Page 1

The Great Work of Montana’s Public Schools Vo l u m e I I I

October 2015

“ It is the goal of the people to establish a system of education which will develop the full educational potential of each person. Equality of educational opportunity is guaranteed to each person of the state. ” Ar t icle X , Section 1, Montana Constitution

A joint publication of the following education advocacy groups


E R I C F E AV E R President MEA-MFT efeaver@mea-mft.org (406) 442-4250

DENISE WILLIAMS Executive Director Montana Association of School Business Officials dwilliams@masbo.com (406) 461-3659

DIANNE BURKE

Executive Director Montana Quality Education Association dburke@mqec.org (406) 449-4594

KIRK MILLER

Executive Director School Administrators of Montana samkm@sammt.org (406) 442-2510

L A N C E M E LT O N

Executive Director Montana School Boards Association lmelton@mtsba.org (406) 442-2180

This information has been presented for the use of parents, state policymakers, our members and the public at large.

We are united by our shared interests in the best interests of students.

D AV E P U Y E A R

Executive Director Montana Rural Education Association dpuyear@mrea-mt.org (406) 443-2626


Introduction and Executive Summary The Montana Association of School Business Officials (MASBO), MEA-MFT, Montana Quality Education Coalition (MQEC), Montana Rural Education Association (MREA), Montana School Boards Association (MTSBA) and School Administrators of Montana (SAM) are proud to collaborate in spreading the word about the Great Work of Montana’s Public Schools. Through careful stewardship, engagement of communities and inspiration provided through the Montana Constitution, Montana’s Public Schools have evolved over the last 150 years into community owned centers of excellence, life-readiness and opportunity. Along the way, our public schools have earned a well-deserved reputation as places where tradition is treasured and communities are connected, futures are readied and potentials are realized, children are cherished and kindness is kindled, students are stimulated and inspired, and where excellence is encouraged. We invite you to join us in the important and inspiring work of ensuring individualized excellence for each child educated in Montana’s Public Schools. Learn more at mt-pec.org.

|1


Montana’s Public Schools are gover ned by elected school trustees Local school boards are made up of over 1,400 Montanans that come from all walks of life - including accountants, bankers, farmers, ranchers, retirees, aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers, friends and neighbors. What binds this diverse group of volunteer leaders together is their desire to serve their community and help prepare children for a lifetime of success and happiness.

“ ...Mo st of our ongoing conversations with our constituents have regarded

classroom space... we are becoming very overcrowded in our elementary and our middle school... So classroom space has been a premium for us... Also we’re very conscious of what the public wants from curriculum, so we’re constantly adapting curriculum to provide for those public needs and hopefully fulfilling jobs in the Flathead.

— M a r y R u b y, K a l i s p e l l P u b l i c S c h o o l s Tr u s t e e

2|

Elected trustees in Montana volunteer nearly 750,000 hours each year in pursuit of increased student achievement, taking on complex and sometimes controversial challenges with no compensation whatsoever. Elected trustees contribute the equivalent of 360 FTE positions provided free of charge each year, providing taxpayers over $14 million in savings each year compared to what those positions would cost if filled by employees. Elected trustees oversee the employment of over 25,000 public employees who educate, support, transport, supervise, feed and protect the safety of over 147,000 children, in virtually every community in the state, every day of the week throughout the school year. School boards govern for excellence and efficiency in equal measures and the results of their efforts speak for themselves. Montana’s Public Schools provide performance that compares favorably by any measure, nationally or even internationally and elected trustees deliver these results for below average costs when compared to other states in our Nation. Elected trustees ensure preservation and fulfillment of important constitutional guarantees afforded Montana's citizens.

“ Ou r l o c a l l y e l e c te d b o a r d o f tr u s te e s s e ts a v i s i o n fo r o u r s c h o o l d i s tr i c t... th a t m e a n s th a t a l l k i d s a r e e n g a g e d i n l e a r n i n g to d a y fo r l i fe to m o r r o w. T h e y p r o v i d e th e w i n d b e n e a th o u r w i n g s ... th e y s e t th e d i r e c ti o n fo r th e s c h o o l d i s tr i c t. We m o v e fo r w a r d w i th th e i r g u i d a n c e a n d s u p p o r t a n d th e i r k n o w l e d g e o f o u r c o m m u n i ty... a n d m o s t o f a l l w i th th e i r s p i r i t fo r th e c h i l d r e n ... th e y a r e v o l u n te e r s , th e y a r e e l e c te d to s e r v e a n d th e y g e t n o “ c o m p e n s a ti o n ” ... th e i r o n l y c o m p e n s a ti o n i s to s e e c h i l d r e n s u c c e e d ... s o th e y p u s h u s fo r w a r d a l l th e ti m e to m a k e s u r e th a t happens.

— Ta m m y L a c e y, Superintendent Great Falls Public Schools


Montana’s Public Schools are responsive to the needs of each community Our constitutional founders got it right when they designed the governance of Montana’s public schools. Our school districts are generally supervised by the Board of Public Education and funded by the Legislature, but they are also community owned through elected school boards, which are vested with “supervision and control” of all publicly-funded K-12 education in Montana. Additional safeguards employed to ensure each community’s voice in how its schools are governed and run include the constitutional rights of the public’s right to know, influence, and participate in the operations

“ O u r h i g h s c h o o l b o a r d h a s s p e n t th e l a s t fi v e y e a r s r e a l l y

and activities of its public schools. These constitutional guarantees

o u r s c h o o l b o a r d n e e d s to b e e ffe c ti v e , o u r m e e ti n g s n e e d to b e

f o c u s in g o n b e i n g r e s p o n s i ve to o u r c o m m u n i ty ’s n e e d s ... th a t

afforded Montana citizens cannot be replicated in the private sector

e ff e c t i v e , a n d th a t w e g e t a w a y fr o m th e i d e a th a t a v e r a g e w a s

and provide an assurance that each community has a voice and a seat

O K . . . w e ’ v e w o r k e d th e l a s t th r e e y e a r s w i th s tr a te g i c p l a n n i n g

at the table when it comes to public education.

t o p u t p r o g r a m s i n p l a c e , g i v e te a c h e r s th e r e s o u r c e s th e y n e e d i n t h e c l a s s r o o m , to p u t u s i n th e to p 2 0 p e r c e n t o f s c h o o l s i n t h e n ati o n b y e v e r y a c a d e m i c m e a s u r e .

— S a b r i n a S t e k e t e e , J e ff e r s o n H i g h S c h o o l Tr u s t e e

|3


M o n t a n a ’s P u b l i c S c h o o l s a r e d e s i g n e d f o r exc e l l e n c e Assessment/Test Scores

According to calculations made by the Alliance for Excellent Education, Montana is likely to see significant economic gains as a result of increases

Montana’s graduation rates on the rise

$5.9

million annual boost to Montana’s economy

Test Scores

in its high school graduation rate over the period of 2009 to 2014, which resulted in 520 additional high school graduates. The Alliance estimates Montana will see a $5.9 million annual boost to the state’s economy going forward and an increase of $12.3 million in spending on homes and a $700,000 increase in automobile sales. Collectively, the additional graduates will likely earn an additional $95 million over

2012 MT Natl

2013 MT Natl

2014 MT Natl

VERBAL

536 496

538 491

555 497

MATH

536 514

541 503

552 513

WRITING

511 488

513 480

530 487

SAT*

* Scholastic Aptitude Test-- High Score 800. In 2014, 17 percent of Montana graduating seniors took the SAT. Nationally, 43 percent of graduating seniors took the SAT.

the course of their lifetimes, compared to if they had not graduated from high school. Additional earning equals additional tax revenues

$12.3

million home sales

$700,000 automobile sales

and less reliance on public assistance programs. This benefits all citizens.

Montana’s pu blic school studen ts were found to be th e

4th best in th e wor in science

ld

6th best in the world in math *

Montana’s average 8th grade science score is 163, ranked 1st in the nation Montana’s average 8th grade reading score is 272, ranked 6th in the nation Montana Public Schools had the second best (lowest) white/Hispanic achievement gap in the nation

*Recent NAEP-TIMSS linking study

“ Ed u c a t i o n i s w h a t m a k e s a d i ffe r e n c e i n o u r s o c i e ty. I b e l i e v e i n th e g a m e c h a n g e r,

t h e d o o r o p e n e r, t h e o p p o r t u n i t y m a k e r...T h e e n te r p r i s e th a t w e c a l l p u b l i c e d u c a ti o n ...

— Ta m m y L a c e y, S u p e r i n t e n d e n t , G r e a t F a l l s P u b l i c S c h o o l s

4|


Montana’s Public Schools are efficient Licensed K-12 Staff (Full-Time Equivalent)

Montana’s Public Schools

Per Pupil

Expenditures Ranked

Montana’s Public Schools

Per Graduate

29th

Expenditures*

Montana’s costs are:

Ranked

$850

below national average

Annual Savings of

$123 million

to Montana taxpayers each year compared to national averages

Montana’s Public Schools

Per Capita

Expenditures Ranked

41st

38th

Montana’s costs are:

$2,204

below national average

Montana’s costs are:

$292

below national average Graduation represents the universal benchmark for success of K-12 public education and Montana’s public schools produce graduates at a cost lower than all but a handful of states in the nation.

School Revenues Ranked

29th

per $1,000 in personal income in the nation

*Derived from a combination of graduation rates and per pupil expenditures

Montana public school administrator staffing is effective and efficient:

1,051

students

➤ per superintendent

327

per principal

249

per administrator

per administrator

students

students (Superintendents and Principals)

20.4

employees

Compare to other Montana industries*:

11.7

employees

6.5

per healthcare administrator

➤ per construction manager 5.6 per manufacturing employees ➤ manager

employees

2014-15

Teachers-Classroom, Title I, Special Ed................................10,364 Superintendents and Assistant Superintendents ....................... 158 Principals and Assistant Principals ............................................. 505 Other Administrative Staff .............................................................. 91 Education Specialists (Library, Guidance Counselors) ............. 939 Licensed Professional (Noneducator) ......................................... 390 Total Licensed Staff FTE .........................................................12,447 Paraprofessionals.......................................................................2,445 Total Licensed and Paraprofessional Staff ...........................14,892 Student/Teacher Ratio

2010-11

2011 -12

2012 -13

Montana average

13.8

14

14

National average

15.7

16

16

Data from Common Core of Data, U.S. Department of Education

* U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics/Educational Research Service

“ I b ecame an educator for the simple o p p o r t u n i t y t h a t i t a l l o w s m e t h e f o c u s t o b e a b l e t o touch the future ... it’s my way of being a b l e t o k n o w I c a n m a k e a p o s i t i v e i m p a c t i n t h o s e individuals lives as they make their choi c e s f o r t h e i r e d u c a t i o n . — Andrew Holmlund, Superintendent, Ronan Public Schools

|5


Montana’s Public Schools adapt and innovate to ensure student success • Four day school weeks in many communities

• Advanced Placement

throughout the state that have embraced the concept in collaboration with parents and others

• Dual High School/College

in the community

Credit

• Distance learning options through the Montana

• Vocational, computer and business classes in addition to college prep classes

Digital Academy that fully integrate technology and learning and which provide an expansive breadth of curriculum in all participating public schools while retaining community ownership and local control • Proficiency-based learning opportunities free from

... we have to teach much more tha n j u s t t h e

academics, ... I’ve been fostering gr o w t h m i n d s e t s , perseverance, and developing grit...

seat time restrictions where high level learning is the constant and time is the variable

— A n n e Ke ith , 2 0 1 0 M o n ta n a Te a ch e r o f th e Year

“ ...before school ever starts, I go o n h o m e v i s i t s w i t h a l l o f m y s t u d e n t s . I h a v e a c h a n c e

to meet them and their families on the i r h o m e t u r f . We j u s t h a v e a c o n n e c t i o n a n d r e l a t i o n ship from the beginning of school... Th a t ’s a p r e t t y i n n o v a t i v e p r o g r a m a n d I ’ m v e r y h a p p y to be a part of that... I try new and di ff e r e n t t h i n g s e a c h y e a r. — J a n e S h a wn , F ir st Gr a d e Te a ch e r

6|

• Part time enrollment options for home school students • Credit recovery options for students who have fallen behind


Montana’s Public Schools earn trust through transparency Montana voters trust local educators the most when it comes to doing what is right academically for children in our public schools. That trust should come as no surprise as it has been hard earned

W h o d o M o n ta n a v o te r s tr u s t to d o w h a t i s b e s t a c a d e m i c a l l y fo r s tu d e n ts i n p u b l i c s c h o o l s ?

and preserved through the transparency of Montana’s Public Schools. Public meetings, public comments, and the right for public participation on each voted item, help make Montana’s public schools transparent, but our public schools do much more than that! Our schools are governed and operated in a manner that not only upholds Montana constitutional guarantees of openness and public participation but which also actively engages communities in fully developing the potential of each student. Montana’s Public Schools are committed to working hand in hand with and in their communities in creating a bright future for Montana’s children.

“ Ev en as a young school distric t . . . w e ’ v e a l r e a d y h a d t h e m o d e r n i s s u e s t h a t s c h o o l d i s tr i c ts fa c e that can be quite difficult ... tr ans p a r ency a n d t r u s t h a s r e m a i n e d w i t h t h e s c h o o l a n d w i th th e

co mmunity, as a result of Montana o p e n m e e t i n g l a w s . . . t h e m o s t p o w e r f u l s t a t e m e n t w e c a n m a k e to our constituents is that, if they c a r e e n o u g h , t h e y c a n b e a p a r t o f e v e r y m e e t i n g a n d t he r e fo r e e very decision that happens in the d i s t r i c t . . . — L o r e n Bo u g h , Big Sky Pu b lic Sch o o ls Trustee

|7


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s Students —

M O N TA N A’ S

K - 1 2

V I S I O N

G R O U P

CORE

PU R POSE

“It is the goal of the people to establish a system

of education which will develop the full educational potential of each person.” Article X, Section 1, Montana Constitution, 1972

8|


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s Students —

M O N TA N A’ S

K - 1 2

V I S I O N

G R O U P

C OR E

VAL UES

Montana’s public school districts share the authority and responsibility with the Legislature, Governor, Board of Public Education and State Superintendent to provide a system of public education that affords children, their families and Montana’s citizens each of the guarantees of Article X of the Montana Constitution. Ensuring the preservation of a basic system of free quality public elementary and secondary schools throughout Montana that is capable of developing the full educational potential of each person served

Ensuring quality and equality of educational opportunity for each child

Ensuring the preservation of the distinct and unique cultural heritage of American Indians

Ensuring against direct or indirect aid to parochial education

Ensuring against discrimination on account of sex, race, creed, religion, political beliefs, or national origin in Montana’s Public Schools

Ensuring each community’s ownership of its schools, exercised through supervision and control by elected trustees

Ensuring general supervision of Montana’s Public Schools by an appointed Board of Public Education

Ensuring the proper and exclusive use of state land revenues for Montana’s Public Schools

|9


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s Students M O N TA N A’ S

LIBBY K-12 Schools

K - 1 2

WHITEFISH Public Schools

RONAN Public Schools

V I S I O N

MISSOULA COUNTY Public Schools

S TAT E WIDE

SUNBURST Public Schools

BROWNING Public Schools

EVERGREEN Elementary KALISPELL Public Schools BIGFORK Public Schools

CORVALLIS K-12 Schools

G R O U P

R EPR ESEN TAT ION

DODSON Public Schools HAVRE Public Schools MALTA K-12 Schools

SHELBY Public Schools CONRAD Public Schools

POPLAR Public Schools NASHUA K-12 Schools FRAZER Public Schools

DUTTON/BRADY K-12 Schools

SIDNEY Public Schools

GREAT FALLS Public Schools HELENA Public Schools

POWELL COUNTY High School

CASCADE Public Schools EAST HELENA Elementary MT CITY Elementary

JEFFERSON High School

BOZEMAN Public Schools ANDERSON Elementary

HARRISON Public Schools

CULBERTSON Public Schools

WIBAUX K-12 Schools

LEWISTOWN Public Schools

PLEVNA K-12 Schools

BILLINGS Public Schools LOCKWOOD Elementary ASHLAND Elementary

DILLON Elementary

AA

10 | 8 |

A

B

C

Independent Elementary

ISBC


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s Students W H E R E

A R E

W E

G O I N G ?

O U R

E N V I S I O N E D

F U T U R E

F OR

T H E

YEAR

2025

Montana’s Public Schools work collaboratively with each other, with state policymakers, and with their communities to successfully develop the full potential of each child.

| 11


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s Students W HE R E

A R E

W E

G O I N G ?

O U R

E N V I S I O N E D

F U T U R E

F OR

T H E

YEAR

2025

Vi v i d D e s c r i p t i o n s o f o u r E n v i s i o n e d F u t u r e : Policymakers at all levels: • • • •

Consistently recognize, honor and support the goal of the people to establish a system of education which will develop the full educational potential of each person and use that goal to drive policymaking decisions; Consistently support each community’s ownership of its public schools and each district’s ability to develop the full potential of each child through supervision and control by locally elected school boards; Adequately and rationally provide the resources needed by Montana’s Public Schools; and Support the budgetary and other flexibilities needed by Montana’s Public Schools to be responsive to community and student needs.

Montana’s public school districts are student-centered, focused, adaptable, innovative, engaging, safe and secure, and driven to:

12 |

Ensure that public school students’ knowledge and skills match contemporary needs;

Use innovation and technology to link each student to the world in which he/she will learn and succeed;

Operate in well-designed, modern and updated facilities that enhance learning;

Engage families, the community, and each other to develop the full potential of each child;

Empower and engage students to actively participate in their education and set high expectations for themselves;

Design and use effective data systems to support and enhance each student’s success; and

Increase academic excellence through equitable availability of the full spectrum of educational resources and opportunities.


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s Students W H E R E

A R E

W E

G O I N G ?

O U R

E N V I S I O N E D

FU T U R E

F OR

T H E

YEAR

2025

Vi v i d D e s c r i p t i o n s o f o u r E n v i s i o n e d F u t u r e : As a result of the support of policymakers and the leadership of Montana’s public school districts, Montana’s public school students: •

Appreciate the intrinsic value of their education and are inspired to ensure the success of public education as stewards of the future;

Succeed despite the circumstances of life that could otherwise interfere in achievement of their full potential; and

Use the knowledge and skills they develop in Montana’s Public Schools to think critically and engage and succeed as productive members of society.

| 13


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s S t u d e n t s H O W

D O

W E

P L A N

TO

G E T

T H E R E ?

O UR

5 -YEAR

GOAL S

S t u d e n t S u c c e s s : I n t e n d e d S u c c e s s fo r t h e ye a r 2 0 2 0

Continued growth in student success in Montana’s Public Schools is evident through multiple measures, including but not limited to: • 100% of Montana’s students earning a high school diploma or equivalent; • A continued increase in students graduating with post-secondary credits; • Continued improvement in narrowing achievement gaps through targeted intervention and other strategies; • Increased achievement on standardized tests; • Enhanced and expanded opportunities for dual enrollment; and • Wide availability of a well-rounded education, including items such as all day kindergarten, gifted and talented, music, art, physical education, technology, career and vocational technical education and advanced placement courses. As a result of these achievements, students in Montana’s Public Schools complete their K-12 education ready for a lifetime of post-secondary success as productive and engaged citizens, pursuing the full spectrum of college and career options.

Te a ch i n g a n d L e a r n i n g : I n t e n d e d S u c c e s s fo r t h e ye a r 2 0 2 0

Through a widely held, intrinsic trust in educators and strong local control, Montana’s Public School educators and students thrive. Montana’s Public Schools have the resources they need to succeed, allowing teachers and administrators to consistently avail themselves of the latest research and the innovative use of technology and other evolving teaching and learning strategies to provide personalized instruction for each child. As a result, Montana’s Public Schools are a magnet for the recruitment and retention of quality educators.

14 |


A V ision for the Success of Montana’s S t u d e n t s H O W

D O

W E

P L A N

TO

G E T

T H E R E ?

O UR

5 -YEAR

GOAL S

Gover nance, Leadership And Accountability: Intended Success for the year 2020

Locally elected school boards, administrative leaders, teachers and other staff collaboratively focus on the interests of each child educated in our public schools. This collaboration and focus is also reflected in the relationships among the statewide public education advocacy groups representing teachers, trustees, administrators, and school business officials. The Legislature, Governor, Board of Public Education, and State Superintendent all actively support and collaborate to continually improve and enhance a system that develops the full educational potential of each student in Montana’s Public Schools. As a result, Montana schools are nationally recognized for excellence.

Culture, Climate And Social Values: Intended Success for the year 2020

The independent spirit and unique values of Montanans are well recognized and reflected in each of Montana’s Public Schools. Through our collective dedication to maximizing our resources for excellence, our commitments to quality public education in each community, and the preservation of personalized learning environments, all students, regardless of personal circumstance or ability, feel supported and fully prepared for a successful future. Montanans recognize their public schools as the key to the state’s future success.

Community Engagement: Intended Success for the year 2020 Increased recognition of the great work of Montana’s Public Schools has caused Montana’s communities to engage and support success for each child served. As a result, Montana’s Public Schools and their communities have collaborated to energize and effectively individualize public education to increase student success in Montana’s Public Schools.

| 15


M T- P E C / Z o g b y P o l l R e f l e c t s S t r o n g S u p p o r t f o r M o n t a n a P u b l i c S c h o o l s A m o n g M o n t a n a Vo t e r s In October 2015, the Montana Public Education Center released results of a recent poll of Montana voters’ opinions on K-12 public education issues. The poll was conducted by respected international polling and research company Zogby Analytics, using industrystandard methodologies with a margin of error of +/-4.5%. The poll results reveal a strong sentiment of support among Montana voters for K-12 public education on a wide range of issues.

70 60

Montana voters’ opinions

62.9%

regarding the quality of their

When asked to grade their local community public schools, 62.9 percent of Montana voters would give their local schools an A or a B grade.

30

20.8%

20

7.8%

Basics only

10

16 |

89.2%

Well rounded

40

0

should be well rounded or basic?

own local community public schools:

50

Do Montana voters think public education

7.6%

A andB

C

Not sure

5.1%

D

3.7%

F

3.0%

Not sure


Who do Montana voters trust to do what

Montana voters support elected

is best academically for students in

officials who support increased

public schools?

funding for public education over elected officials supporting

0.2% — Congress

a decrease or freeze in public

1.3%

— Legislators

education funding:

1.4%

— Governor

2.4%

— U.S Dept. of Education

5.7%

— Not Sure

5.7%

— School Superintendents

5.8%

— School Principals

60.5% Support elected officials who support increased funding for K-12 public education

— State Superintendent

7.9%

Support elected official’s position on this matter doesn’t matter to me

— State Board of Public Education

11.4%

11 . 8 %

18.4%

— Locally Elected School Boards

39.9%

— Classroom Teachers

0

16.2%

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

Not sure

11 . 5 %

Support elected officials who supports decreasing or freezing spending in K-12

| 17


Montana voters support elected

Montana voters’ opinions regarding who

officials who support improvement

should decide whether two or more

and innovation in public education

school districts must consolidate:

over elected officials supporting public funding of private school alternatives:

65.0%

65.4% responded that it should be the voters in the school districts affected by the change in the structure.

65.4%

Supports elected officials who support improvement and innovation in public education

Voters in school districts affected.

18.5%

Supports elected officials who support providing taxpayer funding of private school alternatives

21.4% Elected school boards of the districts affected by the change in structure

10.1%

7 . 7 % Not sure

Not sure

6.4%

Position of elected officials on this issues does not matter to me

18 |

2.6%

2.9%

State Legislature

Executive Branch (Governor, State Superintendent)


Should the Legislature prioritize funding to address $360 million in deferred maintenance identified in its 2008 school facilities study?

76.7%

Support prioritization of funding to address $360 million in deferred maintenance

public schools

30

When it comes to how state government spends tax dollars, which of the following areas do you think should be the highest priority?

Montana voters’ opinions regarding school facilities and student achievement

89.4%

Connection of condition of school facilities to student achievement considered important

24.4%

20 10 0

Not sure

48.9% K-12

40

Oppose

7.7%

State budget priorities for Montana voters

50

15.6%

Public health and human services (services for children, aged and disabled)

15.6%

Unimportant

10.6%

Corrections, public safety and law enforcement

8.1%

Not sure

8.0%

Higher education

1.9%

Not sure

| 19


Montana voters’ cherish their constitutional guarantees. Percent identifying as important.

Adequate and equitable funding 89.6% of public schools by the Legislature Supervision and control of public education 83.7% by locally elected school boards General supervision of public education and development of standards by the Board of Public Education 83.2% Prohibition on discrimination on account of sex, race, creed, religion, political beliefs or national origin 82.3% Preservation of cultural heritage of American Indian Peoples and Tribes 74.1% Prohibition on direct or indirect aid for parochial schools 53.0%

0

20 |

20

40

60

80

100


The Montana Constitution provides that our publicly funded K-12 schools: Will devote themselves to developing the full educational potential of each person

Will afford citizens a right to attend and participate in decisions of the school board and access public documents

Will be adequately and equitably funded by the Legislature

Will be generally supervised by an appointed board of public education

Will be governed by local trustees, subject to popular election in each community

Will preserve the distinct and unique cultural heritage of American Indian Peoples and Tribes

Will provide equality of educational opportunity to each child

Will be nonsectarian and otherwise free from discrimination on account of sex, race, creed, religion, political beliefs, or national origin

Will protect the privacy interests of students

The Montana Constitution provides enforceable constitutional guarantees that substantially benefit all Montana citizens.

The founding of Montana’s Public Schools pre-dates Montana’s statehood by 25 years. The creation of a system of public schools was one of the first actions of the First Montana Territorial Legislative Assembly in 1864. Since the first public school opened in Virginia City in 1865, Montana’s Public Schools have been preparing Montana children for a future of success over the last 150 years, governed by community-elected trustees all along the way.


MTSBA 863 Great Northern Blvd Suite 301 Helena, MT 59601

All photographs in this publication are of students, teachers, administrators and trustees from Montana’s Public Schools.

The Great Work of Montana’s Public Schools Vo l u m e I I I

Learn more at mt-pec.org

October 2015

“It is the goal of the people to establish a system of education which will develop the full educational potential of each person.” Article X, Section 1, Montana Constitution, 1972

Profile for Montana School Boards Association

The Great Work of Montana's Public Schools, Volume III  

Our annual publication celebrating the Great Work of Montana's Public Schools.

The Great Work of Montana's Public Schools, Volume III  

Our annual publication celebrating the Great Work of Montana's Public Schools.