Page 1

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL VOLUME 9 ISSUE 5 / SEPTEMBER 2017

MBJ

A STRONG VISION Changing the World, One Scholar at a Time

WORKING SMARTER: C R E AT I N G T O M O R R O W ’ S WORKFORCE

MADE IN MGM: M A N U FA C T U R I N G I N M O N T G O M E RY


Making Life

EASIER. That’s what I expect from my bank. In real estate, you never stand still. So anything that saves me time is good for me and my

clients. River Bank gives me products that help me keep moving. The latest mobile time-saving technology, along with personal service you just won’t find at those big banks. Making my life easier. That’s how I know River Bank appreciates me.

Mindy O’Brien REALTOR‰ The Lake Martin Experience

To see more follow us on

and

RIVERBANKANDTRUST.COM Equal Housing Lender

Member FDIC

NMLS 405629


10

20

CONTENTS S EPTEMBER 2 0 17

THIS ISSUE: 10 18 20

Workforce Solutions

CHAMBER NEWS

Diversity: Why it Matters

08 Events

Made in MGM

40 Connect 42 Connect Resource Guide 24 Powerhouse Q&A

48 Members on the Move

27 Member Profiles

52 Business Buzz

32 #MyMGM

60 Members in the News

36 GiveBack

66 Ribbon Cuttings

44 Small Business Briefcase

70 New Members 74 Intel

4

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


S


MBJ

THE NUMBER ONE BUSINESS SOURCE FOR MONTGOMERY AND THE RIVER REGION

BACK TO SCHOOL – BACK TO CLEAN.

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT Randall L. George DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS Jina Miniard

EXPLORE MEDIA PUBLISHER Pam Mashburn

MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Stewart Kornegay

ART DIRECTOR Erika Rowe Tracy

DESIGN Heather Cooper, Shelby Berry

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORIAL Jennifer Kornegay, Wendi Lewis, Racheal Lunn PHOTOGRAPHERS Bryan Carter, Robert Fouts, Brooke Glassford, High 5 Productions, David Robertson Jr., Shelby Berry ON THE COVER Governor Kay Ivey, Mayor Todd Strange and County Commissioner Elton Dean Sr. visit Valiant Cross Academy. By High 5 Productions ADVERTISING Serena Minton, Christina Bennett, Kristina Boddie exploreMedia / 334-578-7810 MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

Proudly keeping homes cleaner and healthier since 1987

277-7749 www.MAIDS.com

Post Office Box 79, Montgomery, Alabama 36101 Telephone: 334-834-5200 • mbj@montgomerychamber.com © Copyright 2017 exploreMedia and the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved. MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MISSION STATEMENT

Committed to exceptional service, the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce works to improve the economic well-being of the business community and enhance the quality of life of the area through the creation and preservation of jobs. The Montgomery Business Journal (USPS NO. 025553) is published bi-monthly by exploreMedia for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104, (334) 834-5200, www.montgomerychamber.com. Subscription rate is $30 annually. Periodicals Postage Paid at Montgomery Alabama, 36119+9998, USPS NO. 025553. Volume 9, Issue 5.

Referred for a reason.

POSTMASTER send address changes to Montgomery Business Journal, c/o Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 79, 41 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36101, or email mbj@montgomerychamber.com. The Montgomery Business Journal welcomes story ideas from its readers. Email to: editor@montgomerychamber.com. Subscriptions are a part of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce dues structure. Subscriptions and bulk subscriptions can also be purchased per year at www.montgomerychamber.com/mbjsub.


CHAMBER EVENTS

Connect. Learn. Grow. + MARK YOUR CAL ENDARS FOR THESE U PCOMING C HAM BE R E VE N TS

Upcoming Workshops SEP

26

Diversity Summit, 9 am - 5 pm, at the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel and

60 Minute Coffees & Business After Hours These popular networking events are the perfect place to exchange business cards and meet potential customers.

Convention Center This highly anticipated event features dynamic speakers from across the country, and offers an intense one-day agenda full of diversity and inclusion training that is crucial to any business model and size. This year’s keynote is Rosanna Durruthy, Head of Global Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging for LinkedIn. To register, visit montgomerychamber.com/diversity. Presenting Sponsor: Stivers Ford Lincoln

09/28 Business After Hours Sponsors: Gilpin Givhan and Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood Location: Lakeview Center (2660 EastChase Pkwy)

10/11

NOV

5-11

60 Minute Coffee Sponsor: River Region United Way Location: River Bank & Trust

Military Appreciation Week

Every year, River Region businesses take part in a public display of support for the military, both

10/26

active duty and retired. Held in conjunction with Veterans Day, “Freedom Isn’t Free” is a regional

Business After Hours Sponsor: New Waters Realty Location: The Waters, 50 Lucky Lane

media campaign that promotes special offers and discounts for military personnel and families. Presenting Sponsor: Caddell Construction

11/08 60 Minute Coffee Sponsor: Alley Station Location: The Warehouse

Save the Date! DEC 145th Annual Meeting,

07

Chamber Member Orientation

12 - 1:30 pm at the Renaissance

Montgomery Hotel and Convention Center This is the largest and most anticipated business

November 1, from 8 - 9 am at the Chamber of Commerce

event of the year. This signature event celebrates the Chamber’s rich 145-year history, the eco-

Get connected and make the most of your membership investment. Connect with new and existing Chamber members and gain powerful insight on the Chamber’s top priorities and initiatives from the Chamber President. Sponsor: CharterHR

nomic development milestones of the year and the installation of the new Chairman. Presenting Sponsor: Capell & Howard P.C. Attorneys at Law

All Ears

//

BizTalk MGM - The Official Podcast for Small Business in MGM Every Monday at 6 pm on WVAS 90.7FM, Montgomery Chamber staff plus host Melissa Johnson Warnke from the Alabama Retail Association will talk with business experts on topics that are important to small businesses.

Sponsor: MAX

8

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

BUSINESS Resource Center

The Chamber’s BRC connects local businesses with the critical resources they need to grow and be successful. Business 101: Start it Up! September 19; October 3, 17; November 7, 21, from 8:30 - 9:30 am, at the Chamber’s BRC No registration required. $10 fee. Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC Business Tax Update October 19, from 11 am - 1 pm, at the Alabama Department of Revenue Montgomery Taxpayer Service Center Registration is required. Presenting Sponsor: The BeneChoice Companies, LLC

Upcoming Webinars • Funding Opportunities for Women Entrepreneurs October 5, from 12 - 1 pm • Beyond Google: Free Market Research at Your Library October 12, from 3:15 - 4:45 pm • Making Smart, Ethical Business Decisions October 12, from 12 -1 pm • Ask SCORE: Business Plans October 17, from 1 - 2 pm • Which Certifications Are Right for your Business? October 18, from 12 -1 pm • How to Steer Clear of Accidental Discrimination When Hiring October 19, from 12 -1 pm

+

Register online

Register online for Business Resource Center events and webinars at montgomerychamber.com/events


MY C ITY MY U N IVE RS I TY

MY TROJAN WARRIOR SPIRIT Amy W., Alumna Marketing Professional. Mom.

TROY University is a proud partner of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce. Chamber members are eligible for 10% tuition scholarships and application fee waivers. For more information, visit troy.edu/Montgomery or call 1-800-414-5756.

MONTGOMERY

© 2017 Troy University

Now more than ever, Troy Montgomery is fueling success. At our state university, working professionals are getting the degrees they need to not only seize opportunities but to also create them. That’s progress. That’s the Trojan Warrior Spirit, and it’s alive and well at Troy University.


MANUFACTURING IN MONTGOMERY IS MOVING

MADE IN MANUFACTURING IS A MAINSTAY OF MONTGOMERY’S ECONOMY. TODAY, COMPANIES ARE RAPIDLY PROGRESSING FROM THE INDUSTRIAL ERA TO THE MODERN AGE, UTILIZING OUR AREA’S TECH AND TALENT RESOURCES. BY JENNIFER KORNEGAY IMAGE COURTESY OF HYUNDAI MOTOR MANUFACTURING

10

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


FULL SPEED AHEAD.

MGM THE LIST OF COMPANIES WHO MAKE THINGS RIGHT HERE RANGES FROM BRAND NEW VENTURES TO FAMILY OWNED BUSINESSES MORE THAN A CENTURY OLD. READ ON TO LEARN WHAT THE BUZZ IS ALL ABOUT.

Manufacturing Alabama (HMMA) on 1,700 acres of pasture,

When the news broke in 2003 that Hyundai Motor Co. was

bringing with them even more capital investments and jobs.

placing its first U.S. plant in Montgomery, building the

But the reach of manufacturing here extends beyond the

3-million-square-foot, state-of-the-art Hyundai Motor

automotive sector. Everything from syrup to surgical

11

it changed the economic landscape in the area significantly. It alone initially had and continues to have a huge positive economic impact on the River Region and beyond. It also brought a wave of additional good news that swelled into a tsunami, as automotive parts suppliers flocked to the area in order to meet HMMA’s demand for components,

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


“What is so special about the River Region and Manufacturing companies keep coming to Montgomery and expanding here. From top to bottom: Coca-Cola Bottling Company UNITED, STERIS and Gerhardi.

truly unique is the great partnership between the city and the county and the Chamber.” - Allen Smoot, Director-South Alabama Division for Coca-Cola Bottling Company UNITED

equipment is produced in plants large and

pointed to the positives that have kept the

small all around the region. And the outlook

company going and growing in Montgomery.

for the future of the sector here seems bright.

“The workforce diversity is good here. We’ve

According to Allen Smoot, Director, South

been able to recruit and retain people for our

Alabama Division for Coca-Cola Bottling

engineering and assembly positions,” he said.

Company UNITED, “The overall state of manufacturing in general is very healthy, particularly

He also pointed to the Chamber’s role in

for us,” he said. “In the last two years, we’ve

supporting existing businesses like STERIS.

added about 90 new positions and we’ve

“Our most recent expansion would not have

invested a lot in our local operating model.”

been possible without the Chamber staff and

Coca-Cola Bottling Company UNITED, a

the work they did for and with us to help us

privately held Coca-Cola bottler based in Bir-

secure that opportunity,” he said.

mingham, is growing everywhere, now doing business in seven states across the South-

Smoot agreed, noting that he’s been plenty

east, and has two locations in Montgomery

of places and found none of them compa-

for a total of 455 employees. “We love being

rable to Montgomery on one integral factor.

here for several reasons, one of which is the

“I’ve worked in a lot of spots around Alabama

centralized location with interstate access.

and Florida, and what is so special about the

That is a big benefit for us,” Smoot said.

River Region and truly unique is the great partnership between the city and the county

WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

and the Chamber,” he said, “The Chamber

Mac McBride, director of operations at

has been an amazing resource for us, and

STERIS, which opened in Montgomery in

the climate here created by these three enti-

1976, echoed Smoot. His company, which

ties is focused on business growth.”

manufactures surgical solutions, including operating tables, lights, warming cabinets and

BETTER BUILDERS

equipment management systems, completed

James Uhm at DAS North America also

an $11 million expansion project in 2013 and

praised the Chamber and its team for its

now employs 344 area residents. McBride

welcome, quick response and willingness to

DRIVING FORWARD A recent economic development win was the announcement of Gerhardi Inc.’s decision to locate in Montgomery. The German auto supplier is investing nearly $38 million in its capital city facility and will create up to 240 jobs. According to Gerhardi’s CEO Fredy Franke, that workforce could grow depending on customers and products. The parent company, which has 1,400 employees, has increased annual sales from $50 million to $200 million. The plant broke ground in July 2016 and production is estimated to start in 2019.

12

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


13

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


IMAGE COURTESY OF HYUNDAI MOTOR MANUFACTURING

“The Chamber communicated with us, listened to us…the city, county, state and Chamber came together to help us work on the infrastructure we needed.” -James Uhm, Chief Operating Officer at DAS North America

work hard on his behalf. “We looked very hard at a lot of cities when

DAS, which supplies parts to Kia, started in Montgomery in a

making our decision on where to locate,” he said. “We were new at

temporary facility. It invested $17 million in its plant, completed in

this and needed all the help we could get. The Chamber commu-

2014, and has been expanding ever since. A second building with

nicated with us, listened to us. I reached out to economic develop-

new equipment was completed in 2015, and a press shop and two

ment offices in the other places and didn’t get much of a response.

additional assembly lines have just been finished. The company

In some cases, it was hard to even find the right contact info.”

has also added employees and now has approximately 400.

But once he connected with the Chamber, almost immediately he

Uhm pointed to one other major positive in Montgomery. “One

had a meeting with Ellen McNair. “She was so helpful, and the city,

thing that doesn’t get mentioned much is how many good com-

county, state and Chamber came together to help us work on the

mercial builders Montgomery has,” he said. “We went with Marshall

infrastructure we needed,” he said. “And the Chamber consistently

Construction, but there were so many good options who could do

checks in on us to see how they can help us.”

what we needed.”

14

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


JOBS IN MGM BY THE NUMBERS Montgomery County Job Growth for 2016

$371.3M New Investments by New and Expanding Industry

42 New and Expanding Industry Economic Development Project Announcements

TOP IN THE STATE

1,704

Job announcements by New and Expanding industry Governor Kay Ivey with Alabama representatives and Mayor Todd Strange and Commissioner Elton Dean at the announcement of the Alabama Department of Commerce’s 2016 jobs numbers.

15

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


BRINGING THE BUSINESS THE CHAMBER HAS PLAYED A KEY PART IN BRINGING AND KEEPING MONTGOMERY’S MANUFACTURING COMPANIES HERE. So how are current efforts going? Ellen McNair, the Chamber’s Senior Vice President for Corporate Development, weighed in.

the city, the county, state elected officials, utilities, CSX rail, the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, the Alabama Department of Transportation and more. “When we’re recruiting any industry of any magnitude, the people involved are so numerous, and there are so many moving pieces,” she

80% OF JOB

“We recruit world wide and in a very competitive market, so things

said. “We all work together so well,

that go on all over the state, like past political turmoil in our state

with one vision. Our key to success is

government, is used against us by other states,” she said. “Instabili-

the ability to communicate and work

ty is an issue and a challenge.”

in a seamless and transparent way.”

Other issues that can affect economic development efforts include

And she stressed that while the

negative education news, since it is so closely tied to workforce.

announcements of a major company

“But no matter the temporary obstacles, we still push and promote

locating here only come around sporadically, the expansion of

this area because we believe we have so many positives to offer,”

existing business is just as vital to our economy, if not more so.

McNair said.

“Eighty percent of job creation here is from existing industry, so the

CREATION

IS FROM EXISTING

INDUSTRY

best source of our growth is with the companies already here,” she

WORKING TOGETHER

said. To that end, the Chamber has several people on staff who do

According to her, one of the city’s major assets is its economic de-

nothing but focus on meeting the needs of our current companies.

velopment team, which extends far beyond the Chamber to include

“And it’s not just about job growth,” she said. “It’s about retention.”

w

Professional Clerical (334) 265-4100 Industrial (334) 265-0100 300 Arba Street Montgomery, AL 36104 www.walkerworkforce.com

WalkerWorkForce copy.indd 1

WorkForce “Since 1957” Walker Personnel, LLC Celebrating

60 Years

of serving the River Region!

Call us for all your staffing needs! PROFESSIONAL 16

CLERICAL

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

INDUSTRIAL 8/29/17 12:06 PM


BY THE NUMBERS

Sabel Steel has been a Montgomery family owned and operated manufacturer for

Here’s How Manufacturing Adds Up Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama has invested a total of

$1.8 BILLION

in its Montgomery plant.

161 YEARS.

Coca-Cola Bottling Company UNITED produces and distributes

MORE THAN 750

Neptune Technology Group has an installed base of more than

30 MILLION water meters.

refreshing beverages.

SWEET SUCCESS Founded in 1906, Montgomery’s Whitfield Foods is celebrating 111 years in the same location and is still producing the same Alaga cane syrup that became a household name in our region decades ago. But through its many years, the business has changed and grown. It once produced pickles but stopped in the late 1970s. Today, a large part of its business model is contract manufacturing and packaging. The company realized that due to similarities Images courtesy of Brooke Glassford/Colorbox Photography.

between its syrup processes and those used for many beverages, it could use its manufacturing equipment and lines to meet the needs of companies who weren’t keeping up with demand for their products. Through the last 40 years, the company has produced beverages for companies like Ocean Spray, Tropicana, Minute Maid and Snapple. Pepsi Co. is currently Whitfield’s biggest customer, although they produce only non-carbonated drinks, like juices and Gatorade. President Les Massey explained the advantages the company

Left to right: Louie Whitfield, Vice President Administration, and

sees in its Montgomery location.

President & CEO Les Massey at Whitfield Foods.

“We are close to transportation here,” he said. “We’re not too far

and that comes from our management staff and employees. Keeping

from Atlanta. We have two major

turnover low is integral, and we do that by treating our people right.”

interstates properly situated so that’s good for truck transport.

The company’s efforts have paid off for a century and were recently

And we’re a part of this commu-

recognized by PepsiCo which awarded Whitfield Foods its “Co-Pack-

nity. This is where we started.”

er of the Year Award” for the third time in six years. “We are very proud of our employees and the obvious effort that they bring forth

He also shared the company’s

every day to meet the very high standards required by our industry,”

recipe for success. “We are smaller than many other companies that

said Massey. “Food industry standards and regulations are increas-

do the same thing, but we compete because we are committed to

ingly challenging each year, and our employees take a lot of pride in

doing things right,” he said. “Our customers appreciate our quality

providing the highest level of service to PepsiCo.”

17

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

Source: businessalabama.com/Business-Alabama/February-2017/The-Shape-and-Future-of-Auto-Growth/

MADE IN MGM


Developing competitive talent is a cornerstone of the Chamber’s Imagine a Greater Montgomery strategy.

WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS Montgomery is addressing workforce issues and meeting the needs of manufacturing and beyond.

W

top things on my agenda when hile manufacturing

“There is a big void in providing a

I started in this position last

baseline certification program for our

is, by most accounts, booming

year was to talk to and listen to

in our area, companies still

the companies that we provide

industrial workforce, so we formed

sometimes face issues. One

workforce to.”

a Manufacturing Skills Standards

that’s being addressed head-on

Council, and from their recommen-

is the ready availability of a

In manufacturing, he and his

properly educated and trained

team learned of the need for

workforce for the manufacturing

consistency. “There is a big void

and industrial sectors. Mac Mc-

in providing a baseline certifi-

Bride, Director of Operations at

cation program for our indus-

STERIS, pointed to the important

trial workforce, so we formed a

efforts of Alabama Industrial De-

Manufacturing Skills Standards

velopment Training and others.

Council, and from their rec-

careers in manufacturing,” he

“The support we get from AIDT

ommendations, we created a

said. “We are working with the

is a major positive,” he said.

curriculum. We are rolling that

National Association of Manufac-

STERIS has had trouble finding

out now and are the first state in

turers ‘Dream It, Do It’ program

qualified machinists, so AIDT

the country to do it.”

and using that message to

sends a mobile classroom to the company. “They do the training onsite with a fulltime instructor,”

EYES AHEAD: The Future is Now

dations, we created a curriculum. We are rolling that out now and are the Jeff Lynn, Senior Executive

first state in the country to do it.”

Director for Workforce and Economic Development

engage parents, educators and students and to combat old stereotypes about manufacturing jobs.”

McBride said. Echoing McBride, Lynn stressed

IN CONTEXT

Ed Castile, AIDT Executive Director

AIDT’s primary purpose is to

the importance of changing the

close the skills gap that too

environment in our K-12 class-

Sheron Rose, Vice President

often keeps people who need

rooms. “We need to be serious

of Community Strategies at the

jobs and job openings from

about reaching out to students

Chamber, outlined the Cham-

matching. “It’s a challenge

as young as possible, in ele-

ber’s outlook on workforce

everywhere, across the country,”

mentary school even,” he said.

development. “Promoting and

Ed Castile, AIDT’s executive

“We need to get them excited

aiding workforce development

director, said.

about STEM subjects, get them

fits perfectly with the Chamber’s

into problem solving, and show

mission to enhance business

Chamber, not just

The state’s community college

them the different careers and

and the quality of life here

AUM or Trenholm Tech,

system is also tackling the

opportunities in manufacturing

through the creation and reten-

and industrial sectors.”

tion of jobs because to do that,

not just us at AIDT.”

workforce problem, and Jeff

you have to have a qualified

Lynn, Senior Executive Director for Workforce and Economic

An element of Lynn’s strategic

workforce. And not just a one-

Development, believes the first

plan is changing mindsets too.

time workforce, but a pipeline.

step toward progress is contin-

“We are marketing to millennials

That way, we are ready to recruit

ued communication. “One of the

and getting them excited about

the companies we want here.”

18

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

“WE ARE NOW WORKING TOGETHER AS A GROUP,” It’s not just the


SOFT SKILLS ARE CRITICAL AIDT has also created workforce training centers scattered around the state in key regions. There are seven total, including The Montgomery Regional Workforce Training Center, which is operated by AIDT in a partnership with several entities including the Montgomery Public Schools, Alabama Community College System, ATN, AUM, the Department of Education and the Chamber.

THE ULTIMATE GOAL

The ultimate goal is to provide entry-level training, existing employee upgrade training, two-year technical college level training, and K-12 career training to give area businesses a trained workforce. The center is currently teaching individuals already working in area companies in all sectors, including health care and government in addition to manufacturing, and covers topics like Information Technology, Manufacturing Fundamentals and Workforce Skills training.

“The support we get from AIDT is a major positive. They do the training onsite with a fulltime instructor.” - Mac McBride, director of operations at STERIS

Manufacturing Fundamentals lets employees brush up on hard skills they need in their daily work, things related to technology, robotics and safety. “We’ve had more than 2,000 people go through it in this area,” AIDT’s executive director Ed Castile said. And now, anyone can take advantage of the program. “Anybody can sign up, get training and then get placed in a pool that our manufacturers hire from.” The program also addresses workforce skills, also often called “soft skills.” “We see people missing some fundamental things, soft skills like just showing up, being on time, having good attitude,” he said. “We are making sure that we are checking those boxes in everything we do. We don’t want to skip ahead and try to train managers. We are trying to make sure we’ve got some basic people ready for entry-level employment.” Recognizing this need and meeting it is a team effort. “We are now working together as a group,” Castile said. “It’s not just the Chamber, not just AUM or Trenholm Tech, not just us at AIDT.” And he has big plans for the future of workforce development. “My hope is that we will get this soft skill stuff done, and then we can really get into the tech and robotics and train the next generation of software developers,” he said. “But we’re not quite there yet.”


DIVERSITY: WHY IT MATTERS

Do you know what “diversity” really means and why it’s important to your business?

of business today thanks to advances in technology and transportation that are making the world seem smaller and smaller and pushing a variety of people closer together. “We are living in a global society; you have to do business from that perspective,” said Rose.

Diversity is a buzzword that’s thrown around a lot. But what does it

This means clear communication is crucial to better outcomes.

really mean and why is understanding it key to doing better busi-

“Understanding differences can bridge gaps and result in improved

ness? “Diversity is important in today’s world and in the marketplace

corporate reputation, higher employee and customer satisfaction,

because our society is changing quicker than ever before,” said Dr.

marketplace growth and more creativity and innovation,” Ingram

Rhea Ingram, Dean, College of Business, Auburn University at Mont-

said.

gomery. And while we often think of race and gender when we talk about diversity, it’s broader than that. Diversity includes all differ-

As Ingram pointed out, your business’ image can benefit from

ences, both inherent and acquired. “You have to consider cultural

a commitment to diversity, and an increasing number of people

and geographical differences, age and experience differences and

make decisions based on more than just traditional factors like

diverse political opinions too. All of these things together represent

price, quality or service. “Our investors and our community at large,

true diversity,” said Sheron Rose, the Chamber’s Vice President,

particularly millennials, are basing decisions, whether investment,

Community Strategies.

employment or purchasing, on a company’s stand on diversity and inclusion,” Rose said.

In a business context, fostering diversity is an important way to achieve better understanding, and that’s key with the global nature 20

Making diversity a priority is also valuable from an innovation and

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


“Our investors and our community at large, particularly millennials, are basing decisions, whether investment, employment or purchasing, on a company’s stand on diversity and inclusion.” - Sheron Rose, the Chamber’s Vice President, Community Strategies

productivity perspective. “Research has shown that diversity in your team leads to diversity of thought,” Ingram said. Creating a diverse workplace is as much about environment as it is hiring choices, according to Ingram. “In order to enjoy diversity, companies must create and cultivate a culture of inclusion and respect, where people enjoy and relish differences, and companies must hire individuals who are able and willing to understand differences and be able to effectively manage these individuals,” she said. Promoting and embracing diversity is not just for major corporations. “Small businesses can have worldwide reach these days, and they need to know how to be responsive to their customers, who can be anywhere now,” Rose said. She also stressed that the concept isn’t just for businesses. “Good diversity across every aspect of society increases quality of life in any place, and that in turn is important from an economic development standpoint,” Rose said. “So it comes full circle.”

NEW THIS YEAR Small Business & Entrepreneurs Series MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 • 3:30 PM TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 • 5 PM

FEATURING: Michele Hoskins, owner of Michele Foods

Tye and Courtney Caldwell, creators of ShearShare

GET LINKEDIN

Read on for information

on this year’s Diversity Summit speaker on page 22.


2017 DIVERSITY SUMMIT: GET IN THE KNOW The Chamber’s annual Diver-

FACTS:

A recent report published by the Association of Chamber Executives, “Embracing the Challenge: The Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Imperative for Chambers of Commerce” contains a wealth of information, but a few of the report’s findings really stand out:

Demographic change is driven by natural growth, not immigration.

• • •

businesses comprehend the

Rosanna Durruthy, Head of Global Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging at LinkedIn

concept of diversity and the role it can play in their day-today operations and decisions. Sheron Rose, the Chamber’s Vice President, Community

Image courtesy of Rosanna Durruthy.

A FEW

sity Summit helps member

Strategies, explained the motivation behind the event. “We always strive to meet the needs of our community, and this event is a part of that,” she said. The Summit highlights

and how they affect how we

and have the desire to really

the impact of diversity on your

relate to the world and to oth-

connect with the mission of

business and its bottom line,

ers. Understanding this helps

the company and work hard to

as well as its influence on your

us understand the needs and

further it.”

recruitment, retention and

wants of our workforce and

more. “Having our business

customers in a manner that

community and community at

lets us all be successful.”

large more informed on these

She’s excited about the chance to speak in Montgomery, a place where she

The number of businesses

issues contributes to a more

Her title includes “belonging,”

sees opportunity to embrace

owned by immigrants is

well rounded community,”

and, according to Durruthy,

change. “Montgomery is really

increasing.

Rose said.

it’s a key word. “We add

growing and changing,” she

‘belonging’ to diversity and

said. “There are benefits that

This year, the Summit is on

inclusion because it’s crucial

can come from changes.”

September 26 and features

for employees,” she said.

keynote speaker Rosanna

“If they don’t feel like they

In addition to Durruthy’s talk,

Durruthy, Head of Global

belong, they go elsewhere.

the event promises some-

Diversity, Inclusion and Be-

For any business, it is a pivotal

thing for every type and

longing at LinkedIn. Durruthy’s

differentiation context.”

size of business, including

Cities and regions that support and promote diversity do better economically. Diverse and dynamic epistemic communities are key to regions adapting to new economic and demographic realities.

READ THE FULL REPORT AT ACCE.ORG.

PLAN TO ATTEND:

SEP

26

primary role is finding the right

continuing education credits.

ways to empower LinkedIn’s

Durruthy also shared how

Rose believes the value of

employees, members and

attention to all of these points

participating is clear. “I believe

customers. She stressed why

pays off. “Research shows that

attendees will gain a deeper

work like hers pays off. “Di-

businesses with more diversity

understanding of the goals

versity goes beyond outward

prove to be more innovative

and objectives of diversity

things and means the things

in solutions and services for

in business, and I hope they

that matter to us as individ-

customers,” she said. “They

leave with a commitment to

uals,” she said. “It’s about

retain employees better, and

take back the best practices

understanding the ways in

these employees are more

that they’ve learned,” she said.

which our differences manifest

satisfied and therefore loyal

Register to attend: montgomerychamber.com/diversity

9AM-5PM 22

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Aronov

covers Montgomery downtown

The Business Center of Alabama

The Bailey Building

One Commerce Street

midtown

eastside

Carmichael Center

Aronov Centre

Aronov has the right address for you. From a one-room office to space built specifically for your requirements, we can meet the needs of any company, whatever the size. And, we’ll do it with superior service and market knowledge that only Aronov can offer. So when you’re in the market for office space, choose the company that knows Montgomery best –- Aronov.

Call Scott Harris or Dawn Casey at 334.277.1000

3500 Eastern Boulevard

Montgomery, Alabama 36116

www.aronovcommercial.com


VESTOR IN

OFIL

Q&A

E

BARRIE & LAURA HARMON Barrie, who founded Harmon Dennis Bradshaw in 1977, and his wife Laura have lived in Montgomery all their lives. The couple views their commitment to their hometown and support of many arts organizations and non-profits, including the Chamber, as a natural extension of their affection for their city. And they see the same spirit in many of their fellow citizens.

What is your company’s primary service?

LH: I am seeing the local business community being much

BH: We are insurance brokers, and we concentrate in certain

more charitable recently. I think that points to a good busi-

segments like manufacturing, health care, wood products,

ness climate.

construction, social services and property management. We are based here but have a satellite office in Birmingham.

What makes Montgomery special to you both?

What are your community involvements?

residents understand their responsibility to support the things

LH: My passion is Service Dogs Alabama, an organization

that make Montgomery a great place to live, like ASF, MMFA,

that trains dogs to help students with a lot of things, like anxi-

the Symphony, our Zoo and initiatives that celebrate our rich

ety, which is helping raise test scores. I’m working to get them

history.

corporate support and planning a fundraiser. That’s one of

LH: I’d like to add that all of the colleges we have here add

the main ways I get involved, by aiding in fundraising efforts.

to our community. And the willingness of people to get in and

I’m very involved with the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, the

work together on different things.

BH: We live in a very civic-minded community. Many of our

Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts and the Family Sunshine Center. And I’m on the board of the Jackson Hospital Foundation.

Why do you both provide the Chamber with such a high level of support?

BH: I’m personally supportive of all the arts here, ASF, the

BH: The Chamber is really the lifeblood of Montgomery. It

Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, our symphony, Alabama

brings many different facets of the community together, and

Dance Theatre and the Montgomery Area Business Commit-

not just businesses. They work as a team with city leadership,

tee for the Arts. Outside of that, we both support Common

making it the most effective Chamber I’ve seen since I’ve

Ground, Valiant Cross School and the Montgomery Christian

been in business. When Hyundai came to Montgomery, it was

School as well as the United Way.

such a positive, and the Chamber was instrumental in cultivating that relationship and bringing them here. And because

What’s your opinion of the business climate in Montgomery?

the Chamber is so active and visible, I think that encourages further community support from citizens.

BH: Very positive. I’ve seen a dramatic increase in the vitality of the business community here in the last five years, a lot of optimism and growth. The leadership at the city and the

What do you see on the horizon for Montgomery?

Chamber are really matched up well now, and together, they

BH: I’m very encouraged to see so much young leadership

are providing the best business environment for the city that

emerging. Seeing these young people staying here and as-

I’ve seen in a long time, and I’ve lived here all my life. I think

suming responsibility. That points to a bright future, that, and

the continued revitalization of downtown and economic

the continued vitality downtown.

development are the two most important things happening in

LH: I also love seeing young people come back here and

the city right now, especially downtown. If the core of a city is

stay here, and that they are so active in the community. That’s

not viable, the city is not viable. It will rot from the inside.

what makes a place great.

24

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

IMAGE BY ROBERT FOUTS

PR

PO W E RHOUSE


Helping Hands It’s amazing how you can get people to step up and help with things all over our community. We take care of each other. I guess that happens in other cities, but here it never ceases to amaze me.

“ “We live in a very civic-minded community. Many of our residents understand their responsibility to support the things that make Montgomery a great place to live.” - Barrie Harmon

25

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


26

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER profile

JONATHAN AVANT Jonathan Avant is a native Montgomerian, born on Maxwell Air Force Base while his dad was serving there. When his father retired, he chose to stay in the capital city, and Jonathan has now made it his home as well. As PNC Bank’s Business Banking Relationship Manager for the River Region and Selma, he’s now serving too, ensuring that local business owners have the financial resources and guidance to achieve success.

When did you join PNC? In December 2011.  

Any recent awards? PNC bank recently received the 2016 Gallup “great workplace award” as recognition for being an amazing place to work. Also, I’ve had the honor to be regionally (Georgia and Alabama) recognized as a three-time recipient of PNC’s Market All-Star award and a two-time PNC Circle of Excellence (company-wide) award winner.  

What’s your favorite thing about your job? Successful businesses make productive members of the local economy. Therefore, my favorite part of my job is to assist my business owners in various industries in their journey to reach their goals. Seeing that journey to its fruition is also the most rewarding aspect of my job.  

What are your interests outside of work? My life is pretty simple. God, family, banking and music. I’ve played the trumpet since the age of 7. Now I am a professional trumpeter and jazz artist. I also enjoy spending time traveling, fishing and listening to music with my wife

Business Philosophy:

Jessica, two daughters Jazz and Juliana and two dogs.

To keep God first, remain a humble

What’s an accomplishment you are proud of? I am proud to currently serve as a board member

servant and treat people the way I

of MEOW (Music Education On Wheels) and The Family

motto is, “As one person, you cannot

Guidance Success by Six program. Both organizations

change the world but you can change

focus on the successful learning development of local

the world of one person.”

would want to be treated. My favorite

children. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

Care to share a fun fact? Before graduating with an accounting degree from Auburn University at Montgomery, both my wife and I were members of The Alabama State University Mighty Marching Hornets band. PNC.COM

27

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BE R profile

DR. IN C. SHIN After embarking on a career in engineering, Dr. In C. Shin yearned to connect more with other people, so he went to medical school and became an ophthalmologist. He’s been caring for patients and safeguarding sight at Montgomery Eye Physicians (MEP) since 2003.

What brought you to Montgomery? I was born in Seoul, South Korea. I moved to Huntsville when I was 15 and graduated from UAH in Mechanical Engineering. After five years of being an engineer, I went to UAB Medical School and finished my residency in ophthalmology at Tulane University. I came to Montgomery Eye Physicians straight from finishing my cornea fellowship at Oklahoma University.

What motivated you to become an ophthalmologist? I always loved math, science, painting and drawing. Ophthalmology satisfied all of those interests. I see patients in clinic for medical treatments, and I perform interesting and challenging surgeries that require manual dexterity.

What specific types of care do you provide your patients? As a board-certified ophthalmologist, most of my practice consists of cataract and LASIK surgeries. I perform a full range of glaucoma and cornea transplantation surgeries, as well as more esoteric surgeries like ocular surface tumor resection and keratoprosthesis, which is an implantation of artificial cornea.

What sets MEP apart from other practices in the area? We are group of competent and ethical doctors and have a support staff that puts the patient’s wellbeing above all other considerations.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? Most eye surgeries provide very quick vision improvement. I love seeing patients one day after cataract or LASIK surgeries with big smiles and thanking me for

Top Honors:

their great eyesight. I also love performing a complex combination of surgeries to save eyesight.

America’s Top Ophthalmologists by Consumers’ Research Council of America

What are your interests outside of work?

for Cornea and Cataract Surgery.

I have 9-year-old triplets who keep me busy. I also do target shooting whenever I get the chance. OPERATED SINCE 1945 onlinemep.com 28

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK C. WILLIAMS

In 2009, Dr. Shin was selected as one of


29

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


M EM BE R profile

PATRICK HART Owner of Montgomery’s Spherion Staffing, Patrick Hart has found his true purpose in his work, seeing the staffing and recruiting services his company offers as a way to meet the needs of individuals while also providing “the right person for the right job” to our local business community.

What does Spherion offer? Spherion is a staffing and recruiting leader with local roots. Founded in 1946, we have a firm grasp on what it takes to build a strong workforce and a successful career. When you work with Spherion, you’ll feel like you’re working with a locally owned business because we are one. But, since we’re part of a $20 billion-plus global staffing company, you’ll never lack the resources or support needed to conquer your goals.

Number of employees (locally): 4 Why did you decide to purchase Montgomery’s Spherion? I love this industry and

Mission Accomplished:

my job more than I ever imagined possible. We spend

Becoming a business owner has always

more time at work than we do with our families, and jobs

been a long-term goal of mine, but this

are the most critical part to any thriving economy and

industry gave me a purpose in life. And

community. We have the best of both worlds, operating

being a full-time single parent in addition to

as a local-owned business with the resources of the

a business owner is something I’m proud of.

second largest staffing and recruiting company in the world. This gives us the freedom to offer companies customized and personalized solutions, without being held to corporate metrics.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? Knowing that what we are doing matters and has an impact across multiple facets of our economy. I enjoy having the opportunity to help others personally, professionally and financially.

What’s on the horizon for Spherion? Continued growth as well as partnering with education and workforce development.

Spending time with my son and family, golf, fishing, hunting, sports and investing and following the stock market. OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 2015 spherion.com 30

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ROBERTSON JR.

What are your interests outside of work?


31

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MyMGM

DOWNTOWN LIVING

/ by WENDI LEWIS

For the last decade there’s been increased activity downtown, but now people aren’t just heading to the center of the city to catch a baseball game, walk the riverfront or grab a bite. They’re going downtown to live.

Trey Starke’s spacious and light-filled downtown loft retains many of the space’s original architectural details, and they are combined with modern conveniences and a custom spiral staircase. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRYAN CARTER PHOTO & DESIGN.

Montgomery is in the midst of a boom in downtown residential devel-

early mixed-use loft properties above the restaurants at the Alley.

opment, with easily a dozen multi-family residences either newly

The nine units that are available for leasing are the Watertower Lofts,

constructed or under construction but already leasing. Arguably,

so named for the iconic and historic water tower that marks the

living downtown became more attractive after significant downtown

entrance to the Alley. “There were people who had hesitation to live

revitalization projects like the construction of the Renaissance Hotel

downtown without certain amenities and, on the other side, people

& Spa at the Convention Center and the Montgomery Performing

not opening a business because people weren’t living there. So now

Arts Centre; the Montgomery Biscuits Baseball Stadium; The Alley

we’re seeing a progression and there’s a lot happening.”

Entertainment District; and, most recently, mixed-use development on Lower Dexter.

From an economic development standpoint, residential development in Montgomery’s downtown is actually progressing at a very healthy

Jake Kyser, owner and qualifying broker of Kyser Property Man-

pace, according to Lois Cortell, Senior Development Manager for the

agement Company, Inc., described the see-saw of commercial

City of Montgomery. “It’s sometimes hard to calculate because de-

and residential development downtown as a “chicken or the egg”

mographics in a given area are determined according to a number of

proposition. “It was sort of a question of who’s going to move first

different variables, so it depends on what you’re counting,” she said.

– restaurant or living,” Kyser said. “The construction of the baseball stadium gave us confidence to come and invest in downtown, and

MULTI-FAMILY MARKET

especially in downtown living.” Kyser Property developed one of the

“Multi-family market rate—That is what has changed the most in the

32

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


array of styles ranging from traditional “loft” style apartments in renovated historic buildings to brand new construction offering more traditional apartment plans, including amenities like a pool and clubhouse. Many offer enticing features like private balconies, unique hidden green spaces or exclusive views of the downtown skyline and the Alabama River.

MIXED-USE APARTMENTS TJ Williford’s company, Partners Realty, manages historic lofts for sale or rent at 246 Court; mixed-use apartments that combine the charm of an old building with new amenities and features at Alley Station Flats; as well as brand-new construction in the heart of it all at 79 Commerce, with apartments located over the Mellow Mushroom pizzeria. “Each property has its different features that create an environment that is attractive. But the overall draw is living in a true urban environment in a modern downtown Montgomery, in a walk-able urban community. It’s a practical lifestyle that’s efficient, and it’s just really fun,” he said. Abby Migliore said when she and her husband realized they were in downtown more than they were at their sprawling four-bedroom house in Prattville, they decided it was time to relocate. The Migliores have been in the River Region since 2010 and decided Mixed-use commercial and residential buildings on Commerce Street.

to stay after Mr. Migliore retired from the military. “We actually loved the house, but it was a lot of space for the

downtown core area. Where there might have been a little more

two of us and half the time when we met up with people it was

than 200 units 20 years ago, we are currently getting close to

in Montgomery—maybe 80 percent of the time,” Abby said. “We

the 750 range in the multi-family market rate. I’m optimistic in five

realized we were driving into Montgomery to work, to play—ev-

years we will get close to 1,000, especially with potential proper-

erything.”

ties that could convert. Even going from 250 to 750 is a big jump in 20 years—That’s safely a three-fold increase,” she said.

They decided to put the house up for sale and see what happened, and when it quickly sold, they took that as a sign. After

The makeup of people moving downtown includes a mix of

looking around downtown, in September 2016 they chose a

singles who want to walk to work; professionals—usually with no

one-bedroom flat at the Printing Press Lofts, owned and managed

kids—who want to be in heart of the city; as well as empty-nest-

by Foshee Residential.

ers who are active adults who, with no more kids at home, are downsizing and planning for the future. Montgomery also has a

“We really fell in love with the Printing Press—the brick walls,

unique subset of temporary downtown residents because of state

wood floors. One thing that impressed me about Foshee is they

government. Legislators and affiliated staff may not live here full

really utilized the space. We liked how they kept the integrity of

time but may rent an apartment to use as a home base while the

the structure.” she said. “Plus, now I’m less than a mile from my

legislature is in session.

work, my husband less than three miles from his. What better thing on weekends to walk to all these great restaurants or a Biscuits

Like their residents, the properties are diverse, offering a wide

33

game. There’s nothing you’re not close to here.”

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


MyMGM Bright Spot Facing the prospect of an empty nest when the last of his five children left home, Trey Starke was attracted to the vibrancy of downtown. But instead of securing a spot in one of the many multi-family properties springing up, he wanted his own space—and lots of it. He purchased an existing building located next to the Renaissance Hotel, and created a unique downtown dream home. Starke purchased the former Reinhart Toyota parts building, encompassing 5,000 square feet. The first floor was developed for office space. The second floor, approximately 2,500 square feet, was completely renovated into a spacious loft. The property also includes a 1,500-square-foot rooftop deck.

Interior of Commerce Street loft.

Rebecca Cornwell grew up in Montgom-

tivity around you. I have my window open

ery but moved to Boston after earning her

most of the year and I can hear people

degree at the University of Alabama. She

talking on the street. That part just makes

lived there for nine years and fell in love

me feel like this is a city,” she said.

with living in the heart of the city. When she decided to move back to her home-

The surge in residential development

town in November 2014, she knew she

feels like its turning a corner in down-

wanted to live downtown. But she had her

town revitalization, Cortell says. While

heart set on buying, not renting. Through

big economic development projects like

a childhood friend, she connected with

the stadium and the Convention Center

Williford and discovered her dream loft at

were catalysts, residential and mixed-use

246 Court.

development is about sustaining revitalization. “It’s exciting that we are turning

He was able to design every room and select

into this phase,” Cortell said. “When you

each fixture, enlisting the help of Jeffery Paulk

have residents downtown, the business

from Paulk Construction and interior designer

opportunities follow, because they need

Lisa Woolard. They kept interesting architec-

services. These services for residents

tural details including 15-foot ceilings, concrete

are a whole other phase of downtown

floors, steel trusses, wood floors, exposed

development. This is a whole untapped

brick and exposed ductwork. A custom spiral

area for entrepreneurs.”

staircase leads to the rooftop deck.

Expanding the offerings in the city center

“I felt moving to downtown Montgomery was

and in the neighborhoods just outlying

a way to minimize that fear of being lonely

Having lived in Boston, where the cost of

is important to continued growth, Cortell

when all my kids have gone. I feel I’m near a

living is much higher, she was thrilled that

said. “I fully believe a range of residential

vibrant scene. I can walk to restaurants, shows,

she was able to make an investment in

options in downtown will be critical to

concerts. My office is downtown so I can walk

her loft, and in herself and her future. She

making sure we’re inclusive and growing

to work. There’s a Montgomery down here that,

says she can’t imagine living anywhere

and healthy and diverse,” she said. “May-

even being from Montgomery all my life, I never

else in Montgomery. “There is always ac-

be that’s also the next phase.”

knew existed,” he said.

“When you have

residents downtown, the business opportunities follow, because they need services. These services for

residents are a whole other phase of downtown development.

34

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


Erin Andrews

Television Personality Orangetheory Fitness Member

A coach to teach and motivate, a group for support, a scientifically designed workout. And you feel better then ever.

HEART RATE-BASED INTERVAL TRAINING • ALL FITNESS LEVELS • BURN 500+ CALORIES IN 60 MINUTES*

TRY A FREE WORKOUT AT ORANGETHEORYFITNESS.COM** OTF Montgomery | 1645 Perry Hill Road | Montgomery, AL 36106 | 334.409.2007 Orangetheory®, OTF® and other Orangetheory® marks are registered trademarks of Ultimate Fitness Group LLC. ©Copyright 2017 Ultimate Fitness Group LLC and/or its affiliates. *Visit orangetheoryfitness.com/termsofuse for additional information. **First-time visitors and local residents only. Certain restrictions apply. $28 minimum value. At participating studios only.

OTF-57978_MarchApril_PrintAd_OFFER_MALE_8.5 x 5.5

IN THE DETAILS The Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center believes in creating an entire experience for you and your event attendees. Located in downtown Montgomery, this Four Diamond-AAA hotel offers meticulous service, a unique atmosphere, and 140,000 square feet of meeting space, including a 14,000 square-foot Grand Ballroom and an 1,800-seat Level 1 Performing Arts Centre. Once the work is over, take advantage of the 9,000 square-foot European-style spa, access to three Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail courses, and 346 luxurious rooms and suites. To book your next meeting, call 338.481.5000 or visit renaissancemontgomery.com.

RENAISSANCE MONTGOMERY HOTEL & SPA AT THE CONVENTION CENTER 201 Tallapoosa Street Montgomery, AL 36104 t: 338.481.5000 renaissancemontgomery.com

35 PCH2984MONT_MontgomeryBusinessJournal.indd 1

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM 1/23/17 2:41 PM


GiveBack

AN A+ EFFORT / by WENDI LEWIS Valiant Cross Academy is changing the world, one scholar at a time, and area businesses are helping this non-profit school succeed.

Valiant Cross students and the school’s leaders are looking to a bright future. IMAGES BY HIGH 5 PRODUCTIONS.

When Valiant Cross Academy started in 2015 it was a unique

Anthony Brock said. “And we are teaching them how to be

educational opportunity for 30 boys. It has now has grown

men, and we are teaching confidence—so they’ll be ready to

into a life-changing experience for 90 scholars as of this fall,

go anywhere and compete.”

and the school shows no signs of stopping, with a waiting list of more than 100 young men who hope

Anthony and Frederick grew up in Mont-

to join the student body, and plans are

A strong vision.

actively underway for a new High School program in 2018-19. The all-male private school, located in downtown Montgomery, began with a class of 30 sixth-grade boys. Its founders, Anthony Brock, who is Principal, and his brother Frederick, who acts as Director of Operations, literally had to

“Valiant Cross Academy is a shining example of leadership in action.” - Tommy McKinnon

gomery, with Anthony attending Lanier High School and Frederick going to Jeff Davis High School in order to play football. When the boys graduated, Anthony went to Alabama State University to get his degree in education, and began teaching and working in Autauga County Schools, as well as coaching junior high football. He eventually became a Principal in the Autauga County School

go door-to-door in the Washington Park

system and was in charge of Prattville’s

Neighborhood to talk to families and sell

alternative school.

them on the idea for a new school concept. Of course a strong academic program is a cornerstone, but from the beginning

When he became involved in a mentorship program, Brother

the idea has been to focus on developing the whole man.

to Brother and Sister to Sister, he began to recognize that

The school’s website lists the qualities of a Valiant Cross Man:

there was not enough time in a regular school day to focus

courageous, righteous, committed, loving. “One thing we are

on “soft skills”—the social and leadership skills young people

adamant about is giving them a strong spiritual foundation,”

need to gain confidence, find their voice and succeed. In

36

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


We are exactly like the traditional accounting and advisory firms you’ve come to know — except completely different. S E RV I N G S M A L L TO M ID-SIZ E D BUSIN E SSE S AN D N ON P ROFIT O RG A N I Z AT I O N S I N TA X, ATT E STAT ION , ACCOUN T IN G AN D CON SULT IN G

JEREMY MORELAND

MIC HAE L SHAW

JODY T HRASHE R

MSTC PA.COM 844.678.27 27 / 260 COMME RC E ST, ST E 3 20 YOUR SUCC E SS IS OUR PASSION

37

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


GiveBack

particular, he began to see a real need for

this fall and a new class of sixth-graders

boys and young men to have a role model,

coming in. In this way, the older boys “grow

as they often came from homes with ab-

up” with the program, and also act as

sent fathers.

mentors and big brothers to the younger classes.

Meanwhile, Frederick attended Southern Miss on a football scholarship and went

Children are not tested to gain a spot in

on to play in the NFL, first with the Arizona

the school. They are tested after they are

Cardinals and then with the Cleveland

admitted to determine if their academic

Browns. After he stopped playing pro-

skills are at grade level. If they are below

fessional ball, the brothers began talking

grade level, teachers work with them to

about starting some sort of educational

bring them up to where they should be. In

or youth program in Montgomery. Fate intervened and instead, Fred became head football coach and Athletic Director for St. Jude Educational Institute. Anthony took a leap of faith and left a secure three-year contract with the public school system to join his brother and take over as Principal at St. Jude. “That was a really good time for us, and we met a lot of great people,” Anthony says. “I really loved that year, but the school closed.” While deciding on their next move, Anthony and Frederick took their biggest leap

“This

very special school inspires each of us to think differently about education and to reject whatever excuses stand in the way of every child getting the same attention and care as those afforded to scholars at Valiant Cross.”- Leslie Sanders

addition to academics, scholars participate in Morning Village, where they gather together to recite the school’s motto and creed, and to receive encouragement, and participate in chapel services to provide spiritual enrichment. The curriculum also includes a service component so the young men participate in giving back and learning about how they fit into their community. Tommy McKinnon, System Director, Marketing & Communications for Baptist Health, which is a Valiant Cross corporate sponsor, says the excellence is evident to

of faith yet and began seriously laying the

anyone who visits the school and looks at

groundwork for what would become Val-

the program. “Valiant Cross Academy is a

iant Cross Academy. They teamed up with community leaders including Bryan Kelly of Common Ground Montgomery, Ron Mitchell of Prattville Christian Academy, and Montgomery natives Eddie Welch, Chase Fisher and Ben Blanchard to explore avenues of funding to make the idea a reality. “A group of men had been praying for a community school and an all-male school,”

In addition

to tuition,Valiant Cross Academy is funded by private donations, grants, corporate donations, and partially from monies from the Alabama Opportunities Act.

shining example of leadership in action,” he said. “Headmaster Anthony Brock followed through on a vision to positively affect young African American males’ lives in order to produce young men of high character through enhanced academics, purposeful pursuit of Christian values and exposure to a world of community events, organizations and people whom the academy’s scholars would most certainly have never interacted with. I, personally, cannot

Anthony said. “We really felt led and compelled to open a school to impact young

wait to see the fruits of Valiant Cross’s

men who might be fatherless or didn’t have

The school is growing slowly, and steadily,

efforts that I expect will result in a new

the upbringing we did. It’s not an achieve-

by design. After the first 30 students fin-

generation of leaders.”

ment gap for African American young men;

ished sixth grade and moved up to seventh

it’s an opportunity gap. We want to stand in

grade, the school accepted 30 more boys

Other local companies and businesses

the gap and expose them to opportunities

to begin at the sixth-grade level. There

are stepping up to support the school

and education and training that will give

were 85 on the waiting list. They plan to

too, including Alabama Power. “This very

them the tools to succeed.”

add a grade each year, with the original

special school inspires each of us to

sixth-graders moving up to eighth grade

think differently about education and to

38

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


GiveBack

to expand the athletic program. Valiant Cross already offers track and golf, and there are plans to begin football this fall. At Opposite: Valiant Cross has support in high places, including Gov. Kay Ivey. Above: While sports play a part at Valiant Cross, emphasis is on academics and character. Right: Students often get encouragement from exciting visitors, like pro football player O.J. Howard.

full capacity, once the school has students in sixth through 12th grade, there will be 210 students. “We wish we could serve

reject whatever excuses stand in the way

selected as one of three winners nation-

more, but those numbers are based on our

of every child getting the same attention

wide and received a $50,000 grant.

budget, so for sustainability that’s where we

and care as those afforded to scholars at

The grant money is earmarked for the

need to be,” Anthony said.

Valiant Cross. The scholars at Valiant Cross

new Valiant Cross Academy high school.

Academy will be our next generation of

School leadership is currently searching for

leaders and that gives me great hope for

a suitable facility. In addition to a top-notch

is funded by private donations, grants, cor-

the future,” said Leslie Sanders, Vice Pres-

academic program, plans for the high

porate donations, and partially from monies

ident, Southern Division, Alabama Power

school include a job-shadowing program

from the Alabama Opportunities Act.

Company.

to allow the scholars to connect with local businesses and to learn professional and

And River Region residents are clearly

vocational skills.

In addition to tuition, Valiant Cross Academy

Be a part: For more information about Valiant Cross

behind Valiant Cross as well. In June, the school was selected from more than 1,000

At both the existing Valiant Cross Academy,

Academy, to schedule a visit or find out

applications to the education category for

which will house the middle school pro-

how you can support its programs, visit

an A Community Thrives (ACT) grant. The

gram, and the high school, there are plans

them online at valiantcross.org.

nationwide USA TODAY initiative provides resources for philanthropic efforts. After entering, applicants have to win the grant by way of popular vote. Valiant Cross was

The Chamber wants to share the good news of businesses doing good. Please send story ideas for Giveback to jminiard@montgomerychamber.com.

GIVEBACK

BRIEFS

Y102 Backs the Blue WHHY, All the Hits -Y102, along with Moe’s Southwest Grill, held a “Back The Blue” lunch in late July at Moe’s Southwest Grill on Zelda Road. All active law enforcement officers, in uniform and with ID, received a free meal for lunch. The event was the second of three planned lunches that have taken place this summer at designated Moe’s locations in the River Region. Y102 teamed with Moe’s Southwest Grill to show appreciation for all that our men and women in law enforcement have done and continue to do in service to our communities.

39

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS

Connect +

NEWS, R ESO U R C E S AN D A LOOK IN S IDE THE MAN Y WAYS YOUR CHAMBER WORKS FOR YOU

TEAM REPORT Member & Investor Relations The Chamber is only as strong as its many members. They make up its foundation and are the driving force behind everything the organization does. It’s why the work of Patsy Guy and her team at Member & Investor Relations is so vital, as Guy explained.

ADD IT UP Patsy Guy and her Member & Investor Relations team work hard to ensure every Montgomery-area business understands the value of Chamber membership.

“Our biggest challenge is getting the small business owner to see the importance of being a Chamber member and supporting our efforts,” said Guy. While she asserts that getting smaller businesses

Left to right: Patsy Guy, Sandra Kelley, Lynn Norton and Linda Drumheller.

involved can be tougher,

What does the Member & Investor Relations team do and oversee?

connects the local business community to

Being a membership-based organization,

business community about the number of

members are the lifeblood of the Chamber.

benefits their membership affords them so

Our department handles all aspects of

they can be successful.

membership from attracting and securing

members to retaining them. We handle a majority of the “member” signature events

How does the general community in general benefit? JOBS and money.

each year: 24 Networking Meetings (12

Everything the Chamber does is about job

60-Minute Coffees and 12 Business After

creation and job preservation. We work

Hours), the Chamber Golf Classic (more than

every day to make not only Montgomery

200 Golfers), The Annual Meeting (more

but the River Region a better place to LIVE,

than 600 in attendance), Ribbon Cuttings

WORK and PLAY.

the Chamber. Our job is to educate the local

and Ground Breakings. Our department

for the all of the Chamber’s programs and

What do you consider some of your and your team’s most significant recent achievements? Coordinating an

events, securing $9.5 million over the last

annual successful Total Resource Campaign.

handles the annual Total Resource Campaign, which provides funding resources

11 years. We also oversee the Chairman’s Circle, Imagine investors and TIPS Club.

What is your favorite part of your job?

Ribbon Cuttings! It is so exciting to talk with

How does the local business community benefit from what you and your team do? Our department

new business owners and to hear their “story,” their “vision” and their dreams for their new business venture. 40

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

membership stats show that she and her team are getting that job done.

Breakdown of Membership

71% 1-10 EMPLOYEES

20% 11-50 EMPLOYEES

4% 51-100 EMPLOYEES

5% 100 + EMPLOYEES


CHAMBER NEWS Connect CO NNEC T I NG YO U TO T H E M A N Y CHAMBER RES OURCES AN D S ERVICES AVAILABLE

GET CONNECTED

WHAT THEY SAY

CELE B RATE YOUR BU S I N ESS                           Ribbon cuttings, ground breakings and grand openings for your business: . . . . . . Kappes McGough, kmcgough@montgomerychamber.com Press releases and announcements: . . . . . . . . . . . Jina Miniard, jminiard@montgomerychamber.com

CHAMBER MEMBERS SPEAK OUT ON HOW THEIR MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS THEIR BUSINESS.

Event calendar: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/events SAV E MONE Y Member-to-Member discounts: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/discounts Notary public service: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Paul Redhead, predhead@montgomerychamber.com Membership mailing lists and labels: . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com MEET MORE CLIENTS & VENDORS Networking events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra Kelley, skelley@montgomerychamber.com Ambassador program: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynn Norton, lnorton@montgomerychamber.com

Alabama Dumpster Service has been a member since 2001 and in 2003 won the Chamber’s

Online membership directory: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/directory

Emerging Business Award and

Government contract resources: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

was a runner up to the Cosby

HIRE & TRAIN YOUR WORKFORCE Job board: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . montgomerychamber.com/jobboard

at ADS credits its growth in its

Corporate recruitment: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Justice Smyth, jsmyth@montgomerychamber.com Corporate retention:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Horsley, jhorsley@montgomerychamber.com Workforce training:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constance Calambakas, ccalambakas@montgomerychamber.com BUILD YOUR B USIN ESS Research information: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rachel Madore, rmadore@montgomerychamber.com Small business counseling: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com Diversity and inclusion programs: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

Awards in 2005. Randy Perry beginning to the Chamber’s resources, including having access to retired business managers and owners who offered wisdom on good managerial practices. He also pointed to the Chamber’s marketing opportunities. “The advertising that the Chamber has offered has allowed our business to get in front of key people,” he

Entrepreneurial development: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

said. His involvement in the Tips

Seminars and training: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

Club has also been valuable. “We

Temisha Young, tyoung@montgomerychamber.com

meet once a month to exchange

Co-working space: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

tips, leads and prospects, making

Office space to rent in the Chamber’s Business Resource Center: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa McGinty, lmcginty@montgomerychamber.com

nesses, expansions and more,”

each other aware of new busihe said. “Linda Drumheller at the

HOST MEE TINGS I N M O N TG O M ERY Meeting and event venue information: . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com

Chamber does a fantastic job with

Special hotel rates for meetings, events & sporting events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keely Smith, ksmith@montgomerychamber.com

- RANDY PERRY ALABAMA DUMPSTER SERVICE

these meetings.”

OUR CHAMBER. YOUR VOICE. 42

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Connect A LO O K B AC K AT T H E FACES AN D PLACES OF RECEN T CHAMBER EVEN TS

MEMBER EVENTS:

JUL 12

60 Minute Coffee at Troy University Montgomery Sponsored by Troy University Montgomery

QUARTERLY AMBASSADOR MEETING AND WORKSHOP: INTERPERSONAL SKILLS, AUGUST 15 at the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce The Chamber Ambassadors had a special guest and speaker at their last quarterly meeting. Sharleen Smith, Director of Continuing Education at Troy University Montgomery, conducted a small workshop entitled Your Personal Communication - Branding as an Ambassador. CHAMBER MEMBER ORIENTATION, AUGUST 1 at the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce

JUL 27

Sponsored by CharterHR

Business After Hours at RSA Dexter Avenue Sponsored by JMR&H Architects

This informal orientation was a great way for members to connect and engage with each other, give a brief overview of their business or service and hear from the Chamber President, Randy George, on the Chamber’s top goals and initiatives that impact the local business community. CYBER FORUM, AUGUST 2 at the Business Resource Center Sponsored by Intelligence Designs LLC

AUG 60 Minute Coffee at Montgomery Regional Airport 08

Sponsored by Montgomery Regional Airport

43

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

This forum brought IT professionals, innovators and users together for informational discussions on the latest in security, networking, data storage and wireless technology and gauged the IT business outlook for the River Region. Josh Hinshaw, Brigade Captain from HackMGM, and Ken Heitkamp spoke at the event.


Small Business Briefcase +

PACK ED WITH TIPS AN D TOOLS TO BEN EFIT YOUR BUSINESS

DO YOU KNOW NETWORKING? GROWING YOUR BUSINESS THROUGH RELATIONSHIPS It’s a fact. Relationship building through social interaction is key to growing your business and/or advancing your career. And while most people understand this, they’re still divided into two groups: those who enjoy it and those who don’t. No matter which best describes you, there’s a good chance you could do it better. And if you’re someone who dislikes it, we’ve got tips to make it easier.

HOW TO GET IT RIGHT CONNECTING. COMMUNICATING. FORGING AND FOSTERING RELATIONSHIPS AND EXCHANGING IDEAS. Call it whatever you like, but mingling and chatting with

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF NETWORKING? IT HELPS YOU CONNECT WITH OTHERS. IT HELPS YOU BUILD YOUR GROUP OF CONTACTS. IT’S MUCH EASIER THAN “COLD-CALLING.”

colleagues, peers and potential

BEST PLACES TO NETWORK:

RSVP “YES” • Chamber events are fabulous.

Many are set up for the primary purpose of making it easy to connect with others like 60-minute Coffees and Business After Hours.

• Association meetings. • At church, your children’s school, your neighborhood.

clients or customers in a relaxed setting is crucial to almost every kind of business. You know this. But do you know the best, most effective ways to do it? The actions and attitudes that reap real results and show in an improved bottom line? Liz Sutton of Alabama World Travel and Sutton & Associates does. Sutton became passionate about the benefits of networking done right after seeing them work for her. “Stacia Robinson did a seminar on networking for the Chamber,” Sutton said. “She was so willing to share her tips on how to do it successfully. I found her ideas easy to follow, and they helped me become more successful. Now, I’m always eager to share my experience with others.”

EXPERT ADVICE:

DO THIS:

• Always ask how you can help the other person. Who are their best customers? What kind of business are they seeking? Is there anyone they are trying to meet in order to be more successful? In

• Always carry a portfolio with pen and

paper. You never know when you will need to make notes.

• When someone joins your circle,

introduce yourself to them and then them to the others. Welcome them into the conversation by sharing “We were just discussing ...”

other words, “How can I help you?”

NOT THIS:

shake their hand. Energy is exchanged

• Don’t stand around with your “friends”

• Introduce yourself first. Reach out and when you shake hands.

• Have fun. Networking is and should be fun and enjoyable. Smile! Make sure your body language is positive.

• Approach people that are standing alone or in threes.

• Always, always have business cards.

44

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

and colleagues. Spread out to meet people.

• Don’t check your email, take phone

calls or check your phone while talking.

• Don’t forget to wear your nametag on the “right” side. It makes it easier to read when you shake hands.


NOT INTO CROWDS? WHAT IF NETWORKING ISN’T YOUR THING: Some advice for people who are naturally shy or introverted and are therefore hesitant or uncomfortable in “networking” situations: Practice in front of the mirror. Extend your hand out and introduce yourself. I actually practiced for months. Have a few key questions you can ask the people you meet. For example: “Tell me about you.” “Describe your ideal customer.” “What’s your most recent success?” and “What project(s) are you working on now?”

PATIENCE PAYS OFF

I was a volunteer for the Chamber and met a CEO that I

had been trying to meet for years. After that meeting about

Chamber business, he asked me about my business. I followed up with a handwritten ‘thank you’ note. I continued to call on him for the Chamber and brought business ideas to the table for his business. After several years, he hired our company for a big project, and we have been working with them for several years now. I learned the value of ‘volunteering to be visible.’ Sometimes you have to give a lot before you receive. But the more I help others, the more it comes back to me. - Liz Sutton

OUR EXPERT: Liz Sutton owns Alabama World Travel and Sutton & Associates, a second-generation family owned business celebrating 46 years in Montgomery. Alabama World Travel is part of the prestigious Virtuoso network that offers exclusive amenities and benefits to travelers that they cannot receive on their own. Sutton & Associates is a division of AWT that partners with sales organizations to create company top-performer award trips (incentive trips) for their employees and/or customers.


Small Business Briefcase +

WHAT THEY SAY

PACK ED WITH TIPS AN D TOOLS TO BEN EFIT YOUR BUSINESS

WE ASKED MEMB ER S O F T HE C HAMB ER ’S C HAIR MAN’S C IR C L E:

“WHAT’S THE BEST PIECE OF BUSINESS ADVICE YOU’VE EVER GOTTEN?”

Tommy Brigham, a managing partner for

Success is not true

surround myself with smart people who

The Waters, gave me this advice: If we

greatness; accept-

aren’t afraid to disagree with me or tell me

could establish the words of Philippians

ing and overcoming

when I am wrong. - KERRY PALMER

2:3 as a platform for how we developed

failures is the true

Head of School, Trinity Presbyterian School

the business (Do noth-

greatness.

ing out of selfish ambi-

- DR. YT TSAI

The guy that hired me in my first sales job

tion or conceit, but in

CEO & President,

out of college started a small business

humility consider others

Regitar USA Inc.

and became a recognized entrepreneur.

as more important than

He told me not to hire

yourselves) that we

A mentor and my former college president,

people until I had the

would find great suc-

Dr. Jack Hawkins Jr., Chancellor of Troy

business to support

cess and would be able to work with great

University, observed

them. That has allowed

people. He was right. We have grown to a

that most people who

our company to have

team of 14 and are able to serve custom-

fail at the executive

conservative growth

ers throughout the River Region.

level do so at the

and not downsize

- JENNIFER ATKINS, Development Director,

hands of their own

during slow times.

Vice President and Qualifying Broker,

ego. I take this advice

- KEITH CARTER

New Waters Realty, The Waters

to heart, and work to

Founder & CEO, Pinnacle NetworX

46

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


M EM BER Spotlight

ORANGETHEORY FITNESS Orangetheory Fitness is offering our area a lot more than a workout. With a welcoming atmosphere and a personal approach to motivation, OTF provides its members with a supportive, encouraging community too.

WHEN DID OTF OPEN IN MONTGOMERY? October 2, 2015 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 10  

WHAT DOES OTF OFFER? The best one-hour workout in the country. OTF Montgomery is a place you can go and be empowered to become the best version of yourself. The sense of community and support from the team and the other members is palpable. Our team of fitness specialists and coaches meet you wherever you are on your journey and take you where you desire to go. And your

Left to right, top row: Kassie Berrios-Beck, Donna Ellis, Fredrick Turner, Jailyn Lover and Joe Pears. Bottom row: Chelsey Walker, Jaime Maddox, Lauren Goldasich, David Adair, Ryan Stovall and Sommer Henry.

first workout is free. We even offer a 30-day money back results guarantee.

EXPLAIN ORANGETHEORY’S EXERCISE PHILOSOPHY. We are a five-zone, heart-rate-based, interval training program with a focus on zones three, four and five. Every workout differs from the day before, yet the goal is always the same. Each participant is coached to spend a minimum of 12 minutes in an uncomfortable training zone based on their current fitness level. Every minute spent in the uncomfortable training zone gets the participant closer to the “after burn effect.” Twelve minutes or more ignites the resting metabolism and results in an excess amount of calories burned for up to 36 hours after completion of the workout. Each participant wears a heart rate monitor that displays his or her heart rate on large TV screens throughout the training room. The professional fitness coach is there to motivate and educate each individual though the workout.

WHAT MAKES OTF DIFFERENT FROM OTHER WORKOUT SYSTEMS? The science behind our product is nothing new; the way we package it is. Our space is welcoming, efficient, friendly, clean, motivating and fun. We take the time to get to know each member and what motivates them to get fit, be fit and stay fit. In addition to the amazing environment, we provide the technology that shows you exactly how hard you need to work at any given time in our 60-minute experience. This technology is the reason that anyone ranging from a novice to an elite athlete can participate in the same class and both receive a phenomenal workout.

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR OTF? Montgomery can expect a second location on the east side of town in 2018.

MONTGOMERY, 1645 PERRY HILL ROAD/ AUBURN, 1345 OPELIKA ROAD SUITE 1&2 334-409-2007 (MONTGOMERY) / 334-521-8081 (AUBURN) / ORANGETHEORYFITNESS.COM 47

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

JACKSON THORNTON ANNOUNCES PROMOTIONS

ment division. He maintained relationships with some of

Jackson Thornton, a certified public accounting and

Hodges Commercial Real Estate, Warehouse + Logistics.

consulting firm, recently announced several promotions

“It’s special to have relationships like that that you main-

within its family of companies.

tain and work together to accomplish a job,” said Tidwell,

Robert Lang, CPA was promoted

who was born in Montgomery and graduated from Lee

to Senior Manager. Lang, who

High School. He left Hodges because he completed

joined the firm in 2008, special-

his assigned projects, which included a connector road

izes in audits within the utilities

from Northeast Boulevard to the Wynbrook neighbor-

industry. He is a member of the

hood, which reduced driving times for the residents and

Telergee Audit Committee and

the distance from the closest fire station. He was also

is in the Tennessee Society of

instrumental in the development of North Eastern Bou-

CPAs. Nic Cofield was promoted

levard to bring in WOW, Burger King and a Mapco that

to Director of Client Services,

is scheduled to start construction in January. “We are so

Jackson Thornton Technologies

fortunate to have Jay come back to the firm,” Moore said.

(JTT). Cofield joined the firm in

“I’ve known him for a long time and he is a high-quality

2005 and is responsible for all

individual. He will fit in nicely with the team.”

his previous Moore clients even when Tidwell worked at

business development efforts and client service functions within JTT. He holds the Cisco

CHRISTOPHER RICHARD JOINS GILPIN GIVHAN

Sales Expert; VMWare Sales Pro-

Gilpin Givhan has announced that Chris Richard, former

fessional; and VMWare Technical

Assistant General Counsel for the Alabama Medicaid

Sales Professional certifications.

Agency, has joined the firm’s

Chris Bell was promoted to

Health Care practice group.

Director of Technical Services,

Richard joins the firm with a

Jackson Thornton Technologies

focus on health-care providers

(JTT). Bell joined the firm in 2009

and suppliers with respect to

with more than 10 years of prior

business, regulatory, compliance

IT experience. He holds the

and payment issues. “Chris will

following certifications: Cisco

be a tremendous asset to our

SMB Select Engineer; Microsoft Certified Profession-

Health Care group,” said Davis

al; MxLogics F3 Partner; Virtualization Technical Sales

Smith, Managing Partner. “His depth of experience in the

Professional; and Xirrus Certified Wireless Technician.

health care arena and his ability to resolve complex legal

Jackson Thornton also promoted Erica Bailey, CPA, CFE;

matters make him a valuable member of our team.”

Eva Spooner, CPA and Laura Williams, CPA to Manager. Jackson Thornton Technologies promoted Adam Swanner to Project Services Manager.

SETH CAPPER JOINS GILPIN GIVHAN Gilpin Givhan recently announced that Seth Capper has joined the firm as an associate in the Taxation Practice

TIDWELL REJOINS MOORE COMPANY REALTY

Group and the Business Organi-

Four years after leaving Moore

Group. A recent graduate of

Company Realty to work as a

the Master of Laws in Taxation

project manager at a local firm,

program at New York University,

Jay Tidwell has returned to

Capper will work to structure

Moore as an associate broker.

and administer complex transac-

Tidwell, who rejoined the Moore

tions from a tax perspective to

firm August 1, said his primary

fit our clients’ business objec-

responsibility will be in the company’s project manage-

tives. “Tax law touches every part of our economy, and

zations & Transactions Practice

48

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


49

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


50

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members on the Move K EEP U P W I T H O U R M EM B ER S W ELCOMIN G N EW HIRES AN D ACCEPTIN G N EW POS ITION S

our clients across all industries look to us for counsel in

division that provides access to investment products and

this area,” said Davis Smith, Managing Partner. “Seth has a

services through Infinex Investments, Inc. Cook is a gradu-

strong analytical mind and a desire to work within different

ate of Montgomery Academy and

areas of the law. We are thrilled to welcome him to Gilpin

earned his B.S. from Washington

Givhan and introduce him to our clients who rely on our firm

and Lee University. “I am excited

for this advice.”

to lead River Financial Services as Vice President and Financial Services Advisor,” said Cook.

SMILEMAKERS WELCOMES NEW DENTIST SmileMakers Dentistry recently added Josh Mathis, DDS, to its practice. Dr. Mathis will primarily be based out of the practice’s new EastChase location,

“My approach is client-centered rather than product-focused. I will give clients the independent, objective financial advice they need for any goal they may

which is next door to Hobby Lobby

have, whether it’s paying for college for their children or

and across from Academy Sports

securing their own retirement. It’s an honor to serve in this

and Outdoors. With a dentist father

important capacity.”

and a dental hygienist mother, Dr. Mathis had early exposure to the ed summa cum laude from Oklaho-

NEW CHAIRMAN OF THE AMERICAN PUBLIC GAS ASSOCIATION BOARD

ma State University with a degree in

The American Public Gas Association (APGA) has named

Physiology. He then obtained his Doctor of Dental Surgery

Greg Henderson, President

from the University of Oklahoma.

and Chief Executive Officer of

many sides of dentistry. He graduat-

Southeast Gas, as Chairman of the APGA Board of Directors.

HILL HILL CARTER HIRES NEW ASSOCIATE Hill Hill Carter announced the addition of Jordan Speake Jenkins to the firm. Jenkins will be based in Hill Hill Carter’s Montgomery office. As an associate,

Henderson was elected during the APGA Annual Meeting in San Francisco for a term of one year. APGA is a national,

Jenkins’ practice will include a broad

not-for-profit association rep-

range of civil litigation matters, with

resenting over 700 publicly owned natural gas distribution

an emphasis on insurance defense.

systems in 37 states. APGA is the only trade association

Jenkins is admitted to practice

that solely represents the interests of public natural gas sys-

before the United States District

tems at the federal legislative and regulatory level. “APGA is

Courts for the Northern, Middle and

very pleased to have Mr. Henderson as our Chairman as we

Southern Districts of Alabama, as

enter an important time here in Washington. As the APGA

well as the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. “We are pleased to have Jordan join our team,” said David Henderson, the Managing Shareholder of Hill Hill Carter. “She has excellent analytical skills and a passionate approach to the practice of law.” Jenkins graduated cum laude from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 2010. She received her juris doctorate from Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law in 2013 where she also graduated cum laude.

Chairman, Mr. Henderson brings the necessary experience and institutional knowledge to deal with the many issues facing local utilities. His leadership ability and knowledge of the natural gas industry will serve our members and industry well,” said APGA President and CEO Bert Kalisch.

+ SUBM IT T IN G N E WS? Submit information to

Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber. com. Attach press releases as a Word document and include a high-resolution headshot (at least

CLAY COOK TO LEAD RIVER FINANCIAL SERVICES

300 dpi). An accompanying headshot is required

River Bank & Trust announced that Clay Cook has been

for “Members on the Move” announcements.

hired to lead River Financial Services, Inc., the bank’s

51

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

NSF FUNDS AUM RESEARCH A method developed at Auburn University at Montgomery to help students who are blind or have visual impairments learn algebra and other advanced mathematics has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant for further study by AUM and Rice University. The grant supports research to determine whether that method, called Process-Driven Math, can improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education for all students. AUM was awarded $298,000 in funding for its part of the project. The development of Process-Driven Math (PDM) began as “The Logan Project” at AUM in 2015, when psychology student Logan Prickett, who was almost completely blind and had severely limited mobility and a voice no louder than a whisper, began his undergraduate career there. Because of his disabilities, typical low-vision tools were not adequate for Prickett to demonstrate his capability in math. AUM’s Learning Center partnered with him to address his needs and, by extension, help others in similar situations.

LOWDER NEW HOMES ANNOUNCES “THOUGHTFUL HOMES”

ONL INE NOW

Lowder New Homes will begin building 55 new homes at Bristol Park Place located in New Park, a residential planned unit development by Jim Wilson & Associates, LLC in Montgomery. The

The Alabama Farmers Federation

to residents. Additionally, online vis-

long-respected developers who have shaped

the Alfa Perks smartphone app

the residential landscape of the River Region and

to access benefits at businesses,

beyond over the last six decades. “We are excit-

restaurants and attractions across

ed about this new relationship with Jim Wilson &

the state. Alfa Perks locates and

Associates and the opportunity to build homes

notifies users of local, county-specif-

in New Park,” said Jimmy Rutland, President of

ic benefits whenever they’re on the

Lowder New Homes. New Park was started in

road. The app also allows members

2008 with a master plan of 1,160 acres and a

to save on popular brands like

projected 2,700 homes. Lowder New Homes will

Ford vehicles, Express Oil Change

introduce new floor plans and designs of what

services and Choice Hotels. The

it calls a “new generation of homes” to its New

app compliments the local member

Park portfolio of plans developed by internation-

benefits program the Federation

ally recognized residential architectural firm BSB

launched last year. Alfa Perks offers

Design. Known for its innovative floor plans that

savings at 840 retail locations

capture the changing trends in living styles, BSB

statewide. To claim a benefit, show

has designed floor plans and homes for Lowder

the Alfa membership card, which is

New Homes in New Park that will live like today’s

available on the app.

CAPITOL HILL HEALTHCARE LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE

to design for what the firm calls a Thoughtful

Long-time Montgomery business,

House. “We have taken a fresh look at both

Capitol Hill Healthcare has launched

existing designs and living style trends to develop

a new website aimed at educating

plans that have spaces that are easy, relaxing and

the public about skilled nursing

rejuvenating while being accessible, flexible and

care options. This newly designed

convenient to those that live in the home,” Swift

site has quick and easy access to

said. Construction of these new plans began in

essential information and features

July with move-in dates in the fall.

52

five-star long-term care and rehabilitative services. The site also has rich

has announced members can use

and Senior Partner Stephen Moore built a process

understanding of the company’s

FARMERS FEDERATION ANNOUNCES APP

venture marks a new relationship between two

homeowner. Dan Swift, president of BSB Design,

that offer a more comprehensive

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

content focused on its commitment itors will get a glimpse into resident life at the facility. “This is a future home for someone, so it’s always good to have as much information as possible to ensure this is the right place for their needs,” said Capitol Hill administrator, Sharon Baker.

WANT YOUR NEWS IN THE MBJ? Submit information for consideration to Jina Miniard at jminiard@montgomerychamber.com. Please attach press releases as a Word document or a PDF (Word documents preferred), and please include high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) photos with your press release if possible.

SUBMISSION DEADLINES: NOVEMBER ISSUE - SEPT. 25 JANUARY ISSUE - NOV. 22


M EM BER Spotlight

RJ YOUNG RJ Young recently brought its brand of customer-centered business solutions services to the capital city. Despite being a newcomer to the Montgomery-area market, the company has been in business since 1955 and is recognized as the largest independent office technology dealer in the Southeast.

WHEN DID RJ YOUNG OPEN IN MONTGOMERY? May 2017 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 11 WHAT ARE RJ YOUNG’S PRIMARY PRODUCTS AND/OR SERVICES? RJ Young provides solutions to securely manage paper and digital information, maintain vital information technology systems and empower businesses with leading printing and copying technologies.

WHAT IS RJ YOUNG’S BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY? RJ Young’s business philosophy is to provide innovative products and solu-

Standing left to right: Chris Smith and Chris Clark.

tions while maintaining a commitment to excellence and integrity for our people, customers and communities. We strive to provide an environment where our people can achieve their personal and professional goals, exceed our customers’ expectations and utilize our resources as an investment in the community.

WHAT MAKES RJ YOUNG STAND OUT FROM OTHER SIMILAR BUSINESSES? RJ Young puts customer satisfaction at the center of our business. We stand behind every product and service we offer with our “We Make It Right” guarantee. If customers are unhappy with our equipment, service, supplies, billing—anything—we will make it right, right away.

HAS RJ YOUNG BEEN HONORED WITH ANY RECENT MILESTONES AND AWARDS? RJ Young has received awards, recognitions and certifications from many leading brands that we offer, including Canon, Ricoh, Lexmark, HP and Océ. We pride ourselves on consistently delivering award-winning service to every customer.

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR RJ YOUNG IN MONTGOMERY? As we’re new to the Montgomery area, we see lots of growth on the horizon. We will continue to expand our teams and become more involved in the community.

2350 FAIRLANE DRIVE, SUITE 100 / 334-230-5107 /RJYOUNG.COM 53

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


54

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

GOVERNOR IVEY APPOINTS NEW COMMISSIONER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH

BUSI NE SS BUZ Z Focus

During the summer, Governor Kay Ivey

developmentally delayed, and those who

ment; they are services for individuals

appointed founding member and exec-

struggle with substance abuse.”

with developmental disabilities and those

utive director of Montgom-

with substance abuse disorders.

ery’s Envision 2020 Lynn

Beshear was named The

There are several very specific action

Beshear as Commissioner

Montgomery Advertiser’s

arenas, based from our experience in

of the Alabama Department

Woman of Achievement

the Healthy Minds Network, which is

of Mental Health. “Through

in 1993 and received the

the name given to the work in the River

active participation in secur-

Maury D. Smith Excellence in

Region. They fall under the headings of

ing mental health services

Professional Ethics Award in

Partnerships, Planning and Prevention

in the River Region, Lynn

2016, among other honors.

with the over-arching goal being to es-

understands the complexi-

As Commissioner, Beshear

tablish permanent working relationships

ties of the Department, and

will work toward developing

that are relevant and effective.

the importance of its work

new polices and strive to

on behalf of the people of Alabama,”

better existing programs.

A sampling of the big issues: • Stigma

Governor Ivey said. MBJ asked her to share some of what

• Crisis care to avoid jail and ERs

she’ll be working on:

• Mental health care workforce

MBJ: What was your reaction to

• Housing­—as primary care intervention

Nursing and worked as a staff nurse in

your appointment?

• Opioid crisis

the Intensive Care Nursery at Duke Uni-

Complete surprise! I had done a presen-

• Use of technology and data

versity Medical Center and was promot-

tation to a Montgomery civic club in mid-

• Suicide prevention

ed to head nurse in the Duke Well-Baby

May and received a call that the governor

• CIT training statewide

Nursery. She moved from Kentucky to

had heard about it. My first reaction was,

• Mental health first aid

Montgomery in 1978 and has been a key

“Am I on Candid Camera?” On the other

• Mental health and substance

player in the city’s positive development

hand, the fact that the Governor was

ever since. She has previously served on

interested was affirmation of the entire

• Autism services

the board of directors for organizations

Envision 2020 team’s collaborative work

• Supporting people with disabilities

and establishments including Montgom-

in the River Region to create a coordi-

and their families, including expanding

ery Academy, United Way, First United

nated local system of access to mental

self-directed services

Methodist Church and others. She cur-

health care.

Beshear is married to Dr. Bob Beshear, a

recruitment and retention

retired pediatrician. She graduated from North Carolina Baptist Hospital School of

abuse courts

MBJ: What are a few things you’d

rently serves on the board of Joint Public Charity Hospital, Montgomery Metro

MBJ: What are some of the main

YMCA, and the AUM School of Liberal

things you and your team will be

department and the work it does?

Arts Advisory Board.

working on?

Just like cancer, heart disease and dia-

like people to know about your

It goes without saying that access to

betes, mental illnesses are diseases—not

“I did not seek out this position, but I am

mental health care is a tremendous

character flaws. Twenty-five percent of

honored to be chosen to serve my fellow

health-care access issue across the

the population will have a mental illness

Alabamians,” Beshear said. “I am excited

United States and particularly in rural

in any given year. No socio-economic

to work with Governor Ivey, her Cabinet,

states that have scarcity of both monetary

group or race is “immune.” Most people

the Legislature, and the professionals

resources and medical care providers of

with mental illness have depression or an

within the Department of Mental Health,

all types. In addition, the Department of

anxiety disorder and function well with

to provide excellent services for Alabam-

Mental Health has two other broad areas

the proper support system, which can

ians with mental illness, those who are

of care in addition to mental health treat-

include medication and therapy.

55

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

SMILEMAKERS ADDS NEW LOCATION Doctors Fry, Barganier and associates at SmileMakers Dentistry have been serving patients in the Montgomery area since 1979. The doctors and staff are committed to excellent care for their patients with respect for their patients’ time, comfort and convenience. To accommodate a large patient base, the flagship office on Woodmere Boulevard is now accompanied by a new office on EastChase Parkway near the Shoppes at EastChase.

H EALT H - CA R E N E WS Dr. Timothy Morrow, Dr. Brian Richardson and Dr. Brian Thomas

HUDSON INK ACQUIRED Taylor Blackwell, President of brands Walker360, Fifth Advertising and Creative Printing, added another acquisition

showing an ultrasound image done with Jackson Hospital’s bkFusion™.

to his companies this past spring. Blackwell purchased Hudson Ink in April as a strategic acquisition to work

JACKSON HOSPITAL FIRST TO OFFER GROUNDBREAKING SOLUTION

in concert with his other businesses. Hudson Ink is a

Jackson Hospital is pleased to be the first provider in the U.S. to offer

16-year-old direct marketing company that services clients

bkFusion™, a groundbreaking solution for improving biopsy targeting for

throughout the country. Blackwell said, “We believe the

assistance in diagnosing prostate cancer. bkFusion is a powerful software

direct marketing expertise found at Hudson Ink will greatly

advancement in diagnostic visualization that combines real-time ultrasound

contribute toward growing our companies at large.” The

imaging with pre-exam MRI information. This technology is an innovative

purchase of Hudson Ink represents a unique and strategic

solution for improving biopsy targeting in prostate cancer and it is fully inte-

opportunity to enhance growth and expand client offer-

grated onto a premium ultrasound system, the bk3000. “We are confident

ings. Hudson officially moved to a newly renovated space

that with our state-of-the-art MRI system and bkFusion, we can better identify

at Walker360’s East 5th Street location in July.

and target suspicious prostate lesions, giving our patients clear answers and peace of mind,” said Brian Richardson, MD, Chief of Robotics and Minimally Invasive Surgery for Jackson Hospital.

MAC PAPERS BUYS FLORIDA COMPANY Mac Papers, one of the largest merchant distributors in the Southeast U.S., announced in July that it completed the

NCAA ADVANCES AUM

acquisition of Florida Graphic Supply, Inc. (FGSI), a Clear-

Auburn University at Montgomery moved one step closer to full NCAA Divi-

water, Fla.-based distributor that specializes in the most

sion II membership this past summer, when the NCAA Division II Membership

advanced wide format technology available. “Mac Papers

Committee notified AUM that its athletics program successfully completed

is proud to announce this acquisition, which is an import-

provisional year one in 2016-17 and is now permitted to begin its second year

ant and strategic move for us in wide format,” said Sutton

of the membership process this fall. “This is an exciting time for AUM athlet-

McGehee, President of Mac Papers. “Not only does the

ics,” AUM Chancellor Carl A. Stockton said. “I want to applaud our athletics

acquisition reaffirm the company’s commitment to offering

staff and coaches, as well as the members of our campus community who

our customers a broad, diversified product lineup, but it

have supported this university-wide effort. I look forward to making continued

also affirms our focus on extending our capabilities in the

progress toward full NCAA Division II membership.” During provisional year

sign and display market. We are pleased to welcome FGSI

two, the Warhawks will compete as a provisional member of the Gulf South

employees into the Mac Papers family.” This announce-

Conference, which excludes participation in conference or NCAA postseason

ment follows a string of acquisitions the company has

events. With the completion of all benchmarks over the coming year, AUM

made in recent years.

will move to its final provisional year in 2018-19, with the 2019-20 season marking its first full year of Division II membership and postseason eligibility.

56

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


You’ve built your business by serving your clients’ best interests. So have we. Our commercial clients know the value of doing business with BB&T. Our consultative approach allows us to understand your business and provide insights to drive the performance of your business forward. For more than 140 years, we’ve built relationships by creating long-lasting partnerships that extend beyond deals and transactions. Experience the difference when one of the strongest and most respected banks in the nation is also part of your community. BBT.com

Guy Davis 334-523-9121 Guy.Davis@BBandT.com

B A N K I N G

.

I N S U R A N C E

.

I N V E S T M E N T S

Member FDIC. Only deposit products are FDIC insured. BBT.com © 2016, Branch Banking and Trust Company. All rights reserved.

IT’S A WASTE TO WASTE MONEY ON WASTE. No business can afford to waste money on waste. Sadly, many businesses don’t know what they’re actually paying, or who is even in charge of it. Someone signed a contract long ago, the bills keep coming and nobody worries about it. But most companies’ contracts have built in rate increases. So you may be paying a lot more than you should. At Alabama Dumpster Service, we have the dumpster or roll-off container that’s right for your business and your budget. Our customer service is unsurpassed and you can trust us for timely delivery and pick-up. So take a second look at your trash removal costs and call us. We’ll make sure you’re not wasting money on waste.

FRONT LOADS | ROLL-OFFS | COMPACTORS | PORTABLE RESTROOMS AlabamaDumpster.com | 334-288-1500 follow us on facebook 57

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Business Buzz CO M MUN ITY + COMMERCE N EWS

CADDELL CONSTRUCTION AWARDED NEW PROJECTS

When teachers and students of Mont-

Caddell has been awarded the contract to

gomery’s Loveless Academic Magnet

construct a new state-of-the-art head-

Program arrived for the first day of school

quarters and operations complex for the

this year, they showed up at the school’s

2nd Radio Battalion supporting the U.S.

new 82,250-square-foot facility at its new

Marine Corps, II Marine Expeditionary

Image courtesy of Grace Photography

#1 HIGH SCHOOL IN ALABAMA OPENS NEW FACILITY

campus at the One Center on McGehee Road. The spot gives the school plenty of space to continue serving it students and space to grow in the future—an additional 23,760 square feet are still available for development—and the move was

Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C. The mission of the 2nd Radio Battalion is to provide signals intelligence, electronic warfare, limited cyberspace operations and special intelligence communications support to the Marine Air Ground Task Force and

welcomed by many. “The support of the local businesses and residents in the area is exciting

Joint Forces Commander. Caddell has also

to all of us in the LAMP family. We all realize the communal revitalization begins with bringing

been selected as the general contractor

in great education into the area. With MPACT and now LAMP being right there, we

for the University of Alabama’s newest

are excited to see the area continue to revitalize and grow with us,“ said LAMP Principal Matthew Monson. Progress like this is made possible in part due to the Chamber’s 2017 Education Champions, who’ve earned a big “thanks”: Leslie Sanders of Alabama Power Company; Dr. Michael Williams of Faulkner University; Jackie Ragan of Information Transport Solutions, Inc.; John Curvey of SABIC

BIG THANKS Chamber’s 2017 Education Champions

Polymers; and Angela Cone of Trenholm State Community College.

58

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Freshman Residence Hall. The new four-story dormitory will feature 496 beds, and each room will accommodate two students with its own bathroom and kitchenette.


M EM BER Spotlight

LEAR Founded in Detroit in 1917, Lear serves every major automaker in the world. It does a good bit of its work here in Alabama, with three facilities in the state, including one in Montgomery, where it fills Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama’s need for seats.

WHEN DID LEAR OPEN IN MONTGOMERY? 2005  

WHAT DREW LEAR HERE? Lear was selected by Hyundai to build seats for HMMA.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES (IN MONTGOMERY): 440 WHAT ARE LEAR’S PRIMARY PRODUCTS? Lear is one of the world’s leading suppliers of automotive seating systems and electrical distribution systems (E-Systems). Our world-class products are designed, engineered and manufactured by a diverse team of 156,000 employees in 257 locations. Lear is uniquely positioned to take advantage of industry growth and major trends, including vertically integrated automotive seating including metal stamping/welding/assembly, foam and surface materials, as well as our E-Systems business segment’s products in connectivity, wiring and high-power products for electrical and hybrid vehicles and more. Lear content can be found on more than 400 vehicle nameplates, and Lear ranks No. 151 on the Fortune 500 list.  

WHAT DOES LEAR’S MONTGOMERY PLANT PRODUCE? Lear MGM assembles and sequences Elantra, Sonata and Santa Fe vehicles for HMMA.

Front: Courtney Franklin and Latiki Williams Back: Tamaya McReynolds, Regina Jackson, Jeffery Hendricks, Darrell Williams, Stephen Underwood and David Deem

 

IN ADDITION TO JOBS, WHAT DOES LEAR BRING TO MONTGOMERY? Lear MGM is a proud member of the Montgomery community and is heavily involved with many charitable groups including Habitat for Humanity, Montgomery Community Action Committee, Montgomery Southlawn Elementary School, Prattville YMCA and the Montgomery Christmas Clearing House.

WHAT IS LEAR’S BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY? Our vision is to be consistently recognized as the supplier of choice, an employer of choice, the investment of choice and a company that supports the communities where we do business.

ANY RECENT MILESTONES OR AWARDS? In 2017, Lear celebrates our 100th year anniversary.

WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR LEAR IN MONTGOMERY? Lear MGM is currently preparing the plant for the new Santa Fe seats that will be supplied to HMMA in 2018.

200 FOLMAR PARKWAY / LEAR.COM 59

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM

From left: Stephanie Robinson, Travis Zeigler and Jemichael Washington


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

Community

Interim Director while the Museum’s Board of Trustees conducts a national search for a permanent director of the Museum.

ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL APPOINTS NEW ARTISTIC DIRECTOR After a yearlong national search process, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival Board of Directors has appointed Arkansas-native Rick Dildine as ASF’s new Artistic

MMFA WELCOMES NEW DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT The Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts has named Emily Flowers as its new Director of Development. Flowers will direct and execute fundraising, manage donor relations, lead visitor services

Director. ASF Board Chairman

staff dedicated to engaging audiences and oversee public

Dr. Laurie Weil said, “A son of the

relations and marketing. As an experienced managing, marketing

South, Rick Dildine understands and

and communications professional, Flowers has spent the past

appreciates what a unique treasure

seven years serving as the managing director and development

the Alabama Shakespeare Festival is

director at The Cloverdale Playhouse. “Emily Flowers will bring a

to Montgomery, to the River Region,

new level of leadership to MMFA.

to Alabama and to the Southeast. He

She brings a depth of experience

came to the search interviews having

in organizational strategy, audience

carefully studied the challenges and

development and revenue en-

opportunities of our professional, producing theatre.” Under Dildine’s leadership at Shakespeare Festival St. Louis over the past eight years, the organization has grown attendance by 55 percent and contributed revenue by 38 percent. Dildine’s “Shakespeare in the Streets” program has received national attention for its distinctive storytelling style that uses Shakespeare and the words of everyday St. Louis residents to create original plays that are performed in the streets — a model so successful the concept has been replicated at theatres in Germany and South Africa. He has also developed numerous educational and community initiatives, for communities with little to no arts programming. Dildine replaces Geoffrey Sherman, who retired in July after serving as Producing Artistic Director of the Alabama Shakespeare Festival for the past 12 years.

hancement with a focus on cultural nonprofits,” said Mark Johnson, past Director of the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts. “Her background at the Cloverdale Playhouse and John Stanley & Associates makes her an ideal choice as we prepare for the new Sculpture Garden opening next year.” Flowers earned her undergraduate degree in English at the University of Alabama. She also earned certifications from the American Society Appraisers, Pratt Institute, New York, and CCIM Institute, Atlanta. “As a native of Montgomery, Alabama, I am excited and honored to join MMFA because it is such an important cultural and educational resource for the Southeast.” Flowers said, “I am invested in helping enrich the museum’s reputation and attracting guests from the

DIRECTOR OF MMFA RETIRES The Board of Trustees of the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts and Mark M. Johnson, Director of the Museum, announced his

capital city and around the globe.”

retirement effective August 15, 2017. Johnson served for 23 years,

BEASLEY ALLEN ATTORNEY NAMED PRESIDENT OF ALABAMA ASSOCIATION FOR JUSTICE

by far the longest tenure of any director in the Museum’s history.

Frank Woodson, who practices in Beasley Allen’s Mass Torts

He joined the staff of the MMFA as Director in August of 1994.

Section, was inducted as the President of the Alabama Associa-

MMFA is Alabama’s first art museum, founded in 1930. It is na-

tion for Justice (ALAJ). It is the mission of ALAJ to make sure any

tionally recognized for its collections of American art, Old Master

person injured through another’s misconduct or negligence can

Prints, and regional works from the American South. During John-

get justice. ALAJ works to eliminate civil justice restrictions and to

son’s tenure, the museum welcomed more than 3 million visitors

strengthen the civil justice system so that everyone can have their

and acquired 1,700 works of art. At a meeting of the Board of

day in court and equal access to justice. “As a 33-year member

Trustees in June, the Board acknowledged Johnson’s long tenure

and now in my sixth year as an officer of the Alabama Association

and accomplishments, and accorded him the honorary title, Direc-

for Justice, I know the importance of the work we do, not only for

tor Emeritus. At a subsequent meeting, the Board announced the

members, but for the citizens of the State of Alabama. As Pres-

appointment of Edwin C. Bridges, Ph.D., as the Interim Director

ident, I will work closely with our staff, lobby team, officers and

of the Museum. Dr. Bridges is the former Director of the Alabama

board of directors to keep the doors of the Courthouse open for

Department of Archives and History, serving in that position from

clients, educate and assist our members and fight to uphold the

1982 until his retirement in 2012. He has agreed to serve as

7th amendment rights of the citizens of our state,” Woodson said.

60

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


61

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


62

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U IC K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

CLOVERDALE PLAYHOUSE ADDS NEW STAFF

of good governance—inclusive of ethics, openness, honesty, and fairness—carry the most weight of importance,” said Stephen Hahn-Griffiths, vice president and U.S. consulting director for Reputation Institute. “Highly reputable banks such as Synovus also realize that beyond the table stakes of delivering on high quality products and services, that perceptions of innovation are increasingly important, accounting for 13.5 percent of the weight of reputation.” The list of America’s most reputable banks is compiled annually by American Banker and Reputation Institute, the world’s foremost research and advisory firm focused solely on corporate reputations.

TURENNE PHARMEDCO CELEBRATES 25 YEARS For a quarter century Turenne PharMedCo has been committed to strengthening the long-term health-care industry by providing quality solutions and exceptional service. The pharmacy and The Cloverdale Playhouse, Montgomery’s community theater, is currently in its 6th season of plays, classes, special events and more, and its success has led to growth and exciting changes. This summer, the Playhouse attracted two new staff members: a new Managing Director and its first full-time Technical Director. Melaine Bennett, an Alabama native who recently returned home, is Managing Director and Scott Grinstead, who moved to Montgomery from Chattanooga, is Technical Director. They join current Artistic Director Sarah Walker Thornton to complete the 2017 Season and make plans for the 2018 Season.

medical supply distributor celebrated 25 years in business this summer. Turenne PharMedCo’s 25th anniversary offers employees and customers an opportunity to reflect on the company’s growth and impact on the long-term health-care industry. In 1992, Turenne was established in a small office with a handful of dedicated skilled nursing professionals to provide a few products to a limited customer base. Over the years, it has grown to serve longterm health-care facilities throughout the nation with a wide range of medical supplies and has three pharmacies in Alabama and Tennessee. PharMedCo now employs about 200 people at its approximately 100,000-square-foot home office in Montgomery.

Achievements SYNOVUS RANKED MOST REPUTABLE BANK Synovus, Sterling Bank, has been named “Most Reputable Bank” in the United States in the annual Survey of Bank Reputations conducted by Reputation Institute and published by American Banker. Of 42 banks included in the survey, Synovus ranked first overall, first among non-customers and in the top ten among customers. Synovus ranked second overall in 2016. “We are proud to be named as the country’s most reputable bank, and I am deeply grateful to the entire Synovus team for making this recognition possible,” said Kessel D. Stelling, chairman and CEO of Synovus. “This year’s ranking demonstrates that who we are, what we stand for, and how we do business resonate strongly with customers and non-customers. It also validates the strength of Synovus’ service-focused culture as we transition to a single brand in 2018.” The annual Survey of Bank Reputations, which began in 2010, provides a detailed analysis of the components that together formulate corporate reputations, and how different banks rate on those measures. “The most reputable banks in 2017 recognize that perceptions

63

GILPIN GIVHAN IN TOP SEVEN FINALISTS FOR “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” Gilpin Givhan announced that Captive Review named the firm in the top seven finalists for “Law Firm of the Year” in its 2017 U.S. Captive Review Awards. Judged by a panel of captive owners and risk managers and presented by the leading trade publication focused on risk management and captive insurance, the awards celebrate innovation, commitment and those firms that demonstrate the highest levels of excellence in the captive insurance field. “We are extremely pleased to be in the running for Captive Review’s ‘Law Firm of the Year,’” said Gilpin Givhan Managing Partner Davis Smith. “We are proud of our team for their dedication to client service, continuing leadership and significant contributions to the industry. It is always a great honor to be recognized with a nomination for meeting the highest standards of service by peers and clients.” Gilpin Givhan’s Health Care and Regulated Industries practice group advises our clients on creative solutions to manage risks and realize business objectives through captives.

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Members in the News A Q U I C K LO O K AT O U R M EM B ER S ’ MAN Y ACCOMPLIS HMEN TS , AWARDS AN D HON ORS

CADDELL PRESIDENT AND CEO FEATURED IN BUSINESS ALABAMA

ican female principal at the Beasley Allen Law Firm by age 37

Caddell Construction President and CEO Eddie Stewart was se-

and is particularly motivated by cases that have the potential to

lected as the cover feature for the June 2017 issue of Business Al-

advance women’s health issues. She has helped win millions of

abama magazine, one of the largest and most influential business

dollars in verdicts for those suffering because of reprehensible

publications in Alabama with a multi-state regional distribution.

corporate conduct. These verdicts have provided a platform

The article highlighted Stewart’s selection as the 2018 president

for raising public awareness about unsafe medical devices and

of the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), the larg-

drugs. They have also led to corrective action by regulators and

est U.S. construction industry association and a strong advocate

drug manufacturers. Nationally, Mason was also named to the

for thousands of large and small construction-related businesses

2014 and 2015 Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” list, which recognizes

nationwide. He will be

the top up-and-coming attorneys.

where she proudly focuses her practice on health-related cases

the first Alabamian to

LOCAL MED STUDENT HONORED

serve in this prestigious

Caroline Sellers Fuller has been recently named as one of

role, which coincides

The Dean’s Primary Care Scholars at the UAB School of Medi-

with the AGC’s centen-

cine. Sellers is a member of the Class of 2020 assigned to the

nial celebration. Stewart

Montgomery Regional Medical Campus of the UAB School of

is currently the national

Medicine. Seven first-year medical

AGC vice president

students from the Birmingham cam-

and has been an active

pus and one each from the three

member and officer for

regional campuses were selected

more than 25 years. “I

for the honor. As a high school

am very honored by

student, Fuller participated in the St.

this privilege to serve

Hugh’s Summer Program at the Uni-

an organization that has and will continue to do so much for our industry,” he said. The article explored Stewart’s perspective on some of the benefits of AGC involvement. “AGC has a great relationship with many Caddell clients, including federal agencies. Having the opportunity to work one-on-one with the policy and decision makers of those agencies was a tremendous benefit to Caddell. We’ve also formed many successful joint ventures because of the companies and individuals we met through AGC.” Stewart will be officially sworn in as AGC President in February 2018 at the AGC National Convention in New Orleans.

versity of Oxford in England. She is a native of Birmingham and was a Dean’s Honor Graduate in the College of Natural Sciences from the University of Texas at Austin where she received her BS degree. Previous Montgomery campus Dean’s Primary Care Scholars were Xavier Baldwin, Paylee Myrex and Russell Marsh.

BEASLEY ALLEN ATTORNEY AWARDED Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, P.C. Principal Andrew E. Brashier was selected as a 2017 recipient of the American Association for Justice (AAJ) Wiedemann & Wysocki Award. The

Awards & Honors

award is presented annually to lawyers who demonstrate a deep

BEASLEY ALLEN PRINCIPAL NAMED “RISING STAR”

commitment to the highest standards and who are passionately

Danielle Ward Mason, principal with Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin,

committed to the principles of the civil justice system and the mis-

Portis & Miles, P.C., has been included for the second consecutive

sion of AAJ, which is to “promote a fair and effective justice sys-

year in the Law360 Rising Stars rankings. Law360’s Rising Stars

tem and to support the work of attorneys in their efforts to ensure

profiles the top legal talent nationwide, younger than 40. The

that any person who is injured by the misconduct or negligence

winners are comprised of top litigators and dealmakers practicing

of others can obtain justice in America’s courtrooms, even when

at a level usually seen from veteran attorneys. “We congratulate

taking on the most powerful interests.” Brashier has practiced in

Danielle on her continued success and hard work,” said Beasley

the Consumer Fraud section since joining the Beasley Allen Law

Allen Principal & Managing Attorney Tom Methvin. “Her drive

Firm in September 2010. He has focused primarily on consumer

to obtain justice for her clients epitomizes our firm’s bedrock

class actions along with qui tam litigation under the False Claims

principle to put our clients first and ensure their access to justice.”

Act and was recently named by The National Trial Lawyers to the

Mason, a Montgomery, Ala. native, became the first African-Amer-

Alabama Top 40 Under 40 list.

64

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


I never met a fry with ketchup I didn’t love...or wear. Same Day Dry Cleaning & Laundry EG AL

ACY

OF CL EAN

1941 SINCE

TWELVE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS WITH FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY TUXEDO AND SUIT RENTALS / TEL: 334-262-8852 / JIMMASSEY.COM

65

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

SMILEMAKERS FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY

REZFIT

8565 EastChase Parkway, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-277-5498 • www.smilemakersal.com David M. Fry-Dentist, John W. Barganier-Dentist, Josh Mathis-Dentist / Dentists

3440 Atlanta Highway, Montgomery, AL 36109 504-915-7879 • www.rezfit.com Corey Ellis-Founder/Owner Fitness Training

TOWNEPLACE SUITES BY MARRIOTT-EASTCHASE

DREAMLAND BAR-B-QUE

2845 EastChase Lane, Montgomery, AL 36117 334-239-7110 • www.marriott.com Rinkesh Patel-President / Hotels/Motels

12 West Jefferson Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-273-7427 • www.dreamlandbbq.com Bob Parker-Managing Partner / Restaurants-Barbeque

ESCAPOLOGY

BUSH PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

130 Commerce Street, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-523-1947 • www.escapology.com TJ Williford-Owner, Graham Cook-Owner Attractions-Entertainment

4740 Woodmere Boulevard, Montgomery, AL 36106 334-676-2144 • www.bushpediatricdentistry.com Samuel Bush-Dentist Dentists 66

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


68

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL


CHAMBER NEWS Ribbon Cuttings C EL EB R AT I NG N EW & EXPAN DED BUS IN ESS ES

ROBERT TRENT JONES GOLF TRAIL 25TH ANNIVERSARY

VALIANT CROSS ACADEMY

2600 Constitution Avenue, Prattville, AL 36066 334-285-1114 • www.rtjgolf.com/capitolhill Michael Beverly-Golf Pro / Golf Courses

301 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-301-0478 • www.valiantcross.org Anthony Brock-Head of School / Private Schools

DEXTER ALLEY

LUCIDA CONSTRUCTION

52 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104 334-273-8733 • www.fosheedc.com John Hunter Foshee-Owner / Retail Shops/Distribution

63A Bridge Street, Pike Road, AL 36064 334-356-0905 Mike Addison-Owner / Builders-Commercial

NEW MEMBER?

NOW WHAT? Being a member of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce is more than just paying dues and getting a decal. We provide connections, resources

PEPPERTREE PLAZA GROUND BREAKING

and solutions that help you grow your business and help grow Montgomery’s economy!

Halcyon Park Drive, Montgomery, AL 36116 334-834-2073 • www.kyserproperties.com Jake Kyser-Broker / Shopping Malls & Centers

GET CONNECTED TODAY. www.montgomerychamber.com/events

69

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS New Members W ELCO ME TO OUR N EWEST MEMBERS

ASSOCIAT IONS / N ON -P R OF I T

CON S ULT IN G S E RV IC E S

CFA Society Alabama Will Aycock 2712 18th Place South Birmingham, AL 35209 205-533-4108 www.cfasociety.org/alabama

Teach to Lead, LLC Douglas Watson 4740 South Court Street Montgomery, AL 36105 334-538-4877 www.teach2leadllc.com

AUDIO-VISUAL CONSULTANTS & D E S I G N E R S

DA N C E

Curtis AV Larry Huffstetter P.O. Box 210215 Montgomery, AL 36121 334-279-7127 www.curtisav.com BEAUTY SALON S / S PAS

River Region Golden Shears and More Reginald Miller 22 Monroe Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-7800 C ELLULAR /WIREL E SS P H ON E SERVICES

Central Alabama Iphone Repair Jonathan Strange 9560 Twickenham Ct. Pike Road, AL 36064 334-399-2120 www.ca-iphonerepair.com/ C HIR OPR AC TORS

Rose Chiropractic, Inc. Timothy Rose 2941-B Zelda Road Montgomery, AL 36106 334-264-7948 C LEANING SUPP L I E S

American Osment Tim Adams 1120 Emory Folmar Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36101 334-269-4309 www.americanosment.com

Maya’s Belly Dancing Maya Salm 8130 Hialeah Lane Montgomery, AL 36117 334-322-0946 www.mayasdanceandfitness.com FA M I LY S E RV IC E S

JULY/AUGUST NEW MEMBERS F IT N E SS C E N T E R /GYM

Burn Boot Camp Montgomery Kim Plourde 8888 Minnie Brown Road Montgomery, AL 36117 334-676-2668 www.burnbootcamp.com/montgomery-al

Family Guidance Center of Alabama Walter P. White 358 Fairlane Drive, Building F Montgomery, AL 36116 334-270-4100 Ext 247 www.familyguidancecenter.org

FO O D S - S P E C IA L IZE D

F I N A N C I A L P L A N N E R /A DV IS O R

H E A LT H & F IT N E SS

Edward Jones Investments, Jonathan Shoffner Jonathan Shoffner 7001 Potsdam Court Montgomery, AL 36117 901-488-9809 www.edwardjones.com/ jonathanshoffner

Club Pilates Montgomery Lanie Brazell 8143 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36116 334-538-8102 www.clubpilates.com/location/ eastmontgomery/

Primerica Financial Services, Rickey L. Pitts Rickey L. Pitts 3320 Skyway Drive, Suite 803 Opelika, AL 36804 334-887-1155 www.primerica.com/rickeypitts

SYNERGY HomeCare of Central Alabama Scott Slocum 540 Clay Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-203-1850 www.synergyhomecare.com

F I R E P R OT E C T IO N

H E AT IN G & A IR CO N D IT IO N IN G S E RV IC E S

NAFECO Andy Boyd P.O. Box 210458 Montgomery, AL 36121 334-296-3142 www.nafeco.com

Chad’s A/C Direct Chad Wiswall 2546 Bell Road Montgomery, AL 36117 334-264-6464 www.chadsacdirect.com

70

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Harcal, LLC Gregory B. Calhoun 4155 Lomac Street, Suite G Montgomery, AL 36106 334-272-4400

H E A LT H C A R E S E RV IC E S


Montgomery S A V E T H E D AT E

JOIN US TO CELEBRATE THE 2017

RELAUNCH OF THE MBJ

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 AT 5:00 / CAPITAL CITY CLUB Evening reception with special recognition for Member Profiles and Spotlights

MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

71

MONTGOMERYCHAMBER.COM


CHAMBER NEWS New Members H O M E H E A LT H S E RV IC E S

Comfort Keepers Jason Poole 445 Dexter Avenue, Suite 4050 Montgomery, AL 36104 228-234-1925 www.montgomeryal. comfortkeepers.com/ IN D IV ID UA L

Gordon G. Martin P.O. Box 2641 Birmingham, AL 35291 www.alabamapower.com IN V E ST M E N T A DV IS O R S / BR O K E R S

Wiregrass Equity Partners Darin Phillips 121 Coosa Street, Suite 200 Montgomery, AL 36104 334-356-2612 www.wiregrassequity.com M U S IC /M U S IC A L IN ST R U M E N TS

Bailey Brothers Music Company Sam Marsal 231 E Jefferson Street Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-7827 www.baileybrothers.com P H YS IC A L T H E R A P ISTS

Rehab Associates Nils Neglen 1215 Mulberry Street Montgomery, AL 36106-1130 334-262-6161 www.myphysio.com P R IVAT E S C H O O L S

Montgomery Christian School Kathi Atkins 3265 McGehee Road Montgomery, AL 36111 334-386-1749 www.montgomerychristianschool.com R E A L E STAT E - AG E N TS

Alabama Homefinders, Inc. Robb Colley 1740 Taliaferro Trail Montgomery, AL 36117 334-358-3883 www.ahfhomes.com

R E H A BIL ITAT IO N SERVI CES

Harmony Wellness & Rehab Darren Woodling 6942 Winton Blount Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36117 334-277-1234 harmonywellnessandrehab.com /therapy.html R E STAU R A N TS

Ginza Japanese & Korean Cuisine Jennie Cochren 2070 Eastern Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36117 334-593-0043 www.ginzamontgomery.com The Irish Bred Pub Montgomery Luis Rubio 78 Dexter Avenue Montgomery, AL 36104 334-834-7559 www.irishbredmontgomery.com SA F E T Y P R O D U CTS

Trio Safety Brady McLaughlin 216 Aquarius Drive, Suite 309 Birmingham, AL 35209 205-440-1000 www.triosafety.com S E C U R IT Y S E RVI CES

Signal 88 Security of Montgomery Jeff Mattox 314 Poplar Street Prattville, AL 36066 334-322-8956 www.signal88.com/ montgomery-al S E C U R IT Y SYSTEMS

ADT Security Services, Inc. Ricky Scott 516 Pennacle Place Prattville, AL 36066 334-395-5771 www.adt.com


Central Alabama’s Best Business Source

Make Your Mark. MARKET DIRECTLY TO MONTGOMERY ’ S MOST INFLUENTIAL BUSINESS LEADERS TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS.

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL VOLUME 9 ISSUE 1 / JANUARY 2017

MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL V O L U M E 9 I S S U E 3 / M AY 2 0 1 7

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MBJ

WHY TOURISM=

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT F O R M O N T G O M E RY

MONTGOMERY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Small Biz, BIG Impact

EYES AHEAD:

WHAT SMALL BUSINESS LOOKS LIKE IN MONTGOMERY

CHAMBER’S HIGH I M PA C T P R I O R I T I E S

GOING UP

CHAMBER CHAIRMAN DAVID REED IS building ON A strong LEGACY

LANDING GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS F LY I N G H I G H : NEW F-35 FLEET KEEPS TUSKEGEE AIRMEN SOARING

BUILDING BACK:

G R O W I N G R E A L E S TAT E IN THE RIVER REGION

MB_JAN17_Issue1_FINAL.indd 1

//

R E S E R V E N O W.

PLUS:

HISTORIC HOT DOGS HOW TO HIRE AN INTERN

7/27/17 3:37 PM

Our Content

Our Readers

We Reach

IS CENTERED ON BUSINESS NEWS

ARE COMMUNITY-FOCUSED,

INDUSTRY STAKEHOLDERS,

AND PERSPECTIVES FROM

DIVERSE, EDUCATED, AFFLUENT

MILITARY, DECISION MAKERS

MEMBERS AND INDUSTRY LEADERS.

AND INFLUENTIAL.

AND SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS.

C O N TA C T S E R E N A M I N TO N AT 3 3 4 - 3 1 6 - 3 3 5 1 / S E R E N A @ E X P LO R E M E D I A .O R G


Numbers reflect June 2017 over June 2016.

Economic Intel MGM TRANSPORTATION 28,162 TOTAL PASSENGERS IN JUNE 2017

TOURISM

Source: MGM-Montgomery Regional Airport

+ .20%

SECTORS GOING UP

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR LEISURE & HOSPITALITY PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES EDUCATION &HEALTH SERVICES

YTD REVPAR

SUPPLYROOMS AVAILABLE

+ 8.5%

(REVENUE PER AVAILABLE ROOM) IS UP

+ 2.9%

+ 5.1% + 2.6% + 1.1%

$864,619.46

JUNE 2017 LODGINGS TAX COLLECTIONS

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

Source: Smith Travel Research Report, City of Montgomery

HOUSING

LABOR FORCE

JUNE 2017 HOUSING JUNE 2017 SALES

-16.1%

-2.6%

TOTAL HOMES LISTED FOR SALE

AVERAGE DAYS ON THE MARKET

= 2,232

= 111 days

421 HOMES SOLD AVERAGE SALE PRICE: $171,000

Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate MGM Area

- 1.1% UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

+ 0.5%

CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE

Source: Alabama Department of Labor, MGM Metro Area

74

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

+ 1.6%

EMPLOYED


TECHNOLOGY & RISK SOLUTIONS

Pictured: Paul Perry, Jason Asbury and Amy Walker

TRADITIONAL ACCOUNTING CORPORATE ADVISORY SERVICES TECHNOLOGY & RISK SOLUTIONS HR SOLUTIONS

We often begin relationships with traditional tax or audit services, but clients quickly realize we can offer so much more. By listening to your needs, we connect you with our experts to help accomplish what’s important to you. From risk assessments and IT security to business software and backup disaster recovery solutions, it’s time to take a closer look at Warren Averett and all we have to offer. Let’s Thrive Together.

FINANCE TEAM SUPPORT PERSONAL SERVICES

Alabama | Florida | Georgia

| www.warrenaverett.com


MBJ

MONTGOMERY BUSINESS JOURNAL

Post Office Box 79 Montgomery, AL 36101

Montgomery Business Journal - Mid-September 2017