Issuu on Google+


• WELCOME......................................2 3 ChampChange................................... • MSU .............................................4 Resources ........................................5 Land Grant University ..........................6 A Short History on MSU ........................7 Success Snapshot – Shannon Prokop.........8 .9 Success Snapshot – Kelsey Brangoccio...... • BEGIN ..........................................10 Resources 2 Attributes of Success ...........................1 .14 Decision Deadlines ............................ It’s Okay to be Undecided ......................15 What is in a Credit? .............................15 What is in a Grade? .............................16 Success Snapshot – Mandy Naylor What is in a Grade?..... continued ..............18 .19 Success Snapshot – Ethan Olson.............. Resources .......................................21 2 Things to Know About I.T. at MSU ............2 tory Direc ct Conta ing Departmental & Advis Police Department .............................31

Parking ..........................................31 Free Transportation ............................32 3 Success Snapshot – Virginia Yazzie............3

• LEARN

5

Resources........................................3 6 Tips to Succeed in the Classroom .............3 ..37 Reading Tips................................... Studying Tips....................................38 8 Test Taking Tips .................................3 ...39 Success Snapshot – Paige Crawford.......

• PARTICIPATE .................................4 0 1 Resources ........................................4 42 ....... ....... tory Direc ns Clubs & Organizatio Office of Activities & Engagement ...... Success Snapshot – Jesse Cook


• SPIRIT .........................................48 Resources .......................................4 9 What is a Bobcat? ...............................50 The MSU Fight Song Success Snapshot – Zach Minter ..............52 Must Do Events ... Homecoming Success Snapshot – Jasmine Neeno ..........55

• TAKE CARE ....................................56 Resources ........................................57 Tips to Stay Healthy .............................5 8 Homesickness ...................................59 Depression and Anxiety ........................61 Drugs and Alcohol ..............................62 Relationships ....................................63 Success Snapshot – Katherine Leonardson Success Snapshot – Nels Tate

• BUDGE T ........................................66 Resources ........................................67 Investment in College ..........................68 Budget ...........................................69 Scholarship Opportunities .....................70 Finding a Job ....................................71 Success Snapshot – James Patton .............72 Success Snapshot – Macy Page ................73 • BREATHE .......................................74 Resources / Getting Around ....................75

What to Do… with 30 Minutes to a Full Day for Fun ............................................76 Great Hikes in the Area ..........................78 What to Do…with 30 Minutes to Two Hours to Improve Your Grades .........................79 Success Snapshot – Prithiv Sivasubramaniam .......................81


6) • MONTA NA AREA CODE (40 -XX XX • MSU PHONE# PREFIX 994 • ALL EMERGENCIES 911 O) • ASK US DESK 994-46 36(INF -23 41 • PRESIDENT’S OFFICE 994 71 • PROVOST OFFICE 994-43 • VICE PRESIDENT OF STUDEN 994-2828

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• THE GUIDE (online version of ide.php www.montana.edu/success/gu

-7627 • THE GUIDE (hard copy) 994 email: success@montana.edu

isions, -Any questions, additions, rev to The Guide suggestions, etc. pertaining are greatly appreciated.

Favorite People Watching Spots: #1 Centennial Mall. The ultimate gathering spot. #2 The Fitness Center. #3 SUB Union Market. Oh, the diners. Not So Secret Anymore... The Brewed Awakening Coffee Bar at the Library. Ah, the studious.

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WELCOME TO MSU! The GUIDE was designed and produced by the Office of Student Success with the intent of giving you a quick introduction and reference of useful information to help make your first year at MSU as successful and rewarding as it can be! The GUIDE is easy to navigate, compact and durable so you can reference it often and take it with you as you explore campus, your college and the Bozeman community.

TOP 12 THINGS YOU GOTTA TO DO AS AN MSU STUDENT:

1. FREE Tutoring – sign up for your FREE SmartyCats Tutor by visiting www.msusmartycats.com. 2. Memorize your NetID and log-in to your MSU email account (and then forward it to your preferred address...see page 22). 3. Go to the first football game…Trust us, you will want to be able to say you were at the first game under the lights. 4. Get to know your Academic Advisor. Don’t know who it is? See your Department Administrative Assistant (or check out page 25)! 5. Find out if your classes are using D2L and log-on NOW. Don’t wait for the first assignment or test to learn how to use it. 6. Earn as many ChampChange points as you can and win cool prizes at monthly auctions. Go to www.ChampChange.com for upcoming events. 7. You don’t want to miss the annual Cat/Griz basketball game…There ain’t nothin’ better than a full house in that domed building. 8. Meet your personal Student Success Advisor in the Office of Student Success…College is a LOT different than high school. They are here to help. 9. To get a bird’s eye view of your new home, grab a couple of friends and hike up the “M”. 10. Go to www.MyCatCareers.com to find a job or internship...and attend the Student Employment Job Fair on September 11th in the Ballrooms. 11. Show your Bobcat pride on Blue & Gold Fridays by wearing your MSU gear (and learning the Fight Song…it’s on page 51). 12. Get to know your professors…you should know their names (and even should say “Hi” to them!)

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EARN CHAMPCHANGE WHEN YOU: • Visit the Math Learning Center • Workout at the Hosaeus Fitness Center • Meet with a SmartyCats Tutor • Attend workshops and activities • Visit the Bracken Business Center • Go to the Gallatin College Programs Lab • And so much more! Trust us, it’s easier than you think! The fun starts at the beginning of each semester! Visit www.ChampChange.com to see events, how many points you have and how to start winning prizes!

REDEEM POINTS FOR AWESOME PRIZES LIKE: TV’s $1000 tuition credit

iTunes money

Bikes

At the end of each semester, you can win fabulous prizes at our auctions. We host a variety of auctions where you can have fun in a face-to-face bidding war or participate in our virtual online auction. Winter Auction: Dec. 5th, 6 PM Ballrooms B,C,D

Spring Auction: Starts April 24th www.ChampChange.com

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Questions? Visit the Office of Student Success in 177 Strand Union Building or call 406.994.ROAR (7627).


• ASK-US INFO HELP DESK

994-46 36

www.montana.edu/askus

994-2826

• DE AN OF STUDENTS OFFICE www.montana.edu/wwwds

SS 994-7627 • OFFICE OF STUDENT SUCCEcess tsuc www.montana.edu/studen

994-7359

• PARENT & FAMILY HOTLINE • MAIN CA MPUS OPER ATOR

994-0211

www.montana.edu/people

• REGISTRA R 994-2601

www.montana.edu/registrar

-1991 • STUDENT ACCOUNTS 994 dentaccts.html /stu wbu /ww w.montana.edu ww

• FIN ANCIA L AID 994-2845 www.montana.edu/wwwfa

MSU

• RESIDENCE LIFE 994-2661 www.montana.edu/reslife

53% to 47% is

the ratio of male to female students at MSU.

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What is a Land Grant University and why should it matter to you? You can’t attend a great institution and not know a little bit about our history. Besides the epic location, Montana State University is a pretty cool place founded upon some unbelievable history. So sit back, relax, and soak it in, because you are walking on the grounds of GREATNESS. With your registration (and eventual graduation) at Montana State University you have joined an exclusive club. This club is part of a collection of great universities known as Land Grant Institutions (signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln – during a pretty dicey time in American history – the Civil War). Land Grants were designed to establish higher education institutions in each state that would provide degrees in sciences such as Agriculture, Home Economics, and Mechanical Arts.

Favorite Place to StudY... #1 Library. Specifically, the 3rd floor, in the big chairs surrounding the fountain. #2 SUB Union Market. The best spot is on the west end by the windows. #3 Outside. Basically, any spot of grass, bench or step that is in the sun. Not So Secret Anymore... EPS Lounge. Check it out! 2nd Floor, has great windows!

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Recognizing the changing needs of industry during the Industrial Revolution, Land Grant institutions were charged with providing a practical education for all members of society. This radically changed the idea that higher education, which before had stressed only classical studies, would provide useful instruction impacting the daily lives not only of students, but the general public. “Land Grants”, as they are known today, are respected for being cutting-edge institutions who invest heavily in research and improving the lives of citizens through their respective states. Because of the far reaching effects of these institutions on education, America has forever changed for the better. As a student at Montana State University, you’ve been given the gift of the Land Grant heritage. We hope you’ll cherish it, embrace it, and make a difference in the world with it (just like those before you have).

A SHORT HISTORY ON MSU... ON FEBRUARY 16, 1893, the Agricultural College of the State of Montana was founded as the state’s ONLY Land Grant college. Renamed The Montana College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, the institution was popularly known as Montana Agricultural College. By the 1920s, the institution’s preferred name was Montana State College and so it remained until July 1, 1965, when, in recognition of the enormous advances in the College’s commitment to scientific and humanistic research, the 39th legislative assembly of the state of Montana changed MSC’s name to Montana State University. Today, MSU is known as one of the top 96 universities in the country (according to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching).

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SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am a sophomore from Belgrade, studying Psychology at MSU.

BIGGEST SHOCK ARRIVING AT MSU AS A FRESHMAN? It definitely was not as intimidating as I thought!

COOLEST MSU TRADITION? Legend of the Bobcat, and the Cat vs. Griz Game!

ADVICE FOR INCOMING FRESHMEN?

SHANNON PROKOP

Go to all of your classes! Talk to your professors, they are always willing to talk and help.


KELSEY BRANGOCCIO

I am a sophomore currently majoring


TER 994-35 32 • ACADEMIC ADVISING CEN vising.html /ad wus /ww www.montana.edu DENT • CA REER, INTERNSHIP & STU -4353 EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 994 www.montana.edu/careers

• OFFICE OF STUDENT SUCCE

SS 994-7627

www.montana.edu/success

26 • DEAN OF STUDENTS 994-28 www.montana.edu/wwwds

G • UNDERGR ADUATE CATALO t www.montana.edu/wwwca

-1991 • STUDENT ACCOUNTS 994 dentaccts.html /stu wbu /ww w.montana.edu ww

-2601 • REGISTRA R'S OFFICE 994 www.montana.edu/registrar

• FIN ANCIA L AID 994-28 45 www.montana.edu/wwwfa

OGRA M (FYI) • FIRST YEA R INITIATIVE PR cess 994-7627 www.montana.edu/suc

2,379 degrees were awarded the 2011-2012 year.

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Getting an education is so much more than getting a degree; it is a culmination of all your experiences that shape and define the person you will become. As you embark on this experience, here is some advice to get you started as a successful student…

• BRING AN OPEN MIND.

Challenge your own theories, beliefs, and values. Be prepared to learn from those around you. This isn’t high school and it isn’t intended to be...having an open mind will be the key to your success.

• GO TO CLASS - SOUNDS STUPID, RIGHT?

Actually, we know those who “make it here” are those who attend class. If you are an in-state student, each one hour class session costs you $40 (out-of-state students pay $75 per class). Get your money out of this experience...and trust us, you need to go to class.

• KNOW CAMPUS INSIDE AND OUT. BECOME AN EXPLORER.

Know where every academic department and student service is located. Make it your mission to understand your new environment. Get comfortable here. This is your new home; get to know it well. Visit www.montana.edu/campusmap to view a map of campus.

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• UNDERSTAND MSU HAS RULES AND EXPECTATIONS.

Being a member of the MSU community requires that you uphold your part of the bargain. You are expected to meet the expectations of a number of people including faculty, staff, and your RA. Perform at your optimum level, read, and have a copy of MSU’s Student Code of Conduct and Violations. More importantly, just be a good person.

• IGNORE RUMORS AND SEEK THE TRUTH.

Acting on or putting your faith in a rumor could lead you in the wrong direction. Seek help from an advisor or other student services staff (featured in the LEARN, ACHIEVE, & TAKE CARE sections).

• COMMUNICATE.

The single most important life skill is communication. Successful students take the time to connect with faculty and ask questions inside and outside of the classroom. If a policy or rule doesn’t make sense, ask a staff member to clarify the meaning. Remember, we can’t fix an issue unless we know it is a problem for you.

• COMMUNITY.

Become part of the university community; it will only enhance your education. Now that you are a part of this institution, you are a part of a very special community. Enjoy it, leave your mark, and make it better.

• BE WELL.

Take care of yourself and safeguard your physical and mental well-being. When exhausted, get rest.

• CREATE A “BIG PICTURE” PLAN.

Studies indicate that students who have a plan for why they are attending college do much better in school than those who do not. Don’t know what your plan is? That is okay; talk to your advisor or a Career Coach from the Career, Internship & Student Employment Services Office. “Becoming part of the community and meeting new people is what I enjoy most about MSU.”

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DECISION DEADLINES • ADDING A COURSE.

Day 1-5 of classes: May add class online. Day 6-10 of classes: Additions require both your instructor’s & advisor’s signatures. Day 11+ of classes: Additions require your instructor’s, advisor’s, & Assistant Dean’s signatures; this is only approved under extraordinary circumstances.

• DROPPING A COURSE.

Day 1-10 of classes: May drop class online. Full refund may be given for the dropped course. Day 11-15 of classes: Drops require both your instructor’s & advisor’s signatures. Partial refund given. Day 15+ of classes: Drops require both your instructor’s & advisor’s signatures. Drops will receive no fee refunds. A ‘W’ grade will be given through the last day of the official registration for the next semester. Please note, if you are withdrawing completely from MSU, please consult with the Student Accounts Office to determine if you are eligible for a refund.

• ELIGIBILITY FOR A ‘W’ WITHDRAWAL GRADE.

Day 16+ of classes: You can drop a course and receive a ‘W’ grade, but must get approval from both your instructor and academic advisor. (Go to the Registrar’s web page for the exact date each semester). No fee refunds are given for withdrawing from classes after the 16th day. Note: If the course is repeated, your new grade and credits will count towards your GPA, but the ‘W’ will remain on your transcript.

Favorite place to Hang Out with Friends... #1 SUB Rec Center. Play some billiards or bowl a few games. #2 Hosaeus Fitness Center. Have you experienced the climbing wall yet? #3 Procrastinator Theatre. Watch some great movies! Not So Secret Anymore... SOB Barn Loft. Attend the Friday night country dance, 9 to midnight.

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IT’S OKAY TO BE UNDECIDED: If you have not decided on a particular major and are exploring your options, it is okay. You are not alone! University Studies is home for “exploring” students. About one third of the incoming freshmen are undecided. MSU has the following support services here to help you during this exciting time of your life: Academic Advising Center Academic Department Offices Career, Internship & Student Employment Services Disability, Re-Entry & Veteran Services Education Advising Center First Year Initiative (FYI) HHD Advising Center Office of Student Success They can assist you in making a decision that will allow you to explore and confirm your existing interests, and also support and encourage you to discover new ones.

DIFFERENT WAYS TO SAY YOU ARE UNDECIDED: • I am exploring my options. • I am deciding which direction is best for me. • I am investigating which major is best. • I have so many interests, I need to take some time to narrow my options.

WHAT IS IN A CREDIT? A CREDIT IS A UNIT used to compute the amount of work required for graduation.

• 1 credit roughly equals 1 hour of class time each week for one semester.

• Most faculty believe for each credit of class you take, you should commit 2-3 hours of studying/ researching/writing per class. This means if you enroll in 15 credits per semester you should plan on 30 to 45 hours of work per class, per week outside of class time. Yup, be prepared to work hard to be successful here.

• A full-time student must be enrolled in 12 or more credits per semester.

• Typically, 120 credits are required to complete undergraduate curriculum requirements.

• To complete your curriculum in 4 years, you need to successfuly complete 15 credits per semester.

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WHAT IS IN A GRADE?

Quality of Grade: A=Excellent, B=Good, C=Fair, D=Passing, W=Withdraw, F=Failure, I=Incomplete Your grades determine your Grade Point Average (GPA). Your GPA shows how successful you were in your classes. This is how to calculate your GPA:

MINIMUM GPA REQUIREMENTS:

• You must earn a GPA of 2.0 or better each semester to be “in good academic standing”. • A GPA below 2.0 will mean that you could be placed on academic probation or suspension. • C- grade or better must be earned for any pre-requisite, required, or core courses (but remember, a C- average means you are still below a 2.0 GPA). Some departments also require that certain majors maintain grades higher than C-. • D+, D & D- grades will not count towards your major, with a few exceptions. But you really don’t want D’s on your transcripts...so start studying!

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SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am a junior in the Nursing Program here at MSU. I am from Belgrade, Montana.

HOW CAN FRESHMEN CONNECT WITH THE UNIVERSITY?

Get involved! You never know who you will meet or what you will learn until you try!

ADVICE FOR HOW TO DO WELL IN CLASS?

Form study groups with your peers. Get a tutor early, before you need one, and have faith in yourself!

WHAT MSU OFFICE IS MOST HELPFUL FOR FRESHMEN?

MANDY NAYLOR

The Office of Student Success, of course!


WHY FIRST SEMESTER GRADES MATTER: IMAGINE THIS… you slip in your first semester grades…Yikes! Your first semester GPA IS 2.64. DID YOU KNOW, you would need to get 25 credits of ‘A’ grades or 61 credits of ‘A-‘ grades TO MOVE YOUR GPA UP TO A 3.5!? So sharpen those pencils and start studying...grades matter!

REPEATED COURSES:

• Your cumulative GPA will only include most recent, repeated credits and grades. • Transcripts include all grades, not just the most recent, repeated course grade.

INCOMPLETE GRADE:

• The University assumes that when you register for a class, you have committed and are responsible for completing all academic obligations to the class. • However, an instructor can request an ‘I’ grade if three-fourths of course work has been completed with a passing grade and personal hardship or other academic circumstances have occured that are clearly beyond the student’s control. • If an ‘I’ grade is approved, the student will be given a specified amount of time to complete the required work. If the work is completed within the time frame, the student will then have the ‘I’ grade replaced with the appropriate grade. If the work is not completed within the required time frame, the ‘I’ grade will be replaced with an ’F’ grade.

ACADEMIC PROBATION:

• When your GPA falls below 2.0, you are in academic danger and will be given a warning and put on probation. • If you do not raise your GPA above 2.0, you will be reviewed by the University Scholastic Appeals Board, where a recommendation will be determined for either suspension or transfer out of a curriculum.

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SUCCESS SNAPSHOT WHO AM I?

I am a sophomore studying Computer Science and I absolutely love living in Bozeman, Montana.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE A BOBCAT?

A Bobcat is a hard working, hard studying individual who knows how to swing dance, and sleeps only because they need to.

BEST THING TO HAPPEN TO YOU FRESHMAN YEAR? I learned to love the field of Computer Science.

WORDS OF WISDOM?

Through hard work and connecting to MSU, Ethan earned enough ChampChange points to win a $1000 prize towards his tuition.

ETHAN OLSON

Don’t panic! You may need to bleed on a text book or two, but with effort and desire you will find a way to learn and have fun.


• ASK-US DESK 994-46 36 www.montana.edu/askus

• CA MPUS MA P

map

www.montana.edu/campus

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www.montana.edu/academ

• ITC HELP DESK 994-1777 11 • MSU BOOKSTORE 994-28 px e.as om g/h e.or stor ook w.msub ww

• TERM CA LENDA R INFO

/calendar.php

calendar.msu.montana.edu

E DESK • RENNE LIBRA RY REFERENC pusmap /cam .edu 994-3171 www.montana • RES NET 994-1929

www.montana.edu/resnet

E

• RENNE LIBRARY HOMEPAG www.lib.montana.edu

• DESIRE 2 LEARN 994-3255 eu.montana.edu/d2L/help

4,890 Parking spaces are on campus.

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We know one of the hardest things to do when making the transition from high school to university is to “learn the ropes” (this is true at any institution). You’ve developed a comfort level and patterns that have given you a routine. Now you are going to have to learn new processes, procedures, and names of new buildings, friends and faculty (just to name a few). Most of us find this a bit confusing, tiring and sometimes very frustrating, but hang in there! Use this section as a guide to assist you, and remember, you can always ask a student, staff or faculty member for help (they were there once too).

THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT I.T. MSU STUDENT ID (GID): • Your MSU Student ID, also called your GID, is what

you use to log in to the MyInfo secure area for you to see your student account, registration information, unofficial transcript, and more. This is also a place to make changes in your current contact information (i.e. address, phone number, email). • Your MSU Student ID is an eight digit number preceded by a dash (-) and looks like: -01234567 • You can set your MSU Student ID password (also called your PIN) and log in to the MSU MyInfo area by clicking on the MyInfo button on the bottom of the MSU web site home page: www.montana.edu.

MSU NET ID: • Your NetID is the ID you will use to access your

student email, D2L, Library resources, iClicker registration, McAfee virus software, SmartyCats Tutoring Database, and other essential services. • Your NetID has letters and numbers and looks like: a12b345 • You can view your NetID and set up your NetID password at: http://password.montana.edu • You can find more information on the “What’s a NetID?” page: www.montana.edu/itcenter/accounts/netid.php

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MSU EMAIL: • Your official MSU email is the primary way MSU will communicate with you.

• Your email address looks like:

firstname.lastname@msu.montana.edu

• You need to set up your email at:

www.montana.edu/email/setupST.html

• You can then access your MSU email account at: http://gapps.montana.edu/apps-types/email

MSU “DOMAIN” ACCOUNT: • Your MSU “Domain” Account is used to access the

campus wireless network, student computer labs, SUB computers, and your “Z” drive. • Typically, your MSU Domain Account username is your firstname.lastname • You can view your MSU Domain Account username and set up your password at: http://password.montana.edu

MSU DESIRE 2 LEARN (D2L): • D2L is the online course supplement used for a lot

of classes at MSU. At the start of each semester, be sure to log in and see which of your instructors are using D2L for your classes (not all of your instructors will). • Log in to D2L at http://ecat.montana.edu with your NetID or firstname.lastname D2L Username and your NetID password. • You can view your D2L password at: http://password.montana.edu • You can get more D2L help at: http://eu.montana.edu/d2l/help/

MSU “Z” DRIVE: • Your “Z” Drive has 200 MB of free storage to use. • Whenever you log in to a campus computer using your domain account, you can save your documents, spreadsheets, PowerPoints, and projects to your “Z” drive.

“The people here truly care about you as a person as well as your success as a student.”

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COMPUTER LABS:

The IT Center currently runs 12+ computer labs at Montana State University with a total of over 380 computers. Our major labs in Reid and Roberts Halls are staffed with student assistants called USA’s (User Support Associates) or you can go on the web and get immediate help from Student Labs Online Assistance by visiting studentlabs.montana.edu/help. USA’s help students with general computing questions as well as some specific software related questions.

LOCATIONS:

1 lab in Animal Bioscience 234 1 lab in Linfield Hall 232 5 labs in Reid Hall 302, 303, 304, 305, & 306 3 labs Roberts Hall 109, 110, 111 2 Mini-labs in Renne Library 217, 317 1 lab in Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center Lounge

OTHER COMPUTERS:

24 computers are placed on the first and second floors of the SUB. Career, Internship & Student Employment Services hosts a mini-lab of 4 computers. Wilson Hall hosts the Writing Lab on the second floor and there are two computers in the Writing Center.

PRINTING IN COMPUTER LABS:

You can print 250-300 pages per semester in all the labs for free. After that, the cost is 3 cents for a single sided sheet (1 Page) and 5 cents for a double sided sheet (2 pages). Color printing is available in the library.

“Go join a club or two, and go to campus events. MSU is full of friendly people.”

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DEPARTMENTAL AND ADVISING CONTACT DIRECTORY:

For the undergraduate areas of study check out http://www.montana.edu/academics/majors/

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 202 Linfield, 994-3681

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 204 Linfield, 994-5745 Advisor: Nora Smith norasmith@montana.edu

AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS & ECONOMICS 306 Linfield, 994-3702 Advisor: Jane Boyd aboyd@montana.edu

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

230 Linfield, 994-2132 Advisor: Melany Cheeseman melany.cheeseman@montana.edu

ANIMAL & RANGE SCIENCES

203 Animal Bioscience Building 994-5582 Advisor: Denise Thompson deniset@montana.edu

BIOTECHNOLOGY

210 Plant Bioscience, 994-5908 Advisor: Andreas Fischer fischer@montana.edu

IMMUNOLOGY & INFECTIOUS DISEASES 960 Technology Blvd, 994-4705 Office Assigns Advisors iid@montana.edu

LAND RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 334 Leon Johnson, 994-3090 Advisor: Linda McDonald lindam@montana.edu

PLANT SCIENCES & PLANT PATHOLOGY

324 Leon Johnson, 994-4832 Advisor: Jill Scarson jscarson@montana.edu

PREVETERINARY MEDICINE

119 Animal Bioscience Building, 994-5598 Advisor: Becky Mattix rmattix@montana.edu

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RESEARCH CENTERS 202 Linfield, 994-3681

SUSTAINABLE FOODS & BIOENERGY SYSTEMS

301 Romney Gym, 994-5640 Advisor: Dean Williamson, Ph.D dean.williamson@montan.edu

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE 217 Cheever, 994-4405

ARCHITECTURE

140 Cheever, 994-5772 Advisor: Rachael Ortego rortego@montana.edu

ART

205 Haynes, 994-4503 Advisor: Mandi McCarthy-Rogers mmrogers@montana.edu

FILM & PHOTOGRAPHY 202 VCB, 994-2484 Advisor: Vicki Miller vmiller@montana.edu

MUSIC

189 Howard, 994-3562 Office Assigns Advisors keggemeyer@montana.edu

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

172 Howard, 994-5762 Advisor: Kristin McGarity kristin.mcgarity@montana.edu

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 412 Reid, 994-4421

BUSINESS

338 Reid, 994-4681 Office Assigns Advisors business@montana.edu

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 250 Reid, 994-4133

ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 132 Reid, 994-1880 Advisor: Cyndi Meldahl cmeldahl@montana.edu

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 210 Reid, 994-5775 Advisor: Scott Davis sedavis@montana.edu

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HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 121 H&PE Complex, 994-4001 HHD Advising Center hhdadvising@montana.edu

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 212 Roberts, 994-2272

GENERAL ENGINEERING

212 Roberts, 994-2272 Advisor: Heidi Sherick HSherick@coe.montana.edu

CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 306 Cobleigh, 994-2221 Advisor: Shelley Thomas ShelleyT@coe.montana.edu

CIVIL/CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING 205 Cobleigh, 994-2112 Advisor: Renee Hecox reneeh@ce.montana.edu

COMPUTER SCIENCE 357 EPS, 994-4780 Office Assigns Advisors csinfo@cs.montana.edu

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING 610 Cobleigh, 994-2505 Office Assigns Advisors ecedept@ece.montana.edu

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

403 Roberts, 994-5938 Advisor: Bill Schell wshcell@ie.montana.edu

MECHANICAL/MET ENGINEERING 220 Roberts, 994-2203 Office Assigns Advisors kathy.campbell@montana.edu

COLLEGE OF LETTERS AND SCIENCE 2-205 Wilson, 994-4288

AMERICAN STUDIES

130 Gaines, 994-5936 Advisor: Teresa Greenwood tgrnwd@montana.edu

CELL BIOLOGY AND NEUROSCIENCE 510 Leon Johnson, 994-5120 Advisor: Lisa Musgrave cellbio.msu@gmail.com

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CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 305 Gaines Hall, 994-5393 Advisor: Steve Holmgren holmgren@chemistry.montana.edu

EARTH SCIENCES

200 Traphagen, 994-3331 Office Assigns Advisors earth@montana.edu

ECOLOGY

310 Lewis, 994-4548 Office Assigns Advisors jvanandel@montana.edu

ENGLISH

2-176 Wilson, 994-3768 Office Assigns Advisors dept@english.montana.edu

HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY & RELIGIOUS STUDIES 2-155 Wilson, 994-4395 Office Assigns Advisors dmanry@montana.edu

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 2-214 Wilson, 994-3601 Office Assigns Advisors math@math.montana.edu

MICROBIOLOGY

104A Lewis, 994-5675 Advisor: Kari Cargill kcargill@montana.edu

MODERN LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 117 Gaines , 994-4448 Advisor: Tracy Knudson tracy@montana.edu

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES

1 Wilson, 994-5260 Advisor: Walter Fleming wfleming@montana.edu

PHYSICS

260D EPS, 994-7851 Advisor: Dana Longcope longcope@physics.montana.edu

POLITICAL SCIENCE

2-143 Wilson, 994-4141 Office Assigns Advisors banderson@montana.edu

PRE-MED ACADEMIC ADVISING 130 Gaines Hall, 994-3532 Academic Advising Center advising@montana.edu

28


PSYCHOLOGY

325 Traphagen, 994-3801 Advisor: Brenda Lewis psydept@montana.edu

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 2-128 Wilson, 994-4201 Advisor: Leslie Crismond crismond@montana.edu

COLLEGE OF NURSING 115 Sherrick, 994-3783

NURSING

Bozeman Campus - 109 Sherrick, 994-2660 Advisor: Melissa Gutzman melissak@montana.edu

CARING FOR OUR OWN PROGRAM (CO-OP) 203 Sherrick, 994-5711 Advisor: Jenny Gorsegner jennifer.gorsegner@montana.edu

GALLATIN COLLEGE PROGRAMS 201 Hamilton Hall, 994-5536

AVIATION BOOKKEEPING DESIGN DRAFTING INTERIOR DESIGN MEDICAL ASSISTANT WELDING

201 Hamilton, 994-5595 Advisor: Nicole Berg nicole.berg@montana.edu

PRE UNIVERSITY STUDIES (UNDECLARED) 101 Hamilton, 994-7160 Advisor: Terra Cusack tcusack@montana.edu

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 212 Montana, 994-4371

DIRECTED INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Quad F, 994-4110

UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM Quad F, 994-2822 Advisor: Tommy Donovan feelslikerain9@yahoo.com

UNIVERSITY STUDIES

130 Gaines, 994-3532 Academic Advising Center advising@montana.edu

29


NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE

130 Gaines, 994-3532 Academic Advising Center advising@montana.edu

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARS PROGRAM 130 Gaines, 994-3561 Academic Advising Center usp@montana.edu

NON-DEPARTMENTAL ADVISING AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENT CENTER 1 Wilson, 994-3334 Advisor: Rita Sand rsand@montana.edu

ATHLETICS

133A Fieldhouse, 994-6130 Advisor: Jamie Rizzuto jamie.rizzuto@montana.edu

HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISING 317 Leon Johnson, 994-1670 Advisor: Sheila Nielsen-Preiss hpa@montana.edu

DISABILITY, RE-ENTRY, AND VETERANS’ SERVICES 180 SUB, 994-2824 Advisor: Brenda York byork@montana.edu

OFFICE OF STUDENT SUCCESS 177 SUB, 994-7627 success@montana.edu

AIR FORCE ROTC

318 Hamilton, 994-4022 Advisor: Capt. Lucas Bergert afrotc@montana.edu

ARMY ROTC

305 Hamilton, 994-5476 Advisor: Major Darren Purcell DPurcell@montana.edu

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 400 Culbertson, 994-7180 Advisor: Debra De Bode debode@montana.edu

30


POLICE DEPARTMENT The MSU Police Department is here to keep you safe. While we would describe this campus as being safe, one should always take precautions. Here are a few tips that will help prevent you from being a victim: • Lock the door to your room or apartment, even if you’re just going out for a few minutes. • Lock your vehicle and don’t leave valuable items in plain view. Don’t leave skis and snowboards in the rack on your vehicle. • Make a list of your valuables, including brand name, model number and serial number. Keep your list in a safe place. • Register your bicycle with the MSU Police. Record information about your bike in case it is stolen. Purchase the best bike lock you can afford and use it. • If you’re concerned about walking alone at night, call the MSU Police Department for an escort. Phone # 994-2121 • Report crimes and suspicious activity. Call the MSU Police Department directly or email Silent Witness at switness@montana.edu. • If you are the victim of a crime, please report it and provide as much information as you can. YOU CAN CALL THE MSU POLICE DEPARTMENT 24/7: EMERGENCIES - DIAL 911 24/7: NON-EMERGENCIES - DIAL 994-2121

PARKING PARKING FEES. There are a variety of permit options ranging from $60 to $159 for non-reserved commuter parking. They also offer daily hangtags for $2.50/ day and the fee lot is available for an hourly charge. Visit www.montana.edu/police/permit.shtml to purchase a parking permit. FREE PARKING. Sorry, no free parking, other

than the 15-30 minute short term parking areas, but beware, these parking spots are patrolled and timed by University Police.

PARKING AVAILABILITY. Those parking lots closest to the core fill up first, usually by 8:15 in the morning, but by looking further out, in the Huffman, Antelope and Gravel lots, for example, one can almost always find a parking spot.

31


PARKING TICKETS. If you get a ticket you can pay

online at: http://www.montana.edu/wwwmsupd/. You may also mail in the payment in the yellow envelope which was placed on your windshield. Alternatively, you may come in and pay the permit in person at University Police on the corner of Kagy Blvd. and S. 7th Avenue. University Police is open 24/7.

APPEALING TICKET. You may also appeal the citation either online by going to: http://www.montana.edu/police/appeals.shtml, or by coming in to the University Police Station at the corner of Kagy Blvd. and S. 7th Avenue and filling out an appeal form. Appeals must be filed within 7 days of being issued.

FREE TRANSPORTATION STREAMLINE BUS SERVICE

Streamline Bus provides service within Bozeman, with limited commuter services between Bozeman, Four Corners and Belgrade; seasonal routes to Bridger Bowl are also offered. Streamline operates Monday through Friday, with a late-night service operating from 9:30 PM to 2:30 AM, Thursday through Saturday. The Streamline service is fare free. Website: www.streamlinebus.com.

SKYLINE BUS SERVICE

Skyline | The Link To The Peak, provides free bus service to Big Sky & Moonlight Basin. This is a yearround service. Website: www.skylinebus.com. Phone number 995-6287.

PARK-N-RIDE

A free Ski Bus to Bridger Bowl during the ski season. Website: www. bridgerbowl.com.

39,764 was the population of Bozeman in 2011. 32


SUCCESS SNAPSHOT WHO AM I?

I came to MSU to study Exercise Science, I am currently a sophomore, and couldn’t be happier.

WHY MSU?

I chose MSU because of the academics, opportunities and challenges.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE A BOBCAT?

It means a lot to know that I am part of a legacy.

BEST THING TO HAPPEN TO YOU AT MSU?

Taking on so many responsibilities and paving my own road in life is a rewarding feeling.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR INCOMING FRESHMEN?

VIRGINIA YAZZIE

Go to all your classes, ask your instructors for help and get a tutor if you need one. Try to have fun and don’t procrastinate.


• CHEMISTRY HELP CENTER

994-4801

• CREATIVE ARTS LIBRA RY

994-4091 p

ions/cal.ph www.lib.montana.edu/collect

• DISABILIT Y, RE-ENTRY & VET SERVICES 994-2824

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s

www.montana.edu/wwwre

I) PR0GRAM • FIRST YEAR INITIATIVE (FY /success .edu 994-7627 www.montana • MATH CENTER 994-5375

ergrad/mlc.html

www.math.montana.edu/und

• SM ARTYCATS TUTORING com 994-7627 www.msusmartycats. AIN OFFICE) • PHYSICS HELP CENTER (M .edu 994-3614 www.physics.montana • RENNE LIBRA RY 994-3171 www.lib.montana.edu

15 • WRITING CENTER 994-53 wc

www1.english.montana.edu/

35


We know, we’ve been there too, you think “I already know how to study, I’ve done it well through high school...don’t need to read this section...”

WELL THINK AGAIN. This is a different world. The content in classes will move along much more quickly, the faculty will have higher standards, and excuses just won’t cut it anymore. Long story short, you’ll be evaluated on a new set of criteria so take a moment and review these important tips to ensure you succeed in the classroom. Don’t believe us? Well, you might want to read this section after your first mid-term. • ATTEND CLASS.

The quality of class is higher when there is a commitment to attendance. You also gain a cumulative knowledge base and progress in your learning at a more rapid pace.

• BE ON TIME.

Why would a professor take you seriously if you do not take him or her seriously? Also, concepts at the beginning of class can prepare you for more complex concepts toward the end of class.

• BE SEEN.

When you are self-motivated and interested, your professor will most likely be motivated and interested in helping you as much as possible.

• LISTEN.

Concentrate on listening to each word and understand the embodiment of those words.

• VALUE CRITICISM.

Remember, you are learning to grow and break restrictive patterns.

• USE D2L AS A TOOL.

If your instructor is using D2L, you should log in to D2L regularly to stay on top of your classes and not miss out on important information.

36


• ASK QUESTIONS.

If pertinent, questions can help clarify and enrich your knowlege base. Questions, such as those that are a result of being late or inattentive, lower the quality of the class.

• YOU MAY DISAGREE.

But it is not always appropriate to challenge your professor during classtime. Set up an appointment during his/her office hours if you want to delve into a subject further.

• APPRECIATE.

Help your professors improve their quality of teaching by giving them feedback on what has been beneficial or detrimental in their classrooms.

READING • POSTURE.

It is best to read at a desk or table, sitting in an upright position, with good lighting.

• NOISE.

Background noise must be kept to a minimum. Find a quiet place in the library if necessary.

• BE PREPARED.

Attack the material with textbook, pen and paper in hand.

• INTERACT WITH YOUR TEXT.

Take notes and talk back to the text. Feel free to mark up the pages (you bought the textbook).

• WRITE AS YOU READ.

Concentrate on reading each word and understand the embodiment of those words.

• SEGMENT.

Break long assignments into segments. Read 10 pages, then do something else. Later, read the next 10 pages and so on.

• YOUR WORDS.

Translate difficult material into your own words. Create an “alternative text” that will help you remember and understand.

25.2 was the average ACT score of last year’s incoming freshmen class.

37


STUDYING • LOCATION.

Select a place to study that is free from distractions... dorm rooms typically aren’t free from distractions, but you decide.

• TIMING.

Develop a sense of how long you can concentrate by recording the time of when you begin to study and then note when your mind begins to wander. Try to increase this time each time you record.

• BREAKS.

Take planned study breaks.

• PLAN.

Decide exactly what you will try to accomplish when you begin your studying (set a goal…it will really make a difference).

• STUDY ACTIVELY.

Use a method that involves surveying before reading, organizing what you read, anticipating test questions and reciting/reviewing.

• GET TO IT.

Do large tasks, one small task at a time. Don’t let the task overwhelm you so that your energy is used in worrying rather than in doing.

• INCENTIVE.

Reward yourself for studying.

TEST TAKING • TIME MANAGEMENT. Budget your time.

• FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS.

Read the directions (don’t assume).

• UNDERSTAND.

Read each question thoroughly and critically.

• EASIEST FIRST.

Answer the easiest questions during the first “go through”. On the second “go through” reason through each question.

• TRANSLATE.

Put difficult questions into your own words.

• KEY WORDS.

If the question is complicated, underline key words to try to “extract” more information.

38


I am a sophomore from Colorado Community Health and play

?

PAIGE CRAWFORD

Talk to your professors, ask them the best way to study for their tests, and don’t procrastinate!


• ASMSU 994-29 33

www.montana.edu/asmsu

• ASMSU RECRE ATIONAL SPO 994-5000 • OFFICE OF STUDENT SUCC

RTS & FITNESS

ESS 994-7627

www.montana.edu/success

• DIVERSITY AWARENESS OFF

ICE 994-5801

ty www.montana.edu/diversi

• MSU LEADERSHIP INSTITUT

E 994-7275

www.montana.edu/leadership

AGEMENT • OFFICE OF ACTIVITIES & ENG munity /com 994-6902 www.montana.edu • OUTDOOR REC 994-3621 D SORORIT Y • OFFICE OF FR ATERNITY AN .edu/fslife LIFE 994-2826 www.montana • RESIDENCE LIFE 994-2661 www.montana.edu/reslife

36 • WOMEN’S CENTER 994-38 omen www.montana.edu/wwww

41


CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Go through this list and put a check-mark by five to ten clubs or organizations that sound interesting – then do some investigating! Check out their listing online at www.montana.edu/wwwstuac/clubs.php, e-mail studentactivities@montana.edu, or call 994-6902.

DEPARTMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

□ Accounting Club/ Beta Alpha Psi □ Agriculture Student Council □ Algebraic Adventures □ American Indian Council □ American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) □ American Society of Civil Engineers □ American Society of Heating Refrigeration and A/C Engineers □ American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) □ Animal Spirits (Economics) □ Anthropology Club □ Associated English Graduate Students □ Ceramics Guild □ Collegiate FFA □ Dead Lizard Society (DLS) □ Deutsch Klub (German Club) □ Earth Sciences Student Colloquium □ English Club □ Exercise Science Club □ Exploring Psychological Well-Being □ Finance Club □ Graduate Human Performance □ Health Professions Club □ HR/Management Club □ IEEE Student Branch □ Institute of Industrial Engineers □ Japan Club □ LRES GSO □ Marketing Enthusiast at MSU □ Montana Student Dietetic Association □ National Society of Collegiate Scholars □ Parallel Computing Organization □ Philosophy Society □ Pre-Dental Club of MSU □ Science and Natural History Filmmaking Forum □ SFP Network □ SIFE (Students In Free Enterprise) □ Smiths Metals Guild □ Society of Physics Students □ SPAM Student Printmaking Association of Montana □ Student Chapter of ASCD □ Technology Education Club □ The Wildlife Society □ Undergraduate Chemistry Society □ Women in Science and Engineering (WISE)

42


HONORARY ORGANIZATIONS □ Alpha Lambda Delta □ Alpha Pi Mu-Industrial Engineering Honor Society □ Alpha Zeta □ Beta Gamma Sigma □ Chi Epsilon-Civil Engineering Honor Society □ Honors Student Forum □ Mortar Board □ Order of Omega □ Panhellenic Council □ Phi Alpha Theta □ Phi U Epsilon Omicron Honor Society □ Pi Tau Sigma-Tau Rho □ Psi Chi □ Sigma Alpha □ Sigma Tau Delta □ Tau Beta Pi □ Triota Honor Society “The best thing about MSU would have to be the people.”

-BILL JENSEN

Mechanical Engineering Technology

RECREATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS □ Alpine Ski Club □ Bozeman Cutthroat Rugby □ Bozeman Hoopers □ Bozeman Parkour □ Brazilian Jiu Jitsu □ Breakdance Club □ Club Baseball □ Club Fastpitch □ Club Soccer □ Club Tennis of Montana State □ Cycling Club □ Dance Club □ European Martial Arts Project (EMAP) □ Fencing Club □ Hockey Club of MSU □ Judo Club □ Kashima Shinryu □ Lanakila Boxing □ Men’s Club Volleyball □ Mens Lacrosse □ Montana Motocross Club □ Nordic Ski Club of MSU □ Polo Club □ Racquetball Club of MSU □ Rugby at Montana State University □ Run MSU □ Salsa Club □ Soccer International Club □ Strength Club at HFC □ Swing and Country Dance Club □ Swing Cats Dance Club □ Tactical Action Gaming □ Taekwondo Club □ Team JRA “Just Riding Along” □ Telemark/ Backcountry Club □ Toushi Kan Karate □ Ultimate Frisbee Club □ Uni-cycling for Change □ Vert-I-Go Mountaineering □ Water Polo Club □ Women’s Rugby Whitetail

43


RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS □ Atheists and Humanists of Bozeman □ Baha’i Campus Club □ Bozeman Hindu Society □ Campus Crusade for Christ (CRU) □ Cats for Christ □ Chi Alpha (XA) Christian Fellowship □ International Students Inc. □ InterVarsity Christian Fellowship □ Jewish Student Organization □ LDSSA (Latter Day Saints Student Assoc.) □ Lutheran Student Fellowship □ Muslim Student Association □ Nations □ Orthodox Christian Fellowship (OCF) □ Resurrection Catholic Campus Ministry □ ROTC Bible Study □ United Methodist Campus Ministries

SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS

□ 1,000 New Gardens □ 450th Cadet Wing □ ACDA (American Choral Directors Association) □ Active Minds □ Actor’s Lab □ African Society At Montana □ AISES (American Indian Science and Engineering Society) □ All Booked Up □ American-Brazilian Correction □ Amnesty International of Bozeman □ Anime Club □ ASMSU Associated Student of MSU □ Association for Computing Machinery □ Association of Women in Computing □ Bangladesh Student Association (BSA) □ Believe, Borrow, Balance □ Blue and Gold Committee □ Bobcat Motorsports □ Bobcats 4 Bozeman □ Bozeman Blues □ Bozeman Model United Nations □ Cats for a Cure □ Chinese Culture Club □ Circle K □ College Against Cancer □ College Democrats □ College Republicans □ Collegiate 4-H □ Collegiate Stockgrowers at MSU □ Collegiate Young Farmers and Ranchers □ Cribbage Club □ Dance Marathon of MSU □ Diabetic Dialogues “Get out there, meet people, □ Drum Club and try things you have never □ Engineers Without Borders done before.” □ Forward Montana State □ Friends of Local Food -CODY KIRK □ Global Culture Club MATH EDUCATION □ Graphic Design Guild (GDG) □ Health Professions Club □ Hivemind Technology Group □ Indian Student Association □ Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W) Club of MSU □ Interfraternity Council □ Liam McGenity Fan Club □ Men Stopping Rape □ Montana Advocates for Sexual Health (MASH) □ Montanans for Progress □ Music in Montana □ National Coalition For Men □ Network of Environmentally Conscious Organizations (NECO) □ NORML Chapter at MSU 44 □ Painting and Drawing Guild □ Pow wow Basketball Tournament Club


□ Pre-Vet Club □ QSA (Queer Straight Alliance) “I just had the right feeling □ Read This when I came here.” □ Robo Sub □ Saudi Student Club -KELSY BRANGOCCIO □ SCA Shire of Silverkeep HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT □ SEDS Montana □ Sensory-Based Movement & Dance Club □ Sign Language Club □ Society of American Indian Graduate Students □ Society of Women Engineers □ Sons of Odin □ Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) □ Speech and Debate at Montana State □ Stock Horse Team of MSU □ Student Alumni Association □ Student Health Advisory Committee □ Student Veteran Club □ Students Against Sexual Assault □ Students for Choice □ Students for Life □ Sustained Dialogue □ Tactical Action Gaming Club □ TBA A Cappella, aka Boy Band □ Tias y Tios □ Toastmasters of Montana State University □ Turkish Student Association □ University Chess Club □ Upheaval: A Revolution of the Art □ Wikipedia Club □ Wilderness Association □ Young Americans for Liberty

MORE OPPORTUNITIES THROUGH THE DIVERSITY AWARENESS OFFICE: SAFE ZONE

Safe Zone is a program that is designed to promote a welcoming, inclusive and safe environment for LGBTQIQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, questioning) students, faculty, and staff.

SUSTAINED DIALOGUE

Sustained Dialogue is a group of students that come together to thoughtfully dialogue about differences, similarities, and other aspects of life.

TUNNEL OF OPPRESSION

Tunnel of Opression is an interactive event that highlights contemporary issues of oppression.

EVENTS

Throughout the year, from Native American Heritage Day to Coming Out Week and everything in between, visit www.montana.edu/diversity to see what is happening.

“It is great to be part of MSU!”

-KATIE DESLAURIERS COMMUNITY HEALTH

45


MORE OPPORTUNITIES THROUGH THE OFFICE OF ACTIVITIES & ENGAGEMENT: Here are a few of the opportunities the Office of Activities & Engagement put together for you to get involved on campus and in the Bozeman area.

SERVICE SATURDAYS

Once a month service projects held on the 1st Saturday of the month, October through April.

JOIN OR START A STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Find your passions and meet new people by starting your own organization or club!

SPRING SERVICE TRIPS

BreaksAway trips are offered over spring break to other parts of the US where students can learn and serve together.

MSU AMERICA READS*AMERICA COUNTS (ARAC) MSU students are matched with local school kids who need assistance in math or literacy. Volunteer and work-study positions are available.

COMPACT SERVICE CORPS

An AmeriCorps program that actively engages MSU students in meeting community-identified needs through meaningful service.

BOZEMAN AREA COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS Volunteer for a non-profit community organization on an on-going or one-time basis. Go to www.montana.edu/community/organizationlist.html

96

is the average number of non-profit organizations in Bozeman that are on the list needing help in MSUs Office of Activities & Engagement.

46


SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am currently a senior from Bozeman studying Biochemistry.

WHAT WAS YOUR BIGGEST SHOCK WHEN ARRIVING AT MSU?

The amount of studying required was a big suprise to me!

WORDS OF WISDOM?

Get involved, get connected, and pursue something you’re passionate about.

ADVICE FOR INCOMING FRESHMEN?

JESSE COOK

Focus on studies and don’t procrastinate too much, it will hurt you in the long run.

47


-2401 • ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 994 www.alumni.montana.edu

• ASMSU 994-29 33

www.montana.edu/asmsu

• ATHLETICS 994-4221 www.msubobcats.com

• CALENDAR OF EVENTS

/calendar.php

calendar.msu.montana.edu

• CHAMPCHANGE 994-7627 www.champchange.com

-3591 • STUDENT ACTIVITIES 994 ivities tact den /stu .edu ana ont www.m

49


One of the best things about attending MSU is the Bobcat Spirit and pride we share in our mighty blue and gold. Our traditions are multi-faceted, often understated and yet very powerful. We take great pride in our athletic teams and their character on and off the court. We celebrate the academic achievements of our students and the service we give to communities, our home and abroad. And we know once you graduate from here and move on to the next step in your life, you too will feel the power and pride of what it really means to be a Bobcat because you have been well prepared in an environment that wants you to succeed.

WHAT IS A BOBCAT? Bobcats (the animals) are known for their resiliency, independence, persistence, and ability to adapt to their environment. Bobcats (the students) are known for their loyalty, pride, and spirit. We also have a renowned work ethic, commitment to excellence, ability to look after each other, and know the difference between right and wrong (trust us, employers love Bobcats).

50


THE MSU FIGHT SONG Stand up and cheer, Cheer long and loud for dear Montana For today we raise The blue and gold to wave victorious Our sturdy band now is fighting And we are sure to win the fray We’ve got the vim, We’re here to win For this is dear Montana’s Day!

51


I am a junior studying Family & Consumer Sciences. I am also on the MSU Football team.

ADVICE FOR FRESHMEN?

ZACH MINTER

Go to class on the first day. Listen and learn how the class operates. The professor will usually give advice on how to get good grades.


“MUST DO” EVENTS...

• CATAPALOOZA- August, the week before classes start • LEGEND OF THE BOBCAT (Friday night before school starts) • CONVOCATION (Condoleezza Rice, Sept 5) • GOLD RUSH FOOTBALL GAME (First home game) • SEPTEMBER INVOLVEMENT FAIR (September) • ETIQUETTE DINNER AND CAREER FAIR (Fall semester) • CHAMPCHANGE AUCTION (Fall/Spring semesters) • CHRISTMAS STROLL (December) • TUNNEL OF OPPRESSION (February) • RAIL JAM (Spring semester) • ART WALK DOWNTOWN (Fridays in the summer) • SWEET PEA FESTIVAL (Summer) • BITE OF BOZEMAN (Just before the Sweet Pea Festival) • MUSIC ON MAIN (Thursdays in the summer)

“MY TOP 3 EVENTS” 1. Student Employment Fair 2. Legend of the Bobcat 3. Blue and Gold Ball

-EMILY BERGUM

SECONDARY EDUCATION

1. Undie Run 2. Catapalooza 3. Voting in the ASMSU Elections

-KIAH ABBEY

POLITICAL SCIENCE

1. Bobcat Games 2. Pow-wow 3. Cat/Griz football

-STEVE COSTLE

CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING

53


OH, DID WE MENTION HOMECOMING? YOU HAVE TO BE A PART OF THESE EVENTS: • LIGHTING OF “GO CATS” IN THE RESIDENCE HALLS • MIDNIGHT MANIA • HIKING AND PAINTING OF THE “M” • PARADE • FREE STUDENT BBQ & CONCERT ON THE MALL • DECORATING OF RESLIFE & SORORITY/ FRATERNITY HOUSES • DOWNTOWN PEP RALLY

54


SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am a sophomore from Anchorage, Alaska. I am majoring in both Biomedicine and Spanish.

FAVORITE PLACE TO STUDY ON CAMPUS? The third floor of the library. It’s very calming and great for studying.

WHAT DO YOU WISH YOU KNEW AS A FRESHMAN?

That college isn’t as scary as it may seem. It’s important to get involved and to meet as many people as possible.

As easy as it is, don’t procrastinate! It’s much easier to learn the subject matter over time as opposed to the night before the test.

JASMINE NEENO

STUDY TIPS FOR EXAMS AND PROJECTS?

55


994-29 33

• ASMSU LEGAL SERVICES

l.html

ega www.montana.edu/asmsu/l

GICAL • COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLO 31 -45 SERVICES 994 www.montana.edu/wwwcc

• DE AN OF STUDENTS OFFICE

994-2826

• DISABILIT Y, RE-ENTRY & VET SERVICES 994-2824

ER AN

www.montana.edu/wwwds

s

www.montana.edu/wwwre

• HEALTH PROMOTION 994-54

97

althpromo www.montana.edu/health/he

11 • HEALTH SERVICES 994-23 www.montana.edu/wwwhs

37 or 587-2306 • INSIGHT PROGRAM 994-59 21 • SILENT WITNESS 994-21 nt.shtml w.montana.edu/police/sile ww

• VOICE CENTER 994-7142 www.montana.edu/voice

36 • WOMEN'S CENTER 994-38 omen www.montana.edu/wwww

57


STAY HEALTHY Well, we don’t want to sound like your mom, but in reality, your mom was right. You have to build habits and make choices that allow you to have optimum health. Think about it, Olympic athletes don’t go into a competition without being in the best physical and mental shape. They develop habits and make choices to maximize their success. You are now on your own, learning to be responsible for yourself and your own choices. Part of personal responsibility is making sure you take care of yourself and stay as healthy as you can. Here are a few tips to maintain good health at MSU.

• GET VACCINATED. Several vaccinations are

important for college students to have. The meningitis vaccine is one of the most important for students living in residence halls. Some other important vaccines are tetanus (Tdap), HPV (for women), polio, MMR, Hepatitis B, varicella (chicken pox), Hepatitis A, and of course, influenza. • WASH YOUR HANDS. Being around so many people and so many germs make it easy to get sick. Washing your hands is the easiest and most effective way to prevent the spread of germs. When you don’t have soap and water to clean your hands, hand sanitizer is the next best thing. • CLEAN YOUR ROOM. Even though Mom and Dad won’t be there to tell you to clean up anymore, it’s still important. Leaving old food, dirty clothes, and who knows what else laying all over your dorm room floor is an open invitation for bugs, visible and invisible to multiply...it just makes you feel yucky! • GET YOUR EXERCISE. Walking to class, eating right and getting regular exercise is a great way to maintain the healthiest immune system you can. Trying not to gain the “freshman 15” isn’t easy, but it will go a long way in maintaining your overall health.

58


• EAT A WELL-BALANCED DIET. Do your best to

eat a healthy, well-balanced diet and your body will thank you for it. The better your diet, the stronger your immune system will be. • GET PLENTY OF SLEEP. It is an important part of a healthy lifestyle to get as much rest as you can. Staying up all night and sleeping through your classes isn’t ideal either, so get your sleep at night. • DRINK LOTS OF WATER. Sodas and coffee may help you stay awake, but they will also contribute to dehydration. Keep a water bottle with you all the time, drink throughout the day, and you will probably get what you need.

REDUCE YOUR STRESS Many college students report experiencing high levels of stress at times, which is a normal part of college life. However, high levels of unmanageable stress can cause problems that affect your health, your academic success and your relationships. Some healthy ways to relieve stress include:

• EXERCISE. Enough said! • ASK FOR HELP. With schoolwork, with a family

problem, a health problem, etc. Never underestimate the value of talking to a friend or family member when you’re feeling overwhelmed. • SLEEP! Students tend to not sleep enough, and this ‘deficit’ is cumulative. Lack of sleep will lower your resistance to even small stressors, plus increase the likelihood you’ll catch a bug. • LEARN RELAXATION STRATEGIES. Breathing, meditation, or just finding a quiet place and being still for a short time helps reduce stress. • EAT WELL. Pay attention to what you’re eating when stress levels are high. Poor nutrition, while sometimes giving a quick ‘boost,’ will not help in the long run.

HOMESICKNESS Very few people are immune from homesickness. Yearning for the comforts of home is normal. Not only are you experiencing a major adjustment to your new environment, but you are also experiencing a loss of what was comfortable and predictable. Feeling “homesick” may include sadness, loneliness, nervousness, insecurity, missing loved ones, or apathy towards your new environment. Here are some tips 59 (on the following page) that may help you in your transition:


• GIVE YOURSELF PERMISSION TO BE HOMESICK! Realize that a period of “homesickness” is natural, it doesn’t mean that you’re a “baby,” that you’re immature or that you’re a “mama’s boy/ daddy’s girl.” And guess what, everyone else is having similar feelings.

• FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF WITH YOUR NEW SURROUNDINGS. Once you know your new

environment, find your way around, see where your classes are located, and discover some fun hang-outs and activities; you will likely feel more comfortable and in control of your situation. • EXPLORE ACTIVITIES. Make a list of all the things you like to do and explore the clubs or organizations that interest you. Chances are you’ll find the perfect one! • BRING FAMILIAR THINGS WITH YOU. Having pictures, memorabilia, or favorite possessions with you in your new living space can help facilitate a smoother transition. • BE OPEN TO NEW OPPORTUNITIES. Try to avoid comparing your new environment to home it’s different! The more open you are to NEW things, the less you might miss PAST things.

• INVITE OTHERS IN YOUR EXPLORATIONS.

Getting involved with others and making friends can help you feel less alone. Inviting roommates, classmates, and neighbors to “check out the campus” or “see what’s downtown,” can often lead to a positive experience. • KEEP IN TOUCH WITH FRIENDS. Stay in contact with friends and family. Tell them all about your new experiences and encourage them to do the same with you. • MAKE PLANS TO VISIT HOME. Knowing that you have an upcoming trip home set for a specific time may be comforting and allow you to focus on your goals while on campus. It also prevents those impulsive trips home and encourages you to invest in your new life at school.

• WHAT IF NONE OF THIS STUFF WORKS??

If you find that you are having trouble adjusting, or continue to feel homesick after a reasonable amount of time (4-6 weeks), you may need to talk to someone. Talking to friends, family, or your RA may be a good starting point. Try meeting with a Success Advisor from the Office of Student Success to learn how to adjust to campus life. If you think you need something more, MSU’s Counseling and Psychological Services is here to help. You can contact them at montana.edu/wwwcc or call 994-4531.

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DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY Depression and anxiety are among the most common issues college students deal with; about 1 in 5 students experience either condition. For some, depression or anxiety existed before college, and many others will experience these conditions at some point during their college career. Some amount of sadness or nervousness is normal; we all experience these emotions from time to time. The difference with depression and anxiety is that they are both more intense, longer lasting, and cause more interference with everyday life than common feelings of sadness, nervousness, or “bad days.” Depression Symptoms: Sadness • Irritability • Poor Motivation • Difficulty Concentrating • Trouble Sleeping • Appetite Changes • Restlessness • Fatigue • Pessimism • Loss of Interest/Enjoyment • Suicidal Thoughts

Anxiety Symptoms: Chronic Worry • Nervousness/Fear • Panic Attacks • Sense of Dread • Muscle Tension • Fatigue • Trouble Sleeping • Appetite Changes • Trouble Concentrating • Repetitive Thoughts/ • Behaviors

There are several causes for depression/anxiety. Sometimes these conditions seem to come “out of the blue.” Other times there may be life experiences, transitions, or current stressors or experiences that contribute to these feelings. Substance use can exacerbate these conditions, so can our thinking styles and how we interpret/react to life events. There are several ways to minimize the likelihood that you will become depressed/anxious and there are ways to manage it if you do. Practicing good self-care is the best start: Getting consistent sleep, eating healthy, exercising, and avoiding excessive drug/alcohol use is the first step. Good time/stress management, coping skills, and finding balance will also help keep life from getting too hectic or out of control. Talking about these issues and experiences can often help - seeking out friends, family, RA’s or other MSU staff for support is a great resource. If any of these issues are interfering with life or academics and you find yourself having difficulty managing them on your own, MSU’s Counseling and Psychological Services offers free, confidential counseling to students for these and any other i ssues. You can contact them at: montana.edu/wwwcc or call 994-4531.

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DRUGS AND ALCOHOL Students give many different reasons for why they may drink. Some students say they drink because of peer pressure and to be part of a crowd. Some use alcohol to avoid difficult situations that may arise at school and work, or with family and friends. Others use alcohol to avoid uncomfortable feelings, like anxiety or sadness. Anyone who drinks runs the risk of developing an alcohol problem. A serious problem can develop quickly. Drug and alcohol use and abuse is preventable; here are some helpful hints to help you make good choices:

• GET EDUCATED. Know the facts. Once you do,

you will realize that it is not worth endangering your career, your health, your relationships, and your future. • AVOID PEER PRESSURE. Think ahead about how to say “no.” • ENVIRONMENT. Avoid situations where people will be drinking and using drugs. Get involved in non-drinking activities. • FACE IT. Confront your problem if you have one. • SUPPORT. Get help for the underlying problems of family, relationships, anxiety, or depression. Health Promotions is a great resource. Website: montana.edu/health/healthpromo/

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RELATIONSHIPS While the early months of a relationship can feel effortless and exciting, successful long-term relationships involve ongoing effort and compromise by both partners. Building healthy patterns early in your relationship can establish a solid foundation for the long run. When you are just starting a relationship, it is important to:

• BUILD. Build a foundation of appreciation and

respect. Focus on all the considerate things your partner says and does. Happy couples make a point of noticing even small opportunities to say “thank you” to their partner, rather than focusing on mistakes their partner has made. • EXPLORE. Explore each other’s interests so that you have a long list of things to enjoy together. Try new things together to expand mutual interests. • ESTABLISH. Establish a pattern of apologizing if you make a mistake or hurt your partner’s feelings. Saying “I’m sorry” may be hard in the moment, but it goes a long way towards healing a rift in a relationship. Your partner will trust you more if he or she knows that you will take responsibility for your words and actions.

VOICE CENTER If you are grappling with a relationship problem or issue and would like some help, we encourage you to contact the Student Health Services at 994-2337, or Counseling & Psychological Services at 994-4531, or VOICE Center at 994-7069.

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SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am a sophomore at MSU studying Animal Science, and I love riding horses.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO RELAX?

To relieve stress and relax, I enjoy riding horses and playing the piano.

WORDS OF WISDOM FOR INCOMING FRESHMEN?

A handshake, introduction, and a smile are the best way to find friends at MSU.

There is no shame in having to change your major. Admitting that you miss home is completely acceptable. College is such a unique time in your life...so enjoy it!

KATHERINE LEONARDSON

WHAT DO YOU WISH YOU KNEW AS A FRESHMAN?


SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am a sophomore studying Electrical Engineering here at MSU. Longboarding is one of my favorite things to do.

FAVORITE CAMPUS RESOURCE? I like the Math Learning Center. They are a great source for helping you to pass your classes.

FAVORITE STUDY SPOT?

I like to go to the third floor of the Library. They have the quietest study areas where you can focus on your work.

FAVORITE CLASS?

NELS TATE

Anything to do with Electrical Engineering. I find it very cool and fascinating.

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DENT • CA REER, INTERNSHIP & STU -4353 EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 994 www.montana.edu/careers

• FINANCIAL AID 994-28 45 www.montana.edu/wwwfa

• OFFICE OF STUDENT SUCCE

SS 994-7627

www.montana.edu/success

NDATION • STUDENT ASSISTANCE FOU ege.org coll out rtab ma w.s 994-5024 ww onlight Basin)

• SK YLINE BUS (to Big Sky & Mo 995-6287 www.skylinebus.com • STREAMLINE BUS SERVICE

587-24 34

• TR AILS AROUND BOZEM AN

556-1496

www.streamlinebus.com www.gult.org/trails

85.9” is the average

number of inches of snowfall per year in Bozeman.

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MONEY, SCHOLARSHIPS, JOBS AND ALL THE OTHER THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW... You’ll have more freedom in college than you’ve probably ever experienced in your life...and that is a good thing. You’ll have the freedom to decide your courses, your major, when you study, where you eat, your friends, your internship, etc. But remember, there are a few areas where you’ll want to practice restraint, and your budget and is one of them.

THE BEGINNING OF THE SEMESTER “FLUSH” At the beginning of each semester, most students feel “flush” financially. Most of us either worked and saved our pennies or received a refund check through Financial Aid (or some combination of both). Regardless, our advice is to really consider what and how you want to spend your money. It might be tempting to deck out your dorm room with a new Wii or flat panel TV, but the point is, that type of spending probably isn’t going to yield better results on a test or paper.

GETTING USED TO THE “I” WORD When we say “I” we don’t mean you (at least not this time)...we mean “investment.” College is an investment. You are making an investment in yourself, and investments yield the best results when you put your full energy toward the investment and not other things that take away from the value. Investment values also improve over time, because you have resources to put into them. So let’s say you have an extra $500 per semester from your refund check that you could consider “fun” money. Instead of spending it, you decide to put it in your savings account. Now, in your junior year, you might decide you want to do a “Study Abroad” in another country to better master a foreign language or learn from a diverse culture… because you’ve saved $2,000 you’ll be able to make this investment in yourself. Sure, it would be nice to have a new TV, but you won’t impress an employer with the size of your flat screen...

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MANAGING YOUR BUDGET

Managing a budget is not as hard as it sounds. Making the initial commitment to live according to your budget is the hardest part. If you have done that, you are well on your way to wise spending and saving.

WHAT IS A BUDGET?

It is simply a written plan for spending your money. You will spend your money; a budget just helps you to spend it wisely.

MANAGING YOUR BUDGET. Prepare a budget worksheet. To make your own, just write down your income in one column and your expenses in another column, then compare the two. Then, start tracking your incidental expenses. You’ll probably be surprised at what you spend your money on. For more information on budget and financial planning, go to the MSU CashCourse website at: www.cashcourse.org/montanastate/Default.aspx A FEW IDEAS THAT YOU CAN USE TO SUCCESSFULLY MANAGE YOUR BUDGET: • Define your wants verses your needs. Concentrate on spending money only on your needs. • Don’t drink, smoke, or do drugs. They are bad for • you, addictive, and cost money. You don’t need them. • If at all possible, keep a savings account. Pay • yourself first. • Use everything to its full potential. Don’t waste anything. • Recycle and reuse study materials such as pencils, pens, and paper. Buy used textbooks whenever possible, and sell the ones you no longer need. • Don’t spend money around the plans you make. Make plans around the money you have after all your responsibilities are met. • Don’t be tempted by your friends’ spending habits. • Make the most of the college’s meal plan, attend college events where there is free food. • Use your tuition money wisely. Consider taking the maximum number of credits allowed. • Get an on-campus job. • Make things yourself instead of buying them whenever possible.

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• Shop smart when buying groceries and household items. Use coupons. Shop the sales. Don’t buy soft drinks unless they are on sale or store brand. Drink water. Do not spend money on snack machines. • Shop smart when buying clothes. Do not pay retail prices. Shop thrift stores, consignment shops, yard sales, clearance racks, and buy during off seasons. • Take advantage of student discounts and free offers.

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AT MSU Scholarship opportunities for returning students may be found through the various departments and colleges on campus. Many have their scholarship applications available on their websites and available for download just after the first of the year. Students need to be aware of the individual deadlines that these scholarships have, and submit their applications in a timely manner. Scholarships may be found through the completion and submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The Office of Financial Aid has limited scholarship monies available to students who qualify by filing of this form. Forms are available online after January 1st of each year and early submission is important.

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FINDING A JOB WHILE AT MSU Whether you have to work or you want to work, having a job while you are in school can help you in the short term (providing money to pay for school) and the long term (experience on your resume). In fact, we encourage you to get a job whether you need the money or not. The experience you gain will pay off in the end.

• UTILIZE MYCATCAREERS. This is a service from

Career, Internship & Student Employment Services. Go to www.MyCatCareers.com to find student employment opportunities both on and off campus. • HAVE WORK-STUDY? Positions can be found online at www.MyCatCareers.com. Don’t have a work-study? Don’t worry, there are still a lot of opportunities for you to find a part-time job on this site. • TAKE THE PROCESS SERIOUSLY. Applying for a job as a student is just as important as if it were a full-time job. Create a professional resume and be professional in your dress and demeanor in the interview and on the job. • GET A JUMP START on your competition by having your resume ready and apply to the position as soon as you see one of interest. • IF YOU REALLY WANT TO WORK for an off-campus organization or on-campus department, ask them if they are hiring. Take the initiative to ask, it can’t hurt. • DO AN INTERNSHIP. An internship is a formal experience with an employer where you will work for an organization completing projects, observing others, and getting to know what it is like to work in the “real” world. Internships are a great way to build your resume and get to know an employer.

• YOU MUST DO AN INTERNSHIP!

$4,280 is the estimated yearly cost to students for books/supplies ($1,150) and misc. personal expenses ($3,130).

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SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am a sophomore from Nevada and am majoring in Chemical and Biological Engineering.

HOW DID YOU MEET NEW PEOPLE AT MSU?

Meet people on your Residence Hall floor, step out of your comfort zone! Find a free SmartyCats Tutor; who knows, it might be me!

HOW DO YOU BALANCE SCHOOL AND SOCIAL LIFE?

Go straight to the library before and after class, get all of your homework done as soon as possible. Then, you can have most nights off.

ADVICE FOR FRESHMEN?

JAMES PATTON

If you struggle academically, there are people to help; go to the Office of Student Success!


SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

Volleyball brought me to MSU. I am majoring in Health Enhancement K-12, I am currently a junior and love MSU.

WHAT WAS THE BEST THING THAT HAPPENED AS A FRESHMAN?

Meeting great people who have greatly impacted my life.

WORDS OF WISDOM? Enjoy your time here. It goes by so fast.

ADVICE FOR FRESHMEN ON HOW TO DO WELL IN CLASS?

MACY PAGE

Focus on school and make good study habits early.


• INTRA MURA LS & RECRE ATI

ON 994-5000

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• THE MUSEUM OF THE ROCKI g www.museumoftherockies.or

ES 994-34 66

ozemanevents.net • BOZEM AN EVENT S www.b manonline.com

• BOZEMAN ONLINE www.boze • BOZEM AN FAIRGROUNDS

582-3270

68 • OUTSIDE BOZEM AN 582-80 www.outsidebozeman.com

CENTER • THE EMERSON CULTURAL g/events.aspx n.or erso eem 587-9797 www.th

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WHAT TO DO WITH... 30 MINUTES: • Checkout an exhibit at the Exit Gallery in the SUB or the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in Haynes Hall. • Feed the ducks in MSU’s Duck Pond. • Get to know one of your MSU professors or faculty members better – initiate a conversation or make an appointment with them. • Walk through the MSU Architecture Department and check out the latest projects. • Check out the Resource Center & Bulletin Board at ASMSU Outdoor Recreation Center for upcoming events, outings, services and exchange of equipment. • Read ‘The Exponent’ – your campus newspaper. • Make a new friend – strike up a conversation with a fellow student. • Explore the MSU website - www.montana.edu.

ONE HOUR: • See a laser show or check out an exhibit at the Museum of the Rockies. • Write down your goals & dreams of what you would like to do after you graduate. • Jump on one of the Streamline buses at the Strand Union and take a roundtrip tour of town. • Try a Yoga, Pilates, Drumming, Kickboxing, Zumba, Max Core, Boot Camp, Hydro Fitness or Slow & Steady Class at the Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center. • Explore what the Renne Library has to offer.

TWO HOURS: • Bike or walk the valley’s trail system. www.gvlt.org/trails • Checkout one of MSU’s many clubs, intramurals or other meetings happening around campus. • Grab a bench up on Peet’s Hill above the city library and watch the sunset. • Stroll Downtown Bozeman on any Friday night or Sunday morning. • Attend a performance of Montana Shakespeare in the Parks.

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• Perfect your grind at the Bozeman Skate Park or visit the BMX track. • Attend/ View art exhibits at Bozeman’s Emerson Cultural Center. • Visit the Farmer’s Market at Bogart Park, Gallatin County Fairgrounds, or the Emerson Cultural Center. • Maintain or repair your own equipment at the Bicycle & Ski Workshop at ASMSU Outdoor Recreation Center.

THREE HOURS: • See a movie at the Procrastinator Theater at MSU or the Gallatin Mall Cinemas, or the Bozeman Film Festival held at the Emerson Cultural Center. • Plan an evening of board games with friends. • Attend a Bobcat sporting event. • Attend the ballet or the symphony. Can’t afford it? See if they need volunteer ushers or look for “rush tickets”. • See a play or comedy at the Main Stage Theatre in the SUB. There are also many small theater companies in Bozeman. • Play frisbee golf at Rose Park in Bozeman. Also try playing paintball at Battle Ridge. • Take dance lessons. Attend monthly Contra or International folk-dancing. Check out the schedule on the Bozeman Folklore Society website. • Take a seminar or non-credit class on outdoor-oriented topics from the ASMSU Recreation Center. • Go on a full moon walk or ski. • Pick a new area of town to explore each weekend. • Attend free evening concerts at places like Bozeman’s Leaf and Bean Coffee House or the Community Food Co-op.

A HALF DAY: • Fish the Gallatin River or other rivers. • Volunteer for an organization in need or for Service Saturdays: check the schedule with MSU’s Office of Activities & Engagement. • Cross country ski on one of the many groomed trails around Bozeman, or check out Bohart Ranch or Lone Mountain Ranch. • Print out the MSU Campus Map and see how many buildings you can explore in half a day. • Ride the Gondola or Zip Line at Big Sky Ski Resort. • Take one of the hikes listed in this section.

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A FULL DAY: • Go on a group outing with the ASMSU Outdoor Recreation Center. • Catch the bus to Big Sky or Moonlight and ski for the day. • Get a job - checkout the job board outside Career, Internship & Student Employment Services. • Drive down to West Yellowstone and view the canyon and wildlife near Big Sky. Watch for moose, grizzlies, and wolves. • Give a day - volunteer for one of the community events going on or for an organization in need. • Visit Mammoth Hot Springs in the winter after snow falls. Bring cross country skis or snow shoes, or rent them right in Mammoth.

GREAT HIKES IN THE AREA: • THE M. One of Bozeman’s most visible landmarks.

There are two mile-long trails to the landmark, one with winding switchbacks and the other a rigorously steep trek for the more ambitious.

• THE DRINKING HORSE MOUNTAIN TRAIL.

Bozeman’s newest hiking gem, but not just because it makes for a short, vigorous 1.6 mile (3.2 mile roundtrip) early-morning or after-class hike. • GROTTO FALLS. A fun hike in Hyalite Canyon. It’s about a mile walk along an easy, gradual grade that leads to the falls. • SACAJAWEA PEAK. The tallest peak in the Bridger range is summited with a steep, two-mile climb that starts at the Fairy Lake Campground. • LAVA LAKE. A beautiful mountain lake in the Spanish Peaks off Highway 191 toward Big Sky.

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IMPROVE YOUR ACADEMIC SUCCESS WHAT TO DO WITH... 30 MINUTES: • Organize your daily planner. Make sure that all important dates are copied down so you can be prepared for a busy week ahead! • Review your notes. Research shows that students who review their notes on a daily basis retain more information than students who do not. • Highlight important paragraphs in your textbook and write down any unanswered questions in the margin of the book. • Stop by your professor’s office hours! Get to know the individual who will be grading all of your work. Take advantage of the face to face time to ask questions and clarify assignments. • Chat with other students in your class about forming a study group. Make arrangements to meet at Renne Library or in the Strand Union Building. • Take a nap in the Leigh Lounge. Being well-rested is important to keep your memory functioning at its prime! • Make a list of goals you want to complete by the end of the semester. Making and achieving small goals can help to build your confidence as a student!

ONE HOUR: • Go to class! It might sound like a no-brainer, but attending class is the absolute best way to ensure your success on campus. Professors can make changes to the syllabus, add an extra assignment, give out extra credit or hand out a quiz. Being present every time class meets guarantees that you are always aware of what is required of you to do well in the class. • Make flashcards for the vocabulary that pertains to your current reading assignment. • Make your own test! Take each heading in your book and turn it into a question. Not only will you know the contents of your reading assignment better but you will increase the likelihood of doing well on the upcoming test!

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• Reformat your notes. Everyone has their own style of learning and it is important that you discover what works for you. Feel free to reorganize your notes or handouts in a manner that suits you and your learning style. • Attend a study group. Bouncing ideas off of other students can help you to understand the problem or assignment in a different context. • Visit the Math Learning Center in Wilson Hall. There is no getting around it: to graduate from MSU you are going to have to take a math class. The Math Learning Center is staffed with students and professors who love to see you succeed. • Stop by the Office of Student Success. We can help you brush up on your study skills, time management, textbook reading, note-taking and even help you develop a career plan. Don’t see what you are looking for? Not to worry! This office can customize a program to fit your needs. • Meet with a SmartyCats Tutor. Go here to get started: www.msusmartycats.com.

TWO HOURS: • Have a busy week ahead? Take your free time on campus to research the paper that is due next week. Use the online catalogs to find articles or journals that pertain to your prompt. • Review your notes for every class that were taken for the week. Find a quiet place on campus and make sure you understand everything that was covered in each of your classes.

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SUCCESS SNAPSHOT

WHO AM I?

I am a junior who is majoring in Business Management. I play tennis for MSU and am on the Student Athlete Advisory Committee.

BEST THING THAT’S HAPPENED TO YOU AT MSU?

Meeting so many new people while I was living in the residence halls.

WORDS OF WISDOM FOR FRESHMEN?

It’s a beautiful place, enjoy it while you are here. MSU has made me a better person on and off the tennis court.

YOUR BEST ADVICE?

PRITHIV SIVASUBRAMANIAM

The faculty are very helpful, all you have to do is ask! They have been a huge support to me.


The Student Success Guide (2012-13)