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Contents

24

14

5

Letter from the Publisher

6

Executive Editor’s Column

7

Calendar

8

Q&A with Sam Munnerlyn

11

Central Alabama Sports Commission

14

Investor Profile: Jim Wilson & Associates

16

The Newly Redesigned 2011 Sonata

21

Montgomery Regional Airport Authority Marketing Campaign

22

Member Profile: Aliant Bank

24

Cover Story: Maxwell Air Force Base-Gunter Annex

30

BCA Legislative Agenda

33

Science & Technology Committee

34

Business Buzz

39

Members on the Move

40

Ribbon Cuttings & Ground Breakings

41

New Members

42

Monthly Food Survey

42

Economic Intel

40 21 8 22

FEBRUARY 2010

16

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

3


THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION PUBLISHER

Randall L. George EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Tina McManama MANAGING EDITOR

David Zaslawsky COPY EDITOR

Michelle Jones DESIGN

Copperwing Design PHOTOGRAPHY

Jamie Martin ON THE COVER:

Lt. General Allen G. Peck, Commander of Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base

Montgomery Business Journal c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Post OfďŹ ce Box 79 41 Commerce Street Montgomery, Alabama 36101 Telephone: 334-834-5200 Fax: 334-265-4745 Email: mbj@montgomerychamber.com www.montgomerychamber.com/mbj The Montgomery Business Journal is published monthly except for the combined issue of November/December, by the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334) 834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Rates is Pending at Montgomery, Alabama. POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 79, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36101, or email mbj@montgomerychamber.com. The Montgomery Business Journal welcomes story ideas from its readers. Email to: editor@montgomerychamber.com. Subscriptions are a part of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce dues structure. Subscriptions can also be purchased for $30 per year at www.montgomerychamber.com/mbjsub.

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


Letter from the Publisher

THE WRIGHT STUFF In early 1910, this Chamber of Commerce made the most significant economic development achievement in its history. That relatively simple, yet brilliant, initiative by the business leaders of the day laid the foundation of what is today MaxwellGunter AFB, home of Air University – the intellectual and leadership center of the United States Air Force. It began in February 1910 when Fred S. Ball, Sr., president of the Montgomery Commercial Club (the Chamber’s predecessor), recognized Wilbur Wright walking near the Court Square fountain and approached him regarding his visit to Montgomery. Wright explained that he was seeking a location to establish a temporary training facility for pilots of his new invention, the airplane. Being an aggressive “Chamber developer,” Ball introduced Wright to Frank D. Kohn, a Montgomery businessman who owned a plantation site suitable for the venture. Kohn generously made the site available to Wright free of charge, and the Commercial Club (through the efforts of its members) secured the funds to erect a hanger facility to house the airplane and conduct training. The residents of the community watched for months, fascinated as this craft lifted off the cotton field and flew over the residents near the downtown area and along the river. This economic development initiative with the Wrights, albeit short lived, lit a fire of passion for flight that has resonated in Montgomery now for 100 years!

where strategies and tactics of airpower were developed and implemented to great acclaim in World War II. These achievements led to the March 1946 formation of Air University, now known as the intellectual and leadership center of the United States Air Force. Most recognize the importance of a Maxwell-Gunter’s $1.5 billion economic impact; however, I believe an even greater benefit of this phenomenal entity is the contribution of its people. They are among the world’s most well trained, well educated population – many of whom have lived all over the world, and some of whom are international world leaders. This large presence of individuals and families, with its incredible array of diversity, intelligence and leadership, engage daily in the civic aspects of our community– our churches, our schools and our neighborhoods – giving Montgomery a more cosmopolitan flavor, especially for a city in the Deep South. Certainly, the presence of Maxwell-Gunter and Air University make Montgomery a far better place in which to live, work and play. Freedom truly is not free, and I know that the citizens of Montgomery and the River Region are justifiably proud knowing that, through the contributions of their neighbors, the men and women of Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base, they have a major stake in securing peace throughout the world.

Fueled by the opportunities presented by aviation, Montgomery business leaders created a strategy to secure aviation-based economic development. First came Taylor Field in 1917, as military aviation rapidly expanded during World War I, and then again in 1918, when Wright’s Field was opened as an engine and repair depot on the original Wright Brothers training site. Later named Maxwell AFB, growth and prestige came quickly from the relocation of the Army Air Corp Tactical School,

Randall L. George, PUBLISHER PRESIDENT, MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

5


EXECUTIVE EDITOR’S COLUMN We were discussing the this month’s cover story, when Joe Greene, the Chamber’s vice president of military & governmental affairs made a simple and profound comment I have to share – “Military appreciation is more than just a day in November.” Amen, Joe. Once you have read “The Military Means the World to the River Region,” I believe you will have an even greater appreciation for our military community. Montgomery would certainly be a poorer city, both literally and culturally without Maxwell. There is diverse mix of useful information in this issue – here are a few of the ones that jumped out at me… In Economic Intel this month, Hyundai sales for December 2009 were up 41 percent year-over-year, with the Sonata up a whopping 59 percent. Have you seen the redesigned 2011 Sonata? Turn to page 15 for a full-color view, along with features and options. It is beautiful. Rip out page 32 and stick it on your refrigerator. The pictures of your area lawmakers and all of their contact information will come in handy when you want your representatives to know your views on issues that matter to you. If you hurry, you can see U.S. Senator Richard Shelby in person at the Eggs & Issues breakfast on February 8. We have a few seats left. Register now at www.montgomerychamber.com/eggsandissues. If you have kids, you need to check out the Downtown Dreamland ad on page 28. Kids eat free on Sunday – great way to keep your personal budget in line. Talking about food… according to the Alabama Farmer Federation’s monthly food price survey on page 42, T-bone steaks were down 68 cents a pound in December. My husband is a smart grocery shopper, always looking for a sale or using a coupon. I sure hope he noticed the T-bones. And last but not least, look at the ad on the left. Please let my husband know I prefer the one in the middle.

Tina McManama, EXECUTIVE EDITOR VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


Calendar Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Events

FEBRUARY

MARCH

8

9

10 25

EGGS & ISSUES WITH SEN. RICHARD SHELBY 7:30 AM @ RSA Activity Center 201 Dexter Ave., Montgomery Registration: www.montgomerychamber.com/eggsandissues

10

60 MINUTE COFFEE Sponsored by Henig Furs 8 AM @ Henig Furs 4135 Carmichael Road, Montgomery

25

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Sponsored by Marquirette’s Exquisite Jewelry 5 PM @ Marquirette’s Exquisite Jewelry 7818 Vaughn Road, Montgomery

CHAMBER 101 Sponsored by Heartsill Payroll Professionals 8 AM @ Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce 41 Commerce St. Montgomery 60 MINUTE COFFEE Sponsored by Alley Station 8 AM @ Alley Station 130 Commerce Street, Montgomery BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Sponsored by LogoBranders 5 PM @ Logo Branders 1161 Lagoon Business Loop, Montgomery

Convention Calendar compiled by the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Convention and Visitor Bureau

FEBRUARY 3-4 10-12

Truman Pierce Institute Meeting

12-17 19-21 21-22

Alabama DECA Annual Conference

25-27

Students Against Destructive Decisions

25-30

Alabama Society of Professional Land Surveyors

Alabama Association of Fairs 53rd Annual Transportation & Engineering Conference

YMCA Youth Legislature Conference

MARCH 3 6-7 11-13 13-18 18-20

YMCA Collegiate Conference

25

Alabama Music Hall of Fame

29-30

Pilot International Alabama District Convention Alabama Grand Council Conclave Alabama Rural Water Annual Convention Alabama Master Gardener Association State Conference

Alabama Education Retirees Association

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

7


TECHNICALLY SPEAKING Q&A WITH SAM MUNNERLYN Sam Munnerlyn is president of H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College. He was recently interviewed by Montgomery Business Journal Managing Editor David Zaslawsky. Montgomery Business Journal: What are your responsibilities as president of H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College? Munnerlyn: I am the chief operating officer of the college. I am responsible for the day-to-day operation of the college, strategic planning, vision, budgeting and student outcomes.

Sam Munnerlyn is president of H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College.

Munnerlyn: We have about 240 fulland part-time faculty and staff. MBJ: What is your operating budget? Munnerlyn: About $25 million – probably a little over $15 million is restricted and about $10 million is unrestricted – that would be our state funds. MBJ: Where does the $15 million come from? Munnerlyn: That would be federal along with any other income that comes into the college.

MBJ: In your case, the student outcomes could be degrees or job placement.

MBJ: Does the $15 million include tuition and fees?

Munnerlyn: That’s right. Student outcomes could be short-term certificates (26 weeks).

Munnerlyn: Yes.

MBJ: Are those short-term certificates for specific jobs? Munnerlyn: Take for instance our welding program. You can stay in the program to get a degree, but some people would rather be in for 26 weeks, get that short-term certificate and they can go to work with that short-term certificate. They don’t have to get a degree. MBJ: Are there other areas for the shortterm certificates? Munnerlyn: In most of our technical programs you can do that – not necessarily in our health care program. MBJ: What about job placements? Munnerlyn: We are very proud of our job placement rate, which is 91 percent. We do have a job placement director on campus who works with not only those students who receive degrees, but those who receive those short-term certificates. Those would be our student outcomes, along with passing various licensing exams. MBJ: What is the staff size at Trenholm Tech?

MBJ: How many students attend Trenholm Tech? Munnerlyn: I keep up with this pretty good because I was dean of students at one time. For the fall term ’09, we had a 21 percent increase in our fall enrollment. We ended up with 1,649 students. MBJ: Are you seeing an increase in older students coming in for training because of the difficult economic times? Munnerlyn: We just noted that our enrollment is growing and we feel sure that (the economic downturn) is a major part of it. Our average age of our students is down to about 28 years old – down from 31 about three years ago. We have made a conscious effort over the past several years of going after those students who are fresh out of high school. We looked at the fact at that time that our average age was 31. That meant that we were not getting too many students straight out of high school – they were going somewhere else. Maybe they were going to another college; maybe working in the work force; or maybe just staying at home. Then they decided they would come back. MBJ: How many programs does Trenholm Tech offer?

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


Munnerlyn: We have 32 programs. MBJ: What are some recent programs you have added? Munnerlyn: We were blessed that a couple of programs came over from Baptist Hospital. We brought in a radiology assistant program; a sonography program; a physical therapy assistant program. Those are our three newest programs here on campus. We had an automotive manufacturing technology program that came on board one year ago. MBJ: Would you please elaborate? Munnerlyn: When Hyundai came to Montgomery – with us being a technical college – we certainly wanted to be involved in long-term training and short-term training for those workers at Hyundai. We’ve managed to establish a relationship with them. As part of that, we wrote a grant to the Department of Labor to receive funds to start an automotive manufacturing technology program and we were lucky enough to get that particular grant. The State of Alabama gave us $1.2 million to build a facility. That facility has been built on the Patterson campus. It is open and operating, but will be formally opened with a ribbon-cutting in February. MBJ: How much was the grant from the Department of Labor? Munnerlyn: It was $3.2 million. MBJ: Are there programs you hope to add during the next several years? What type of additional programs would the business community like to see Trenholm Tech provide? Munnerlyn: We do feel our health care (program) will continue to be a growing field because people will always be sick. One possible future program would be Alternative and Sustainable Energy Technology. What we look at with business – is training for business and industry, not necessarily a degree program. MBJ: What type of training? Munnerlyn: If you have a company and you need someone to teach workers how to do a specific skill then we can come in and teach them how to perform that skill regardless of what it is. If we don’t have the expertise on our faculty we’ll go find it. We’ll come in and teach those employees that skill so they can be more productive for their company. We do that all the time and it’s called “Training for Existing Business and Industry.”

MBJ: How does it work? Do you set up the course? Munnerlyn: Yes, we’ll have our own instructor and they (company) will come up with a curriculum for it and we’ll teach it on-site or some can be off-site here at the college. MBJ: Do you have some examples? Munnerlyn: We did ethics training for VT Miltope’s senior executives and staff. We don’t specialize in ethics training, but we know people who do. We go out and get those people and we bring them in for that particular training. We have one with Rheem Manufacturing, where we did some forklift training. We have people on our staff who are capable of performing that skill. We did stainless steel welding; EMT (emergency medical technician) training certification; and culinary arts training for existing businesses. MBJ: Do the students receive a certificate for completing one of these types of courses? Munnerlyn: Yes. MBJ: What is the length of those courses? Munnerlyn: They could be any amount of time that it would take to get (the individual) proficient at that skill. It could be four days or it could be four weeks based on what that skill is. MBJ: How do you fund those types of courses? Munnerlyn: That charge is based on the agreement we make with that particular company. We find that even with our graduates, they are really, really good with their hands-on portion of the skill they were able to acquire. What we find that is missing sometimes is that work ethic part, so we do a lot of work ethics training not only here on our campus before our students leave, but sometimes we go out to various companies like VT Miltope and we’ll do work ethics training. Because now we have not only created a good worker in terms of being able to perform the skills, but if they don’t come to work on time, they are not going to be a good worker. MBJ: You’re talking about soft skills training. Munnerlyn: Exactly. MBJ: That shows the importance of a close relationship with the business community. Munnerlyn: That’s the role of the two-year college: adult education, transfer ability and

work force development. In the work force development – especially as a technical school – we provide technical skills. MBJ: Do you work closely with the Office of Workforce Development and the Alabama Industrial Development Training (AIDT) office? Munnerlyn: AIDT is on our campus over at Troy Highway. We have a very close relationship. We are heavily involved and sitting at the table, where decisions are made about dollars being given to schools for work force development. What we try to do is let businesses know that will have this service for you. MBJ: You can get leads through AIDT. Munnerlyn: AIDT mostly works with new businesses coming to Alabama and they work all over the state – where Trenholm is mostly working with existing businesses and industries and we have a defined service area. MBJ: What are the college’s mostpopular programs and why? Munnerlyn: One of our most popular programs is our culinary arts program. It’s the one program that meets the public almost every day because they (students) are out in the city; they are working for the state; they are working for Trenholm. What they do as part of their training is being able to provide these kinds of services. They may go and have to serve at some state executive office. They may have to be part of a banquet that’s done for the city. When they (students) are out in the public like that – people see them and they tend to associate the culinary arts program with Trenholm. That’s why it’s probably our most popular program because it has those fingers that go to the outside when most of our programs are concentrated here inside of the college. MBJ: Isn’t that program moving across from the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce? Munnerlyn: That’s correct. MBJ: The culinary arts program was based at the old Montgomery Mall. What are the advantages to moving the program? Munnerlyn: We’re moving from approximately 8,000 square feet of space to almost 15,000 square feet. That gives us room for that program to really grow and it has grown about 15 percent over the last two terms. CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

MBJ: How many students are in the culinary arts program?

MBJ: Are there any other new programs you are considering?

Munnerlyn: There are 81. That program consistently has 80-90 students.

Munnerlyn: There is nothing else right now, and with these 32 programs that we are operating and with our budgets and funding like it is … Whenever you create a new program there is an expense. Some of these programs can cost as much as $500,000 to get off the ground. To be honest with you, we are not in a position to start a lot of new programs, but we are going to do the best that we can to be successful with the programs that we have. And I think we are being successful with the programs that we have.

MBJ: What are your top programs, student-wise? Munnerlyn: Believe it or not, probably one of our top programs is cosmetology. It is not a high-demand program and when I say high-demand I mean in terms of work force development. Another one is Emergency Medical Technology (EMT). We have 75 (students in the program). MBJ: What else? Munnerlyn: Another would be our medical assistant program. It has the highest enrollment of any program we offer. MBJ: How many students are in that program? Munnerlyn: About 120. MBJ: How many students are in the cosmetology program? Munnerlyn: I would say 110. MBJ: What are some of the business community’s needs? What are you hearing? Munnerlyn: We cannot provide enough welders. We opened a night program for the first time in a number of years last semester and we doubled the number of people in the program. MBJ: How many students in the welding program? Munnerlyn: There are 48. A lot of these jobs are backfills. People are going to leave here and take a welding job in Mobile and try to make more money. Well, somebody has to take that job. Truck driving is another one we can’t graduate enough truck drivers to make a difference in our service area. We can’t take more than four drivers in a truck so we’re limited with the number of trucks that we have and we’re limited by the number of students we can actually train at one time. The truck driving program is always full. MBJ: Any other needs you’re hearing from the business community? Munnerlyn: Always a need for nurses and we are very proud of our nursing program because for the past two years, we’ve had a 100 percent pass rate on state boards. We have a practical nursing program and they do have to take state boards.

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

MBJ: In a Montgomery Advertiser article you said that moving the culinary arts program from the old Montgomery Mall to downtown was one of your goals. What are some other goals? Munnerlyn: Our major goal is to apply for SACS (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools) candidacy and eventually get accreditation. That’s our No. 1 goal. MBJ: How long will that process take? Munnerlyn: That’s a process that could take anywhere from three to five years. We are accredited by what’s called The Council on Occupational Education. But being accredited by that agency does not allow our students to transfer (their credit hours) to Troy or Alabama State and other colleges within our state and outside because we are not SACS accredited. MBJ: You’re saying that a two-year degree at Trenholm Tech may not be accepted by four-year colleges or some of your student’s credits may or may not be accepted. If the school was SACS accredited then all the credits would be accepted. Munnerlyn: That’s right. In order to get that SACS designation, we have to go through that whole process. Many schools were able to achieve that because they merged with other schools. When we merged Patterson and Trenholm, we merged two technical colleges. MBJ: Where do you see Trenholm Tech in five or 10 years? Munnerlyn: In five years or less, I see Trenholm receiving full SACS accreditation. With that, I see enrollment growing by at least 40 percent. MBJ: Because students can transfer credits? Munnerlyn: Exactly. The students that are going to the University of Alabama all year

long and they come home and spend time in the summer, what are they going to do? They will take a class with us that they will transfer back to the university in the fall. That’s one thing that is going to happen. Another thing that I would like to see happen is … both of these colleges were built in the early ’60s. They look like old high schools. We want to do a total revamping of both of our campuses and bring our buildings up to specifications in terms of not only the facilities, but the equipment. In order to do that, it certainly would take hard-to-get dollars. We will have to go and find those dollars. MBJ: Are you talking about tens of millions of dollars? Munnerlyn: We are presently working on our master plan, but we’re talking about at least $20 million to start. That will happen in the next five to 10 years because what we’re looking at is with this SACS accreditation it will bring in new students and that’s going to bring in new revenue. It is also going to bring newfound respect for the college and because of that – that creates agreements with other colleges, universities, businesses and industries. MBJ: Anything else? Munnerlyn: We are also heavily into writing federal grants and we’ve able to receive a number of very lucrative grants over the past several years. The one that we received recently through the governor’s Office of Work Force Development – one of them is for energy efficiency and solar system installation. That is going to be a one-time, one-year program and it started in September. We are going to teach people how to install solar systems and especially weatherization. That’s a big part of this whole energy (conservation movement). MBJ: How much was the grant and how many students are in the program? Munnerlyn: It was $230,000 and we have 36 students. We want to parlay this into a regular program at some point, but this is the way to get it started. We also (have a grant) for alternative fuel and hybrid electric vehicle servicing program. MBJ: Is this also a one-time program? Munnerlyn: One-time. We had an $180,000 grant. •


The Economic Pros of Amateur Sports River Region forms commission to host highly profitable youth, recreational sporting events by David Zaslawsky

The new rage in the travel industry is sporting events, and the River Region hopes to capitalize on that growing market with a centrally located multipurpose facility. Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange said that the goal is to have a multipurpose facility built within five years. “From a regional standpoint, it is the highest priority next to the outer loop,” Strange said. He estimates the cost of a new facility between $7 million and $8 million and it would hold 5,000 to 6,000 people. Strange rattled off some of the events that could be held at a multipurpose facility: indoor soccer, indoor tennis, recreational leagues, badminton, volleyball, cheerleading and gymnastics. And it’s all in the name of economic development. Strange sees the cost of a multipurpose facility as an investment that all the cities and counties in the River Region will make. All the government entities would benefit from increased sales taxes and lodging taxes.

Ken Blankenship

“At the end of the day, we want to build a complex somewhere in the River Region that will be able to accommodate these indoor activities that we may or may not have available today,” Strange said. “If you are going to do these events, you have to have a venue and frankly these events are driven by the venue. “If we just had the right facility – we are centrally located in the state. It beats Huntsville, it beats Birmingham, and it beats Mobile.” And hosting youth sports events is big business, according to Berkeley W. Young, director of client services for Charlotte, N.C.-based Randall Travel Marketing, which conducted a survey for the City of Montgomery and the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. Young said that hotel owners want sporting events.

“Occupancy rates for business travelers are declining because everybody is cutting their budget,” Young said. “Occupancy rates for meetings, conventions and groups are declining because everybody is cutting their budget, but people are still playing sports.” Young said that youth sports in particular “generate huge amounts of money” because parents accompany their children and often bring along other siblings and maybe a grandparent. He said that a typical two-night stay for a soccer tournament, including meals, could mean $500 for a family and it also means revenue for the region’s hotels, restaurants, shops and gas stations. “Competitive sports is growing and growing and the economic impact is very, very big,” Young said. “There are growth opportunities.” He said that establishing a sports commission adds “some structure and legitimacy” and can be more aggressive in sports marketing. “You need a sports CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

commission to help with fundraising, soliciting corporate sponsors and upgrading facilities to attract the tournaments,” Young said, “and then the money will roll in.” CENTRAL ALABAMA SPORTS COMMISSION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

CONNIE BAINBRIDGE

President and Director of Economic Development for the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce

JIM BUCKALEW

President of Alabama Real Estate Holdings/PCH

KENNY COLEMAN

Vice President of the Southern Division of Alabama Power

DAWN HATHCOCK

Vice President of Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Convention and Visitor Bureau

JACK HAWKINS JR.

Chancellor of Troy University

BARRY MASK

Executive Director of the Elmore County Economic Development Authority

QUENTIN RIGGINS

Legislative and Political Consultant for the Business Council of Alabama

That’s why the Central Alabama Sports Commission was created and its executive director, Ken Blankenship, is tasked with assessing the region’s venues for sporting events, keeping the sporting events that are already here and attracting additional events on the local, state and national level. Blankenship said another key goal is creating relationships with the organizations that sponsor the sporting events. It certainly helps that he has an extensive background in state high school athletics as both a coach and athletic director, as well as being the executive director of the Alabama High School Athletic Directors and Coaches Association. The Alabama High School Athletic Association has 18-20 championship events, and Blankenship will work “with those people to host as many as possible” in the River Region. The week-long All-Star Sports Week will return to Montgomery next year, according to Blankenship, who said the Alabama High School Athletic Association event brings 3,000 coaches to town for clinics and features five or six all-star games in various sports, including football, baseball, softball, basketball and soccer.

Both Blankenship and Strange talked about the possibility of using the 70,000-plus square foot convention center as a sports venue. “Obviously, the Renaissance has a big box over there and I don’t know what fits in there and what doesn’t,” Strange said about the convention center. Blankenship would like to have the state’s first major boxing event at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center. He also mentioned the possibility of volleyball tournaments at the convention center. He hopes to attract American Softball Association regional and national tournaments to Montgomery. “We’re also going after non-traditional sports,” Blankenship said, referring to the recent success of the Montgomery HalfMarathon where about 1,100 runners participated. Strange estimated that the event had a $1 million economic impact with perhaps as many as 500 runners, each with one guest, staying in hotel rooms. Blankenship is also looking at a bicycle marathon, Ultimate Frisbee events, creation of a Frisbee park and a national horseshoe event, which could be held near the Riverwalk Amphitheater. “There is a long, long list of nontraditional sports and they all bring people into the city,” Blankenship said.

STEVE SAVARESE

Executive Director of the Alabama High School Athletic Association

WILEY STEEN

Director of Parks and Recreation for the City of Montgomery

KARL K. STEGALL

Retired Minister at First United Methodist Church in Montgomery EX OFFICIO MEMBERS

PRATTVILLE MAYOR JIM BYARD JR. MILLBROOK MAYOR AL KELLEY MONTGOMERY MAYOR TODD STRANGE WETUMPKA MAYOR JERRY WILLIS Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange announces the formation of the Central Alabama Sports Commission. Standing behind the mayor (from left) Millbrook Mayor Al Kelley; Barry Mask, executive director of the Elmore County Economic Development Authority; Prattville Mayor Jim Byard Jr.; Wetumpka Mayor Jerry Willis; and Ken Blankenship, executive director of the Central Alabama Sports Commission.

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


While he identifies infrastructure needs of the area’s various sports venues, Blankenship already knows the River Region has some fantastic resources in the Alabama River, where major Bassmaster events are held; Riverwalk Stadium, home of the minor league Montgomery Biscuits; whitewater rafting and kayaking in Wetumpka; and the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail’s Legends at Capitol Hill, home to the LPGA’s Navistar Classic. Softball and tennis tournaments are currently held at Lagoon Park and Fain Park and there are soccer tournaments at the complex in East Montgomery. Already, the College Bass Tour announced that it will hold its 2010 College Bass East Super Regional tournament in Montgomery on the Alabama River. Two-person teams from colleges and universities in the East will compete in the April event, which will be televised for the first time. The event will be broadcast on ESPNU. Strange said the region can expand the tournaments it currently has by using multiple venues in multiple cities.

The River Region’s waterways provide sports-related tourism opportunities like the nationally televised 2009 Bassmasters Tournament on the Alabama River.

“We want to partner with Troy, partner with AUM, partner with ASU, partner with Faulkner, partner with Huntingdon – any of those who have sports facilities – and the same thing in Prattville and Wetumpka,” Strange said. “Does it make sense for us to partner with Wetumpka to get a big event in whitewater canoeing?” Strange asked, “In

five years, they may have (a lot of) hotel rooms, but they don’t have them today.” Blankenship: “There is an incredible interest in this community in pursuing this area and in terms of what it can mean to the community beyond economic development. It creates a positive image of the area; creates a better community and place for people to bring their businesses and come and live.” •

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

13


Investor ProďŹ le

FAMILY

TRADITION Jim Wilson & Associates continues giving back to the community

by David Zaslawsky

Jim Wilson, left, is the chairman and chief executive ofďŹ cer of Jim Wilson & Associates. His brother, Will Wilson, right, is the company president.

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


N

On the day that Jim Wilson Jr. died there were several “big checks” on his desk that he had signed that morning. Wilson, who died in September 2006, was president and chief executive officer of Jim Wilson & Associates, a development company. His son, Jim Wilson III, chairman and chief executive officer of the company, said that his father had “given big pledges that we are still working to pay through.” He said some of those pledges were 10-year commitments. Millions of dollars were pledged to Huntingdon College, the University of Alabama, YMCA, Tulane University (where Wilson Jr. attended school), the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, The Montgomery Academy, Trinity Church, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts and the University of Alabama-Birmingham – just to name a few. “Dad was a giver and he gave ’til it hurt,” said Will Wilson, president of Jim Wilson & Associates. “He felt like God had blessed him with a lot of things and one of them was his financial ability and that it was his responsibility to give back to the community.” Jim Wilson III and Will Wilson continued their father’s generosity. The Wilsons donated land worth an estimated $1 million for a YMCA facility at the 1,400plus acre New Park, a residential project they are developing in East Montgomery. They also donated $1 million for the facility. In addition, the Wilsons donated $1 million worth of land for James W. Wilson Jr. Elementary School. The Wilsons also paid for the roads to get to the school and the YMCA facility. “New Park is an investment of property that dad bought years ago,” Jim Wilson III said. “It’s going to be a long-term investment. The school and the Y were a gift to the community.” Jim Wilson & Associates has donated tens of millions of dollars over the years, the Wilsons said. There are contributions to organizations “that nobody knows and we don’t want people to know,” Jim Wilson III said. The Wilsons are more talkative about their substantial contributions to MANE (Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians), a nonprofit organization that helps children and adults with emotional, physical, cognitive and

developmental disabilities through therapeutic horseback riding.

PAST PROJECTS

The organization, which has a 44acre site in East Montgomery, serves around 70 individuals weekly, according to the MANE Web site.

BIRMINGHAM

Jim Wilson III and Will Wilson said both of their families are involved in MANE. “We try to be leaders in the community,” Jim Wilson III said. “We were downtown first with Union Station. Dad renovated Union Station and moved his corporate offices down there. We were the first ones out east with Wynlakes. We were the first ones out east with a major retail development (EastChase). We were the first ones to do a New Park, which is a very large scale, multi-faceted planned community.”

RIVERCHASE GALLERIA WYNFREY HOTEL BIRMINGHAM

GALLERIA OFFICE TOWER BIRMINGHAM

THE PLAZA BIRMINGHAM

GATEWAY TOWNE CENTER MOODY, AL

THE SHOPPES AT RIVER CROSSING MACON, GA

EDGEWATER MALL BILOXI, MS

THE AVENUE CARRIAGE CROSSING COLLIERVILLE, TN

The company has stepped back from its feverish development, but the Wilsons are developing one more massive project: Redstone Technology Park, which is adjacent to the main gate of Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville.

CARRIAGE CROSSING MARKET CENTER

The first phase of the project will feature 100,000 square feet of retail and office space and a hotel. The completed technology park will have 2 to 4 million square feet of office space and occupy 420-plus acres.

WYNLAKES GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

The Wilsons said the $1 billion development is a 20-year project and that such companies as Boeing and Teledyne will be located at the technology park. The Wilsons are also talking about adding some apartments at EastChase, or as Will Wilson said, “bringing something to EastChase.” Jim Wilson & Associates will also be busy with its New Park development, but now “we are very conservative and very cautious,” Will Wilson said. “We were mainly a big development company two years ago, constantly in the throes of hunting new deals. We do have some deals out there that we are trying to finalize, but it’s not near the pace that we were setting for the last 10 years.” Jim Wilson III said the company is closely monitoring its assets and investments. “Just like every other company in the country – we are not in lockdown, but are trying to ensure that the long-term assets stabilize.”

COLLIERVILLE, TN

MALL OF LOUISIANA BATON ROUGE

MONTGOMERY

THE SHOPPES AT EASTCHASE MONTGOMERY

LAKEVIEW CENTER MONTGOMERY

STERLING CENTRE PRATTVILLE

ONGOING PROJECTS

NEW PARK RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT MONTGOMERY

EASTCHASE MARKET CENTER MONTGOMERY

NEW PROJECTS

REDSTONE TECHNOLOGY PARK HUNTSVILLE

blessed. Yes, times seem to be tough, but you still have been blessed and you’ve got to give back whether it’s going and serving at the soup kitchen or serving at church or school. “I think being a good corporate citizen means helping your town and trying to make it a little better for your kids, yourself and your community.” •

Will Wilson said, “One of the things dad taught us was being active in the community. You’ve got to give back when you’ve been

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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A Chorus Sings of the New Sonata Everybody’s talking about Hyundai’s redesigned 2011 Model by David Zaslawsky

The code name for the sixth-generation Sonata was YF. A production manager at Hyundai’s plant in Montgomery told the employees that YF stood for “Your Future.” It also stood for the company’s future. A lot is riding on the South Korean automaker’s all-new 2011 Sonata. “This vehicle is a real step change for the Hyundai brand in the very competitive fourdoor sedan segment in the U.S. automotive industry,” said Robert Burns, spokesman for Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama. “It really moves away from what I like to call ‘your normal family sedan-looking vehicle.’ This transition – this change in design direction – is really going to set the future for the Hyundai brand in this plant continuing to be successful.” When the 2011 Sonata was launched last year in South Korea, Hyundai’s Vice Chairman Euisan Chung said, “The Sonata will set a new standard for world class mid-size sedans with state-of-the-art technology, superior build quality and emotional design. The new Sonata will raise Hyundai’s brand values.” Hyundai has invested four years and according to some reports $370 million developing the next generation Sonata and now comes an aggressive marketing campaign with ads during the Super Bowl. The Sonata has been the company’s top-selling vehicle for five straight years in the U.S. and during the span has accounted anywhere from 25 percent to 36 percent of all Hyundai vehicles sold in each of those years. “The Sonata certainly has done respectably (in the family sedan category) over the last five years, but now it’s transcending

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

to a sportier look,” Burns said. “Some automotive analysts have said that it kind of has a coupe feel to it, though it is a four-door sedan. We think it’s going to broaden the appeal of the vehicle.” More than 650,000 Sonatas have been sold during the past five years. With a redesigned vehicle, Hyundai expects 2010 to be a banner year. “We do not give sales projections, but with any new model we do expect a sales increase,” Miles Johnson, manager of product public relations for Hyundai Motor America, wrote in an e-mail. The all-time annual sales record for Sonata was 149,513 vehicles in 2006. Now, as Burns points out, the company hopes to attract new buyers – younger buyers. Burns said that with the previous Sonata models the target audience was “in the 40 to 55 range,” but now the company is looking to entice the 30-somethings to the showrooms.


“A person in their 30s (might say) that’s a pretty, stylish car because of the younger, hip styling,” Burns said. “Because of the under $20,000 price point of the base model that was announced in L.A., we feel like that might still be a very nice car for a young family.” The car has undergone a dramatic change, especially under the hood, where the 2011 Sonata will have four-cylinder engines with a gasoline direct-injection fuel system. That will give the vehicle an estimated 23 mpg city and 35 mpg highway. The engine has a preliminary horsepower rating of 198. The SE model’s engine will have 200 horsepower. A turbo version of the engine is expected to be available by the third quarter this year, according

to Burns, and by the end of the year, there will also be a hybrid model.

high-definition radio technology, rear backup camera and Infinity premium sound system.

“This is really significant when you’re eliminating the V-6 because you’re getting nearly the horsepower that is equivalent to a V-6,” Burns said.

“It has all those bells and whistles and techno gadgets that people may want – Bluetooth technology and voice activation on any of the components on that system,” Burns said. “There are enough varieties of options that can satisfy just about any consumer’s taste.”

The new-look exterior is what Hyundai officials call “fluidic sculpture.” The company describes its new design as more sophisticated with “dynamic angles.” There is more sculpting on the body panels and more curvatures. The Limited model features heated front and back seats as well as leather interior. A navigation package is an option that offers a high-resolution, touch-screen display navigation system,

The 2011 Sonata has been receiving rave reviews from the various automotive online sites. On one blog site, a participant wrote that “Lexus had better look in the rearview mirror. Hyundai is getting real close!” Another participant wrote that he is a three-time Toyota owner who is putting “Hyundai at the top of the list for my next vehicle purchase.” Readers at Edmunds’ CarSpace Forums are using words such as “sharp, distinctive, aggressive and radical” to describe the 2011 Sonata. Some of CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

17


the bloggers are talking about preferring the new Sonata over Camry and Accord.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

That’s exactly what Hyundai wants to hear.

by David Zaslawsky

“We just think we are going to draw in so many more potential customers to the brand because Hyundai had a great year in ’09 in the sense of being able to sustain itself during a difficult time,” Burns said. “We feel like we will bring even more consumers to the fold.”

Before the public kicks the tires of the redesigned 2011 Sonata and takes the car out for a road test, Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama employees trained and trained to build the new vehicle.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

18

Hyundai brought new buyers to the fold with its Genesis sedan and Genesis coupe. Burns said the Genesis helped generate increased interest in the brand.

Because the body is different than the previous model, adjustments were made to the robotics that perform the welding. Modifications were also made in the paint shop to make sure all the new nooks and crannies were covered.

“People (saw) that we can build a highquality car at a good price point in this segment (luxury sedan and sport coupe),” Burns said. “And now with the new 2011 Sonata – wow – another design that hopefully captures the consumer’s imagination and desire to purchase the car.

Hyundai spokesman Robert Burns said that employees on the assembly line were doing test builds, which started in November. They were building one or two vehicles at a time to get used to the changes and as Burns said “to make sure the fit is right and functions properly.”

“That just elevates us one more time where we truly begin to compete with the other larger-volume sedan manufacturers in the U.S.” •

Some of the key changes were the components that suppliers made.

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

Burns said that Hyundai uses a Standard Work Instruction Sheet (SWIS) “for every step in building the car.” He said that there was a new SWIS for every job that changed. “Just prior to full production, they spent more time on the line discussing the (changes) because a lot of team members get the SWIS ahead of time so they can read through the sequence,” Burns said. Building a redesigned vehicle has created a stir at the manufacturing facility, Burns said. “The morale boost has been huge. Seeing this whole new design – a new direction for the Hyundai brand has really got our team members psyched up. “People that I’ve seen on the floor are going, ‘Whoa, as soon as I’m ready to buy a car, look out’ or ‘I’m going to trade my other one that I got in 2006 or 2007 – this is such a sharp-looking vehicle.’ ”


TRANSMISSION

Type

DOHC CVVT (Continuously Variable Valve Timing) 4-cylinder

Materials

Aluminum block and heads

Bore & Stroke

88.0 mm x 97.0 mm

Displacement

2.4 liters / 2,359 cc

Horsepower

GLS/Limited: 198 @ 6,300 rpm – ULEV GLS/Limited: 190 @ 6,300 rpm – PZEV (est.) SE: 200 @ 6,300 rpm – ULEV (est.)

Torque

GLS/Limited: 184 lb-ft @ 4,250 rpm – ULEV GLS/Limited: TBD lb-ft @ 4,250 rpm – PZEV SE: 186 lb-ft @ 4,250 rpm – ULEV (est.)

Valves per cylinder

5-speed Manual

6-speed electronic automatic with OD lock-up torque converter, shift lock and SHIFTRONIC™ manual shift mode

Gear ratios First

3.27:1

Second

1.93:1

Third

1.70:1

Fourth

1.28:1

Fifth

1.03:1

Sixth

0.83:1

Reverse

3.59:1

Final drive

SPECS

ENGINE

4.33:1 (1,2,R) / 3.25:1 (3-6)

4

4.21:1

2.64:1

1.80:1 1.39:1

1.00:1 0.77:1

3.39:1 2.89:1

STEERING Type

Motor-Driven Power Steering (MDPS) column mounted, Rackand-Pinion, Engine-RPM-Sensing

Overall Ratio

14.5:1

Turns, lock to lock

2.34

Turning circle, curb to curb

35.8 ft.

BRAKES/TIRES/WHEELS Front

Power-assisted 11.8-in.ventilated disc

Rear

Power-assisted 11.2-in.disc

ABS

4-wheel, 4-channel and 4-sensor with Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD)

Tires

Wheels

P205/65R16 (GLS) P225/45R18 (SE) P215/55R17 (Limited) T125/80D16 (Compact temporary use spare tire) 16 x 6.5-in. steel wheel with full covers (GLS) 16 x 6.5-in. alloy wheel (GLS Optional) 18 x 7.5-in. hyper silver alloy (SE) 17 x 6.5-in. alloy (Limited)

SUSPENSION Front

MacPherson strut with gas-charged hydraulic twin tube shock absorbers and stabilizer bar (24-mm for GLS/Limited/ SE)

Rear

Independent multi-link design with coil springs, gas-charged hydraulic twin tube shock absorbers and stabilizer bar (15-mm for GLS/Limited) Independent multi-link design with stiffer coil springs, gas-charged hydraulic monotube shock absorbers and larger stabilizer bar (17-mm for SE)

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

FUEL ECONOMY

CURB WEIGHT Highway

Combined

4-cyl. manual

23 mpg (est.)

34 mpg (est.)

4-cyl. automatic

23 mpg (est.)

35 mpg (est.)

SPECS

City

3,161 lbs

TBD

4-cyl. manual

TBD

4-cyl. automatic

3,199 – 3,316 lbs

CAPACITIES

INTERIOR DIMENSIONS Front

Rear

40.0 in.

37.8 in.

Leg room

45.5 in.

34.6 in.

Shoulder room

57.9 in.

56.7 in.

55.2 in.

54.9 in.

Head room

Hip room

20

Fuel

18.5 gallons

Oil

4.86 quarts

Coolant

2.7 quarts

TOWING CAPACITY Maximum towing capacity, with trailer brakes

TBD

EPA passenger volume

103.8 cu. ft.

Maximum towing capacity, without trailer brakes

TBD

EPA cargo volume

16.4 cu. ft.

Maximum trailer tongue weight, with trailer brakes

TBD

EPA total volume

120.2 cu. ft.

Maximum trailer tongue weight, without trailer brakes

TBD

For a complete list of the 2011 Sonata specs, options and features go to www.montgomerychamber.com/sonata.

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


Taking Off Montgomery Regional Airport courts new routes, carriers by David Zaslawsky

While some airlines are pulling out of airports or reducing their number of flights, American Eagle recently announced it was adding a third flight out of Montgomery Regional Airport. That announcement did not go unnoticed in the struggling airline industry. Some air carriers have put Montgomery Regional Airport on their radar. “They (airlines) will take a look at our market and see that the community responded to these flights – there was demand for it,” said Lynn Cox, marketing director for the Montgomery Regional Airport. “We’re looking at marketing directly to them. Cox said the Montgomery Regional Airport Authority hired a consultant to obtain a grant from the government’s Small Community Air Service Development program. That grant would give the airport money for an incentive package to attract a new flight, Cox said. She said that the goal is to add a direct flight to Chicago with either American Airlines or United Airlines. Airport officials are also talking to low-cost carrier Allegiant Air about flights to Orlando or Las Vegas. “We have reached out to them, but there is no indication of any deal,” Cox stressed. She attended a May conference, where she sat down with various airlines for 10- to 15-minute sessions – the travel industry’s version of speed dating.

Currently, Delta, through its Atlantic Southeast Airlines group, flies from Montgomery to Atlanta; Northwest flies to Memphis, Tenn.; US Airways flies to Charlotte, N.C.; American Eagle is adding a third daily flight to Dallas/Fort Worth in April. Cox said that the 50-seat passenger America Eagle jets to Dallas were 80 percent full and “overbooked a lot of days.” She said the airline is looking at using a 70-seat jet. “Airlines will look and see what we are doing to generate customer support throughout the community,” Cox said. “They also look at the demographics of the community as well as how the community responds to what we are doing.” The community’s response to the airport’s rebranding campaign has been overwhelmingly positive, according to Cox. “I wanted to raise the level of awareness and the public’s perception about Montgomery Regional Airport as far as being a viable airport,” Cox said. “We are a small community airport, but we have big airport facilities and services that enable passengers to get to their destination with a lot more ease.” Cox said a survey was conducted before the new campaign and “everybody says it’s so easy” getting in and out of the airport. It’s so easy has morphed into the new slogan “Easy going.” The airport is spending nearly $70,000 on its rebranding/marketing campaign, which includes print ads, television

Lynn Cox, marketing director for the Montgomery Regional Airport, launched a rebranding/marketing campaign last year.

ads and radio spots as well as billboards, a new logo and redesigned Web site. During a 30-second spot on TV, viewers hear about the airport’s advantages, including shorter drive, easy parking, quick check-in, less-stressful travel, more time for yourself, arriving at your destination well rested, returning from your trip much closer to home and “all for little or no price difference.” Cox was able to expand the marketing budget by partnering with American Eagle, which began its Montgomeryto-Dallas service in mid-June. “They were branding their flights with the rebranding of the airport,” Cox said. The iflymontgomery campaign was launched in May, after the airport was seeing double-digit declines in the number of passengers boarding a flight, including a 13 percent decline in May. But the new trend is positive. The number of passengers boarding a flight rose 2 percent in July and increased 4 percent in September. “A lot of people have told me they decided to fly here after checking the (airfares) and they can’t believe they may find a rate that’s within a $50 difference

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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Member Profile

Pete Knight, president of Aliant Bank’s Montgomery region.

Expanding Bank Means Money Going Further Aliant Bank executive: ‘We have money and we’re loaning money’ by Tom Ensey

It’s a new year. And Aliant Bank spent the whole last quarter of 2009 getting ready for it.

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


COMPANY NAME

ALIANT BANK TOTAL EMPLOYEES In the wake of the recession that battered many financial institutions to their knees, the 109-year-old bank that began in Alexander City is poised for aggressive expansion into new Alabama markets targeting Huntsville, Mobile and Auburn-Opelika. The Russell family started the bank before they started Russell Corp., and John Russell Thomas, a direct descendant, is the chairman of the organization that now has 15 branches in three regions that include Montgomery, Birmingham and Alexander City. The bank has grown to be a major player in state finance by being “conservative, not by buying other banks,” said Pete Knight, the president of the Montgomery region. “We’ve grown from within.” The bank has about $1 billion in assets, Knight said. “We can do pretty much what the market demands,” he said. “We can make a $15 million loan without asking for help from other banks. We have the technology to compete with other banks. We love small businesses, and try to be (the small business owner’s) partner, not just his bank.” Aliant has the technology to handle a bank twice its current size, Knight said. That – coupled with downsizing of other banks, which has made experienced, talented bankers available to hire – has presented a unique “opportunity for banks like us,” Knight said. The bank’s current president and chief executive officer, Eric Hamilton, came to Aliant about 2 1/2 years ago from Colonial Bank. He worked all over the state with Colonial, and knows bankers in Mobile, Huntsville and other markets. “He has matched up with our personality great,” Knight said. “His ability to identify talent in these markets gives us the confidence level to go for it.” Knight said Aliant has always been a needs-based bank more than a product-pushing bank. That has made it immune to what he called “big bank problems.” “We’re a community bank that focuses on loans and deposits,” he said. “We’re not into investment swaps or any of that.” He said the River Region is poised for expansion as well. “As bad as it’s been here, it’s better than it has been in other parts of the state, the Southeast and the country,” he said. “We have money and we’re loaning money.”

255

EMPLOYEES IN THE RIVER REGION

55

LOCATIONS IN THE RIVER REGION

7 BRANCHES - 5 IN MONTGOMERY, 1 EACH IN MILLBROOK AND WETUMPKA ASSETS

$1.3 BILLION

“We’re not planning on a lot of brick and mortar projects in the River Region,” he said. “But we believe there’s as much opportunity to grow here as anywhere.” Aliant tries to fit the community rather than make the community fit the bank, he said. “We hire the people first, then we build the buildings,” he said. The same philosophy that has allowed the bank to become a stable, dependable corporate citizen in the River Region will help it expand into the new markets. The people who work for Aliant tend to stay there. There have been only two presidents of the Central Alabama region since it joined with the First Montgomery Bank. Two members of the board, Bill Richardson and Jerry Kyser, have served for 34 years. There are branch managers in the River Region who have been at the same bank for 10 years, a rarity in the business these days. Knight said he’s more excited about this year than any other year he’s worked for Aliant. “We’ve got a good game plan out there to make it happen,” he said. •

The Central Alabama market has traditionally been Aliant’s best, and Knight believes it’s going to stay that way as the bank grows and the economy improves. Aliant will work to expand its market share here, as well as in Birmingham and Alex City.

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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Maxwell Air Force Base-Gunter Annex has global impact, brings in $1.5 billion a year locally

MILITARY

MEANS THE

WORLD RIVER TO THE

REGION by David Zaslawsky

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


D

FAST FACTS NUMBER OF STUDENTS ANNUALLY ATTENDING AIR UNIVERSITY CLASSES “It gives Montgomery a unique national and international reputation,” said Rep. Bobby Bright (D-Alabama).

Like so many before and after him, retired Gen. Lance L. Smith first came to Maxwell Air Force Base as a student. He would return 17 years later to Maxwell as commandant of Air War College and vice commander at Air University, later becoming commander of Maxwell’s Air Force Doctrine Center. But it was what he did after he left Maxwell that contributed to Montgomery landing the largest business deal in a generation. While stationed in South Korea at Osan Air Force Base, Smith met with the chairman of Hyundai and the South Korean president. Their meeting was about nonautomotive matters, but it set the stage for a strong relationship between Montgomery and the Korean automotive industry. Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange said that Smith’s relationships helped in recruiting Hyundai to Alabama and building a $1 billion-plus manufacturing facility. “To have that experience from someone who just came from Montgomery has to be very positive,” Strange said. “He goes all over the world, meeting with his counterparts and other leaders.” Having someone with that kind of influence and relationships with world leaders, who also has close ties to Montgomery, is just one of the ways Maxwell Air Force Base and Gunter Annex positively impact the River Region. And Maxwell’s importance to the Air Force cannot be overstated. They call it the “Intellectual and Leadership Center of the Air Force.”

All future Air Force leaders come to Montgomery to General Peck train at Maxwell Air Force Base Air University, and that influence only helps the River Region. Most officers train at Maxwell several times during their careers, and many senior enlisted personnel train here too. “Air Force personnel really have almost no option – if you make any rank at all you’re going to be here at Maxwell a couple of times,” said Col. Kris Beasley, commander of Maxwell Air Force Base, which is part of the Air Force’s 42nd Air Base Wing. Those stays at Maxwell also draw many retired officers back to the River Region. Joe Greene, vice president, military and federal affairs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, said there are about 54,000 military retirees from all branches and all levels living in the surrounding area. “When you look at the population of Montgomery – look at the population of the retired people in Montgomery and you look at the family members that are associated with the military and retirees and you look at the contractors that are associated with the base; and you look at the Department of Defense civilians – about one in every five people in Montgomery is associated with military in some way,” Greene said. Now you begin to understand the impact of Maxwell Air Force Base and Gunter Annex. The economic impact is of epic proportions – an estimated $1.5 billion annually and growing.

32,000-34,000

AIR UNIVERSITY OPERATING BUDGET

$529 MILLION

MUIR S. FAIRCHILD RESEARCH INFORMATION CENTER

LARGEST LIBRARY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE LARGEST FEDERAL LIBRARY OUTSIDE WASHINGTON D.C. WITH MORE THAN 2 MILLION ITEMS, INCLUDING 431,498 MAPS AND CHARTS TOTAL ASSETS

$379 MILLION MAXWELL/GUNTER BASE POPULATION

10,133

AMOUNT OF LAND

4,143 ACRES NUMBER OF BUILDINGS

30 (25 AT MAXWELL) MILES OF ROAD

49 (35 AT MAXWELL) RECREATION FACILITIES

27 (18 AT MAXWELL) TOTAL NUMBER OF FAMILY HOUSING UNITS

711 (410 AT MAXWELL)

TOTAL NUMBER OF DORMS AND TEMPORARY LODGING FACILITIES

3,409 (2,623 AT MAXWELL) TOTAL NUMBER OF SEATS IN DINING FACILITIES

948 (730 AT MAXWELL) Note: Figures are for both Maxwell Air Force Base and Gunter Annex Source: Maxwell Air Force Base

“The area’s GDP (gross domestic product) in real terms is $12 billion,” said Keivan Deravi, current interim vice chancellor for academic affairs for Auburn University’s Montgomery campus and an economics professor. “If this impact is accurate, it suggests that (Maxwell/Gunter) account for more than 10 CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

25


ECONOMIC IMPACT TOTAL PERSONNEL

23,039

MILITARY PAYROLL

$329 MILLION FEDERAL CIVILIAN PAYROLL

$206 MILLION

OTHER CIVILIAN PAYROLL

$339 MILLION

TOTAL ANNUAL PAYROLL

$874 MILLION

CONSTRUCTION SPENDING

$79 MILLION SERVICES

$270 MILLION

MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES

$101 MILLION

TOTAL ANNUAL SPENDING

$450 MILLION

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF INDIRECT JOBS

3,878

AVERAGE ANNUAL PAY FOR THE LOCAL COMMUNITY

$37,398

ESTIMATED ANNUAL DOLLAR VALUE OF JOBS CREATED

$145 MILLION

TOTAL ANNUAL ECONOMIC IMPACT

$1.5 BILLION

Note: Figures are from fiscal year 2008, which ended Sept. 30 Source:Maxwell Air Force Base

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

percent of the region’s economic activity.” And actually, the economic impact has increased, according to Beasley. Payrolls have increased, the number Beasley of employees has increased and construction was up a combined $40 million for last October and November, Beasley said. “We know the economic impact is significant to our community,” Strange said. “We are substantially and significantly better off because of Maxwell-Gunter in the River Region and this is a River Region scenario – not just Montgomery.” Bright said that Maxwell-Gunter “adds another dimension to the economic and social environment of Montgomery and the River Region. The base had a huge, positive impact on the area and will continue to do so for a long time.”

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

by David Zaslawsky When you enter Maxwell Air Force Base, you are entering the “intellectual and leadership center of the Air Force.” Or as Col. Kris Beasley, the base commander, puts it so succinctly: “There is no Air Force base that has as much brains as our base.” Or as Lt. Gen. Allen G. Peck, commander of Air University at Maxwell, describes his job as developing “warrior scholars.” What are warrior scholars? “Those who can fight wars, but also can articulate; who can advocate when necessary; can explain; be comfortable in both a war-fighting environment, but also an environment where you may have to be on a staff,” Peck said. “The higher you go up the ladder, you’ll find it’s more focused on education, which is really preparing for the unknown and uncertain future in changing times.”

Because of restructuring, there is expected job growth at the Gunter Annex. Greg Garcia, director of the 754th Electronic Systems Group that is based at Gunter, said the Air Force is planning to increase its acquisition work force. He said there is also a push to move more activities to government positions.

The Air Force brings its best and brightest to Air University and that spectrum runs the gamut from staff sergeants to three- and four-star generals, who attend a course on cyber operations.

Garcia said “there is a strong possibility” that his group will have one of five Program Executive Officers (PEO), and that person he believes will be a onestar general. There would also be a small staff for that person, whom Garcia called “a senior decision-maker.”

“We really do take seriously this notion that we are the intellectual and leadership center of the Air Force,” Peck said. “Maxwell… is both a military institution with an adherence to standards and discipline and we do have a rank order. But we also blend that with an academic institution with civilian and non-military faculty with the notion of freedom of expression – encouraging new ideas. It really is a blending of almost two different worlds: one is a military institution and one is an academic institution.”

“This PEO who will reside here will clearly have a greater influence and direction and content of how the Air Force presents its IT capabilities,” Garcia said.

Photo courtesy of Maxwell Air Force Base-Gunter Annex

MAXWELL-GUNTER BRINGS IN WORLD’S BEST AND BRIGHTEST

What does Maxwell Air Force Base/Gunter Annex mean to the River Region? “It means economic impact, skilled labor, visibility and a strong, stable economic base, which does not contract and expand with GDP,” Deravi said. “It adds to the economic credibility and stability of the region. It is a pillar of strength and a vote of confidence on the region’s economic resourcefulness.” •

Maxwell Air Force Base is truly unique.

Peck said that his successor will add the title “president” of Air University, just as any other university president. “It does recognize that there are a couple of different worlds that come together here at Air University,” Peck said. “I think that’s what makes this place unique. It is somewhat insulated from the day-to-day realities and churn that you will find in a headquarters.


“A lot of what we do here – we’re trying to develop officers and enlisted people who can plan strategically, think critically and that requires some reflection; it requires an atmosphere where new ideas are not just tolerated, but welcomed and healthy debate (is encouraged).” Bringing highly educated, highly skilled officers with broad backgrounds to Maxwell Air Force Base helps make Montgomery a more sophisticated and cosmopolitan city. Maxwell also draws the best of the best international officers from all over the world. During a recent interview, Peck said there were 140 international students from 70-

“The city sees itself differently and it’s looking toward the future, trying to grow to becoming a regional and in some cases nationally renowned city,” said Beasley, who first came to Montgomery when he was 6. “I think the city… is now much more outwardly focused – more interested in the world and the world is much more interested in it,” Beasley said. “That comes partially from the military influence and partially from a generation of leaders in the city who have grown up with an outward view.” Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange: “What’s important for us in the national scenario, the people that are running the various

militaries throughout the world have been in Montgomery, Ala., and they know the senior leadership of our Air Force and are on a firstname basis. That in and of itself is beneficial.” Keivan Deravi, a longtime economics professor at Auburn University’s Montgomery campus and the current interim vice chancellor for academic affairs, said, “The exposure of the area and its amenities to the international guests will increase the visibility of the area and should lead to future migration and additional tourism.” He said that Air University students help “improve the quality of life through increased diversification and cultural enrichment.” Just think about the exposure of local schoolchildren taking classes with the children of international officers. “On the cultural side of the equation, they (military) have great contributions to the symphony, dance, art and museum,” Strange said, “and with the international officers’ school here, it brings great cultural diversity throughout our community.” •

SAMPLING OF COLLEGES/SCHOOLS/COURSES:

OFFICER TRAINING SCHOOL AIR FORCE RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS CHIEF MASTER SERGEANT LEADERSHIP COURSE AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE Photo courtesy of Maxwell Air Force Base-Gunter Annex

plus countries. In the last five years, 1,062 international officers have graduated from Air University, representing 116 countries from A to Z (Afghanistan to Zambia.). Peck said that about 300 of those international students have risen to lead their country’s Air Force or their country’s equivalent to the Department of Defense. “If you think how important that it is – they come here to America and come here to the River Region – and they go back and the bonds that they form; the friendships; the positive attitudes pays benefits down the road.” Those international students also provide cultural diversity to the River Region.

AIR UNIVERSITY EDUCATION MISSIONS:

SQUADRON OFFICER SCHOOL

ACCESSIONS EDUCATION

AIR AND SPACE BASIC COURSE

PROFESSIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION

LEMAY CENTER FOR DOCTRINE DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION CENTER

SPECIALIZED/PROFESSIONAL CONTINUING EDUCATION DEGREE GRANTING CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION RESEARCH AND CONSULTATION PROGRAMS

AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ADVANCED AIR AND SPACE STUDIES

SUPPORT ACTIVITIES

AIR FORCE JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS

EXTENDED STUDIES AND ADVANCED DISTRIBUTED LEARNING

CIVIL AIR PATROL

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

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GUNTER ANNEX

THE 754TH ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS GROUP IS ONE OF THREE ORGANIZATIONS THAT REPRESENT THE 554TH ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS WING. THE 754TH, 554TH AND 643RD ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS SQUADRON ALL HAVE COMPONENTS AT GUNTER. OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AT GUNTER INCLUDE THE AIR FORCE LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY, A COMPONENT OF CYBER COMMAND; AND EPA. ACADEMIES AT GUNTER

NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICER ACADEMY, SENIOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICER ACADEMY, FIRST SERGEANT SCHOOL, AIRMAN LEADERSHIP SCHOOLS TOTAL NUMBER OF PERSONNEL OF 754TH, 554TH, 643RD, CIVILIAN AND CONTRACTORS

1,500

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

POWERING UP INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY: 754TH ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS GROUP, GUNTER ANNEX by David Zaslawsky Greg Garcia, director of 754th Electronic Systems Group at the Gunter Annex, recalled a phone conversation with a Forbes magazine reporter. Garcia said that the group was listed in the magazine’s Top 10 information technology capabilities in the nation and that the reporter was “stunned” that such a facility would be in Montgomery, Ala. “I think it’s a great national resource right here in Montgomery,” Garcia said. “I think it’s a national treasure here about the corporate knowledge and influence into the direction of IT.” The 754th Electronic Systems Group, which according to Garcia is “basically acquisition, sustainment and development of IT warfighting capabilities,” is the foundation for the River Region’s high-tech sector. “We are the largest IT employer in Montgomery,” Garcia said. He said the group

has an annual estimated financial impact of $590 million-plus, including contractors who work for the group and contracts awarded. Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange said he believes there are growth opportunities in the high-tech industry at the Gunter Annex, where the Defense Information Systems Agency and Cyber Command are also located. Garcia said there will be a new $20 billion contract that will serve the Air Force and Department of Defense in products and services over a five- to seven-year span. He said the $20 billion contract will be divided into eight contracts and will have between 20 and 80 vendors in each category. “There might be a (category) for application services and there might be one for network,” Garcia said. The new contract “will certainly have some impact on the local region,” Garcia said. “A lot of contractors have local offices that understand our needs and capabilities.”


He said there are opportunities for small businesses that “want to have insight to what the Air Force is buying as a whole in the area of NetCentric products and services.” Joe Greene, vice president, military Greg Garcia and federal affairs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, said there are more than 140 IT companies in Montgomery at all levels and about 40 of those “directly support operations at Gunter through contracts or kinds of services to the Maxwell-Gunter IT complex.” He said those IT companies produce an estimated $400 million a year in contracts within the region – highly skilled, highly-paid jobs. “It creates a pool of very high-level technical expertise in a lot of very sophisticated areas,” Greene said. “One of the specialized areas is advanced storage of large quantities of information that’s done at the Defense Information Systems Agency. They store millions of medical records and it takes very highly qualified technicians to be able to support those systems.” Because of the military, the Air Force Information Technology Conference is held annually in Montgomery and boasts a $30 million economic impact. The conference not only draws 6,000 participants, but some of the speakers are the biggest names in the IT world such as Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Steve Ballmer and McAfee CEO David DeWalt, as well as CEOs from Dell and Oracle. The military sends some its top brass to speak during the conference. “People recognize what the capabilities are internally in Montgomery and that produces the potential for further economic development in the area,” Greene said, “because businesses come here and they look at Montgomery as a potential area that they might be able to expand their IT business.” •

SERVICE BEFORE SELF: MILITARY VOLUNTEERS HAVE MAJOR IMPACT IN RIVER REGION by David Zaslawsky When it came time to clean up Montgomery Public Schools before the fall semester, the military rolled up its collective sleeves and went to work. Maxwell Air Force Base adopted 19 of the schools – more than one-third of the total number – and spruced them up for students. “One of our core values is ‘service before self,’ ” said Lt. Gen. Allen G. Peck, commander of Air University, which is based at Maxwell Air Force Base and also conducts classes at Gunter Annex. “You’ll find with those who are assigned here and also the students who come through here conduct a host of projects that help the community,” Peck said. Col. Kris Beasley, commander of Maxwell Air Force Base, said that the military contributed about half of the 1,321 volunteer hours for the school clean-up program. Maxwell also provided training for the Montgomery Public Schools senior staff and principals “because we have some leadership experts out here,” Beasley said. Peck said that students at Officer Training School have conducted blood drives, repainted bathrooms at Prattville High School, and planted trees and flowers with the Montgomery Clean City Commission. Here’s just a small sampling of contributions from the military: > The Air Command and Staff cleaned up Old Alabama Park. > Students in the Squadron Officer School gathered hundreds of bags of food for Thanksgiving and donated money to the Family Sunshine Center. > Air War College donated $3,500 to the Alabama Sheriff’s Youth Ranch and contributed gifts for the Angel Tree. > School of Advanced Air and Space Studies visited a hospital and delivered gifts. Peck said that the Noncommissioned Officer Academy and the First Sergeant Academy typically have a community project they will do.

The 754th Electronic Systems Group at the Gunter Annex is also heavily involved in volunteerism, according to Greg Garcia, the organization’s director. He said the group helped set up the Information Technology Academy for the Montgomery Public Schools, worked with the district’s magnet schools, and provided internships for high school and college students. “It gives students exposure to the great things we are doing,” Garcia said. The Electronic Systems Group helps numerous area organizations including Habitat for Humanity, Meals on Wheels, Montgomery Zoo, Feed the Needy, Special Olympics and the Alabama National Fair. Garcia said the reports he receives show that “every individual is doing something to benefit the community.” Beasley said that “a significant portion” of the blood donated in the region is from the base. He said a huge part of the military’s impact isn’t calculable. “How many of our folks are volunteers at United Way? How many are going to AUM and getting a degree amongst the other students? How many of them are employees at a downtown day care center?” Maxwell Air Force Base tracks the volunteer hours and that number totaled about 40,000 for 2008, which is worth an estimated $800,000-plus, according to Phil Berube, chief of Strategic Communications Division at Air University. He said there may be as many as 10,000-15,000 volunteer hours a year not reported to the base. “The military are generous kinds of people in general and they tend to want to become a part of the community,” said Joe Greene, vice president, military and federal affairs for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. “They want to contribute to the community in which they are living. They are very active in volunteering in the community and they actually reach out to the community. They really want to make a difference within their communities. They feel a part of the community here in Montgomery because we embrace the military.” Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange said Maxwell’s “human impact is huge. You name it and they are there. They are the backbone of everything good that happens in our community and it’s not just Montgomery – it’s all over this River Region.” •

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Reading, Writing, and Returns on Investment Business Council of Alabama advances learning curve with Pre-K education by David Zaslawsky

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Business Council of Alabama (BCA) recently announced senior staff changes. Quentin Riggins, former senior vice president of governmental affairs for the BCA, has been named legislative and political consultant for the organization. He will also be the political adviser for ProgressPac, BCA’s political action committee. The BCA has hired Anita Archie as senior vice president of governmental affairs and legal adviser. For details on the senior staff changes, see “Members on the Move.”

With an election looming this year, the state legislature likely will refrain from proposing controversial bills. That’s the expert opinion of the Business Council of Alabama (BCA), a business advocacy group which is also the official advocate for the Washington, D.C.-based National Association of Manufacturers and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Because lawmakers will be consumed by running for re-election, that dynamic has “a monumental effect on productivity or lack thereof during the legislative session,” said William J. Canary, president and chief executive officer of the BCA. He said the organization can play offense in the last year of the Legislature’s four-year cycle. That’s a stark contrast to the first two years of a legislature, according to Quentin Riggins,

Quentin Riggins (left) and William J. Canary

BCA legislative and political consultant. “The first year is when you really have to be prepared for seeing some of the most aggressive legislation. Once you get into an election year, you’re going to see a lot of conservative legislation. You’re not going to see controversial issues.” But that doesn’t mean all is quiet on the BCA’s legislative agenda for the legislative session that began Jan. 12. As always, the BCA, along with its partners, including 124 chambers of commerce, will remain ever so vigilant – protecting its five core tenets: > Fighting for fair and predictable tax policy. > Keeping Alabama a right-to-work state. > Supporting policies that promote sound and sustainable funding for public education. > Supporting meaningful health care reform. > Supporting environmental and energy legislation that is consistent with economic growth. “If we see legislation that we think would stifle business, we are going to do our very best to try and make sure it doesn’t pass,” Riggins said. “We try to (glean) what is going on and communicate concerns or support. We don’t just try to stonewall or kill things. “We try to figure out if there’s a way that we can work with you and try to get solutions. Absolutely opposing things tends to be our last resort. We will do that, but before we get to that point we’ll go and sit down and talk about it. Last year, the BCA tracked nearly 300 key bills and in its 90-page book, “What If No One Was Watching?” proclaimed that “not a single job-killing, anti-business bill passed.”

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Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

Canary points out that the BCA, including its partners, represents “more than 1 million working Alabamians” and the message this year is education, education, education. At an economic forum, Canary said that the BCA wants the Legislature to be pro-business and pro-education. “That’s the message that we need to send to those who we are recruiting to this state and those who are looking to expand.” He repeated that message during an hour-long interview that was dominated with the organization’s renewed commitment to education. “Business and education are compatible,” Canary said. “The reason it’s compatible is that we, the business community, are the largest consumer of a product called education. We want to help to improve it. We want to make sure that those 750,000 young people that are in that system of K-12 get exactly what they need.” The organization’s two primary education objectives are pre-K programs and reducing a high school dropout rate that Canary said is about 40 percent. He is so serious about pre-K funding and programs that he co-authored an oped piece in the Montgomery Advertiser along with Ralph Stacy, president and chief executive officer of the Chamber of Commerce Association of Alabama. “We feel strongly that for every $1 we invest in pre-K that we are going to see anywhere from a $7 to $9 return on that investment,” Canary said. “One of the things that we strongly believe and know for a fact – if you are going to try to improve the current status of our schools – the way to improve our


schools is to improve the preparedness and readiness of those children when they arrive.” Of course, education funding is a key issue. Riggins said it is unfortunate and detrimental that various entities compete for the same precious dollars. “Higher-ed and K-12 should be working in a partnership to turn out the best product that we possibly can,” he said. Canary talked about the implications of reducing the state’s dropout rate. “What a great, positive advantage we would have in the competitive work force.” The push for educational goals is coming from both the BCA leadership and its members and “it’s just the right thing to do,” Canary said. “We just haven’t done enough. We need to step up to the plate and be much more aggressive in our advocacy – speak about it and then put our words into action.” He said the BCA has the “standing to be one of loudest voices” because businesses invest $6 billion annually in the state through corporate income taxes and other means. “How prepared are our kids?” Riggins asked. “We talk about companies wanting to come here and companies want a trained work force and a skilled work force.”

This session, the BCA is supporting a prefiled bill proposed by Rep. Greg Canfield (R-Vestavia Hills) that is an amendment to the state constitution requiring all elections to be conducted by a secret ballot. Riggins said another “front-burner issue” among BCA members was last year’s defeat of a $100 million road construction bond. “We have to figure out how to get engaged on that front.” Canary said the proposal “is a commerce issue, an investment issue for infrastructure, and it’s a job creation issue.” As the Legislature gets under way this month, the BCA will be paying close attention to the General Fund and education budgets, according to Riggins. He said the organization is deeply concerned about Medicaid and funding for Medicaid because it supports “a huge health care structure,” Riggins said. “It’s our job to watch and pay attention; and to advocate; and to candidly fight for these 1 million working Alabamians that we represent in terms of job creation and job sustainability,” Canary said. “And for people to make informed, educated decisions in the legislative process – that’s why we’re here. That’s why this organization was created ...” •

BUSINESS PROS STRIVE FOR PRO-BUSINESS CAUCUS The Business Council of Alabama (BCA) would like to see the creation of a probusiness caucus – the sooner the better. BCA President and Chief Executive Officer William J. Canary wants legislators who are willing to reach across the aisle and come together for job creation. He sees a pro-business caucus making “informed and intelligent decisions that are going to have a dramatic effect on increasing the ability of us to employ individuals.” What can a pro-business caucus accomplish? “We will lower unemployment by putting more people to work,” Canary said. “We will make this state more competitive in the international market. We will improve education. We will create the next generation work force. We will guarantee with the pre-K investment that children are in fact reading by the third grade; and some way, somehow we will drop the dropout rate. “That’s what a pro-business caucus can do.” - David Zaslawsky

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HOW TO CONTACT AREA LAWMAKERS U.S. Senate JEFF SESSIONS (R-Alabama) 335 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510-014(202) 224-4124 e-mail: senator@sessions.senate.gov Montgomery Office 7550 Halcyon Summit Dr, Ste 150 Montgomery, AL 36117 (334) 244-7017

U.S. House of Representatives RICHARD SHELBY (R-Alabama) 110 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 (202) 224-3416 e-mail: senator@shelby.senate.gov Montgomery Office 15 Lee St., B-28 Federal Courthouse Ste 208 Montgomery, AL 36104 (334) 223-7317

BOBBY BRIGHT (D-Montgomery) 1205 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C 20515 Montgomery Office 22 Monroe St., Ste 1B Montgomery, AL 36104 (334) 277-9113

MIKE ROGERS (R-Anniston) 324 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-3261 Montgomery Office 7550 Halcyon Summit Dr Montgomery, AL 36117 (334) 277-4257

State Senate LARRY DIXON (R-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 737-D 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7895 e-mail: larry.dixon@alsenate.gov Business P.O. Box 946 Montgomery, AL 36101 (334) 242-4116

JIM PREUITT (D-Talladega) Statehouse Rm. 729 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7898 Business 723 E. Battle St. Talladega, AL 35160 (256) 362-6900

QUINTON T. ROSS JR. (D-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 734-A 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7880 e-mail: Quinton.ross@alsenate.com Business P.O. Box 6183 Montgomery, AL 36106

WENDELL MITCHELL (D-Luverne) Statehouse Office Rm. 733 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7883 e-mail: wmitchell@faulkner.edu Business P.O. Box 225 Luverne, AL 36049 (334) 244-1877

State House of Representatives MAC GIPSON (R-Prattville) Statehouse Office Rm. 522-E 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7695 e-mail: mac.gipson@alhouse.org District 507 Cook Road Prattville, AL 36067

DAVID GRIMES (R-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 537-A 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 223-7766 e-mail: repgrimes@birch.net Business P.O. Box 6176 Montgomery, AL 36106

JAY LOVE (R-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 527-A 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7716 e-mail: jlove32376@aol.com District P.O. Box 3221 Montgomery, AL 36109 Business 1020 Monticello Court Ste 205 Montgomery, AL 36117

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BARRY MASK (R-Wetumpka) Statehouse Office Rm. 527-C 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7732 e-mail: barry.mask@alhouse.org District 41 Brookland Court Wetumpka, AL 36093

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

ALVIN HOLMES (D-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 525-A 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7706 District P.O. Box 6064 Montgomery, AL 36106 Business: (334) 264-7807

THAD MCCLAMMY (D-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 525-D 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7780 e-mail: thadmcclammy@bellsouth.net District 858 W. South Blvd. Montgomery, AL 36105 (334) 224-7606

JOHN KNIGHT (D-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 516-A 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7660 District P.O. Box 6300 Montgomery, AL 36106 Work: (334) 229-4286

GREG WREN (R-Montgomery) Statehouse Office Rm. 517-B 11 S. Union St. Montgomery, AL 36130 (334) 242-7764 e-mail: repgregwren@yahoo.com District 4213 Carmichael Road Montgomery, AL 36106 (334) 396-4787


Goldsby Selected to Chair Key Committee by David Zaslawsky

Integrated Computer Solutions Inc. Chief Executive Officer Steve Goldsby will chair the Information Technology and Informatics committee. That committee is responsible for creating the strategic direction for Science and Technology Roadmap for Alabama (STRA). The STRA goal is to increase technological innovation so Alabama will remain competitive with other states and regions and to create jobs. “It’s exciting to be part of the team forging Alabama’s strategic direction for informatics,” Goldsby said in a statement. “Information Technology is a force multiplier for all science and technology disciplines by creating a clear vision for IT in Alabama. Industry, academia and government will be better able to capitalize on our assets and create and draw jobs to our state.” The success of the initiative will impact many industries, including health care and energy, as well as increase the role Alabama plays in aerospace and defense, modeling and simulation in the automotive industry and nanotechnology. The next phase of the project is to create specific steps to grow those areas.

“It’s exciting to be part of the team forging Alabama’s strategic direction for informatics.” Steve Goldsby, chief executive officer Alabama of Integrated Computer Solutions Inc. Governor Bob Riley has been a strong supporter of STRA and acknowledges its importance to future economic development in the state. “Alabama has many world-class science and technology assets that we want to nurture and grow,” Riley told the 160 participants at the Alabama Science and Technology Leadership Summit. “Working together, we can capitalize on these assets to create and retain the high-skilled jobs that are vital to Alabama’s economic future. Our state is in a great position to take advantage of emerging opportunities in these fields.” •

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Member News

BUSINESSBUZZ Since its inception in 1987, Merchant Capital has served as a financial adviser or managed more than $32 billion in municipal, industrial and housing bonds.

Thomas Harris

MERCHANT CAPITAL RANKED NO. 1 IN STATE

New York-based Securities Data is an independent company tracking bond issues nationwide and publishes annual rankings.

MONTGOMERY – Investment banking firm Merchant Capital has again been ranked No. 1 in the state by Securities Data Co. for 2009. The Montgomery-based firm has been ranked No. 1 in Alabama for the last 16 years. The firm served as senior manager for 58 bond issues totaling nearly $1 billion. The projects financed include funding for a variety of municipal issues, industrial development and affordable housing. “This (2009) was a challenging year in the credit markets,” said Thomas Ashley Harris, chairman of Merchant Capital. “We are pleased with our performance in 2009 and are optimistic that 2010 will see stabilization in the financial marketplace and the start of recovery in the economy. “We are grateful for the confidence our clients placed in our hands in 2009 and Merchant Capital looks forward to serving municipal and corporate customers across the Southeast in 2010 and beyond.”

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Ben Stakely

LILLY, KOWA AND KOWA PHARMACEUTICALS AMERICA ANNOUNCE CO-PROMOTION AND LICENSING AGREEMENT INDIANAPOLIS and MONTGOMERY - Eli Lilly and Co., Kowa Co. Limited, and Kowa’s U.S. subsidiary, Kowa Pharmaceuticals America Inc. announced a co-promotion and licensing agreement to commercialize Livalo. Under the terms of the agreements, Kowa Pharmaceuticals America will receive an undisclosed upfront payment. Lilly and Kowa Pharmaceuticals America will co-promote Livalo in the U.S. market, with both companies providing sales force resources and sharing development and marketing costs.

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

Montgomery-based Kowa Pharmaceuticals America will record all U.S. sales of Livalo and will pay Lilly an escalating co-promotion fee based on the level of annual net sales. In addition, Lilly has acquired an exclusive license from Kowa to commercialize Livalo in Latin American markets, including Mexico, Central America and South America. Additional deal terms were not disclosed. Livalo is a statin approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August 2009 for the treatment of primary hyperlipidemia (elevation of fats in the bloodstream) and mixed dyslipidemia (elevation of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides or both). “We are excited to partner with Lilly as we work to establish the Livalo brand and expand Kowa Pharmaceuticals America’s presence in the U.S. market,” said Ben Stakely, president and chief executive officer of Kowa Pharmaceuticals America.

TROY UNIVERSITY CHANCELLOR ELECTED CHAIRMAN OF SACS TROY – Troy University Chancellor Jack Hawkins Jr. has been elected chairman of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) Board of Trustees. Through the Commission on Colleges and the Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (K-12), the board is responsible for the

Jack Hawkins

accreditation of institutions, facilitating quality improvement and cooperation among institutions, and preserving the integrity and autonomy of member institutions. “American higher education is the envy of the world in large part due to our accreditation system,” Hawkins said. “I am pleased to have an opportunity to serve SACS in this capacity.” A native of Mobile, Hawkins was named chancellor of Troy University in 1989. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Montevallo and his doctorate from the University of Alabama. Hawkins was recently appointed to the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta’s Birmingham branch. Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta branch directors provide economic information from the branch territory to the district bank’s president and head office directors, who use the information in formulating monetary policy and making discount rate recommendations. Prior to his position at Troy University, Hawkins served as an assistant dean at


the University of AlabamaBirmingham (1971-1979) and as president of the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind in Talladega (1979-1989). In another development, Troy University officials learned that the university has received reaffirmation of academic accreditation from the (SACS) Commission on Colleges. For the first time in more than 30 years, all Troy University campuses and locations are now under one academic accreditation by SACS.

that providing a nationally recognized legal education program in Montgomery will add to the academic reputation of the area in attracting highly qualified faculty and students. “These faculty and students will contribute as a resource not only to the legal community, but also to the local community, enhancing the economic growth of Montgomery,” he said. The law school’s class of first-year students has 150 students from 22 states. Fifty percent of the class is out-of-state students.

TIMEPLUS PAYROLL CHANGES NAME TO HEARTSILL PAYROLL PROFESSIONALS MONTGOMERY – TimePlus Payroll has changed its name to Heartsill Payroll Professionals (HPP). Charles Nelson

FAULKNER UNIVERSITY’S JONES SCHOOL OF LAW RECEIVES APPROVAL FROM AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION MONTGOMERY - Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law has been granted full approval by the American Bar Association (ABA) as an accredited institution of legal education. The ABA approval makes Jones School of Law only the third accredited law school in Alabama. “This is a significant milestone for the school and one which marks us as an outstanding law school,” Dean Charles Nelson said. “It not only allows our graduates to take the bar exam in every state, but it also means that we will draw students to the school from every state and from foreign jurisdictions.” Andy Matthews, assistant dean for student services at Faulkner University, said

Company president Bonita Heartsill said that the change was just one part of an overall branding initiative and expansion. “We’re excited about the new branding and the new look,” Heartsill said. “We’ve also added several options to our list of services, but our clients will still receive the personal service they’ve come to expect from the same people.” In addition to payroll processing and tax management, Heartsill Payroll now provides among its expanded services online employee pay history, Web-based timekeeping integrated with payrolls and its HR Support Center. “The support center gives businesses access to a host of online tools,” Heartsill said. “They can look up employee handbooks, pre-written HR forms and letters, employment laws, job descriptions and even a policy library.”

As an additional option, Heartsill Payroll offers HR On-Demand, where businesses can reach a human resources professional for answers to questions on issues including hiring, termination, FMLA (Family and Medical Leave Act), harassment and discrimination. “It’s like having an HR manager without having to hire one,” Heartsill said.

“The institute’s goals and those of ICS are well aligned around developing the skills and capabilities of students wanting to become IT professionals,” said Steve Goldsby, president of ICS, a Montgomery-based information security and technology consulting firm. “Therefore, the donation was a natural extension to achieving this shared objective.”

Heartsill, who has worked in the accounting and payroll fields for 27 years, said the transition to a Web-hosted system will enhance security, data backup and disaster recovery. The company began operations in August 2007, and currently serves clients across the Southeast in the legal, insurance, medical, banking, retail and restaurant professions among others.

INTEGRATED COMPUTER SOLUTIONS DONATES EQUIPMENT TO AUBURN MONTGOMERY MONTGOMERY - Integrated Computer Solutions (ICS) recently donated about $70,000 in computer equipment to the new Informatics Institute at Auburn University’s Montgomery campus. The Informatics Institute, founded in 2008 under the Auburn University system as a standalone institute, exists to foster research and education in the field of automation of information processing in diverse scientific fields and assurance sciences. Auburn Montgomery hired M. Sahinoglu as its director and the institute, which is a part of the School of Science, became a degreegranting entity in December. The equipment donated by ICS includes enterprise-class servers as well as storage and network security appliances.

Tom Methvin

METHVIN NAMED BEASLEY ALLEN’S TOP ATTORNEY OF THE YEAR MONTGOMERY - Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C., announced that managing shareholder Thomas J. Methvin has been selected as the firm’s Top Attorney of the Year. The annual recognition is presented to the attorney who demonstrates exceptional professional skill throughout the course of the year and best represents the firm’s ideal of “helping those who need it most.” In addition to selecting the overall top attorney, Beasley Allen recognized excellence in each of its sections, naming the Lawyer of the Year in each. Honorees for 2009 are Julia Anne Beasley, personal injury section Lawyer of the Year; C. Lance Gould, fraud section Lawyer of the Year; Ted G. Meadows, mass torts section Lawyer of the Year; Kendall C. Dunson, product liability section Lawyer of the Year; CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

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BUSINESS BUZZ (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35) and Rhon E. Jones, toxic torts section Lawyer of the Year.

R&R SUPPLY CO. LAUNCHES NEW WEB SITE

“Each of these attorneys contributes so much to our firm, and to their profession,” Methvin said about the firm’s Lawyers of the Year. “We are blessed to have such talented and dedicated individuals as part of our team here at Beasley Allen.”

MONTGOMERY - R&R Supply Co. has announced the launch of a new Web site at www. randrsupply.com. Visitors to the site can read about the products and services offered and markets served.

As managing shareholder, Methvin is responsible for overseeing the daily operation of the firm, and for its longterm planning. In addition to these responsibilities, Methvin has been serving as president of the Alabama State Bar since July 2009. Methvin was born in Eufaula in 1963. After graduating from high school, he graduated from the University of Alabama with a degree in corporate finance in the business school. He then received his law degree from Cumberland School of Law in Birmingham in 1988 and began his legal career at Beasley Allen law firm that same year. His family has been involved in the practice of law for 200-plus years. In another development, the Beasley Allen law firm announced the “Wii Give Back” campaign, which will give one Wii gaming system to an Alabama charity each month in 2010. Charities from throughout the state, including Huntsville, Birmingham, Montgomery, Mobile and Dothan are eligible. Nominations will be accepted throughout the year on the firm’s Facebook page, www. facebook.com/beasleyallen, or e-mail at public. relations@beasleyallen.com.

“We have activated this powerful technology as part of our ongoing commitment to excellent customer service,” said Ron Brannon, president of R&R Supply Co. “The new Web site will be a great source of information for current as well as prospective customers. “We upgraded the entire inventory management and sales software, and the addition of the Web site allows us and our customers to take full advantage of the features and benefits of the new system. It also allows us to be open 24/7, letting our customers research and purchase products any time of the day or night.” The user-friendly site allows customers to check inventory for availability as well as process orders more efficiently, submitting them online and monitoring their progress. The “My Account” features allow users to monitor the status of their account and review recent and open orders. Custom shopping lists can be created to make ordering easy. R&R Supply Co. is a major distributor of electrical supplies and lighting fixtures to commercial, industrial, institutional and residential customers.

REGIONS FINANCIAL CORP. CEO WILL RETIRE IN MARCH BIRMINGHAM - Regions Financial Corp. said Chief Executive Officer Dowd Ritter will retire March 31 and

36

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

be replaced by the bank’s president and chief operating officer, Grayson Hall. Regions is Alabama’s largest bank. The Regions board of directors also elected lead director Earnest Deavenport Jr. to be non-executive chairman. Ritter has been CEO of Birmingham-based Regions since the merger with AmSouth Bancorp in 2006. Ritter had been AmSouth’s CEO.

SQUARE ROOT INTERACTIVE RELEASES WEB SITE FOR ‘PROJECT: START-UP’ WINNER MONTGOMERY - Square Root Interactive recently unveiled a new Web site for Project: Start-Up winner Ashley Miller Designs, a local interior decorating business. Square Root Interactive created Project: Start-Up as a way to commemorate its 10th anniversary by awarding a Web site valued at $10,000 to a small business founded within the River Region. The new Web site, www. ashleymillerdesigns.com, serves as an extension of the Ashley Miller Designs brand. The primary objectives of the site are to provide information about products and services offered by founder Ashley Miller and to both inspire and motivate site visitors to consider a design project for their own home. Her company was founded last April. The main features of the site include a design portfolio that showcases Miller’s previous projects and a blog where she can share insightful articles and Web sites related to interior design with her Web site visitors. “As a small business owner, it is important to make a

professional first impression,” Miller said. “The Web site created by Square Root Interactive has helped me make this critical first impression to potential and existing clients by displaying my work in an engaging fashion.” Square Root Interactive also announced the launch of Central Catholic High School’s new Web site, www.centralcatholichs.com. The custom Web site solution includes a new site design and the latest Web site features and functionality. The 82-year-old Central Catholic High School is located in Pittsburgh. Square Root Interactive is a Montgomery-based, fullservice Web site design and development agency and Ektron ELITE Partner.

LWT WINS INTERACTIVE ACCOUNT FOR GRAND BOULEVARD AT SANDESTIN MONTGOMERY – LWT has won the interactive account for Grand Boulevard at Sandestin, Fla. Located on Florida’s Northwest Gulf Coast, Grand Boulevard at Sandestin is a distinctive town center offering exclusive shops, fine dining, state-of-the-art office space and contemporary accommodations. LWT will direct the entire online advertising initiative, including a comprehensive new Web site, social media and search engine marketing. LWT, a marketing and interactive firm, was founded in 1959.

LOCAL MAX CREDIT UNION EXECUTIVE ELECTED TO BOARD BIRMINGHAM – The Alabama Center of the Credit Union


BUSINESS BUZZ The Montgomery-based firm is dedicated primarily to municipal and corporate finance. The Frazer Lanier Co. has been recognized consistently as a leader in public finance since its founding in 1976, and in 2009 led its investment banking peers on Alabama underwritings. Sandra Stenger

Executives Society elected its board officers for 2009-2010 during a recent meeting. The group’s new secretary is Sandra Stenger, vice president of human resources for MAX Credit Union in Montgomery. The Credit Union Executives Society is a Madison, Wis.based association for credit union executives. The organization’s mission is to educate and develop credit union chief executive officers, directors and future leaders.

The Frazer Lanier Co. serves clients throughout the Southeast and across the country with a primary focus within the state of Alabama. The firm’s clients include state, county and local governments, corporations, utilities, non-profit health care providers, higher education institutions, municipal airports and other issuers of taxexempt and taxable debt. “We are proud to be the No. 1 firm in the public finance investment banking business in Alabama for 2009,” said John Barnwell Mazyck, senior vice president at The Frazer Lanier Co. “While we have been the top firm in Alabama for a number of years, we are pleased to have underwritten more than $350 million in par amount than our nearest competitor for the year.”

John Barnwell Mazyck

THE FRAZER LANIER CO. RANKED NO. 1 PUBLIC FINANCE BANKING FIRM IN STATE MONTGOMERY - The Frazer Lanier Co. has been ranked the No. 1 public finance investment banking firm in the state for 2009, according to financial information provider Thomson Financial. The Frazer Lanier Co. competed against state, regional and Wall Street firms on Alabama underwritings and achieved the top ranking for the fifth consecutive year.

Thomas Dozier

FEDERAL LAND BANK ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH ALABAMA CHANGES NAME TO ALABAMA AG CREDIT, ACA MONTGOMERY - The Federal Land Bank Association of South Alabama is now called Alabama Ag Credit, ACA. CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

37


BUSINESS BUZZ (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37) Alabama Ag Credit offers short- and intermediate-term financing in addition to land and mortgage loans. The cooperative association’s new name reflects its new status as an agricultural credit association (ACA). In September 2009, stockholder-owners of the cooperative association voted to approve the conversion to an ACA so that the association could broaden its lending authorities. Alabama Ag Credit will continue to finance and refinance rural real estate, timberland and recreational land purchases and improvements. The association will now additionally offer loans for equipment and operating expenses, such as seed, feed and livestock purchases. “Our association is not merging or being acquired,” said Thomas Dozier, chairman of

38

the Alabama Ag Credit board of directors. “We are a very strong financial institution and we are excited about growing even more with this new opportunity. You will still find the same friendly people to work with and the same land financing experts. Only now we have even more to offer our stockholder-owners.” Alabama Ag Credit finances farmers, rural landowners and agribusiness owners throughout South Alabama. The association, which has its headquarters in Montgomery, has branch offices in Demopolis, Dothan, Enterprise, Loxley, Monroeville, Montgomery, Opelika, Selma and Tuscaloosa. It is part of the nationwide Farm Credit System, the nation’s largest lender to rural America. For information, visit www. AlabamaAgCredit.com.

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

distributor of recreational products. More than 16 years ago, the company began manufacturing its own lines of tents and tactical gear and experienced tremendous growth.

David Cobb

MONTGOMERY MARKETING INC. CHANGES NAME TO MMI OUTDOOR INC. MONTGOMERY - Montgomery Marketing Inc., a leading distributor and manufacturer of outdoor products, has changed its name to MMI Outdoor Inc. “This name change reflects our evolution as a company,” said David Cobb, president of MMI Outdoor. Montgomery Marketing Inc. was founded in 1975 as a manufacturer’s representative and later grew to become a

“The Montgomery Marketing Inc. name has served us well; however, with the introduction of our own Catoma and Trek tent lines, along with Granite Gear tactical packs, it no longer accurately represents who we are,” Cobb said. “For many years our customers have referred to us simply as MMI, and our challenge was to maintain this recognition while better defining what we do as a company.” To submit your business news for publication, email a press release to editor@montgomerychamber.com. Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Members only.


MEMBERS ON THE MOVE BUSINESS COUNCIL OF ALABAMA NAMES NEW SENIOR EXECUTIVES

Anita Archie

MONTGOMERY – The Business Council of Alabama (BCA) has named two senior executives:

Anita Archie has been hired as senior vice president of governmental affairs and legal adviser, and Ralph Stacy has been named senior Ralph Stacy vice president of strategic communications. Stacy will serve as executive director of The Partnership, comprising 120-plus local chambers of commerce throughout the state.

her juris doctorate degree from the University of Alabama School of Law. Stacy has served as president and CEO of the Chamber of Commerce Association of Alabama for the last 10 years. He has a strong background in media and marketing, having worked in both print and electronic outlets. He is an author, former syndicated columnist and a former syndicated radio host. Stacy is a graduate of Huntingdon College. “These individuals have all achieved great success in their current career paths, and when combined with the staff of BCA and working through The Partnership, the 120-plus local chambers of commerce across Alabama, the needs of over one million working Alabamians will be well served,” Canary said.

Quentin Riggins will assume the role of legislative and political consultant for the BCA. Riggins also will be political adviser for ProgressPac, BCA’s political action committee. He is the former senior vice president of governmental affairs. “We’re pleased to be able to announce two new key players in our staff leadership structure, and the addition of a former staff member as one of our allies in our governmental affairs efforts,” said William J. Canary, president and chief executive officer of the BCA. “We feel that these additions strengthen an already formidable team and add a depth of grassroots involvement that will further enhance our efforts in representing Alabama’s business community.” Archie has most recently been Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education director of government relations. She is also a past deputy director of the Alabama Development Office (ADO) and formerly headed the efforts of Montgomery’s Riverfront Development as its executive director. Archie was an associate attorney for successful ADO projects such as Honda and Hyundai and was the principal attorney in negotiating incentive agreements for tier 1 suppliers of Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama. She is a graduate of the University of Alabama-Birmingham and received

NEWSCHWANDER APPOINTED DEAN OF NURSING AT AUBURN UNIVERSITY, AUBURN MONTGOMERY – Gregg E. Newschwander was recently appointed dean of nursing at Auburn Montgomery and Auburn University. Gregg E. Newschwander

Newschwander joins Auburn Montgomery from the University of Virginia’s College at Wise, where he has been professor of nursing and chair since 2008. Previously, he served as chair in the Department of Nursing at the University of Vermont in Burlington. “We were saddened by the announcement that Dean Witt was retiring, but we believe we’ve found the perfect replacement to continue her great work here at AUM with the hiring of Dr. Newschwander,” said Keivan Deravi, interim vice chancellor for Auburn Montgomery’s academic affairs. “This is a unique position because he will head both schools of nursing. His experience and background in the nursing field made him the best candidate, and we look forward to him taking over where Dean Witt left off.” Newschwander was associate dean at the Catholic University of America School

of Nursing in Washington, D.C., 200304; dean and professor in the Division of Nursing and Health Sciences at Neumann College in Aston, Penn., 2000-03; assistant dean at the University of Virginia School of Nursing, 1990-99; and was assistant professor in both the School of Nursing and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, 1988-90; and 1999-2000. While at the University of Virginia, he established an international studies program at the School of Nursing and also taught Comparative Culture and Society: International Health Care at Oxford University in England during the summers of 1995-99. Newschwander began his teaching career in 1982 at Marquette University College of Nursing and was assistant professor and clinical area coordinator, Adolescent and Young Adult Nursing, through 1988. Throughout his academic career, Newschwander has been an active clinician in pediatric emergency/trauma services. Newschwander received a bachelor’s degree from the Rutgers University School of Nursing and a master’s degree from the University of Colorado School of Nursing. He received his doctorate from the Marquette University School of Education, majoring in curriculum and instruction. MARSHALL & ASSOCIATES NAMES VP OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT AUBURN – Marshall & Associates has announced that Mark Saunders Mark Saunders has joined the company as vice president of project management. Saunders has 20-plus years of commercial construction experience. His expertise is in developing project costs, assembling project teams of suppliers and subcontractors and determination of project delivery methods to best meet the specific needs of each customer. “We are extremely blessed to have Mark Saunders join Marshall & Associates,” said William Marshall, president of Marshall CONTINUED ON PAGE 40 February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

39


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

& Associates. “His extensive industrial and commercial background will be a key advantage as Marshall & Associates grows and expands across the Southeast region.” Prior to joining Marshall & Associates, Saunders gained five years of experience in the Design-Build delivery method at Marshall Design-Build LLC. He has five years of experience with a leading regional developer/contractor of apartments and 12 years of experience in competitively bid projects. “I am very excited to join Marshall & Associates’ leadership team,” Saunders said. “The company is uniquely positioned to capitalize on the economic recovery with unmatched experience, low overhead, and a focus on meeting and exceeding customer expectations.” Marshall & Associates is a provider of construction services. RETIRED BRIG. GEN. WALDROP WILL LEAD APPTIS MONTGOMERY OFFICE CHANTILLY, Va. – Apptis Inc. has hired retired Olan Waldrop Brig. Gen. Olan Waldrop as the regional director of Department of Defense operations. In his role, Waldrop will lead the Montgomery office and will work with Department of Defense customers throughout the Southeast to develop technology solutions that meet mission needs and leverage existing technology investments. “We are thrilled to have Olan on board to help us continue to build a strong presence in Montgomery as part of our commitment to supporting the IT requirements of the Air Force,” said Skip Nowland, chief operating officer of Apptis. “Olan’s knowledge of and commitment to the Montgomery community and the United States Air Force provides us with a passionate and capable executive to lead the growth and delivery of Apptis IT service offerings to the Air Force.”

Force Combat Ammunition Support as well as Defense Logistics Modernization.

Mills and Cawood Inc. and will work in the firm’s architecture department.

“I am proud to join the Apptis team and I look forward to using my Air Force experience to help the company deliver cutting-edge solutions in a way that meets the requirements and mission of our Air Force customers,” Waldrop said.

Originally from Boulder, Colo., Page has more than 10 years of design experience. His background includes consulting with community nonprofit organizations to help rebuild disadvantaged cities and urban environments.

Waldrop received his bachelor’s degree and juris doctorate from the University of Alabama.

He has been involved in all aspects of project operations ranging from design to management. Currently Page is working on the new Selma High School design.

Waldrop’s 31-year military career included service as General Counsel for Air Force Material Command in Dayton, Ohio; Commander of Air Force Legal Services Agency; General Counsel, Pacific Air Forces; and Principal Executive Assistant to the Judge Advocate General of the Air Force. Waldrop was a frequent lecturer at the Air University at Maxwell Air Force Base throughout his career. Apptis is a leading provider of information technology and communications services to Department of Defense and civilian agencies. ADMIRAL MOVERS ANNOUNCES TWO NEW EMPLOYEES

Chris Powers

Powers brings more than 25 years’ experience Danny Watkins in the moving industry. He has managed every aspect of moving from sales and management to operations. Watkins, who has 15 years’ experience in the moving industry, will be specializing in the sales department’s national accounts. He has a degree in business administration from Auburn University with a minor in industrial management. GOODWYN, MILLS AND CAWOOD ANNOUNCES NEW HIRE

Prior to joining Apptis, Waldrop served as vice president and general manager of Montgomery Solutions Center with EDS. He served as a program manager for Air

MONTGOMERY – AJ Page has joined Goodwyn, AJ Page

40

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

MONTGOMERY – Chris Powers and Danny Watkins have joined Admiral Movers Inc. as commercial and residential move consultants.

Page received master’s degrees from the University of Colorado in architecture and urban design. BERINGER REALTY ANNOUNCES NEWLY HIRED REALTOR MONTGOMERY – Jackson Looney has joined Beringer Realty as a Realtor. Jackson Looney Looney, who received his real estate license in November, graduated from the University of South Alabama. He majored in communications with a minor in public relations.

RIBBON CUTTINGS & GROUND BREAKINGS

HERE WE GROW AGAIN

COTTON STATES INSURANCE 11123 Chantilly Parkway Court Pike Road 272-2378 Harrell Reynolds, Agency Manager Insurance Companies/Services

LIGER’S BAKERY 3040 McGhee Road Montgomery 288-6550 Carl Stokes, Owner Bakery


New Members Architects JMR ARCHITECTURE, PC Mike Rutland 60 Commerce Street, Suite 1520 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-420-5672

Associations/ Nonprofit DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS Willie T. Scott P.O. Box 242994 Montgomery, AL 36124 334-271-5077 DOROTHY’S VISION, INC. Dorothy Carter 4030 Green Acres Drive Montgomery, AL 36106 334-395-8238 GROUP HOMES FOR CHILDREN, INC. Demetria Parnell, MSW/LCSW 1426 South Court Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-241-9604

Cleaning Services PREFERRED CLEANING SERVICE Phyllis Carnes 594 Ridgeland Farms Road Montgomery, AL 36105 334-224-6845

Construction LONE WILLOW ENTERPRISES, INC. Leslie Stone 3800 McGinnis Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-613-0642

Consulting Services COOLEY PUBLIC STRATEGIES Emily Bryan 1865 Graham Street Montgomery, AL 361063 334-265-1035

APPTIS, INC. Olan Waldrop 60 Commerce Street Montgomery, AL 36104 229-291-2947 MAC ENTERPRISE SOLUTIONS Peter Waldo 360 Lindsey Road Coosada, AL 36020 334-201-4719

Insurance Companies/Services RONNIE SHAW-COTTON STATES Insurance Ronnie Shaw 75 Market Place Montgomery, AL 36117 334-279-9400

Nursing Homes/ Assisted Living CEDAR CREST HEALTH & REHAB Anneke Parker 4490 Virginia Loop Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-281-6826 WOODLEY MANOR NURSING HOME David Thornton 3312 Woodley Road Montgomery, AL 36116 3334-288-2780

Plumbing CITY PLUMBING John Townsend 860 Hatcher Street Montgomery, AL 36109 334-221-1332

Publications LAKE MARTIN LIVING MAGAZINE Carol King Hill P.O. Box 909 Alexander City, AL 35011 256-496-0170 ∑

Document Scanning DISCOVERE PARTNERS Greg Collett 28 Monroe Street, Suite 100 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-263-2511 Information Technology Firms

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

41


ECONOMIC INTEL Grocery Shoppers Bagged Lower Food Prices MONTGOMERY – The region had some welcome news during the past holiday season: lower food prices. Some of the more affordable items this past holiday season were pecan halves, sweet potatoes, apples and oranges. Compared to last December, pecan halves were down 59 cents to $6.29 a pound, sweet potatoes were down 3 cents to 76 cents a pound and apples were down 23 cents a pound to $1.16. To add a bit of color to their holiday tables, shoppers could take advantage of oranges, down 6 cents to 86 cents a pound. The main dishes at the table cost shoppers more this holiday season, however. Whole turkeys averaged $1.24 a pound, up 5 cents from last December, and smoked hams were up 7 cents to $1.91 a pound. Cranberry sauce increased 6 cents a can to $1.20, and pre-packaged stuffing saw an increase of 5 cents to $2.62 a pound. Shoppers also found savings on a few staples along the grocery aisles. According to the Alabama Farmer Federation’s monthly

42

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

food price survey, the average cost of 20 basic market basket items decreased from November’s average. Alabama shoppers paid a penny less for the surveyed items, which had a total average cost of $51.59. The savings didn’t extend to most items in the meat case, however, where shoppers noticed slightly higher prices from November’s savings. Pork chops were up a penny to $3.14 a pound; Boston butts were up 4 cents to $1.61 a pound; and ground beef was up 2 cents to $2.26 a pound. Bacon and chicken breasts also saw an increase. Bacon was up 7 cents to $4.08 a pound, while chicken breasts increased 2 cents to $2.03 a pound. Whole fryers stayed the same at $1.19 a pound. While most meats were higher in price in the latest survey, the savings on steaks and chuck roasts more than made up for the increase. T-bone steaks were down 68 cents a pound to $7.56, while chuck roasts were down 20 cents a pound to $3.11. Eggs were up to $1.66 a dozen, an increase of 13 cents from November.

News on the produce aisle was mixed as prices increased on average 9 cents. Tomatoes were up 41 cents to $2.09 a pound and lettuce was up 8 cents to $1.59 a head. Sweet potatoes and red potatoes were more affordable, however. Sweet potatoes were down 8 cents to 76 cents a pound and red potatoes were down 3 cents a pound to 89 cents. In the dairy case, shoppers looking for milk, ice cream and cottage cheese found an increase in prices, while those after butter noticed savings. Milk was up 10 cents to $2.94 a half-gallon, ice cream increased 10 cents to $3.99 a half-gallon and cottage cheese increased 17 cents to $2.64 a pound. Butter dropped 6 cents to $3.36 a pound. Regional reports collected by volunteer shoppers showed the market basket averaged $50.41 in Northwest Alabama, $51.47 in Northeast Alabama, $51.75 in Central Alabama and $53.19 in South Alabama.


Unemployment Data Civilian Labor Force

Unemployment Rate

Nov p 2009

Oct r 2009

Nov r 2009

164,369

165,479

171,461

9.70%

10.00%

6.00%

Autauga County

23,411

23,520

24,420

9.00%

9.20%

5.40%

Prattville City

15,078

15,102

15,803

7.40%

7.30%

4.10%

34,259

34,424

35,959

8.70%

8.90%

5.60%

4,715

4,830

4,886

15.70%

17.50%

11.70%

Montgomery County

101,984

102,705

106,197

9.80%

10.20%

6.00%

Montgomery City

92,400

93,090

96,263

9.70%

10.10%

6.00%

Birmingham-Hoover MA

506,992

510,238

527,437

9.50%

9.90%

5.20%

Birmingham City

96,070

97,018

99,293

11.80%

12.50%

7.10%

197,020

197,526

203,271

7.70%

7.90%

4.30%

86,372

86,587

89,444

7.30%

7.50%

4.30%

181,879

182,710

185,806

10.80%

11.00%

5.80%

85,433

85,888

87,259

11.10%

11.40%

6.10%

2,073,377

2,089,314

2,159,689

10.30%

10.70%

5.90%

153,539,000

153,635,000

154,624,000

9.40%

9.50%

6.50%

Montgomery MA

Elmore County Lowndes County

Huntsville MA Huntsville City Mobile MA Mobile City Alabama Not Seaonally Adj. United States Not Seaonally Adj.

Nov p 2009

Oct r 2009

Nov r 2008

p Preliminary r Revised The numbers are not seasonally adjusted. Estimates prepared by the Alabama Department of Industrial Relations in Cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, based on 2008 benchmark. Montgomery MA is Augtauga, Elmore, Lowndes and Montogmery counties. Birmingham - Hoover MA is Bibb, Blount, Chilton, Jefferson, St. Clair, Shelby and Walker counties. Huntsville MA is Limestone and Madison counties. Mobile MA is Mobile County .

Montgomery Building Starts Building Permits

Building Valuations

Current Month DEC 09

Last Month NOV 09

Last Year DEC 08

Current Month DEC 09

Last Month NOV 09

Last Year DEC 08

New Construction

15

16

16

$1,661,800

$1,733,600

$7,890,800

Additions and Alterations

54

36

36

$6,068,000

$889,800

$14,702,800

Others

25

46

62

$190,600

$2,366,400

$2,077,800

Total

94

98

114

$7,914,400

$4,989,800

$24,671,400

Source: City of Montgomery Building Department

Montgomery Metro Market Home Sales Current Month NOV 09

Last Month OCT 09

Month/Month % Change

Last Year NOV 08

Year/Year % Change

Statewide NOV 09

293

352

-16.76%

221

32.58%

3,589

Median Selling Price

$124,500

$125,250

-0.60%

$120,000

3.75%

$118,630

Average Selling Price

$142,610

$139,232

2.43%

$131,928

8.10%

$144,089

93

90

3.33%

92

1.09%

148

3,087

3,085

0.06%

3,235

-4.57%

40,363

Total Home Sales

Average Days on Market Total Homes Listed

Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate (ACRE), The University of Alabama

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

43


Montgomery Regional Airport Current Month DEC 09

Last Year DEC 08

Year over Year % Change

YTD 2009

YTD 2008

Year over Year % Change

Air Carrier Operations

1,036

866

19.6%

11,701

11,604

0.8%

Total Operations

4,600

4,501

2.2%

67,833

72,857

-6.9%

Enplanements

14,996

12,267

22.2%

161,272

169,528

-4.9%

Deplanements

14,418

11,615

24.1%

162,167

168,174

-3.6%

Total Passengers

29,414

23,882

23.2%

323,439

337,702

-4.2%

Source: Montgomery Regional Airport (MGM) Dannelly Field

Airline Fares Roundtrip airfare comparisons from Montgomery, Birmingham and Atlanta airports to key destinations. Destination

Hyundai Sales

Montgomery

Birmingham

Atlanta

Baltimore (BWI)

$295

$210

$229

Boston (BOS)

$328

$251

$239

Charlotte, NC (CLT)

$147

$187

$167

Chicago (ORD)

$358

$283

$257

Cincinnati (CVG)

$261

$234

$254

Dallas/Ft Worth (QDF)

$247

$227

$249

Denver (DEN)

$374

$342

$319

Detroit (DTW)

$289

$317

$219

Houston (QHO)

$345

$290

$237

Indianapolis (IND)

$303

$233

$219

VEHICLE

DEC 2009

DEC 2008

YTD 2009

YTD 2008

Accent

4,149

1,833

68,086

50,431

Las Vegas (LAS)

$325

$274

$339

Sonata

10,485

6,593

120,028

117,357

Los Angeles (LAX)

$322

$384

$330

Elantra

5,763

2,635

103,269

94,720

Memphis (MEM)

$447

$348

$194

Tiburon

7

412

8,587

9,111

Miami (MIA)

$334

$348

$219

Nashville (BNA)

$207

$167

$290

Santa Fe

9,264

6,289

80,343

70,994

New Orleans (MSY)

$330

$319

$269

Azera

330

347

3,808

14,461

New York (JFK)

$330

$288

$293

Tucson

903

874

15,411

19,027

Orlando (MCO)

$288

$228

$219

Entourage

11

3,065

3,433

8,470

Philadelphia (PHL)

$341

$287

$209

Veracruz

531

949

10,210

11,004

Pittsburgh (PIT)

$308

$248

$219

Genesys

2,354

1,040

21,889

6,167

St Louis (STL)

$244

$235

$219

Total

33,797

24,037

435,064

401,742

Seattle (SEA)

$373

$303

$331

$1,186

$1,161

$1,171

Tampa (TPA)

$283

$223

$213

Washington DC (DCA)

$341

$281

$261

Source: Hyundai Motor America

Seoul, Korea (SEL)

Date of travel: Feb. 15-21. Date of pricing: Jan. 10, 2010. Source: travelocity.com

44

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010


Quarterly Reports NAME

QUARTERLY REVENUES

NET INCOME

EARNINGS PER SHARE

EARNINGS ESTIMATE

YEAR-AGO REVENUES

YEAR-AGO NET INCOME

Big Lots

$1B

$30.3M

$0.37

$0.18

N/A

$12.2M

Will buy back $150M of shares

Costco

$17.3B

$266M

$0.06

$0.60

$16.4B

$263M

Sales of stores open at least one year rose 3%

Dollar General

$2.9B

$75.6M

$0.24

$0.25

$2.6B

(-$7.3M)

Sales of stores open at least one year up 9.2%

Best Buy

$12B

$227M

$0.53

$0.43

$11.5B

$52M

$160M

$3.4M

$0.12

N/A

$138.9M

(-$9.2M)

Revenue increased 15%

(Red Lobster, Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse)

$1.6B

$60.3M

$0.43

$0.42

$1.6B

$59.7M

Red Lobster sales dropped almost 7% to $562M

Rite Aid

$6.4B

(-$86.1M)

(-$0.10)

(-$0.18)

$6.5B

Walgreen

$16.4B

$489M

$0.49

$0.48

$15B

$408M

$240.1M

$6.6M

$0.12

(-$0.09)

$240.6M

(-$8.8M)

One-time tax gain of $6.5M

$2B

$151.3M

$0.58

$0.43

$1.8B

$87.7M

Profit surged 73%

$1.8B

$67.6M

$0.49

$0.47

N/A

$59.3M

Profit increased 14%

Sonic

$136.5M

$6.2M

$0.10

$0.13

$184.1M

$7.1M

Revenue declined 26%

Haverty Furniture

$162.4M

N/A

N/A

N/A

$161.8M

N/A

Steak n Shake Darden Restaurants

Finish Line Bed Bath & Beyond Family Dollar

NOTABLE

Profit more than quadrupled

(-$248.7M) Closed 14 stores in the quarter Administered 5M flu shots compared with 1.2M flu shots in 2008

Sales of stores open at least one year rose 2%

Source: PR Newswire and Charles Schwab wire services

Sales Tax Collections Current Month DEC 09

Last Year DEC 08

Montgomery County

$2,863,389

$2,990,680

City of Montgomery

$6,691,106

YTD 2009

YTD 2008

-4.26%

$37,403,916

$40,553,257

-7.77%

$6,716,656

-0.38%

$83,181,972

$90,968,196

-8.56%

$555,765

$697,209

-20.29%

$6,992,262

$7,933,818

-11.87%

$1,054,569

$1,200,460

-12.15%

Elmore County

$714,978

$549,456

30.12%

$8,351,193

$6,906,793

20.91%

Wetumpka

$422,511

$478,660

-11.73%

$5,404,427

$5,790,261

-6.66%

Millbrook

$432,084

$458, 223

-5.70%

Autauga County Prattville

Year over Year % Change

Year over Year % Change

Sources: Montgomery County Commission, City of Montgomery,Autauga County Commission, City of Prattville, Elmore County Commission, City of Wetumpka, City of Millbrook

February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

45


National Retail Sales

(Monthly and Quarterly)

RETAIL STORE

YEAR

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

Wal-Mart

2009

2.1%

5.0%

0.6%

5.9%

2008

0.2%

2.5%

0.9%

2.6%

4.0%

6.1%

3.0%

2.8%

2.0%

2.2%

2009

-3.3%

-4.1%

-6.3%

0.3%

-6.1%

-6.2%

-6.5%

-2.9%

-1.7%

-0.1%

-1.5%

2008

-1.1%

0.5%

-4.4%

3.1%

-0.7%

0.4%

-1.2%

-2.1%

-3.0%

-4.8%

-10.4%

2009

-11.0%

2008

-4.5%

2009

2.4%

5.9%

6.2%

2008

2.1%

2.1%

-0.7%

6.6%

3.6%

4.6%

3.5%

4.2%

4.6%

3.6%

3.5%

2009

4.0%

4.0%

3.0%

-2.0%

-1.0%

-1.0%

-2.0%

0.0%

3.0%

3.0%

0.0%

2008

3.0%

3.0%

3.0%

5.0%

5.0%

5.0%

6.0%

6.0%

6.0%

2.0%

1.0%

Target Sears Sam’s Club Costco Family Dollar

2009

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

-1.5%

-11.7%

-12.5%

-2.3%

-8.6%

-6.2%

-9.0%

0.3%

0.6%

0.1%

6.4%

Best Buy

2009

6.2%

9.4%

Lowe’s JCPenney Kohl’s Gap CVS Rite Aid Walgreens AutoZone Advance Auto Parts McDonald’s Burger King Wendy’s

1.9%

5.4%

10.1%

-6.2%

-3.9%

1.9%

-4.1% -7.3% 0.1% 2.0%

1.0%

2.4%

5.6%

2.1% 10.6%

0.4% -4.9%

5.3%

-6.3%

2009

-13.0%

-8.6%

-8.5%

-6.9%

2008

-8.3%

-6.5%

-7.9%

-7.1%

2009

-9.9%

-6.6%

-9.5%

-7.5%

2008

-7.6%

-8.4%

-5.3%

-5.9%

2009

-16.4%

-8.8%

-7.2%

-6.6%

-8.2%

-8.2%

-12.3%

-7.9%

-1.4%

-5.9%

-3.8%

2008

-1.9%

-6.7%

-12.3%

-1.7%

-4.4%

-2.4%

-6.5%

-4.9%

-12.4% -13.0% -11.9%

-8.1%

2009

-13.4%

-1.6%

-4.3%

-6.2%

-0.4%

-3.8%

-3.2%

0.2%

5.5%

1.4%

3.3%

4.7%

2008

-8.3%

-3.8%

-15.5%

3.5%

-7.2%

2.3%

-10.4%

-5.8%

-5.5%

-9.0%

-17.5%

-1.4%

2009

-18.0% -12.0% -14.0% -10.0% -11.0% -10.0%

-9.0%

-7.0%

-8.0%

-6.0%

-4.0%

2008

-4.0%

-6.0%

-5.0%

-3.0%

-14.0% -11.0%

2009

3.6%

3.3%

6.1%

5.7%

2008

3.4%

3.9%

3.1%

3.7%

2009

1.0%

2008 2009

-3.0%

-14.0%

0.0%

-7.0%

-5.0%

-4.5%

-12.0%

-0.9%

-0.1%

1.8%

0.6%

-0.6%

-0.6%

-1.9%

0.3%

-0.5%

-0.8%

-1.8%

2.0%

2.2%

2.6%

0.5%

1.3%

-0.4%

1.2%

1.1%

1.7%

2.9%

0.0%

-0.2%

0.4%

-1.9%

1.5%

5.7%

1.0%

3.4%

2.0%

1.9%

2.4%

4.9%

3.9%

-0.3%

2008

8.3%

4.4%

1.6%

3.9%

3.4%

4.1%

0.9%

4.7%

2.0%

-0.9%

0.4%

2009

6.0%

7.4%

5.4%

5.6%

2008

-0.3%

-0.3%

-0.6%

-1.5%

2009

3.0%

8.2%

4.8%

2008

-0.3%

2009

5.4%

2.8%

4.7%

6.1%

2.8%

2008

1.9%

8.3%

2.9%

2.0%

4.3%

0.6%

4.7%

2.9% 2.6% 3.4%

6.7%

-0.1% 1.7% 4.5%

-0.1% 4.7%

5.3%

4.5%

2009

1.9%

1.6%

-4.5%

-2.8%

2008

4.2%

5.4%

5.3%

3.0%

2009

3.7%

1.0%

-0.4%

2009

-0.1% -0.2%

-8.5%

-8.7%

2008 U.S. same store sales compiled from 10-Q and 10-K forms (excluding fuel sales) Source: RetailerDaily.com

46

3.4%

1.0%

2008 Arby’s

DEC

8.6%

2009

2.1%

NOV

13.3%

2008 2008 Home Depot

OCT -0.5%

2008 Dollar General

SEP

Montgomery Business Journal February 2010

-6.9%

-9.0% -7.2%

5.0%


February 2010 Montgomery Business Journal

47


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Montgomery Business Journal – February 2010  

Montgomery Business Journal – February 2010