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RISE4Montana Semi-Annual Report Midyear Reflections on Challenges, O p p o r t u n i t i e s a n d P r o g r e s s To D a t e May 2016 RISE4Montana is a joint initiative of the Montana Association of School Business Officials, MEA-MFT, Montana Quality Education Coalition, Montana Rural Education Association, Montana School Boards Association, School Administrators of Montana, the Phyllis J. Washington College of Education and Human Sciences and Montana State University’s Department of Education.


Introduction The partners in RISE4Montana have taken significant steps during the first six months since we announced our initiative to increase awareness of and otherwise alleviate the challenges facing Montana’s public schools in successfully recruiting and retaining incredible school educators. We have worked together with a sense of urgency, recognizing the key role that teachers and administrative leaders play in developing the full educational potential of Montana’s school-aged children. Through our efforts over the last six months, we have:

Our Core Purpose To increase the number of available educators interested in working in Montana’s Public Schools while preserving our current standards of quality.

Our Core Values •

We are committed to developing the full educational potential of each student in our public schools and we recognize and respect the role of highly qualified educators in achieving this important outcome.

We respect and support the Accreditation Standards adopted by the Montana Board of Public Education.

We empower students in each community of the state by ensuring successful recruitment and retention of highly qualified educators by all of Montana’s Public Schools.

We are committed to continued success of Montana’s Public Schools.

We do not compromise when it comes to quality for kids.

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1. Researched, in collaboration with Education Northwest, the extent of recruitment and retention challenges faced by public schools nationwide so as to better understand the magnitude of the challenges our own schools face; 2. In collaboration with nationally renowned research firm Zogby Analytics, developed, administered and derived statistically valid data from an opinion poll of the teachers and administrative leaders currently serving in Montana’s public schools; 3. Developed meaningful proposals to streamline licensure through recommendations advanced in collaboration with the Office of Public Instruction to the Board of Public Education; and 4. Advocated for solutions before the Legislature’s School Funding Interim Commission. In this update, you will find highlights and insights regarding the above-referenced efforts, as well as an outline of our intended next steps in recruiting incredible school educators for Montana’s public schools.


We Have Confirmed that Recruitment and Retention is a National Problem One of the first steps we took was to identify the extent of recruitment and retention problems across the nation. Through work with Education Northwest and our own extensive tracking of media coverage, we confirmed our suspicions that recruitment and retention is a problem that is national in scope, affecting virtually every state in the Nation to some degree or another. Let’s face it, teaching and administrative leadership are mobile professions and we compete not only among ourselves for the best and brightest teachers and administrative leaders but with the nation at large. Correspondingly, recruitment and retention challenges faced by other states will exacerbate the challenges we face here as other states develop their own initiatives to recruit and retain teachers and administrative leaders. The dedication of our existing teachers and administrative leaders serving in Montana’s public schools may be the most important asset we have going for us at this time. The selfless devotion to students and communities is not surprising to those of us who work so closely with Montana’s public schools, which we were able to confirm through polling addressed later in this update. And just because this “asset” as such is intangible, that does not mean it is infinite or invulnerable to attack or denigration. The importance and interwoven nature of career satisfaction as it relates to a supportive and collaborative working environment as well as to the ability to operate in local communities that support their public schools and their public school educators cannot be overstated. The respect accorded public school educators in Montana is something upon which we have long relied to assist in recruiting and retaining incredible school educators and is also something we have seen reinforced in other polls we have conducted over the years. We need to maintain or even ideally increase these levels of support and respect for public educators if we are to avoid taking the ill-thought fork in the road chosen by some states that have chosen to treat public educators like an enemy to be punished and denigrated rather than as a friend to be trusted and appreciated.

National: Teacher preparation enrollment and completion numbers, 2010-2014 2014

499,800 197,459

Total 2013 Number 2012 of Enrollees 2011

Total 623,190 204,180

Number 684,801 217,492 of Completers

2010

719,081 232,707

725,518 241,401

Source: Title II Report, includes state and territories. Enrollees include all state-approved teacher preparation programs, traditional, and university-based and non-university based alternative programs.

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We Have Crafted Meaningful Proposals to Streamline Licensures in Collaboration with OPI The organizations partnering in RISE4Montana have worked collaboratively with OPI in streamlining licensure. These efforts have been undertaken in alignment with our objective to increase the number of available educators interested in working in Montana’s public schools while preserving our current standards of quality. If these proposed changes are accepted by the Montana Board of Public Education as expected, a career in public education in Montana will be available to any quality teacher or administrator from around the Nation, as long as they have a documented track record of success as a licensed educator in another state. 1. If a candidate for licensure is nationally board certified then the candidate is eligible for full licensure in Montana in the field endorsed 2. If a candidate for licensure has five years of successful licensed practice as a teacher or administrator in any other state in the U.S., documented by a recommendation from a state accredited P-12 employer in that state then the candidate is eligible for full licensure in the field endorsed 3. If a candidate for licensure has completed accredited professional educator preparation programs outside of Montana and holds an endorsement in specific disability areas of autism, hearing impaired or visual impaired they may qualify for an endorsement in Montana in these areas

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Our Next Steps Will Be Driven by Research As exciting as our efforts to date have been, we have only begun on our journey to ensure that Montana’s educators are valued and respected and that Montana’s Public Schools reach our intended future for 2020:

Montana’s Public Schools are a national magnet for the recruitment and retention of quality educators. We look forward to continued collaborations and efforts with our respective members in building this inspiring vision into a reality.

Polling Those Who Know These Challenges the Best Most recently, we conducted research regarding the opinions of current teachers and administrative leaders serving in Montana’s public schools. We decided that getting detailed information from those with personal experience dedicating their careers to Montana’s public schools would be the best first step in determining how to address the recruitment and retention challenges of which we have heard from Montana’s public schools. The value of the information we have obtained through this process cannot be overstated, providing statistically valid information regarding the extent of recruitment and retention issues as well as identifying the key motivators leading current educators to commit to a career in public education. The insights of these Montana leaders will form the foundation from which we will develop solutions in the coming months and years. Detailed findings and related charts can be found on the remaining pages of this update. ➤5


Key Insights from Polling Zogby Analytics conducted a hybrid survey (online and live telephone interview) of 602 teachers and 200 school administrators in Montana to determine their opinions and attitudes related to their jobs, careers and overall educational climate. The margin of error on the poll of teachers is +/-4.1% while the margin of error on the poll of administrators was a bit higher at +/-7.1% due to the smaller population sampled. Some questions were directed to both teachers and administrators, while some questions specifically targeted one of these two groups. The following are some key findings from the survey.

The Shortage in Montana is Real The shortage in recruitment and retention of quality educators in Montana is real, with Montana’s public schools increasingly relying on emergency authorizations (32% of those surveyed), provisionally certified staff (62% of those surveyed), interns (49% of those surveyed) and teachers teaching outside of their endorsement areas (36% of those surveyed).

50 47%

40 30 23%

20

20%

10 0

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Recruitment: Percentage of Districts Reporting Applicable Average Number of Applicants for Openings

9%

Between 1-5 Applicants

Between 6-10 Applicants

More than 15 Applicants

Between 11-15 Applicants

3%

1%

Unsure

Zero


Recruitment: Percentage of Districts Reporting Difficulty Filling Positions in Specified Areas

80 70

68.32%

60 50

56.44%

54.46%

40 30

52.48%

49.50%

45.54%

43.56%

41.00%

40.59%

36.63% 36.63% 36.63% 36.63%

20

35.64% 34.65%

34.31%

10 0

Special Industrial Education Trades and P-12 Technology

Music K-12

World School Agriculture Math Family Computer Business Languages Counseling Middle and Science and K-12 K-12 Grades Consumer K-12 Information (4-8) Sciences Technology

Library K-12

Traffic Science Education (Broadfield)

Art K-12

Physics

Chemistry

The endorsement areas for which it is most difficult to find certified teachers are Special Education P-12 (69% of surveyed administrators consider it difficult to find certified teachers), Industrial Trades and Technology Education (57%), Music K-12 (55%), World Languages K-12 (53%) and School Counseling K-12 (50%) It is important to note, however, that a sizable minority of school districts appear to be experiencing difficulty in finding certified teachers and administrative leaders in all subjects and at all levels.

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Administrators - Sources of Information on Job Openings

Finding Open Positions Montana’s public schools and candidates for teaching and administrator vacancies rely heavily on online portals, particularly OPI’s career center, to fill positions for teachers and administrative leaders.

100 80 60

32%

37%

39%

39%

Somewhat Important Very Important

40 52%

45%

44%

42%

20 0

100

OPI Website

School District Website

Online information from Montana teacher and administrator job listing website

Information and encouragement from friends

Teachers - Sources of Information on Job Openings

80

60

27%

39%

32% Somewhat Important

40

46%

42%

40%

OPI Website

Information and encouragement from friends

School District Website

20

0 ➤8

Very Important


Administrators - Key Factors Important to Choice of Current Position 100

80

28%

36%

35%

38%

45%

30%

54%

60

40

Somewhat Important

61%

56%

56%

49%

46%

46%

37%

Very Important

20

0

Health Care Benefits

Job Retirement School Collegiality Proximity Availability Benefits Reputation to Friends

Salary

Teachers - Key Factors Important to Choice of Current Position 100

80

29%

33%

37%

31%

50%

43%

44%

34%

60

Somewhat Important Very Important

40

63%

53%

52%

46%

41%

34%

31%

29%

20

0

Job Availability

Health Care Benefits

Retirement Proximity Benefits to Friends

Salary

School Collegiality Reputation

Small Class Size

Choosing a Position Competitive deficits in compensation are part of the recruitment and retention problem, particularly in rural and isolated districts and particularly when it comes to health insurance and retirement benefits, both of which were valued above salary as primary factors for choosing a position. Additionally, although current teachers and administrators did not emphasize salary and benefits as the primary motivators for their own career choices, they did express belief that improvements in salary and benefits will be key to retaining teachers and administrative leaders. Going forward the opinions of educators in this regard are well supported and in alignment with previous court decisions, notably Judge Sherlock’s opinion from December 2008, where he noted the following in finding 122 of his Order: “In Finding of Fact 86, this Court noted the continuing problems with the recruitment and retention of teachers in isolated districts. While the State has made progress in this regard, it would be helpful if more could be done to ease these problems. As noted, increasing salaries for rural and isolated districts would have a noticeable impact on recruitment and retention problems.” ➤9


Administrators - Perceptions of Factors Important to Retention 100

14%

19%

25%

27%

29%

34%

38%

38%

36%

41%

44%

45%

43%

44%

80 Somewhat Important

60

86%

40

81%

76%

71%

Quality Health Care Coverage

Higher Salaries

Collegial Work Environment

66%

65%

61%

61%

60%

Time for Teachers to Collaborate

Internet and Telecomm

56%

55%

54%

52%

50%

Access to High Quality Curriculum and Teaching Resources

Family Involvement in Students’ Education

In-School Teaching Mentors/ Coaches, Dedicated New Teacher Support

Very Important

20

0

Supportive Leadership

More Help for Students Who Have Problems that Interfere with Learning

Clean and Safe Building Conditions

Retirement Relevant Community Benefits Professional and Development Living Conditions

Teachers - Perceptions of Factors Important to Retention

100

14%

18%

19%

20%

28%

31%

31%

32%

32%

35%

36%

39%

34%

42%

49%

80

60

40

Somewhat Important

85%

81%

80%

78%

70%

65%

65%

64%

63%

62%

58%

57%

57%

51%

46%

20

0

➤ 10

Supportive Leadership

Quality Health Care Coverage

Higher More Help Clean Retirement Family Access Time to Salaries for Students and Safe Benefits Involvement for Who Have High Building in Students’ Teachers Problems Conditions Quality Education to that InterCurriculum Collaborate fere with and Learning Teaching Resources

Collegial Relevant Internet Work Professional and Environ- Development Telecomm ment

In-School Greater Teaching DecisionMentors/ making Coaches, Role for Dedicated Teachers New Teacher Support

Community and Living Conditions

Very Important


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Administrators - Factors Important in Selection of Education as a Career

Career Motivation Montana’s public school teachers and administrators are motivated most by a sense of purpose and the importance of their work. For example, the two most important reasons cited for becoming a teacher or administrator among those surveyed were “opportunity to make a difference in the lives of students” (described as ‘very important’ by 89% of both administrators and teachers), and “having a sense of purpose or meaning in my work” (87% of administrators and 89% of teachers).

100

7%

12%

20%

80 60

89%

87%

36% Somewhat Important

76%

40

55%

20 0

Opportunity to make a difference in the lives of students

Having a sense of purpose or meaning in my work

Ability to serve a community that I care about

Stable pay and benefits

Teachers - Factors Important in Selection of Education as a Career 100

11%

10%

27%

80

60

89%

89%

68%

32%

59%

40

20

0

➤ 12

Very Important

Opportunity to make a difference in the lives of students

Having a sense of purpose or meaning in my work

Stable pay and benefits

Being active at work - not being confined to a desk

Somewhat Important Very Important


Administrators - Satisfaction with Community

Community Satisfaction

100

16%

20%

28%

28%

37%

80 Somewhat Agree

60

83%

74%

72%

68%

58%

I know a lot of people in the community and they know me

Participating in community events is enjoyable

Overall, the community supports my leadership and vision

Living in my community is a very rewarding experience

40

Strongly Agree

20

0

I like to be part of the community and try to do so

Teachers - Satisfaction with Community 100

80

29%

35%

29%

38%

47%

60

Montana’s public school teachers and administrative leaders love living in the community where their school is located. As an illustration, the statement “I like to be part of the community and try to do so” got 83% ‘strongly agree’ and 16% ‘somewhat agree’ response from administrative leaders. Additionally, all five affirmative community-related statements that were offered got a very high level of agreement among teachers surveyed, ranging from 86% to 97% (combined ‘strongly agree’ and ‘somewhat agree’ responses).

Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree

40

68%

61%

61%

54%

39%

Participating in community events is enjoyable

I know a lot of people in the community and they know me

Living in my community is a very rewarding experience

Overall, the community supports my leadership and vision

20

0

I like to be part of the community and try to do so

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Administrators - Career Satisfaction

Career Satisfaction Montana teachers (95%) and school administrators (98%) appear to be very satisfied with their career as educational leaders, defying national trends to the contrary. They would, if offered the chance to restart their careers, choose public education again (administrators at 89%; teachers at 86%). Correspondingly, a high percentage of teachers (78%) and administrators (89%) would, given their experiences over the course of their own careers, encourage graduating high school students to also pursue a career in education.

100

80

24%

31%

21%

34%

32%

41%

34%

39%

74%

68%

68%

63%

57%

54%

54%

52%

60

40

Strongly Satisfied

20

0

I am satisfied with my position as a leader in the public schools

I am satisfied with my career in education

If I had the chance to start my career over, I would choose to become a licensed principal or superintendent again

I feel successful in supervising and evaluating teachers

I would I am satisfied encourage with my graduating opportuhigh school nities to students network with to pursue colleagues a career in in similar education positions

I am I am satisfied satisfied with the with the support professional I receive development from my opportunities supervisors/ I have had leadership

Teachers - Career Satisfaction 100

80

32%

31%

24%

44%

60

63%

63%

62%

I am satisfied with my career in education

I am satisfied with my position as a teacher in the public schools

If I had a chance to start my career over, I would choose to become a licensed educator again

34%

20

0

Somewhat Satisfied Strongly Satisfied

40

➤ 14

Somewhat Satisfied

I would encourage graduating high school students to pursue a career in education


Teachers - Current Position Satisfaction 100

80

83%

80% 73%

60

72%

71%

66%

64%

64%

63%

61%

57%

56% 50%

40

48% 34%

30%

20

0

Retirement benefits

Roles teachers have at my school

School facilities

Work-life High quality balance professional development opportunities

Health benefits

Teacher workload

Local Professional parent and learning community communities support

Salary

Student conduct

Statelevel policy and policy making

Student assessment

Perception Federal- Community of teaching level policy underand and policy standing teachers making of the throughout day-to-day the state complexities of teaching

➤ 15


MTSBA 863 Great Northern Blvd Suite 301 Helena, MT 59601

MASBO

MEA-MFT

Montana Association of School Business Officials

SAM

MQEC

School Administrators of Montana

MTSBA

Montana School Boards Association

Montana Quality Education Coalition

We are united by our shared interests in the best interests of students.

MREA

Montana Rural Education Association

RISE4Montana is a joint initiative of the associations and Montana universities listed above.

RISE4Montana Semi-Annual Report Midyear Reflections on Challenges, Opportunities and P r o g r e s s To D a t e May 2016

Profile for Montana School Boards Association

RISE4Montana Semiannual Report, May 2016  

The partners in RISE4Montana have taken significant steps during the first six months since we announced our innitiative to increase awarene...

RISE4Montana Semiannual Report, May 2016  

The partners in RISE4Montana have taken significant steps during the first six months since we announced our innitiative to increase awarene...