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December 2013 • Section B

Montana Fish Company Supports Local Agriculture and Economy There are many reasons to support local agriculture. Ecologically, the carbon footprint of a Montana-raised and -processed cow is comparably minute compared to the beef in the commodity market because it doesn’t travel thousands of miles from the ranch to the feedlot to the processor/packer and, finally, to the distribution warehouse where it will eventually make its way to the local meat counter. The economic benefits of local agriculture are substantial as well. Montana ranchers are able to keep more of the total sales dollar from their products when they are able to market to a variety of consumers, rather than selling the whole animal to a feedlot in another state. Finally, flavor is another important, if oft overlooked, consideration. Commodity cows are corn-fed specifically to increase their fat content, but a Montana-grown, pasture-raised cow has an incomparable flavor profile while being leaner and healthier. The Montana Fish Company’s sustainable mix of local meats allows for the utilization of nearly every part of an animal. When a rancher makes the decision to market his products in a holistic way, the biggest challenge he faces is what to do with

the less-than-glamorous or well-known parts of the animal. The prime cuts of beef – tenderloin, ribeye, new york strip, etc. – comprise a small percentage of the whole animal; the majority is in the form of chuck roast, sirloin, round, brisket and flank. These cuts, which are featured in our local meat club, are often amazingly tender and flavorful in a braised or slowcooked method. For five dollars per pound, you can fill your freezer with the bounty of Montana’s ranchers and support our local economy. The Lazy SR Ranch, our beef producer, is located in Wilsall and features incredible quality Black Angus. Born, raised, finished and processed locally, the beef from these cows is all natural, hormone-free and USDA Choice grade. Our local pork comes from Montana’s Best Meats in Whitehall and is wonderfully flavorful. The Montana Fish Company began as a wholesale and retail fresh fish and seafood provider in downtown Bozeman in 2005. As the local food market has evolved, we’ve added other local proteins and products to our offerings. Drop by our store at 119 East Main Street and ask us about all the options to feed your family healthy meals this winter.


BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

Eagle Mount Bozeman is Beneficiary of The Leaf & Bean’s Christmas Blend Coffee Sales (For the fourth consecutive year, The Leaf & Bean has partnered with Eagle Mount to raise funds for the local non-profit through sales of its annual Christmas Blend coffee. Eagle Mount will receive a portion of each sale of the crisp blend of Guatemalan and French Vanilla beans. Christmas Blend will be available at The Leaf & Bean, Heyday, Olivelle, and Heeb’s East Main Grocery. Mail orders are also welcome. In addition to Christmas Blend, Eagle Mount will operate a booth selling Leaf & Bean treats during the 31st Annual Christmas Stroll on Saturday, December 7th. Eagle Mount will be

serving Christmas Blend by the cup, peppermint hot chocolate (with housemade peppermint syrup and a candy cane), holiday sugar cookies, and other confections from The Leaf & Bean bakery. Since 1982, Eagle Mount has been transforming the lives of people with disabilities and children with cancer. With the help and support of a generous community, Eagle Mount opens up a world of adventures – skiing, horseback riding, swimming, camping, rock climbing, kayaking, cycling, fishing and more – that foster freedom, joy, strength, focus and confidence. Set under the beauty of Montana’s legendary big sky, Eagle Mount focuses on people’s abilities, while gently supporting their disabilities. For more information, contact The Leaf & Bean at 406.587.1580 or visit www. leaf-bean.com or www.facebook.com/ theleafandbean.

Cigar of the Month Johnson’s Pick Padron Imperial Serie 1964 (Natural)

This cigar is another premium edition of Padron’s collection of superb cigars. The cigar’s size belies the ease of smoking it... this stick smokes as smooth and even as any cigar I have tried. Prominent notes of coffee and toasted pecan are prevalent throughout, balanced by complimentary flavors of white pepper and cedar. A slight sweet finish lingers with the aftertaste, and the cigar produces heavy clouds of aromatic smoke. The taste and balance were excellent, right down to the nub. A truly premium cigar for the smoking enthusiast. This cigar can be found downtown Bozeman at your local tobacconist, Poor Richards.

A familiar fixture on Main Street since 1962.

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- Local Montana and regional books, including Falcon Guides - Local, regional and national newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal and the Sunday New York Times - Over 200 magazines and periodicals - Large selection of fine cigars, including Padron, Arturo Fuente, Ashton, Partagas, Macanudo, Romeo y Julieta, Punch, Oliva, and more… - Pipes, including Peterson, Savinelli, Federico Rovera and more… - Fine tobaccos and accessories


BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

Pearls: The Only Gemstone From a Living Creature By Patti Albrecht Pearls have fascinated people since ancient times; they are valued around the world for their beauty and rarity. The Bible even refers to a man who was willing to trade everything he owned for ONE pearl of high value. While most gemstones are lying buried deep under the ground, pearls are the only gemstones that are not mined, polished or cut. Their iridescence and symmetry come from the natural processes of the living mollusks that form them. A common myth insists that a grain of sand irritates an oyster and causes it to form a pearl. While this may possibly happen in rare cases, a small piece of organic material or an injury most often initiates the formation of a pearl. In either case, the pearl is irritating to the oyster. The mantle begins to secrete nacre or mother of pearl, which is soothing to the oyster and covers the irritant. Over time, many layers of nacre are deposited, forming a natural saltwater pearl.

with a little human help. Mussels or clams are the most common types of mollusks used for freshwater pearl production. A small piece of the mantel from another mollusk or a small bead is inserted between the mantel and the shell. Sometimes, just cutting the mantle is enough to start the secretion of nacre that will form a pearl. In the freshwater mollusks, several irritants can be inserted into the same creature at once, prompting the creation of more than one pearl. The color of the pearl is influenced by what the mollusks are fed; the most common colors are white, cream, rose and champagne.

Pearls are valued by size, luster, color, symmetry and flaws. Translucent layers of microscopic crystals that refract light into rainbows of color create the multicolored iridescence that seems to radiate from within a pearl: the finer the layer of nacre, the greater the iridescence. These natural layers also allow for an easy way to distinguish real pearls from fake ones. If a real pearl is lightly rubbed between one’s teeth, grittiness will be felt. Since fake pearls are usually made from glass or plastic, they will feel smooth.

The innovative technique of cultivating freshwater pearls made pearl ownership available to all. Freshwater pearls are still real pearls, but they have been instigated

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Earth’s Treasures has a wide selection of high quality, affordable pearl jewelry in a range of colors. Pearl studs with sterling silver backs are $12; a matching single pearl, sterling silver pendent with a sterling silver chain is only $29. And a knotted pearl necklace is a mere $24.50. Earth’s Treasures is located at 25 N. Willson. For more information, contact the store at 586.3451 or visit www. EarthsTreasuresMT.com


BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

The Artists’ Gallery in December

The Artists’ Gallery is proud to feature local artists Kathy Burk and Geri Ward throughout December. Both use transparent mediums, Kathy working in fused glass and Geri working in watercolor.

As a glass artist, Burk is currently studying instruments, tools

Your best friend is waiting.

Lost your dog or cat?

Don’t forget to check Heart of the Valley first! In 2008, HOV received more than 1,400 stray or abandoned animals, and only 546 were reclaimed by their owners. If you have lost your pet, HOV recommends that you take the following steps: 1. Call the shelter right away at (406)388-9399! We want to see you reunited as soon as possible, so let us help! 2. Come out to the shelter at least three times per week to look at our lost animals. Your pet could arrive at any time. Most pets are found within the first week, but reunions have occurred as long as two years after the pet was lost! 3. Call the Bozeman Daily Chronicle @ 582-2600. They will run a 7-day ad at no charge. 4. Post a flyer with a picture of your pet in the area where your pet was lost, as well as at PetsMart and businesses in your area. Please notify us when your pet is found. Not only does this help with the updating of the animal’s file but we’d like to hear the good news! Volunteers needed at Heart of the Valley to help with school presentations, tours, summer day camp and children’s birthday parties at the shelter! You’ll have a blast while teaching kindness to the next generation! Call 388-9399 for more info!

...

P.O. Box 11390 Bozeman, MT 59719 1549 E. Cameron Bridge Road Bozeman, MT 59718 (406)388-9399 www.heartofthevalleyshelter.org Fax (406)388-2877 adopt@heartofthevalleyshelter.org

This time of year, many of us have more chocolate around the house than we do at other times of the year. Baking chocolate is much more toxic than milk chocolate – small amounts can be enough to make your pet sick. It is common for dogs or cats that eat large amounts of candy (chocolate or not) to get acute gastritis with vomiting and/or diarrhea as a result. In severe cases, ingestion of large amounts of rich foods can cause pancreatitis, which often requires hospitalization. If you give gifts of candy, chocolate or foods, make sure to let the recipient know that they should keep it out of reach from curious noses. Candy and treats are not the only things animals eat. Because our animals explore the world with their mouths, they often chew on and ingest things that can make them sick. Many decorative plants, such as poinsettias, holly and mistletoe, can be toxic, especially to cats. Clinical signs range from inflamed gums to sustained vomiting. Depending on the type of mistletoe, liver failure and seizures are a possibility. Cat and kittens are often entertained by playing with ribbons and tinsel because they are similar

avenue to the design of her mosaic collages. She sketches the interesting shapes and small details of these technological items from various angles and then combines them into one design. She produces pieces for your wall as well as kiln glass as decorative sculpture or functional ware. She also

Holiday Hazards The holidays are fast approaching and, while we are joyfully celebrating, cooking and decorating, it’s easy to lose track of our fourlegged friends. With a little forethought, we can make the festivities safe and fun for our pets as well. Following are some common hazards that can easily be prevented from becoming medical emergencies.

and machines as an

makes unique lighting pieces that brighten an interior space with warmth and color.

to toys they may play with on a regular basis. While chasing and pouncing pose no health issues, chewing and swallowing these can cause string or “linear foreign bodies” to catch in the gastrointestinal tract. As the body tries to move the strings through, the intestines bunch and the strings can saw back and forth causing potentially fatal perforations requiring surgical correction. Closely supervise animals that play with strings. Electric lights and wires are also tempting to cats who like strings, as well as to puppies that are teething and interested in chewing. If pets bite through electrical cords, they can get severe burns on the mouth and tongue, potentially causing the lungs to fill with fluid, leading to respiratory distress and a medical emergency. Electrocution is also possible. Many toys come with small batteries. If your pet ingests one of the small flat button batteries, call your veterinarian immediately as they can cause chemical and electrical burns in the mucosa of the throat and intestines. Make sure to keep batteries out of reach from young children and pets. Often we find the holidays a bit stressful and sometimes our animals can as well. Frequent visitors can cause stress and anxiety. Try to provide a quiet room where nervous animals can go to get away from excessive noise and strangers. With a little preparation, the holiday season will be safe and fun for you and your pets.

(406)587-4458 www.GallatinVetHospital.com reyadvertising@q.com

Ward also employs transparency in her light and iridescent watercolors. Often demonstrating an Asian influence, her subjects range from koi swimming among lily pads and cranes in flight to simple landscapes and butterflies. Her works are rendered with a light and practiced hand to create interest that goes beyond the obvious subject matter.

These featured artists will be on hand to share wine and conversation during the December ArtWalk, on Friday, December 13th, from 5 to 8PM, at the Emerson Cultural Center. Come and see all of the wonderful locally made art and find unique Christmas gifts in the process.

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BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

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BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

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BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

Frame Your Future Photo Show to Highlight Gallatin County This fall, residents have the opportunity to visually express what they love about living in Gallatin County and have some fun along the way. Gallatin Growth Solutions, a citizen organization that provides information and resources about the growing valley, is organizing the Frame Your Future photo show to highlight the people, places and things that make the Gallatin Valley such a great place to live. Frame Your Future is both a photo project and contest. Organizers are making the event fun for participants by creating a platform for residents to submit, view and vote on other participants’ photos. Organizers also see the project as an opportunity to draw attention to the things people care about in the county. The results of the show will be compiled into a visual report, which will be delivered to City and County Commissioners as well as other area leaders and policy makers. “This is an opportunity for people of all ages to contribute to the future of the county”, said Wendy Weaver, a Gallatin Growth Solutions organizer. “One aspect of this event is to give people a way to share what they value about living here, and to do it in a way that encourages reflection and creativity”. Both professional and amateur photographers can submit photos, and all ages are invited to participate.

There are five categories: Buildings and Neighborhoods, Public Spaces, History and Heritage, The Natural World, and People and Community. The winners of each category will be chosen by popular citizen vote, which will be done through online voting at Gallatin Growth Solutions’ webpage. Winners in each category will win prizes and their photos will be on display during the event’s awards show. The deadline for submitting photos is January 10, 2014.Online voting will run from January 11 through January 31. The Frame Your Future Photo Project will end with a celebratory gala and awards show on Saturday, February 22nd, 2014 from 7 to 9 PM at Riverside Country Club. The event is free to attend and all are invited. Winning images will be on display and organizers will present a slideshow of all images submitted. Attendees will be able to mingle with friends while they enjoy complementary food and beverages. The contest is open to all Gallatin Valley residents; previously taken photos can be submitted. For more information, go to www.GallatinGrowthSolutions.org and look for the “Photo Project+Contest” link on the left or contact Julie Hitchcock at juliehitchcock27@gmail.com. Gallatin Growth Solutions promotes a resilient, prosperous and enduring future for the Gallatin Valley through its signature initiative, “Gallatin Ahead.”


BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

Skyline Winter Schedules & Bus Stop Changes

Winter service starts Thursday November 28th

The Big Sky Transportation District announces the release of the new winter season schedules for the Skyline transit system. Schedules for this service are available online at www.skylinebus.com and in print at transfer points, the Big Sky Chamber and participating businesses.

Operating from November 28th through April 20th, Skyline’s winter schedule provides seven roundtrips between Big Sky and Bozeman Monday through Thursday and eight round-trips from Friday through Sunday. The Canyon/ Mountain, Mountain Loop and Meadow Circulator routes will operate within Big Sky for local service. The bus stop that was located in the Gallatin Valley Mall parking lot was moved to Technology Blvd W, behind Kohl’s, on Thursday, November 28th. As such, the Skyline Link Bus will no longer pick up at the Gallatin Valley Mall.

The Skyline service within Big Sky is fare-free. A $3 per round-trip fare will be charged on the Link Express, the service between Big Sky and Bozeman, based on the rider having a bus pass. The cash fare is $5 per round-trip. Bus passes (fare cards) are available in three denominations: $15 for five, $30 for 11 and $60 for 23 round-trips.

Bus passes are not sold on the bus, so they should be purchased in advance at participating businesses, including Rosauers, Bob Ward & Son’s, Chalet Sports, Gallatin Valley Mall (Mall Office), Joe’s Parkway Market, the Round House, and Town & Country Foods (near the MSU Campus) in Bozeman. Bus Passes are also available at Casey’s Corner (Exxon) in Four Corners, and in Big Sky at the Big Sky Owners Association office (Meadow Village), Big Sky Resort’s Basecamp (Mountain Village), the Country Market, Hungry Moose Market & Deli and the Moonlight ticket window in the Madison Base Area.

ZoeCare Pregnancy & STD Testing Clinic

Serving the greater Gallatin Valley Community since 1978

ZoeCare is the new name of Bozeman’s community pregnancy and STD testing clinic. Formerly Zoe Women’s Services, ZoeCare encompasses the expansion of our services. We now offer limited STD/STI (sexually transmitted disease/infection) testing and treatment for women AND men. This is in addition to the services we have offered for many years, including pregnancy tests, ultrasounds, options counseling, consultation and education regarding sexual health. All our services are provided FREE of charge to our patients regardless of race, religion, or gender. Our mission is to provide men and women with education regarding unplanned pregnancies, STDs, sexual integrity and sexual health. If you’re facing an unplanned pregnancy or have concerns about the sexual history of your partner, you will find confidential, compassionate care and support at ZoeCare. You probably have a lot of questions and ZoeCare is your source for answers. We recognize you want to be fully informed about all of your options. Our services include: medical quality pregnancy tests, limited ultrasounds, sexually transmitted disease and infection (STD/STI) testing and treatment, as well as education information, caring client/patient advocates, licensed medical professionals, registered nurses, nurse (medical) consultations, community referrals, discussion of all your options, adoption referrals and programs to help you make knowledgeable and informed decisions.

Did You Know?

A positive pregnancy test is not a confirmation of a viable pregnancy. It is estimated that 25-40% of pregnancies are not initially viable and will end in miscarriage. When your home pregnancy test is positive and you are trying to make significant decisions about your future, it’s important to know if your pregnancy is viable. We can help! Our nurses are specially trained in early OB ultrasound to confirm viability. You might be surprised to know that half of unplanned pregnancies occur while using contraception. There is a lot of misinformation about various types of contraception and subsequent confusion regarding contraceptive use. We can help you sift through what’s true and what’s not. If you are sexually active and have more than one partner, or your partner has had other partners, you are at risk for STIs. STIs are becoming very common among sexually active people with more than one partner. Additionally, STIs/STDs are often asymptomatic, therefore the majority of people who have an STI don’t even know they’re infected. Untreated these infections can lead to serious health concerns, including infertility, PID, (Pelvic Inflammatory Disease), and though rare, even cancer. If you have questions, we encourage you to set up an appointment or speak with a ZoeCare nurse. We believe our patients deserve accurate information and high-quality, professional care. We care about you and are here to help. All of our services are provided FREE of charge and your information is private and secure. ZoeCare is open 9-5 Monday through Thursday. We take same-day and advance appointments, as well as walk-ins. We also have an after-hours call line. For more information, call us at (406) 5869444, or visit our website at www.gotozoe.org ZoeCare is a 501c3 nonprofit, faith-based charitable organization.

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• MENTAL HEALTH MONTHLY

BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

Johns Window Cleaning & Painting

Gallatin mental health center

699 Farmhouse Lane • Bozeman, MT 59715 • 406-556-6500 www.gallatinmentalhealth.org

Supporting Our Children:

S ervice with Q uality Reflec tion s

Comprehensive School and Community Treatment Montana’s school districts are striving to meet the ever-changing needs of their students through a variety of ways. For instance, schools know that it’s hard for a child who is hungry to learn and, as such, are redoubling efforts to address hunger with their students on both national and local levels. But, imagine trying to learn while feeling incredibly sad, worried or afraid or grasping a lesson if you’re unable to focus for longer than a minute? Schools have begun to understand that mental health has a huge impact on a student’s ability to learn, which has led to the development of important programs addressing the mental health needs of students. You may have heard about Montana Behavior Initiative or Graduation Matters, two programs that schools use to address school culture, safety, engagement and other factors that influence a student’s long-term investment in their education. But have you heard about Comprehensive School and Community Treatment (CSCT)?

A l l S e as o n O u t s i d e W i n do w C l e an i n g do w n t o t e n de g re e s

Active in Montana for the past 10 years, CSCT offers high-intensity therapeutic services to students who are experiencing serious emotional, behavioral and mental difficulties that are getting in the way of being successful in school and at home. This service is offered through a partnership between a school district and mental health center and includes individual, family and group therapy – as well as behavior support in the classroom or community – to assist the student in making choices that will facilitate success. Oversight for the program comes from the Children’s Mental Health Bureau and costs for the program are covered by insurance, sliding scale fee schedules and self-pay. Students enrolled in the program have year-round support to transform roadblocks into strengths, accomplish goals and, finally, allow for learning to happen.

Have a holiday event? Here to ski? I can clean your windows all winter long, inside and outside.

Cl ien ts say ;

“I’ve never seen my windows so clean!” “The way you clean windows makes them sparkle and stay clean longer.”

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I hand wipe each inside and outside pane of glass 3 to 4 times. I use a safe professional window cleaning spray and specialty towels. (This cleans glass much better than water and squeegees do which rely heavily on blading your glass.)

I wash super-clean all your screens and their frames - outside with water or a gentle electric power washer, including your sliding screen doors, if removable. I vacuum out and wipe your window sills inside and outside. Insured, References Supplied, Contractors Certificate of Exemption.

You don’t need to be home, I can walk around the outside of your home and call you with a free bid.

If you would like more information about CSCT, please visit www.dphhs. mt.gov/mentalhealth/children or contact the Gallatin Mental Health Center at 406.556.6500.

If you want the best, at competitive rates -

(406)

580-0087

September 21, 2013–January 26, 2014 This fascinating exhibit presents Yellowstone’s colorful and varied history as America’s foremost tourist destination. Highlighted with artifacts from the Museum’s Hamilton-Povah Yellowstone Collection, along with other artifacts, photos and movie footage from the National Park Service, Welcome to Yellowstone! is curated by MOR’s own Michael Fox. Come discover the many ways visitors traveled to and from the park, where they stayed and where they played during the golden age of American tourism. Presenting Sponsor:

Contributing Sponsors:

Supporting Sponsors: Row of Transportation Busses at Old Faithful Inn, 1920 Courtesy Union Pacific Railroad Museum

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BOZEMAN MONTHLY • DECEMBER 2013

The Leaf & Bean Hosts Little Artists for the Holidays The Leaf & Bean is expanding its fourth annual series Christmas cookie decorating events for 2013 with the addition of Christmas ornament decorating events!

every child will have an opportunity to grow, succeed and become a valuable member of our community through its programs that strengthen families and empower children and youth.

On Sunday, December 1st and Sunday, December 8th, kids of all ages can come to the Leaf & Bean to decorate an ornament. Supplies such as paint, glitter and stickers will be provided. Cost is $5 for an ornament and any drink from the kids’ menu.

The traditional cookie decorating events will follow on the next two Sundays: December 15th and 22nd. The Leaf & Bean provides lots of colorful frosting, sprinkles and other fun toppings, as well as that most dreaded of holiday baking tasks – clean-up. The cost of $5 includes a bag of six sugar cookies to decorate and any drink from the kids’ menu.

312 e. Main st. / BOZeMan / 406.587.3973 / thenOvacafe.cOM

All events take place at The Leaf & Bean, 35 West Main Street, in downtown Bozeman, from 2 pm to 5 pm. Special thanks to Montana Parent, Arts on Fire and Thrive for their collaboration and contributions! For more information, contact The Leaf & Bean at 406.587.1580.

downtown local b o z e m a nfood and art

bacon! bacon! bacon!

K I d S’ m e n U

daIlY SpecIalS

breaKfaSt 7-2

t h e n o va c a f e . c o m

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406.587.3973

312 e. maIn St. bozeman

localS ’ choIce

YoU ’ll want to lIcK oUr SKIlletS

lUnch 11-2

The Leaf & Bean is a proud supporter of Thrive and their mission to ensure that

Breakfast 7-2 Lunch 11-2

GlUten free

Participants may also donate their ornaments to Thrive’s Ornament Sale, taking place at The Leaf & Bean during the Downtown Bozeman Art Walk on Friday, December 13th. The $5 fee will be waived for participants donating their ornament; Thrive will receive all proceeds from the Ornament Sale.

d. o o f l loca t. r a l a loc e. c i o h ’s c l a c o l



The Monthly Bozeman Edition Dec 2013 Sec B