arthur DuCote

by David Zaslawsky

REGIONS’ 2008 IMPACT IN THE RIVER REGION LOANS TO BUSINESSES AND CONSUMERS

$525 MILLION

DIRECT JOBS

ABOUT 400

DIRECT AND INDIRECT JOBS

ABOUT 2,500

COMBINED EARNINGS POWER

$73 MILLION PAYROLL

$44 MILLION

NON-PAYROLL EXPENDITURES

$17 MILLION

REAL ESTATE TAXES

$140,000

PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES

$308,000

Source: Regions/University of Alabama’s Center for Business and Economic Research

When Regions Financial Corp. and AmSouth Bancorporation – the two largest banks in Alabama – announced their plans to merge four years ago, the combined company was massive. The new Regions had: > Almost $140 billion in assets. > Nearly $100 billion in deposits. > About $95 billion in loans. > About 2,000 branches. > About 37,000 employees. > A market capitalization of about $26 billion. > About 2,800 ATMs. > Customers in 16 states. The numbers, though large, are what you might expect from a top10 bank holding company serving 5 million households. But until Regions commissioned a study by the University of Alabama’s Center for Business and Economic Research, the bank’s economic impact on the state was unknown. The numbers truly do speak for themselves, said Arthur DuCote, executive vice president/Central Alabama Area president for Regions. According to the 2008 study, Regions has an annual economic impact statewide of $12.7 billion – $1.5 billion in “economic activity or output” and $11.2 billion in loan originations.

Here is how the numbers shake out: > $320 million in nonpayroll expenditures. > $590 million in payroll. > About $51,000 for an average salary, 34 percent more than the average state worker’s pay. > 11,500 employees. > Nearly 24,000 in direct and indirect jobs. > $80 million in state and local taxes generated by employee spending. DuCote said the study “allows all of us to stop, pause and say, ‘Wow, I had no idea they (had such an impact on) the communities that they serve.’” That’s because it is rare that the impact of a single business gets analyzed, he said. “We are accustomed to doing economic impact studies on industries we are trying to attract,” DuCote said. “But as a business community, we are lax in understanding the economic impact on long-time established businesses in our communities. This (economic impact study) brings it to light.” It also brought to light that banks are lending, contrary to what you might hear in the national media. “The fact of the matter is that in any difficult economic time, fewer people qualify for credit. There is much, much less demand for loans.” But the bank is ready to lend, he said. “You could not bring us today enough qualified borrowers. We love to do loans; and we want to do loans. We have a lot of balance sheet capacity to do loans.”

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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Member ProďŹ le

(L-R) Brian Key, Account Executive; Angela Stiff, Creative Director and Principal; Shawn Constance, Digital Media Director; and Nell Rankin, Account Director and Principal.

Excellence by Design Copperwing thrives on team concept, passion by Jennifer Kornegay

Since its inception, Copperwing Design in Montgomery has taken each step and approached each new challenge with a thoughtful design and purpose-driven plan behind it.

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COPPERWING DESIGN “Design is a verb, not a noun,” said Angela Stiff, Copperwing’s principal and its creative director. “Everything we do is by design, and it’s not just about an aesthetic.” An identity management firm offering a full range of communication services, Copperwing was founded by Stiff in 1999. Principal Nell Rankin joined her the following year. When the two teamed up, they formed not just a new company, but also a new kind of advertising agency for the area. “We had both been looking for something different,” Rankin said. “We did research and discovered this idea of really delving into a company’s inner core and building on that foundation for all media.” So they came up with their own process. “It allows us to excavate a company’s strategies and then develop brand strategies that link with them,” Rankin said. “Our process fits any industry, but it is also very specific for each client.” “It is multi-layered and multi-message,” Stiff added. “It works really well when trying to market several different products and services to several audiences. It keeps the corporate brand message consistent through all we do.” This unique brand management process has proved successful, and clients have noticed. “We grew quickly as we got such a great reception to our process,” Stiff said. One client that benefited from Copperwing’s process was Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama. “That opened many doors for us,” Stiff said. “Now we have clients with national and international reach.” Copperwing’s clients include Jackson Thornton, The Shoppes at EastChase and Neptune Technology Group, to name just a few. As they discussed the business, Stiff and Rankin continually used the pronoun “we,” rarely referencing any individual and it is this team approach that really drives their process. “We all have our roles and responsibilities,” Rankin said. “I work with the companies to identify the products and services that we need to promote, and Angela is on the creative side, but we all operate as one big team.” Often, Copperwing holds group brainstorming sessions that include the entire office. “This is where members who aren’t even working on a certain account have the chance to have some input and offer ideas. We’ve found this to be very productive and effective.” Stiff said. Copperwing’s main goal, according to Rankin, is “effective communication. We want to get a message to the audience in a way that gets a positive response.” The team-focused approach allows Copperwing to meet this goal over and over. And the layout and design of Copperwing’s office puts further emphasis on teamwork.

YEAR FOUNDED 1999 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 13 PRIMARY SERVICE COPPERWING IS A CREATIVE CONSULTANCY AND IDENTITY MANAGEMENT FIRM OFFERING A FULL RANGE OF COMMUNICATION SERVICES AWARDS: COMMUNICATOR AWARD PRESENTED BY THE INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF THE VISUAL ARTS MORE THAN 100 AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADDY AWARDS 2-TIME WINNER, BEST IN SHOW FOR PRINT, AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADDY AWARDS BEST IN SHOW FOR INTERACTIVE, AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADDY AWARDS SPECIAL JUDGES AWARD, AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADDY AWARDS MOSAIC AWARD, AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADDY AWARDS 3-TIME WINNER, DESIGNER OF THE YEAR, AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADDY AWARDS 5-TIME WINNER, COPYWRITER OF THE YEAR, AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION ADDY AWARDS MEDALLION AWARD, PUBLIC RELATIONS COUNCIL OF ALABAMA STARR AWARD, BEST OF SHOW, PUBLIC RELATIONS COUNCIL OF ALABAMA BRONZE AWARD, LARGE EXHIBIT CATEGORY-BEST IN SHOW PRESENTED BY AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION ELECTRONIC MEDIA AWARD PRESENTED BY LAS VEGAS WOMEN IN COMMUNICATIONS AWARD FOR COMMUNICATION EXCELLENCE PRESENTED BY AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EXECUTIVES

The sleek and stylish, yet warm and homey, space in East Montgomery is evidence of Stiff’s take on design, and its importance beyond the aesthetic. Interior designer Cindy Barganier helped Stiff bring her vision to reality.

building in downtown Montgomery. On any given day, you might find an employee baking cookies, and the scent wafts easily through the airy spaces that are full of natural light. “It all comes together and lends to a good mood,” Stiff said. “People hang out in the kitchen and munch, but they’re also casually batting ideas around.”

The concept was focused on finding a look that would encourage collaboration and the natural flow of creativity. One example is the open kitchen, with funky barstools salvaged from the old Kress

That same atmosphere carries into the workroom that’s outfitted with a massive table begging to be the centerpiece of some genius joint effort. “This was a vision of mine for a long time,” Stiff said. •

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Full Speed Ahead Hyundai shatters previous sales records by David Zaslawsky

“The momentum of the Hyundai brand and specifically the 2011 Sonata is incredible at this time.” Robert Burns, spokesman for Montgomery-based Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama

This has been a recordsmashing year for Hyundai. First the Korean automaker set a sales record for the month of March. Then there was a sales record for the first quarter. Now there is a sales record for the month of April and a sales record for the first four months of the year. There was an additional sales record set that went unnoticed. The Sonata, which along with the company’s Santa Fe is manufactured at Hyundai’s plant in Montgomery, set a record for consecutive months. With 18,536 sales in April, coupled with another 18,935 sales in March, 37,471 Sonatas have been sold in a two-month period. That total topped the previous backto-back month record of 36,703 set in November-December of 2007. The third-highest consecutive month total was November-December 2005. In addition to breaking a consecutive month record, the Sonata sales in March and April of this year ranked No. 3 and No. 4 alltime. The most Sonatas sold in a month was December 2007 (24,872) and the secondhighest total was December 2005 (20,853). “For the second straight month, our all-new Sonata is the third-best selling mid-size car in the country in retail sales, well ahead of

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Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

strong rivals such as Nissan Altima, Chevy Malibu and Ford Fusion,” Dave Zuchowski, Hyundai Motor America’s vice president of national sales, said in a statement. “We’re glad to see Sonata’s unique combination of great design and segment-leading 35 mpg fuel economy is resonating with America’s car buyers.” Hyundai sold 44,023 vehicles in April, which was a 30 percent increase from last April. That meant Hyundai sold 10,000 more vehicles this past April than April of last year. It also was the 16th straight month of Hyundai gaining market share. Hyundai has sold 155,532 vehicles for the first four months of the year. Last month, when Hyundai had sold 111,509 vehicles in the first quarter, it broke its previous first quarter record of 105,988 vehicles in 2006. “The momentum of the Hyundai brand and specifically the 2011 Sonata is incredible at this time,” said Robert Burns, spokesman for Montgomery-based Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama. “The quality and value proposition offered by Hyundai is obviously ringing true with today’s cost-conscious auto shopper. The continued success of the both the Sonata and Santa Fe bodes well for the long-term future


TOP GUN SONATA BESTS RIVALS IN CARS.COM FAMILY SEDAN “SHOOTOUT” by David Zaslawsky The redesigned 2011 Sonata was the winner in the inaugural Cars.com $25,000 Family Sedan Shootout. The shootout involved a family of four as well as six automotive journalists, who tested eight mid-sized sedans costing less than $25,000. The eight vehicles were the 2010 Ford Fusion, 2010 Chevrolet Malibu, 2010 Nissan Altima, 2010 Honda Accord, 2010 Mazda6, 2010 Suzuki Kizashi, 2010 Toyota Camry and the 2011 Hyundai Sonata. Each vehicle was rated in 10 categories with a maximum of 1,000 points. The participants put the vehicles through two days of what were called “real-life” road tests. “We looked to see how easy it was to install car seats, we filled the trunks with groceries, and as any parent can relate to, we drove all around town,” Patrick Olsen, Cars. com editor-in-chief, said in a statement. “Having participation from a family of four that is actually in the market to buy a car helped ensure that we

of Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama and its supplier base in the River Region. The economic impact of our operations is sure to grow well into the future.” Sonata sales were up 57 percent in April compared with a year ago, while Santa Fe sales increased 59 percent for the same period. Santa Fe sales in April were 5,917. Genesis sales rose 9 percent – the 10th straight month of year-over-year sales increases. The redesigned Tucson saw its sales jump 271 percent from April 2009 (1,428) to April 2010 (5,917). “Despite an overall industry increase in the level of sales to fleet accounts, we remain extremely focused on reducing our fleet mix, improving the quality of our market share,

kept our focus on the features that are most important in this segment.” The Sonata received 794 points, followed by Camry (752 points); and Suzuki was third with 731 points. The comments about the Sonata included “its striking design, but it was the whole package that earned it the Family Sedan Shootout title.” David Thomas, an automotive journalist with Cars.com, had this to say about the Sonata: “Value, value, value – $22,745 for navigation and all the other goodies in such an attractive wrapper. None of the competitors came close.” Other automotive journalists who tested the vehicles were from MotorWeek and USA Today. “This was a close match, but the value of the Sonata catapulted it ahead of the others,” Olsen said. “The $22,745 price tag including navigation along with its modern, upscale looks really impressed the expert judges and the participating test family. The Sonata is something any shopper in this segment must consider.”

SONATA’S TOP MONTHS

DEC. 2007: 24,872 DEC. 2005: 20,853 MARCH 2010: 18,935 APRIL 2010: 18,536 MARCH 2006: 17,487 SANTA FE’S TOP MONTHS

JULY 2004: 11,474 FEB. 2003: 11,292 APRIL 2003: 10,927 AUG: 2009: 10,791 AUG. 2007: 10,570 HYUNDAI’S TOP MONTHS

AUG. 2009: 60,467 and driving more retail volume through Hyundai dealerships,” Zuchowski said. “Widespread acceptance of our new products and growing recognition of our brand’s inherent value has also allowed us to significantly reduce incentive spending at a time when some of our top competitors were taking a different approach.”

JUNE 2008: 50,033 JUNE 2007: 49,368 JULY 2006: 47,205 DEC. 2007: 46,487

More than 50,000 Sonatas have been sold this year, nearly one-third of the company’s total sales. The No. 2 bestselling vehicle is the Santa Fe with almost 31,000 units sold in 2010. •

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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SOMETHING

FRESH


everything. It’s the same sort of system used for downtown and the development planned in West Montgomery. Ironically, that is one reason that Hampstead feels so old-world. It’s an urban farm community. Conceived about a year and a half ago, Hampstead is a $500 million joint

ON THE URBAN

FARM

Smart code embodied in every aspect of Hampstead by David Zaslawsky

When a reporter is given an opportunity to take a guided tour of the Town of Hampstead by the visionaries who created it, you jump at the chance.

project of The Colonial Co., City Loft Corp. (Lowder and Sahota) and Duany Plater-Zyberk and Co., the creator of Seaside and Rosemary Beach, Florida.

The minute you hop onto an electricpowered vehicle, and there’s talk of turning used oil from the Ham and High restaurant into biodiesel fuel, you realize this is not your father’s real estate development.

Located just a mile-and-half from the intersection of Taylor and Vaughn roads, Hampstead is about two miles from The Shoppes at EastChase. It opened last summer.

On the 3-acre Hampstead Farms, there is a real red barn, with a real farmer who harvests and delivers produce to an on-site restaurant. And members of the Hampstead community can and do grow their own tomatoes, okra, peas, squash and herbs.

“At first we thought, ‘are we being crazy in Montgomery? Is this really just too far out?’ We’ve seen that the biggest feature that residents and visitors have been attracted to is Hampstead Farms,” Lowder said.

“In August, we have these amazing sunflowers,” said Anna Lowder, who with husband Harvi Sahota are directors of design and development for the 416acre Hampstead project. “We had some sunflowers that were over 10 feet tall.”

Smart code means that it is designed for the pedestrian experience, which allows for smaller, narrower streets. There is an abundance of places for residents to mingle, for dogs to be walked (at “The Barking Lot”) and for children to run around. CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

And it’s all according to plan. The Town of Hampstead follows a strict development code, called “smart” code, which mandates things such as tree spacing and playgrounds within a 3-minute walk. (There are nine of them.) Lighting, signage, lots… the code addresses almost

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HOMES AT HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE HOMES

NUMBER OF BEDROOMS: 3

TO 5 PRICE: $320,000S TO $500,000S COTTAGES NUMBER OF BEDROOMS: 3 PRICE: FROM THE $260,000S ROW HOUSES NUMBER OF BEDROOMS: 2 PRICE: FROM THE $310,000S LIVE-WORK UNITS NUMBER OF BEDROOMS: 1 TO 3 PRICE: FROM $180,000 TO $500,000S

CUSTOM HOMES PRICE:$500,000S TO $1 MILLION-PLUS Source: Town of Hampstead

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

“You can see your neighbors all the time,” Sahota said. “That’s a big part of this lifestyle – it’s a place where you really are connected more than perhaps (in) other communities. We have gathering spots, where you really get to know your neighbors.” Combine those amenities with a town center that features about 65,000 square feet of space for retail and offices and what do you have? “What we are trying to do here is create a sustainable community that combines everything that people need in their daily lives,” Lowder said. “That is the combination of places to live, places to work, places for educational purposes, civic places like the library, YMCA or churches and give people the opportunity to live in an environment where they can walk and just have a healthier lifestyle.” And for many, a healthier lifestyle brings us right back to the farm. The community is developing a composting program that collects organic waste from the restaurants, grass clippings from landscapers, and organic refuse from the residents and reuses them at the organic farm. There is even a drip irrigation system powered by a windmill. Houses in Hampstead range from $160,000 to as high as you’d like, Lowder said. There are five types of homes, not including the condos. One home on the development easily tops $1 million. While about 35 houses are presently occupied, the master plan calls for 1,700 homes.

But, as Sahota says, the master plan is not set in stone – it’s fluid. It evolves. There are plans for a 20-acre lake and Lido pool, a dentist office and maybe a church or two. Big dreams include a site for a school. “Ideally we would want an elementary school,” Lowder said. “And that could be a public school or a private school or a Montessori school.” The five-acre site for the school would be incorporated with the farm and the soccer fields, an entire area of about 15 acres, Sahota said. Lowder said she would like to see a salon come to Hampstead, and maybe a retail shop. Her vision: Women would spend hours at Hampstead, going from the café in the morning to the library and YMCA, and then to the spa or shopping after lunch. The first phase outfitted Hampstead with all the restaurants it needs. There is casual eating at The Tipping Point, a meat-and-three at Farmhouse Kitchen, and fine dining (dinner only) at Ham and High with Hampstead resident Jon Sanchez, who was sous chef at the Old Edwards Inn in Highlands, N.C. Eventually, Ham and High will open during the day and sell steaks, seafood, pork, cheese, fresh-farm produce and wine. Sahota said that Sanchez “truly believes in the farm-to-table concept,” and he will be using produce and herbs from Hampstead Farms. Lowder described Ham and High as “local, seasonal foods that have a slight Southern influence.” Wholesale bakery Millie Ray’s is another business that was scheduled to open at Hampstead. Her products will be sold to retail locations in Montgomery and Atlanta, as well as to The Tipping Point. When 75 to 80 percent of the 120 lots are sold, the second phase around the lake will begin, Lowder said. The third phase will be a more rural setting, Lowder said. It will be tucked back further from Taylor Road. Hampstead, which opened in October of 2008, will continue to be developed over the next 12 to 15 years, Lowder said.

Anna Lowder and Harvi sahota, directors of design and develoment for The Town of Hampstead

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She describes it as a place that is “exciting, energetic, creative, beautiful – a place where you can find everything you are after in one community.” •


A LITTLE BIT OF LONDON Inspired by London and its infamous lack of parking, The Town of Hampstead recently added a new style of homes called “mews.” Mews are attached units with a singlecar garage and some “pretty unique floor plans,” said Harvi Sahota, who along with his wife Anna Lowder are directors of design and development for Hampstead. The garage is on the ground floor and the living space is on the second floor. Lowder said, “There has been a lot of interest in these types of homes.” The mews range from a 650-square-foot, one-bedroom unit to a 1,350-square-foot two-bedroom unit to a 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom unit. The homes start at $169,000 and top out at $199,000. “It’s more for a buyer that’s looking for a lock-it-and-leave-it place,” Sahota said. “A place you don’t have to worry about when you’re out of town – when you travel a lot.” The style is similar to the development’s live-work units. As with all the types of homes there are several builders and architects and each style has several options displayed on Hampstead’s website. The live-work units range from 1,085 square feet to 3,732 square feet. The Village Homes start at 2,005 square feet to 3,646 square feet and there are seven different models. There are eight different cottage models with the homes ranging from 1,500 square feet to 2,025 square feet. There is one model for the row house, and it is 2,158 square feet. “I think because of the range of prices and the range of types or styles of residential plans that we are allowed to have (because of the Smart code), we have everything from

The Town of Hampstead

the youngest people buying their first home to our oldest resident who is 83,” Lowder said. “He was renting for the last 20 years and he is building a house for the first time.” Sahota said that “we don’t segregate different housing options. Within the same block we can have a house that is 18-feet-wide on an 18-foot lot with a house that is 54-feet wide, and different price points. The price points within that same block are under $200,000 going up to over $1 million.” That creates a dynamic for people of different ages and income brackets living on the same street. - by David Zaslawsky

THE WATERS The Waters is a large traditional neighborhood development in Pike Road with 160 families currently living there. The 1,250-acre development will eventually encompass 2,500 lots, according to Nathan Norris, the director of marketing and design for The Waters. The town square, which has about 10,000 square feet of retail space, features Blue Heron Café, YMCA’s Y’s Up, Cindy Barganier Interiors, Pike Road Dental, The Waters Realty Sales Office and Design for Living Counseling. Angie’s Corner is a gift shop inside the Blue Heron Café. All the retail space and nearly all the homes are in the Lucas Point Hamlet. - by David Zaslawsky

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WASTE NOT, WANT NOT by David Zaslawsky Behind the big, red barn at The Town of Hampstead is a modular biodiesel facility. All the equipment used to convert waste oil from restaurants into biodiesel fuel is housed in a 20-foot portable storage container. That’s what Clay McInnis, owner of SouthernEco, does – collect the vegetable and animal waste oil from about 10 Montgomery restaurants, including Hampstead’s Ham and High. He also collects oil waste from Sinclair’s, Dreamland BarB-Que, Derek’s Filet and Vine, Crockmier’s Grill and Bar and Shashy’s Bakery. He said any diesel engine can run on biodiesel fuel without modifications. McInnis said he has three diesel trucks and all run on biodiesel fuel. “We are decreasing production to a smaller, local scale,” McInnis said, referring to the modular biodiesel unit.

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Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

He said he collects about 200 gallons of waste oil a week and converts all of it into 200 gallons of diesel fuel, which he sells for about $3.50 a gallon to a Montgomery construction company. McInnis said he makes biodiesel fuel for about 90 cents a gallon. In addition to picking up free oil waste at restaurants and converting it into biodiesel fuel, he is the Alabama representative and a partner with the Chico, Californiabased Springboard Biodiesel, which makes the biodiesel processors used to convert waste oil into fuel. He sells those modular biodiesel units, which include processors, pumps, barrels and filtration equipment, from about $30,000 to $45,000.


WORLD-CLASS EDUCATION

Chamber News

Local leaders interested in bringing International Baccalaureate program to Montgomery by Michelle Jones

At a recent Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors meeting, Neal Wade, director of the Alabama Development Office, reminded those around the table that it’s not just incentive packages that can seal the deal when a new business considers a site.

in 139 countries. All IB students learn a second language, as well as the skills necessary to compete and contribute on a global scale. Writing figures prominently, even in math classes, and students incorporate real-world events, such as Hurricane Katrina, into lab assignments.

It’s the soft features, like quality of life and educational opportunities.

Once IB students earn the diploma, they often are welcomed into some of the most prestigious universities in the world, said Keith Karst, chairman of the Chamber’s Education and Workforce Development Council.

So when a group of about two dozen elected officials, education leaders and Chamber officials assembled for a tour of one of Alabama’s best high schools, they weren’t just there for the lunchroom food. They were taking the first steps towards establishing in Montgomery an International Baccalaureate program, a school within a school that can offer high school students a world-class education. “The IB program brings an academic rigor to a level that we do not have in Montgomery,” said Barbara Thompson, Montgomery Public Schools superintendent. Called the IB program for short, the International Baccalaureate program serves students at the top end of the achievement curve, a demographic that can be woefully under-represented. IB students are expected to perform at a level usually not experienced until college, if at all. It is an international program, with more than 813,000 students in 2,900 schools

“They are very driven, they are motivated, they are tops in their class – when they receive their IB diploma, these students go to virtually any college that they want to, most of the time with full scholarships.” During the tour of Mobile’s Murphy High School, which has housed an IB program for 20-plus years, local officials learned from coordinators, teachers and students what sets an IB program apart from, say, a magnet high school. “The students told the group that the IB program is the most advanced program in which a high school student can participate,” said Nancy Beggs, Director of Educational Programs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. Students explained that they learned to manage stress and perfect their study skills early. They also are part

of the larger high school – they eat, take electives and participate in extracurricular activities together. Their evaluation process, however, is unique. Rather than being strictly test-based, as most of American education is, the IB program relies on an interactive system between student and teacher, in which a student must be able to express his or her views orally. Curriculum and teaching standards are international, with teachers also being evaluated, Karst said. There are seven IB programs in Alabama: Auburn, Decatur, Tuscaloosa, Hoover, Birmingham and Mobile. The program’s approach to education would be one more feather in Montgomery’s cap, Karst said. It would keep the River Region in the forefront of economic development, allowing Montgomery to boast of a superior public education. In April, the Chamber’s Board of Directors passed a resolution in support of the IB program, calling for the Board of Education to support Thompson’s embarking on the planning process to bring IB to Montgomery. It will be presented some time this month. According to the resolution, “The International Baccalaureate (program) encourages students across the world to be active, compassionate, lifelong learners.”

Almost two dozen Chamber representatives and education leaders visited Mobile’s Murphy High School to learn about the IB program. From left to right are Nancy Beggs, Antoine Kirby, Charlotte Meadows, Keith Karst, Barbara Thompson, Ann Sikes, Shannon Speir, Dave Borden, Beverly Ross, Nim Frazer, Jesse Frierson, Randy George, Eleanor Dawkins, Melissa Snowden, Rafael Richardson, Rod Frazer and Cam Martindale.

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Guest Commentary

Small Business Owner to Government: Leave Me Alone by Eric Lewis

“Hello,sir! I’m from the government and I’m here to help!” There is not a single statement that can be made that will violate the senses of a small businessperson in more ways than this one. It assaults the sense of independence that is the core of what makes a small business owner who he or she is. It flies in the face of the constitutional intentions laid down by the righteous men we esteem so sincerely as the forefathers of our country. It simultaneously stirs humor via its oxymoronic irony while breeding a sense of loathing for that which controls in spite of its inefficiency. Small businesses by their nature thrive in an environment that is free from binding rules and regulations. Their owners think and perform best when they are allowed to apply their resources and energies toward the goal of promoting, supporting, growing and maintaining the business. Distractions such as reporting data and information that will eventually only serve to provide employment for someone in a bureaucratic office position do not in any way serve to improve the business. Paying taxes, license fees and regulatory fines are not part of what a small business finds in the book of How to Make a Profit nor do they make a positive contribution to the society for which the business provides the goods or services. So, what exactly do I, as a small business person want or expect my government to do to help me succeed? Let’s start on the opposite side of the question first, and we’ll get to the answer shortly. Here is what I don’t want or need my government to do in its effort to help me and my business. Or perhaps more properly stated, here is what my government is doing to hinder and prevent my success as a small business person.

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Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

1. Mandating complex and inexplicable tax laws that require a third party to interpret. The truth is most accountants are so baffled by the current tax regulations that even they can’t dependably advise someone on what is the best plan of action. 2. Implementing regulatory requirements for small businesses based on the practices of large corporate entities. There is simply no possible way that the average small business either needs to, or can truly live up to, the regulations that are stipulated by regulatory agencies such as OSHA or ADEM. 3. Taking on the responsibility of supporting large portions of our society at both

federal and state level, which then requires the government to pillage the coffers of the small businesses to meet the fiscal needs of such inefficient welfare programs. 4. Establishing programs that benefit foreign entities that then compete with unfair advantages against the small businesses that, without the burdens enumerated above, could provide much more quality of life, valuable services and products for the local economy. 5. Artificially controlling economic factors by establishing minimum wages, mandating employee benefit provisions, and establishing or restricting price controls on services. Small businesses, under the proper circumstances, can provide all of the following at a local level: jobs, infrastructural services, import and export of goods, stable economic revenue flow, sustainable environments that cultivate homes, schools and education, and ancillary support industries. Left to their natural ends, these circumstances will promote a content, peaceful society that is relatively free of crime, substance abuse and other noxious behaviors that lessen the quality of life for citizens. So, what do I want my government to do help me succeed as a small business? The truth is, I don’t want or expect my government to play a direct part in my business at all. The question is flawed. It is based on the premise that government should have a part in business operations to any extent. This is not constitutionally correct, nor is it functionally effective. But we have to live in the world that we are currently in, so my list of requests would be the following: CONTINUED ON PAGE 32


Guest Commentary

Government, Private Sector Should Work Together in Harmony by Scott McNelley

The proper role of government has become a major political and economic issue in today’s world. Unfortunately, it has also become very divisive. So, what role should government play? In my opinion as a business owner, there must be a joint effort of government and private enterprise to provide the type of place people choose to live in and industry will locate or expand existing facilities to provide jobs and a tax base. There are roles only government can provide as well as functions that must be provided by private enterprise. Basically, city and county governments’ role is to provide the infrastructure to make a place livable (utility service, police protection, fire department, streets, recreation facilities, public safety, libraries, etc.). Without these essential services, people, as well as industry, will not locate to a city or area. It is crucial that government perform these functions efficiently and equitably for all of its citizens. I expect my government to be fair in all of its dealings with all of its citizens, be beneficial, efficient and effective to those it serves, and to promote competitiveness in the private sector. To have a vibrant, growing city there must be a good business climate. Industry provides the oil that makes the engine run. It provides employment that creates salaries, taxes, and in turn, provides the city services. I believe that any governmental body should have a tax structure that supports the growth of business, especially small operations. When the local economy is growing, almost always, the city follows. “A rising tide floats all boats” is an often-used phrase, but I believe allowing all businesses to flourish helps all citizens. Local government should do things that make its citizens proud to live and work there. Quality of life is critical to new people locating to a city. A lot of us want a clean city that is attractive and well maintained. Pride in this area fosters the right tone for us all, and encourages visitors to have a favorable impression of our whole region. Montgomery

We must not fail in this area. Currently, we are blessed with strong leaders and good administrators in both the state and municipal executive offices. That can change easily. We, the citizens, must be diligent to keep competent leaders in place and hold them accountable. Scott McNelley

and the River Region are most fortunate to have an outstanding quality of life. Not many cities of any size can match our offerings, such as the Alabama Shakespeare Festival and other attractions. The relatively new Riverwalk and the recent revitalization of downtown Montgomery, along with an outstanding baseball park and a professional baseball team, certainly add to the quality of life for all citizens of the Montgomery area. Add the large number of college options and the work force it provides, and golf courses and other sports and recreational offerings in our area, and you provide people with a variety of choices. Again, you have a combination of government and private enterprise working together to provide a variety of opportunities for a quality lifestyle. Education is of major importance! An essential element in any progressive community is the availability of good schools. The children hold the future in their hands, so to neglect to properly educate them assures failure as a society and municipality. Unfortunately, too many high school graduates do not have the skill level to assume positions requiring modest skill levels. Government’s role is to ensure good physical facilities, but most importantly, demand well qualified teachers and require discipline and expectations from teachers, students, and administration. An educated work force is absolutely essential to the growth of any community, regardless of size.

On the federal level, I believe if the U.S. – as the world’s largest economy, the world’s biggest innovator, and the world’s biggest exporter – is to remain in that position, we must ensure that America is the world’s best place to do business. The federal government should not run the whole show, but should demonstrate common needs by addressing its own uses first. As America’s largest landowner, building/owner operator, largest employer and therefore largest consumer of energy, government should focus its efforts on making sure its own internal operations follow sound business practices including conservation of people and resources. By doing so, it paves the way for private enterprise to follow their lead. Government must create economic, social and environmental value while minimizing or avoiding damage to the economic, social or natural capital. Finally, we should not forget that our government works for its citizens, and in the end the elected officials are accountable to the people. Elected officials should never lose sight of the importance of being an advocate of private enterprise, and the two working together will provide a vibrant, healthy place in which to live and work. Quiet enjoyment, although very much a legal term, says a great deal about what citizens should expect from government. For the most part, I want government to let us all “quietly enjoy” our lives. Allow us to live unencumbered by unneeded intrusion. Scott McNelley is president of Admiral Movers and Admiral Records Management

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30

AT THE FEDERAL LEVEL: > Abandon all efforts to forcefully ensure that people receive economic support regardless of their efforts to provide for themselves at the expense of any business or individual. > Cease and desist any programs that enforce regulatory compliance to standards that were not developed based on the actual day-to-day activities of a specific small business type. > Discontinue any practices that encourage non-American business entities to pursue enterprise in the U.S. by giving them economic incentives that exceed incentives provided to local small businesses (or make it less expensive to provide the same services locally). > Relegate all inter-business regulations to the states to negotiate, and only affect these transactions as they occur between the states. AT THE STATE LEVEL: > Dissolve/discontinue all programs whose subsidization is based on compliance with federal impositions on small

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Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

businesses. You are responsible to your citizens, not the federal government. Do not enslave us to them. > Recommit your purpose to protect and represent small businesses within your boundaries. The majority of state responsibilities to its residents can be met by ensuring the success of small businesses, which in turn will provide the needs of the population in all aspects. > Resolve to meet fiscal needs of the state by supporting the production of products and services from the state’s small businesses, rather than obtaining these resources by directly taxing the businesses themselves. The current population of our country has been coddled and coaxed from infancy to accept the concept of a nanny state. Most citizens subconsciously accept the idea that government – state and/or federal – is responsible for providing or controlling or ensuring certain basic necessities of day-today life. This mentality is equivalent to slavery, since if you depend on those who ensure your survival, you will obey their every demand.

Eric Lewis

If we as Americans wish to recapture the freedom that our forefathers dreamed of when they crafted that immortal document we call the Constitution, we need to actively reshape our governmental overlords into the servants they were originally designed to be, and put the power of our communities and our entire society back in the hands and hearts of the entity that is truly capable of providing our future: the small business, because “we” are the small business. Eric Lewis is a veterinarian and owner of Bell Road Animal Medical Center


Better Than Expected: Prospects Improve for State’s Economy by David Zaslawsky

A number of economists have been busy revising earlier forecasts. BMO Capital Markets recently amended its forecast of gross domestic product (GDP) growth this year of 3.1 percent to 3.3 percent due to improvements in manufacturing, employment and consumer spending. Meanwhile, the Conference Board’s index of leading economic indicators surged 1.4 percent in March, the largest increase in 10 months. Economists were expecting a 0.9 percent increase. Ahmad Ijaz

The index of leading economic indicators was also raised in January and February from previous estimates. The increase in January was 0.6 percent instead of 0.3 percent and February’s increase was 0.4 percent instead of 0.1 percent. That index is comprised of 10 indicators including housing, employment, manufacturing and the financial sector. The University of Alabama’s Center for Business and Economic Research revised its forecast of the state’s GDP growth from 1.9 percent to 2.2 percent. The Center for Business and Economic Research expects manufacturing to lead the growth and forecasts output rising 3.0 percent this year, which translates into an increase of nearly $1 billion from the previous estimate, according to Ahmad Ijaz, an economic analyst with the center.

The business services sector is also expected to be a bright spot this year in Alabama, but the center projects commercial construction to be a drag on the state’s economy into next year. The center is also projecting job growth this year in transportation equipment and related industries, but overall expects the state to lose about 9,200 jobs – a decrease of 0.5 percent. The transportation industry is forecast to add about 700 jobs this year, Ijaz said. Most of the job losses are projected to come from the construction sector, where 7,000 jobs will be lost this year. There are some other bright spots for employment, according to the center. Educational and health services are expected to add about 3,700 jobs; professional and business services will add 2,000 jobs; and the leisure and hospitality sector will add about 1,000 jobs. Alabama employment is not expected to “fully recover” until 2014, according to the center, which reported that industries producing goods saw a decline of 8.5 percent in employment last year. The center is now projecting state tax receipts to decline 1.5 percent in the current fiscal year. The center also put out a more optimistic forecast of tax revenues increasing about 1 percent.

The center is forecasting motor vehicle production in Alabama could increase 5.0 percent in 2010, helped by strong sales of the newly remodeled 2011 Sonata, which is produced at Hyundai’s manufacturing facility in Montgomery. That increase is from $4.1 billion in 2009 to $4.4 billion in 2010, Ijaz said.

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Member News

BUSINESSBUZZ Tabor Novak has been selected for the third consecutive year for inclusion in “Alabama Super Lawyers 2010” in the fields of civil litigation defense, personal injury defense, medical malpractice, and business/corporate. Tabor Novak

Saxon Main

Chris Waller

LOCAL ATTORNEYS NAMED TO LAWYERS AND RISING STARS PUBLICATION MONTGOMERY – Three Ball, Ball, Matthews & Novak, P.A attorneys have been selected for this year’s “Alabama Super Lawyers” and “Rising Stars” lists.

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Saxon Main and Chris Waller were selected for inclusion in “Alabama Rising Stars 2010.” Main practices in the firm’s real estate and business litigation practice groups. Waller practices in the firm’s litigation practice group, with a special emphasis on defending complex personal injury claims, products liability and construction defect litigation.

zero complaints, the highest volume and outstanding customer service, according to Doug Isaacson, manager, Isaacson Family Enterprises.

Larry H. Gibson Jr.

Lyman Ramsay Jr.

ALABAMA TRUCK RENTAL WINS AWARD

TWO ELECTED TO ALABAMA AG CREDIT BOARD OF DIRECTORS

MONTGOMERY – Penske Truck Leasing, the nation’s largest truck leasing company, presented Alabama Truck Rental with two awards: Highest Volume Commercial Rental Agent, and Highest Volume Residential Agent.

MONTGOMERY – Lyman “Woody” Ramsay Jr. of Grand Bay and Larry H. Gibson Jr. of Aliceville have been elected to the Board of Directors for the Montgomerybased Alabama Ag Credit.

Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

The board of directors is responsible for establishing policies, providing strategic direction, and overseeing all major institution functions. Alabama Ag Credit provides long-term real estate loans on farms, timberland, recreational properties, home sites, agribusinesses and country homes in the lower 40 counties in Alabama. They also provide short- and intermediateterm lending for operating, equipment and livestock. CALIFORNIA KRAZE YOGURT COMING TO MONTGOMERY

Only 5 percent of Alabama lawyers are selected by Super Lawyers, and no more than 2.5 percent of Alabama lawyers are selected by Rising Stars.

These awards were given to Alabama Truck Rental based on the company’s having

is president of Gibson Forest Management, a forestry consulting firm.

Ramsay is the owner and manager of Gulf Equipment Corporation, a general contracting company. Gibson

MONTGOMERY – Aronov Realty Management announced the addition of California Kraze Yogurt in two Montgomery shopping centers, Zelda Place and Cornerstone Shopping Center. Both stores will be adjacent to the Publix supermarket at each center. California Kraze Yogurt is the brainchild of Montgomery businessman Michael Cantey and his partner Wayne Green of Dothan. The stores will feature an eclectic interior with soft seating, modern color-tainting tables that change with a touch, and free WiFi access.


A Dothan location opened in May. Aronov is the largest privately held, full-service real estate company in the Southeast with over 100 properties, and performs acquisition, development, management, leasing and brokerage services for its portfolio and properties owned by third parties.

Beasley Allen Law Firm presented the James W. Barrie Center with a Wii gaming system.

‘WII GIVE BACK’ PROGRAM SELECTS FOURTH RECIPIENT MONTGOMERY – Beasley Allen Law Firm presented the James M. Barrie Center in Etowah County with a brand new Wii gaming system as part of its yearlong “Wii Give Back” campaign. The Barrie Center helps to ease trauma for children reported as victims of sexual or severe physical abuse. “The children that are served at our center will benefit having the Wii console to occupy their time while here. The Wii will help them feel at ease before being interviewed concerning abuse allegations,” said Leyla Padgett, interim director of the James M. Barrie Center. Past recipients of Wii games include the Jimmie Hale Mission, Harriet’s House, Camp ASCCA, Brantwood Children’s Home and Common Ground Montgomery.

La., and seeks to represent individuals and businesses that have incurred damages related to the disaster, including real and personal property damages, loss of profits and earning capacity, loss of revenues and more. Stephen L. Davidson

MONTGOMERY CANCER CENTER DOCTOR ELECTED PRESIDENT OF STATE ONCOLOGY ORGANIZATION MONTGOMERY – Stephen L. Davidson, M.D., has been elected to a two-year term as president of the State of Alabama Society of Clinical Oncology and Alabama Cancer Congress. The professional organization represents Alabama’s providers of cancer medicine, promoting education, advocacy and community.

that allow our businesses and their employees to succeed.”

Defendants named in the suit are BP, plc; BP Products North America Inc., BP America Inc., Transocean Ltd., Transocean Offshore Deepwater Inc., Halliburton Energy Services Inc., and Cameron International Corporation f/k/a Cooper Cameron Corporation. The oil spill is expected to make an especially big impact in Louisiana, where in 2006 expenditures related to recreational fishing, hunting and wildlife-watching in coastal areas exceeded $3.2 billion

A partner with Montgomery Cancer Center, Davidson is a medical oncologist and hematologist, and is the medical director of clinical research at the Center. “Not only is Dr. Davidson a highly accomplished physician who takes excellent care of his patients,” said Venty Butts, administrator for Montgomery Cancer Center, “but he’s also one of the true leaders in our state and our region when it comes to clinical oncology.” Opened in 1990, Montgomery Cancer Center is nationally respected for its oncology and hematology diagnostic and treatment services. BEASLEY ALLEN FILES CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT IN OIL SPILL MONTGOMERY – Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C. filed a second class action lawsuit as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The suit was filed on behalf of plaintiff Gulf Crown Seafood Inc., based in Delcambre,

The award is based on how members of Congress voted on key business issues, which the Chamber outlines in its annual publication, How They Voted. Those members of Congress who supported the Chamber’s position on at least 70 percent of those votes are eligible for the award. Bright maintained an 87 percent rating.

Cynthia Lorino

MONTGOMERY BREAST CENTER INTRODUCES GAMMALOC BIOPSY SYSTEM

Bobby Bright

BRIGHT RECEIVES SPIRIT OF ENTERPRISE AWARD FROM THE U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WASHINGTON, DC – Congressman Bobby Bright was awarded the Spirit of Enterprise Award by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce based on his pro-business voting record during the first session of the 111th Congress. “I want to thank the Chamber of Commerce for recognizing my support of pro-business policies, especially legislation to help our small businesses,” Bright said. “I look forward to continuing to work with the Chamber and its local affiliates in Alabama to promote policies

MONTGOMERY – Montgomery Breast Center is the first in the country to install and use the GammaLoc lesion-localization system – the only FDAapproved device for gammaguided, minimally invasive needle biopsy of suspicious lesions identified with BreastSpecific Gamma Imaging. BSGI uses a gamma camera that reveals lesions and detects early-stage cancers that can be missed with other imaging methods. The system calculates the specific depth and location of a lesion, while the computer offers the physician step-bystep instructions throughout the biopsy. Successful biopsies already have been performed using the system. “BSGI often discovers cancerous lesions that are not seen on mammograms or ultrasound. Now we have a way to quickly sample suspicious (CONTINUED ON PAGE 36)

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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BUSINESS BUZZ (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35) tissue and give accurate results for a patient’s peace of mind,” said Dr. Cynthia Lorino, director of breast imaging at Montgomery Breast Center. LIFESOUTH TO BUILD NEW HOME IN MONTGOMERY MONTGOMERY – LifeSouth announced construction will begin on a new $4 million district headquarters in Montgomery, located at Carmichael Road adjacent to Iberia Bank. A ceremonial groundbreaking was held May 19. LifeSouth supplies more than 60 hospitals in Alabama with blood components, making it the largest supplier in the state. The new 17,500square-foot facility will house administrative offices for the district and the Montgomery region under one roof, and will feature a state-of-the-art donor center – the hub where collected blood is processed and sent to local hospitals. LifeSouth purchased the 3.5-acre site in 2006, and since that time a large sign facing I-85 has declared it the “future home of LifeSouth Community Blood Centers.” “The future is finally here,” said LifeSouth South Alabama District Director Judy Russell. JACKSON HOSPITAL PEDIATRIC UNIT BECOMES PART OF ANIMAL THERAPY PROGRAM MONTGOMERY – Jackson Hospital announced it will expand the current Animal Therapy Program to its pediatric unit. The therapy program was introduced in March, and is a vital part of our patient care. The animal-human bond

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has been proven to provide an enhanced quality of care and healing experience for patients during their hospital stay. Animal visits can combat feelings of isolation, fulfill our need to nurture, and can be a source of laughter.

Renate Wood

There are currently10 dogs in the program.

JACKSON HOSPITAL CELEBRATES NATIONAL VOLUNTEER WEEK MONTGOMERY – Jackson Hospital recently celebrated National Volunteers Week with a special luncheon at Wynlakes Country Club to honor all of its hospital volunteers.

Kim Hendrix

WSFA 12 NEWS ANCHOR KIM HENDRIX DEPARTING MONTGOMERY – WSFA News 12 announced that anchor Kim Hendrix has left the station to become the director of development at Saint James School. “It’s time for a new season – as much as I love this job – knowing how your work can affect change and touch hundreds of thousands instantly, this change will give me more time with my family,” Hendrix said. “This couldn’t have come at a better time.” Hendrix helped create and anchor two WSFA newscasts: the weekday 5 p.m. news and “Alabama Live!” Over the past 20 years, she has covered stories as far away as Versailles, France, and the Panama Canal. She provided live coverage from Washington, D.C. for the inauguration of President Barack Obama and live coverage of the University of Alabama football team’s national championship in Pasadena, California.

Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

Renate Wood, who volunteers with the Imaging Center, was named Volunteer of the Year. With 1,538 hours, Betty Roy (CVICU/ICU) was recognized for most hours worked. Roosevelt McDowell and Dan Owens placed second and third. Outstanding service awards were given to Roberta Waldrup for 22 years of service; Betty Roy, 20 years; and Ann Webster, 23 years. One-, five- and 10-year service pins also were awarded. Jackson Hospital volunteers must be at least 19 years old and are asked to work four hours a week. They must complete an application and pass a background check. LOCAL CW AFFILIATE WINS STATION OF THE YEAR MONTGOMERY – WBMM, Montgomery’s CW affiliate, has been awarded “2009 Station of the Year” by the CW Network. WBMM was chosen over 100 other CW Plus Affiliate stations throughout the U.S. “WNCF/WBMM General Manager Jesse Grear and his team have done a terrific job in both sales and marketing, and have earned the prestige and recognition that comes with

Local CW affiliate WBMM was named Station of the Year.

this Station of the Year honor,” said Russ Myerson, executive vice president and general manager of CW Plus Stations. INDUSTRIAL SPECIALTY COMPANY RECEIVES SUPPLIER AWARD MONTGOMERY – Industrial Specialty Company, Inc. announced that it received the 2010 Supplier Award by Elbit Systems of America in recognition of its outstanding performance. The award was given to the top three performers among 50 vendors that service Elbit Systems. Elbit Systems of America is a leading provider of high performance products and system solutions in defense, homeland security, commercial aviation and medical instrument markets. The Montgomery-based Industrial Specialty Company was founded in 1974 and employs about 52 people. It has been a leader in the manufacturing community for more than 35 years. BRADLEY ARANT LAWYERS NAMED TO ‘SUPER LAWYERS’ LIST BIRMINGHAM – Two Montgomery lawyers with Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP were chosen for inclusion in the “Alabama Super Lawyers 2010” list. Charles Stewart and Philip Butler were named to the list in the primary practice area of business litigation.


BUSINESS BUZZ Goodwyn was instrumental in creating Leadership Montgomery with the goal of bringing white and black leaders together to improve the city. He helped create Envision 2020, a community-driven organization that takes an in-depth look at Montgomery’s future. He also helped spearhead Family Promise, a program for the homeless.

responsibilities in the field, said Dr. Anthony Rhee, associate dean of the Sorrell College of Business. It is a 30 credit hour program that features an alternate weekend format.

Charles Stewart

“This program offers advanced study in human resource management designed to present HR professionals with the opportunity to further develop strategic managerial, leadership, and decisionmaking skills,” Dr. Rhee said. TROY UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES APPROVE TUITION CHANGES FOR 2010-2011

Philip Butler

They are two of 60 attorneys from the law firm named to the prestigious list. Bradley Arant maintains offices in Birmingham, Huntsville, Montgomery, Jackson, Mississippi; Charlotte, North Carolina; Nashville and Washington, D.C.

Anthony Rhee

TROY LAUNCHES WEEKEND HR MASTERS PROGRAM MONTGOMERY – Troy University will launch a new weekend format for the Master of Science in Human Resource Management program starting this fall at the Montgomery campus. The new format is designed to be more accessible to working HR managers or professionals who currently hold

TROY – Troy University’s Board of Trustees approved a tuition and fee schedule that takes effect next fall.

Harrell Reynolds

This award recognizes an agency manager for his agency’s production levels as well as the leadership he provides to the agency. Cotton States Insurance has been providing quality insurance protection to customers in the Southeast since 1941, with products for auto, home and life.

Brian Key

Undergraduate tuition will increase from $193 to $216 per credit hour, and graduate tuition increases from $220 to $246 per credit hour. The general student fee increased from $8 to $24 per credit hour. Jim Bookout, senior vice chancellor for finance and business affairs, said the combination of a declining national economy and a three-year cycle of reduced state appropriations were the primary reasons for the increases. Even with those increases, Bookout said TROY’s fee schedule remains below the national average for public colleges and universities. AREA AGENCY MANAGER GIVEN COTTON STATES INSURANCE AWARD MONTGOMERY – Cotton States Insurance agency manager Harrell Reynolds was recently named Agency Manager of the Year for the organization. Reynolds’s agency is located in Pike Road.

COPPERWING NAMED AGENCY OF RECORD FOR THE COMPLIANCE STORE MONTGOMERY – The Compliance Store announced Copperwing as its agency of record for integrated branding and creative marketing services.

George T. Goodwyn

WINNERS HONORED AT VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR CELEBRATION MONTGOMERY – George T. Goodwyn was awarded the Volunteer of the Year Lifetime Achievement Award at a celebration hosted by Volunteer and Information Center and the Junior League of Montgomery. A partner with the Montgomerybased Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood engineering firm, Mr. Goodwyn is the first recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award. The newly created award honors outstanding leadership and commitment to improving the lives of residents in the River Region.

The Compliance Store, a Turenne & Associates Company, is a web-based health care compliance source, accessed by healthcare professionals nationwide for instant retrieval of up-to-date state and federal regulations, guidelines, and hundreds of other compliance guides and forms. “As Copperwing continues to grow its digital media services, we’re attracting more brands looking to maximize their presence and integrate their message across a variety of media.” said Copperwing Account Executive Brian Key. (CONTINUED ON PAGE 38)

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BUSINESS BUZZ (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37) Montgomery-based Copperwing is a creative consultancy offering design and integrated brand management services. It was founded in 1999 and serves local, regional and national clients. SERVISFIRST BANK COMMEMORATES FIFTH ANNIVERSARY, OUTSTANDING GROWTH BIRMINGHAM – ServisFirst Bank marked its five-year anniversary, ranking in the top 5 percent of de novo banks founded in 2005 for cumulative profitability, along with an 81 percent compounded annual growth rate in total deposits. Bank founders attribute the strong five-year performance to the organizing concepts of providing outstanding customer service by the best bankers

in the market and by offering innovative banking services. ServisFirst opened in May 2005 with $35 million in capital – the most capital raised by a start-up bank in Alabama – and within six months had reached profitability, with $200 million in assets. In 2006 the bank was named the largest and fastest growing new bank in the U.S. by Donnelly Penman & Partners. By 2008, the bank had exceeded $1 billion in assets. The bank has offices in Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan, for a total of eight banking centers and 160 employees. WALKER360 SIGNS EAMC MONTGOMERY – Montgomery advertising agency Walker360 announced it has been named

Walker360 offers a range of services, from marketing plans and strategies, to graphic design and copywriting for radio, TV, print, outdoor, direct mail, websites, and packaging. The company has offices in Montgomery and Atlanta and has been in business for more than 60 years.

Taylor Blackwell

“agency of record” for East Alabama Medical Center in Opelika. EAMC is an acute care regional referral center serving east Alabama and west Georgia. “Our creative team has extensive experience in healthcare marketing, and we hope to ensure that EAMC is recognized not only for the quality of their care, but for the quality of their communications as well,” said Taylor Blackwell, president of Walker360.

To submit your business news for publication, email a press release to editor@montgomerychamber. com. Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members only.

RIBBON CUTTINGS & GROUND BREAKINGS

HERE WE GROW AGAIN

ARONOV REALTY BROKERAGE, INC.- RESIDENTIAL 7027 Halcyon Park Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-277-2700 Carol Andrews-Broker Real Estate Residential

DOCTORS HEARING CLINIC 7025 Halcyon Park Drive, Suite A Montgomery, AL 36117 334-396-1635 Dr. Bettie Borton-Board Certified Audiologist Hearing Aids/Instruments

APPTIS 60 Commerce Street, Suite 1205 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-538-3264 Olan Waldrop-Regional Director DoD Programs Information Technology Firms

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Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES MONTGOMERY EASTCHASE 8970 EastChase Parkway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-260-8650 Layne Matthews-General Manager Hotels/Motels

EASTER SEALS CENTRAL ALABAMA-THE ROTARY WORK CENTER 2125 East South Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36116-2454 334-288-0240 Debbie Lynn-Executive Director Business/Vocational Schools


New Members Apartments

Child Care Centers

Hotels/Motels

ADAMS AVENUE LOFTS 3501 Reserve Circle, Suite B Montgomery, AL 36116 334-657-0296

HEARTS DESIRE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 4355 Virginia Loop Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-612-7400

CANDLELIGHT INN AND SUITES 1100 West South Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36105 334-281-1660

AttractionsEntertainment

Churches/Ministries

GEORGIA AQUARIUM 225 Baker Street N.W. Atlanta, GA 30313 404-581-4175

THE ASSEMBLY BAPTIST CHURCH 3063 Guymar Road Montgomery, AL 36111 334-281-5709

Audio-Visual Consultants & Designers

Consulting Services

MONTGOMERY AUDIO & VIDEO 5114 Nancy Court Montgomery, AL 36108 334-356-0201

Banks BB&T Wetumpka Branch Wetumpka, AL 36092 BB&T Millbrook Branch Millbrook, AL 36054 334-285-3017 BB&T Downtown Branch Prattville, AL 36067 334-365-4121 BB&T McQueen Smith Branch Prattville, AL 36066 334-361-6170

Batteries SIMMONS BATTERY CO. LLC 725 Oliver Road Montgomery, AL 36117 334-271-6251

Catering Services CITY OF MONTGOMERY FOOD & CATERING SERVICE DEPARTMENT 329 Vandiver Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36110 334-240-4910 HOUSE OF BREAD PROFESSIONAL CAKES P.O. Box 242661 Montgomery, AL 36124 334-590-3322

DOSS & ASSOCIATES, LLC 8448 Crossland Loop, Suite 149 Montgomery, AL 36117 334-213-0463

LANGHORN INSURANCE AGENCY 2743 Office Park Circle Montgomery, AL 36116-1143 334-273-0964

HARRIS FAMILY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 60 Commerce Street, Suite 1250 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-224-0751

Financial Services HARRIS FAMILY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 60 Commerce Street, Suite 1250 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-224-0751

Fitness Center/Gym PERCY BROWN’S INSTITUTE OF TAE KWON DO 2829 East South Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36116-2513 334-649-1414

WATERMARK RESIDENTIAL 101 West Ohio Street, Suite 2000 Indianapolis, IN 46204 317-454-8021

Insurance Companies/ Services

Exhibitions,Trade Shows, Fairs

CAPITAL WEALTH MANAGEMENT GROUP 4131 Carmichael Road, Suite 3 Montgomery, AL 36106 334-315-4067

Real EstateDevelopers

MOTEL 6 & GOVERNOR’S HOUSE CONVENTION CENTER 2705 E. South Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36116-2511 334-288-2800 Ext 514

AFLAC 116 Company Street Wetumpka, AL 36092 334-478-3835

Financial Planner/ Advisor

WMRK NEWS TALK 107.9 4101-A Wall Street Montgomery, AL 36106 334-244-0961

COUNTRY INN & SUITES 10095 Chantilly Parkway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-277-4142

OPERATIONS & TECHNOLOGY INC. 600 S. Court Street, Suite 208 Montgomery, AL 36104 301-802-2451

GEORGE FERN COMPANY 2101 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. N Birmingham, AL 35203 205-458-8741

Radio & Broadcasting Companies

Jewelers/Jewelry CHARLOTTE’S JEWELRY 8161 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-396-1991

Medical Equipment/ Supplies HAUSTED PATIENT HANDLING SYSTEMS, LLC 2511 Midpark Drive Montgomery, AL 36109 334-215-5151

Mortgage/Finance NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE 6987 Halcyon Park Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-523-9100

Patents PQ ENTERPRISES LLC 60 Commerce Street, Suite 1200 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-263-0005

RemodelingResidential/Commercial ELEGANCE KITCHEN & BATH RENOVATION LLC 3038 South Hull Street Montgomery, AL 36105 334-262-7123 RECON BUILDERS, INC. 5955 Troy Highway Montgomery, AL 36116 334-281-8600

Restaurants LUNDE’S RESTAURANT 201 Montgomery Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-265-3663 THE TIPPING POINT 5015 Hampstead High Street Montgomery, AL 36116 334-260-9110

Security Systems ADT SECURITY SERVICES, INC. 5911 Monticello Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-395-5771 SAFETEC SECURITY 6334 Woodmere Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36117 334-356-2774

Telecommunications CAVALIER 100 Centerview Drive, Suite 260 Birmingham, AL 35216 205-940-9330

Shoes-Slip Resistant SERENDIPITY UNIFORMS 5085 Virginia Loop Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-288-4555

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

39


MEMBERS ON THE MOVE “I was looking for a new challenge and a way to diversify my skills in a different industry,” Masterson said. “I am fascinated with how technology impacts society. It allows people to not only access information instantly but it really does underscore the idea of globalization.”

Chris Waller

BALL, BALL, MATTHEWS & NOVAK ANNOUNCES ADDITION MONTGOMERY – Ball, Ball, Matthews & Novak, P.A. announced that Chris Waller has joined the firm in its Montgomery office. Waller practices in the firm’s litigation practice group, with a special emphasis on defending complex personal injury claims, products liability and construction defect litigation. Since the 1890s, Ball, Ball has represented insurance carriers almost from its inception, and handles all facets of litigation that arise from that representation. With offices in Montgomery and Mobile, the firm practices throughout Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Ronnie Shaw

Masterson is responsible for client relations, agency communications and project management.

40

Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

“I plan to work closely with our faculty to foster an environment in which new ideas and new initiatives can come forward that will help us continue to develop students who are prepared for the global business environment of the 21st Century,” Edwards said.

Cotton States Insurance financial representative Ronnie Shaw of Montgomery earned a position on the insurance group’s distinguished All American team. Shaw is among a group of more than 25 Cotton States financial representatives and agency managers who qualified for the award. This is the third time he has been named an All American.

Shannon Masterson

MONTGOMERY – Square Root Interactive, a Montgomery-based, full-service website design and development agency and Ektron ELITE Partner, is pleased to announce the appointment of Shannon Masterson as its newest account executive.

Edwards serves on the board of the Council for Community and Economic Research and is a member of the Agriculture Advisory Board of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. He holds national certification as an Economic Development Finance Professional.

LOCAL FINANCIAL REPRESENTATIVE HONORED BY COTTON STATES INSURANCE

The All American recognition is awarded each year by Cotton States to financial representatives and agency managers who have excelled in identifying insurance products and financial solutions that fit the needs of their clients. Agency managers and financial representatives who receive the award provide outstanding service to their clients.

MASTERSON JOINS THE SQUARE ROOT INTERACTIVE TEAM

doctorate in international development from the University of Southern Mississippi.

JUDSON EDWARDS APPOINTED DEAN OF SORRELL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS TROY – Troy University officials announced the appointment of Judson Edwards as dean of the Sorrell College of Business. Edwards has been an associate professor of economics and director of the university’s Center International Business and Economic Development since joining Troy University in 2006. An undergraduate alumnus of Troy University, Dr. Edwards earned a master of science in economic development and a

W. Daniel Miles, III

BEASLEY ALLEN ATTORNEY NAMED TO HERITAGE REGISTRY OF WHO’S WHO MONTGOMERY – W. Daniel “Dee” Miles, III has been selected for inclusion in the 2010 edition of The Heritage Registry of Who’s Who. Miles is a shareholder with Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C., law firm in Montgomery, and head of the firm’s consumer fraud section. Miles was selected in recognition of his accomplishments and achievements attained in the field of legal services. The Heritage Registry of Who’s Who is a New York-based biographical publication that selects and distinguishes individuals throughout North America who have attained a recognizable degree of successin their field of endeavor and thereby contribute to the growth of their industry. Miles was named Beasley Allen’s Litigator of the Year in 2008.


POST TENSIONS TECHNOLOGIES ANNOUNCES NEW PRESIDENT MONTGOMERY – Post Tension Technologies, LLC, a full-service posttensioning construction company, announced the promotion of Michael Johnston to president. Johnston has more than 20 years of experience in the construction business. He is a PTI Certified Installer/Inspector and is a member of the board of directors of Post-Tensioning Institute.

Cathy Wright

Post Tension Technologies, LLC, also announced the promotion of PTI Certified Installer Randy Andrews to Field Operations Manager, and the new additions of Kelli McMahon, office manager, and Jeremy Hibbard, projects estimator. Post Tension Technologies, a member of Post-Tensioning Institute, is a PTI certified tendon fabrication plant with PTI certified inspectors and installers, specializing in both post tensioned slab on grade and post tensioned structural slab fabrication and construction as well as drilled pier construction.

April Kelley

COPPERWING PROMOTES WRIGHT, KELLEY MONTGOMERY, AL – Copperwing has announced that Cathy Wright has been promoted to the position of project manager, with April Kelley moving to production manager.

Wright, who served previously as Copperwing’s production manager, joined the firm in 2005, and has led the production team in major branding efforts for regional, national and international clients including Jackson Thornton, Neptune Technology Group and Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama. She has more than three decades of experience in managing the execution of communication projects. Kelley, who joined Copperwing in 2008 as production artist, has served clients as both a graphic artist and as a manager of complex production processes. In her new position, she will lead the planning and execution of all project production, while serving as a liaison to Copperwing’s resource partners. To submit your business news for publication, email a press release to editor@montgomerychamber. com. Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members only.

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

41


ECONOMIC INTEL Meats, Produce Lead to Increased Grocery Bills MONTGOMERY – Past the stocked shelves of chocolate bunnies and egg dye kits, shoppers noticed their grocery receipts were slightly higher.

$3.35 a pound; ground beef was up 11 cents to $2.51 a pound; chuck roasts were up 5 cents to $3.49 a pound; and Boston butts were up 3 cents to $1.69 a pound.

According to the latest results from the federation’s monthly food price survey, the average cost of 20 basic market basket items was $54.11, up $2.41 or 4.7 percent from the previous survey.

Shoppers were able to save money on bacon, however, down 8 cents this month to $4.05 a pound. Whole fryers remained $1.23 a pound. Eggs averaged at $1.75 a dozen, an increase of 20 cents from March.

Nationally, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s (AFBF) quarterly market basket survey revealed a similar trend. The survey showed the total cost of 16 food items was $45.54, up $2.64 or 6 percent from the fourth quarter of 2009. Of the 16 items surveyed, 14 increased and two decreased in average price compared to the prior quarter.

Prices surged in the dairy case this month as well. Ice cream increased 20 cents to $4.06 a half-gallon; milk increased 7 cents to $2.88 a half-gallon; and cottage cheese increased a penny to $2.53 a pound. Meanwhile, butter was down 16 cents this month to $3.43 a pound.

At Alabama supermarkets, a significant portion of the increase came from several items found in the meat case. T-bone steaks were up 74 cents to $8.41 a pound; chicken breasts were up 40 cents a pound to $2.31; pork chops were up 15 cents to

42

Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

“Improved demand for milk and dairy products here at home and from export markets was the driving factor behind higher retail prices found by our volunteer shoppers during the first quarter of the year,” said AFBF economist John Anderson. “Higher retail prices for some meats were due to reduced supplies,” Anderson said.

Increased prices also extended to the produce aisle as prices jumped 19 cents on average. Tomatoes increased 76 cents to $2.88 a pound; lettuce increased 11 cents to $1.37 a head; and red potatoes increased 3 cents to 74 cents a pound. Noticeable savings on sweet potatoes, however, provided shoppers with a bit of a price break. Sweet potatoes were down 16 cents to 76 cents a pound. Regional reports collected by volunteer shoppers throughout the state showed the market basket averaged $50.91 in northeast Alabama, $53.41 in northwest Alabama, $54.89 in central Alabama and $58.02 in south Alabama. Alabama Farmers Federation, a member of the American Farm Bureau Federation, is the state’s largest farm organization.


Unemployment Data Civilian Labor Force

Unemployment Rate

Apr p 2010

Mar r 2010

Apr r 2009

Apr p 2010

Mar r2010

Apr r 2009

164,881

163,440

167,680

9.8%

10.3%

8.3%

Autauga County

27,728

27,452

28,907

13.4%

13.9%

12.2%

Prattville City

15,204

15,097

15,667

6.7%

7.4%

6.4%

Elmore County

37,447

37,210

37,280

9.3%

10.2%

7.5%

Lowndes County

7,989

7,887

8,606

20.0%

20.4%

16.6%

Montgomery County

8,904

8,851

9,282

17.3%

18.2%

13.4%

Montgomery City

92,043

91,150

93,384

9.8%

10.2%

8.1%

Birmingham-Hoover MA

502,583

498,444

515,604

9.8%

10.3%

8.0%

93,993

92,846

96,080

12.2%

12.3%

10.1%

203,692

201,564

203,397

7.9%

8.4%

6.4%

90,125

89,131

90,144

7.6%

8.1%

6.3%

180,496

179,180

182,757

11.4%

11.7%

8.9%

84,167

83,489

85,098

11.7%

11.9%

9.1%

2,086,035

2,068,879

2,121,919

10.3%

10.8%

8.8%

153,911,000

153,660,000

153,834,000

9.5%

10.2%

8.6%

Metro Area Montgomery MA

Birmingham City Huntsville MA Huntsville City Mobile MA Mobile City Alabama United States

p=Preliminary r=Revised Estimates prepared by the Alabama Department of Industrial Relations in Cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, based on 2009 benchmark.

Alabama Per Capita Personal Income 2005

2008

Variance

% of National Avg

% of Alabama Avg

United States

$35,424

$40,166

13.4%

100%

119%

Alabama state total

$29,838

$33,655

12.8%

84%

100%

Autauga, AL

$28,643

$32,547

13.6%

81%

97%

Elmore, AL

$27,207

$31,043

14.1%

77%

92%

Lowndes, AL

$23,233

$27,568

18.7%

69%

82%

Montgomery, AL

$35,356

$39,182

10.8%

98%

116%

Birmingham-Hoover

$35,947

$39,886

11.0%

99%

119%

Huntsville

$33,550

$38,259

14.0%

95%

114%

Mobile

$26,476

$30,567

15.5%

76%

91%

Montgomery

$32,339

$36,129

11.7%

90%

107%

Counties

Metropolitan Statistical Areas

Note: All state and local area dollar estimates are in current dollars (not adjusted for ination). Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Regional Economic Information System.Internet release date: April 22, 2010.

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

43


Montgomery Metro Market Home Sales MAR 2010

FEB 2010

Month/Month % Change

MAR 2009

Year/Year % Change

Statewide MAR 2010

314

226

38.94%

283

10.95%

3,540

Median Selling Price

$129,900

$116,500

11.50%

$125,900

3.18%

$123,064

Average Selling Price

$156,281

$137,634

13.55%

$140,427

11.29%

$146,811

97

97

0.00%

91

6.59%

155

3,272

3,133

4.44%

3,124

4.74%

40,642

Total Home Sales

Average Days on Market Total Homes Listed

Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate (ACRE), The University of Alabama

National Retail Sales Target Costco Gap CVS McDonald’s

January

February

March

April

2010

0.5%

2.4%

10.3%

-3.5%

2009

-3.3%

-4.1%

-6.3%

0.3%

2010

0%

2%

2%

3%

2009

4%

4%

3%

-2%

2010

2.0%

0.0%

11.0%

3.0%

2009

-18.0%

-12.0%

-14.0%

-10.0%

2010

4.9%

-2.3%

2009

3.6%

3.3%

2010

-0.7%

0.6%

2009

5.4%

2.8%

U.S. same store sales compiled from 10-Q and 10-K forms (excluding fuel sales) Source: RetailerDaily.com

44

Montgomery Business Journal June 2010

1.5% 4.7%

6.1%


Average Wage Per Job

Airline Fares

2005

2008

Variance

United States

$40,807

$45,716

12.0%

Alabama State Total

$34,001

$38,055

11.9%

Autauga

$27,690

$30,776

11.1%

Elmore

$28,415

$30,083

5.9%

Lowndes

$30,638

$34,452

12.4%

Montgomery

$35,149

$39,582

12.6%

Counties

Metropolitan Statistical Areas

Roundtrip airfare comparisons from Montgomery, Birmingham and Atlanta airports to key destinations.

Montgomery

Birmingham

Atlanta

Baltimore (BWI)

$354

$244

$224

Boston (BOS)

$368

$293

$310

Charlotte, NC (CLT)

$234

$234

$190

Chicago (ORD)

$428

$328

$274

Cincinnati (CVG)

$284

$242

$260

Dallas/Ft Worth (QDF)

$278

$258

$294

Destination

Birmingham-Hoover

$39,007

$43,322

11.1%

Denver (DEN)

$420

$374

$344

Huntsville

$41,874

$46,967

12.2%

Detroit (DTW)

$382

$368

$264

Mobile

$33,280

$37,922

13.9%

Houston (QHO)

$408

$328

$284

Montgomery

$33,915

$37,890

11.7%

Indianapolis (IND)

$344

$244

$240

Las Vegas (LAS)

$418

$400

$364

Los Angeles (LAX)

$408

$328

$288

Memphis (MEM)

$535

$396

$220

Miami (MIA)

$302

$232

$138

Nashville (BNA)

$258

$158

$396

New Orleans (MSY)

$278

$178

$240

New York (JFK)

$450

$350

$329

Orlando (MCO)

$326

$246

$240

Philadelphia (PHL)

$366

$318

$274

Pittsburgh (PIT)

$372

$240

$217

St Louis (STL)

$282

$228

$244

Seattle (SEA)

$447

$383

$356

$1,642

$1,718

$1,607

Tampa (TPA)

$302

$212

$240

Washington DC (DCA)

$400

$290

$264

Source: BEA, REIS, Internet release date, December, 2009.

Hyundai Sales VEHICLE

APR 2010

APR 2009

YTD 2010

YTD 2009

Accent

2,990

5,189

18,278

18,912

Sonata

18,536

11,815

50,283

37,472

Elantra

9,657

4,684

28,909

26,479

0

3,353

0

6,263

5,917

3,726

30,633

19,839

237

289

935

1,292

3,871

1,428

11,912

5,106

0

186

0

3,171

Veracruz

550

1,206

2,111

5,251

Genesys

2,265

2,076

7,842

6,021

44,023

33,952

155,532

129,806

Tiburon Santa Fe Azera Tucson Entourage

Total

Seoul, Korea (SEL)

Date of travel: June 14-20. Date of pricing: May 9. Source: travelocity.com

Source: Hyundai Motor America

Montgomery Regional Airport APR 2010

APR 2009

Year over Year % Change

YTD 2010

YTD 2009

Year over Year % Change

Air Carrier Operations

1,057

928

13.9%

3,853

3,540

8.8%

Total Operations

6,851

6,319

8.4%

23,170

22,786

1.7%

Enplanements

16,225

11,892

36.4%

56,788

42,755

32.8%

Deplanements

16,208

12,174

33.1%

56,709

43,363

30.8%

Total Passengers

32,433

24,066

34.8%

113,497

86,118

31.8%

Source: Montgomery Regional Airport (MGM) Dannelly Field

June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

45


Quarterly Reports Quarterly Revenues

Net Income

Earnings Per Share

Earnings Estimate

Year-ago Revenues

Year-ago Net Income

CSX Corp.

$2.5B

$306M

$0.78

$0.69

N/A

$254M

Profit climbed 22%

Yum Brands (Pizza Hut, KFC, Taco Bell)

$2.4B

$241M

$0.50

$0.53

$2.2B

$218M

Profit jumped 37% in China to $176M

MetLife

$13.1B

$805M

$0.97

$0.97

$11.1b

(-$574M)

International Paper

$5.8B

(-$162M)

(-$0.38)

$0.04

$5.7B

$257M

Took a $124M charge to close a mill

Southern Co.

$4.2B

$494.5M

$0.60

$0.44

$3.7B

$125.7M

Residential electricity sales rose 20.6%

Panera Bread

$364.2M

$25.8M

$0.82

$0.82

$320.7M

$17.4M

Profit rose 48 percent

Buffalo Wild Wings

$152.3M

$10.6M

$0.58

$0.57

$131.6M

$9.5M

Revenue increased 15%

Office Depot

$3.1B

$20M

$0.07

$0.08

$3.2B

Papa John’s

$285.8M

$16.9M

$0.62

$0.50

$280.9M

$17.8M

Revenue up, but lower average ticket prices

Domino’s Pizza

$381.1M

$24.5M

$0.41

$0.33

$321.8M

$23.8M

Revenue rose 18%

CVS Caremark

$23.8B

$771M

$0.55

$0.58

$23.4B

$738M

Pharmacy same-store sales up 3.7%

Name

Notable

Revenue increased 17%

(-$54.7M) Sales declined 5%

Source: PR Newswire and Charles Schwab wire services

Sales Tax Collections APR 2010

APR 2009

Year over Year % Change

$3,566,410

$3,259,987

$8,324,934

Pike Road Autauga County

YTD 2009

9.40%

$13,184,717

$13,183,859

0.01%

$7,367,633

12.99%

$30,013,173

$28,982,957

3.55%

$157,191

$57,012

175.72%

$630,982

$274,373

129.97%

$659,869

$608,141

8.51%

$2,468,706

$2,415,731

2.19%

$1,295,102

$1,209,070

7.12%

$4,955,141

$4,818,996

2.83%

Elmore County

$787,925

$712,040

10.66%

$2,990,936

$2,849,114

4.98%

Wetumpka

$480,791

$486,757

-1.23%

$480,791

$1,869,326

-74.28%

Millbrook

$510,931

$434,918

17.48%

$1,885,683

$1,685,591

11.87%

Montgomery County City of Montgomery

Prattville

Sources: Montgomery Cou City of Wetumpka, City of Millbrook

46

Year over Year % Change

YTD 2010

Montgomery Business Journal June 2010


June 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

47


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Profile for Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

Montgomery Business Journal – June 2010  

Montgomery Business Journal – June 2010