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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL V O L U M E 1 0 I S S U E 3 / M AY 2 0 1 8

MBJ

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MOMENT OF TRUTH DOES MONTGOMERY REALLY WANT GOOD PUBLIC SCHOOLS?

SAFE & SOUND T H E I M PA C T O F MGM’S INSURANCE I N D U S T RY

ALL RELATIVE

THE INS & OUTS O F FA M I LY B U S I N E S S


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CONTENTS MAY 2 0 1 8

THIS ISSUE: 10 31 44 50 57

Transforming Montgomery’s Public Schools Safe & Sound: MGM Insurance Industry Back to Life Small Business: Family Matters Tourism: Find Your Fun Right Here

22 Powerhouse Q&A 26 Member Profiles 62 GiveBack 66 #MyMGM

CHAMBER NEWS:

08 Events 68 Connect 70 Connect Resource Guide 72 Members on the Move 77 Members in the News 82 Business Buzz 88 Ribbon Cuttings 91 New Members 94 Intel


S


MBJ

THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT Randall L. George DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS Jina Miniard

EXPLORE MEDIA PUBLISHER Pam Mashburn

MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Stewart Kornegay

ART DIRECTOR Erika Rowe Tracy

DESIGN Bryan Carter, Heather Cooper, Shelby Berry Shubird

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORIAL Jennifer Kornegay, Minnie Lamberth, Meg Lewis PHOTOGRAPHERS Bryan Carter, Nick Drolette, Robert Fouts, Brooke Glassford, Jonathon Kohn, Josh Moates, David Robertson Jr., Eric Salas, LaShanda Gaines ON THE COVER The time is now to make a positive change in Montgomery’s public schools. ADVERTISING Anna Turner / exploreMedia / 334-578-7810 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Post Office Box 79, Montgomery, Alabama 36101 Telephone: 334-834-5200 • mbj@montgomerychamber.com © Copyright 2018 exploreMedia and the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved. MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MISSION STATEMENT

Committed to exceptional service, the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce works to improve the economic well-being of the business community and enhance the quality of life of the area through the creation and preservation of jobs.

The Montgomery Business Journal (USPS NO. 025553) is published bi-monthly by exploreMedia for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334) 834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Periodicals Postage Paid at Montgomery Alabama, 36119+9998, USPS NO. 025553. Volume 10, Issue3. POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 79, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36101, or email mbj@montgomerychamber.com. The Montgomery Business Journal welcomes story ideas from its readers. Email to: editor@montgomerychamber.com. Subscriptions are a part of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce dues structure. Subscriptions and bulk subscriptions can also be purchased per year at www.montgomerychamber.com/mbjsub.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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CHAMBER NEWS

Events +

MA RK YO UR CALENDAR S FOR THE SE UP COMING C HAMB E R E V E NTS

Upcoming Workshops

60 Minute Coffees & Business After Hours These popular networking events are the perfect place to exchange business cards and meet potential customers.

5/9 60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: MACAO

MAY

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Military Salute Riverwalk Stadium 6:35 pm

Chamber and business leaders join the city’s

BUSINESS Resource Center

Business 101: Start it Up! May 15; June 5, 19; July 3, 17; 8:30-9:30 am, the Chamber’s BRC No registration required. $10 fee. Establish a strong foundation for your new or existing business. Topics covered include locating financing, writing a business plan and finding expert advice. Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC

5/24 Business After Hours Sponsor & Location: Regions Bank Downtown

elected officials to host military leaders at River-

6/13

walk Stadium in recognition of the military’s

60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: Brantwood

vital role to our community. Discounted tickets are made available to more than 1,700 military

CHAMBER MEMBER ORIENTATION August 8, 8 - 9 am, Location TBD

members and their families during this annual

7/11

Biscuits Baseball event.

Connect and engage with your

60 Minute Coffee Sponsor & Location: Troy University

Presenting Sponsor: HCS Group, PC

Chamber and increase your brand one-on-one with potential clients. Chamber orientations are a great way to build relationships with current members and gain powerful insight into the Chamber’s top

JUN

21

Military Family Appreciation Day The Montgomery Zoo 9 am - 5 pm

priorities and initiatives. You will

Meet the NEW Host!

also have an opportunity to meet

BizTalk MGM - The Official Podcast

working hard for you to help grow

several Chamber staff members

for Small Business in MGM

your business.

Every month, on the second Tuesday,

The Chamber’s Military Appreciation Day at

at 6 pm on WVAS 90.7 FM,

the Zoo is a fun day for all military personnel

Montgomery Chamber staff, plus host

and their families. With a valid military ID (ac-

Tonya Scott Williams, will talk with

tive duty & retired), the entire family can enjoy

business experts on topics that are

a great day at the Montgomery Zoo with FREE

important to small businesses.

lunch and admission.

Sponsor: MAX

Presenting Sponsor: Guardian Credit Union

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Sponsored By: BB&T

+

Register online

Register online for Business Resource Center events and webinars at montgomerychamber.com/events


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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


THE TIME IS NOW

Transforming Montgomery’s Public Schools

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


“Based on the numbers of people who have announced they are running for the board, there is an increased interest in MPS, which I think is very positive.” – Dr. Ed Richardson

CALL FOR LEADERSHIP

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OUT OF

Montgomery voters blame the Board of Education for Montgomery’s failing school system.

IMAGE COURTESY OF JOHNATHON KOHN

By Jennifer Stewart Kornegay / Photography by Josh Moates and Brooke Glassford 11

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


At the Chamber’s Annual Meeting in December,

A Fresh Take

Dr. Ed Richardson asked 700 business and community

It seems clear that shaking up

leaders, “Do you really want good public schools

the entrenched mindset of the

for Montgomery?” The Answer is YES

Education could go a long way

Montgomery County Board of in addressing the problems MPS is facing. This year, five of the Board’s seven seats are up for

Montgomery has earned some impres-

to the Alabama Department of Education’s

sive accolades, scored major economic

Interim Superintendent of Education Dr.

election, and 19 new faces are

development wins and hit multiple high

Ed Richardson, we can fix this. “I want

running. This alone signals bet-

marks: The city was named one of the 52

to assure concerned parents and others

ter things ahead to Dr. Ed Rich-

places in the world to visit in 2018 by The

all over the

ardson. “Based on the number of

New York Times; tourism numbers soared

city that these

to new records; and the entire area

problems can

people who have announced they

celebrated the landing of the F-35, an

be solved,” he

achievement that will have an $80 million

said. “It will take

annual economic impact.

commitment and

are running for the board, there is an increased interest in MPS, which I think is very positive,” Richardson said.

a focused effort Things have been going well, and there

on the issues,

are more bright spots on the horizon.

but we can

But amid all of the good news and sunny

do it. Don’t be

skies, there’s a single dark cloud, one

discouraged.”

years; Richardson pointed to a

and one that could billow and grow into

Richardson says the first step is being

from the current group. “There

a storm that stops the area’s forward prog-

honest about where things stand. The

are some board members trying

ress in its tracks.

student achievement of MPS is among the

to do the right thing but, as I

lowest in the state. “That speaks for itself,”

have told the board, if it wishes

The need for change on the Dr. Ed Richardson

already raining on the capital city’s parade

Montgomery’s public schools are failing;

Richardson said. As do other disappoint-

they’re failing the students they exist to

ing numbers. MPS has lost more than

serve; they’re failing the city and its res-

2,300 students in the last four years, for

idents whose tax dollars fund them. And

an average of 585 lost per year. “Most of

they’re negatively affecting the business

these losses are due to concerned par-

community by stifling economic develop-

ents taking their children either to another

ment efforts.

public school system [Auburn, Pike Road, Autauga County] or putting them in private

board has been apparent for few of the complications arising

to be active in this process and the discussion, it has to demonstrate that it is willing to be more involved.” He outlined the activity he’d like to see. “Acknowledge the magnitude of problems we are facing; take responsibility for

school,” he said.

these problems; identify specific

and the poor performance of Montgomery

The next move needed is a perspective

seen very little interest by most

Public Schools. When the state board of

shift, as Richardson explained. “During

of the board members in that

education announced its intervention in

recent discussions with the Montgomery

regard [finding solutions].”

the system in early 2017, it only under-

County Board of Education, you seldom

scored the issues residents and city lead-

hear anything about improving achieve-

ers have been wrestling with for years.

ment for students. You hear, ‘It’s all about

Mayor Todd Strange recently made a direct link between losing a major employer

the students, but actions don’t show that Yet it’s not all doom and gloom. According

statement to be accurate.”

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

solutions. Unfortunately, I have


The public agrees that the problem is dire

engaged and get involved, which could

and change is needed. According to a

prove to be one of the tougher tasks. “Many

recent poll conducted by the Montgomery

of the parents really interested in improving

Area Chamber of Commerce, 7 out of 10

public education are no longer a part of

people believe Montgomery Public Schools

MPS,” he said.

are in crisis and blame that crisis on the leadership at the top.

Money Matters

While Richardson has shown himself dedicated to telling the hard truths, he’s still positive when he talks about MPS. “There

Continual money woes only exacerbate the

WE CAN

DO IT

situation; the system is currently considered financially unstable. Richardson announced a plan to address this earlier this year, and it places major emphasis on keeping teachers in the classrooms. “It addresses the financial deficits without having to fire a large number of staff,” he said. “We’re closing some schools and selling unneeded central office buildings.” Each piece of property sold means fewer people losing their jobs. “That’s a big objective,” he said.

“I want to assure concerned parents and others all over the city that these problems can be solved. Don’t be discouraged.”

Funding is essential to public education,

are several schools in the system doing

but it only goes so far and isn’t the remedy

exceptionally well. There are some strong,

for every ailment. Developing strategies to

talented teachers and administrators,” he

improve student achievement is even more

said. “But their performance is adversely

important, and Richardson is looking at

impacted due to the fights for control over

an array of options, ranging from opening

the system.”

alternative schools to hiring more teachers.

Come Together

The real key is a commitment to keep pushing ahead, despite a hard road, and working together. “The local school officials have to be able to work with the accrediting body, as they will make specific recommendations to help boost student achievement,”

He believes that before the start of the next school year, a final list of school closings will be out, giving teachers the security of knowing where they will be assigned. And as for the 2018-2019 school year in Montgomery, Richardson remains hopeful: “I think we can see some significant improvement during the next school year.”

Richardson said. More parents need to get

WHAT THE VOTERS SAY: The Chamber conducted a poll of registered Montgomery voters that revealed some stunning statistics:

Nearly

90 % believe the state’s

intervention was needed due to the lack of

MORE MONEY? Yes, but not yet. Throwing money at MPS’ problems won’t solve them, but according to Dr. Richardson, there will come a time for a discussion about possible increased funding. “Not now, but at some time, MPS will have to consider allocating more resources to its schools,” he said. “But right now people would be too skeptical for that. We have to fix what’s wrong now. We have to show that we are listening and being responsible and responsive. That is how MPS builds the confidence needed to ask for those additional funds in the future.”

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

leadership, mismanagement of the system, quality of education and discipline.


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


OTHER VOICES: Parent Perspectives

It’s all well and good for city officials, politicians, administrators and teachers to voice opinions and ideas on how we can improve our public schools. But some of MPS’ harshest critics and its biggest cheerleaders are those most affected: area parents. We asked a few to share where their hearts and heads are when it comes to their children’s options for education. Bethany Garth and her husband moved to Montgomery from Nashville after living in Auburn for several years before that. The couple has two daughters, ages 3 and 18 months. As soon as her husband’s colleagues at Neptune Technology heard he and Bethany were settling in Montgomery they asked: “What will you do about school?” “That’s sad,” Garth said. “We as a community are not educating our kids, our future, and I think it is our duty to equip them,” she said. Some of her feelings stem from her Christian faith; part of it is just practical wisdom. “Different options – private school, home schooling, public school – are right for each different family, but for us, we feel strongly about getting our kids out of the Christian bubble, to send them out as arrows of light, and we believe school is an effective way to do that and a way to expose our kids to the fullness and diversity of this community. So we want to invest in our city by being a part of the public school system,” she said. “That being said, I’m not willing to make my kids martyrs for that cause. We won’t sacrifice their future for it, and sending them to the public schools

BETHANY GARTH

“We as a community are not educating our kids, our future, and I think it is our duty to equip them.”

as they are right now would do that.” She is pleased with recent progress. “Dr. Richardson is taking Garth stressed that she and her husband have not made

definite steps in the right direction,” she said. “Just finally

any decision regarding public education for their daughters

acknowledging the problem is major.”

yet, but she did express a specific concern. “At least in the public schools we know the most about, thanks to friends in

She also understands the importance of MPS’ budget with

our neighborhood who are involved, overall, there is so little

a caveat. “There is no amount of money you can put into

parental involvement,” she said. “I think that creates such an

schools to compensate for the lack of parental involvement,

uphill battle for teachers. And the catch is, if we don’t figure

so it can’t stop there.”

out how to fix that, it is a cycle that will repeat.” Aquan Robinson was born and raised in Montgomery and She believes it will take parents who care coming together

now works as a lease portfolio manager at BMW in Mont-

and putting their kids in public school to change things from

gomery. He and his wife have a son in first grade at Dalraida

the inside out. She knows that’s a huge ask. “Three families

Elementary and another child not yet school age. They’re

can’t do it; you need a lot of people coming in, working to

currently pleased with their son’s education, but he’s unsure

make things better. I’m not sure that’s at all realistic though.”

about the next few years. “I am very happy with the school

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


AQUAN ROBINSON

my son is in right now, and I know other parents at that school feel the same way,” he said. “But once he gets to 5th grade, that’s where it drops off, and that’s when parents have to make a hard decision.” He echoed Garth’s worries about public schools, but had some additional thoughts about root causes. “There’s a lot of blame to go around. Some board members have been in place a long time, and I’m not sure if it is just complacency or a resistance to work with others, but their inactivity has played a role, so I think

“There’s a lot of blame to go around. Some board members have been in place a long time, and I’m not sure if it is just complacency or a resistance to work with others, but their inactivity has played a role.”

it’s time for some change,” he said. “There is a butting of heads between the school board and other powers above them and

and brightest aren’t with other kids, where they could have a

not enough working together.”

positive influence. And you’re taking all of the involved parents and putting them in one place. So, I love them, but I wonder if

He also believes race still plays a role. “When you talk about

they are hurting other schools. Same with charter schools. I like

MPS, and the magnet schools, the majority of the students are

the way that sounds, but I’m not sure how it really works.”

minority kids, while a lot of the law makers and policy makers are white, and typically, their kids aren’t even in MPS,” he said.

Pride in his city has pushed Robinson to stay active and

“On the flipside, you have school board members who are

engaged; it sparked him to form the South Central Business

minorities who have not been making the best decisions, and

District, a group of concerned citizens and business owners

there is so much finger-pointing and not much accepting of

working to help revitalize and reenergize the area around the

responsibility.”

Southern Boulevard, Troy Highway and McGehee Road. It also prompts him to look for the good. “There are a lot of things

He’s a product of the magnet schools, graduating from BTW,

wrong with the school system, and we hear a lot about that,

but he’s conflicted about the program today. “The magnet

but no one talks about what is right, and that is unfair to the

schools are great for the students they have,” he said. “They

teachers and administrators working their tails off to do right by

are the best and the brightest, but that also means the best

the students.”

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


TRUTH BE TOLD

“There are a lot of things wrong with the school system, and we hear a lot about that, but no one talks about what is right, and that is unfair to the teachers and administrators working to do right by the students.”

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MEET THE CANDIDATES:

We asked all of the new candidates for the Montgomery County Board of Education what motivated them to seek the position. Here’s what they had to say.

The Montgomery County Board of Education’s Districts

EDITOR’S NOTE: We contacted all new candidates (not incumbents) and gave them the

1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 are all up for election. Earlier this year,

opportunity to share their thoughts; two candidates did not respond before press time.

the Chamber launched educatemgm.com to provide information and cultivate interest among the public to run for the board. As a result, 19 new candidates are

DISTRICT 1

seeking election. Liletta Mahone Jenkins / As a citizen of Mont-

june

gomery, parent and an advocate for education,

november

july

I can no longer watch the public schools in my hometown fail. Because I care about the children in our public school system, I decided to

PRIMARY ELECTION

RUN-OFF ELECTION

run for the board. I believe all children deserve

GENERAL ELECTION

a quality education and failure is not an option. Marcus Vandiver / I believe the school board is in need of fresh ideas, new perspectives and energy. My knowledge of K-12 education, ex-

FIND YOUR DISTRICT:

perience as a teacher and an educational pro-

3

fessional, and data-driven approach to problem

1 2

solving will positively impact the decisions

7

facing the board over the next few years.

6 4

Frederick Turner / The reason I'm running for

5

FIND YOUR DISTRICT AT educatemgm.com

Montgomery County School Board is because I am MPS, and I believe in the future of MPS. It's up to us to change the culture of our schools!

MONTGOMERY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES: SOURCE: Montgomery County Elections Office DISTRICT 1

Liletta Mahone Jenkins (D) Lesa Keith (R), Incumbent Frederick Turner (D) Marcus Vandiver (D) DISTRICT 2

Brenda Irby (D) Larry Lee (R) Ted Lowry (R) Misty S. Fairbanks Messick (D) Clare Weil (D) DISTRICT 3

Brenda DeRamus-Coleman (D) Phillip Ensler (D)

DISTRICT 2

DISTRICT 5

Jannah Morgan Bailey (R)

Larry Lee / I am running for the MPS board

Dianelle Gross (D)

because we need people with common sense,

Rhonda Oats (D)

maturity, the ability to cooperate and an under-

Carey Owens Jr. (D)

standing of what goes on in our schools and

DeVona Sims (D)

the challenges they face. We certainly need

Melissa Snowden (R), Incumbent

members who are fiscally conservative. Ted Lowry / I know we can have a world-class

DISTRICT 6

Jessica Johnson Anderson (D)

public school system. Montgomery Public Schools must have new leadership that is will-

Timothy Bass (D)

ing to make difficult decisions and back those

Claudia T. Mitchell (D)

decisions with appropriate action. Our children

Robert Porterfield (D), Incumbent

deserve no less.

Deena Weston (D)

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


DISTRICT 2

Do Your Homework

Misty S. Fairbanks Messick / I am running for the board because I want to be part of the

Since a clear line can be drawn be-

solution. Our children deserve better. And they

tween quality public schools and eco-

need better if they are going to grow into suc-

nomic development (and therefore,

cessful adults. As a smart, hardworking lawyer, I

quality of life), even if you don’t have

believe I have something to contribute.

children, the state of MPS should concern you. And area parents are

Clare Weil / I am running for the board because

all too aware of how it affects their

I believe every child deserves a first-class edu-

families, knowing that their children’s

cation. The current board has failed to expect

futures are at stake. So what can you

excellence. Leadership has been missing, and

do? Dr. Ed Richardson offered a few

I hope to bring that back as well as a sense of

suggestions:

optimism that we can fix this problem.

1 / Review the current board members and the board candidates for your district.

DISTRICT 3

Brenda DeRamus-Coleman / I am a candidate for the board because I have dedicated my

Learn as much as you can about

life to education, and I want the opportunity to

them; listen to what they are saying;

help to formulate sound policies and programs

ask them questions and be specific.

to move our community forward. I believe that what is good for children and schools is good

Vote. 2/

for the community. Phillip Ensler / I am a civil rights lawyer and former Robert E. Lee High School teacher, and I am running because our public school students deserve a fierce advocate who will fight to en-

3 / Stay informed and involved.

sure that they are receiving access to an equal, quality education.

You can’t just vote and walk away. You have to communicate with board members and hold them account-

DISTRICT 5

able. That doesn’t mean every single

Jannah Morgan Bailey / I am a product of MPS

time something little pops up you

and I want children in our community to have

cry foul. It means attending meet-

the same quality education and opportunities

ings, expressing your opinions and

that I had. I believe this can only come with

offering your ideas. And don’t just let

change. I am running for the board because

them know when there is a problem

I have the experience to work with groups of

affecting your child. Look at and be

diverse people for a common mission.

concerned about the overall issues.

Dianelle Gross / I am a United States Air Force veteran with no education experience; yet I am a proud parent of two MPS graduates and two current MPS students. I don’t feel our children nor our schools are failing; they are victims of a failed system. It’s time to rebuild MPS.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


DISTRICT 5

DISTRICT 6

Rhonda Oats / I am running for the board

Jessica Johnson Anderson / I believe that by

because I firmly believe that education matters

investing in children, we are investing in not

for students, teachers, parents and the commu-

only their future, but our city’s as well. As a

nity. I believe our schools must provide a safe

mom, the thought that we are failing children

environment and ample opportunities for all

means I can’t stay on the sidelines anymore,

students to achieve and excel.

even if it means an uphill battle. Claudia T. Mitchell / I am running for the board

Carey Owens Jr. / The Montgomery Public

because our school system is facing chal-

School system is the foundation of our commu-

lenges that require responsible leadership. I

nity. However, our foundation is cracking. We

understand the importance of ensuring that all

have an opportunity to make adjustments. I am

perspectives are heard, policies are enacted,

asking to be the voice for the children, parents

timely budgets are adopted and decisions

and community.

properly meet the needs of our constituents.

DeVona Sims / I am running for the board

Deena Weston / I believe that MPS can be-

because I believe that public education is ul-

come a success story for all families. I want to

timately connected to the vitality of our commu-

serve on the board because I believe Mont-

nity. I am running because our future depends

gomery should expect more from our public

on leaders who are willing to take a stand and

school system, and I believe I am prepared to

do the right thing.

lead MPS toward the high performing lists.

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VESTOR IN

OFIL

Q&A

E

MICHAEL GALVIN As President of The Montgomery Advertiser, part of the USA Today Network, Michael Galvin is well aware of the issues our city faces. But by putting more emphasis on solutions-based journalism, he and the rest of the team at Montgomery’s only daily newspaper are encouraging residents to shun the “How did we get here?” attitude in favor of a “How do we get where we want to be?” mindset. Question? Answer. How long have you been in the newspaper business? I’ve been in the “newspaper business”

What challenges are facing your industry as a whole? The “dualopoly” of Google and Facebook creates

approximately 18 months (which is when I came here). My

challenges on both the content and revenue sides of our

background is in business, and I spent most of my career

business. They control much of the news that is shared,

with BellSouth, AT&T and YP Marketing. My focus the past

regardless of the accuracy, without revenue attribution to

10 years has been on digital media solutions and business

the journalists. On the advertising side, our Facebook part-

transformation.

nership, Google Premiere partnership and our quality scores provide greater value for our clients, but it is a model where

Where are you originally from? I was born in

they have significant leverage dictating very lean margins.

Boston and moved to Nashville in the 2nd grade. With BellSouth, I moved throughout the Southeast before landing in Birmingham for the 13 years prior to moving to Montgomery.

What specific challenges are facing The Montgomery Advertiser and how is the paper addressing them? Last year was a good year for The

In your opinion, what role does/should a daily newspaper play in a community? I believe local

Montgomery Advertiser. The content side of our house

content providers, whether print or digital, should play a role

the advertising side, we exceeded our financial goals. And I

in improving our community, and we can accomplish this in

think Montgomery should take pride in having a successful

two ways. One, as a trusted source to inform our community,

daily newspaper. Print is still an effective medium to reach

providing relevant content however people choose to re-

an educated, affluent and engaged audience, but it is

ceive it—anytime, anywhere. Second, and equally important,

declining. Fortunately, digital media continues to grow, and

we help businesses grow. The Montgomery Advertiser has

we’ve added additional capabilities, including experiential

been connecting buyers and sellers for 190 years, partner-

or event marketing. It’s an important component for ad cam-

ing with local business on their success.

paigns, especially for clients that want to reach millennials

continues to be recognized for its quality reporting, and on

who look for more interaction with local businesses, so we

How is The Montgomery Advertiser filling that role? Executive Editor Bro Krift leads a very talented team

expanded into event marketing, including the Food Truck

of reporters that are committed to their craft. The depth of

sponsors of these events.

their journalism helps increase the narrative on topics that

are important for all of us. In the coming months, you will see a greater focus on solutions-based journalism, report-

What changes have you seen in your time in this industry? The digital landscape is constantly chang-

ing on the effectiveness of the responses to challenges we

ing, which requires significant investment in capabilities

face. I see it as a positive shift from what can sometimes be

and ongoing training to stay relevant. That change is only

viewed as “problem spotting.” On the advertising side of our

going to accelerate as AI and voice search become more

business, we will continue to leverage USA Today Net-

mainstream.

Mashup, which has been good for Montgomery and for the

work media solution capabilities for more intelligent media campaigns and transparent reporting. It can be a little scary

What do you love about your job? I love being a

when you can see how data can be leveraged for targeted

part of the community. I don’t take for granted being includ-

campaigns based on the persona a client wants to reach.

ed at events throughout the year from ASF to Zoobilation,

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT FOUTS

PR

PO WERHOUSE


Warm Welcome I’ve lived in several SEC cities, including Nashville, Knoxville, Jackson and Birmingham. Montgomery has been the easiest by far to meet people and quickly become a part of the community. I think that it may be in part because it is a military town.

“I am continually impressed with how our local business leaders and community officials work together, especially on larger projects.”

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


Don’t worry

about the Dry CLEANING.

“I believe local content providers, whether print or digital, should play a role in improving our community.” but being associated with telling the stories of people that make a difference can be the most rewarding and humbling part of my job. I’m also fortunate to have the opportunity daily to interact with impressive community and business leaders, and on my most rewarding days, I have the chance to work with them on some significant projects.

We’ll pick up where you left off. Jim Massey’s will pick up and deliver your dry cleaning and laundry from your home or office — at no extra charge! • No need to be present for pickup or delivery • We provide a laundry bag • Itemized receipts of pickup and delivery • We’ll wash, dry and fold your home laundry • Easy monthly payment

Speaking of significant projects, what are your thoughts on the successful landing of the F-35 jet program? We did an editorial series called “Landing the Lightning,” and on the advertising side, we did the “35 for 35” series. I was thrilled we were included in that process and were able to help give our community a voice. We had the chance to inform the community on what this deal would mean for everyone and were able to showcase this community’s support for the military presence here. The entire effort was a great example of what we can accomplish when our community comes together and gets focused on something. Now we need to put that focus on public education.

What are your impressions of Montgomery? I’ve found Montgomery to be incredibly welcoming. I’ve lived in several SEC cities, including Nashville, Knoxville, Jackson and Birmingham. Montgomery has been the easiest by far to meet people and quickly become a part of the community. I think that it may be in part because it is a military town.

What do you think and hope is on the horizon for the city? I am hopeful that we can continue to work together on projects that are important for the future of our business community and quality of life, including working together to improve our public schools, continue to improve our airport and continue the recent growth in events so that everyone can enjoy our community and live in a place that we are all proud to call home.

What are your interests outside of work? My wife Lynn and I are blessed with six children, so we are fortunate to have plenty of weekend activities. This time of year, it’s track meets and soccer. Soon it will be back to football then bas-

Jim Massey’s Cleaners 531 E. South Street, Montgomery 334.481.1911 | www.jimmassey.com

ketball. My favorite activity is probably Saturday night dinner at Midtown Pizza Kitchen when all my children are home from college.


.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BE R profile

KEARY FOSTER Local CPA Keary Foster has broken barriers in his career, but what he loves most about his job is hearing from his clients about positive impacts the work of his firm, Wealth Management Partners, has had on their life and in their businesses.

When was Wealth Management Partners founded? I started WMP in 2007. What made you want to be a CPA? My love for numbers and solving problems.

What are WMP’s primary services? WMP is a full-service Certified Public Accountants (CPA) and business-consulting firm. We have a private sector and governmental services group. The private sector group works with individuals, businesses and non-profit entities. The government services group provides services to federal agencies.

Who are WMP’s primary clients? Many local and regional businesses. We have individual clients in just about every state. We have established a very good niche in servicing physicians and physician practices. On the government side, our primary clients are Department of Defense and Health and Human Services.

Recent awards or honors? In the fall of 2015, I participated in and completed the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program. It’s a program that helps entrepreneurs create jobs and economic opportunity by providing greater access to education, capital and business-support services.

On a Mission: In addition to his work as a CPA, Keary also owns The Mission House, a 3,000-square-foot facility serves the community as a place to hold business outings, special and private events and other gatherings. He purchased the property in May 2016 and renovations were completed in November 2016.

After completing my Masters of Science in taxation from the University of Alabama in 2004, I was the first African American CPA to be hired to work with one of the established CPA firms here in the city. From the experience I gained there, I formed WMP, which is the first diverse CPA firm, in terms of staff and client base, in the city of Montgomery. wmpcpa.com

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT FOUTS

historic property downtown. The

What’s an accomplishment that you are particularly proud of?


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER profile

DR. KIM OUSLEY For almost 20 years, Dr. Kim Ousley has been caring for animals large and small. Now, at Eastmont Animal Clinic and its associated service, The House Call Vet, Ousley finds continual joy in helping people help the companion animals they love.

How long have you been with Eastmont Animal Clinic and The House Call Vet? 10 years. What made you want to be a vet? I wanted to be a vet since I was 7 years old. My aspirations and goals were to become a marine mammal vet, and I had that opportunity directly out of vet school.

Where are you from? I am originally from Perrysburg, Ohio. I chose Auburn University since it is known to have one of the best vet schools in the country. I have practiced all over the United States, and in Korea, covering several aspects of veterinary medicine, from marine mammals (dolphins, beluga whales and sea lions) and reptiles to rodents, dogs and cats.

What are your practice’s primary services? We specialize in small animal medicine and surgery, and we are one of the few practices to offer house calls. We also offer dentistry, radiology, laser therapy, boarding and grooming.

What do you love about being a vet? Ultimately, for me, being a vet is about respecting the human-animal bond and the unconditional love that our patients have for their owners. It is rewarding to treat animals but moreso help people with the pets they love. That bond is amazing and can be stronger than human relationships.

What are your interests outside of work? I also am a partner in a veterinary financial consulting business. My hobbies are water skiing, snow skiing, mountain biking and Crossfit. I also love training and working with horses and dogs.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

What’s an accomplishment that you are particularly proud of? I am most proud of my two wonderful daughters, 16 and 14, who are not only straight-A students, but have the character to back it too. I have

Patient-Care Philosophy Our motto is “Excellence in care and compassion

worked very hard to teach them character by example.

in medicine.” My creed is, “Your baby is my baby.” We treat all pets as if they were our own.

EASTMONTANIMAL.COM, THEHOMECALLVET.COM

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EMBE R Spotlight

HARMON DENNIS BRADSHAW For just over 40 years, Harmon Dennis Bradshaw has been on a mission to provide superior insurance and risk management solutions to its clients at competitive premiums and with outstanding service. Harmon Dennis Bradshaw now extends well beyond the River Region. A Birmingham division was established in 2010 and it has grown by more than 60 percent in just the last couple of years. HDB also has Korean bilingual personnel for our commercial and personal lines client needs. Harmon Dennis Bradshaw is one of the largest insurance agencies in the state but is still privately owned.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 40   

WHAT ARE THE COMPANY’S PRIMARY SERVICES? Commercial property and liability insurance and group benefits. HDB’s total written premium is approximately $90 million with 84 percent being commercial property and liability business, 15 percent group benefits and 1 percent personal lines.   

WHO ARE THE COMPANY’S PRIMARY CLIENTS? Commercial businesses of all sizes and spanning all industry segments. The company focuses on a number of different industries—manufacturers, retail, social service, health care, construction, agriculture, real estate, hospitality and food processing industries—and there is no industry that makes up more than 20 percent of our revenue.   

WHAT SETS HARMON DENNIS BRADSHAW APART? There are a lot of great insurance agencies in Alabama, but unlike most of those agencies, HDB has incentive programs in place, including a profit-sharing plan, that trickle down to the employees to reward them and incentivize them to do their best. We are successful because our customers recognize that our employees are going the extra mile on their behalf each and every day, whether that means getting a better premium for them, improving their coverage, implementing a risk management tool or making sure a claim is resolved in a quick and equitable manner. The company also makes it a priority to support various non-profits in the River Region.

WHAT HAS DRIVEN THE COMPANY’S SUCCESS? In a word, teamwork. People make a company, and without each and every one of the employees at HDB pushing themselves to give more, we wouldn’t have been as successful as we have been.     

HOW HAS TECHNOLOGY CHANGED YOUR BUSINESS? We implemented imaging software and are now “paperless,” which has helped us become more efficient and mobile. All account managers and assistants have dual monitors to take full advantage of the efficiencies of software systems. We now have the ability to send clients forms that require signatures via electronic signature.

7115 HALCYON SUMMIT DRIVE / 334-273-7277 / HDBINSURANCE.COM 30

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


IN D USTRY OVE RVIE W

| INSURANCE

THE BUSINESS OF INSURANCE

SAFE& SOUND

Today, most people accept that many forms of insurance are necessities, but until disaster strikes, we may not think much about it. But the impact of the insurance industry in our area extends far beyond premiums and brings much more than the peace of mind its policies provide.

The influence and impact of our area’s insurance industry adds up to more than you might think.

“There are many jobs created by our industry,” said Charlie Harris, Executive Vice President at Starke Agency, Inc. His company has 30 employees, but ESTIMATED

INSURANCE INDUSTRY

PAYROLL IMPACT:

RIVER REGION IMPACT:

$200M

as a whole, the industry accounts for thousands of jobs in and around Montgomery. “And I don’t know if people think about it, but you can’t have economic development without insurance. Banks don’t loan money without it.” Alabama Insurance Commissioner Jim Ridling agreed. “There is not a structure built or an automobile sold in this state without insurance,” he said. “It is an essential piece of business getting done and our economy running.” Since the primary mission of the Alabama Insurance Commission that Ridling heads is to monitor insurance companies, he has a good understanding of how and why the industry matters here. As does Tommy Coshatt, Executive Vice President of Operations at Montgomery-based Alfa Insurance, one of the city’s oldest and largest companies that employs approximately 1,000 people in the River Region. “From a purely economic standpoint, our footprint here is significant,” he said. “Our annual impact is $1.4 billion in this area; that impacts a lot of lives.”

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INDUST RY OVERVIEW

| INSURANCE

LEADERSHIP LEGACY Two fixtures in Montgomery’s insurance industry are also two of the city’s biggest champions, serving as vocal advocates for both the business community and the overall community. Charles Jinright, CEO of the Jinright Group,

PUTTING A PREMIUM ON PHILANTHROPY Despite this impressive figure,

Sonya Berryman, Senior Vice President Insurance Services at Palomar Insurance Corporation, a

Coshatt believes that Alfa actually

local independent insurance agency

contributes to its community in an

focused on commercial and personal

even larger way. “We strive to be

insurance, touted her company’s

there when people need us most,”

similar efforts. “We encourage our

he said. “I can’t quantify the emotion-

employees to impact their commu-

al stability we can give families in the

nity; it’s where we live too,” she said.

aftermath of something tragic.”

“We provide one paid day of leave for our employees each year to vol-

Of course, that’s an insurance

unteer with whatever their passion

company’s primary job. But Alfa and

is.” Palomar is also heavily involved

other local companies go several

with the Joy to Life Foundation,

steps farther too. “We are so proud

a local breast cancer non-profit,

of our Alfa Cares initiative, which

signing up a large company team to

was recently recognized by the

participate in its major fundraiser, the

National Farm Bureau as being

Walk of Life, every year.

the top program of its kind in the country,” he said. Through Alfa

Berryman pointed to another way

Cares, the company has raised more

companies like Palomar benefit

than $400,000 for the American

Montgomery. “As an independent

Cancer Society since 2015, and last

agency, we are always bringing

year, raised more than $120,000 for

insurance company representatives

Children’s Hospital. “And we don’t

to Montgomery,” she said. “They stay

just write checks,” Coshatt said. “We

in our hotels, eat at our restaurants,

get our employees engaged with

and we get to show off our city.”

the community by giving them a paid

a benefits brokerage, stressed how and why insurance agents in particular play positive roles in Montgomery. “You see a lot of insurance agencies, of all sizes and particularly small ones, all across the city and region getting very involved,” he said. “They sponsor youth sports teams, participate in fundraisers and join civic clubs,” he said. “It’s good for their business, hav-

C H A R LE S J I N RI G H T

ing their names attached to those things, but it goes beyond that. And all those actions collectively make a big difference here. You see a lot of insurance industry folks in leadership roles too. That’s important.” Jinright is a prime example, serving on the Montgomery City Council for 23 years. He’s currently the Council President, an office he’s held for 15 years. Barrie Harmon of Harmon Dennis Bradshaw also believes his industry colleagues bring a lot more than just their business to the area. “In our company, we feel we have an obligation to be community partners and

day off to volunteer with a cause or

to give back because

non-profit they care about.”

a majority of our client base is here,” he said. “I think the industry as a

whole as well shows its

We encourage our employees

commitment to be active

to impact their community; it’s where we live too.

B A R RI E H A RM O N

corporate citizens.” And he doesn’t just talk: He walks the walk too. Both personally and profes-

- SONYA BERRYMAN,

sionally, Harmon supports multiple arts organiza-

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT INSURANCE SERVICES

tions and other charitable causes in the city.

AT PALOMAR INSURANCE CORPORATION 32

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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INDUST RY OVERVIEW

| INSURANCE

KEEPING UP Like everything else, the insurance industry is

especially look at insurance options

THE DOLLARS AND CENTS OF THE ECONOMIC IMPACT IN THE RIVER REGION

online, most people still, at least in

facing nearly constant evolution in

our area, want someone to talk to and

response to multiple changes, many

want that personal interaction.”

occurring at a lightning pace. “Risks keep changing, and we [the industry]

As Harris pointed out, the internet

have to adapt to provide the needed

gives consumers access to a wealth

insurance products,” said Charlie Har-

of information that has ramped up

ris, Executive Vice President at Starke

comparison shopping, and Tommy

Agency, Inc. “Take cyber liability. That

Coshatt, Executive Vice President of

wasn’t even a thing 15 years ago.”

Operations at Montgomery-based Alfa Insurance, elaborated on that

Society’s youngest adults are driving

thought. “Competition for customers

many of the new trends. “We see

has intensified, and it’s not just large

that many millennials don’t want the

national companies we’re pitted

whole relationship aspect of an insur-

against,” he said. “Thanks to technol-

ance agent,” said State Farm agent

ogy, we’re seeing startups disrupting

Willie Durham. “They just want to go

the traditional insurance model; that

to the website, get the information

is putting some pressure on us. And

and get the policy. They don’t feel

that’s pushing us to work smarter.”

they need to know me. That could change as they get older though.”

BY THE NUMBERS

$80K

AVERAGE ANNUAL INCOME

FOR INSURANCE AGENTS IN THE RIVER REGION CLOSE TO

$1 BILLION ESTIMATED INSURANCE INDUSTRY

ECONOMIC IMPACT IN THE RIVER REGION

$200M

ESTIMATED PAYROLL IMPACT

OF INSURANCE INDUSTRY IN THE RIVER REGION

But some things stay the same. “We have to be innovative to meet today’s

Harris believes it will and that there

customers’ needs but also stay true to

will always be a demand for personal

our mission and provide that person-

customer service. “Insurance is still

alized service,” Coshatt said. “Some

a very people-oriented industry. I’ve

people initially want no human inter-

been hearing since the mid-1990s

action, but when there is a problem,

that the internet would change that,

you want a person to talk to.”

and while I think younger generations

EXPERT OPINION: “THE VERY PRESENCE OF ALFA IN MONTGOMERY

GREATLY MAGNIFIES THE IMPACT

“Thanks to technology, we’re seeing small startups disrupting the traditional insurance model; that is putting some pressure on us.

OF THE INDUSTRY IN THE REGION.”

And that’s pushing us to work smarter.” - TOMMY COSHATT, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS AT ALFA INSURANCE

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

D R. K E V I N D E RAV I , DEAN OF AUM’S COLLEGE OF PUBLIC POLICY AND JUSTICE


Industry Leader | IN S U R ANC E

Alliance Insurance Group Founded: 2002

Additionally, many of our moderate-sized clients of 50 employees or more like the fact that we offer and administer Flexible Spending

Employees: Currently, we have a local staff of 14 that serves

Accounts, which allow employees to pay copays, remaining coin-

our clients in a broad range of employee benefits consulting and

surance balances, prescriptions and more with tax-free dollars while

benefits administration capacities. Additionally, we have three smaller

their employer (our ideal client) saves the matching payroll taxes on

offices in Alabama, in Opelika, Luverne and Birmingham that serve

their employee’s deductions. We also do COBRA administration, and

their local areas.

we offer our clients access to a free online benefits administration system, as well as both “live” and online access to HR resources to

Primary Products and Services: Our sole focus is employee benefits. Insurance is a vast industry, and we don’t try to do everything or be everything to everyone. Our ideal client has us assisting them in the plan design of their major medical plan or plans,

help them do their jobs better.

What Sets Us Apart From the Competition: Our customer service and access to the top-rated carriers.

perhaps even moving them from being fully insured to become “self-insured,” sometimes using a Health Reimbursement Arrangement to help employees better afford those medical plans. Once that is done, we cover our ideal client’s risk of unforeseen large employee claims with stop-loss reinsurance and finally, add complementary benefits such as life insurance, dental, vision and more, which can be either company-paid or voluntary or a combination of both.

35

6730 Taylor Court, Montgomery, AL | 334-396-3960 www.allianceinsgroup.com

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


INDUST RY OVERVIEW

| INSURANCE

CONNECTION COUNTS

NEWS FOR 2018 Changes in insurance laws and regulations are ensuring consumers have clearer pictures and lower costs when it comes to protecting property and other valuables.

CYBER THREATS Cyber threats are driving new insurance legislation too. The Alabama Legislature passed a law to require companies that handle and

Insurance is still A VERY

PEOPLE-ORIENTED

INDUSTRY. I’ve been hearing since the mid-1990s that the internet would change that, and while I think younger generations especially look at insurance options online,

store sensitive personal information

most PEOPLE STILL, AT

One mandate effective at the

to BE MORE ACCOUNTABLE FOR

LEAST IN OUR AREA, WANT

beginning of 2018 requires companies

SECURING THAT DATA and for

SOMEONE TO TALK TO and

offering HOME INSURANCE POLICIES

quickly and clearly informing custom-

want a personal interaction.

GET SMART

to separate out what EACH PIECE OF

ers when there is a breach. “Compa-

COVERAGE COSTS.

nies have an obligation to protect that information,” said Sonya Berryman,

“This will help

- CHARLIE HARRIS, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

AT STARKE AGENCY, INC.

Senior Vice President Insurance

consumers be more

Services at Palomar

informed and help

Insurance Corporation. “How they

them shop smarter.”

have handled responding to

-JIM RIDLING,

breaches in the past has been a bit

ALABAMA

lax, so look for more legislation on

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER

that from the federal level too.”

THE NUMBERS GAME THERE ARE

THE ALABAMA INSURANCE COMMISSION COLLECTED

IN 2016

$342 MILLION

(LATEST YEAR AVAILABLE),

$20.7 BILLION

IN TOTAL PREMIUM TAX IN FY2017, MAKING IT THE LARGEST CONTRIBUTOR TO THE STATE’S GENERAL FUND BUDGET.

IN INSURANCE PREMIUMS WERE WRITTEN IN ALABAMA.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

25,785 REGISTERED INSURANCE AGENTS

IN ALABAMA, AND THEY ONLY MAKE UP A PORTION OF THE PEOPLE EMPLOYED IN THE OVERALL INSURANCE INDUSTRY.


Industry Leader | IN S U R ANC E

Cedric Bradford State Farm Agent

Founded: January 1, 1988

want to be treated if we were in their position. We take pride in

Employees: 3

spouses that handled all of the insurance business. I also have

Primary Products and Services: Auto, life,

the people here well. I was born and raised here and graduated

educating our young adults and senior citizens that have lost a long-standing connection to Montgomery, so I want to serve

homeowners, renters, business insurance and bank products.

What Sets Us Apart for the Competition:

high school from St. Jude Educational Institute before graduating from the University of Alabama.

Over 70 years of combined experience between my team members who are all licensed agents. We believe in offering and explaining insurance coverages as opposed to just quoting rates. We believe in treating our customers the way we would

37

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

420 S. Lawrence St. | 334-262-5100 www.cedricbradford.com


Industry Leader | I NSURANCE

AssuredPartners Primary Products and Services: Over the past 50

your unique needs can be overwhelming. It is so important to find a

years, AssuredPartners’ (formerly Colonial Insurance) presence in

trusted partner who not only understands your needs, but also has

Montgomery has flourished, serving the community and surrounding

access to the best programs to mitigate and insure your risks. At

areas. AssuredPartners is positioned to utilize our expertise in prop-

AssuredPartners, we’re not just in the insurance business. We’re in

erty and casualty insurance to offer the best customized solutions

the business of developing strong, lasting relationships. Relation-

to our clients. Our team of experts assists clients in nearly every

ships built on trust that we earn day in and day out by collaborating

industry including emergency medical services, medical profession-

with you as partners – where we view each other as equals, show

al, social services, real estate, hospitality, construction and more.

mutual respect and work openly and honestly together to achieve

We understand the unusual risks and exposures associated with

common goals. As true partners, our team of dedicated, experi-

doing business in those industries and offer a proactive approach to

enced insurance professionals always has your best interests in

services far beyond the abilities of the average insurance provider

mind and is passionate about protecting your assets and helping

including claims consulting and advocacy, experience mod analysis,

you grow. It’s what we call power through partnership.

loss prevention, disaster planning, self-insurance programs, and cyber liability, which allows us to take the best care of our clients and offer customized services unique to each situation.

What Sets Us Apart from the Competition: With the wide variety of insurance coverage options available to

5251 Hampstead High Street, Unit 200 | 334-270-6824

protect your most coveted assets, knowing which one is best for

www.assuredpartners.com

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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INDUST RY OVERVIEW

| INSURANCE

HOW TECH CAN HELP State Farm Insurance agent Willie Durham pointed out one way technology can come to the aid of

UPGRADE UPDATE ACCORDING TO OUR INDUSTRY SOURCES, FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE, TECHNOLOGY’S ENDLESS MARCH FORWARD IS AFFECTING THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY IN SEVERAL KEY WAYS.

the insurance industry and its customers. “Alabama is a mandatory liability insurance state for cars, and that happening helped the industry some,” he said. “But there’s some tweaking that still needs to be done.” If you visit Durham and buy car insurance, you get a card that day that says you are insured – and have paid for that insurance – for six months. But you can never make another payment, and you still have the card for five more months, even though, since you

insurance. But the police see that card, so they are processing the

tech and that means costly parts, so we’ve seen repair expenses shoot up in

for companies and consumers. “Email

our claims,” Tommy Coshatt, Executive

alone has revolutionized how we interact

Vice President of Operations at Alfa

with our clients,” said Sonya Berryman,

Insurance, said.

Senior Vice President Insurance Services at Palomar Insurance Corporation. They also give customers options. “My cus-

expectation that the insurance of the driver who was at fault will pay to fix their car. “But in these cases, it’s my customers’ insurance that

becoming commonplace with companies like Uber and Airbnb can

click through an app to reach me,” said

be problematic. “Folks using their own

Willie Durham, a State Farm agent. “That

vehicles operating as a cab is impacting

means I can take care of clients out of my

the industry because it changes the type

area, like kids going off to college.”

of insurance they should have,” said

The ability to gather and analyze

Durham. “They have

mass quantities of information

to get a special

quickly is helping insurance companies

endorsement from

better predict losses and adapt products

their auto insurance,

and prices accordingly.

and there is an additional charge. And

without giving the uninsured driver

And the other driver has a false

The peer-to-peer transactions

tomers can come to my office, call in or

accident and all leaving the scene a ticket,” Durham said.

ers. “They are full of advanced

efficient, and these changes save money

ly insured. “My customers are getinsurance card but doesn’t have

Today’s cars are moving comput-

tures, company apps and more are making the industry faster and more

stopped paying, you’re not actualting hit by a car, the driver has an

Things like email, digital signa-

Smart phones have led to a “dis-

if you don’t tell your

tracted driving” epidemic. “It’s a

insurance company,

big issue for insurance companies and

and don’t get that

for clients,” said Charlie Harris, Executive

endorsement, and

Vice President at Starke Agency, Inc. “We

there is an accident, it might not be cov-

are working with business clients to help

ered. The same goes for renting out your

put policies in place for their sales staff

house with Airbnb or VRBO. People need

and drivers to protect them from risk.”

to be aware of that.”

W I L L I E D U RH A M

has to pay, so it causes frustration,” Durham says. “Technology could be used in the enforcement

LOOK OUT

of the law so the police would be

Self-driving cars are going to rock the insurance industry.

able to tell, real time, if an insur-

“They are still years away, but they’re coming,” said Charlie

ance policy is current.”

Harris, Executive Vice President at Starke Agency, Inc.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


INDUST RY OVERVIEW

| INSURANCE

NEWS TO KNOW

Insurance is a heavily regulat-

ed industry, but the employee benefits segment even more so. And, it is constantly changing and evolving. Mike Hicks, President at Alliance Insurance, shared a few thoughts on some of the latest changes and trends that Montgomery employers should be aware of.

STORM SURGE 2017 was the most expensive year on record for natural disasters, with $306 BILLION IN DAMAGE

REPORTED. The industry is reacting in a few different ways. “We may see some costs go up, but many companies are also incentivizing consumers to take steps to lessen some of these risks,” said Alfa Insurance’s Tommy Coshatt. The Alabama Insurance Commission is doing exactly that, offering grants to help people make their houses and structures more resistant to wind damage. The program, called Strengthen Alabama Homes, was initially aimed at primarily coastal communities, but it should soon go statewide. That’s good news for the River Region, an area often in the path of hurricanes moving north and tornadoes. LEARN MORE ONLINE AT STRENGTHENALABAMAHOMES.COM

M I KE H I C KS

“One trend worth expounding

One particularly appealing

upon is that most employers

‘new’ regulation effective for

have now realized that keeping

tax years 2018 and 2019 is a

good employees is worth the

tax credit of up to 25 percent of

expense of offering employee

applicable paid wages for em-

benefits. Yet, just offering ben-

ployers who offer ‘paid family

efits is not enough. It takes the

and medical leave’ pursuant to

right mix of benefits, the proper

the Family Medical Leave Act.

and frequent communication

Since 1993, qualifying employ-

of those benefits, and an easily

ees have been able to take up

understood and used enroll-

to 12 work weeks off for qualify-

ment process so employees

ing medical and family reasons,

know why each benefit is being

but now, dependent upon their

offered and how that benefit

employer, they may be able

will address risks inherent for

to receive pay during these

that particular employee or

absences, and that's exciting

their family. Happy and secure

news for many employees.”

employees make happy and secure companies.

#NOWTRENDING The recent large number of sexual harassment and hostile work environment reports at all kinds of companies and businesses both large and small is rubbing off on the insurance industry as Sonya Berryman, Senior Vice President Insurance

"WE NOW HAVE SOME LADIES OUT THERE SELLING VERY SUCCESSFULLY AND ALSO RISING TO PRINCIPALS AT AGENCIES." - SONYA BERRYMAN

Services at Palomar Insurance Corporation, explained. “In

resources to help them mitigate their risk, so there’s a push for

response to the #metoo movement, I think we’re going to see

education on what right practices in the workplace are.”

some strengthening of employee liability policies, and as an offshoot, we’ll also see more businesses holding more civil

And while this issue facing mainly females is disturbing,

training courses for employees,” she said.

Berryman sees some bright light. “In our industry, we are now seeing more women move into sales positions, and that is

Charlie Harris, Executive Vice President at Starke Agency, Inc.,

exciting,” she said. “Historically, it was men selling the policies,

echoed Berryman. “All the sexual harassment allegations are

and women servicing them, but we now have some ladies out

getting businesses’ attention, and part of our job, in addition

there selling very successfully and also rising to principals at

to getting a business owner the right policy, is to provide

agencies as well as owning them.”

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Back to Life Montgomery’s historic Kress building is full of light and life again, recently reopening as Kress on Dexter, a multi-use space that preserves the past with eyes on the future.

T

he resurgence of Dexter Avenue, one of the most

when private investors began to see new opportunity in the

pivotal streets in American history, continues to

beautiful structure. Its redevelopment is a project of Mont-

gain steam, thanks to the redevelopment of some major

gomery BUILDS, which was founded by Mark and Sarah

structures. Among them is the former site of an S. H. Kress

Beatty Buller through their company ELSAJA.

Co. department store. The nearly 90-year-old building reopened in April as Kress on Dexter following a $20 million transformation that began in 2014. The mixed-use development now combines retail, office and residential space under one roof at 39 Dexter Avenue.

“S. H. Kress had a legacy of creating these architectural gems throughout the Southeast.”

Protecting and salvaging as much of the original building as possible was a goal from the start. “S. H. Kress had a

Sarah Beatty Buller said that her New York-based family was

legacy of creating these architectural gems throughout the

introduced to Montgomery about seven years ago when

Southeast, and Montgomery’s was one of the finest,” said

husband Mark, owner of MarJam, expanded his business to

Zac Gibbs, Development Director for ELSAJA Holdings LLC,

the River Region. During their initial visits, they took in the

the company behind the building’s transformation.

history of the downtown area – which crosses pivotal moments of American history from the Civil War through to the

Legacy Lives That legacy lives on in the preservation of the original terra cotta façade, as well as the original columns and the terrazzo tile floors on the first floor of Kress. Some but not all of the intricate plaster work in the beams and ceilings was also kept. “About 40 percent of that had to be restored,” Gibbs said. Elements were also brought in from the historic Webber building following its collapse. “The heart pine floor for the second floor was all reclaimed wood from the Webber building,” Gibbs said.

Civil Rights Movement. “We were struck by Dexter Avenue, in particular,” Buller said. Many of the buildings were in dismal shape in a place that held extraordinary layers of history, she said. “It’s an incredibly important and amazing place.” With her husband’s company as the impetus for their connection to the city, along with their interactions with other developers in the area, the Bullers upped their level of investment in this historic setting by purchasing several properties, including the Kress building and One Court Square.

The Kress department store chain opened a Montgomery location at this spot on Dexter Avenue in 1898. However, the first building was destroyed in a fire in 1927, and the

“There are too many things tied to our history that are on this street,” she said. “Our family decided that we would invest in a project called Montgomery BUILDS.”

current building was completed in 1929. The chain ceased

Building Community

operations in the early 1980s. The defunct five-and-dime

The purpose of Montgomery BUILDS is to preserve and

department store had been vacant for more than 30 years

protect resulting in beautiful environments that link to the

by MINNIE LAMBERTH / photography by JONATHON KOHN 45

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


“The Kress building is unique in creating a new downtown community of like-minded local entrepreneurs. It’s a hub for art, culture, community and economic development.” - Zac Gibbs, development director, ELSAJA

city’s history while offering places, “where

space and traditional office space. The

people can play, eat, learn and live.”

fourth and fifth floors – which were added to the building during construction – hold

Planning and design for the Kress redevel-

28 residential units.

opment began in 2014, with construction starting in 2015. In the meantime, One

The apartments actually opened in August

Court Square began to serve as an incu-

2017 and quickly found tenants. “We con-

bator for Kress on Dexter’s initial tenants.

sider them 100-percent occupied,” Buller

“The Kress building is unique in creating a new downtown community of like-minded local entrepreneurs,” Gibbs said. “It’s a hub for art, culture, community and economic development.” Prevail Union Coffee, I Am More Than Tours and the Chop Shop – all locally owned businesses – all started at One Court Square with plans to become some

A Big Deal COMING THIS SUMMER

It took $20 million and four

said, noting that the two-bedroom and one-bedroom units are just right for empty nesters, downtown workers, young couples and students.

years to transform an

abandoned vacant shell

into a beautiful

building ready to re-tell its

The construction project has already gotten attention far outside the River Region. Montgomery BUILDS’ Kress on Dexter project received the 2018 Excellence in

story and add new chapters to it.

Construction Award from the Associated

They’re now located on the first floor. “It’s

The total project covers about 115,000

March. “We won first place for the Kress

been fun to watch (the entrepreneurs)

square feet of space. Levels one and two at

building,” Gibbs said. “We won the state

bond around the mission,” Gibbs said.

Kress on Dexter are geared to food, enter-

of Alabama award in winter, then we were

tainment and retail. Level three is an event

nominated for the national award.”

of the first tenants at Kress on Dexter.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Builders and Contractors, Inc. (ABC) in


47

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( ) SMALL

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t Capitol’s Rosemont Gardens and CCC Associates, two separate but complementary

P E R C E N TA G E O F C H A M B E R M E M B E R S T H AT ARE SMALL BUSINESSES

companies owned by the same family, it works well. J. Lamar Thompson, president
of Capitol’s Rosemont Gardens, highlighted the many advantages. “Working with family is really fun if you all get along, and we are blessed in that way,” he said. “We have all always worked well together.”

R

O

W N

Another plus is the ability to spread the emotional load:

B Y

Shouldering setbacks and celebrating success together makes hard things easier and good times even sweeter.

N

S

G

Y L I FA M E R S T T A M IO G T E N E R A

“We share difficulties and rewards, and this sharing concept is the greatest strength of our family owned businesses,” Thompson said. Warner Mathis at Southern Sash has seen multiple benefits come from working side-by-side with his brother, Peyton, the current president of the company, and also when the two worked under their father. “When you work with family, you know everyone has everyone’s back, and we have a shared vision,” he said. He also pointed to a shared mindset. “We know that any decision any one of us is making is based on what we think is best for the company,” he said. And while that doesn’t always guarantee it’s the right decision, knowing the motivations were honorable softens any conflict. “Even if we end up being wrong, we know we had the right intention.”

WHEN IT COMES TO RUNNING A SUCCESSFUL SMALL BUSINESS, ARE F A M I LY T I E S A B O N D O R A B U R D E N ?

At Ross-Clayton Funeral Home, Montgomery’s oldest minority owned small business, four generations of family leadership over a century have allowed the business to build on a strong, stable foundation. “As we celebrate 100 years, we also celebrate our founders and family that came

B L O O D I S T H I C K E R T H A N W AT E R ,

before us for providing leadership that fosters cohesiveness,” said Sarah Ann Ross, a licensed funeral director and the company’s administrative liaison, who came to work

but do the crimson ties of family

with her husband, president David Ross, in 1998.

make it easier or harder to bring in the green? We asked some long-standing, local family owned businesses how working with relations works.

She backed up Mathis on the “common goal” concept, touting that at Ross-Clayton, the family members are on the same page and each have a vested interest in working to promote the business. “We all know we share the same goal of providing exceptional service to our clients, and PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT FOUTS

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


( ) SMALL

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SMALL IS THE NEW BIG: 95% OF MONTGOMERY CHAMBER MEMBER BUSINESSES HAVE 100 EMPLOYEES OR LESS

that’s a good feeling,” she said. “The fact that family is present to help carry the work, participate in problem solving and be a part of the team to serve the community is a great feeling.”

LOOKING AHEAD

Small businesses make up a key segment of our area’s business community. Family owned small businesses are a smaller piece of that pie, but still important, and these stats

But as Thompson points out, as a company

show some interesting trends

adds more and more family members to the

coming and some tricky

mix, keeping everyone on the same page

challenges facing this sector.

can be a challenge; in his mind, it’s one of

on its own complexity,” he said. “You can

personal interests with what is best for the

their family members, other family owned businesses are not so fortunate. Mathis mentioned an instance where a brother and sister got along so badly, one finally had to sell out of the company. He offered some straightforward advice. “My brother and I work closely together,” he said. “So if you with them.”

large number of family involved, that brings

for each family member and in balancing

faced an impressive few conflicts among

can’t stand your sibling, don’t try to work

the biggest. “As you grow, and you have a

face difficulty in determining what is best

While these three local companies have

For him and his brother, constant comof the “next gen” have trouble getting the current generation to give their ideas attention.

munication has been key, and he echoed Thompson on an important point. “Everyone involved has to pay attention to

business.” It’s a tightrope, but in the end,

what’s best for the company, which may not

according to Thompson, you have to do

always be what is best for you, at least at

what is best for the business. “In the long

the moment,” he said. “But long term, what

run, that usually ends up being what is best for all the family as well.”

of family businesses do not have a succession plan in place.

is good for the business is good for you.” Ross offered her tips for keeping family

Mathis outlined another possible down-

business functional and friendly. “Not unlike

side to working with family: handling the

any other business, you have to respect the

transition between generations. “When my

leaders, and who is in what role should be

brother and I bought my dad out when it was time for him to retire, that was tough,” he said. “He did not want to relinquish his control.” Had it been a stranger the brothers had bought the company from, they’d have quickly told the previous owner to butt out. “You can’t do that to your dad,” Mathis said.

of the next generation of family owned small businesses believe their business has the right strategy for the digital age.

clearly defined,” she said. Thompson advises playing up one of the most positive points of working with family: a good understanding of personalities and who is good at what. “We are fortunate in

Sources: Price Waterhouse Coopers “Next Gen” 2017 Study, Price Waterhouse Coopers

that our business is diversified, and as a result, we are able to give our family members opportunities that fit their strengths

Ross agreed with Mathis on the need to set clear boundaries, particularly between the

there is the tendency to think that the old

old guard and the new. “Working every day

ways of doing business need change. They

with family, you have to keep in mind who

are often eager to try new or different ways

is actually the boss,” she said. “With our

of doing things.” Sometimes that’s good,

adult children who work with us (who are

but Ross stressed that sometimes tried and

licensed funeral directors themselves),

true is best.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

and not step on each others’ toes,” he said. “The more you can do that, the fewer problems you’ll have. And determining clear leadership roles, whether it’s with family members or not, in the end will make or break any business.”


( ) SMALL

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FUELING SMALL BIZ STARTUPS Small businesses are the engines that drive our economy, and technology is heavily influencing the way small businesses start, grow and succeed. It’s also creating a new category of small business: IT and tech-focused startups that aren’t just built on innovation, they’re empowering it. To draw

M E E T T H E F A M I LY :

these small businesses to our area and see them flourish, there is one essential

1949

Y E A R FO U N D E D

ingredient: a skilled workforce.

SO UT HE R N SASH F A M I LY M E M B E R S E M P L O Y E D

2

Peyton and Warner Mathis’ father bought it in 1962.

According to Renee Borg, Technical Mar-

P R I M A R Y P R O D U C T/ S E R V I C E :

keting Specialist at RSA Dexter Datacenter,

Windows, doors and other general building materials for both residential and commercial projects.

who heads the Board of Advisors of the Alabama

“If you can’t stand your sibling, don’t

#MONEYQUOTE:

try to work with them.” - Warner Mathis

Technology Foundation (ATF), we’re not where we need to be yet, but we are on our way, and the foundation is playing a crucial

RENEE BORG

role. “Montgomery is becoming a tech hub, and the city wants to expand that, but you can have all the right infrastructure to get the tech startups here, and without the right workforce, the skilled IT folks, it just won’t grow like we want,” she said. The ATF is working to create a workforce pipeline for existing and new businesses in IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ROSS-CLAYTON FUNERAL HOME

the IT sector, and it’s doing it by connecting needs and resources, as Borg explained. “We don’t have a ‘brain drain’ issue; I

M E E T T H E F A M I LY :

believe we have a connectivity issue. The

R O SS- CLAYTO N F UNE R A L HO M E

talent is out there, but there’s no good way

Y E A R FO U N D E D

to find it,” she said. “So we’re creating a da-

1918

F A M I LY M E M B E R S E M P L O Y E D

tabase where companies can find and pull students from all over the state,” she said.

P R I M A R Y P R O D U C T/ S E R V I C E :

The ATF recently launched its new website

#MONEYQUOTE:

that allows students studying IT topics and hoping for a career in IT to upload

7

Funeral direction, embalming and all related services

“We [family members] all know we share the same goal of providing exceptional service. That’s a good feeling.” - Sarah Ann Ross

their resume, transcripts, certifications and

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M E E T T H E F A M I LY :

CAPITOL’S ROSEMONT GARDENS & CCC ASSOCIATES Y E A R FO U N D E D

1950

CCC Associates founded in 1960. The companies are in the process of transitioning from the second to the third generation of family leadership. F A M I LY M E M B E R S E M P L O Y E D

7

P R I M A R Y P R O D U C T/ S E R V I C E :

Capitol’s Rosemont Gardens, fresh flower arrangements, décor and gifts; CCC Associates (includes Caffco, Southern Homes & Gardens and more), silk florals, home and garden decor, nursery/landscaping products. #MONEYQUOTE:

“We share difficulties and rewards, and this sharing concept is the greatest strength of our family owned businesses.” - J. Lamar Thompson

+

THE FUTURE: THIS NEXT GENERATION IS AMBITIOUS. 75% SAY THEY HAVE BIG PLANS TO TAKE THEIR FAMILY BUSINESS FORWARD.


( ) SMALL

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HELPING HAND

recommendations into a data-

forward. ATF is also working with

base. Then, businesses – from

career counselors at colleges all

large, established companies

over Alabama to encourage their

to tech startups – can access

students to put their information

and search the database. They

in the database. The database

can search different curriculums

also allows students to note if

and areas of IT, from project

they are looking for internships

management and cyber security

or fulltime employment, and

While Woodhouse has had issues finding enough skilled per-

to data storage and mobile apps.

Borg stressed the importance of

sonnel, he hopes that it is in the process

“These students are our future IT

internships in IT. “We know that

of changing, and he noted the positive

professionals,” Borg said. “So we

to develop Montgomery and all

environment in Montgomery for small busi-

are connecting the employers

of Alabama, we have to build on

nesses of all kinds. “We have a good small

with potential employees.”

technology, and that is not just

business climate and atmosphere from

up to our schools,” she said. “It is

civic leadership and the Chamber,” he said.

The project is still in its beginning

up to our tech-focused business-

“You see small businesses being support-

stages, and the ATF is partner-

es too. That’s why internships

ive of each other.”

ing with businesses and other

are so important; these compa-

organizations like Maxwell-Gunt-

nies can mold students into the

er AFB’s Air University to push it

specific talent they need.”

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT ALABAMATECHNOLOGYFOUNDATION.ORG

54

One positive on MGM’s tech landscape is the community of support that has formed, according to William Woodhouse, president and CEO of eSolution Architects, Inc., which started in 2005. The 40-employee company provides software development, network services and website development and hosting, mostly for the Air Force community at Maxwell AFB and Gunter Annex.

He’s doing his part in that, taking the time

W I L L I A M WO O D H O U S E

to share his experience and expertise with new tech businesses. “We’ve been in the business long enough to have made the mistakes, so we can show others how to avoid them. We try to do as much as we can to help new tech companies thrive here.”

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


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IMAGE BY ERIC SALAS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARTER PHOTO DESIGN

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IMAGE COURTESY OF ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL


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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

ESCAPOLOGY Designed to get your pulse pounding and brain clicking, the “escape” games offered at Escapology are fun but also functional.

WHEN WAS ESCAPOLOGY OPENED? May 2017 EXPLAIN WHAT ESCAPOLOGY OFFERS. We are Montgomery’s original, premium live-escape game and virtual reality experience located downtown. Intricately designed escape games challenge two to eight players to work together to find clues and then solve puzzles and riddles to earn their freedom.

WHAT MAKES THE ESCAPOLOGY EXPERIENCE SO MUCH FUN? We can take you around the world with our exciting range of games. We see a lot of double dates coming in. The setup is perfect. Grab some dinner, maybe a drink nearby and come see us. For employers, it is an easy way to build morale and communication skills among their staff. Sometimes, it takes a little puzzle solving to make reserved personalities come out and shine.

WHY DO YOU THINK IT IS POPULAR? Escape games are the fastest growing segment of the entertainment industry, and Escapology Montgomery is the leader with our quality experience.

WHO IS ESCAPOLOGY’S PRIMARY CUSTOMER? We find that there is no specific audience. People ages 8 to 88 can come enjoy the fun. We are a friendly venue for the whole family. This is for everyone, and once you’ve experienced the fun, you’re hooked.

ARE BUSINESSES USING ESCAPOLOGY? While we do have a broad audience, we also have a niche: corporate team building. The wide range of industries that come to Escapology all find the same thing. They find a safe, fun way to create things like goal orientation, conflict resolution and a sense of community. As an employer, you can step into our observation room to watch your group while they are attempting to escape.

WHAT MAKES ESCAPOLOGY UNIQUE? We are one of the nation’s largest escape attractions, as well as a virtual reality arcade, built inside a renovated downtown Montgomery warehouse. We have six games to choose from in our 8,000 square feet. And we display unique artwork from artists right here in Montgomery. Our virtual reality room is better than any in our area. We also have meeting space for parties and corporate functions.

WHAT’S ON THE HORIZON? We want to grow exponentially. Even if you don’t think you are “into this kind of stuff,” at least come by for a tour. You may be surprised at how exciting this place can be.

130 COMMERCE STREET, SUITE 700 / 334-523-1947 / ESCAPOLOGY.COM/EN/MONTGOMERY-AL 61

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack

CULTURAL COLLABORATIONS Exposure and access to art is essential for any prosperous community. In Montgomery, The Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts has provided this for decades, and area businesses that support this mission ensure it

/ by MINNIE LAMBERTH

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MONTGOMERY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

can keep doing so for decades to come.

The building that houses the MMFA’s impressive collections is, itself, a work of art.

The Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is located in

which enables the facility and permanent collection to be

a beautiful setting on 33 acres of land within the Wynton M.

maintained by city funding. Funds also come through the

Blount Cultural Park. The MMFA houses a permanent collec-

Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Association, as well as

tion that encompasses 4,000 works of art, including major

other corporate and community support, grants and private

collections of American paintings,

donations. These are the sources

Old Master prints, Southern regional

of funding that make free admission

art, folk arts and decorative arts.

to the museum possible and also

Several temporary exhibitions organized by major museums around the country are also displayed

A true art community

each year. The popular ARTWORKS

Our collection is your collection.

hands-on gallery, a part of the education wing, routinely draws kids of all ages. And these are just

- Emily Flowers

some of the features that bring tens of thousands of visitors annually to

create additional programs for the community. “Our members and corporate partners are crucially important,” Flowers said. For example, the Poarch Band of Creek Indians (PBCI) has extensively supported exhibition programs in recent years. “They are generous

this treasure of art and art education. Even better, there’s no

with funding for educational programs here at the Museum,”

charge to get in. “This museum is free and open to the public

Flowers said. “They’re just terrific supporters in every avenue

six days a week,” said Emily Flowers, MMFA director of devel-

of the arts in Montgomery.”

opment. “Our collection is your collection.” The PBCI tribe has also partnered with the museum for the The MMFA is a department of the City of Montgomery,

62

last five years in a Native American Family Day, during which

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Join the (Garden) Party MMFA has formed a Garden Society as an annual campaign that will help support the installation and maintenance of its new

the tribe shares aspects of their rich

John and Joyce Caddell Sculpture Garden,

history and culture in fun and interactive

opening this fall. Visit mmfa.org to find out

ways for all ages. The afternoon of events includes storytelling, dance performances

how you can get involved.

and artisan displays. This year’s Native

A growing passion

American Family Day was held in April as

This fall the MMFA will open a new ex-

transition between directors and the

a free event for the community.

hibit area in its own backyard. The John

construction of the Sculpture Garden has

and Joyce Caddell Sculpture Garden will

been a true gift.”

Some of the museum’s programs do

encompass more than two acres and will

come with a fee, such as studio classes

feature an entertainment area and an ed-

Ground was broken in 2014 for what will

that provide art instruction for a variety

ucational courtyard. “We were delighted

soon become an event and browsing

of age groups. The annual Flimp Festival

to announce the naming of The John and

space, or simply a place to sit and take

geared toward children and young peo-

Joyce Caddell Sculpture Garden. The

in art and nature. Construction crews

ple also asks for a modest admission fee.

Caddells have a long history of sup-

have completed their work, and now the

After nearly 30 years, the Festival has

porting the arts in Montgomery, and the

finishing touches are being made. “We’ve

become one of the MMFA’s most antici-

Museum’s incredible Sculpture Garden

got all the hardscape in. We’re putting in

pated events each spring for its full day

wouldn’t have been possible without

the landscaping,” Flowers said. “We’re

of art-related activities and entertainment.

their generosity.”

excited to be opening in fall 2018.”

Thanks to continued corporate sponsor-

Flowers also pointed to another major

Sculpture pieces will range from contem-

ship and private donations, the museum

corporate partner, Alabama Power, and

porary to traditional. Some will be formal,

continues to expand its offerings to the

praised a member of its executive team

others will be interactive in this outdoor

community.

for her personal contributions. “The

and uncovered space. The sculpture

Museum has been fortunate to have

garden will operate as other exhibits do

Leslie Sanders as President of the Board

in that pieces will be on loan, and art will

The Chamber wants to share

of Trustees this year. As Vice President of

rotate – moving in and out. Again, cor-

the good news of businesses doing

the Southern Division of Alabama Power,

porate sponsorships make these exhibits

good. Please send story ideas to

she makes a lot of amazing things hap-

possible and help maintain the area for

jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

pen, but her leadership at this period of

the Montgomery community and visitors.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack GIVEBACK

BRIEFS

High Marks for Generosity

temperatures cause many people to use

WCOV-TV FOX 20 donated $5,000 to

more energy than usual and can lead

Valiant Cross Academy to be used as the

to higher bills. In February, the Alabama

school sees fit in achieving their mission

Power-affiliated Alabama Business Char-

of helping young men “rise above.” “The

itable (ABC) Trust Fund announced it was

Brock brothers [at Valiant Cross] have done

donating $100,000 to Project SHARE and

a marvelous job in teaching their students

the Salvation Army. ABC Trust has given

how to be kind, respectful, loving young

$50,000 to Project SHARE (Service to Help

men. We are grateful for their vision and

Alabamians with Relief on Energy) to help

hard work,” WCOV Owner David Woods

low-income customers who are age 60 and

said. Valiant Cross Academy is an all-male

Pictured left to right: Ryan Torregano, WCOV Creative

older and/or disabled. Project SHARE is an

private school located in the heart of

Services, Kathy Liles, WCOV Business Manager,

energy assistance program administered

downtown Montgomery based on Christian principles with an intentional culture of structure and discipline. “We are truly grateful for the support of WCOV,” said Kimberly Baker, Director of Development

Jada Jones, Valiant Cross Administrative Assistant, and Anthony Brock, Head of Valiant Cross Academy.

Academy has been able to grow and thrive in the River Region.”

by the Salvation Army in partnership with Alabama Power and rural electric cooperatives. The program recently extended its services to more customers by dropping its qualification age from 62 to 60. Since

for Valiant Cross Academy. “It is because of

No Cold Shoulder

the tremendous support of our corporate

Alabama experienced prolonged freezing

100,000 households and given more than

and community partners that Valiant Cross

temperatures last winter, and extreme

$30 million to help Alabamians in need.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

its inception, ABC Trust has helped about


GiveBack

GAINING ALTITUDE The Red Tail Scholarship Foundation is preserving an important legacy by helping others prepare for a prosperous

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE RED TAIL SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION.

future. Torius Moore, the first person to receive his pilot’s license with the help of Foundation, shared his experience.

What is the Red Tail Scholarship Foundation? In the United States, African Americans comprise 13.6 percent of the popula-

Dig Deeper #SerquestMBJ

tion. However, the number of minority pilots in both commercial

Want to know more about The Red Tails Scholarship

and military aviation hovers around 2 percent. The Red Tail Scholarship Foundation is dedicated to change this. It was not until the establishment of a program in 1940 to train African Americans to fly and maintain combat aircraft that minority pilots took flight. This select group trained in Tuskegee, Ala., and became known

Foundation? Check out #SerquestMBJ on Facebook to watch a short video produced by Serquest, a local organization that helps non-profits with their media and software needs to secure and source resources. www.redtailscholarshipfoundation.org

as the Tuskegee Airmen with the nickname “Red Tails.” These brave pilots possessed unwavering courage, professionalism

by stationary heights. After the first flight, I knew I had to fly

and patriotism, and the Foundation’s goal is to find students who

again. I kept flying and paying for it with my internship and re-

demonstrate these values and give them the tools to succeed in

search funds. These funds started to dwindle about three-fourths

this career field.

through me getting my Private Pilot License (PPL). I needed help paying for the rest. My instructor is good friends with the Founda-

Tell us a little bit about yourself. I am an undergraduate student

tion’s Co-Chair Col. Sparrow, and he told Col. Sparrow about me.

triple-majoring in Aerospace Science Engineering, Physics and

I became the first Red Tail Scholarship Foundation recipient and

Mathematics at the Historic Tuskegee University. I am from Attal-

obtained my PPL last summer.

la, Alabama, aspiring to become an astronaut. How has the Foundation impacted your life? It has made me part How did you become interested in flying? In high school, I did

of something bigger than me: honoring the legacy of the Tuske-

some research and found that most astronauts were former mili-

gee Airmen. I will forever be grateful for this scholarship and what

tary pilots or test pilots. After that, I was driven to take that route:

it has helped me accomplish. And I am so proud to see more

I joined Air Force ROTC, became a STEM major, interned with

scholarships being awarded to deserving African Americans.”

NASA and began flying on my own.

P OW E R E D B Y

How did you get involved in the Foundation? I started with general aviation to test myself and see if I could handle flying because both of my parents fear heights. Turns out, I’m only rattled

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MyMGM

A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT / by MEG LEWIS

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE CARTER PHOTO DESIGN

There are multiple diverse ways to make the most of Montgomery’s liquid asset.

“A river is more than an amenity, it is a treasure.”

Want more? Visit the Museum of

- Oliver Wendell Holmes

Alabama exhibit “The Story of Alabama Begins

There’s nothing quite like a river to take you away from the every-

their dogs or even doing a few

day grind. There’s something about that soft rustle of the current,

downward facing dogs in a sunrise

the lapping of waves on the shore and the activity of area wildlife

yoga session on the weekend.

in The Land” for more history on the Alabama River.

that invites you to relax and reconnect to nature – even in the middle of a bustling downtown like Montgomery.

Downtown office dwellers can often be seen at lunch hour enjoying an alfresco meal at one of the picnic tables, or getting a few extra

Residents and visitors alike seek out the banks of the Alabama Riv-

steps in on the trails. The splash-pad cools down the kiddos when

er to get away, either as a short break from the workday or to add

summer temps soar, and the park serves as a gorgeous spot for

some adventure to their vacation. The revitalization the city’s histor-

weddings and special private events year round.

ic downtown has experienced in recent years all revolves around this body of water that is the culmination of the Coosa, Alabama

The river gives Montgomery an edge in tourism, too. Dawn Hath-

and Mobile Rivers flowing from the northwest of town and running

cock, Vice President of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Com-

318 miles south to converge with the Mobile River.

merce, echoed McCreery and stressed the valuable part the river and its banks play in wooing and wowing visitors. “More people

Kay McCreery, Director of City Events in Montgomery, describes the

than ever are traveling here to learn and experience this city that

river as an anchor for downtown. “Bodies of water draw us,” she

has a complicated history and that only exists because of the

said. “The river is a source of beauty, pleasure, relaxation and con-

economic force of the river,” she said. “And the river’s appeal goes

gregation and represents a signature part of the downtown revival.”

beyond its inherent beauty and the water-related activities. More

Riverfront Park’s green spaces are where you’ll find an ever-grow-

Than Tours begins at the river. The Civil Heritage Trail includes

ing number of downtown residents taking an afternoon stroll with

multiple sites at or near the river. The new EJI museum includes a

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


MyMGM

ON THE WATER:

Tell our river’s story Keep the conversation flowing and share what the river means to you on social media. Use the hashtags

#myMGM #thealabamariver #AL200

+ THE B EST WAY TO LEAR N MOR E AB OUT THE ALAB AMA

R I VER I S TO GET OUT ON THE WATER . HER E AR E A F EW WAYS TO TR EAT YOUR SELF TO A DI F F ER ENT VI EW THAN THE SHORE.

HARRIOTT II:

section about the slave trade in Montgomery, which is

Enjoy scenic lunch cruises, dinner cruises and blues cruises.

tied to the river.”

f u n in m on tgom ery.com

Today, people love to “gather at the river” in Mont-

SUP BOARD RENTALS: Skim the surface on a

gomery – for concerts, sporting events and festivals.

paddleboard. l ight n in gl in em gm .com

Riverfront Park has hosted major concert acts like Bruno Mars, and even The Dave Matthews Band, Usher and

PONTOON BOAT RENTALS: Putt along on a private

the Roots earlier this year. The annual Capital of Dreams

pontoon boat. Rent one from Capitol Oyster Bar. 3 3 4 - 2 3 9 - 8 3 5 8

Triathlon, Dragon Boat Races and the new Stand-Up Paddle competition draw thousands of spectators and

FISHING: Try your luck and drop a line. Find fishing license info

competitors. Got a thing for wine and waterfront views?

at ou tdooral abam a.com

Get your tickets early for the popular Riverwalk Wine

+ AND DON’T MI SS SPECI AL ANNUAL EVENTS

Festival held every fall. And for those who like to let the river roll their blues away, the Harriott II Riverboat’s

ON THE R I VER AND AT R I VER F R ONT PAR K LI KE:

themed cruises are a perfect option.

• Easter Eggstravaganza Kids Fest • BrewFest and River Jam • Rock the Park

No matter how it is experienced and enjoyed, the Alabama River remains one of the most powerful assets driving the future of our city by increasing the quality of life for residents and enhancing visitors’ experiences.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

• Stars on the Riverfront • Dragon Boat Festival • Riverwalk Wine Festival


CHAMBER NEWS

Connect +

NEWS, R ESO U R CES AN D A LOOK IN S IDE THE MAN Y WAYS YOUR CHAMBER WORKS FOR YOU

TEAM REPORT

BY THE NUMBERS

Destination MGM Sales Team Destination MGM shares the story of our city and all it offers with the world, working to entice both business and leisure travelers to Montgomery. The Sales Team, led by Ron

4 new hotels

Simmons, uses its expertise to bring meetings, conventions and events of all types and sizes here, and Simmons shared how and why they do it.

under development and/or construction in downtown By the year 2020, there will be approximately

1,100 rooms available within downtown, which is a

30% increase over the current inventory.

gates, we find that they return for leisure travel with family and friends – spending more dollars and improving the perception Ron Simmons, Vice President; Octavius Jackson, National Sales Manager; Kristen Henderson, National Sales Manager; Keely Smith, Director of Sales; Marion Winn, Convention & Event Servicing Manager; Ann Titus, Administrative Assistant

in our city.

What do you and the Destination MGM Sales Team do? Destination MGM is the

groups that have selected Montgomery as

What one thing would you like readers to know about the work of the Sales Team? The Montgomery Chamber Desti-

a meeting destination. When these groups

nation MGM Sales Team is committed to

tourism arm for the city of Montgomery. The

visit Montgomery, they sleep, eat, shop

providing an exceptional experience for our

Sales Team promotes and sells Montgom-

and buy gas locally. As a result, our tourists

groups. We recruit groups such as social,

ery as a convention, meeting and tourist

spend $1.4 million per day in the city. They

religious; multicultural; fraternal; education;

destination for groups and sporting events.

seek local entertainment, dining and shop-

government; national, regional and state

We serve as the destination experts who

ping experiences. This is a direct revenue

associations; and family reunions. If you’re

work behind the scenes to provide meeting

generator for our local and small business

part of any of these types of groups, we can

and sport planners access to a wide range

community.

help bring your group’s meetings or events to Montgomery.

of services within the city, including but not and meeting space availability, and linking

How does the community at large benefit from what you do? The daily $1.4

planners to local service providers. We are

million economic impact resulting from tour-

Any recent major accomplishments? Montgomery has grown as a sports

an extension of an organization’s planning

ism is beneficial to everyone in the River

destination. We have been intentional in

team.

Region. These tourism dollars help offset

going after non-traditional sporting events,

limited to site inspections, checking hotel

the costs of public safety and infrastructure

which have opened up an entirely new

How does the local business community benefit from what y’all do?  Tourism

for the citizens of Montgomery. Montgom-

market of opportunities for Montgomery as

ery is ranked No. 1 in the state of Alabama

a sports destination. Examples of non-tra-

is economic development. The Montgom-

for hotel occupancy. This means we have

ditional sporting events that have come

ery Chamber Destination MGM team works

a demand for more hotels, which ultimate-

here are: 2016 World Horseshoe Pitching

closely with the hospitality community such

ly generates more jobs in the hospitality

Tournament, 2013 -2018 Capital of Dreams

as hotels, restaurants and attractions to

industry within our region. When we exceed

Triathlon, 2018 World Championships of

provide an exceptional experience for the

the expectations of our convention dele-

Cornhole, Sugar Bert Boxing National Qual-

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


ifier and the 2015 and 2019 World Combat Firefighter Challenge. Montgomery has also been selected as the host city for the 2018 Governor’s Conference on Tourism and a host of other conventions.

What is your favorite part of your job? There are two parts of this job that get me excited: First, I love my team. I am fortunate to have the opportunity to work with a group of professionals who have a passion for this city and what they

F-35 UPDATE: CHAMBER EVENT CELEBRATES SUCCESS

do. And they are good at it! Secondly, we

The Chamber held a special Eggs & Issues Event with Senator Shelby to celebrate

represent an awesome destination. I love

landing the F-35 jet program that included special honored attendees Representative

the reaction I see in meeting planners

Martha Roby and Representative Terri Sewell. On February 22, Senator Richard Shelby

and convention delegates when they

addressed a packed house during the Chamber breakfast event. His remarks included

visit the city for the first time. I love to

recognition of Montgomery’s technology economic development strategy, and he declared,

see people return to Montgomery who

“Alabama is open for business.” Montgomery community and local elected leaders joined

haven’t been here in 10 years or more. I

Alabama’s 187th Fighter Wing to thank Senator Shelby, as well as Representative Sewell

love to see the fruit of our hard work fill

and Representative Roby for their support and the role they played in the successful effort

our hotels, restaurants, attractions and

to bring the F-35 to Dannelly Field. All three were presented with a framed print of the three

walking the streets of downtown. It’s a

aircraft that have displayed the Red Tail through history in flight, as well as a framed press

very rewarding feeling.

plate from the Montgomery Advertiser’s announcement headline reading, “It’s Ours!” 

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Connect CO NNEC T I NG YO U TO T H E M ANY CHAMBER RES OURCES AN D S ERVICES AVAILABLE

ONLINE M EM BERS HI P D I REC TO RY montgomerychamber.com/directory

R I B B O N C UTTI N G S , G R O UN D B R E A K I N G S A N D G R A N D O PE N I N G S Rhonda Figh, rfigh@montgomerychamber.com

J O B BOA RD montgomerychamber.com/jobboard

PR E SS R E L E AS E S & A N N O UN C E ME N TS Jina Miniard, jminiard@montgomerychamber.com

EV EN T C A L EN DA R montgomerychamber.com/events

S MA L L B US I N E SS R E S O UR C E S webinars, seminars, mentoring, counseling NE T WO RKI N G EVEN TS Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com

& CO -WO R K I N G A N D O F F I C E S PAC E FO R R E N T Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

HOSTING IN-TOW N M EET I N G S & EVEN TS Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com AMB ASSA D O R P RO G RA M Lynn Norton, lnorton@montgomerychamber.com

WO R K FO R C E TR A I N I N G Sallie Hines, shines@montgomerychamber.com

MEMB ER TO M EM BER D I S CO U N TS Rhonda Figh, rfigh@montgomerychamber.com

S E MI N A R S A N D TR A I N I N G Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

RESEARC H I N FO RM AT I O N Rachel Madore, rmadore@montgomerychamber.com

CO R PO R ATE R E TE N TI O N Jessica Horsley, jhorsley@montgomerychamber.com

MEMB ERSHI P M A I L I N G L I STS & L A BEL S Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com

CO R PO R ATE R E C R UI TME N T Shelby Stringfellow, sstringfellow@montgomerychamber.com

NOTA RY S ERVI C ES Paul Redhead, predhead@montgomerychamber.com

G OV E R N ME N T CO N TR AC T R E S O UR C E S Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

OUR CHAMBER. YOUR VOICE.

WHAT THEY SAY

“I wanted a way to give back to the city of Montgomery, so the Montgom-

CHAMBER MEMBERS

me. It has allowed me to stay in tune with what is going on in the city and

ery Chamber of Commerce Ambassador program has been a perfect fit for to make great connections. Being an ambassador since 2014, I have had

SPEAK OUT

the pleasure of welcoming new members to the Chamber, participating in

ON HOW THEIR MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS THEIR BUSINESS.

ribbon cuttings and many other community events. Over the last two years, CRAIG SNELL, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE FOR CARR, RIGGS & INGRAM, LLC

70

I also have made connections that have led to more than $100,000 in revenue. This is all great and helps professionally, but most important are the friends I have made through the Chamber’s Ambassador program.”

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Connect A LO O K B AC K AT T H E FACES AN D PLACES OF RECEN T CHAMBER EVEN TS

CITY AND COUNTY SMALL AND MINORITY BUSINESS

MEMBER EVENTS:

RECEPTION, FEB 21 at DoubleTree Sponsored By: City of Montgomery, Montgomery County & the Chamber

The City of Montgomery and the Montgomery County Small and Minority-Owned Business Initiative partnered with the Montgomery Chamber for a reception to highlight the progress of the

FEB 07

FEB

initiative, recognize participating firms and offer an opportunity to net-

60 Minute Coffee at Capitol Hyundai

work and hear from a dynamic speaker who epitomizes small business

Sponsored by Capitol Hyundai

success, Island Delight owner Melissa Smith.

Business After Hours at Wind Creek Montgomery

MAR 60 Minute

Sponsored by Guardian Credit

Coffee at Montgomery Antiques & Interiors

Union and Wind Creek

Sponsored by AALOS

22

14

Montgomery

EGGS & ISSUES WITH

Mayor Todd Strange and County

SENATOR RICHARD SHELBY,

Commission Chairman Elton

FEB 22 at the Alabama

Dean provided comprehensive

Activity Center

updates on the state of the City

Presenting Sponsor:

and Montgomery County.

Beasley Allen Law Firm

Highlights included:

The Montgomery Chamber held

• Updates on revenues and

a special Eggs & Issues with

unemployment numbers;

Senator Shelby to celebrate

• Violent crime stats are down;

landing the F-35. Alabama’s

• Construction and renovation

Senior Senator played a

projects, including several

critical role in landing the F-35

hotels;

Lightning II and securing flying

• The status of Montgomery’s

missions for the 187th Fighter

recycling program and facility.

Wing, further continuing the Red

Both also included thoughts on

Tail legacy for generations.

education. The challenges and opportunities facing Montgom-

MAR Business After Hours at 29

STATE OF THE CITY

ery Public Schools affect the

Alabama Shakespeare Festival

& COUNTY, MARCH 22

economic well being of both

Sponsored by Spectrum Reach

at the Alabama Activity Center

the City of Montgomery and

Presenting Sponsor: Baptist Health

Montgomery County.

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

Warren Averett New Additions

sure to ensure Alfa could always do right by its policyhold-

Warren Averett, LLC recently announced that Sellars

ers. “He often says our first focus is delivering Alfa’s promise

McCurdy has joined its team as a Business Development

to customers, and being profitable allows us to do what’s

Manager. Warren Averett, Alabama’s

right for them, for our employees and for our company,” Par-

largest accounting and advisory firm,

nell said. Rutledge plans to remain active in the Montgomery

welcomes McCurdy’s extensive expe-

community. He is past chairman and currently serves on the

rience in building strong relationships

Goodwill of Central Alabama’s board of directors. Additional-

and his knowledge of the financial

ly, he has been named a vice chair of the Montgomery Area

industry. At Warren Averett, McCurdy

Chamber of Commerce for 2018 and was recently asked

will employ outreach techniques to

to serve on the board of directors for Children’s Harbor.

highlight the firm’s many services,

Sellars McCurdy

Rutledge and his wife, Amy, are members of First Baptist Church in Montgomery. They have three adult children.

including those outside of traditional accounting, so that clients and the community are aware of, and enriched by, the firm’s business offerings and

Mia Mothershed Joins Jackson Hospital

meaningful relationships. Warren

Jackson Hospital recently announced the hiring of Mia

Averett Asset Management recently

Mothershed as the hospital’s marketing and public relations

welcomed Barry Prim as a Senior

director. Mothershed will oversee internal and external

Client Consultant. Prim joins the firm

Barry Prim

communications, media relations, and digital marketing and

with an extensive background in asset

reputation management for the hospital.

management, trust administration, banking, client relation-

Mothershed has leveraged her market-

ships, management and marketing. Prim will focus on build-

ing and public relations experience in

ing client relationships in the Montgomery area. He is an

Montgomery for 18 years and is excited to

active member in the Montgomery community, and serves

join Jackson Hospital in its commitment to

on the Alabama Shakespeare Festival Board, as well as the

a healthier River Region. She holds a dual

board of trustees and Vice Chairman for St. James School.

degree in communications and business

He is also a graduate of Leadership Montgomery and former

from Alabama A & M University and is

board chair for Family Sunshine Center.

active in the community, volunteering her time
with organizations including the Junior League, Lead-

Alfa Executive Vice President of Operations Retires Alfa Insurance Executive Vice President of Operations Steve

ership
Montgomery and currently serving as ambassador chairman for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce.

Rutledge retired in February after more than three decades while he was excited for the next

Anzalone Liszt Grove Research Hires Director of Operations

chapter in his friend’s life, it was bit-

Montgomery-based Anzalone Liszt Grove Research recently

tersweet. “We will miss Steve’s smart,

announced that Andrea Screws joined the firm as Director

conservative management philosophy

of Operations. Screws will manage Human

and faithful Christian example,” Parnell

Resources, Information Technology, Legal,

said. “We have been blessed to have

Finance and Marketing for ALG Research

him as our representative for the past

in their Montgomery office. Screws has

33 years.” It was Rutledge’s “conser-

extensive executive experience in the cor-

vative management philosophy” that

porate sector with service companies such

helped protect Alfa’s financial strength through numerous

as HealthSouth, ARAMARK and Kinder-

challenges, including Hurricane Ivan, Hurricane Katrina and

Care Learning Centers. Most recently, she

the April 27, 2011 tornadoes. He was also the chief architect

served as the Executive Director for the

of Alfa’s reinsurance program, limiting the company’s expo-

Kiwanis Club of Montgomery Foundation.

of dedicated service. Alfa® President Jimmy Parnell said

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

Alfa Announces New Senior VPs

Capell & Howard P.C. Announces New Shareholder

Alfa Insurance announced the promotion of Beth Chancey to

Clinton A. Richardson has been named shareholder of

Senior Vice President of Property & Casualty (P&C) Opera-

Capell & Howard P.C. “Richardson

tions effective February 1. Chancey replaces Tommy Coshatt,

has made a positive impact on the

who was promoted to his current

firm and our clients, and I know

position as Executive Vice President

he will continue to be a valuable

of Operations following the recent

member of Capell & Howard. We

retirement of Steve Rutledge. “It is my

consider being a shareholder of the

pleasure to announce the promo-

firm to be an honor and are happy to

tion of Beth Chancey to Senior Vice

have Clinton join us,” said Courtney

President of P&C Operations,” Coshatt

Williams, managing director of the

said. “A 30-year veteran of Alfa, Beth

firm. Richardson concentrates his practice in the areas of

has earned the respect of manage-

civil litigation and criminal defense. Clinton currently serves

ment, coworkers, agents, the Alabama

as the vice-president of Clefworks, Inc. and was recently

Farmers Federation Board of Directors

selected as a Super Lawyers 2017 Mid-South Rising Star.

and industry colleagues for her knowledge, work ethic and positive attitude.” Coshatt said he was confident the company’s P&C operations would

Lyons HR Names Business Development Manager

excel under Chancey’s direction. Alfa

Lyons HR recently brought Melanie Rainey Cain on board in

Insurance® President Jimmy Parnell

the Montgomery office as Business

had equally positive things to say about Coshatt’s promo-

Development Manager. Lyons HR

tion. “It is my pleasure to announce Tommy’s promotion to

is dedicated to providing smarter

Executive Vice President of Operations,” Parnell said. “He

workforce management strategies for

is a natural leader and proven team builder with experience

businesses, and Cain brings a strong

in all areas of the insurance business, which will continue

sales background and a dedication to

to prove valuable as we work to develop products and

strategic problem solving to the labor

corporate initiatives that surpass company and customer ex-

procurement process in Montgomery.

pectations. Tommy’s experience, coupled with his innovative

As part of her focus at Lyons HR, she

vision, will complement the skills of Alfa’s leadership team

will match high-quality employees to area businesses after

and strengthen the company’s position for future growth.”

strategically considering all business needs. “We are very excited to welcome Melanie to our team at Lyons HR. She brings more than ten years of business-to-business sales

experience and a strong customer relationship focus to our

River Bank & Trust Expands Team River Bank & Trust has added Mobile native Karen Morris to its team. Morris will serve as Vice

Montgomery team,” said Alan Ridgway, President of Lyons HR’s Staffing Division.

President and Relationship Manager for the Coastal Region. She brings ex-

+ SUBM IT T IN G N E WS? Submit information to

tensive financial expertise and excep-

Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

tional customer service as a well-regarded lender in Baldwin and Mobile

Attach press releases as a Word document and include

counties. “Karen Morris is a wonderful

a high-resolution headshot (at least 300 dpi). An

banker and community supporter”

accompanying headshot is required for “Members on

said Jimmy Stubbs, River Bank’s CEO.

the Move” announcements.

“We are so excited to have her on the River Bank team.”

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

Goodwyn Mills and Cawood, Inc. Announces New CEO Goodwyn Mills and Cawood, Inc. (GMC) is pleased to announce Jeffrey Brewer as its new CEO. Brewer has led the architecture and engineering firm’s Birmingham office since its inception in 1998. For the past three years, he has served as president of GMC’s north region, encompassing north Alabama and Tennessee, and on the board of directors. Brewer succeeds Bill Wallace, who announced last year that he would step down after three years as CEO. Wallace will continue leading in the firm as an executive vice president. “It’s an honor to be appointed to this position following Bill’s leadership. We have spent the last year working together to ensure a smooth transition,” Brewer said. “The men and women we get to work alongside every day are some of the best and brightest in the A/E industry, and the opportunity to serve in this new capacity is truly humbling.” In addition, GMC has named Galen Thackston as chief operating officer and Amanda Davis as chief financial officer. Thackston founded the firm’s environmental division in 1993

From left: Jeffrey Brewer, Galen Thackston, Amanda Davis, Kristen Gulino, Chris Engel and Kevin Laird.

and has served for the past three years as GMC’s south regional

President of Architecture Chris Engel from the Birmingham office and

president and on the board of directors. Davis has been with GMC for

Regional Vice President Kevin Laird from the Greenville, S.C., office

more than 20 years, most recently as vice president of finance. Kristen

have been appointed to the 2018 board of directors alongside David

Gulino has been promoted to fill Davis’ previous role as vice president.

Reed (chairman), Cedric Campbell, Steve Cawood, Galen Thackston

Lastly, the firm announced two new board members. Executive Vice

and Lee Walters.

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Community

and infrastructure meet the basic expectations of the ASBMB; has demonstrated a grasp of fundamental concepts and critical

Governor Ivey Awards Montgomery Company

reasoning skills on the ASBMB Evaluation Instrument; and has demonstrated their competitiveness with peers from across the nation.

ASU Recognized As a “Best Online College” Alabama State University has been recognized as one of the ‘Best Online Colleges in Alabama’ in 2018 for its excellence in online learning by AffordableCollegesOnline.org (ACO), which is a leader in higher education information, resources and rankings. “Alabama State University is honored to receive this recognition,” said Dr. William A. Person, dean of The Harold Lloyd Murphy Graduate School. “With the expansion of online Regitar owner, Dr. Yu-Tueng (Y.T.) Tsai, receives Trade Excellence Award.

In late March, Governor Kay Ivey recognized eight Alabama

courses and programs, ASU is creating outstanding educational opportunities, particularly for our non-traditional students.”

companies for success in selling their goods and services

Faulkner University Gets Top Marks

to countries around the globe, including Regitar USA Inc., a

Faulkner University was recently ranked the top university in Al-

Montgomery-based company that is a major manufacturer and

abama for having the best online graduate criminal justice and

distributor of automotive electronics, power tools and mobile

criminology program according to a new report by U.S. News

safety products. It exports around the world, with primary em-

& World Report. The U.S. News & World Report’s Best Online

phasis on North, Central and South America, the Caribbean, the

Programs Rankings listed Faulkner University among the top 20

Middle East, Australia and New Zealand. “Today, we celebrate

schools nationally with a rank of 19 out of 70 total schools, and

the ingenuity and dedication of eight Alabama companies who

number one among four other Alabama colleges who made the

recognize that commerce does not end at our state’s borders,”

list. The ranking, for Faulkner’s Master of Justice Administration

Governor Ivey said at the award ceremony. “These companies’

program, was based on factors such as “admissions selectivity,

vision to be international leaders in their respective fields is

faculty credentials and academic and career support services

most impressive, and we look forward to their continued efforts

offered to students” according to the report. “We are very proud

in overseas markets.” The governor also acknowledged that

of such a high standing,” said Robert Thetford, the director for

each of this year’s Governor’s Trade Excellence Award recipi-

Faulkner University’s Master of Justice Administration. “The pro-

ents are small businesses, a pillar of Alabama’s economy.

gram was ranked 20 last year, so we are happy to see that we have moved up within just a year.” Faulkner was also recently

Huntingdon Biochemistry Program Receives National Accreditation

ranked the 2nd top Christian university in the nation for 2018 ac-

The Huntingdon College Biochemistry program has achieved national accreditation from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The College was notified in March that the accreditation is for a full seven-year term, through October 14, 2024. ASBMB has accredited college Biochemistry and Molecular Biology programs at nearly 70 colleges. Huntingdon is the only college in Alabama to have achieved this accreditation, which assesses the program based on seven criteria, including curriculum, research opportunities for students, faculty

cording to a new study released by The Edvocate. After looking at Christian universities and colleges throughout the country, The Edvocate complied a list of 31 schools where Faulkner was lauded as the best of the best in the 2018 Best Christian Colleges and Universities in America report. And the university’s online graduate degree in counseling was recently ranked No. 2 in the nation by Online Psychology Degrees.

Achievements

training, and learning infrastructure. For Huntingdon Biochem-

ASU Student Brings Home Major Prize

istry graduates, a degree certified with ASBMB accreditation

Terrell Hilliard, an Alabama State University master of

affirms to graduate schools and potential employers that the

science candidate in biology and a National Institute of

student has matriculated through a program whose curriculum

Health scholar, took home a first-place prize for his research

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MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

at the 2018 Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in

Local Builder Heads State Association

Washington, D.C. “It was an honor and pleasure for me to attend

James (Jimmy) W. Rutland, IV of Montgomery has been appointed

the ERN conference and

to serve as the 2018 President of the Home Builders Association

present my work. Winning

of Alabama (HBAA), the fourth largest state Home Builders Associ-

first-place meant the

ation in the United States. He succeeds

world to me because I

2017 HBAA President Dan Taylor,

worked and studied hard

owner of Taylor Construction, Inc.

for my presentation,”

and a member of the Marshall County

Hilliard said. “I practiced

Home Builders Association. Rutland,

and rehearsed before I

President of Lowder New Homes, has

boarded the plane, during

been actively engaged in the residen-

the plane ride and even

tial construction, development and

afterward while at the ho-

real estate industry in Alabama for the

tel. Winning first-place re-

past 25 years. A graduate of Auburn

ally solidified in my mind

University, he has also earned the pro-

that hard work does pay off.” Hilliard’s graduate oral presentation

fessional designations of Certified Graduate Builder and Certified

(biological sciences category) was titled, “Accelerating Wound

Green Professional from the National Association of Home Build-

Healing Process using Biomaterials in ‘In Vitro’ 3D Air-Lift Skin Cul-

ers and Energy Key Builder from the HBAA. Rutland is a longtime

ture Model and Fabrication of 3-D Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

member of the Greater Montgomery Home Builders Association

using Wet-laid Technique.” Hilliard’s thesis research is supervised

and served as its President in 2005. He was named the GMHBA’s

under the direction of ASU researcher Dr. Vida A. Dennis at the

Builder of the Year in 2005 and in 2012 was presented with the

Center for NanoBiotechnology Research (CNBR).

Shannon Lowder Builder of the Year Award by the HBAA.

78

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Local Attorney Makes Who’s Who List

have been recognized on the inaugural Forbes “Best-in-State

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP recently announced

Wealth Advisors” inaugural list, published on February 15. In all,

that Charles Stewart, a partner in the firm’s Montgomery office,

638 Merrill Lynch advisors are included on this year’s list, the most

has been named by Who’s Who Legal as among the world’s

of any firm. The Forbes “Best-in-State Wealth Advisors” ranking

leading product liability defense practitioners. He is listed in the

was developed by SHOOK Research and is based on in-person

Who’s Who Legal: Product Liability Defence 2018. Stewart is a

and telephone due diligence meetings to evaluate each advisor.

member of Bradley’s Litigation, Intellectual Property and Labor & Employment Practice Groups and the Life Sciences industry team. He has more than 32 years of experience as a trial lawyer,

Chambless King Awarded Highest Honor

having successfully tried a vast number of cases, primarily in the defense of corporations in product liability, employment, business disputes, class actions, intellectual property, antitrust, construction and catastrophic personal injury matters.

Gibson Vance Elected President of Association Gibson Vance, a principal with Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C, was elected president of the Southern Trial Lawyers Association (STLA) at the organization’s 30th Annual Conference, held in New Orleans, Louisiana, February 7-11. Vance will lead the organization for a one-year term. The STLA’s mission is to promote fellowship, learning and networking among trial lawyers throughout the 13 southern states. “It will be an honor to lead the Southern Trial Lawyers Association over this next year,” Vance said of his newest position with the organization. “I’m humbled to be asked to lead such an accomplished group of lawyers.” Membership in the STLA is by nomination made by a member of the Board of Directors, with approval by other Board members from the nominee’s state and, thus, consists of some of the “best of the best” throughout the South.

On March 1, Chambless King Architects was presented with an Honor Award by the Alabama Council of the American Institute of Architects for the Montgomery Interpretive Center at Alabama State University in Montgomery. The Honor Award is the highest level of recognition that the Alabama Council AIA bestows to firms for projects displaying exemplary design exceeding the criteria set forth by the jury. The Montgomery Interpretive Center exists to commemorate the people, events, and route connected with the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March. It is the third in a line of three Interpretive Centers stretching from

Local Financial Advisor Recognized

Selma to Montgomery.

Matthew Murphy, CFP® of Longleaf Wealth Management at UBS Financial

Beasley Allen Honored

Services was recently recognized

Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C., has been

as a 2018 UBS “Top 35 Under 35”

selected as recipient of one of Law360’s 2017 Practice Group of

Financial Advisor. Murphy also holds

the Year awards in the Products Liability section for its work on

the Portfolio Manager and Retirement

litigation related to Johnson & Johnson talcum powder and its

Plan Consulting Specialist designa-

link to an increased risk of ovarian cancer. The group, composed

tions through UBS. He has over 10

of dozens of Beasley Allen attorneys and support staff, leads the

years of experience in the wealth

litigation against Johnson & Johnson (J&J), Johnson & Johnson

management industry having spent

Consumer Companies, Inc., and Imerys Talc America, Inc (Imerys).

all of that time at UBS.

“It is an honor to be recognized for our work on behalf of so many women who were misled for decades about the danger of J&J’s

Awards & Honors

talc-based products,” said Ted Meadows, Principal and co-lead

Local Merrill Lynch Financial Advisors Named on Forbes’ “Best-in-State Wealth Advisors” List

talc attorney for Beasley Allen. In this round of award winners,

Merrill Lynch recently announced that River Region financial Advi-

their work.

Beasley Allen was one of 80 national law firms recognized for

sors Bob Runkle, Holley Pierce, Laurie Russell and Webb Chastain 79

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Southland International Trucks Earns Prestigious Award

ty awareness and improvement programs during the fourth quarter

Southland International Trucks, a locally owned full-service dealer-

of 2017, the Caddell Logan-Martin team was selected for the Quest

ship, was recently honored with the International Truck Presidential

Award from among construction services crews working at South-

Award. The award, introduced in 2017, honors the top seven per-

ern Company facilities throughout the Southeast. Caddell Safety

cent of dealerships—those that achieve the highest level of perfor-

Superintendent, Leonard Mistich, led the effort to closely observe

mance in operating and financial standards, market representation

daily team safety practices and upload this data into the Southern

and customer satisfaction. Southland International Trucks has been

Company system for their review. Caddell won the award based on

locally owned and operated since 1986 by president and owner,

the quantity and quality of that safety data and for demonstrating a

Drew Linn. Southland has a full-service dealership in Montgomery

safety culture of continuous improvement.

and employs more than 235 people statewide. “This award is yet another accolade for the tremendous team we have at Southland International Trucks,” Linn said. “I’m extremely proud of our team members. It’s also indicative of the new products and services we offer, and it speaks well to the future of our brand.”

Local Law Firm Honored Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP is recently announced that the firm has been named the 2018 Southeast Firm of the Year by Benchmark Litigation. This is the first year for the regional firm of

the year awards, which recognize firms with a strong litigating pres-

Caddell Garners Safety Award

ence in multiple states in their respective regions. “This is a great

The Caddell crew at Logan-Martin Dam numbers between 15 and

honor for Bradley to be recognized by Benchmark Litigation as

20 people whose mission is to maintain the strength and integrity

the nation’s top law firm in the Southeast for 2018,” said Bradley

of a structure built in 1964 and that spans the Coosa River creating

Chairman of the Board and Managing Partner Beau Grenier. “We

the Martin-Logan Lake Reservoir. This crew is constantly drilling and

commend our accomplished attorneys and support staff for all of

grouting critical sections of the dam and performing a wide range

their hard work and the many litigation and business successes

of related maintenance functions. Based on their documented safe-

they have helped achieve for our clients.”

MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY THURSDAY, JUNE 21ST 9AMM5PM

Come and enjoy a great day at the Montgomery Zoo and Mann Museum. Lunch will be served from 11:30 to 2:00.

* FREE WITH A VALID MILITARY ID 80

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Presenting Sponsor:


M EM BER Spotlight

ALABAMA ORTHOPAEDIC SPECIALISTS For almost 40 years, Alabama Orthopaedic Specialists has been providing the River Region with precise, professional and compassionate orthopaedic care.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 47  

DOCTORS: Steven A. Barrington, MD, Total Joint Surgery; Erwin Bennett MD, Foot & Ankle Surgery; Michael E. Davis MD, Spine Surgery; Charles W. Hartzog Jr. MD, Sports Medicine; Donald D. Thornbury MD, Foot and Ankle Surgery; Hussein W. Turki MD, Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery; George D. Walcott Jr. MD, Sports Medicine.

WHAT ARE AOS’ PRIMARY SERVICES? Diagnostic and corrective surgical services for orthopaedic problems. We offer a full range of operative and non-operative treatments for sports medicine, orthopaedic spine issues, hand and upper extremity (including shoulder

Standing Left to right: Michael Davis, Erwin Bennett, Dexter Walcott Sitting left to right: Dave Thornbury, Steve Barrington, Hussein Turki and Charles Hartzog

issues), foot and ankle issues, total joint replacement, arthritis, injuries and all musculoskeletal problems. We also have on-site whole body MRI and physical therapy services.

WHAT IS AOS’ PATIENT-CARE PHILOSOPHY? Our mission is to provide a full range of orthopaedic specialty care to our patients and to remain at the forefront of orthopaedic advancements and techniques. We strive to provide each patient with precise, cost-effective and respectful care with the ultimate goal of improving our patients’ quality of life. We always strive to treat our patients, their families, our community and each other with respect, compassion and discretion.

HOW HAVE CHANGES IN TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED THE WAY AOS APPROACHES PATIENT CARE? AOS was an early adopter of the EHR (Electronic Health Record) and has been using it for 10 years. This has allowed for a more complete and accessible patient record. AOS also uses digital x-ray images, making them instantly available to the doctor and allowing for quick retrieval of previous images for comparison.

WHAT SETS AOS APART? We are a sub-specialized orthopaedic practice where each physician has completed a fellowship (extra training following the residency) in a specialized area of the musculoskeletal system. We are a one-stop orthopaedic campus for most orthopaedic problems. There is little reason to travel to Birmingham for orthopaedic care when we have this caliber of expertise here. And we’ve simplified the process. At our Montgomery location, we have an orthopaedic campus with two clinic buildings, AOS Physical Therapy Center and a MRI facility, so there is no need to bounce between multiple offices for the care you need. AOS also sees patients by appointment in Prattville and Wetumpka.

4294 LOMAC STREET / 334-274-9000 / AOSONLINE.NET 81

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

Chambless King Renovates Auburn University Building Chambless King, the architect of record for work on Auburn University’s Broun Hall, home to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, recently announced the completion of the renovation and an addition. The project, known as the Davidson Pavilion, was unveiled at a ribbon cutting ceremony in February. The early 1980s building is in the center

CON GR ATS, LA D I E S!

of Auburn University’s campus and adjacent to the Ginn Concourse. The renovation includes a new two-story

Left-to-right: Miss Philanthropic and Miss Congeniality Autumn Allday; First Runner-Up Lindsey Hicks; Miss Huntingdon 2018 Cassidy Oswald; Second Runner-Up Taylor Young; Crowd Favorite Sidney Ison

main entrance addition and upgraded public spaces with updated information technology, lighting, finishes, mechan-

New Miss Huntingdon Crowned Fifteen Huntingdon College women competed for the title of Miss Huntingdon in mid-March, where judges observed for self-expression, talent, poise, platform and the answer to a question posed on-stage. At the pageant’s conclusion, six prizes were awarded. Miss Philanthropic, voted by her peers, and Miss Congeniality, voted by her sister contestants, were awarded to Autumn Allday, a sophomore Exercise Science major from Valley Grande, Alabama. A new Crowd Favorite Award, voted upon via text by pageant viewers, was presented to Sidney Ison, a sophomore Biochemistry major from Huntsville, Alabama. Taylor Young, a junior majoring in Business Administration and Art from Wetumpka, Alabama, was awarded Second Runner-Up.

ical and electrical systems. In addition, new landscaping and exterior spaces are provided adjacent to the pedestrian Ginn Concourse. “The new Pavilion provides the students with an environment conducive to study and collaboration,” said Stephen King, Principal of Chambless King Architects.

Lindsey Hicks, of Tallassee, Alabama, a junior majoring in Elementary Education/Collaborative Special Education, was honored as First Runner-Up. Miss Huntingdon 2018 is Cassidy Oswald, a sophomore majoring in Religion and Psychology from Troy, Alabama.

Baptist Health Teaches Kids about Hospitals

season. Chris Adams-Wall will return for his third season as the “Voice of the Biscuits”

In late February, Baptist Health hosted its

to call all 140 games, both home and away.

35th Let’s Pretend Hospital, a weeklong

“Cumulus has been a tremendous part-

event that helps children alleviate their

ner of the Biscuits for 15 years, and we’re

fears of hospitals by introducing them to

incredibly excited to broadcast our games

departments and activities that happen in a

on SportsRadio 740,” said Biscuits General

healthcare setting in a fun and non-threaten-

Manager Scott Trible.

ing manner. This year, more than 2,400 area first graders from across the River Region

MAX Opening Chantilly Branch

participated.

In February, MAX celebrated its ground breaking on its new location at the corner

Biscuits Announce SportsRadio 740 as New Flagship Station

of Chantilly Parkway. The new two-story branch and will also house Wealth Manage-

The Montgomery Biscuits and Cumulus

ment and Business Services. The Chan-

Radio announced earlier this year that

tilly location will be MAX’s 10th branch in

SportsRadio 740 AM is the new home for

Montgomery County and MAX’s 18th branch

Montgomery Biscuits baseball for the 2018

overall. 82

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

WANT YOUR NEWS IN THE MBJ? Submit information for consideration to Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com. Please attach press releases as a Word document or a PDF (Word documents preferred), and please include high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) photos with your press release if possible.

SUBMISSION DEADLINES: JULY ISSUE: MAY 29 SEPTEMBER ISSUE: AUG 9


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

ASU Features “Me, Too” Movement Founder “Me, too” movement founder Tarana Burke had a message for the audience about survivors of sexual abuse when she spoke at Alabama State University’s Distinguished Lecture

Alabama Physicians Contribute Billions to State Financial Health Alabama’s more than 8,700 patient-care

Series on Marcy 16 at ASU’s Ralph D. Abernathy College of Education Hall. Her message

physicians fulfill a vital role in the state’s

was, “Create opportunities for survivors of sexual violence to heal.” The need to help others

economy by supporting 101,770 jobs and

motivated the community organizer to commit herself to being there for people who had

generating $16.7 billion in economic activity,

been abused. Burke, a TIME magazine 2017 “Person of the Year,” said the movement has

according to a new report released by the

become a rally cry for people everywhere who have survived sexual abuse and assault.

Medical Association of the State of Alabama

During the Q&A portion of the program, Burke advised students how they can become

and the American Medical Association.

active participants in combating sexual violence. “Get creative with your protesting and do

“Urban or rural, large group or solo prac-

something different that might catch more attention than a predictable protest,” Burke said.

titioner, Alabama’s physicians are major economic engines,” said Medical Association President Jerry Harrison, M.D. The

Caddell Begins New U.S. Embassy in Mexico City

report measured the economic impact of

Caddell’s Senior Vice President of International Rod Ceasar was among the special guests

Alabama’s physicians according to four key

who manned a ceremonial shovel for the ground-breaking ceremony for the new $943

economic barometers: jobs; output; wages

million U.S. Embassy in Mexico City. Caddell’s $518 million construction contract is among

and benefits; and tax revenues. While this

the largest for new State Department diplomatic facilities and demonstrates the importance

new study illustrates that physicians carry

of the U.S./Mexico relationship. The multi-building complex is being constructed on an 8.5-

tremendous responsibility as skilled healers

acre site in the upscale Polanco District of Mexico City, Mexico, very near the headquarters

charged with safeguarding healthy commu-

of Mexico’s richest man, Carlos Slim. The construction contract was awarded in September

nities, it also shows their positive impact is

2017, and completion of the project is anticipated in 2022.

not confined to the exam room.

83

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

AT&T Adds Additional Access in Central Alabama AT&T has expanded internet access throughout Alabama to better serve those in rural and urban areas, relying on the nearly 1.7 million strand miles of fiber optics that cover Alabama to keep the state’s residents and businesses connected. As part of its FCC Connect America Fund commitment, AT&T has deployed high-speed internet service to unserved and underserved locations in parts of 32 counties.

Warren Averett Donates $10,000 Paul McTear (WCOV Promotions Director), Donna Marietta (MACOA Executive Director), Pam Goodwin (MACOA Director of Senior Services), David Woods (WCOV Owner and General Manager), Chalcoby Burns-Johnson (MACOA Director of Development), and Drew Woods (WCOV National Sales Manager).

WCOV-TV Makes $5,000 Donation WCOV-TV FOX 20 recently showed its support for the Montgomery Area Council on Aging (MACOA) by providing a $5,000 donation to the organization. “MACOA couldn’t provide or sustain our services to local seniors if it wasn’t for the strong community support from businesses like WCOV,” said Donna Marietta, Executive Director of MACOA. MACOA has been serving River Region seniors for 45 years. In addition to Meals on Wheels, MACOA runs a variety of programs designed to enrich the lives of the elderly. MACOA also runs several Senior Activity Centers in the Montgomery Area and is instrumental in putting an end to elder abuse. WCOV Owner David Woods said, “WCOV has been a business volunteer for MACOA’s Meals on Wheels, running the Cloverdale route for many years. We have seen the impact they have on the lives of senior citizens in the River Region.”

Alabama Delegation Honored The U.S. Chamber of Commerce recently honored 249 members of the U.S. House

Richard Stabler, Warren Averett Montgomery Managing Member, presents check to Burton Ward, Central Alabama Community Foundation Executive Director.

Warren Averett hosted its 2018 Great Gatsby Casino Night at Montgomery Country Club in February. For the second year the event has been held to raise money for local organizations through the Central Alabama Community Foundation (CACF). With the help of many generous sponsors, Warren Averett was able to raise $10,000 to present to CACF.

(AL-4); Rep. Mo Brooks (AL-5); and Rep. Gary Palmer (AL-6).

Volunteers Clean Alabama River The first Renew Our Rivers cleanup of 2018 took place in mid-February at Swift Creek

of Representatives and 48 members of

Local Realtor Completes Training

the U.S. Senate with its annual Spirit of

Sally Hodges of EXIT Best Homes Realty

performed by volunteers and was coor-

Enterprise Award, given in recognition of

joined real estate professionals at Ambas-

dinated by Autauga County PALS, Army

their support for pro-growth policies in the

sador Training, a two-day course designed

Corps of Engineers, the town of Autau-

first session of the 115th Congress. The

to improve public-speaking skills and devel-

gaville, Autauga County Rescue Squad, Au-

Chamber’s prestigious Spirit of Enterprise

op confidence when speaking with people

tauga County Litter Crew, Autauga County

Award is given annually to members of

one-on-one, in small groups or to an audi-

Commission, Advanced Disposal Systems

Congress based on their votes on critical

ence. Ambassador Training is the brainchild

and Alabama Power. Volunteers for Renew

business legislation as outlined in the

of EXIT Realty Corp. International’s Director

Our Rivers, one of the Southeast’s largest

Chamber’s How They Voted scorecard.

of Leadership Bob McKinnon. “We are ex-

river cleanup campaigns, have collected

Several members of Alabama’s congressio-

cited that Sally Hodges has graduated EXIT

more than 15 million pounds of trash and

nal delegation were among those recog-

Realty’s Ambassador Training Program. This

debris since the program’s inception in

nized: Senator Richard Shelby; Rep. Bradley

training will elevate her public-speaking

2000. This year, 30 cleanups are planned

Byrne (AL-1); Rep. Martha Roby (AL-2); Rep.

skills and enable her to better serve her

through November on seven different rivers

Mike Rogers (AL-3); Rep. Robert Aderholt

community,” said McKinnon.

throughout the state.

84

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Landing in Autaugaville. The cleanup was


M EM BER Spotlight

WSFA-TV From its first telecast on Christmas Day in 1954 all the way to today, WSFA-TV has been serving our area as a trusted source for hyper-local news, weather and sports information. WSFA 12 News is a market leader on TV as well as in its digital platforms, earning an average of 400,000 unique visitors and 4.5 million page views a week.

HISTORY: WSFA-TV signed on the air on December 25, 1954. Before it was a television station, the call letters W-S-F-A were familiar in Montgomery. Gordon Persons (who went on to become an Alabama governor) opened Alabama’s fourth radio station in 1930, locating it at what was then the city’s airport. He publicized the station with the slogan, “With the South’s Finest Airport,” hence, WSFA. Raycom Media, headquartered in Montgomery, has owned WSFA since January 2006. In August 2006, WSFA was the first television station in Alabama to upgrade to digital, non-linear video news gathering equipment, and it was the first television station in Montgomery to begin broadcasting in high-definition in 2008. We were also first in the market with local news and weather apps in 2011 and added a state-of-the-art mobile weather lab in 2014 – Storm Tracker – to cover severe weather. In 2015, the station added the ability for viewers to watch us on Roku and Amazon Fire. And last March, we launched Central Alabama Weekend, a new website and app.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 100  

WHAT SERVICES DOES WSFA PROVIDE? Local news, weather and sports coverage; NBC news, entertainment and sports programming; and syndicated programs. WSFA 12 News works hard to bring area events live from all over our 15-county designated market area.

Front Row From Left to Right: Sally Pitts(Anchor/Reporter), Valorie Lawson (Anchor/Reporter), Steve Kohn (Engineer Manager), Mark Bullock (Anchor/Reporter), Amanda Curran (Meteorologist/ Reporter) Back Row From Left to Right: Taylor Burk (Director) Shani Crayton (News Operations Supervisor), Jeff Harrison (News Operations Manager), Joshua Cooley (News Content Specialist), Vernon Turner (Meteorologist/Reporter), Henry Carnegie (News Content Specialist), John O’Conner (Anchor/Reporter)

WHAT IS WSFA’S ROLE IN THE COMMUNITY? To serve as residents’ top information source during breaking news and breaking weather. We also bring awareness to events and causes that shape who we are.

WHAT SETS WSFA’S NEWS AND WEATHER TEAM APART? Our people. For more than 63 years, WSFA 12 News has employed the right people at the right time to do the job right – fair, accurately and balanced. We are journalists who love to share and tell the stories of people who we serve. We are driven by the fact that we never want to let down our viewers.

HOW HAVE CHANGES IN TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED WSFA? Consumers have the ability to get our news when they want it, how they want it and where they want it across many platforms. You can even watch WSFA newscasts on a mobile device through our apps. 

12 EAST DELANO AVENUE / MONTGOMERY / 334-288-1212 / WSFA.COM 85

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MAX 15th Annual Community Reception Honors Local Difference Makers On February 1, MAX held its 15th Annual MAX Community Reception, an annual event that brings together business, political and community leaders to celebrate community successes and recognize organizations and individuals who have made a significant difference in the quality of life in Central and East Alabama. This year, MAX honored Hope Inspired Ministries and Valiant Cross Academy for their efforts in contributing to a

Biscuits Extend Relationship with Tampa Bay Rays The Montgomery Biscuits and Tampa Bay Rays

celebrity Oprah Winfrey dined at

with the MAX Community Achieve-

Central restaurant with friends. “The

ment Award, MAX was also honored

whole restaurant was excited to see

to present Hope Inspired Ministries

Oprah Winfrey chose Central as her

and Valiant Cross Academy with a

place to dine while she was visiting

check for $3,000 to further support

the city,” said Jason McGarry,

both organizations’ efforts.

Central’s new Executive Chef.

said Mitch Lukevics, Director of Minor League Operations for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Kickball Back In MGM

Development Contract through the end of the

Home Team Sports launched its Montgomery

2020 baseball season. To celebrate this exten-

Spring 2018 Kickball season in March. Several

sion and 2018 being the 15th year of a Rays-Bis-

factors set this kickball league apart, accord-

cuits partnership, the Biscuits also announced

ing to Montgomery-based Home Team Sports

that they will wear a new powder blue on-field

co-partner Jeffery Runyon. “We are the only true

jersey and hat during each of the Biscuits Sun-

local league in Montgomery (local ownership),”

day home games. The new powder blue jersey

he said. “We’re also the least expensive league.”

will be emblazoned with the letters “MGM” in

Registration is $45 per player compared with

honor of Montgomery’s abbreviation, complete

other leagues charging $55 and $65 per player.

with the Rays sunburst on the far right and the

The league is open to adults ages 21 and older

Biscuits’ fan favorite “Monty” biscuit. The New

with all types of athletic ability.

home logo over a powder blue base with navy

YMCA Celebrates 150 Years

bill and the Tampa Bay Rays “TB” logo on the

On March 1, the YMCA of Greater Montgomery

side of the hat. The hat, along with an assort-

celebrated is forward-thinking leaders and its

ment of other powder blue apparel items to

service to its community that has been ongoing

mark 15 years of partnering with the Rays, are

since 1868. Volunteers and staff have anchored

now available for purchase. “The Tampa Bay

neighborhoods, reinforced family bonds and

Rays cherish their relationship with the Mont-

helped thousands of people of all ages and

gomery Biscuits and the City of Montgomery,”

backgrounds live healthier lives.

86

On a recent visit to Montgomery,

better River Region community. Along

announced that they have extended their Player

Era 59fifty hat features the Biscuits primary

Oprah Dines at Local Restaurant

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Huntingdon Offers Dual Enrollment & Summer Academies for High School Students Huntingdon College is offering summer opportunities for high school students to either explore career pathways or earn credit toward their undergraduate degrees. Three summer academies allow rising high school juniors and/or seniors to explore vocational callings in ministry, health and medicine, or community and economic development. In addition, the College will offer a new Dual Enrollment Program during Summer 2018: two summer classes designed specifically for rising high school juniors and seniors, each allowing students to earn three hours of college credit. Students must apply for the program with the signature of their high school guidance counselor by May 15 and may enroll in one or both classes.


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

City Honors Civil Rights Activist The City of Montgomery celebrated civil rights activist Claudette Colvin with a tribute on March 2 at the City Hall auditorium. Colvin was just 15 years old when she refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a Montgomery bus on March 2, 1955 – about nine months before Rosa Parks also refused to give up her seat. Colvin, who attended Booker T. Washington High School, rode the bus to and from her childhood home in King Hill, which is near Capitol Heights. The tribute included speaker Margaret Burch, who was a passenger on that

Capell & Howard, P.C. Opens Office in Baldwin County

same bus in 1955. She was joined by Attorney

Capell & Howard, P.C.’s newest office is open for business in Baldwin County. For more

Fred Gray, who represented Colvin and other

than 70 years, a commitment to two core values — professional leadership and civic

plaintiffs in a case where the court ruled that

responsibility — has defined Capell & Howard. The full-service law firm, with more than 40

Montgomery’s segregated bus system was

attorneys, is dedicated to seeing Alabama thrive. “We are proud to announce the opening

unconstitutional. The event also included a

of a new branch office in Fairhope and even more excited to continue to build more rela-

screening of the short film “A Letter to Clau-

tionships and friendships in Baldwin County and South Alabama,” said Managing Director

dette Colvin” by Atlanta film director Victoria

Courtney Williams.

Wilson.

Look who’s

in your

corner.

We are pleased to return a record $8.5 customers, based on our 2017 earnings.

million

www.AlabamaAgCredit.com

(800) 579-5471 Part of the Farm Credit System

in patronage to our

Since 2006, Alabama Ag Credit has returned more than $68 million in stock reductions, dividends and patronage distributions to our borrowers. This year’s payment benefits you by giving you cash, and by lowering your overall cost of borrowing — just one more advantage of doing business with Alabama Ag Credit! Thank you for your business! Please let us know if we can be of further assistance. 87

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

NEW PARK DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

LOVE’S TRAVEL STOPS & CONVENIENCE STORES

1361 Barret Park Way, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-215-9215, www.newparkliving.com Anita Carter-Vice President “Real Estate-Sales & Development”

1127 Tyson Road, Hope Hull, AL 36043 334-280-0009, www.loves.com Michael Jones-General Manager “Convenience Store”

ABLE HOME CARE SERVICES

MAX—GROUND BREAKING

600 South Court Street, Suite 310, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-617-6453, www.ableservices.org Lamar Barber-Owner/Registered Nurse “Home Health Services”

11020 Chantilly Parkway, Montgomery, AL 36117 www.mymax.com, Greg McClellan-President/CEO “Banks” “Credit Union”

WATERFRONT SWEETS

PARTNERS FOR PETS

22 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-416-8598, www.waterfrontsweets.org Kimyatta Moss-Owner “Candies, Cookies and Confections”

11123 Chantilly Parkway, Montgomery, AL 36064 334-218-4500, www.partnersforpetsal.com Frank Aman, DVM, Steven Sirmon, DVM “Veterinarians” 88

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


89

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT IN G N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

SAM’S CLUB #8106 1080 Eastern Boulevard, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-272-0277, www.samsclub.com Jeff Young, Club Manager “Wholesale Warehouse Club”

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH/ WINSHAPE CAMPS 6610 Vaughn Road, Montgomery, AL 36116 334-272-6152, www.aldersgateumc.org Associate Minister Richard Williams “Churches/Ministries”

RUNWAY 28

AHI PROPERTIES

4445 Selma Highway, Montgomery, AL 36108 334-593-8822, www.tailwindconcessions.com Jeff Switzer, President “Restaurants”

8220 Federal Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-603-8101. www.montgomery.ahiproperties.com Kim Furlow, Property Manager/Realtor “Property Management”

NEW MEMBER?

NOW WHAT? Being a member of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce is more than just paying dues and getting a decal. We provide connections, resources and solutions that help you grow your business

HOME TEAM SPORTS

and help grow Montgomery’s economy! GET CONNECTED TODAY. www.montgomerychamber.com/events

149 Lakeshore Drive, Pike Road, AL 36064 334-603-2114, www.hometeamsports.com Greg Shelton, President ”Sports-Amateur” 90

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS New Members W ELCO ME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

ACCOUNTING-TAX RETURNS

Inaugural Accounting Group MeKeisha Thomas 8417 Crossland Loop Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-356-2420 www.inauguralaccountinggroup.com ASSOCIATIONS/NON-PROFIT

AARP Alabama Anne Hails 201 Monroe Street, Suite 1880 Montgomery, Alabama 36104 334-954-3070 www.aarp.org/al Montgomery Pride United Meta Ellis 2015 East 3rd Street Montgomery, Alabama 36106 334-356-2464 www.montgomeryprideunited.org ATTRACTIONS-SPORTS & RECREATION

Launch Trampoline Park Sammy Razick 891 Boardroom Drive Prattville, Alabama 36066 334-568-2041 www.launchprattville.com ATTRACTIONS-SPORTS & RECREATION, SPORTS-AMATEUR, SPORTS-PROFESSIONAL

River Region Generals Syreeta Bailey 2025 Edinburgh Place Montgomery, Alabama 36116 334-835-1600 www.riverregiongenerals.org AUTOMOBILE MANUFACTURERS/SUPPLIERS, MISCELLANEOUS-MFR.

Shinsung NVH USA, Inc. Michael Nam 201 Smothers Road Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-399-6332

MARCH NEW MEMBERS

AUTOMOBILE REPAIR SERVICES

Johnson Upholstery Jamey Johnson 1013 Lagoon Business Loop Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-294-2384

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS/BARBER

Diverse Barber & Beauty Complex Deirdre Wilson 1311 East South Boulevard Montgomery, Alabama 36116 334-286-1000 BUILDING MATERIALS, GARDENS-SEED/SUPPLY, LAWN EQUIPMENT, LUMBER-WHOLESALE/RETAIL

Lowe’s Craig Hill 1950 Eastern Boulevard Montgomery, Alabama 36117-1614 334-409-9000 www.lowes.com BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Second Chance Investments, LLC Timothy Williams 1785 Taliaferro Trail, Suite 15 Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-676-3101 www.secondchanceinvestmentsllc.biz CAR WASH & DETAIL

Goo-Goo Express WashAtlanta Highway Jonathan Richard 6225 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-274-9028 www.googooexpresswash.com

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Goo-Goo Express Wash-Carter Hill Kevin Keyes 2909 Carter Hill Road Montgomery, Alabama 36106 334-531-5448 www.googooexpresswash.com Goo-Goo Express WashMalcolm Drive Rocky Riddle 3621 Malcolm Drive Montgomery, Alabama 36116 334-260-9111 www.googooexpresswash.com CARPET/UPHOLSTERY CLEANERS

Welch’s Chem Dry David Welch P.O. Box 230116 Montgomery, Alabama 36123 334-286-9271 www.welchschemdry.com CHARITABLE FOUNDATIONS, ASSOCIATIONS/NON-PROFIT

Catholic Social Services of Montgomery Deacon Raymond Gueret 4455 Narrow Lane Road Montgomery, Alabama 36116 334-288-8890 www.cssalabama.org CHURCHES/MINISTRIES

Saint John’s AME Church Roosevelt Williams III 807 Madison Avenue Montgomery, Alabama 36104 334-265-4136 www.saintjohnsame.com


CHAMBER NEWS New Members WELCOME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

CLOTHING ACCESSORIES-ONLINE

Johnson Tie Knot Design Willie Johnson 408 Cowan Street Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 617-803-2273 www.jtkdesign.org COMPUTERS-SALES/ SERVICES/SUPPLIES

INSURANCE COMPANIES/ SERVICES, SPECIALIZES IN WORKMAN/COMMERCIAL INSURANCE

Associated Insurance Administrators Barbara Evans 4138 Carmichael Road Montgomery, Alabama 36106 334-279-7600 www.aiamga.com MUSIC/MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

HyTech Solutions Darnell Hughley 6385 Atlanta Highway Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-271-0179 www.hytech.solutions CONSULTING SERVICES

Questia Corps, LLC Linnea Conely 600 South Court Street, Suite 215 Montgomery, Alabama 36104 334-590-6164 www.questiacorps.com FIRE PROTECTION

Montgomery Fire Equipment Co., Inc. Darrell Eller 3274 Wetumpka Highway Montgomery, Alabama 36110 334-265-7260

HEALTH CARE SERVICES, MEDICAL BILLING/CONSULTING

MEOW Academy Terrance Baldwin 104 Mendel Parkway Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-676-1449 www.meowacademy.net NURSING HOMES/ASSISTED LIVING, NURSING HOMES/ ASSISTED LIVING

Country Cottage in Montgomery Abby Pope 235 Sylvest Drive Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-260-8373 www.cottageassistedliving.com PARKING MANAGEMENT

Parking Management Company Edward Pettway 201 Tallapoosa Street Montgomery, Alabama 36104 334-544-2669 www.parkingmgt.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

MD Revenue Solutions LLC Heath Russell 105 Jackson Lane Wetumpka, Alabama 36093 334-478-4301 www.mdrevenuesolutions.com

AHI Properties Kim Furlow 8220 Old Federal Road Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-603-8101 montgomery.ahiproperties.com

INDIVIDUAL REAL ESTATE-AGENTS

William Powell III 200 West Clinton Avenue Jackson, Alabama 36545 (334) 324-9356

Chosen Realty, LLC Cassandra Andrews 4269 Lomac Street Montgomery, Alabama 36106 334-676-2273 www.chosenrealtyllc.com


REAL ESTATE-AGENTS, REAL ESTATE-RESIDENTIAL

iHomes.club Stephanie Wyatt 358 North Capital Parkway Montgomery, Alabama 36107 334-669-3728 www.ihomes.club REAL ESTATE-BROKER, REAL ESTATE-AGENTS

EXIT Best Homes Realty Bernice Henderson 1345 Carmichael Road Montgomery, Alabama 36106 334-356-7575 REAL ESTATE-COMMERCIAL/INVESTMENTS, SHOPPING MALLS & CENTERS

Norman Bridge Shopping Center Buddy Rousso 4105 Norman Bridge Road Montgomery, Alabama 36111 334-322-4600 RESTAURANTS, RESTAURANTS-SOUTHERN

All In One Restaurant Laurine Pettway 163 Eastern Boulevard Montgomery, Alabama 36117 334-412-1478 RESTAURANTS-BAR/GRILL, RESTAURANTS, RESTAURANTS-AMERICAN

Runway28 Jess Backhaus 4445 Selma Highway Montgomery, Alabama 36108 334-593-8822 www.tailwindconcessions.com RESTAURANTS-SEAFOOD, RESTAURANTS

The Seafood Bistro Paul Do 1651 Perry Hill Road Montgomery, Alabama 36106 334-279-7500 www.theseafoodbistro.com

SHOPPING MALLS & CENTERS, WAREHOUSING/ DISTRIBUTION

Norman Bridge Shopping Center, LLC Leon Capouano 4011 Norman Bridge Road Montgomery, Alabama 36105 SPORTS-AMATEUR

Home Team Sports Greg Shelton 149 Lakeshore Drive Pike Road, Alabama 36064 334-603-2114 www.hometeamsport.com TAXI/CAB SERVICE, TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

On Time Taxi, LLC Dennis Wesley 847-B North University Drive Montgomery, Alabama 36104 334-505-1189 www.ontimetaxi.co TRASH/GARBAGE SERVICE

Republic Services Lynn Popwell 343 Landfill Drive Greenville, Alabama 36037 800-752-4092 www.republicservices.com Sea Coast Disposal Alaron Hubbert P.O. Box 250 Hayneville, Alabama 36040 334-314-8499 VIDEO PRODUCTION

Bama-Q Productions, LLC Mike Smith 3066 Zelda Road Montgomery, Alabama 36106 (334) 791-6229 www.bama-q.tv


Numbers reflect February 2018 over 2017.

FLYMGM

Economic Intel

WINGS Two New Direct Flights from MGM UP!

STARTING MAY 14, 2018

MGM

STARTING JUNE 7, 2018

SFB

TO

MGM

ORLANDO -SANFORD INTERNATIONAL

MONTGOMERY REGIONAL

TO

MONTGOMERY REGIONAL

DCA

REAGAN NATIONAL

HOUSING

#1

TOURISM

GREAT JOB!

FEBRUARY 2018

67%

DS MGM CURRENTLY LEA TRO CITIES ME A AM AB AL R HE ALL OT IN OCCUPANCY RATE

OCCUPANCY RATE

+ 6.6

LODGING TAX

+15% + 3%

SUPPLY

OVER FEB 2017

+ 8%

TOTAL HOME SALES

1,966

$153,128

TOTAL HOMES LISTED FOR SALE

AVERAGE SALE PRICE

DEMAND

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

Source: Smith Travel Research Report, City of Montgomery

CIVILIAN

LABOR FORCE

171,932

EMPLOYED

LABOR FORCE

164,812

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR GOING DOWN

4.1% UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate MGM Area

SECTORS GOING UP

LABOR FORCE

TRADE, TRANSPORTATION, WAREHOUSING & UTILITIES

+ 2.0%

EDUCATION & HEALTH SERVICES

+ 1.5%

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

+ 1.3%

GOVERNMENT

+ 0.2%

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

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MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Post Office Box 79 Montgomery, AL 36101

Profile for Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

Montgomery Business Journal - May 2018  

Montgomery Business Journal - May 2018