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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL VOLUME 9 ISSUE 4 / AUGUST 2017

MBJ

SCORE!

H O W F O O T B A L L FA C T O R S INTO OUR ECONOMY

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

TEAM MGM WORKS New Initiatives GAME CHANGERS FOR MGM

H E A LT H C A R E L E A D E R S OFFER PRESCRIPTION FOR PROGRESS

PLUS:

G E T A TA S T E O F # EatMGM R E S TA U R A N T W E E K


CONTENTS AU GU ST 2017

THIS ISSUE: 10 15 43 46

Fly MGM AFITC: The Future is Now

CHAMBER NEWS

A Win-Win: Total Resource Campaign

08 Events

Prescription for Prosperity

50 Connect 52 Connect Resource Guide 26 Powerhouse Q&A

58 Members on the Move

29 Member Profiles

60 Business Buzz

34 #MyMGM

66 Members in the News

36 Regional Impact

72 Ribbon Cuttings

38 GiveBack

75 New Members

56 Small Business Briefcase

78 Intel

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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MBJ

THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT Randall L. George DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS Jina Miniard

EXPLORE MEDIA PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

Pam Mashburn

Jennifer Stewart Kornegay

ART DIRECTOR

DESIGN

Erika Rowe Tracy

Heather Cooper, Shelby Berry

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORIAL Jennifer Kornegay, Wendi Lewis PHOTOGRAPHERS Robert Fouts, David Robertson Jr., Bryan Carter, Shelby Berry ADVERTISING Serena Minton / 334-316-3351 / serena@exploremedia.org exploreMedia / 334-578-7810 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Post Office Box 79, Montgomery, Alabama 36101 Telephone: 334-834-5200 • mbj@montgomerychamber.com © Copyright 2017 exploreMedia and the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved. The Montgomery Business Journal (USPS NO. 025553) is published bi-monthly by exploreMedia for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334) 834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Periodicals Postage Paid at Montgomery Alabama, 36119+9998, USPS NO. 025553. Volume 9, Issue 4. MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MISSION STATEMENT

Committed to exceptional service, the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce works to improve the economic well-being of the business community and enhance the quality of life of the area through the creation and preservation of jobs. POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 79, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36101, or email mbj@montgomerychamber.com. The Montgomery Business Journal welcomes story ideas from its readers. Email to: editor@montgomerychamber.com. Subscriptions are a part of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce dues structure. Subscriptions and bulk subscriptions can also be purchased per year at www.montgomerychamber.com/mbjsub.


CHAMBER NEWS

Events +

MA RK YO UR C A L E NDAR S FOR THE SE UP COMING C HAMBE R E V E NTS

60 Minute Coffees & Business After Hours

Upcoming Workshops

These popular networking events are the perfect place to exchange business cards and meet potential customers.

Resource Center

08/24 Business After Hours Sponsor: Verizon Location: Moore Company Realty

09/13 60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: Faulkner University

09/28 AUG

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Eggs & Issues with Martha Roby, 7:30-8:30 am Alabama Activity Center

Connect with your state representatives

Business After Hours Sponsor: Gilpin Givhan and Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood Location: Lakeview Center (2660 EastChase Lane)

and gain insight on the issues impacting

10/11

business in MGM. This event series is the perfect opportunity to engage with local

60 Minute Coffee Sponsor: River Region United Way Location: TBD

and state leaders who are impacting your community. Sponsored by Gilpin Givhan

Chamber Member Orientation

SEP Diversity Summit, 9 am to 5 pm

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at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel and Spa at the Convention Center

November 1 from 8-9 am at the Chamber of Commerce

This highly anticipated event features dynamic speakers from across the country and offers an intense one-day agenda full of diversity

This informal orientation is the perfect event for members to connect and engage with each other, give a brief overview of their business or service and hear from the Chamber President, Randy George, on the Chamber’s top goals and initiatives that impact local business. Sponsor: CharterHR

and inclusion training that is crucial to any business model and size. Hundreds of local business leaders attend, so you don’t want to miss it. Presenting Sponsor: Stivers Ford Lincoln

All Ears

//

BizTalk MGM - The Official Podcast for Small Business in MGM Every Monday at 6 pm on WVAS 90.7FM, Montgomery Chamber staff plus host Melissa Johnson Warnke from the Alabama Retail Association will talk with business experts on topics that are important to small businesses.

BUSINESS Business 101: Start it Up! August 15; September 5, 19; from 8:309:30 am at the Chamber’s BRC No registration required. $10 fee. Establish a strong foundation for your new or existing business. Topics covered include locating financing, writing a business plan and finding expert advice. Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC Mastermind September & October at the Chamber’s BRC This eight-week class is an opportunity to collaborate with like-minded individuals focused on taking results to a new level. Together, the group will learn to raise its leadership lid by implementing the 21 irrefutable laws of leadership. Registration is required, and the fee is $55. Presenting Sponsor: KEMCO Integrated Services

Upcoming Webinars • Alternative Financing Options for Small Business August 10, 11:30 am - 12:30 pm • Optimize Your Business: 12 Ways Automation Technology Can Improve Your Sales and Marketing August 10, 1-2 pm • Managing Your Online Reputation August 16, 9:30-11:30 am • Add More Revenue Streams to Your Service-Based Business August 16, 1-2 pm • Crowdfund It: VBOC’s Small Business “It” Series, August 24, 11:30 am-1 pm •Creating an Effective Business Workflow, August 24, 1-2 pm • Independent Contractor or Employee September 7, 11:30 am - 12:45 pm • How to Create a One-Page Plan of Action to Grow Your Company September 12, 1-2 pm • Creating Great Visuals for Your Business, September 13, 9-10:30 am • Video Marketing Made Easy September 21, 1-2 pm

+

Register online

Register online for Business Resource Center events and webinars at montgomerychamber.com/events

Sponsor: MAX

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DIRECT TO BUSINESS

FLY

MGM by WENDI LEWIS

The Montgomery Regional Airport is the key to open doors for continued growth.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


“Montgomery Regional Airport is a key piece of the economic development puzzle on so many fronts. But the airport can’t succeed if people don’t use it. It would be unthinkable to lose this critical resource.” - Tammy Knight Fleming, Chair of the Montgomery Airport Authority

A regional airport is critical to a community’s growth, prosperity and viability. Don’t believe it? Think about this: The airport is the first and last impression of our community, and the state of Alabama for many, when passengers arrive. As Alabama’s capital city, it is crucial for Montgomery to be accessible, particularly for the business of state government, economic development and military operations. The airport is the conduit to move people into the national air traffic network, connecting them with the world. Two commercial airlines serve Montgomery: Delta Air Lines with seven flights daily to Atlanta, and American Airlines with two flights daily to Charlotte and one to Dallas. Montgomery has seen three straight years of passenger growth, and it is an important connection for air travel to and from Korea, as well, as the location of Hyundai Motor Manufacturing North America and its many suppliers. Since June 2017, four daily flights (two American and two Delta) to and from MGM have carried Korean Air flight numbers. “It is absolutely essential that we communicate how important it is to Fly Montgomery,” said Tammy Knight Fleming, Chair of the Montgomery Airport Authority. “With anything we do, we encourage the community and the region as a whole to Fly MGM. That’s the key. That’s how we keep

ON BOARD

THE CHAMBER ALONGSIDE THE MONTGOMERY AIRPORT AUTHORITY IS FOCUSED ON: • Expanding Air Service • Improving Passenger Experience • Reducing Leakage and Capturing More Travelers

the airport here.” An increased emphasis on customer service is an important part of the plan. A recent addition to the services offered by the airport is the Sky Cap Ambassadors, operated through Air Chef, providing curbside baggage handling as well as wheelchair


IN NUMBERS. % ON-TIME DEPARTURES 83% ATL 84% BHM

service. Customers can call ahead to be met curbside for assistance. “This new pro-

“It’s the board’s

gram exemplifies our overall commitment to

direction and

good quality customer service, which in turn the Montgomery airport,” Fleming said. “I

to improving

believe that service will be critical to help-

passenger

83% MGM

ing to develop the use of MGM and to bring

% CANCELED FLIGHTS

goal for strategic planning.”

.66% ATL

GETTING SOCIAL

1.16% BHM

Need for the concierge service was discov-

.69% MGM

media feedback, and The Montgomery

more airlines here, which is our number one

ered through passenger surveys and social Regional Airport is utilizing cutting-edge technology to promote the airport to po-

“The Montgomery Regional Airport is losing 75 percent of local travelers to Birmingham or Atlanta, and that’s unacceptable!”

-CHAIRMAN DAVID REED

WITH FLYMGM.COM

Did you know flymgm.com has a cost calculator to compare airfare costs from MGM, ATL and BHM? It will even figure in parking fees and fuel costs to provide a total trip cost before booking your flight.

experience while at the same time staying in step with the city’s initiatives, which include moving technology forward with the development of the Internet Exchange.” - Tammy Knight Fleming, Chair of the Montgomery Airport Authority

tential customers through social media and digital marketing. The airport has become

time and advertising dollars – it dovetails

an early adopter of geofencing, using

with the Airport Authority’s partnership with

location data to identify potential custom-

the City of Montgomery. “It’s the board’s

ers and analyze consumer movement.

direction and commitment to improving

This technology helps the airport identify

passenger experience while at the same

“leakage” – customers who bypassed the

time staying in step with the city’s initiatives,

Montgomery airport to fly out of Atlanta or

which include moving technology forward

Birmingham instead – and educate them

with the development of the Internet Ex-

about the benefits of flying MGM.

change,” Fleming said.

“This technology helps push through the

FORWARD & FUTURE THINKING

psychology of the decision-making process,

TAKE FLIGHT

commitment

we hope will increase passenger usage of

and aims to help customers break the

Another way the Airport Authority is

habits they are in that may make it easy to

supporting city and regional economic

forget the alternatives,” explained Scott Bell

development initiatives is in its commit-

of Bell Media, which is spearheading the

ment to bringing the F-35 to Montgomery.

airport’s digital marketing efforts through

Dannelly Field is home to the 187th Fighter

platforms including display, banner, social

Wing of the U.S. Air National Guard. The

media and video. The technology also

187th currently utilizes F-16 aircraft, but is

allows the airport to accurately track how

in the running to be the new home for a

many people were reached that actually

squadron of fifth-generation fighter jets, the

converted into a flight booked out of Mont-

F-35 Lightning II. The Montgomery Airport

gomery. The campaign has been active for

Authority has been working tirelessly in

about 18 months now.

conjunction with the City of Montgomery and Montgomery County governments to

MGM is one of the few regional airports

secure the F-35 program. “Our number one

utilizing geotracking and digital marketing,

focus in the short term is being the best

putting it ahead of the game in the industry.

community partner we can possibly be to

This not only positions the airport to target

help land the F-35,” Fleming said. “We’re in-

its audience of potential customers – saving

credibly hopeful that we’ve done everything

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


FLIGHT PATH PERFECTLY POSITIONED FOR GROWTH:

• Land all around it that can be developed for cargo, storage and other commercial air development projects • Central in the state between other aeronautical developments like Boeing to the north and Airbus to the south

Boeing to the north and Airbus to the south, we can do, and we believe we’ve assisted

The Montgomery Regional Airport is per-

and the land is primarily flat acreage that is

in making Montgomery number one.”

fectly positioned for growth, from a literal

development-ready.

standpoint, with land all around it that can This includes committing the land for a new

be developed for cargo, storage and other

“There is so much potential right now, in

entryway to the 187th Fighter Squadron

commercial air development projects. This

Montgomery and at the airport,” Fleming

headquarters, as well as purchasing addi-

will allow the airport to generate non-aero-

said. “Montgomery Regional Airport is a key

tional acreage to expand, eventually adding

nautical business and diversify the airport’s

piece of the economic development puzzle

a second runway to accommodate larger

revenue stream. Montgomery is also

on so many fronts. But the airport can’t

aircraft and work with the military.

perfectly located centrally in the state be-

succeed if people don’t use it. It would be

tween other aeronautical developments like

unthinkable to lose this critical resource.”

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LO C A L H E A LT H C A R E

MEDICINE IN MONTGOMERY

PRESCRIPTION FOR PROSPERITY The health-care industry is an economic driver and key employer for Montgomery and the River Region. Major players explain how they are dealing with challenges, outline what the future may hold and highlight the region’s many opportunities. 15

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

• High Tech Right Here • Regional Medical Campus a Game Changer • Nursing Education Options


PRESCRIPTION FOR PROSPERITY

MGM: Strong Contender The competition to recruit doctors to our area is stiff, but Montgomery competes well. “Our community is where we shine,” said Julia Henig, Vice President of Business Development at Baptist Health. She pointed out the city’s positives. “We are a big small town. We are a great place to raise a family, with proximity to lots of

If You Build It?

great places. We don’t According to Henig, the number

have bad traffic.”

about 100 opportunities offered to them before they are done, so it’s very competitive to get them,” Henig said. Recruitment is a large part of her job. One issue making it difficult is the fact that our Medicare reimbursement rate is lower than other parts of the country. But, as Peter Frohmader, Marketing Director at Jackson Hospital pointed out, we have some positives that other areas can’t match. “All the providers in the community are working hard to recruit doctors,” he said. “We continue to be very successful once we get potential doctors here. They are very impressed with our city, what has been happening downtown, in

We have the hospitals and clinics;

of doctors we need, but don’t

economic development and our

we have plenty of patients who

have, could hit 90,000 across the

resources for a city our size.” In

require care. But do we have the

country in the coming years. And

the last few years, Jackson has

necessary contingent of doctors

it’s the same with nurses and gets

recruited more than 50 health-

and nurses to meet their needs?

worse when you look at medical

care professionals.

For now, yes. But soon, maybe

specialties. Some new and

not. That’s the consensus from

interesting solutions, supported

hospital administrators, nursing

by advances in technology, are

and medical school instructors

being considered to combat this

and others in the know on the

workforce shortage, things like

subject. “For our population and

telemedicine and an increased

service areas, we have enough

reliance on “mid-levels,” people

don’t have bad traffic, and we’ve

facilities with Baptist Hospital,

like nurse practitioners and physi-

got a regional airport.” She also

Jackson Hospital and some

cian assistants, who in the future

pointed to another benefit. “We

outside clinics,” said Julia Henig,

may be trained to do more. “We’ll

Vice President of Business Devel-

have to figure out something or

opment at Baptist Health. “The

people may have to drive long

issue we face, like all industries,

distances for a specialist and

is the aging population of baby

even for primary care,” Henig

boomers. We don’t have enough

said.

professionals coming in behind those who are retiring to fill their shoes, and that means we don’t

Filling the Void

have enough medical profession-

While the most obvious fix is to

als to take care of all the aging,

get and keep more doctors here,

and our retiring doctors and nurs-

that’s easier said than done.

es are adding to those ranks.”

“Doctors in training will have

16

Henig agreed. “Our community is where we shine,” she said. Julia Henig, Vice President of

“We are a big small town, a great

Business Development

place to raise a family, with prox-

at Baptist Health

imity to lots of great places. We

GETTING THE JOB DONE

have the fantastic opportunity to start a specialty medical career,” she said. “We are not oversaturat-

Together, Baptist Health and Jackson Hospital provide 6,200 jobs and are within the top 10 largest private employers in Montgomery.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

ed with specialists.” And she praised the Chamber for its help. “It is often easier to recruit families over single people,” she said. “We sometimes work through the Chamber to help get a spouse placed in a job, and they have been great in that effort.”


Together makes us better. And you, too.

Knowledge that will change your world

See a UAB doctor in one of these specialties UROLOGY GASTROENTEROLOGY ENDOCRINOLOGY RHEUMATOLOGY Coming Soon CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY BREAST HEALTH

The UAB Multispecialty Clinic at Baptist Medical Center South brings two names you trust together.

Together makes us happier, stronger, better. That’s why Baptist South has opened a clinic that brings the best names in healthcare together. Nurses and staff from Baptist South have joined specialty-trained doctors from UAB to offer advanced care in many specialties. It’s a partnership that’s going to make everyone better, including you. Call today and make an appointment at the UAB clinic. Let’s get you better, together.

334.613.7070 UABmedicine-Baptist.com MULTISPECIALTY CLINIC BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER SOUTH

2119 East South Blvd, east of the Emergency entrance at Baptist South


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


HIGH TECH Right Here Providing world-class care here at home so residents don’t have to leave the market is a priority for both of Montgomery’s hospitals and that means staying up to date with the latest and greatest medical technology and coming up with new ways to serve patients are necessities. Here’s a brief overview of a few recent advancements at both Jackson and Baptist.

Jackson Hospital:

Baptist Health:

The 3-Tesla MRI: the stron-

The Davinci X5 Robot:

gest MRI used on patients

the newest tech for robotics

anywhere (and currently the

in the country, being used to

only one here). It gives doc-

perform minimally invasive

tors the ability to see things

surgeries.

they’ve never been able to before.

The UAB Multi-Specialty

Tru-D SmartUVC: a germ-

Clinic: staffed with 10 doctors

eliminating robot that

in four specialties with breast

generates UV light energy

and cardiovascular surgery

that modifies the DNA or RNA

added in summer 2017.

structure of an infectious cell. Jackson is the first hospital in the River Region to use it.

ADDED BONUS “It’s so efficient. In the past, these doctors and nurses would have to leave the city for several days to train. Now, they just walk out of the hospital, into the training center, learn what they need and get back to work.”

Don’t Panic So you find out your surgeon did his training in the back of an 18-wheeler. Sound sketchy? Don’t worry. It’s not. One key piece of the medical professional retention puzzle is making continuing education a no-brainer. Of course, this pays off for patients too. At Jackson, surgical teams often train in a mobile lab, which just happens to be in an 18-wheeler’s trailer. Stryker, a medical equipment company, drives its lab (basically a surgical suite on wheels) to the hospital and sets up shop and then brings entire surgical teams in to get specialized training on cutting-edge equipment. This particular mobile lab is for neurosurgery and spine procedures using 3D navigation, a kind of GPS mapping and imaging for your body, that Jackson now utilizes. Peter Frohmader, Marketing Director at Jackson Hospital.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


PRESCRIPTION FOR PROSPERITY UAB Med School Good for MGM

Making Montgomery Home

UAB’s School of Medicine Montgomery Regional Medical

Julia Henig, Vice President of

Campus started in 2012 and

Business Development at Bap-

is in partnership with Baptist

tist Health, stressed the role

Health. “UAB knew the med

residents can play in recruiting

school needed to increase its

doctors. “To get doctors here,

class sizes and produce more

we need to continue to add

doctors for our state,” said Dr.

to and improve upon existing

Wick Many, regional dean for the school. But rather than have those students assigned to the main campus or UAB’s campuses in Huntsville or Tuscaloosa, the recommendation was to place a campus in Montgomery.

A group of UAB School of Medicine Montgomery students, class of 2018.

The students, who are all in their third year of medical school when they come to Montgomery, love it. “They go back and brag to students in Birmingham about the relationships they are developing here.”

The idea was that UAB’s close

Area doctors are pitching in too.

el of excitement and enthusiasm

relationship with Baptist Health

“Our faculty is mostly voluntary,”

that rekindles those feelings in

would remove some of the diffi-

Many said.

our faculty who are practicing doctors,” he said. “It raises the

culty of starting a new program. But the focal point was the lack

The students, who are all in

level of educational discourse,

of access to care in some of the

their third year of medical

gets them talking about new

economically depressed areas

school when they come to

breakthroughs. The students

right outside of Montgomery.

Montgomery, love it. “They go

are actually bringing some new

“The hope is, if we train doctors

back and brag to students in

ideas and knowledge to these

here and have them live here,

Birmingham about the rela-

faculty, things that just weren’t

that the long-term investment

tionships they are developing

on the map when some of our

will pay off by having many

here,” Many said. And these

faculty were in school.”

of them come back and work

relationships could make all the

here,” Many said.

difference when the students the future. “Will all our students

to make the med students’ time

come back to this area? No.

here a positive experience, and

But if we have 20 graduate and

they’re getting help. “The city,

have three to five come back,

the Chamber and Baptist have

that is a homerun, and I think we

bent over backwards to help

will get that,” Many said.

us,” he said. “I am in awe of the support we receive and the wel-

And it’s a win-win, according to

come the students are given.”

Many. “The students bring a lev-

options that make quality of life great,” she said. “And to keep them here, we need to embrace them." One recent recruit to the area explained why he came and

Dr. Geoff Habermacher, a urologist, from Charlottesville, Va.

why he and his family feel so at home. Dr. Geoff Habermacher, a urologist, came to Montgomery last year from Charlottesville, Va. He’s now practicing at the UAB Multi-Specialty Clinic. “To be successful, and to be on the leading edge of a new

are deciding where to settle in Dr. Many and others work hard

amenities and entertainment

venture for a large academic center like UAB is a neat thing,” he said. He and his family are also enjoying the welcome. “Both of our daughters are fitting in well. Dr. Wick Many, Regional Dean, UAB’s School of Medicine Montgomery Regional Medical Campus

Plus, the people are as warm as the weather, and that’s nice.”

Adding to the problems plaguing health care everywhere is uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act and

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT UNCERTAINTY

its replacement. “The overall state of health care in general is really an unknown with the uncertainty at the federal level right now,” Frohmader said. In a perfect world, more people insured is always better for hospitals and health-care providers. “Better access is a great premise, but under the ACA, we still had problems with payment,” Henig said. “Many were still uninsured and those insured at the lowest level had such high deductibles. Some reform is needed for sure.”

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LO C A L H E A LT H C A R E

A FEW EXPERTS Local professionals sharing their insight

Dr. Jean Leuner, the Dean of the College of Nursing & Health Sciences at Auburn University at Montgomery

Image courtesy of Auburn University at Montgomery.

TAPPING INTO TALENT nursing, but we have more quali-

dire, hasn’t. “The work of nursing

fied applicants than we have seats

has gotten more complex as our

nursing shortage head on.

in schools.”

population ages and the number of

Our area – just like our country – is

A look at data from the Bureau of

Leuner said. “It is a very demand-

already facing a nursing short-

Labor Statistics shows that we had

ing profession today, but we still

age as well as a nursing faculty

2.71 million nurses in 2012 and that

have many who want to do it.”

they can, and hopefully will, teach.

shortage, a situation Dr. Jean

figure will rise to 3.24 million by

Leuner, the Dean of the College

2022, an increase of 19 percent.

Yet, we don’t have the manpower

There’s also a need for more nurs-

of Nursing & Health Sciences at

And yet, we still fall short. “It’s esti-

to train them all. The faculty short-

es with bachelor’s degrees, and in

Auburn University at Montgomery

mated that we’ll need an additional

age is, as Leuner put it, “severe.”

an effort to meet that, AUM has put

(AUM) calls “the perfect storm.” “We

half million nurses by 2022, so the

Adding additional instructors to

its RN to BSN program complete-

are seeing baby boomers retiring;

growth we have is not enough,”

nursing schools is one reason

ly online, which lets registered

as they age, we see the shortage

Leuner said.

recent recommendations put out

nurses pursue a bachelor’s, and is

by the Institute of Medicine call

admitting new students to it every

How the River Region is fighting an impending

Kay Bennett, Vice President of Human Resources

chronic diseases has increased,”

intensifying because the need for

at Baptist Health

more nurses is getting greater,” she

One factor that you’d think might

for doubling the number of nurses

semester. The school has also cre-

said. “There’s plenty of interest in

make the situation even more

who get a doctorate degree so

ated a community for pre-nursing

MAKING IT COUNT

LEARN HERE. WORK HERE. "Our graduates are very well thought of in our community. Baptist in particular loves having our students do their clinicals there. They say they are so well prepared and so professional. And more than 75 percent of the nurses trained in our ASN program stay here.” - Dr. Sherry Seibenhener, Troy University Montgomery Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the Associate’s Degree in Nursing program

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


LO C A L H E A LT H C A R E

NURSING SCHOOL IN THE RIVER REGION For River Region residents looking to enter the nursing profession, there are several options for education right here at home. Here are some of the offerings.

TROY UNIVERSITY MONTGOMERY: • Associate of Science degree in nursing, a two-year program that allows its graduates to take the

AUBURN UNIVERSITY

national licensure exam to become

AT MONTGOMERY:

a licensed registered nurse.

• Bachelor of Science in nursing

• Master of Science in nursing

• RN to BSN, which allows registered nurses to obtain their BS degree in

SOUTH UNIVERSITY:

nursing, and is offered as a totally

• Bachelor of Science degree

online option or in a hybrid format with partnership hospitals.

in nursing

• RN to BSN

• Master of Science in nursing

• Master of Science in nursing with specialization in Family Nurse Practitioner Image courtesy of Auburn University at Montgomery.

LOOKING AHEAD students, blocking off an entire floor in a dorm for them to live and learn together. “It’s the first academic community like this at AUM, and there is a lot of research showing how beneficial these live/learn groups are,” Leuner said. Both Montgomery hospitals are doing their part.

A look at data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that we had

ing, not just here, or regionally, it is nationwide,” she said. “We have a lot of strategies, but one

will rise to 3.24 million by 2022, an

tionship is more formal; we talk to their nursing

that leads new RN graduates through a yearlong but continue their training while working, and

and Leuner. “There is a great demand for nurs-

2.71 million nurses in 2012 and that figure

Jackson now has a nurse residency program training program. “They are practicing nurses

Kay Bennett, Vice President of Human Resources at Baptist Health echoed both Frohmader

increase of 19 percent. AND YET, WE STILL FALL SHORT.

work with a dedicated experienced nurse who serves as a mentor for them,” said Peter Frohmader, Marketing Director at Jackson

is working closely with area schools, like AUM as well as Troy and Wallace. With AUM, this relafaculty often and get their feel for what is going on and how we can help their efforts.” Baptist offers nurse extern programs where students actually shadow nurses in eight different departments, rotating every week, to get an idea of where they’d like to work.

Hospital. Jackson also offers an externship for The hospital also facilitates a support program

nursing students in their last two semesters of school. They operate as nursing techs, and get

programs have been very successful and great

for just-graduated nurses where they meet

paid while they finish their studies. “We hope

transition tools for new graduates who maybe

monthly to talk, share advice and more. “Our

they stay on with us once they graduate and

don’t feel confident to just step out on their

senior leaders participate in that, and we get

pass the nursing exam,” Frohmader said. “Both

own.”

feedback from the nurses and make adjust-

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


ments to make their work environment better,” Bennett said. “These are ways we not only recruit but also retain good nurses.” And retention is key. “We have and are looking to implement a lot of strategies on this point,” Bennett said. One is establishing unit councils in every department to provide their nurses the ability to make decisions that affect their day-today. Another is recognizing and rewarding good work with awards. And finally, giving nurses flexibility and the chance to grow is key. “We have

Image courtesy of Troy University.

a place for a nurse to practice in almost every area,” Bennett said. “We’ve also increased the

graduating nursing students from AUM stay in

are better prepared to onboard quickly at local

number of clinical educators on the floor sup-

the greater Montgomery area, so it behooves

hospitals and health-care agencies,” she said.

porting our nurses. And going forward, we’re

both hospitals to keep an eye on these students

In the end, this is all good news for nursing

looking at some pretty creative shift scheduling

and reach out to them.

students and middle or high school students

and different staffing models all in an attempt to

interested in the career. “The employment

understand what nurses need to be successful

Leuner and her team are being proactive too,

opportunities for nursing students are great,”

and meeting those needs so they can best care

working with local health-care entities to see

Leuner said. “When our students graduate, they

for their patients.”

what AUM can do to best meet their needs in

have job offers in hand, and that is due to the

terms of nursing, things like revising or adding

huge need. Especially for bachelor’s degree

to its curriculum. “This means our graduates

nurses, the employment outlook is amazing.”

According to Leuner, 90 to 95 percent of the

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VESTOR IN

OFIL

Q&A

E

COLEMAN LARLEE While he’s been with SABIC for 17 years, Coleman Larlee has only been General Manager at the company’s Burkeville plant for a few months. Yet in that short time, he’s already experienced and come to appreciate the positives of doing business—and living—in the area. Where are you from? I was born in a small mill town

good for a community. It brings a lot of diversity and a lot of

in Maine, but I moved around a lot growing up. I joined the

patriotism. On the business side, finding exceptional people

military and lived all over the world, and I was in Albany, New

is always a challenge, but our recent work to bring talent into

York, before coming here.

the company here has been very successful. The feedback from current employees is that they are pleased with the

Share a little about what SABIC does. SABIC

caliber of people we are bringing in.

ranks among the world’s top petrochemical companies and is among the world’s market leaders in the production of poly-

Any challenges on the horizon? We know we will

ethylene, polypropylene, advanced thermoplastics, glycols,

have a huge need for new talent in the next five years. We are

methanol and fertilizers.

in a re-tooling stage from a personnel standpoint because a lot of our employees have been with us from the beginning,

What does SABIC make here? The Burkville site

so they’re getting ready for well-earned retirement. Keeping

produces polycarbonate, which is used extensively in the

all that institutional knowledge and passing that along to new

automotive industry, as well as in consumer electronics,

people will be our next big challenge. We are a global com-

healthcare, the construction industry and more. We are a

pany, a world player, and to maintain that, we need to keep

world-scale plant, producing around two million pounds of

our quality high and service excellent with low costs. The only

polycarbonate resin a day, some of which is compounded for

way to do that is with a talented, trained workforce.

customers here in North America or Mexico. The balance of the resin is shipped to the Pacific, to our compounding plants that service the Asian market.

What do you think SABIC brings to the area (besides jobs)? I haven’t been here long, but I know this site strives to build a positive and sustainable relationship with

How many people does this plant employ?

the communities where we operate. Last year, the Burkville

Approximately 320, plus well over 100 resident contractors.

Site donated more than $1.4 million to the community through its United Way campaign, educational science programs for

How long has it been open? This plant broke ground

schoolchildren and more.

in 1985 and has been open since 1987; we just celebrated our 30th anniversary. It has undergone two major expansions

Why is SABIC so supportive of the Chamber?

since initial construction. One doubled our capacity; then we

Obviously SABIC has significant history here, three decades

quadrupled it in 1996.

of it. The partnership that we’ve created with the Chamber is beneficial for both. It’s great to see the success here and

What’s your impression of the area and Montgomery so far? I believe it is going to be a great

to see what looks like a healthy economy. The Chamber’s

place to call home. It is a beautiful area, very rich in history.

is critical to the prosperity of everyone in the area. Another

I enjoy the outdoors and am an avid motorcyclist, so I’m

important thing the Chamber does is create a network in the

looking forward to exploring Alabama’s back roads. As I men-

community where businesses can collaborate on shared chal-

tioned, I grew up in mill towns and I served in special forces in

lenges. It really is a catalyst for growth and really represents

the Army for 16 years, so I understand the needs of industry,

the area in a great light to prospective industries and busi-

and I understand military communities. I think having the Air

nesses. It also fosters an environment where businesses can

Force base here is a big plus. Military presence is always

grow. We really have all the raw materials for success here.

26

commitment to continued development of a quality workforce

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

IMAGE BY ROBERT FOUTS

PR

PO W E RHOUSE


Hard at WORK SABIC’s Montgomery-area plant produces approximately 2 million pounds of polycarbonate resin each day.

“ “The Chamber is a catalyst for growth and really represents the area in a great light to prospective industries and businesses. “

- Coleman Larlee

27

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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M EM BER profile

MONICA VIRGIL Monica Virgil has a passion for math (and the master’s degree to prove it), and through her business, Mathnasium of East Montgomery, she’s using her knowledge and enthusiasm to help math make sense to area students.

What do you love about math? Math is not only a subject, but it is a tool that offers unlimited academic and career opportunities. I love that my enthusiasm for math is contagious. I believe that it helps me fulfill my responsibility and to leave a legacy.  How

did you get interested opening a Mathnasium? I was on track to becoming a college

math professor. When I learned about Mathnasium, I decided to use my skills as a public school math and science teacher in the private sector. Armed with a bold vision and a tremendous passion for math education, I followed my dream to combine education and leadership. As a result, I opened Montgomery’s first Mathnasium. Mathnasium is a nationwide franchise of more than 800 learning centers that helps students better understand math through personalized learning programs.   

What are the primary services that Mathnasium offers? Math tutoring and enrichment for grades K-12.

What makes Mathnasium different from other tutoring services or learning centers? Mathnasium specializes in math only. We put a lot of emphasis in hiring and training math experts that help students catch up, keep up or get ahead in math.

Recent milestones? Mathnasium of East Montgomery has served close to 1,000 students in all levels of math, even college, in the past four and half years.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? I love when a student comes to us disliking math and ends

Besides Just Numbers:

up loving it because of us.

I enjoy serving the community through motivational

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

speaking, volunteering for different non-profit

What’s on the horizon for Mathnasium?

organizations, and I enjoy the performing arts.

Mathnasium is looking to move to a new larger location to give us the ability to serve a larger customer base.

One of the highlights of my career was being selected

COMPANY FOUNDED SEPTEMBER 2012 mathnasium.com/eastmontgomery

winter commencement ceremony.

as a speaker at Western Governors University’s 2013

29

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BE R profile

MELISSA WARNKE Melissa Warnke came to Montgomery from Cullman, Ala., to work as a reporter for WSFA-TV. Now, as Communications and Engagement Manager for the Alabama Retail Association, a key part of her job is still telling stories. And the story of retail in Alabama is an important one. Including food and beverage establishments, retail is our state’s top private sector employer.

What is the association’s mission? To promote and protect the retail industry in Alabama. We also serve as the voice for retailers to the Alabama Legislature and the U.S. Congress. One in four people in Alabama work in retail, and local retailers are the backbone of our communities.

How many businesses does the association represent? The association represents 4,200 members with some 6,000 locations statewide, ranging from small, family-owned retail stores to large national chains.  

What is your primary role? I work to build relationships with our members, the media and peer-groups (like chambers, downtown groups, etc). I do writing for our website, magazine and member communications as well as video production, public speaking and social media.

What is BizTalk MGM? It’s a radio show I host every Monday night at 6 p.m. on WVAS 90.1 FM. And you can listen to podcasts of all the episodes on the Chamber’s website. The show was created to connect the community to business topics that matter – whether that’s learning new ways to market your business, gaining insight on how to network with other business own-

Recent honors:

ers or getting connected with the resources we have

I was recently named a “Rising Star” by PR

in this community. Full credit goes to Temisha Young,

News and the Social Shake-Up in the 2017

who produces the show and developed the show along

Movers and Shakers awards. I also recently

with Lisa McGinty, both at the Chamber. And it was the

received a “Medallion” for my work with

brainchild of Ron Simmons, also at the Chamber.

our “Shop Alabama” campaign from the

What’s your favorite thing about your job?

campaign has been my “baby,” and I have

I take pride in knowing the work that I do every day has

enjoyed leading the charge to educate

a tangible impact, and every day at Alabama Retail is

Alabamians on the importance of supporting

something new.

local retail. Next year, the Alabama Retail Association will mark its 75th anniversary. 30

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

OPERATED SINCE 1943 alabamaretail.org

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

Public Relations Council of Alabama. The


www.jackingram.com 334-277-5700

31

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M E M BE R profile

TODD MOTE Todd Mote wasn’t born and raised here, but the Troy University grad has been happy to call the River Region home for the last 14 years. As Area Executive for PrimeSouth Bank, he wears many hats; serving his fellow River Region residents and continuing the bank’s commitment to its community are the most rewarding.

When did you join PrimeSouth Bank? October of 2012.

How many branches does PrimeSouth Bank have in the River Region? We have four full-service locations throughout the River Region, including offices in Tallassee, Wetumpka and Pike Road.

What does your job entail? I am our Area Executive and cover the Pike Road and Montgomery markets, but in simple terms, I specialize in relationship banking, and I’m involved in all areas of the bank from lending and deposits to overall business development. With all decisions being made locally, I am able to service our customers’ needs in an efficient and effective manner. From discussing a complex commercial loan request to discussing the importance of basic financial literacy, I cover it all.

What’s your business philosophy? In 1958, PrimeSouth Bank was founded on the simple principles of meeting the financial needs of the communities we serve, while also being engaged as a committed corporate citizen. We believe in giving back to our communities. You can find us serving concessions at local high-school football games during the fall and partnering with various non-profits throughout the River Region.

Standing the Test of Time In 2018, PrimeSouth Bank will celebrate its 60th anniversary, and I am proud to say that serving our local communities is still our top priority, just as it was back in 1958.

These principles have always been and will continue to be the heartbeat of PrimeSouth Bank.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? I am given the opportunity every day to help people achieve their goals, from building their dream home to

What are your interests outside of work? That’s an easy one, FISHING! From bass to speckled trout, I love catching them all. primesouthbank.com 32

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

building their business.


we see your story

33

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MyMGM

EAT IT UP

/ by WENDI LEWIS

Take a bite out of the capital city and get out there to #EatMGM during this year’s Montgomery Restaurant Week.

SEE YOU THERE: RESTAURANT WEEK AUGUST 11-20

For more information on EatMGM visit

There’s no question that food and dining

the restaurant community to come together

have become events unto themselves.

to take pride in the local scene. Beyond

They’re entertainment. They’re an experi-

Montgomery, it raises awareness of the city

ence. They are ways to learn about other

as a dining destination for surrounding areas.

scene,” said Chase Brown, General Manager

cultures and a little about yourself. The third

Both of these are part of building up Mont-

of The Vintage Year and the just-announced

annual Montgomery Restaurant Week, set for

gomery’s restaurant scene, which our visiting

Vintage Cafe, which is slated to open later

August 11-20, 2017, is the ultimate expression

travel writers tell us without fail is competitive

this fall. The VY has participated in Restau-

of food as fun, as art and as education.

with any other destination.”

rant Week since the event’s first year in 2015.

Restaurants participating in the 10-day event,

EatMGM enhances the relationships between

unite the Montgomery dining scene as one

dubbed EatMGM, will offer special menus,

Montgomery restaurants, diners, visitors

city and one culinary destination. People

events and pricing to encourage local diners

and the media and raises awareness of the

tend to get in a routine where they visit the

to enjoy their favorite places and also try

variety and quality of restaurants and food

restaurants they know, on their side of town,

new experiences. “EatMGM Restaurant Week

experiences in Montgomery. Organizers also

in their neighborhood. This showcases Mont-

does two important things for us,” said Meg

hope that this effort will increase business

gomery’s dining scene as a whole. I want

Lewis, Director, Brand Development and

for local restaurants during the late summer,

people to hear that MGM is the next culinary

Special Projects for the Montgomery Area

which can be a slower time for restaurants.

destination.”

it encourages people to try a new place or

“First, of course, this is a great opportunity

Locally owned and managed restaurants

rediscover old favorites and encourages

for people to get out and explore the dining

have been encouraged to offer specials

www.eatmgm.com

“But Restaurant Week also is a chance to

Chamber of Commerce. “On the local level,

34

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


FOLLOW ALONG facebook.com/eatgump @eatmgm For more information on dining in Montgomery, go to www.visitingmontgomery.com. Just two of the flavorful dishes offered by local restaurants during EatMGM last year. (left: Central; right: La Jolla)

“La Jolla has participated in the EatMGM restaurant event for the past two years

at set price points of $5, $10 and $15 for

during Restaurant Week, there will be a

with great success,” said Rachel Arnone,

lunch and $10, $20 or $30 for dinner. Offers

variety of social media promotions and other

Marketing Director for La Jolla Restaurant &

are listed on the EatMGM website at www.

special events in the days before and after

Bar. “It gives the community incentive to try

eatmgm.com and are being promoted on

the event. The promotional week also coin-

new restaurants throughout the Montgom-

social media channels including Facebook

cides with Alabama Restaurant Week, and

ery area that otherwise may not be on their

and Instagram.

all participating restaurants will be featured

radar. The city of Montgomery having events

in that statewide promotion coordinated by

of this nature encourages residents to get

the Alabama Tourism Department.

out in the community and eat good food!”

In addition to the special pricing offered

Open for Breakfast & Lunch 6:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Back room available for parties, corporate meetings, and special occasions. Off-site catering available Honors Military, Fire, Police and EMS discounts

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Regional Impact

FOOTBALL & FANS Fall means college football is here again, but the region’s most popular pastime brings more than fun to Montgomery. Learn how the city capitalizes on the South’s favorite game.

STATE OF

IMPACT “When someone goes to a football game they are not just driving in, going to the game and leaving. When they are coming in from other states they are staying for the weekend. They are staying in hotels, they are eating in restaurants, they are shopping.” - BRIAN JONES, ALABAMA TOURISM DEPARTMENT

LSU Tigers unload at Embassy Suites Hotel & Montgomery Conference Center to visit with fans.

Montgomery packs plenty of team spirit in its

and coaches away from the excitement and

visiting teams also like to stay in town. On

borders, as home to three universities with

crowds that pack Auburn on home game

a big SEC rivalry weekend, it’s not unusual

football programs and fans of all stripes. It

weekends. The Tigers spend Friday nights

for our hotels to be sold out citywide,” said

also plays an important role in the storied

at The Renaissance Hotel & Spa at The Con-

Hathcock.

football program at nearby Auburn Universi-

vention Center downtown and do their best

ty, hosting the players and coaches the night

to relax and prepare for the coming compe-

On top of the money Auburn and its games

before every home game – and hosting

tition. General Manager Perry Grice and his

bring here, there are two other colleges

AU’s opponents. So how does all this pig-

team do their best to adequately host these

close by, as well as the three Montgom-

skin passion benefit the capital city? Dawn

big (literally and figuratively!) guests. “We

ery-based colleges with football programs.

Hathcock, vice president of the Chamber’s

block off rooms for them that are away from

They all benefit the city. “We get teams that

Destination MGM & Brand Development

the rest of our guests,” Grice said. “We want

are playing ASU, Troy, Huntingdon, Faulkner,

team, offered her opinion. “It’s hard to give a

it nice and quiet where they are.”

Tuskegee and Auburn staying in Montgomery, plus, some of their fans, on any given

precise economic impact number due to the

Saturday during the season,” Hathcock said.

way the schedules vary and who is playing

This arrangement is obviously lucrative for

where,” she said. “But I would say each

the hotel, but the rooms booked by the

football season can generate an economic

team have a positive effect on the entire

The positive effects of football here go

impact here that is in the millions of dollars.”

city thanks to lodging and gas taxes, extra

beyond the dollars spent and taxes re-

money spent, and more. And just across the

mitted. The intangibles are important too,

Our neighbor to the east plays a large part.

street, Auburn’s opponents bed down at

as Hathcock explained. “It creates a very

Since it’s only 40 miles away from Auburn

The Embassy Suites Hotel & Montgomery

festive atmosphere when you have all of

University in Auburn, Montgomery is the

Conference Center. These teams’ fans often

these fans out and about in your town,” she

natural choice for a locale that gets the team

choose Montgomery too. “The fans of the

said. “It’s fun.”

36

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


BY THE

NUMBERS On game days, the college football programs based in Montgomery often pack their respective houses with thousands of residents but also thousands of visitors.

FAULKNER, EAGLES Stadium capacity: 6,000

HUNTINGDON COLLEGE, HAWKS Stadium capacity: 2,000

ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY, HORNETS Stadium capacity: 26,500

BLOSSOMING BOWLS In 2014, the first ESPN Raycom Media Camellia Bowl was played in Montgomery, putting the capital city on college football’s map with an exciting post-season game. Played in historic Cramton Bowl, which has been hosting gridiron action for almost a century (including University of Alabama home games in the 1920s), the bowl is named after Alabama’s showy state flower. Each December, the Camellia Bowl brings teams from the Sun Belt Conference and the Mid-American Confer-

YELL-O!

ence for one last bout of intense competition before they hang up their helmets for the year. According to the bowl’s Executive Director Johnny Williams, the Camellia Bowl is something special. “The history in Montgomery is incredible. To be able to take a student-athlete, who may never have visited Montgomery or Alabama, to the Rosa Parks Museum, is a special opportunity. We’re able to share the civil rights history as well as the sports history of Cramton Bowl,” he said. “We’re also able to provide the student-athletes, coaches and fans with great food and southern hospitality among the other perks of being in a bowl game.” The game is televised on ESPN and drew more than 7,000 fans in person and far more viewers in its first year. And it’s still growing. Williams stressed why Montgomery visitors and residents should check out the next bowl. “Our goal is to create a unique college football experience that you can’t get anywhere else.” So far, they’ve succeeded, according to Hathcock. “Fans and players are loving this bowl, and it can fill our hotels in a time that is normally not very busy, so it is

MIDNIGHT YELL The teams slated to play

a definite boost to the local economy,” she said. “In the first year, we saw about a

Auburn spend the night before game day in

$15 million economic impact over the year before the bowl was here, and this rise

Montgomery, and when Texas A&M is in town,

has continued to stay steady.”

its fans carry out their tradition, the famous “midnight yell,” at the SandBAR, on the banks of

The city is poised to rack up more positive points since it recently scored another

the Alabama River downtown. Hundreds of fans

bowl game, the Guardian Kick-Off Classic, which features Jacksonville State play-

gather for this late but loud and rowdy pep rally

ing UT Chattanooga on August 26. Plus, the city hosts the return of the intense

that gets them all fired up and lets them practice

ASU versus Tuskegee game over Labor Day weekend. “We expect big returns

cheers and chants for the next day.

from all of these,” Hathcock said.

37

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack

CULTIVATING COMPASSION The basics – “reading, writing and arithmetic” – will always be key components of education, but Montgomery-area schools are teaching students more too, including the importance of contributing to their community.

A group of Montgomery Catholic seniors spent their Lenten Day of Service helping clean up the property where the scenes in the fictional town of Spectre were filmed for the movie “Big Fish.” They picked up trash and did some landscaping, including stump removal.

Learning to look beyond yourself and truly see and care about

for elementary and middle school students in Montgomery

the needs of others is a skill the world could use much more of.

and surrounding areas, and tickets are donated to community

Like any topic, philanthropy takes root best when taught young,

organizations serving children. At Montgomery Museum of Fine

a fact schools in Montgomery understand. We talked to a few

Art’s FLIMP Festival, we support the Humane Society’s efforts

to find out how and why they’re instructing their students to reach out, give back and make a meaningful difference. “I believe that learning to serve is one aspect of a well-rounded student and that well-rounded students not only achieve in school but also, in turn, give back even more to their community,” said Principal Quesha Starks at Booker

Begin early. “When you learn to give generously and volunteer your time and talents at a young age, you will continue to do so as an adult.” - Jill Wyrosdick

T. Washington Magnet High School.

to find a home for pets and to heighten awareness in our community about the needs of the shelter.” BTW students also participate in a number of clubs and other groups through the school that pursue their own charitable projects each year. It’s the same at other area public schools. “Community service and engagement continue to be a cornerstone for our career and technical education,” said Principal Marsha Baugh of the Montgom-

She learned the value of philanthropy through her many activities as an MPS student herself, and

ery Preparatory Academy for Career Technologies (MPACT). All

this attitude has made her dedicated to fostering the same in

of the student organizations have community service require-

her students. “Part of BTW’s mission is to promote a service

ments, which enhance learning through innovative programs,

mindset among students and staff,” she said. “Through our

business and community partnerships and leadership experi-

annual Showcase at the Davis Theatre, our students perform

ences. “It is important for young people to participate in these

38

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Meet Fred & Nita Johnson! In 2014, they opened Little Red Cupcake Gourmet Cupcakery or LRC. Soon you will also find them in downtown Prattville and a cupcake kiosk in downtown Montgomery.

39

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack opportunities. It promotes compassion and understanding, and also allows them to see

IT ALL ADDS UP

what a difference they can make in their community,” Baugh said. At some area private schools, a set number of completed service hours is required for

Change 4 Change

graduation, and they all offer extra-curricular activities with service components. These schools recognize that the overall

Teaching its students how to serve others is a focal point at Trinity

character building that comes from a focus

Presbyterian School. The many pro-

on philanthropy yields adults who’ll be bet-

grams and activities available

ter, more productive members of society.

encouraged from kindergarten

But they are taking things a step further

through high school are proof.

During its annual Wilburn and Jean Bullington Eagles for Christ Day, ACA high school students went to more than 21 different organizations in Central Alabama, including E.A.T. South, giving a combined

now, providing coordinated opportunities

One example shows how working

for students to share with those in need.

together makes an even bigger

Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School

initiative is a school-wide missions

is building on its heritage. Founded by the

project to which students and faculty

believed that children should develop a

Sisters of Loretto, an order of nuns from

contribute spare change. The money

value system including honesty, loyalty and

Kentucky, in 1873, the school’s opening

is used to support local and interna-

service. Therefore, the school should be

total of approximately 1,500 service hours.

impact. Trinity’s Change 4 Change

was actually delayed as the nuns spent all their time when first here caring for those suffering from a yellow fever epidemic. Today, every high school student spends a morning at Vaughn Road elementary school working with special needs students; it all adds up to 660 volunteer hours provided to

tional ministries and charities.

During the 2015-2016 school year, $28,018.20 was collected, and a total of $68,487.17 has been collected in the last three years.

Vaughn Road students each year. Catholic

“Since its founding, Saint James has

characterized by a community service ethic, and opportunities for community service should be available at all levels,” said Elizabeth Hawke, the school’s Advancement Director. In its new strategic plan, the school has put greater emphasis on what it means to be a school that is an advocate for its community.

students also volunteer across the River

spring. “Philanthropy is definitely encour-

Region during an annual Lenten Day of

aged at Macon East throughout all grades,”

Service is important at Alabama Christian

Service. In 2017, the student body, faculty,

said Jill Wyrosdick, Public Relations Direc-

Academy too. “Our slogan ‘Thrive in wis-

staff and parent volunteers provided over

tor. “When you learn to give generously and

dom, serve in spirit,’ truly embodies our mis-

1,100 hours of service in one day. “In such

volunteer your time and talents at a young

sion to empower our students with giving

a secular world, it is imperative for each of

age, you will continue to do so as an adult.”

back to the community,” said Kathryn Bandy,

us to be the hands of Christ for others. We

ACA’s Director of Public Relations and Mar-

as administrators and leaders of our school

Saint James School has made preparing

keting. In addition to its annual Wilburn and

work to encourage this servant spirit in

its students for lives of responsibility and

Jean Bullington Eagles for Christ service

our students,” said Anne Ceasar, Catholic’s

service an integral piece of its mission.

day, ACA students participate in projects

President. “Works of mercy and the gift of

Grade level divisions, clubs and specific

including a garden planted and tended

service should be part of the daily lives of

events like participation in the National

by elementary students who donate the

each of our students and lead them to be-

Make a Difference Day and Jump Rope

harvest to the food bank and canned food

come persons of faith, virtue and wisdom.”

for Heart, which in 2017 alone raised more

and blood drives. ACA has the distinction of

than $16,000, have focused on fulfilling this

being the school to raise the most money

mission for decades.

for Jump Rope for Heart in the state.

At Macon East Academy, the Student Government Association’s Change for Change initiative selects causes throughout the year to support through student giving. The SGA also hosts an annual blood drive in the

The Chamber wants to share the good news of businesses doing good. Please send story ideas for Giveback to jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

40

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


GiveBack

LOCAL CLASS ACTS Volunteering time or donating money or goods to a charity is definitely a matter of the heart, but it is also a learned behavior. Several recent studies show that students who are exposed to specific philanthropic education exhibit a deeper level of interest and involvement in service activities going forward. Both Trinity and The Montgomery Academy offer entire courses focused solely on philanthropy.

TRINITY’S SERVICE 101 CLASS lets students explore and participate in service opportunities throughout the community. They’re learning to be more empathetic but also honing leadership skills and teamwork as they develop and implement service ideas.

THE MONTGOMERY ACADEMY’S PHILANTHROPY 101 CLASS, which is only one of several philanthropy-centered offerings at the school, is a three-week course where rising seniors delve into an indepth study of local charitable and non-profit organizations. They learn from presentations that outline the inner workings of these groups and also spend time each day aiding the organizations directly. After completing the course, they leave with a heightened understanding of the part they can play in change and the diverse ways to give back.

Montgomery Academy student Martha Glen Sease presenting her Philanthropy 101 stipened to Chandalyn Chrzanowski of Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians. Each student participant is given a stipend, a part of which must be donated to a single nonprofit 501(c)3 organization of his or her choice.

GIVEBACK

BRIEFS

to alleviate the financial burden, allowing students to focus more on their studies and ultimately help strengthen the future of Central and East Alabama.” The 10 seniors from Montgomery, Autauga, Elmore and Lee counties listed below were selected from nearly 80 applicants, representing 30 different schools as the recipients of the MAX4Kids Scholarships, totaling $25,000: Ashlyn Dallas, Auburn High School; William Dowe, Macon East Academy; Farhan Hossain, Loveless Academic Magnet Program High School; Kiara Peters, Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School; Shalynda Pettway, Carver Senior High School; Malisa Ray, Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School; Haley Skipworth, East Memorial Christian Academy; Keondrea Surles, Alabama Christian Academy; Carson

MAX4KIDS FOUNDATION® recipients from Central and East Alabama.

Turner, Wetumpka High School; Hunter Winged, Wetumpka High

MAX4KIDS Awards Scholarships to Area Seniors

Students Receive Free Sports Physicals

In early May, the accomplishments of 10 high school seniors were recognized by the MAX4Kids Foundation at a scholarship reception. The MAX4Kids Foundation® is a non-profit organization that was created in 2001 by MAX associates as a way to give back to the communities MAX serves. “MAX4Kids is honored to celebrate the accomplishments of these 10 outstanding high school seniors,” said Jessica Pigg, MAX4Kids Board Member at Large. “College is increasingly expensive, and we hope that these scholarships help

41

School.

Jackson Hospital’s sports medicine program provided free physicals to student athletes in mid-May. The annual event gives student athletes the opportunity to receive a free physical so they are eligible to participate in school athletics during the upcoming academic year. As part of the Jackson Sports Medicine program, more than 2,000 student athletes went through the comprehensive physical examination as part of their eligibility to participate in school athletic activities in the coming academic year.

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


42

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


AFITC 2017:

THE FUTURE IS NOW Get an inside look at this major Air Force conference that focuses on all things tech and whose offerings and audience go far beyond the military. by WENDI LEWIS

T

he Air Force Information Technology Conference (AFITC) is back and better than ever. The event has expanded in focus to include defending America from cyber-attacks, advanced

persistent threats, and how the Air Force can proactively lead this battle in this increasingly digital world. It has even changed its name

“By making technology a priority, and allowing entrepreneurs in the technology area to flourish, we are establishing Montgomery as a hub for business development.”

to reflect this new frontier—the Air Force Information Technology &

-Joe Greene, Vice President, Military & Innovative Strategies for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

Cyberpower conference, held this year on August 28-30. Maxwell Air Force Base is the home of Air University, the Air Force’s Intellectual and Leadership Center for the Air Force, and Gunter

Vice President, Military & Innovative Strategies for the Montgomery

Annex hosts some of the most sophisticated technology enterprise

Area Chamber of Commerce. “In the sense that everyone faces

systems in the Department of Defense (DOD). Maxwell-Gunter AFB

questions about security, moving toward more advanced systems

and the City of Montgomery together are participants in a Smart City/

like cloud computing and Artificial Intelligence. These concepts apply

Smart Base initiative. Maxwell-Gunter AFB is the only military base in

across the board. Everyone has access to technology. Everyone has

the nation to be designated a Smart Base as part of a pilot program

an iPhone, a smart phone. So how can we make those transitions in

with AT&T. In addition, Air University has opened a new Cyber Col-

the military and make smart transitions. AFITC is about crossing those

lege with the goal of developing new strategies and tactics for the

lines between the Air Force, the DOD and civilian sides, and how

use of Cyberpower and leveraging new and innovative technologies

they can each enhance what the other is doing.”

within the Air Force and Department of Defense. To help facilitate this sharing of information, the conference focus“Technology is the same whether it’s inside the Air Force, the Depart-

es on collaboration. Activities allow and encourage individuals to

ment of Defense, or businesses and universities,” said Joe Greene,

become more than a passive audience. “AFITC has definitely evolved

43

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


“We are developing the capabilities to share large amounts of data on a global scale. That requires a lot of computing capabilities. We’re taking two-lane roads and turning them into major highways.” -Joe Greene, Vice President, Military & Innovative Strategies for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

From left: Mayor Todd Strange and County Commission Chair Elton Dean speak at AFITC 2017. Lieutenant General Steven Kwast addresses AFITC attendees.

These conversations are not limited to

from anywhere on the globe and work on

AFITC. The Chamber is working in con-

programs together across the internet and

junction with Air University and the Cyber

across systems we’re developing.”

College to set up an innovation center downtown to collaborate with people from

Another ongoing initiative to develop tech-

private industry, universities and research

nology in the River Region is TechMGM train-

centers on an ongoing basis. They will exam-

ing, a partnership between the Chamber,

to address the challenges and opportuni-

ine what new technology could be applied

the Alabama Community College System

ties that exist today,” said Charisse Stokes,

to the Air Force, not just for Smart City/Smart

(ACCS) and the local IT industry community

Chairman of the Chamber’s TechMGM Task

Base but along a broader spectrum. “This

to find ways to provide opportunities for IT

Force. “AFITC used to be primarily focused

opens up the larger question about how we

professionals to further develop their skills

on air space and ground intelligence. That’s

can use the capabilities we’re developing

and qualifications in order to allow local

still a big part of the conference, but now

here in Montgomery to host those collabo-

contractors to source their talent locally. The

because of the prioritization of cyberspace –

rations both physically and virtually,” Greene

program is intended to help boost the IT

the Department of Defense as a whole, has

said. “We are developing the capabilities

workforce pipeline in Montgomery, where

moved to value cyberspace – it becomes a

to share large amounts of data on a global

numerous DOD contractors provide highly

matter of how do we educate our workforce,

scale. That requires a lot of computing

technical services to Maxwell-Gunter Air

provide them with the right tools to support

capabilities. We’re taking two-lane roads and

Force Base’s defense programs.

this industry. AFITC brings in every sector

turning them into major highways.”

and allows everyone to collaborate on

Additionally, AFITC showcases Montgomery

those tools and the development of a total

Eighteen months ago, city and county

to the top business leaders in the IT industry

workforce.”

leaders announced the development of the

as a potential site for their projects. This

Montgomery Internet Exchange, MGMix. In

provides huge potential for future business

A key part of that collaborative effort is

June, the exchange increased its capacity to

development in the River Region. “The ones

Innovate AFITC, which will be run by the

100 gigabytes, which is 10 times what it was

who come here to speak are top in their

City in parallel with the conference. This is a

when it started. That bandwidth will allow a

field for the company,” Greene said. “AFITC

hands-on “hackathon” type activity that will

much faster exchange of data, making Mont-

provides us the advantage of being able to

task teams to identify potential problems

gomery attractive to high-level technology

showcase what’s going on here in Mont-

and propose solutions to address those

companies, and expanding the opportunities

gomery. We want to go beyond just having

challenges. The theme this year will be

for high-paying jobs and advanced industries

a great conference and then everyone goes

potential challenges faced by Smart Cities.

to locate in the River Region. “By making

home. We want to actually look at how it can

Teams must include at least three members,

technology a priority, and allowing entre-

improve what we’re doing here in Mont-

one each from the military, private industry

preneurs in the technology area to flourish,

gomery and improve those partnerships to

and a student. “It’s really about bringing the

we are establishing Montgomery as a hub

continue to grow businesses and innovation

right people to the table to solve problems,”

for business development,” Greene said.

in the River Region.”

Stokes said.

“They can communicate with Montgomery 44

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


exchanges and positioning it to

to leverage the MGMix to grow

attract peering partners that move

Montgomery’s cyber vertical as an

large amounts of data like Amazon,

economic development opportu-

Microsoft, Apple or Netflix. Auburn

nity. A new emerging innovation

University at Montgomery has

district has been created down-

signed a peering agreement and

town with CoWerx46, a develop-

is set to become the first Uni-

er-centered co-working space as

MGM’s new cyber and technology

versity to join MGMix. For AUM,

the anchor. These new initiatives,

initiatives are re-writing the busi-

that means the potential for cost

along with hosting the military’s

ness playbook in the River Region

savings and more opportunities for

only IT conference, are fueling

in multiple ways. Alabama’s only In-

large-scale collaborative research

economic growth, will maximize

ternet Exchange, MGMix, reached

with other universities. Montgom-

the community’s technology talent

a milestone in June when

ery business leader Carl Barranco

pipeline and have already perfect-

it announced it can handle 100 gi-

has been named Cyber Strategy

ly positioned MGM as an emerging

gabytes of traffic per second plac-

Coordinator, helping to further

tech hub and tech leader within

ing it among the ranks of powerful

develop and manage the effort

the Southeast.

GAME CHANGER

45

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS

A WIN-

WIN

FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION AND MGM

Invest in the Chamber and Grow Your Business

GET INVOLVED

The Annual TRC offers plenty of unique and creative ways to build your business and your brand. Find the right event or sponsorship for you and your business. www.ygmtrc.com/MontgomeryChamber17

The Chamber’s Annual Total Resource

experience growth, expand their network

Compass Bank has participated in TRC

Campaign is right around the corner. The

of potential clients and increase their brand

for almost 10 years. Bruce Crawford, the

exciting 8-week campaign offers local

identity and awareness. That’s why many

bank’s Montgomery-area CEO, explained

businesses a great way to gain exposure,

businesses participate year after year.

why, echoing Guy. “Signing on to sponsor Chamber events and other initiatives

increase their brand, market to a captive audience and support the Chamber’s top

The visibility and credibility that come with

through TRC gets our name and brand out

initiatives through unique and exclusive

joining the Chairman’s Circle, sponsor-

in front of the business community, which

marketing and advertising opportunities.

ing an event or having an eye-catching

is a demographic we are always trying

banner ad on the Chamber’s website or

to reach,” he said. “But just as important

e-newsletter are powerful and productive.

is the fact that the dollars we and other

HOW IT WORKS

Businesses can choose avenues that

Every year, the Chamber’s Total Resource

reach the entire Chamber membership, or

Campaign (TRC) raises money to help fund

they can hit a target audience. By allowing

Chamber events and programs. More than

businesses to reach specific groups (like

25 volunteers, who work at Chamber-mem-

professional women, small businesses,

ber businesses and organizations, contact

tourists or elected officials), TRC products

other member businesses and offer them

have consistently produced quantifiable

unique ways to market and grow their busi-

results.

“ WHAT MEMBERS SAY: “Many events provide continuing education, and

ness through Chamber events, programs and communications.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 49

TRUTH BE TOLD

it gives the business that purchased a sponsorship

By investing in the Chamber’s TRC,

Patsy Guy, vice president, member and in-

member businesses connect to the vital

vestor relations for the Chamber, stressed

programs and resources they need to

what businesses get out of TRC. “Members

grow their business and thrive. Sponsor-

increase their business and community

ships not only impact the Chamber, they

awareness by marketing through Chamber

fuel economic growth for Montgomery and

programs and products,” she said. “And the

the River Region.

entire community benefits by accelerated

to their community where

growth created by successful well-funded

they live, work and play.”

Time after time the marketing and adver-

programs.”

tising opportunities offered through the campaign help local member businesses

But don’t just take her word for it. BBVA

46

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

an opportunity to invite customers or potential customers to that event. It reinforces their commitment

- ANN SADIE OSTEN, SADIE’S GLOBAL TRAVEL


A FEW

GOOD

OPTIONS

Grow Your Business These are just a few of the marketing and advertising opportunities that will be available through TRC starting in mid-August.

3 ANNUAL MEETING As the largest and most

1

2

CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

EGGS & ISSUES SERIES Each Eggs and Issues event in the series features briefings on the issues that impact our region from a local, national or international perspective. The five-part series includes our two Alabama U.S. Senators and three Congressional Representatives. However, should they not be available, the event could feature The Chairman’s Circle is an elite list of executives

elected or high-ranking government

and business owners in Montgomery and the River

officials such as cabinet members or

Region looking for connections on a high and influen-

senior military officials.

tial level. Members will receive increased exposure

THE PERK:

to the business community, invitations to exclusive

Be recognized as a powerful

functions, receive top-level briefings by key lead-

business leader and give your em-

ers and government officials and receive targeted

ployees, clients or stakeholders

information regarding the Chamber’s initiatives and

a seat at the table and a chance

strategic priorities.

anticipated business event of the year, close to 800 community and business leaders attend the Chamber’s Annual Meeting. This signature event celebrates the Chamber’s rich 146-year history, the economic development milestones of the year, and the installation of the new Chairman.

THE PERK: Be seen as a leading stakeholder and vital key player among the who’s who of the business community at this exclusive event.

5 DIVERSITY SUMMIT

to learn about local and

THE PERK: Gain a seat at the table with some of Montgomery’s most prominent business stakeholders.

AN EVENT FOR WOMEN

4

national issues impacting our business community.

Hundreds of local business lead-

CONVERSATIONS: ROUNDTABLES FOR PROFESSIONAL WOMEN

ers attend this highly anticipated

This engaging and impactful speaker series for profes-

and offering an intense one-day

event featuring dynamic speakers from across the country,

sional women in the workplace celebrates women in

agenda full of diversity and inclu-

all levels of business. The event provides one-on-one

sion training that is crucial to any

networking opportunities, lunch, a presentation from an inspirational and informative speaker and includes facilitated roundtable discussions with outstanding business women in the River Region.

THE PERK: Associate your brand with this unique event that gives a voice to this powerful demographic in business.

business model, and size.

THE PERK: Enhance your brand and the success of your business by setting an example and leading the charge on diversity and inclusion.


SCORE!

Central Alabama’s Best Business Source

Make Your Mark. MARKET DIRECTLY TO MONTGOMERY ’ S MOST INFLUENTIAL BUSINESS LEADERS TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL VOLUME 9 ISSUE 1 / JANUARY 2017

MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL V O L U M E 9 I S S U E 3 / M AY 2 0 1 7

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MBJ

WHY TOURISM=

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT F O R M O N T G O M E RY

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Small Biz, BIG Impact

EYES AHEAD:

WHAT SMALL BUSINESS LOOKS LIKE IN MONTGOMERY

CHAMBER’S HIGH I M PA C T P R I O R I T I E S

GOING UP

CHAMBER CHAIRMAN DAVID REED IS building ON A strong LEGACY

LANDING GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS F LY I N G H I G H : NEW F-35 FLEET KEEPS TUSKEGEE AIRMEN SOARING

BUILDING BACK:

G R O W I N G R E A L E S TAT E IN THE RIVER REGION

MB_JAN17_Issue1_FINAL.indd 1

//

R E S E R V E N O W.

PLUS:

HISTORIC HOT DOGS HOW TO HIRE AN INTERN

7/27/17 3:37 PM

Our Content

Our Readers

We Reach

IS CENTERED ON BUSINESS NEWS

ARE COMMUNITY-FOCUSED,

INDUSTRY STAKEHOLDERS,

AND PERSPECTIVES FROM

DIVERSE, EDUCATED, AFFLUENT

MILITARY, DECISION MAKERS

MEMBERS AND INDUSTRY LEADERS.

AND INFLUENTIAL.

AND SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS.

C O N TA C T S E R E N A M I N TO N AT 3 3 4 - 3 1 6 - 3 3 5 1 / S E R E N A @ E X P LO R E M E D I A .O R G


businesses spend on TRC products help provide the funding for the many events and services that our Chamber offers."

message across in a way that says more than some other forms of marketing and

WHAT MEMBERS SAY:

advertising. “Depending on what events

The foundation of TRC and its success are

“Signing on to sponsor

businesses by providing exposure both

the committed volunteers. Using their time,

Chamber events and other

talents and connections, 25-30 people work hard each autumn to sell TRC’s diverse range of marketing products. But

initiatives through TRC gets our name and brand out in

they benefit from the program as well.

front of the business community, which is a

Ann Sadie Osten of Sadie’s Global Travel

demographic we are

has been involved since 2007. She explained what motivated her to be a part of TRC. “I felt I needed to be more involved

always trying to reach.”

in our community, and the Chamber was

- BRUCE CRAWFORD,

a great way to get started,” she said. “Our

BBVA COMPASS BANK

Chamber does more than most Chambers

they support, participating in TRC benefits to their employees, showing that they support their community, but also to other businesses and potential customers,” she said. “Many events provide continuing education, and it gives the business that purchased a sponsorship an opportunity to invite customers or potential customers to that event. It reinforces their commitment to their community where they live, work and play.” TRC started in 2006, and in the last 10 years, it has been successful on all levels,

around the Southeast and possibly around

according to Guy. “It has provided funding

the country. They focus on economic de-

nities to meet business professionals and

for the Chamber’s important initiatives,

velopment, which benefits all businesses.”

expand my network of contacts,” she said.

provided an opportunity for volunteers to

She also outlined the positives she’s gotten

And Osten shared her belief that busi-

activities and provided volunteers expo-

out of TRC. “I realized very quickly that

nesses who buy TRC products definitely

sure to the community at large and the

volunteering in the TRC gave me opportu-

get their money’s worth by getting their

leadership of the Chamber,” she said.

become more engaged in the Chamber’s

49

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS

Connect +

NEWS, R ESO U R C E S AN D A LOOK IN S IDE THE MAN Y WAYS YOUR CHAMBER WORKS FOR YOU

TEAM REPORT Business Retention & Expansion Team Going after new businesses and helping them locate here is a major part of the Chamber’s economic development mission, but it’s only one piece of the puzzle. Keeping our existing businesses happy and encouraging and aiding them in expansion efforts is just as crucial to the overall economy in our area, and these are the objectives the Chamber’s Business Retention & Expansion Team work hard on every day, as Jessica G. Horsley Director of Retention
explained. From left: Jessica Horsley, Director of Retention, and Constance Calambakas, Project Coordinator .

AT THE TOP 2016 TOP COUNTY for job announcements by new and expanding industry

= 1,704 JOBS

PROVEN PROGRESS What do you and the Business Retention & Expansion team do?

What are some of your team’s most significant achievements? With 1,704

We meet with area manufacturers to explore

jobs in 2016, Montgomery County was

opportunities and challenges; educate man-

the top county for job announcements by

ufacturers on the resources of the Chamber;

new and expanding industry. Montgomery

assist area companies with their expansion

County ranked second last year in new and

plans; handle issues as they are raised by

expanding industry economic development

existing industry; and foster networking

project announcements, with 42 announced

opportunities, recognition programs and all

projects, which was 10.4 percent of the

efforts to promote the growth and develop-

state’s total announcements. Also, in 2016,

ment of the existing industries in our area.

Montgomery County had $371.3 million in new investments.

How does the local business community benefit from what you and your team do? We educate and assist with the abatement process, saving companies po-

What one thing would you like MBJ readers to know about what your team does? We work with manufacturing

2010 #1 New Jobs #2 Total Investment #3 Total Jobs

2012 #3 Total Jobs

2013 #1 New Industries #2 Total Investment #3 Total Jobs

2015

tentially millions of dollars in taxes. We also

companies, headquarters, IT and back-office

#2 New Industries

represent a one-stop location for training

operations. We are ready, willing and able to

#3 Total Jobs

needs through the Montgomery Regional

assist them in the challenges they face daily

Workforce Training Center.

when operating their businesses.

How does the community in general benefit from the team’s work? The com-

What is your favorite thing about your job? I love the feeling of having made a sig-

munity benefits through the job creation and

nificant impact on the day-to-day operations

job preservation that result from our efforts.

of our local industries and their employees. 50

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

2016 #1 Total Jobs #2 Announced Projects #4 Total Investment Source: Alabama Department of Commerce


51

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Connect CO NNEC T I NG YO U TO T H E M A N Y CHAMBER RES OURCES AN D S ERVICES AVAILABLE

GET CONNECTED

WHAT THEY SAY

CELE B RATE YOUR BU S I N ESS                           Ribbon cuttings, ground breakings and grand openings for your business: . . . . . . Kappes McGough, kmcgough@montgomerychamber.com Press releases and announcements: . . . . . . . . . . . Jina Miniard, jminiard@montgomerychamber.com

CHAMBER MEMBERS SPEAK OUT ON HOW THEIR MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS THEIR BUSINESS.

Event calendar: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/events SAV E MONE Y Member-to-Member discounts: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com Notary public service: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Paul Redhead, predhead@montgomerychamber.com Membership mailing lists and labels: . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com MEET MORE CLIENTS & VENDORS Networking events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com Ambassador program: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynn Norton, lnorton@montgomerychamber.com Online membership directory: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/directory Government contract resources: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com HIRE & TRAIN YOUR WORKFORCE Job board: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/jobboard Corporate recruitment: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Justice Smyth, jsmyth@montgomerychamber.com

“When ASK needed to grow, we moved into the Chamber's newly constructed Montgomery Small Business Incubator in 1998. We doubled our size while in the incubator and hatched out in 2003. During that time, the strong support of the Chamber staff helped build a solid foundation for future growth. We are still the largest company

Corporate retention:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Horsley, jhorsley@montgomerychamber.com

to come out of the incubator and

Workforce training:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constance Calambakas, ccalambakas@montgomerychamber.com

will be celebrating our 25th year

BUILD YOUR B USIN ESS Research information: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rachel Madore, rmadore@montgomerychamber.com Small business counseling: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

in business in November. We specialize in providing customer care, order processing and a variety of other back office tasks for scores of national companies,

Diversity and inclusion programs: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

and we are currently experiencing

Entrepreneurial development: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

explosive growth. While we were

Seminars and training: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

in Montgomery or other cities, the

Co-working space: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com Office space to rent in the Chamber’s Business Resource Center: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

deciding whether to grow further Chamber helped us locate incentive packages as well as open locations. Our growth is made possible by the pro-business atmosphere

HOST MEE TINGS I N M O N TG O M ERY Meeting and event venue information: . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com

promoted by the Chamber.”

Special hotel rates for meetings, events & sporting events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com

ASK TELEMARKETING

- RICK BURLEY,

OUR CHAMBER. YOUR VOICE. 52

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Connect A LO O K B AC K AT T H E FACES AN D PLACES OF RECEN T CHAMBER EVEN TS

Recent Chamber Events MEMBER EVENTS:

EGGS & ISSUES WITH LUTHER STRANGE, APRIL 11 at the RSA Activity Center Grand Presenting Sponsor: Gilpin Givhan

A sellout crowd greeted the newly appointed Senator, Luther Strange. Strange may have only been in office for a few months, but he is no stranger to Montgomery or Alabama politics. He is currently serving on several committees that directly impact our area.

APR 12

60 Minute Coffee at Montgomery Antiques & Interiors Sponsored by

APR 27

Business After Hours at Blackfinn Ameripub Sponsored by Blackfinn Ameripub

AALOS (Alabama Artificial Limb & Orthopedic Services)

THE BUSINESS OF GOLF CLINIC AND MIXER, APRIL 20 at Arrowhead Country Club Business relationships are made on the green. The Business of Golf workshop featuring special guest Tiffany Mack Fitzgerald, founder of Black Girls Golf, was a fun way to learn how to use golf as a strategic business tool. MACC/AU GOLF CHALLENGE, APRIL 24 at Wynlakes Country Club Presenting Sponsor: Alabama State Employees Credit Union

MAY 60 Minute Coffee

MAY

03

25

at Alfa Insurance

Sponsored by Alabama Ag Credit and Alabama Farmers

Business After Hours at Answered Prayer Home Care Services Sponsored by Answered

Federation

Prayer Home Care Services

For 27 years, city and military officials have faced off on the green in a battle of the clubs for the MACC/AU Golf Challenge. This year, the city won and leads with 14 total wins.

JUN 14

60 Minute Coffee at Brantwood Children’s Home Sponsored by Brantwood Children’s Home

JUN 29

Business After Hours at Larkspur Management Sponsored by Larkspur Management

53

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

MILITARY SALUTE, APRIL 29 at Riverwalk Stadium Presenting Sponsor: HCS Group Every year elected officials and the community come together to honor Maxwell-Gunter and the families who serve them by having a special Military Salute night at the Biscuits game.


CHAMBER NEWS Connect CO NNEC T I NG YO U TO T H E M ANY CHAMBER RES OURCES AN D S ERVICES AVAILABLE

CONVERSATIONS: ROUNDTABLES FOR PROFESSIONAL WOMEN, MAY 4 at the Montgomery Country Club Sponsored by Morgan Stanley

This engaging and impactful speaker series for professional women in the workplace featured Steve Meany, CEO of Information Transport Solutions (ITS), Inc. Meany discussed the management and technical skills necessary to be a powerful player within the cyber community, as well as women having a an integral role within the IT workforce.

Business Resource Center Recent Events The Chamber’s BRC Works With You to Grow Your Business Grant Writing 101: Where to Begin, May 3 Seeds of Prosperity: Farming as a Business, May 12 High School Entrepreneurial Class: Shark Tank, May 18 at The Rock Academy

EGGS & ISSUES WITH MIKE ROGERS, MAY 10 at the RSA Activity Center

CHAMBER GOLF CLASSIC, MAY 11 at RTJ Capital Hill

Grand Presenting Sponsor: Gilpin Givhan

Presenting Sponsor: KALM Services, LLC

With a new administration and 100 days behind them, Rogers updated locals on how the first 100 is impacting business in Montgomery. He also provided insight on how the first 100 impacts our region and discussed other issues affect the state.

One hundred business leaders and elected officials attended the Chamber’s Annual Golf Classic. This tournament is always the perfect event to engage with community leaders and elected officials, and connect with other members and potential clients.

CHAMBER ORIENTATION, MAY 17 at the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Sponsored by CharterHR

At this informal orientation, new members give an overview of their business and hear from Chamber President, Randy George. MILITARY FAMILY APPRECIATION DAY, JUNE 15 at the Montgomery Zoo Presenting Sponsor: Guardian Credit Union

Every year the Chamber, elected officials and community leaders express gratitude to the heroes of Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base for their service and contributions to our area. This year more than 2,000 people attended.

nch u L SAVE the DATE Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

145th ANNUAL MEETING

- PRESENTING SPONSOR -

December 7, 2017 12PM - 1:30PM Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center Downtown Montgomery 54

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

- GOLD SPONSORS Aronov Realty Management, Inc. Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood, Inc.


M EM BER Spotlight

PEPPER TREE STEAKS N’ WINES In 1998 Kathy Andrews and Jeff Verner combined their talents and years of experience and opened Pepper Tree Steaks N’ Wines on Vaughn Road. Steaks N’ Wines is now considered a fundamental staple in east Montgomery. They have been providing the capital city with the finest cuts of steaks, chops and a large selection of the most desired wines and craft beer for almost 20 years now. It also offers cooked gourmet meals for dine in or carry out.

WHAT DOES PEPPER TREE STEAKS N’ WINES OFFER? We have a range of culinary experiences including a butcher shop with hand-cut steaks that include angus, prime and specialty cuts along with other types of meats like prime pork and free-range organic chicken, house made sausage, plus our famous seasonings, which are now being shipped worldwide. We have a “gourmet to go” department with fresh casseroles, dips, salads, appetizers and baked

Shown left to right: Rod Rudolph, Chantel Davis Bass, Andrew Bass, Kathy Holmes Andrews and Jeff Verner

goods. We will also do the cooking for you, anything from full dinners with our hand-cut steaks or seafood to burgers and sandwiches. We have an on-site chef, Drew Bass, and offer full-service catering for everything from business lunches to lavish weddings. Our General Manager and Catering Director, Chantel Davis Bass can help plan the perfect event. We have an extensive wine department and an experienced staff who can help you choose the perfect bottle. We also do wine tastings, wine dinners and wine classes. Our gift department prepares specialty gift baskets.

WHAT IS YOUR BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY? To offer the finest quality products available while providing a warm and friendly environment while building long-lasting relationships with our customers.  

WHAT SETS YOUR BUSINESS APART? Customer service. We continue to try and exceed expectations with quality products while also placing our customers first and making them feel like family. Our staff is always ready to go above and beyond to help our customers. We are constantly striving to share our passion for delicious food and wine with our community.

ANY MILESTONES OR AWARDS YOU’D LIKE TO MENTION? We have recently renovated the store and improved our customer service area to make it a better shopping experience. Jeff has placed first for the past eight years in the Alabama Wildlife Federation Wild Game cooking competitions, and Chef Drew Bass won the Alabama Shakespeare Festival’s Feast of Flavors tasting competition in 2015.

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON? To continue to increase our catering capabilities by showcasing our “traveling grills” onsite during weddings, corporate events, backyard BBQs, etc. We are striving to be seen more out in the community this way.

8101A VAUGHN ROAD IN PEPPERTREE SHOPPING CENTER/ 334-271-6328 / STEAKSNWINES.COM 55

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Small Business Briefcase +

PACK ED WITH TIPS AN D TOOLS TO BEN EFIT YOUR BUSINESS

LinkedIn Lessons

CONN

ECT

E ONLIN

WAYS TO MAKE THE PLATFORM WORK FOR BUSINESS The use of social media continues to be an important piece of businesses’ marketing and communications plans. And since it’s tailored to business, LinkedIn is one of the major players. We asked Angela Woodruff-Swarts, a former Montgomery business owner who found real success using LinkedIn, to share some of her wisdom.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE WAYS THAT A BUSINESS CAN USE LINKEDIN TO GROW AND BE SUCCESSFUL? What I love about LinkedIn is it’s a busi-

this can be a great means of finding your next hire.

HELLO WORLD

of connecting with business professionals

WHAT ARE A FEW BIG LINKEDIN “DO’S” WHEN USING IT TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS?

LinkedIn is the world’s largest

across the globe, thereby allowing you to build

Build your brand! Post updates that speak to

online professional network

relationships regardless of geography as well

your target audience and demonstrate your

ness-focused platform and offers a means

as provide a hyper-focus on

capabilities. Share meaningful

the service or product verticals

articles and information that

you operate in. As you build your network, you can work to promote your brand through good old-fashioned relationship building, content marketing,

MUCH LIKE ANYTHING ELSE, YOU GET OUT OF LINKEDIN WHAT YOU PUT INTO IT. YOU NEED TO BE AN ACTIVE PARTICIPANT.

with more than 500 million members in over 200 countries and territories.

can help your target buyer and demonstrates your expertise.

Members are joining

Seek to build a relationship with

LinkedIn at a rate of more than

your connections; start a conver-

two new members per second.

sation to learn about them and ask how you can help them.

There are more than 40 million

Be consistent in posting and

students and recent college

referrals. The possibilities are

sharing, at least a few times a

graduates on LinkedIn.

endless.

day, so that you stay in your con-

They are the network’s fast-

nections’ news feed. This goes a

est-growing demographic.

participation in LinkedIn affinity groups and networking for

IS LINKEDIN A GOOD WAY TO FIND AND HIRE EMPLOYEES?

long way in building your brand.

LinkedIn provides you access to millions of tal-

Statistics show that posting three to five times

ented professionals and their profiles, and when

per day is plenty, and you can even use tools

done well, will provide great insight into their

like Hootsuite to help you schedule and man-

experiences, accomplishments and may even

age your posts so you don’t have to remember

have recommendations from peers, managers

to do it at various times across the day. Last but

and customers. It’s also a great resource to

not least, mix up the content as you post across

connect with specialty skill sets and the passive

a day. A combination of the above examples is

job seeker—those individuals who may not be

best so that you’re not spoon-feeding the same

actively looking to make a change but given the

information day in, day out.

right opportunity, would do so. If you have the

BAD HABITS:

STEAR CLEAR • DON’T JUST SELL. Remember

you’re here to build relationships, network, share expertise and

ultimately, earn trust. • DON’T OVER POST. Yes, you can post too much or worse, you end up with posts that look like they

time to mine profiles and initiate conversations,

are better served up on

FROM THE EXPERT: What I love about LinkedIn is it’s a business-focused platform and offers a means of connecting with business professionals, thereby allowing

you to build relationships regardless of geography. ANGELA WOODRUFF-SWARTS 56

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Facebook. Always remember this is a business-focused platform.


M EM BER Spotlight

OFFICES AT MIDTOWN Now called the Offices at Midtown, a section of the established collection of office spaces at Interstate Park in Montgomery just got a new lease on life and a fresh face lift thanks to its new owners.

WHAT LED TO THE RE-BRAND OF THIS PROPERTY? Interstate Park buildings 100-800, located at the intersection of Perry Hill Road and Interstate 85, were recently re-launched as The Offices at Midtown. They were acquired in 2016 and are receiving major improvements courtesy of new owners, an affiliate of Larkspur Properties, LP, a Miami, Florida-based real estate investment firm.

WHAT IS LARKSPUR PROPERTIES? Larkspur Properties is a value-oriented investment firm focused on distressed residential and commercial projects. Founded in 2009, Larkspur’s current portfolio consists of $100 million in real estate assets across the eastern part

Standing Left to right: Kenneth Smith, Maintenance Engineer Kathy Smith, Commercial Property Manager and Jimmy Messick, Maintenance Engineer.

of the United States.

WHAT RENOVATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN COMPLETED? The last year has been spent repositioning the nearly 200,000-square-foot office property with more than $1 million in exterior improvements, improved infrastructure, enhanced landscaping and new entrance and building signage as part of a total renovation and rebranding project.

WHAT SETS THESE OFFICE SPACES APART? Our motto is “where quality meets affordability” and that’s true. We are one of the city’s prime commercial office properties on several fronts. Our unique spot in central-Montgomery is conveniently located and offers immediate access to I-85. The Offices at Midtown features office space with amenities including garden pavilions, covered patios, a conference facility, convenient exterior entrances for each office space, outdoor seating areas, abundant surface parking, mature landscaping and much more. There are eight buildings with lease space available ranging from 894 square feet to more than 20,000 square feet, so there’s something for any size business. And the property already boasts an impressive roster of local, regional and national tenants, including Rheem, which recently signed a 10year lease on 28,000 square feet.

WHAT ARE THE NEW OWNER'S EXPECTATIONS FOR THE OFFICES AT MIDTOWN? According to David Bernstein, president of Larkspur, “We see great potential for this property. We are overhauling the physical design of the infrastructure to put a modern face on the buildings. With the renovations and rebranding of the location combined with our leasing incentives, this will be a very attractive location for businesses looking for a good value in office space.”

100 INTERSTATE PARK DRIVE, SUITE 100 / 334-676-2734 / LARKSPURPROP.COM 57

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

PALOMAR INSURANCE CORPORATION MAKES NEW HIRE

vices Department and will support the Audit Committee of

Palomar Insurance Corporation,

the Board of Directors in the fulfillment of their functional

a Montgomery-based insurance

oversight role.

administrative supervision and guidance to the Audit Ser-

brokerage and risk management consulting firm, announced the

MONTGOMERY CATHOLIC PREPARATORY SCHOOL NAMES NEW PRINCIPALS

hiring of Evans Brown as an Account Executive. He graduated

Nancy Foley was named principal at the Holy Spirit

from the University of Alabama

Elementary Campus. Foley has served as a fourth-grade

and worked in the medical in-

teacher at the Holy Spirit campus

dustry immediately after college.

since it opened in 2012 and has

Brown’s main focus is commercial insurance.

33 years of teaching experience in Catholic, public and magnet

JON MASTERS JOINS MOORE COMPANY REALTY Jon C. Masters is the latest addition to the Moore Company Realty’s brokerage team. Masters, who joined the firm recently, works with clients in a broad range of fields, including office, retail, industrial

schools. After being named, Foley said, “The word for this school is, ‘dedicated.’ The faculty and families are dedicated to helping our students grow academically and spiritually. In turn,

and land. “With the volume of

I am dedicated to the teachers,

business here, I’m doing a little bit

students and families.” Justin

of everything,” said Masters, who

Castanza has been named prin-

received a bachelor’s degree

cipal at Montgomery Catholic’s

in business administration and

Middle/High School campus, a

marketing from Troy University.

position he is familiar with after

He has strong local ties. After

serving as interim principal for

being born in Orlando, Masters was raised in Millbrook; he lives in Prattville; and he works in one of Moore Company’s re-purposed buildings in

the 2016-2017 school year. “I am pleased to announce that we are changing Mr. Castanza’s title from interim to Principal. He has done an amazing job this year with our

downtown Montgomery.

students, faculty and parents, providing many novel and rich experiences for all,” said Montgomery Catholic Prepa-

VENABLE NAMED SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF RISK, COMPLIANCE AND PRIVACY OFFICER FOR ALFA INSURANCE

ratory School president Anne Ceasar.

Alfa Insurance® Executive Vice President and General Counsel Angie Bradwell announced the promotion of

WARREN AVERETT TECHNOLOGY GROUP ADDS EMPLOYEE

Craig Venable to Senior Vice

Rick Deloney joined Warren Averett Technology Group

President, Chief Risk, Compliance

in April as a Senior Business

and Privacy Officer in mid-April.

Development Consultant.

Venable most recently served as

Deloney graduated from Auburn

vice president of Audit Services.

University at Montgomery with a

In his new role, Venable will

Bachelor of Science degree in

provide strategic oversight in the

Business Administration. He has

development and implementation

spent the past 21 years working

of effective and cost-efficient

for Deltacom and EarthLink

programs across all Alfa companies and business units for

Business in different roles, but

Enterprise Risk Management, Corporate Compliance, Pri-

most recently as an Enterprise Account Manager handling

vacy, Audit and Corporate Insurance. He will also provide

a large customer base throughout the United States.

58

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

OLIVIA FOSTER JOINS ADMIRAL MOVERS

years and has experience as a veterinarian technician,

Olivia Foster has rejoined Admiral Movers as vice presi-

groomer, practice manager and has also owned his own

dent and controller. She will also

grooming business.

serve as operations manager. Foster, who was born and raised

JOHN HEMMINGS PROMOTED AT ALFA INSURANCE

in Sylacauga, worked at Admiral Movers as move coordinator

Alfa Insurance® President Jimmy Parnell announced the

while attending Huntingdon

promotion of John Hemmings

College, where she graduated

to Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

with an accounting degree.

in mid May. Hemmings will con-

She became the controller after graduation and assisted with the operations department. Her new duties include overseeing the firm’s finances and ensuring that all paperwork related to moves is complete and accurate. She will schedule the moving crews and work with customers to make their move as seamless as possible.

tinue to serve as a senior vice president and Chief Investment Officer (CIO) — a position he’s held since 2011. “I am pleased to announce the centralization of Alfa’s financial functions under John Hemmings in his new position as CFO,” Parnell said. “He has played a vital role in charting a course for

SERVISFIRST BANK MONTGOMERY WELCOMES NEW VICE PRESIDENT

greater profitability since joining the Alfa family and will do

ServisFirst Bank, a subsidiary of ServisFirst Bancshares,

talented Investment and Finance Department staff.”

well providing coordinated leadership to the company’s

Inc., recently announced the

addition of Max Coblentz as Vice

LONGHORN STEAKHOUSE ANNOUNCES NEW MANAGING PARTNER

President, Commercial Lending within the Montgomery office.

Scott Gavitt was recently promoted to Managing Partner

Coblentz has a decade of bank-

of the LongHorn Steakhouse

ing experience within the Auburn

in Montgomery. He started his

and Montgomery markets. In his

career at LongHorn Steakhouse

new role, Coblentz will originate,

in 2001 as a server at the Prat-

service and close commercial loans and lines of credit in Lee and Montgomery Counties, including commercial real estate and commercial and industrial prospects.

tville location. Over the years, he has grown with LongHorn by helping open several new restaurants across the Southeast. Scott lives with his wife Roxy and they have two sons, Tyler and Cody. Scott also

THE BARKERY ADDS MANAGING PARTNER The Barkery announced that Brett Fuller is now a man-

enjoys fishing and University of Alabama football.

aging partner. He also recently received his American Kennel

+ SUBM IT T IN G N E WS? Submit information to

Club certification. Fuller is among just a handful of groomers in the

Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

River Region who have received

Attach press releases as a Word document and

this certification. In addition to

include a high-resolution headshot (at least 300 dpi).

his AKC certification, Fuller also

An accompanying headshot is required for

received his certification in Pet

“Members on the Move” announcements.

CPR and is First Aid Certified. Fuller has worked in the veterinary field for more than 20

59

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

HIGH RIS E FUN D RAIS IN G

WANT YOUR NEWS IN THE MBJ? Submit information for consideration to Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com. Please attach press releases as a Word document or a PDF (Word documents preferred), and please include high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) photos with your press release if possible.

HOPE INSPIRED MINISTRIES HOLDS FUNDRAISER DOWNTOWN Hope Inspired Ministries (HIM) held the first ever Over the Edge event in downtown Montgomery in early April and raised more than $110,000. The fundraiser allowed men and women around the River Region to raise money for HIM in exchange for an opportunity to rappel down

SUBMISSION DEADLINES: NOVEMBER ISSUE - SEPT. 25 JANUARY ISSUE - NOV. 22

a 110-foot building, the 40 Four Building. Hope Inspired Ministries serves low-skilled, poorly educated and chronically unemployed men and women by preparing them to obtain and maintain employment. The VIP & Media Day was held on Friday where local businessmen and women and celebrities rappelled for HIM. These included Jim Massey, Rick Hendrick, Joe Hunk, Chief Ernest Finley, Chief Miford Jordan, Kim Traff, Lt. Col. Brian Copper and Big Mo. The following day, an additional 63 people rappelled, while spectators enjoyed local food and drink vendors. In total, 73 participated in Over the Edge. “We could not have been happier at how well Over the Edge went and how well it was received by the community,” shared HIM executive director Michael Coleman. “We saw that this event was unlike anything being done in Montgomery, and people got excited about that. We already have a list of people and businesses that want to participate next year.”

TURENNE PHARMEDCO APPROVED FOR NEW DRUG MANAGEMENT SYSTEM A Montgomery-based pharmacy will

AUM ESTABLISHES STATE’S FIRST MIXED REALITY LAB

become one of the first in Alabama to implement new technology and equipment

Auburn University at Montgomery’s College of Education hosted an open house in early April to

to streamline and secure management

demonstrate its Virtual Avatar Lab (VAL) to state educators, as well as faculty, practitioners and

of medications for healthcare facilities.

students from other professions that rely on critical interaction skills. AUM’s COE is leading the

Turenne PharMedCo, a pharmacy and

implementation of VAL, a new, grant-funded virtual avatar reality system that will help prepare

medical equipment supplier for long-term

AUM’s teacher candidates for real-life classroom management. Currently, AUM offers the only

care, is one of the first to be approved

mixed reality teaching lab in the state. The virtual environment, developed by Mursion, uses ava-

by the Alabama Board of Pharmacy to

tars to allow people to practice and master complex interpersonal skills without the possibility

provide remote dispensing technology and

of harming real human subjects. The simulation may also be useful in improving the communi-

equipment. The machines and technology

cation and social skills of children with autism spectrum disorder and in training the teachers,

help facilities to safely manage medication

social workers and behavior therapists who work with them. Applications for VAL extend far

inventory and distribution, while increasing

beyond training teacher candidates, and AUM’s other four colleges are already interested in

security and tracking usage. The more se-

customized scenarios for their students. Nursing students could practice delivering a difficult pa-

cure and advanced systems reduce errors,

tient diagnosis, a counseling student could experience speaking with a patient who is a suicide

lower costs for the facilities and patients

risk, or a business student could hone their sales-pitch skills.

and save time.

60

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

CADDELL POWER LLC OPENS NEW OFFICE Caddell Power LLC officially opened its new office in Atlanta last April with a formal ribbon cutting and reception. Caddell Power is a subsidiary of Caddell Construction Co. headquartered in Montgomery, with projects worldwide. Caddell Power President, Neil Riddle, has formed a team that is expanding Caddell’s construction and maintenance opportunities in the power and industrial markets. Current Caddell Power customers include Southern Company and Linde Gas. “We are very excited about the outstanding opportunities in the power and industrial markets. For more than three decades Caddell Construction has been an industry leader in building challenging and groundbreaking projects worldwide. We are now expanding Caddell’s footprint into new markets with Atlanta as an ideal business location,” said Riddle.

LOCAL MARKET CELEBRATES

RETA IL NEWS

The Knicker Knacker Market in downtown Mont-

SERVISFIRST BANK ANNOUNCES NEW BOARD MEMBER

gomery celebrated 17 years back in June with a

ServisFirst Bank, a subsidiary

party including music, food and big discounts.

of ServisFirst Bancshares,

This one-stop shop offers a diverse selection of

Inc., recently announced the

products and services including bill paying (for a

addition of a member to the

small fee), money orders and ATM machine ac-

Board of Directors for their

cess, free Wi-Fi, Montgomery souvenirs, greeting

Montgomery territory. The

cards, ice cream, hot dogs, pizza and more.

ServisFirst Bank Montgomery Board of Directors welcomes

NEW BBQ TO JOIN EASTCHASE DEVELOPMENT

Edward M. “Eddie” Stivers, owner of Stivers Ford Lincoln.

Jim Wilson & Associates, LLC (JWA) announced

“ServisFirst Bank Montgomery

the sale of a one-acre parcel of land at Eastchase

is proud to announce and

location is a part of the Eastchase Central devel-

THE SHOPPES AT EASTCHASE OFFERS FREE WI-FI

opment on Eastchase Parkway directly across

Starting at the first of April, The Shoppes at

President and CEO of Servis-

from Hampton Inn & Suites. Eastchase Central is a

EastChase began offering access to free Wi-Fi

First Bank Montgomery. “Stiv-

new JWA development under construction and in-

on property. Shoppers and guests are now able

ers’ community involvement

cludes Kirkland’s, Marshalls/HomeGoods and Five

to use the free Wi-Fi on mobile smartphones,

and industry leadership will

Below. “As the developer of Eastchase, a question

tablets or laptops with usage limited to 100MB

be beneficial to the future of

long asked of us has been ‘when will you make

per second. The Wi-Fi enables shoppers to more

ServisFirst Bank.” Stivers has

barbeque a part of the restaurant selection’ and

easily and conveniently research products, view

served on numerous manufac-

today we have the answer,” said Will Wilson, Pres-

restaurant reviews, find promotions and post on

turer and industry boards and

ident of Jim Wilson & Associates, “as we bring Full

social media while they are shopping. This is

councils including three terms

Moon Bar-B-Que to Montgomery and Eastchase.”

the most recent addition to The Shoppes’ guest

on the Ford National Dealer

Full Moon has locations throughout Alabama with

amenities, including soft seating and pet-friendly

Council. Stivers serves on the

a large concentration of stores in the Birmingham

shopping, which were introduced last year. Also

Board of Control of the Com-

metro area. The Montgomery Eastchase location

coming soon: new directory signage, additional

mittee of 100 and the boards

will be the company’s 14th store and is scheduled

soft seating areas, retail giant H+M, which is ex-

of the Montgomery Chamber

to open late summer 2017.

pected to open late fall, and Carter’s, a children’s

of Commerce and the Jackson

clothing store.

Hospital Foundation.

to Full Moon Bar-B-Que. The new restaurant

61

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

welcome our newest board member,” said Carl Barker,


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

CHAMBLESS KING RENOVATING AUBURN UNIVERSITY’S BROUN HALL Montgomery’s Chambless King is the architect of record for the renovation of Auburn University’s Broun Hall. An early 1980s building in the center of Auburn University’s campus and adjacent to the Ginn Concourse, Broun Hall was identified by the University for upgrades to both its interior functionality and exterior imagery. The layout will encompass a new two-story main entrance addition with upgraded public spaces that will include updated information technology, lighting, finishes, mechanical and electrical systems. In addition, new landscaping and exterior spaces will be provided adjacent to the Ginn Concourse.

7TH ANNUAL AGAPE RUN FOR A MOM 5K Agape of Central Alabama held its 7th Annual Run for a Mom 5k & Fun Run on Mother’s Day weekend, Saturday, May 13. The race took place at the Vaughn Park Church and continued through the Vaughn Meadows community. All proceeds from the Run for a Mom 5k & Fun Run went to directly benefit Agape of Central Alabama and its mission to support women, children and families through foster care, adoption and crisis pregnancy counseling. The race is an annual effort to bring people together to honor the role of mom. The event featured family friendly entertainment, food and games.

HUNTINGDON ESTABLISHES PROFESSIONAL CLASSROOM AT DOZIER EXPERIENCED OPERATORS EXCITED TO BUTTER UP BISCUITS' FANS In May, The Montgomery Biscuits announced that the sale of the franchise was finalized by Major League Baseball, Minor League Baseball and the Southern League to a Lou DiBella-led ownership group. The new owners quickly mobilized the Montgomery Biscuits staff to increase the organization's presence and reach throughout the city of Montgomery and surrounding suburbs and promised a renewed commitment to affordable family fun at Riverwalk Stadium by hosting a Grand Reopening Weekend, June 22-25, 2017. The five-game home stand against the Birmingham Barons brought 24,084 fans through the gates, which was the most in any five-game series since April of 2013, and according to Stacy Long of the Montgomery Advertiser, the most since 2008 for any series taking place in June. The five-game set also featured the highest attended Friday and Sunday games of the 2017 season so far, and the second most attended Thursday, Saturday and Monday games (second only to Opening Night, Military Appreciation Night and Grand Slam School Day respectively). The new ownership group led by Lou DiBella praised the fans and the city of Montgomery for the warm welcome and great atmosphere at Riverwalk Stadium.

62

The Huntingdon College Department of Teacher Education and Dozier Elementary School have established a professional classroom at Dozier for the purpose of preparing future literacy educators. The partnership was recently celebrated at the school. Since January 2017, with six Huntingdon students and Dozier Elementary teachers participating in the pilot program, Huntingdon pre-service teacher candidates have tutored first-grade struggling readers using an approach similar to the Reading Recovery Program. The goals of the project are to reduce the number of first-grade students who have extreme difficulty learning to read and write and to reduce the cost of these learners to the educational system. College pre-service teacher candidates have also worked with small groups of third-grade students to improve reading fluency and comprehension. The initial pilot has been highly successful, resulting in increased reading achievement for both first- and third-grade students. Plans to extend and expand the partnership are underway for the 2017–2018 academic year.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

HUNTINGDON BREAKS GROUND ON FIELDS Huntingdon College recently broke ground on the College’s southeast corner, where new soccer and softball fields will be constructed. “We are so pleased to support our student-athletes in these sports,” said Huntingdon President J. Cameron West. “The configuration of the soccer and softball fields — as it has been for many years — has the spaces overlapping, with the softball outfield in part of the soccer field’s space. The new configuration will provide a dedicated field for each sport, which will be helpful as one team runs practices simultaneous with the other team’s season.” Huntingdon offers men’s and women’s soccer and women’s softball among its 18 NCAA-Division III

Y AC H I E VE R S CELEB R AT ES H I GH SCH O OL STUDE NTS

athletic teams. The new fields will debut in time for each sport’s season during the 2017–2018 academic year.

YMCA Achievers Maya Stovall, Mya Grant, Kionee Isaacs and Kyerra Thomas

ALABAMA AG CREDIT RETURNS RECORD PATRONAGE TO CUSTOMERS

YMCA OF GREATER MONTGOMERY HOSTS Y ACHIEVERS BANQUET This past year, through the YMCA’s Y Achievers Program, over 150 under-

Alabama Ag Credit, a rural lending cooperative serving southern

served Montgomery public high school students participated in programs

Alabama, recently declared a $7.8 million cash patronage to

that prepared them for life beyond high school. Throughout the school year,

its customers. This record amount was based on the co-op’s

students were mentored by adult professionals exposing them to various

strong 2016 financial results and was approved by the Alabama

careers while building positive relationships and life skills. Students visited

Ag Credit Board of Directors. Patronage payments are based

several colleges and universities as well as ACT workshops, scholarship and

on the amount of business a borrower does with the co-op and

FAFSA seminars, and much more. These learning experiences gave them

lower the borrowers’ cost of borrowing. As a cooperative, Ala-

the tools they need to get accepted into an institution of higher learning and

bama Ag Credit is owned by its borrowers-stockholders. When

set high expectations for the future. At a recognition banquet, held this past

the co-op performs well, it shares its earnings with its stockhold-

spring, these students were rewarded for their hard work.

ers. The co-op has returned more than $58 million in cash to its borrowers since 2006.

MHA AND NORSTAR RECEIVE FUNDING Norstar Development USA, L.P. and its developer partner, the Montgomery

ADMIRAL MOVERS AIDS LOCAL NON-PROFITS

Housing Authority (MHA), announced that they have secured $1,290,000

Admiral Movers President Scott McNelley is a proponent of

in Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) awarded through the Alabama

giving back to the community. That’s why he donated close to

Housing Finance Authority (AHFA) to build Phase II of Columbus Square. The

$9,000 of services to help Cloverdale Playhouse renovate its

tax credit award will be used to finance 80 new apartments and townhomes

facility. Admiral Movers donated the use of 10 employees and a

equipped with amenities that complement today’s lifestyle. The total cost of

truck to help the theatre move its stock from one warehouse to

the new community is estimated at $16 million. Phase II of Columbus Square

another. “We are part of the community and our success comes

is located at the intersection of Columbus and North Union Streets in down-

from the community. I’m glad to help such a worthy organiza-

town Montgomery. Evette Hester, Executive Director at MHA, explained that

tion. The Cloverdale Playhouse helps make Cloverdale such a

this is the seventh major construction project that the Housing Authority has

unique and special place,” McNelley said. Admiral Movers also

developed or rehabilitated in partnership with the City of Montgomery and

heavily discounted its fee when it helped the Family Sunshine

private developers since 2007. “In an environment of dwindling resources,

Center transport new furniture. Water damage at a Family Sun-

these partnerships are vital to revitalizing communities. MHA has redefined

shine Center facility necessitated the purchase of the furniture,

its concept of affordable housing by building communities where families

which Admiral Movers delivered. “The renovation was fairly

desire to live, empowering people and adding immeasurable value to quality

extensive, and it was an expense that we had not budgeted for.

of life.” Phase II of Columbus Square will be available for occupancy in the

So, we are deeply appreciative to Admiral Movers,” said Melanie

summer of 2019.

Beasley, public affairs director for Family Sunshine Center.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

KNOW THE COMMUNITY CELEBRATES 3,000TH NEWCOMER VISIT

MONTGOMERY AUTHOR BRINGS STATUE TO MONTGOMERY

Know the Community greeters ex-

Soldier from British sculptor James Butler, RA, will be inaugurat-

tended an especially warm welcome

ed in front of Montgomery’s Union Station, and the community

on their 3,000th newcomer home visit

is invited to attend. One hundred years before on that date,

this past June. Know the Community

the 167th Infantry Regiment left Alabama to join the Rainbow

is an outreach for newcomers started

Division and sail for Europe where they served bravely in World

10 years ago by local publisher Pam

War I. This gift to the city of Montgomery was made through the

Mashburn. “We love helping new

generosity of longtime community and business leader Nimrod

families to our community by connect-

T. Frazer. Another casting of this Rainbow Soldier was inaugu-

ing them with our local businesses

rated in 2011 in Fère-en-Tardenois, near Chateau-Thierry, and

On August 28 at 5 pm, a bronze sculpture of the Rainbow

quickly. By providing our resource guide, welcome events and a digital news-

it stands on the site of the battle of Croix Rouge Farm (July 26,

letter called eNewcomer, we hope we encourage our military, retirees, young

1918.) Frazer’s book “Send the Alabamians” recounts the amaz-

professionals and relocating families to call Montgomery home for many years!”

ing story of the 167th Infantry Regiment, from their recruitment

Know the Community’s greeters have plenty of welcoming experience; Rita

to their valiant service on the bloody fields of eastern France

Kafka and Jan Burette have been showing new families to the area some true

in the climactic final months of World War I. After selling nearly

Montgomery hospitality for more than five years by delivering baskets of good-

4,000 copies of the book from two printings, The University of

ies and coupons to their front door. The Jensen family (pictured) recently moved

Alabama Press announced earlier in the summer that it would

to Montgomery from Belgium and received a special commemorative basket.

soon print a third edition.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

TAYLORCHANDLER, LLC This certified public accounting and consulting firm founded in Montgomery in 2003 by partners Norman Chandler and Britt Taylor has grown to serve clients across the Southeast, always delivering on its tradition of “service, technical expertise and innovative thinking.”

WHAT ARE TAYLORCHANDLER’S PRIMARY SERVICES? TaylorChandler, LLC, provides cost-effective services while maintaining the highest quality. The experience and credentials of our partners and professional staff provide clients with the expertise of a large firm, while our commitment to superior customer service offers a personal, one-on-one approach. Our professional staff works closely with our clients by providing accounting, auditing, tax, compliance, advisory and management services to small and mid-sized businesses in targeted industries. In addition to being Certified Public Accountants, many of our professionals have achieved other professional designations that very few CPAs hold. We concentrate our practice to working with small businesses and other organizations in select industries. One of these is the insurance industry, which led us to create Arsenal Insurance Management, a well-established captive insurance manager.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 50 HOW HAS THE COMPANY GROWN? In 2012, the firm expanded into Georgia and Florida. During 2016, TaylorChandler added new professional staff members and promoted Stefanie Chandler, CPA to Partner.

WHAT IS TAYLORCHANDLER’S BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY? We work closely with our clients to fully understand their needs, create a customized approach for success and ultimately strive to build and maintain long-lasting business relationships. Our professional staff brings a combination of extensive industry knowledge and expertise from other industries to offer our clients fresh perspectives and breakthrough business insights that relate to their business.

WHAT SETS THE COMPANY APART FROM OTHER SIMILAR BUSINESSES? We differ from large accounting firms by establishing working relationships, allowing us to become sufficiently involved with our clients. Our clients join the TaylorChandler family because they appreciate the way we work with them and for them. By becoming a business partner, rather than just a service provider, we help our clients improve their tax position, capital position, business structure, benefits package, acquisition potential and much more. We have learned a great deal since we began this business, and we apply this knowledge to enhance our clients’ growth and success.

Standing Left to right: T. Britt Taylor, Partner-CPA; Shown below, left to right:Stefanie Chandler, Partner-CPA, Norman Chandler, Partner-CPA, CPCU, CSFS, CFE, Are, AiAF, ACP

ANY RECENT MILESTONES AND HONORS? This year we will celebrate our 14th year in operation. We are proud of the success we have enjoyed and appreciate the clients who helped us achieve this milestone. Last year, Arsenal Insurance Management was awarded the Independent Captive Manager of the Year in the United States by Captive Review magazine.

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR TAYLORCHANDLER? We continue to look for growth opportunities both in adding to our professional staff and entering new markets through new client acquisitions and possibly office expansion. By recruiting talented and experienced professionals and planning strategic business development, we expect to grow at a pace consistent with what we have accomplished over the past 14 years of operations.

5151 HAMPSTEAD HIGH STREET, SUITE 200 / 334-260-7774 / TAYLORCHANDLER.COM 65

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Community

AUM’s College of Business. She has earned the designations of Certified Valuation Analyst, Accredited

YMCA OF GREATER MONTGOMERY ANNOUNCES JIMMY HITCHCOCK WINNERS

in Business Valuation and Certified in Financial Forensics. Tommy Jackson was honored as the 2017 Outstanding Alumni. Jackson is a senior vice president-investments with Merrill Lynch Global Wealth Management’s Birmingham office. Jackson attended AUM on academic scholarship and graduated Summa Cum Laude in finance in 1985. Bruce Crawford received the college’s most prestigious award, Outstanding Business Leader of the Year.  Crawford is the Chief Executive Officer for Montgomery’s East Region Consumer & Commercial Banking with BBVA Compass. Crawford has served in this capacity since February

2017 YMCA of Greater Montgomery Jimmy Hitchcock Award winners Brian Anderson of Montgomery Catholic High School and Mary Conley Teel of Trinity Presbyterian School.

The YMCA of Greater Montgomery named Mary Conley Teel and

2000 after first joining Compass Bank as a Vice President and Commercial Relationship Manager in 1997. Crawford received a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from AUM in 1983.

Brian Anderson as the recipients of the 2017 YMCA of Greater Montgomery Jimmy Hitchcock Award. Both were honored, along with 51 other area high school seniors, at an awards banquet. Brian Anderson is a senior at Catholic Preparatory School and a star track, football, basketball, and golf player who has won numer-

Achievements FOUR STAR FREIGHTLINER RECEIVES SAFETY AWARD

ous accolades and awards in all sports. In addition to his rigorous sports schedule, he is extremely active in his church, Holy Spirit in Montgomery, and is involved in numerous extracurricular activities. He will be attending the University of North Carolina on a football scholarship. Mary Conley Teel is a senior at Trinity Presbyterian School and a star volleyball and tennis player who has won numerous awards in both sports. She is a star scholar as well with a 4.32 GPA and will be attending Clemson in the fall to study agricultural techniques to help underdeveloped countries and plans to be a missionary. She attends First Baptist Church in Montgomery. The YMCA of Greater Montgomery Jimmy Hitchcock Committee honors young athletes for Christian leadership. Hitchcock was the first All-American football player at Auburn University. Hitchcock played 3rd base for the baseball team and later signed with the New York Yankees. He also started little league baseball in Montgomery.

In April, Four Star Freightliner was selected as the Alabama Trucking Association Workers Compensation Fund Safety Award

AUM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS HONORS ALUMNI The Auburn Montgomery College of Business recognized some of its most successful alumni last spring during its annual Honors Day ceremony on campus. Ashley Taylor, a 2007 and 2010 graduate, was honored as the 2017 Outstanding Young Alumnus. Taylor began her career at Jackson Thornton in 2008. She received her Bachelor of Science in Accounting and her MBA from

66

Winner for the Allied Division. According to ATA, the award is based on the company’s outstanding loss ratio, commitment to safety and willingness to consider and implement loss control recommendations. Four Star Freightliner Dealer Principal Jerry Kocan accepted the award on behalf of his two Alabama dealerships. Four Star Freightliner has operated two dealerships in Dothan and Montgomery for more than 17 years.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

BEASLEY ALLEN SECURES THREE OF THE NATION’S TOP 100 VERDICTS IN 2016

tute has elevated real estate professionals to the highest reaches

The National Law Journal recognized Beasley, Allen, Crow,

owner, partner, principal or president, representing an exclusive

Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C., on its annual list of the nation’s Top 100 Verdicts for three separate trial victories on behalf of cancer victims. In 2016, the firm secured jury verdicts of $72 million, $70 million and $55 million, the third, fourth and fifth largest personal injury verdicts of the year, all against Johnson & Johnson for

of the industry. Almost 70 percent of designees hold the title of worldwide referral network. In addition, CCIM offers its members the industry’s best digital toolkit, allowing entrepreneurial and mid-sized business to compete with multinational providers.

JERE BEASLEY ADDED TO LAWDRAGON HALL OF FAME

ovarian cancer claims related to the use of talcum powder. The

Jere L. Beasley, Principal & Founder of Beasley, Allen, Crow,

rankings are based on research by ALM’s VerdictSearch, the rec-

Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C., has been named to the Lawdragon

ognized leader in U.S. verdict information. “We take great pride in

Hall of Fame. He is among 45 top lawyers in the nation who were

achieving justice for those injured by corporate actions, and we try

selected for this honor. The Lawdragon Hall of Fame “celebrates

mightily to change negligent corporate behavior to prevent future

lawyers whose mark on the legal profession is indelible.” “It is

tragedies,” said Jere Beasley, principal and founder of the firm.

quite an honor to be recognized in this manner, realizing there

ALABAMA AG CREDIT ANNOUNCES NEW DIRECTORS Alabama Ag Credit stockholders recently elected David Hataway of Montgomery and Tim Tucker of Uriah to the Alabama Ag Credit Board of Direc-

has blessed me, and I have tried my best as a lawyer to bless others. I trial lawyer.” Beasley established a

of directors is

one-lawyer firm that officially opened

responsible for

on Jan. 15, 1979, and he filed his first

establishing

case on behalf of the practice on

policies, pro-

Jan. 17, 1979. Today, Beasley Allen

viding strategic

is one of the country’s leading firms

direction and major institu-

more deserving,” Beasley said. “God

am proud and also humbled to be a

tors. The board

overseeing all

are hundreds of lawyers who are

involved in civil litigation on behalf of claimants, having representDavid Hataway

Tim Tucker

tion functions. The two farmer-ranchers began their three-year terms in late May 2017. Alabama Ag Credit, headquartered in Montgomery, provides long-term real estate loans on farms, timberland, recreational properties, home sites, agribusinesses

ed hundreds of thousands of people. In January, the firm opened an office in Atlanta, Georgia, its first expansion outside of its home headquarters in Montgomery, Alabama.

LOCAL CONSULTANT INDUCTED INTO HALL OF FAME Kenneth B. Heitkamp, a long-standing Chamber advocate, sup-

and country homes in the lower 40 counties in Alabama. They

porter and military contributor, was recently acknowledged and

also provide short and intermediate-term lending for operating,

inducted into the Air Force Cyberspace Operations & Support

equipment and livestock. The association is a member-owned,

Hall of Fame. Lt. Gen. William J. Bender, Chief, Information Domi-

locally controlled cooperative that is part of the national Farm

nance and Chief Information Officer, Office of the Secretary of the

Credit System established in 1916.

Air Force, the Pentagon, announced the selection of Heitkamp and three other former Air Force leaders for induction into this

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVES CCIM

year’s Air Force Cyberspace Operations and Support Hall of

SVNJJMottram announced that John Mottram successfully

Fame (formerly Communications and Information Hall of Fame).

achieved the Certified Commercial Investment Member designa-

The Hall of Fame was established by the Air Force in 1999 to

tion on April 4, 2017 at the Midyear Governance Meetings at the

recognize those who contributed high standards of excellence in

Fairmont Chicago in Chicago, Illinois. CCIM is a global community

accomplishing the Air Force mission. During Heitkamp’s 42-year

of 13,000 members, more than 50 chapters and 30 countries that

Air Force career, he was recognized by his colleagues and senior

educates and connects the world’s leading experts in investment

executives in the information technology field as a pioneer and

strategy, financial analysis and negotiation. Through the CCIM

innovator. He also earned the AFCEA International Award for

signature designation program and topical education courses

Excellence in Information Technology and the GSA Trail Boss

offered through the Ward Center for Real Estate Studies, the Insti-

Special Achievement Award for his pioneering work.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U I C K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S ’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

LOCAL LAWYER MAKES LAWDRAGON 500

Remodeling Excellence Awards Banquet, which took place on

Beasley Allen lawyer Ted G. Meadows has been selected

April 8 at the Capital City Club in Montgomery. WSC Distinctive

for inclusion in the 2017 Lawdragon 500 Leading Lawyers in

Builders’ Cottage by the Lake project earned wins in the catego-

America. This annual list represents “the most elite distinction

ries of Additions $100,000-$250,000 and Exterior Remodel and

in the profession, covering the best of the best in all practice

was named a runner-up in the categories of Residential Specialty

areas.” Speaking about this year’s honorees, Lawdragon notes

and Whole House Remodel over $500,000. Selby Davis Builder,

that Plaintiffs lawyers represent the “plight of individuals who

LLC was the winner in the category of Kitchen Remodel under

feel powerless and abandoned. Plaintiff lawyers are a powerful

$40,000 for its Gunster Kitchen project. The company was also

army for the injured, and we are proud of their representation on

named a runner-up in the Outdoor Living category for its Back-

this year’s 500, as every year.” “It’s an honor to be recognized

yard Barbecue Pad. Kimbro Renovations was named a runner-up

by Lawdragon 500,” said Meadows. “However, the truth is that

in the categories of Whole House Remodel under $500,000

I wouldn’t be singled out in this way without the help of great

(Allendale Project) and Bath Remodel under $20,000 (Wildwood

lawyers from around the country and the full support of my law

Bath). The Alabama Remodeling Excellence Awards, presented

partners and staff at Beasley Allen as we’ve litigated talc cases

by the Home Builders Association of Alabama, were presented

over the past couple of years. With this recognition comes the

to remodelers, contractors, kitchen and bath designers, and oth-

opportunity to make the public aware of the danger of genital

er building professionals who exhibited outstanding craftsman-

talc use – this is a priority of the ovarian cancer victims we repre-

ship and attention to detail in projects throughout Alabama.

sent.” The Lawdragon 500 guides are selected from a combination of editorial research by Lawdragon staff; submissions from law firms; and an online nomination form that allows visitors to its site to recommend and comment on their favorite lawyers.

ALFA INSURANCE AGENT RECOGNIZED WITH DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD Alfa Insurance® Agent Billy Bradford of Montgomery was recently honored with the 2016 Distinguished Service

Awards & Honors

Award during the company’s annual

MONTGOMERY HOTEL HONORED At a recent industry conference, Homewood Suites Montgomery won the Outstanding Customer Service award for 2016. Also, the property won the Barry Krakowsky C.A.R.E.S. award for its community service. This is the hotel’s second year in a row to win this particular award.

awards ceremony in Montgomery. The ceremony recognized the company’s best agents and managers for their dedicated service and commitment to policyholders. Bradford has served as an Alfa® agent since 1989.

MONTGOMERY AREA REMODELERS EARN AWARDS

He represents the company’s full line of insurance for auto, home, life and business.

RONNIE SHAW EARNS PRESIDENT’S CLUB AWARD Ronnie Shaw of the Shaw Agency in Montgomery earned the number 20 position in Auto-Owners Insurance Company’s 2016 President’s Club. The President’s Club honors the top 25 agents for Auto-Owners whose life, health and annuity insurance production is the highest for the company in a calendar year. Auto-Owners, a Fortune 500 company, currently has Shelby Davis Builders, LLC accepts awards for Kitchen Remodel under $40,000 and runner-up of Outdoor Living category at the 2017 Alabama Remodeling Excellence Awards.

Several members of the Greater Montgomery Home Builders Association were among the honorees at the 2017 Alabama

69

more than 20,000 agents authorized to produce life and life-related business in 26 states. This is the first time Shaw has been a President’s Club member. His agency, Shaw Agency, has been in business since 1999 and has represented Auto-Owners Insurance Company for over two years.

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U I C K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S ’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

CHAMBER AND HMMA HONORED At the River Region United Way Annual Meeting & Open House in May, The Jean and Adolph “Bucks” Weil, Jr. Award was presented to Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama and The Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. Originally created in 1977, the award now known as The Jean and Adolph “Bucks” Weil, Jr. Award is the highest honor bestowed by the River Region United Way. It honors the philanthropic endeavors and commitment to community service of the late Jean and Bucks Weil, two long-standing supporters of the United Way. This award recognizes individuals and organizations for outstanding service and contributions to the community through the River Region United Way. Year after year, the Montgomery Area Chamber continues to lead, having 100-percent participation from its employees giving to the United Way Campaign. The Chamber’s continued support of the River Region United Way is an extension of its own mission to build a better community for us all. Since HMMA’s

From left to right: are RRUW CEO Jimmy Hill; RRUW Chair of the Board Katherine J. Webb; Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce President Randy George; Laurie Jean Weil, DVM, daughter of the late Jean and Adolph “Bucks” Weil, Jr.; HMMA Director of Quality Mark Rader; HMMA SVP of Human Resources & Administration Richard Neal; Lisa and Andy Weil, III, daughter-in-law and son of the late Jean and Bucks Weil and Tocqueville Society Co-chairs.

first United Way campaign in 2004, team-member and corporate pledges have approached nearly $2.65 million.

70

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

SERQUEST WHEN WAS SERQUEST STARTED? 2014 WHAT IS SERQUEST’S MISSION? We develop software that improves the relationship between businesses, service organizations and the communities they serve.

WHO IS ON SERQUEST’S TEAM? Hammond Cobb and Anna Turner with advisors Matt Dean, Clay McInnis and Chason Smitherman.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 3 fulltime, but we also use a lot of contractors for various tasks.

WHAT ARE SERQUEST’S PRIMARY SERVICES? We are a digital network for non-profits and community organizations. Think of it this way: Facebook is for social, LinkedIn is for professionals, Serquest is for philanthropy. We help nonprofits distribute video and other creative media in an easily shareable format and help them convert it into donations and volunteer resources seamlessly.

The Serquest team (from left to right): Chason Smitherman, Anna Turner, Clay McInnis, Hammond Cobb and Matt Dean

WHAT IS YOUR COMPANY’S BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY? Actions speak louder than words. The best way to communicate is to let others see what you do.

WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHER SIMILAR BUSINESSES? Our software removes barriers to join business-and-nonprofit partnerships with easy donation systems, video distribution and resource management in one place.

ANY AWARDS OR HONORS? We recently helped Valiant Cross Academy deploy media to increase voting for a USA Today/ Gannett Foundation competition. They ended up winning a $50,000 grant. The videos we deployed for them had more than 60,000 views and more than 300 shares.

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR SERQUEST? We continue to help local organizations share stories that matter and communicate impact. We are in the process of conducting workshops with local businesses and nonprofit organizations to improve our product and create additional features to improve the experience our users enjoy.

Mac is a therapy horse who works with kids at Kings Home, a non-profit, but he has his own challenge to deal with, a disease that affects his sweat glands. His vet prescribed a beer a day, and Birmingham’s Good People Brewing donates the beer. Serquest helped connect Mac and the generous brewery, and it also helped produce a short video that gets the word out about how Mac pays that kindness forward.

260 COMMERCE STREET / SERQUEST.COM 71

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT IN G N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

CHILD PROTECT, INC. /GROUND BREAKING

DOWN WITH THE POUNDS

935 South Perry Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-1220 • www.childprotect.org Jannah Bailey-Executive Director / Associations/Non-Profits

1317 Old Oak Place, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-386-3551 • www.downwiththepounds.com Yolanda Turner-Williams-CEO / “Weight Loss Clinic”

BAY EQUITY HOME LOANS

MONTGOMERY DENTAL ARTS

7030 Fain Park Drive, Suite 10, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-777-1897 • www.bayequityhomeloans.com Jennifer Johnston-Branch Manager / Mortgage/Finance

10650 Chantilly Parkway, Suite 101, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-356-0228 • www.montgomerydentalarts.com Dominique Shamburger and Carl Shamburger / Dentist

A.FLEETON COSMETICS

MONTGOMERY AREA COUNCIL ON AGING (MACOA)

7920 Vaughn Road, Montgomery, AL 36116 334-450-8833 • www.afleetonwomen.com Antowan Fleeton-Owner, Cosmetics/Skin Care

115 East Jefferson Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-263-0532 • www.macoa.org Donna Marietta-Executive Director / Community Services/Agencies

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

PICTURE PERFECT SMILES

CARMICHAEL DENTAL CARE

4282 Lomac Street, Montgomery, AL 36106 334-271-2001 • www.picperfectsmiles.com Nzingha Stovall / Dentists

4146 Carmichael Road, Suite D, Montgomery, AL 36106 334-270-9924 • www.myALdentist.com Chet Swartzentruber and Shawn Keahey / Dentists

JDB HOSPITALITY, LLC

RIVER REGION UNITED WAY

4393 Wares Ferry Road, Montgomery, AL 36109 510-812-5728 Ashley Jernigan-Owner / Consulting Services

P.O. Box 868, Montgomery, AL 36101 334-264-7318 • www.riverregionunitedway.org Jimmy Hill-President/CEO / Community Services/Agencies

NEW MEMBER?

NOW WHAT? Being a member of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce is more than just paying dues and getting a decal. We provide connections, resources

GREATER MONTGOMERY HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

and solutions that help you grow your business and help grow Montgomery’s economy! GET CONNECTED TODAY.

P.O. Box 230160, Montgomery, AL 36123 334-277-7766 • www.gmhba.org Chad Stearns-President / Associations/Non-profits

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS New Members W ELCO ME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

ASSOC IATIONS/ NON-PROFIT

B UI L D E RS - R E S ID E N T IA L

Southeast Alabama AHEC Martha D. Vignes 2015 Normandie Drive Montgomery, AL 36111 334-676-4180

D.R. Horton Homes Kent Gibson 1306 Barret Parkway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-301-6662

AT TR AC TIONSENT ER TAINM EN T

C A R P E T/U P H O L ST E RY C L E A N ER S

Escapology TJ Williford 130 Commerce Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-523-1947

A-1 Cleaning Systems, LLC William Wedgeworth P.O. Box 231175 Montgomery, AL 36123 334-603-4203

ATTR AC TIONS-H I STORY

COL L E G E S & U N IV E R S IT IE S

More Than Tours Michelle Browder 116 Montgomery Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-296-3024

The University of Alabama, College of Continuing Studies Kevin Lake University of Alabama Box 870388 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0388 205-348-4632

BAR S-SPEC IALIZ E D

Wet Willie’s Greg Lard 79-E Commerce Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-523-0453 BEAUT Y SALONS / SPAS/BARBER S

Clippers N Scissors OK Chung 131 Eastern Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36117 334-399-7745

COM P U T E R S - S O F T WA R E / H A R DWA R E /CO N S U LT IN G

CO U N S E L IN G

Montgomery Psychiatry & Associates Linda Teel 1040 Longfield Court Montgomery, AL 36117 334-288-9009 C R E AT IV E D E S IG N

MacZas, LLC David Zaslawsky P.O. Box 680282 Prattville, AL 36068 334-391-6888 D E N T ISTS

CodeHeight Solutions, LLC Josh Yates P.O. Box 2414 Montgomery, AL 36102 770-328-2374

Picture Perfect Smiles Nzingha Stovall 4282 Lomac Street Montgomery, AL 36106 334-271-2001

The Data Cloud Group, LLC Bill Kirkpatrick 1000 Peachtree Industrial Boulevard, Suite 6-321 Suwanee, GA 30024 678-458-7986

SmileMakers Dentistry China Morrissette 8565 EastChase Parkway Montgomery, AL 36117 334-277-5498

BOOKS-RETAIL

Barnes & Noble College @ Troy-Montgomery Michelle Green 231 Montgomery Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-241-9510

NEW MEMBERS

COS M ET IC S /S K IN C A R E

A.Fleeton Cosmetics Antowan Fleeton 3173 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-450-8833

D E N T ISTS - S P E C IA L IZE D

Bush Pediatric Dentistry Samuel W. Bush 4740 Woodmere Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36106 334-219-5831 E L E VATO R S - SA L E S /S E RV IC E

Otis Elevator Company Jacob Lethbridge 2194-B Parkway Lake Drive Birmingham, AL 35244 205-313-2965 75

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS New Members

DIVERSITY SUMMIT DIVERSITY & INCLUSION:

So Now What?

SEPTEMBER 26, 2017, 9AM - 5PM @ Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center

F IN A N C IA L S E RV IC E S

IN FO R M AT ION T E C H N O LO GY FI RMS

Phil Welch Phil Welch 600 South Court Street Montgomery, AL 36104 443-404-3679

RJ Young Chris Clark 2350 Fairlane Drive, Suite 100 Montgomery, AL 36116 800-347-1955

F IT N E SS T R A IN IN G

M AC H IN E RY-MFR.

RezFIT Corey Ellis 3440 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, AL 36109 504-915-7879

Acclaim Industries, LLC Kunle Harrison 600 South Court Street, Suite 304 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-354-1530

F LO R ISTS

Lee & Lan Florist Geoff Stough 3365 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, AL 36109 334-277-8040 G IF TS & S P E C IA LT YR E TA IL

Stampin’ Up in Pike Road Pamela Pruett 175 Belser Boulevard Pike Road, AL 36064 253-227-4927 H E A LT H & F IT N E SS

iNFUSION Cryotherapy and Laser Center Darren Woodling 6942 Winton Blount Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36117 334-296-1662 H E A LT H C A R E S E RV IC E S

Nywes Health Care Nikki Walker 2740 Central Parkway, Suite #5 Montgomery, AL 36106 334-676-3388 H OT E L S /M OT E L S

To register, visit montgomerychamber.com/diversity

Comfort Suites Bruce Lee 110 Folmar Parkway Montgomery, AL 36105 334-676-2576

M E D IC A L M A N AG E D CARE

EQUIAN Jennifer Farmer 7480 Halcyon Pointe Drive, Suite 300 Montgomery, AL 36117 334-244-9690 M U S IC P R O DUCTI ON /R E CO R D IN G

Titanium Music Productions Group, Inc. Lisa Perkins 20 Sandy Springs Drive Wetumpka, AL 36092 334-213-3034 P E TS A N D P ET SUPPLI ES

Cupid’s Dog House Cupid Seymour 813 42nd Street North Birmingham, AL 35212 205-421-3143 P H YS IC A L T HERAPI STS

Rehab Associates Nils Neglen 1215 Mulberry Street Montgomery, AL 36106-1130 334-262-6161 Rehab Associates Melissa Myer 464 St. Lukes Drive Montgomery, AL 36117 334-244-6699


CHAMBER NEWS New Members

P U B L IC RELAT IONS

Allison+Partners Lydia Wilbanks 1708 Peachtree Road, Suite 100 Atlanta, GA 30309 404-885-1723 RE AL ESTATE-BROKER

SVN JJMottram John Mottram 7956 Vaughn Road #387 Montgomery, AL 36117 334-356-1771 RE STAURANTS

The Cork & Cleaver Ryan Friday 2960 A Zelda Road Montgomery, AL 36106 334-676-2260

R E STAUR A N TS -B A R BE Q U E

Moe’s Original Bar B Que Hill Lubin 105 East Fairview Avenue Montgomery, AL 36106 334-676-1078 S E C UR I TY S E RV I C E S

STO R AG E

Maxwell Mini Storage Kathryn Fletcher 312 Air Base Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36108 334-263-4214 T R U C K R E N TA L S /L E AS IN G

Workable Solutions Investigative & Protective Services Tyron Works 5925 Carmichael Road, Suite D Montgomery, AL 36106 334-262-0432

Penske Truck Leasing Jerry Conner 1700 Ridgeway West Montgomery, AL 36110 334-270-3390

Dickerson Alarm & Services, Inc. Mario Dickerson 3700 Carriage Place Montgomery, AL 36116 334-538-7876

Mathnasium Learning Center Monica Virgil 3457 Malcolm Drive Montgomery, AL 36116 334-356-1570

77

T U TO R IN G S E RV IC E S

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

VAC U U M C L E A N ERS

Montgomery Sewing & Vacuum Repair Center William Kennebrew 943 South Court Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-3493


Numbers reflect May 2017 over May 2016.

Economic Intel TRANSPORTATION CHECK OUT THE COST CALCULATOR ON FLYMGM.COM TO COMPARE FLIGHT COSTS + FUEL & PARKING VERSUS ATL & BHM.

27,677 TOTAL PASSENGERS IN MAY 2017 Source: MGM-Montgomery Regional Airport

TOURISM

SECTORS GOING UP

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR

OCCUPANCY RATE

EDUCATION & HEALTH SERVICES

+ 5.3%

PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS SERVICES

+ 2.8%

+ 67.4%

+ 1.1% + 1.1%

GOVERNMENT MANUFACTURING

MGM LEADS ALABAMA METRO CITIES WITH A 65.2% OCCUPANCY RATE, YTD, JAN-MAY

$774,067

LODGINGS TAX COLLECTIONS

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

Source: Smith Travel Research Report, City of Montgomery

LABOR FORCE HOUSING

- 1.1% UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

+ 0.3%

+ 1.5%

EMPLOYED

CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE

+ 3.5%

-15.0%

-8.8%

AVERAGE SALES PRICE

TOTAL HOMES LISTED FOR SALE

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET

= $175K

= 2,221

Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate MGM Area

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

78

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

= 103 days


SOLUTIONS TO HELP YOUR NON-PROFIT THRIVE

Non-Profit Advisors: Lee Parks, CPA Jeri Groce, CPA Clynt Hart, CPA, CFE

TRADITIONAL ACCOUNTING CORPORATE ADVISORY SERVICES TECHNOLOGY & RISK SOLUTIONS HR SOLUTIONS

We often begin relationships with traditional tax or audit services, but non-profits quickly realize we can offer so much more. By listening to your needs, we connect you with our experts to help accomplish what’s important to you. From outsourced CFO services to business software and staffing, it’s time to take a closer look at Warren Averett and all we have to offer. Let’s Thrive Together.

FINANCE TEAM SUPPORT PERSONAL SERVICES

Alabama | Florida | Georgia

| www.warrenaverett.com


MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Post Office Box 79 Montgomery, AL 36101

Montgomery Business Journal - August 2017  
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