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www.utilitymagazine.com.au

Issue #16, November 2017

Engineering, Construction & Maintenance

D.I.V.O.R.C.E

SEPARATING ENERGY

CONSUMPTION AND PROFIT

WHO LET THE DOGS OUT?

CORROSION: THE HIDDEN

SNIFFER DOGS DETECT WATER LEAKS

PIPE ASSASSIN WATER

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SEWER

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ELECTRICITY

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GAS

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NBN


DIGITAL UTILITY

AWARDS

COMING IN 2018, THE DIGITAL UTILITY AWARDS Digital Utility of the Year Utility Innovator of the Year Best Use of New Technology Best Customer Innovation

. .

Nominations now open Visit utilityawards.com.au for more information

To be presented at Digital Utilities 19 April 2018 Melbourne

DIGITAL UTILITIES

Conference and exhibition 19–20 April 2018 • Pullman Hotel, Albert Park


welcome

Issue #16, November 2017

Engineering, Construction & Maintenance

UTILITY MAGAZINE

D.I.V.O.R.C.E

SEPARATING ENERGY

FROM THE

CONSUMPTION AND PROFIT

NOVEMBER 2017

SNIFFER DOGS DETECT WATER LEAKS

PIPE ASSASSIN WATER

|

SEWER

EDITOR

WHO LET THE DOGS OUT?

CORROSION: THE HIDDEN |

ELECTRICITY

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GAS

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NBN

11/8/17 12:20 am

Cover image highlights James Myatt's article on page 74.

7,041 1 October 2016 to 31 March 2017

Published by

Monkey Media Enterprises ABN: 36 426 734 954 PO Box 1763 Preston South VIC 3072 P: (03) 9988 4950 monkeymedia.com.au info@monkeymedia.com.au utilitymagazine.com.au info@utilitymagazine.com.au ISSN: 2203-2797 Publisher and Editor Chris Bland Managing Editor Laura Harvey Senior Associate Editor Jessica Dickers Associate Editor Lauren Cella Contributing Editor Michelle Goldsmith Journalist Elisa Iannunzio Kirsty Hutton Marketing Director Amanda Kennedy Production and Customer Service Titian Bartlau Senior Designer Alejandro Molano Designer Jacqui Abela

November 2017

ISSUE 16

www.utilitymagazine.com.au

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or some, the end of the year is a good time to slow down and reflect on the past 12 months. However as we move towards the end of 2017, at Utility and across the industry, things seem to be speeding up. The energy and water sectors are currently seeing exciting developments in the retail and billing space that are shaking up the way utilities are managing their networks and customers. One example of this is James Myatt, the former CEO of Mojo Power, who is trying to change the industry’s thinking about the relationship between energy consumption and profit. Mojo is disrupting the way energy is sold to customers by "divorcing" the amount of energy they consume from the profit a retailer ultimately makes. James said that ultimately all energy retailers will need to move to a model more like this, which separates consumption and profitability. Customer adoption of new energy technologies such as rooftop solar and batteries, as well as embedded networks, are also impacting the traditional revenue model for utilities. This industry direction will likely provide some great opportunities for innovation. This level of change, especially for the energy industry, is making it even more important for those working in the sector to stay up to date with news, trends, legislation and technologies.

INTRODUCING ENERGY With this in mind, I’m excited to announce the launch of Energy, a new sister publication to Utility. Comprising a website, e-newsletter, magazine and social media channels, Energy will cover everything from renewables to future fuels, smart energy, evolving energy networks, disruption, energy efficiency, security, and much more. While Utility will remain the premier voice for the entire utility industry, and will continue to cover the issues that are important to water and energy

utilities, Energy will have a broader and deeper reach into all facets of the energy sector. This includes information relating to renewables projects, consultants, and installers, as well as government agencies. Issue one of Energy magazine will launch in 2018 so keep a look out at www.energymagazine.com.au for more information. In addition to Energy, we’re also continuing to bring our magazine content to life through our events. The inaugural Asset Management for Critical Infrastructure Conference in August was a success with the expert speaker program, speed networking session and high level of engagement being very well-received.

SUPPORTING UTILITIES MOVING TOWARDS DIGITISATION Building on the success of this event, we’ll also be hosting Digital Utilities on 19–20 April 2018, a two-day conference and exhibition that will provide practical guidance to utilities who are grappling with the momentous impacts that digital technologies are having on the industry. Digital Utilities will also include an awards dinner where the Digital Utility of the Year, and Utility Innovator of the Year will be crowned, and the Best Use of New Technology and Best Customer Innovation will be awarded. For more information on the conference or to nominate your utility for an award, visit www.digitalutilities.com. au. Before then I’ll get a chance to catch up with some of you at Australian Utility Week, running 29–30 November in Melbourne, where the latest issue of Utility will be distributed. This exhibition is always a great chance to meet up with professionals from Australia’s power, gas and water sectors so hopefully I will see some of you there to discuss all of these exciting developments in the industry. Chris Bland Publisher and Editor UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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CONTENTS

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22

38

i SMART GRIDS A machine learning approach to improving grid resiliency......... 20

WATER Water operators recognised for best tasting water ................. 26

ASSET MANAGEMENT The future of asset management at Sydney Water............................ 38

Making your smart grid the heart of a smart city: the six immutable truths............. 22

Celebrating WIOA’s newest Life Member.................... 28

Asset management’s best grapple with innovation, standards and sustainability................................ 40

WASTEWATER A new frontier in renewable energy........................ 34 Improving odour management at SA pump station ..................... 36

Easing the stress in trenchless pipelines..................... 30 NSW local council tackles high levels of water losses head-on............................. 32

Sydney Water drives collaboration with tool to prevent roadworks disorder....... 42 Mobile solutions to managing assets..................... 44 Intelligent integration for utility disaster management.................. 45 PRODUCTS Leveraging the cloud to manage data collection and distributed field teams ................................... 46 Ensure reliability and longevity with DF2 switchgear.................... 48

67

84 72

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HDD Water pipe nears completion for new 'inland freight port'........ 67

EQUIPMENT AND MACHINERY

Doug chews through rock for new sewage pipeline............. 68

Create the utility vehicle you've always dreamed about................ 84

The drill trifecta: speed, simplicity and sound................... 70

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

86 76

WOMEN IN UTILITIES Charmaine Quick......................... 86

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60

ISSUE 16

November 2017

74

LAND ACCESS How Jemena successfully secured land access for NGP....... 50

CORROSION AND INTEGRITY Detection dogs help to sniff out water pipeline leaks...... 60

RETAIL Divorcing energy consumption and profit............... 74

TRANSFORMERS AND SUBSTATIONS Replacement program ensures a safe and reliable supply........... 54

Corrosion challenges facing utility companies......................... 62

SAFETY Practicing confined space safety for syphon inspection...... 77

Cable augmentation lighting up the Whitsundays.......................... 56 Smart power transformer maintenance................................. 58

Maintaining pipeline integrity in a changing environment......... 66 EMBEDDED NETWORKS A new rule for embedded networks.................... 72

If you don’t know, don’t dig........ 78 Delivering connected safety for the workforce.............. 82

90 In each issue Editor’s welcome ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������1 A word from Energy Networks Australia ���������������������������������������������������� 6 A word from WSAA ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 8 News briefs ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 10 Advertisers’ index ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������92 Editorial schedule ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������92 WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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A WORD FROM ENERGY NETWORKS AUSTRALIA ANDREW DILLON INTERIM CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER – ENERGY NETWORKS AUSTRALIA

T

he energy ecosystem of the future has already taken root, transforming the way networks provide customers with reliable and affordable electricity. Electricity networks are the nervous system of what Professor Alan Finkel contends is the most complex machine in the world – the National Electricity Market (NEM). Where electricity networks once managed a one-way flow of energy from major power stations to homes and businesses, the network is now emerging as a platform of services, connecting communities and the technologies and services that customers choose. It is clear that the system has changed and that households and businesses want demonstrable efforts to drive down power prices now. The glut of inquiries and reviews all point to the same thing – the need for energy policy stability to avoid higher costs and less reliable supply for customers. Setting aside retail reviews and gas deals, the current unspoken scandal is that our current pricing system is fundamentally unfair. Energy customers increasingly use the grid in different ways, but our pricing structures are not keeping up. Today, customers are usually charged for how much energy they use, regardless of when and how they use it. Customers understand the reasons why they pay more for airline tickets, hotel rooms and even disruptive services like Uber, at peak times, but with electricity that doesn’t happen. We're not rewarding customers who can feed power back into the grid at peak times or move their electricity use from peak to off peak times. If we are to make electricity prices fairer for all customers into the future and keep downward pressure on network costs, the way we price for network services needs to change. Changes to the way we price are supported by the Australian Energy Regulator, Australian Energy Market Commission and the Council of Australian Governments, and the need for change is recognised by Energy Consumers Australia, the Australian Energy Council and many retailers. Given the benefits to energy customers the urgent need for fairer prices is uncontested. However, progress has been slow. Across the NEM most network businesses have provided an alternative to “anytime energy tariffs” – with some businesses having alternative tariffs for more than 15 years. Despite this, networks report only eight per cent of customers have moved away from tariff structures which most stakeholders agree are unfair. In Victoria the ‘opt in’ framework imposed in 2013 has seen take-up of flexible pricing by residential customers remain exceptionally low at less than one per cent, despite the fact that over half of households would be better off under flexible pricing structures. This aligns with what we’ve seen around the world – opt-in tariff reform simply doesn’t work. Worryingly, this is undermining the realisation of full benefits to the Victorian community of the universal rollout of advanced metering infrastructure. The Electricity Network Transformation Roadmap finds it critical to move to more equitable power pricing compared to a continuation of the status quo. Analysis by CSIRO for

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

the Roadmap indicates that without more urgent attention to current pricing arrangements, the Australian community will not achieve the benefits of the integration of network and behind the meter assets - increasing power system risk and affordability in the future. By contrast, progressively adopting better pricing and incentives could help to reduce average network costs by 30 per cent and achieve customer savings of up to $414 per annum by 2050. Evidence also suggests many vulnerable customers would be better off immediately under fairer pricing arrangements. In 2014, the Australian Energy Market Commission estimated that 70 to 80 per cent of all customers will have lower network charges over the medium term as a result of cost reflective network pricing. AGL concluded that vulnerable customers are more likely than other customers to benefit from cost reflective pricing once demand response is accounted for. Trials in the USA found 80 to 90 per cent of low-income customers would benefit from moving away from flat or inclining block rates to dynamic pricing. There will, however, be customers who are vulnerable to price changes and less able to benefit from new technologies. This requires appropriate support and a sensible transition for these customers. Networks need to work with governments, retailers and customer advocates to facilitate this. Better pricing and incentives are essential for a ‘cooptimised’ energy system that allows us to unlock the benefits of a decentralised energy system. Networks need to adapt to allow multidirectional flows as increasing numbers of households connect solar and batteries to the grid. This creates technical and operational challenges but also provides immense opportunities. The Roadmap forecasts up to 10 million households and small customers will have distributed energy resources by 2050. Networks could buy grid support from these customers instead of building their own infrastructure, which could save customers a total of $16 billion in network costs by 2050. This not only benefits owners of distributed energy resources. The removal of inherent cross subsidies in price structures and the reduction in network costs means that an average family that does not have access to distributed energy resources would be $600 per annum better off if fairer pricing and better incentives were implemented. During this critical period of change, Australia has a limited window of opportunity to install fairer, more efficient prices for energy customers, ones that avoid higher cost outcomes where the take up of new technologies for some users is subsidised by higher costs to others. Customers are behind the wheel on the transformation journey but without a navigation system in place, many will be left behind. Pricing reform is a challenging task. Default bias leads many to think of current structures as reasonable when in fact they are fundamentally unfair. However, the political challenge to deliver the change we need to protect the interests of customers will not be easier tomorrow than it is today.

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A WORD FROM WSAA

THE HON LUKE HARTSUYKER MP, ROSIE WHEEN, CHIEF EXECUTIVE WATERAID AUSTRALIA, ADAM LOVELL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR WSAA, AND PAT MCCAFFERTY, MANAGING DIRECTOR YARRA VALLEY WATER AND WSAA CHAIR AT THE LAUNCH OF THE PAPER.

T

he Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA) has released its latest paper which connects the water industry with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Paper, Global Goals for Local Communities: Urban water advancing the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), outlines how the urban water industry in Australia is already meeting challenges set by the SDGs, and provides a framework to further advance the industry’s contribution. The Paper was launched at Parliament House on 7 August by the Hon Luke Hartsuyker, Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister. “Australian water utilities have an opportunity to make a substantial contribution to advancing the SDGs, creating broader value through collaboration and partnership with government, industry and customers,” said Mr Hartsuyker. WSAA Chair and Managing Director at Yarra Valley Water, Pat McCafferty, said the Sustainable Development Goals are a blueprint for a better future. “They represent a compelling agenda for a sustainable and prosperous future for both people and planet. As providers of essential

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services we are committed to the realisation of Sustainable Development Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.” The Australian Government recognises the relationship between access to clean water and sanitation (SDG 6) and all other SDGs. Consistent with this, Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, is a representative on the UN High Level Panel on Water, comprising Heads of State and senior representatives from across the world. The Panel aims to mobilise effective action and advocate on financing and implementation. Importantly, WSAA’s Paper includes a commitment from the water industry to the SDGs, as well as 13 case studies from water utilities around Australia on their work to advance the Goals. The commitment articulates the intent of the industry to support and promote the SDGs in partnership with other utilities, customers and stakeholders. “Our desire is that this Paper will lead to more collaboration between water utilities, governments, regulators, stakeholders and the community to enable us to focus on creating a sustainable and prosperous

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

future,” said Adam Lovell, Executive Director, WSAA. “We have developed strong relationships with our neighbours in the Pacific and South East Asia to assist them in achieving the SDGs. Creating a pathway for water utilities to be more involved will help our developing neighbours to provide clean, safe drinking water and sanitation.” WaterAid Australia CEO, Rosie Wheen, welcomed the Paper and the commitment to SDG 6. “Our work across the region has benefitted from the commitment and expertise of Australia and New Zealand. The key is to provide local solutions using global expertise, and we look forward to working with water professionals to create growth opportunities for communities through accessible water and sanitation.” The SDGs are a long-term vision for a better world. They describe the values that communities seek, and the values that water utilities must generate. The goals are ambitious, interconnected and complex – they require breakthrough thinking and commitment to a collaborative approach.

WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU


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NEWS

BACK-UP POWER PLANT FOR SA A long-term back-up electricity power plant is set to be installed as part of the South Australian Government’s plan for the state to take charge of its energy future. Installation is set to be completed ahead of summer. Rather than just procuring temporary generators, the Government will purchase nine new GE TM2500 aero derivative turbines through APR Energy, providing up to 276MW of generation to the grid when required. The hybrid turbine power plant will initially be installed at two locations, the Adelaide Desalination Plant at Lonsdale and at the General Motors Holden site at Elizabeth, operating on diesel fuel over the next two summers,

before being relocated to a permanent location as a state-owned power plant operating on gas. The state-owned power plant will be able to generate more power than the 250MW originally outlined in the energy plan. SA Premier, Jay Weatherill, said, “Rather than purchasing temporary generators before building a new gas plant, this solution will deliver long-term back-up generation for South Australia before this summer. “Importantly, this solution will deliver more generation capacity than originally planned, while emitting less carbon pollution than Torrens Island Power Station.”

While operating on diesel at the temporary locations the power plant will emit 25 per cent less CO2 per megawatt hour than the former Northern Power Station. Once operating on gas, it will be more efficient than Torrens Island Power Station. The power plant will be tested monthly and only dispatched to the grid when required to prevent an electricity supply shortfall. The costs will be met within the overall $550 million budget of the energy plan. The power plant is being supplied by APR Energy following a competitive tendering process conducted by SA Power Networks and have a lifespan of about 25 years.

For more energy news like this, as well as in-depth feature articles and expert commentary on Australia’s energy industry, visit the newly launched Energy site at www.energymagazine.com.au.

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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NEWS

GAS SUPPLY SHORTFALL THREE TIMES

HIGHER THAN ORIGINALLY ESTIMATED

N

ew reports by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) and Australian Competition and Consumer Competition (ACCC) have predicted gas supply shortages will be considerably higher for eastern and south-eastern Australia than what was estimated six months ago. The AEMO’s update to the 2017 Gas Statement of Opportunities, and ACCC’s Gas Inquiry 2017-20 Interim Report focus on likely supply and demand conditions for 2018. AEMO Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Audrey Zibelman, said, “Based on the most recent information from industry, together with AEMO’s forecast demand, gas supply remains tight in eastern and

south-eastern Australia in 2018 and 2019, and there remains a risk of a supply shortfall. Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, said, “It’s estimated there will be a shortfall … of around 110 petajoules of gas – more than three times the figure we were advised earlier in the year.” Mr Turnbull had a meeting with gas producers Santos, Shell and Origin Energy to discuss the future of Australia’s east coast gas supply. APPEA Chief Executive, Dr Malcolm Roberts, said the industry had reassured the Prime Minister at the meeting in Sydney that sufficient uncontracted gas would be available in 2018 to meet the new, much higher forecast of expected demand.

“There is no reason to fear that eastern Australia will run out of gas in 2018,” Dr Roberts said. “The industry will ensure there will not be a shortfall of gas in the domestic market. The businesses present gave a commitment to the Commonwealth that all uncontracted gas will be offered to the domestic market first.” Mr Turnbull said that while there is more work to be done, the meeting made good progress on the issue. “We have secured that guarantee from these three big gas companies, three big gas exporters that the shortfall, the expected shortfall identified by AEMO and the ACCC in 2018, they will provide the gas to meet that,” Mr Turnbull said.

For more energy news like this, as well as in-depth feature articles and expert commentary on Australia’s energy industry, visit the newly launched Energy site at www.energymagazine.com.au.

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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NEWS

NBN TO USE BIG DATA TO ANALYSE FAULTS

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bn has developed an initiative that will leverage Big Data, machine learning and existing capabilities to improve NBN end-user experience and help resolve issues faster. When faults occur, nbn’s Tech Lab will help the team determine whether a fault can be dealt with remotely and immediately or whether a field technician needs to visit an end-user home to resolve the fault. The Tech Lab will explore and implement emerging technologies such as machine learning and graph technology – which will provide insights, identify patterns, preferences and trends in people’s use and delivery of the services over the NBN. nbn is able to gather the information used in the Tech Lab through a series of surveys that are completed by the end user – with their express consent – about their experiences. nbn’s Chief Systems Engineering Officer, John McInerney, said, “Once the investigation and implementation of the Tech Lab research is complete we could, for example, easily identify trends that occur in a failed activation in order to pre-empt problems before arriving at a house. “Faults are an inevitable part of any technology network but minimising the disruption is key to improving the experience. We expect to see significant improvements as a result of early detection and quick resolution.”

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NEWS

TOWNSVILLE TO RECEIVE NEW WATER PIPELINE

T

he new Haughton pipeline in Townsville will begin construction, with more than 32km of water pipes laid through a $225 million investment in the Queensland State Budget. Townsville Mayor, Jenny Hill, said the council had been doing the necessary groundwork over the past few years so work could begin as soon as the funding was released. “We’re ready to roll with this project because of the preparations the council has done in the last few years so we could build when the right solution and funding was secured,” Ms Hill said. “The work I put in to get water

security as the top priority in the City Deal, the recommendations of the water taskforce and the State Government funding have all helped get this project ready for construction. “Council has been purchasing land parcels that will serve as easements for the pipeline from the Haughton Channel to the Ross Dam. “We always knew that a bigger pipeline would be needed at some point as a water security measure. “This pipeline will get water and jobs flowing into the city with our strong commitment to give as much of the work as possible to local businesses.” Townsville Water and Waste

Chairman Councillor, Paul Jacob, said the council staff have been working very closely with the Department of Energy and Water Supply to deliver this vital project. “This project isn’t just laying a pipeline, it involves a lot of moving parts from expanding the Haughton irrigation channel to a power station needed to pump the water to the Ross Dam,” Mr Jacob said. “When the 1.8m diameter pipe is finished, it will be more than 32km long and deliver up to 234 megalitres of water per day, which is more than our city uses on its hottest day without water restrictions.”

WATER AND SEWER UPGRADES FOR MELBOURNE’S WEST

$

37 million worth of upgrades are underway to three of Western Water’s recycled water plants at Sunbury, Melton and Gisborne in Victoria, to increase sewage treatment capacity and water quality. The upgrades will ensure the plants can cope with increased sewage flows due to population growth, with each town projected to grow significantly in the years ahead. $65.1 million has been invested in capital works in 2016/17, with Western Water expecting to spend around $80 million a year in the next five years. Over $27 million has been spent to date at the Sunbury Recycled Water Plant, including the recent construction of a new membrane tank and associated pipework, a 28m high odour control stack, expanded dewatering facility and new inlet works. The Sunbury plant was originally designed to treat an average of 6.5 million litres of sewage per day from homes in Sunbury and Diggers Rest – after the upgrade it will be

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

able to treat 9.2 million litres per day. The $53 million project is being delivered under a design, build and 10-year operate contract with Downer Group. Construction is under way at the Melton Recycled Water Plant on a new $8 million digester, with the concrete base poured and works beginning on the external walls. A digester is technology that converts sewage into decomposed waste that after further treatment is then suitable for use as a natural fertiliser. It is also converted into a methane gas burned as fuel to produce electricity at the site. The new unit is expected to be completed mid-2018. Excavation works have began on a new $1.6 million UV filtration and disinfectant system at the Gisborne Recycled Water Plant. This is the first of several planned upgrades for the site in the next few years, including a new dewatering system, bio-reactor unit, clarifier treatment tank and new inlet works.

WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU


NEWS

DIGITAL UTILITIES: THE MUST-ATTEND UTILITY EVENT FOR 2018

Digital Utilities 2018 is the premier event for anyone working with or for utilities, and grappling with the momentous impacts that digital technologies are having on the industry.

T

he digitisation of utilities is the greatest challenge currently facing the sector, and there is still much work to do to modernise existing networks, work practices and ways of interacting with customers. However, digitisation is also an area of great excitement and opportunity for those utilities that are willing to be brave, and step boldly into a new paradigm. At Digital Utilities 2018, delegates will hear from the industry’s leaders – those who are taking the action required to turn their organisations into modern, dynamic utilities, equipped to provide customers with the services they expect, at the times they demand, and at a price they are prepared to pay. The utilities sector hasn’t seen a shift this monumental in more than 100 years. The best way to ensure your organisation moves with the times, and establishes itself as a utility the modern consumer wants to do business with, is to learn from the best at Digital Utilities.

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A WORLD-CLASS LINEUP OF SPEAKERS The team from Utility magazine is creating a program of experts from the industry – both here in Australia and internationally – to deliver a high-quality program, synonymous with the highquality content that readers have come to expect from Utility magazine. Day one of the program will run as a plenary session, with a single program of speakers, networking sessions and panels to provide an overview of the current state of utility digitisation in Australia. The international keynote presentation will be delivered by an international utility Chief Information Officer who has significant experience adapting networks to new and evolving digital technologies. This keynote speaker will outline some of the changes currently underway within their organisation, and provide valuable lessons Australian utilities can take on board in their own digital transformation journeys.

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

This will be followed by our domestic keynote speaker, Stuart Hartley, EY’s Sector Leader for Power and Utilities in the Asia Pacific Region. Stuart’s presentation will focus on providing a general overview of the digitisation of the utility sector in Australia, what we have achieved so far, what has been done well and where the areas for improvement are. Other highlights from day one of the program include a CEO panel, which will feature CEOs from Australian water and energy utilities discussing and debating the critical issues they are facing when it comes to the rapid digitisation of their organisations; and a speed networking session, where delegates will be given the formal opportunity to meet at least ten other professionals working in the same industry to compare notes, share ideas and search for new opportunities to collaborate.

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NEWS On day two of the conference, the presentations will be divided into four streams: • Using digital technologies to improve customer relationships • The role of renewables in our digital future • Achieving cyber security resilience in a digital environment • Modernising the network for the digital age Allowing delegates to participate in focused sessions will expand their learning in, and understanding of, specific areas of interest that form a part of the digitisation journey.

GALA DINNER AND AWARDS At the end of the first day of Digital Utilities 2018 there will be a Gala Dinner and Awards evening where the inaugural Digital Utility Awards will be handed out. At the utility industry’s “night of nights”, awards will be handed out in the following four categories: • Digital Utility of the Year • Utility Innovator of the Year • Best Use of New Technology • Best Customer Innovation Winning a Digital Utility Award means you will be nationally recognised as a leader within your utility field of expertise. Applying for the awards give you the chance to stand out and showcase your expertise to the best of the utility industry. All nominations will be judged by a panel of industry experts, who will be announced shortly. To submit your application for a Digital Utility Award, head to www.utilityawards.com.au/apply.

WHY YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO MISS DIGITAL UTILITIES The utilities sector is providing services to consumers who increasingly expect more value for their money, in a market that is changing with the introduction of new technologies, while facing threats from agile start-ups keen to operate in their space. Most of today’s utilities professionals understand that digitisation is the way forward for the sector – the difficulty lies in how to actually execute these digital strategies. It’s a heady mix of factors that need to be taken into consideration, and the consequences of misstep – whether in terms of technology investment, strategic positioning or network management – can be huge. As the publishers of Utility magazine and the organisers of Digital Utilities, we have an intimate understanding of these challenges, and have designed this event specifically to help organisations best direct their effort and investment when it comes to the digital landscape. Digital Utilities has been created using the unique Monkey Media events philosophy. Having already established a reputation for delivering the best magazines in the industries we publish for, including Utility and Infrastructure,

our events build on the magazines and bring the best parts about them – thought-leading content, insightful news and developments and opinion pieces from the industry’s best – to life. Our events provide professionals with unique opportunities to learn from experts within their field, and enhance their connections with other professionals and organisations that are working towards similar goals. Our focus is on providing the best content and the most valuable networking opportunities which are services the industry can benefit from. We only organise events in the industries we are already active in, and we offer generous discounts on ticket prices to qualified utility professionals who will genuinely benefit from attending our events. Digital Utilities is an event not to be missed by professionals working at all levels within the utilities industry. From Chief Executive Officers, Managing Directors and utility board members, to Chief Information Officers and their teams, all the way through to Heads of Innovation and New Technologies, and Technology Developers, there is much to be learned. Digital Utilities will give you a new perspective on the challenges associated with our rapidly digitising industry – make sure your business isn’t the one left behind.

To register your interest or to apply for advance tickets, visit www.digitalutilities.com.au.

Digital Utilities 2018 19-20 April 2018 Pullman Hotel Albert Park www.digitalutilities.com.au

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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SMART GRIDS

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Utility Partner Solutions

A MACHINE LEARNING APPROACH TO IMPROVING GRID RESILIENCY by Sunil Kotagiri, Lead Consultant, Utilities and Geospatial BU, Cyient

As the Internet of Things (IoT) proliferates across the utility network, the increased number of smart devices, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) infrastructure are creating operational complexities, new business paradigms and benefit scenarios.

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n increase in DER across the distribution network mandates real-time generation and supply modelling, bringing fresh challenges to the utilities in managing and interpreting large volumes of information. To streamline this transformation, utilities throughout the world are turning to Advanced Distribution Management Systems (ADMS) and related operational analytics. Data, however, remains a significant stumbling block to realising the benefits. For instance, ADMS and operational analytics can enable power flow modelling to help dispatch smaller energy resources only when the system accurately understands actual load characteristics based on real-time phase and system load. While ADMS play a vital role in enhancing grid resiliency, it heavily relies on the data coming from various IT systems and grid sensing devices to develop advanced applications and operational analytics. Utilities are exploring ways to validate if the input data is operationally viable - complete, accurate, consistent and current. Moreover, utilities are looking for best approaches to sustain the data quality for meeting their stretched goals. The traditional way of data validation using static tools and processes may no longer be productive, and indeed a transformation leveraging advanced techniques like machine learning is the need of the hour. The quality of network connectivity and data governance can be significantly enhanced when machine learning based algorithms are supplemented with real-time grid intelligence.

Smart meters are increasingly gaining acceptance, leading to a proliferation of data along with voltage and load profiles at regular intervals. However, the usage of such data in operations is limited, while this data is immensely useful in meter-to-cash processes. If voltage signature data from the meters and connected grid content is incorporated into the data validation routines, they can bring in real intelligence to undertake the relational check of key attributes such as phasing and meter-totransformer ties. As machine learning algorithms continue to ‘learn’ from the voltage and load data, they become increasingly valuable in data validation and augmentation processes, which ensures the availability of right data in the GIS at all times, and accurate data for ADMS operations. When an ADMS gets access to validated ‘true-state’ representation of the network model, it makes energy dispatch more accurate even after the integration of distributed energy resources. It improves fault localisation, isolation and restoration processes, and enhances the accuracy of switching operations for the safety of workforce and assets. Grid resiliency can only get better if static data and real-time data from sensing devices are used in conjunction. Therefore, data governance plays a key role along with machine learning based data validation algorithms in measuring, protecting and assuring data quality in a manner sufficient to meet the targeted business objectives for which the data is sought.

For more information please write to UandGmarketing@cyient.com or visit www.cyient.com

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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SMART GRIDS

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MAKING YOUR SMART GRID THE HEART OF A SMART CITY:

the six immutable truths by Wayne Pales, Energy Industry Consultant

Energy utilities around the world are scrambling to digitise and provide the best service to consumers in a rapidly changing environment. Here, Wayne Pales outlines the six immutable truths energy utilities need to be aware of, and factoring into their decision making in energy’s new world order.

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here are constant reminders of the disruption that is upon us as an energy industry. We face regulatory uncertainty, so can no longer make long-term infrastructure investments with confidence. Policy decisions are hindering our ability to invest in behind the meter solutions. Consumer adoption of new energy technologies such as rooftop solar and battery storage is impacting revenue and changing how networks are managed. And new entrants in areas such as embedded networks will dramatically eat into the traditional revenue models of utilities. Most of my industry peers believe the above inevitable disruption will happen. The major divide in opinion is when, and to what extent, the impact will be. All of us have been battling with how to respond. We know at the heart of this we must face into the disruption and increase the lifetime value of our customers to reduce the impact to our business, but there are often competing priorities. We still need to keep the lights on and run the business. We need to satisfy shortterm demand from our shareholders

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and deliver healthy returns. And we need to justify why we are making investments in future opportunities that have an uncertain outcome and may, in the short term, reduce our revenue, increase our operational costs, or both. Everyone I talk to agrees the future of our industry is uncertain. There are also strong views put forward by a variety of experts, often with opposing positions. Given the conflicting advice, how can we be expected to make the right investment decisions? It can feel safer to remain unchanged until the fog clears when we have more certainty. The problem with this approach is this – the fog will not clear for many years, if ever. So we need to look for lead indicators that can help us navigate this uncertainty when it comes to the journey from the analogue past to the digital smart cities of the future. These lead indicators are what I call the immutable truths. These immutable truths are the reality that is happening around us, regardless of what we as electricity professionals decide to do. We must take notice of this reality and allow it to inform our smart grid investment decisions. These truths

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

need to be at the heart of our smart grid hypothesis and our journey to smart cities. Jeremy Rifkin, in his book The Zero Marginal Cost Society, writes about the coming together of the Communications Internet, the Energy Internet, and the Logistics Internet in an Internet of Things, and he discusses how this will transform our society. I believe there are six immutable truths that we, as an industry, need to factor into our investment planning decisions in the coming years. The six immutable truths are: 1. New energy technology is getting cheaper, smaller and more efficient 2. Everything is becoming connected 3. The growth of data is increasing insights into companies and consumers 4. Energy consumers strive for greater choice and control 5. Energy consumers expect simplicity 6. Reducing the impact we have on our planet is an increasing part of investment decisions How we decide to interpret these truths is up to us, but we must not

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SMART GRIDS

ignore them. External forces used to be relatively predictable and constant. Historically, energy demand would increase in line with the economy. Customer power consumption would follow standard patterns. Back then, the environment was not a consideration, and investment planning in the grid was fairly straightforward. Today, we must take a serious look at what is going on around us, and have this inform our investment planning decisions.

NEW ENERGY TECHNOLOGY IS GETTING CHEAPER, SMALLER AND MORE EFFICIENT Whatever unit you use to compare, new energy technology is getting cheaper, smaller and more efficient. Solar technologies are the best example of this, with battery storage following suit. All the main car manufacturers have now committed to electric vehicle investments which will mean the price of electric vehicles will drop. The lower the price point, the more people will purchase an electric vehicle. The more people buying electric vehicles, the more investment will be made to make them better and cheaper, and on the cycle goes. The connected home is starting to experience the same trend, with Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Apple all vying to dominate the home through hubs that connect to smart devices and use digital virtual assistants to control them. In the not too distant future, we will see solar technology move from rooftop panels to solar pavements, solar paint and solar tiles, among others. High-rise apartment buildings often placed in the too hard basket for the introduction of solar and storage are now within reach. For example, start-ups like Ubiquitos

Energy announced solar glass that could be used in apartment buildings to replace regular glass. Projects have emerged where solar and storage are being introduced in multi-residential complexes. These projects are breaking down the traditional barriers to entry where solar and storage would only be feasible when installing in a single household.

EVERYWHERE WE LOOK, NEW ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES ARE BECOMING MORE ACCESSIBLE TO HOUSEHOLDS AND BUSINESSES Everything is becoming connected. There is an enormous amount of hype associated with the internet of Things, a term first coined by Kevin Ashton in 1999. The term has been around for many years, yet there is still no globally agreed definition. For this article, I refer to the definition by the Oxford English Dictionary, which states the Internet of Things is “the interconnection via the Internet of computing devices embedded in everyday objects, enabling them to send and receive data”. On the grid side, we see deployments of smart meters and other sensors across the network. The idea is to generate much more granular and timely insights into operations and consumer behaviour so that we can make more accurate and timely business decisions. We are now even seeing a push towards distributed computing and the ability for intelligence to be deployed at the edge of the network and for that device at the edge to make decisions independent from the back-office systems. The move to distributed computing means utilities can now leverage technology to gain insight and take action in near real time, anywhere

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in the network. On the consumer side, we are seeing home appliances connecting to the Internet, such as smart air conditioners and smart thermostats. As mentioned earlier, we are seeing a move by major consumer technology players such as Apple, Amazon, Google, and Microsoft trying to play a vital role in connecting all home smart devices to a central hub to simplify management and reporting to the consumer. For the utility and consumer together, every aspect of the home and power grid are becoming connected.

THE GROWTH OF DATA IS INCREASING INSIGHTS INTO COMPANIES AND CONSUMERS The more we deploy connected technologies, the more data there is to consume. This data, often referred to as big data, will enable organisations to gain levels of insights into their company’s performance and consumer behaviour never seen before. As an example, in utilities, we see the rapid adoption of condition-based maintenance – a move away from time-based maintenance where a utility would schedule a piece of equipment to be assessed or replaced, to a model where they replace or repair components when the device itself provides lead indicators that it is about to fail. This approach can significantly reduce the maintenance costs of a utility. On the consumer side, insights can be used to ensure customers are on the most suitable tariff, to help determine if they would benefit from rooftop solar and battery storage. For these reasons, securing advanced analytical capabilities, whether through partnering or developing in-house, is a vital component of the smart grid.

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Making your smart grid the heart of a smart city: the six immutable truths

ENERGY CONSUMERS STRIVE FOR CHOICE AND CONTROL As with most things in life, we humans do not like being told what we can and cannot do. We want to have choice, and we want to have control over our decisions. This immutable truth can, at times, conflict with another immutable truth, the desire for simplicity. Often utilities create such a wide and varied range of products that customers became overwhelmed and frustrated, and so look to take more control. There is a growing desire for greater control over how we generate our electricity and how we pay for it. In many parts of the world, the drive to go off-grid comes out of a feeling of frustration that the consumer feels they are locked-in and have no choice with their current utility. These off-grid investments come in the form of solutions such as rooftop solar and battery storage to reduce reliance on the utility. The first step is the desire to lessen dependence on the utility and take back more control. The second step will be to leverage software to optimise the combination of grid and off-grid energy available to them. The third and emerging step is the desire to trade excess energy with others in the community. Consumers buying and selling decisions won’t always make economic sense. Someone may want to purchase electricity from their child’s school, their local church, or community centre as a way of supporting them. Don’t ignore the occurrence of this trend just because the math doesn't add up. People will start to head down this path, even if it costs more than their

current electricity plan, as they feel they are giving back.

ENERGY CONSUMERS EXPECT SIMPLICITY No longer do people take the time to study how things work. As Elon Musk famously said, “Any product that needs a manual to work is broken”. Consumers expect solutions to be intuitive and take as few steps as possible to achieve an outcome. When it comes to electricity, people want to have “set and forget” solutions. They want a cost-effective, reliable solution. They want that solution to have minimal impact on the environment. And they want all of this without having to change the way they live. We have tried for years to educate people on the need to change their energy consumption behaviour. While education is still important, and some people take action, the message is not getting out fast enough. I’d argue that with the introduction of solar and storage technologies, people are potentially going to start to consume more, as they won’t see the need to conserve the usage of renewable energy. For utilities to gain traction with consumers, they need to design products and services that minimise the reliance on the consumer doing anything. THE OLD PARADIGM THAT LOW-COST ELECTRICITY IS THE PRIMARY GOAL IS CHANGING Don’t get me wrong, the amount people pay for their electricity is still, in the vast majority of cases, the consumer’s primary concern. What I have been seeing is a growing consumer base where, in addition

to cost, they want to partner with organisations who provide green energy, and where the organisation is active in giving back to the community. These are often people with greater disposable income, and while they may be in the minority of your customer base, they may just be the majority regarding opportunities for new revenue streams. The problem with only focusing on the traditional, price-sensitive consumer is it becomes a race to the bottom where nobody wins. Just focusing on driving out costs and meeting the immediate demands of the majority of your customers will result in missed opportunities, and eventually being surpassed by new entrants and alternate solutions.

THE SMARTER GRID OF THE FUTURE A smart grid has to cater for a reality where it will be more and more connected with technologies it does not own, manage or operate. A reality where the lines between what is part of the grid and what is not become increasingly blurred. It will be a grid that interacts with external Internet of Things platforms that are part of a broader smart city. It will share energy data with third parties so that those third parties can deliver new services to consumers, as well as back to the utility. The smarter grid of the future will be a collaboration with many partners, across many industry verticals, all sharing data with each other. The smarter grid will ultimately be a platform that manages the movement of electrons and data from multiple points of generation to multiple points of consumption.

Wayne Pales has worked in the energy industry for over fifteen years in senior management at gas and electric utilities in Australia and Hong Kong, with exposure to China and India. He is the co-author of the book Building blocks to a digital utility, a step-by-step guide to help utilities develop long-term strategies that embrace behind the meter technologies. He currently consults to utilities in Asia and Australia, using energy data to deliver measurable customer value.

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WAT E R

Water operators recognised FOR BEST TASTING WATER

Goulburn Valley Water took out first place at the 2017 Ixom Victorian Water Taste Test competition at the WIOA conference in Bendigo. Here, we take a look at the history of the competition, the importance of recognising Australia’s water operators, and what it takes to have the best tasting water in the state.

GEORGE LECH, KATHY NORTHCOTT, MARCUS BOYD, AND GEORGE WALL JUDGING THE IXOM VICTORIAN WATER TASTE TEST IN BENDIGO.

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he Ixom Victorian Water Taste Test is an annual competition that selects the highest quality drinking water in Victoria as a way to recognise local water service providers and their ability to supply safe water to the community. The competition began in 2012 when Ixom partnered with the Queensland Water Directorate to hold a water taste test as a fun way to encourage operator and council engagement. After holding the first competition, Ixom was inundated with people calling to ask how they can be involved in the initiative. A year later WIOA hosted the competition at its Bendigo trade show and a tradition was born. Ixom Training Manager, George Lech, said he believes the competition became so successful so quickly because of the well deserved recognition it provides Australia’s water operators. “[The competition] celebrates the hard work that operators do day-to-day in providing absolutely clean pristine water. It is really a testament to them, not only the people who make the

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JUDGES ASSEMBLED FOR THE TASTE TEST.

potable water, but also the people involved in the wastewater treatment as well. Their role is just as critical because they are able to treat the water to a fantastic standard,” Mr Lech said. “That’s what WIOA, the Queensland Water Directorate and Ixom are really proud to be a part of this, to recognise and promote the sort of work that these operators are doing. “They don’t do it for fame, they don’t do it for glory, they don't do it for really great uniforms and medallions, they do it because they’ve got that community spirit to ensure the water they produce is safe and fit-for-purpose.” Craig Mathisen, WIOA Chief Operations Officer, said the general public would be surprised to learn the complexities involved in delivering high-quality water to taps each day. “The competition is a testament to the excellent quality of Australian water, and to the diligence and commitment of the operational employees who deliver it to our communities,” Mr Mathisen said. “We want to celebrate our unsung heroes - the water operators and the maintenance crews who work all yearround to ensure we have high-quality water, which is essential to keep us alive.”

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THE COMPETITION HEATS UP All water organisations in Victoria are invited to nominate one preferred sample of tap water for inclusion in the taste test competition. The judging begins with an intense round of heats pinning entrants against each other as they fight it out to be named the best water in the state. “We hold a series of heats, and what we try to do is get the operators involved. So we would have a whole series of samples, they would taste them and they would rate them. They give them a number and the ones that scored highest then go in as finalists,” Mr Lech said. “The water quality can vary and, oddly enough, even though you would think it’s only water how can you be able taste the difference, but you can depending on the water source. You might get something that's coming from an artesian well and from that you get a lot of dissolved minerals and you might be able to taste that it’s actually got a mineral type of a taste.” “You’ve got others that might have surface water, and you might have organic matter in there, and you actually start to taste that slight peat type of a taste. Which is all fine, all acceptable, and all totally safe.”

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WAT E R

At the 2017 Ixom Victorian Water Taste Test in Bendigo, the top four samples were held under scrutiny by a panel of water connoisseurs. The samples were judged on a point scale of good to best based on clarity, colour, smell and above all, taste. The scores were aggregated and the winner was the sample that achieved the highest combined score.

JUDGES COMPARING THE CLARITY OF THE FINALISTS SAMPLES.

MERRIJIG TAKES OUT FIRST PLACE After many glass swirls and thoughtful sips, this year’s Victorian taste test judges crowned Goulburn

Valley Water’s Merrijig Treatment Plant as the best tasting water in the state. Merrijig’s water sample beat out the likes of Coliban Water, Yarra Valley Water and Melbourne Water. Goulburn Valley Water Manager of Operations, Steven Nash, said they felt very proud to be named this year’s winner. “This is the second time we’ve won in the last three years. So we sort of went on our lessons learned from when we were successful. We won with Marysville two years ago, which was a brand new micro-filtration plant working in an Alpine region, so we had a great rural water quality there with the Stevenson River. Then the operators in the area said to me, ‘We think the water at Merrijig is just as good’,” Mr Nash said. “Merrijig is located between Mansfield and Mount Bulla, and supplied by an alpine region through the Delatite River. It’s a similar plant to Marysville, as they’re both microfiltration. “I had inspected the plant probably

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IXOM WATER TASTE TEST WINNER, GOULBURN VALLEY WATER’ MANAGER OF OPERATIONS, STEVEN NASH, MAKING HIS ACCEPTANCE SPEECH.

a month ago. It was in great condition and the operators were taking a lot of pride in the plant, so I had a lot of confidence in selecting the water for the taste test for this year.” Goulburn Valley Water and its sample from Merrijig will go on to compete in the national competition held on 18 October 2017 in Launceston. The winner of the national competition will then represent Australia at the world championships in the United States.

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CELEBRATING WIOA’S NEWEST LIFE MEMBER The Water Industry Operator Association of Australia (WIOA) has just appointed its seventh Life Member in 44 years of operation. Newest Life Member, Peter Tolsher from North East Water talks about his 16 years of service with WIOA and highlights the importance of recognition and the sharing of information in the water industry.

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s part of WIOA’s various organisational goals, it strives to provide opportunities to recognise the individual achievements of employees within the water industry. As a testament to this, WIOA has appointed Peter Tolsher, former WIOA President and board member, a Life Member in recognition of his commitment to excellence within the industry. Peter was awarded his Life Membership at the annual WIOA conference in Bendigo this September. At the conference, WIOA Managing Director, George Wall, said that Peter’s enthusiasm, commitment, energy, personal qualities and friendly nurturing nature epitomise the values of WIOA.

THIRTY-FIVE YEARS IN THE WATER INDUSTRY Mr Tolsher began his thirty-five year career in the water industry in the early 1980’s working with the Tallangatta Shire, Towong Shire Council, Kiewa Murray Water and finally North East Water. “I was asked if I wanted to go back to school and do some water and wastewater courses. I went to the Water Industry Training Centre in Geelong and started my training. Through the water industry amalgamations in the 1990s, I went from Council to the newly created water authority,” Mr Tolsher said. Mr Tolsher said after presenting a paper at the 1999 WIOA conference in Wodonga, he was convinced they were a valuable organisation to be a part of. “My then boss, Manager of Tech Services Don Jackson said to me, ‘You’ll want to get on board with this group, because I think that’d be really good for you to grow, and it’d be a

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great opportunity to be more involved in the industry.’ “I thought about it and I said, ‘Yeah, why not. Let’s give it a go'. Little did I know that it was going to be a great journey that has made me lifelong friends," Mr Tolsher said. In 2001, Mr Tolsher was elected to the WIOA committee and became Vice President in 2005 before being elected President from 2007-2008. In 2010 he was inducted as an IDIOTS (Inducted as Delegates of the Inextricably Obstructed Tap Society) which is the prelude to the life membership award. “One of the things that I was really chuffed about being President was signing the first Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), with the New Zealand WIOG group. The relationship between our organisations has grown ever since,” Mr Tolsher said. “In my time we also started WIOA Limited, which was needed so we could become a national organisation to share knowledge and run conferences across the country. This allowed the business to employ staff, run events and grow each year to what it has become today. “I was on the board from its inception in 2007 until March this year. The only reason I gave it up was because I’d become a councillor in Towong Shire.”

IMPORTANCE OF RECOGNITION AND INFORMATION SHARING WIOA aims to give recognition to water industry operators who help to provide excellent quality water and wastewater services day after day through such initiatives as the Ixom Water Taste Test and the Operator of the Year award.

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“Being active in nearly all states now, as well as the publicity from running the national water taste test, has provided huge benefits to the water industry and WIOA. It just gets the organisation out there to everybody, it gets the information out to the operators. It’s sort of an organisation that people want to be affiliated with,” Mr Tolsher said. “My personal belief is that if you do something well, you should be recognised.” Throughout Mr Tolsher’s time in the water industry, he has had many opportunities to present papers to his peers on topics including the upgrade of the West Wodonga BNR wastewater treatment plant, the effect that Endocrine Disruptors have on fish, and the Newsoil biosolids project for North East Water. He also represents WIOA on the Australian Standards committee for sludge which has seen him represent Australia at international meetings, the last being in Dublin, Ireland. Mr Tolsher said you are never too old to learn new things about the sector. “It’s just good to share the ideas of what other people are doing. You don’t want to reinvent the wheel all the time, you want to learn off others.” Looking to the future, Mr Tolsher believes that one of the positive and inevitable changes that will continue to occur is the sector’s move towards digitisation. “The technology is where we’re going to, where everything is. I know in the last 15 years SCADA and Citect have made operator's lives so much easier. I think it’ll only advance further and further. It’ll make the work/life balance of an operator a bit better than what it is today,” Mr Tolsher said.

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Utility Partner Solutions

EASING THE STRESS IN TRENCHLESS PIPELINES IPLEX MILLENNIUM PIPE READY FOR HDD INSTALLATION, PART OF THE LIVINGSTONE SHIRE COUNCIL’S CAUSEWAY LAKE WATER MAIN REPLACEMENT PROJECT.

Over the past decade, Australia’s water utilities have become increasingly reliant on trenchless methods of pipeline installation and rehabilitation. This trend has in turn resulted in a demand for higher performance, long-life polyethylene pipes that will provide reliable service for 100 years or more.

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t is this requirement that motivated Iplex to look toward the evolution of PE100 pipe materials – materials that can withstand the inevitable damage and abuse that will occur in trenchless directionally drilled, slip lined and pipe burst installations, or even in open trench installations, where undetected rock impingement may occur during construction. For the past five years Iplex has collaborated with Australia’s resin manufacturer Qenos to develop a superior PE100 resin; a resin with exceptional resistance to slow crack growth. The product of this research and testing program is Iplex Millennium®. Iplex Millennium is a high stress crack resistant (HSCR) grade of PE100 pipe that provides up to ten times greater resistance to slow crack growth than conventional PE100 pipe. It has the same pressure burst strength of conventional PE100 pipe, but is specifically designed for use in critical or high value pipeline assets where the risk of premature failure from slow crack growth is possible. Iplex Millennium conforms in all respects with AS/NZS 4130. The Plastics Industry Pipe Association (PIPA) has published guideline POP016 establishing the performance requirements of HSCR PE100 pipe resin and the Water Service Association of Australia (WSAA) has appraised Millennium in report 1610. Under certain circumstances, selecting Iplex Millennium over conventional PE100 will permit a reduction in pipe wall thickness, resulting in substantial installation and pump energy cost savings. The high stress crack resistance of Iplex’s Millennium pipe may also allow the use of excavated spoil, eliminating the need to import granular embedment in open trench applications. This can save a contractor up to 20

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

per cent in pipeline construction costs. Another advantage is increased service life expectation, as Iplex Millennium pipe can easily achieve an anticipated service life of 100 years due to its greater tolerance of surface damage. This is a substantial benefit to pipeline owners who are required to make accounting provisions for the replacement of assets. Millennium can also provide safer gas pipelines where ‘squeeze-off’ is used to manage pipeline flows for planned or emergency maintenance, and it increases resistance to the initiation of slow crack growth wherever these stress concentrators are present, leading to a longer service life and enhanced network dependability. The first Australian HDD installation of Iplex Millennium is currently underway near Yeppoon in Queensland. The Livingstone Shire Council is drilling beneath an environmentally sensitive estuary to provide an increased flow capacity to meet population growth, in a region south of Causeway Lake. The project involves two 400 metre long bores to install parallel DN450 and DN315 pipes. At the time of writing, the DN450 pipe had been drilled and pulled into place with the DN315 to follow shortly. The critical importance of the pipeline, combined with difficult ground conditions that include significant amounts of rock, drove Livingstone Shire Council to select Iplex Millennium pipe and entrusted specialist HDD contractor Maxibor with the installation. Livingstone Shire Council’s Causeway Lake water main replacement project marks a breakthrough for the Australian trenchless pipeline industry by establishing a new benchmark in the standard of PE100 polyethylene pipe.

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IPLEX MILLENNIUM

®

PE100 HSCR TAKES CARE OF THE STRESS IN TRENCHLESS PIPELINES C I V I L 1 3 1 0 8 6 • E M A I L D E S I G N @ I P L E X P I P E L I N E S . C O M . A U • W W W. I P L E X . C O M . A U W W W. I P L E X . C O M . A U

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WAT E R

Utility Partner Solutions

NSW LOCAL COUNCIL TACKLES HIGH LEVELS OF WATER LOSSES HEAD-ON by Mark Halliwell – Taggle Systems

Narrabri Shire Council in New South Wales is adopting a new approach to tackling an old problem which affects most water utilities: water loss.

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hen Darren Raeck took up his new post of Director Infrastructure Delivery at Narrabri Shire Council in late 2016, he found that the shire was almost at the top of a list that would provide him with a real challenge. That list, found in NSW Water Supply and Sewerage Benchmarking Report, showed Narrabri Shire Council as having the state’s third highest water losses among local water utilities with 300010,000 water connections. Examining the data, Darren’s estimate was that the shire’s Real Losses were running at about 27 per cent. Not really where you’d want to be as the manager of water supplies for about 14,000 people in an area with water supply security concerns. Prior to Darren joining the team at Narrabri Shire Council, about $1.7 million was allocated to replace the shire’s aging water meter fleet. Having just arrived from Grampians Wimmera Mallee Water (GWM Water) in Victoria where he’d seen the success of its new LPWAN based Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) system, Darren questioned the plan to simply replace old water meters with new ones. When a preliminary review showed that an AMR system was feasible, the idea of using the meter replacement money to implement a remote meter reading system was fully investigated and a business case was developed. That business case focused mainly on the current cost of meter reading, underregistration of the old meters, and the potential savings to be made by reducing non-revenue water (NRW) losses. Darren’s view was that, by reducing water losses from 27 per cent to 17 per cent (still an uncomfortably high number), the NRW savings along with

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savings on manual meter reading would pay for his AMR system in less than five years. Mindful of the potential impact an AMR system might have on some council employees, Darren approached his council to outline how, by reading water meters remotely, his staff would have more time to carry out proactive, preventative maintenance and move away from reactive works which never seemed to end. Having already allocated the funds and seeing the potential of Darren’s plan, Council was quick to give him the green light. A short-form tender was issued to prequalified suppliers through NSW’s Local Government Procurement (known as LocalBuy in QLD) and, after due consideration, a contract was awarded to Taggle Systems. As of September 2017, Narrabri’s Taggle LPWAN was fully established across the shire’s eight towns, and about 80 per cent of the new water meters fitted with Taggle transmitters (Tags) were installed. Darren and his team are now able to view data coming from these meters in the MiWater Meter Data Management software procured as part of the AMR system and have identified numerous potential customer leaks. Although these leaks have been identified, Darren is keen for Taggle to complete its data validation and quality checks before putting the new system to work and contacting affected customers. While Taggle’s LPWAN has been deployed to provide AMR services for Narrabri Shire Council, Darren is very conscious of how the network creates new opportunities for the wider community. Narrabri Shire is situated in the heart of the very rich Namoi Valley,

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

well known as a major cotton-producing region where economic output relies heavily on efficient water use. Darren didn’t know it at the time he chose Taggle’s LPWAN for his AMR project but just down the road from his Narrabri office, 35km north-west of Wee Waa, the National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture (NCEA) from the University of Southern Queensland was using the same Taggle network to collect high resolution rainfall and soil moisture data in support of research into autonomous furrow irrigation. That project uses Taggle-equipped rain gauges and soil moisture sensors to monitor soil water content across large individual paddocks, allowing automated furrow irrigation to occur in a more precise and targeted manner. Darren now realises that, with Taggle network more widely available throughout the shire in support of Council’s new AMR system, he has effectively created a new set of modern communications infrastructure which can be used to enhance the productivity of the entire region. To help build awareness of this new facility, Darren will install a Taggleconnected council weather station as well as rain gauges at each of the shire’s towns. While the data collected will help Darren and his team to better understand domestic water use across the shire, he wants to show the community how the council is leading the way in the adoption of new technology and encourage them to make use of it.

For more information, visit: www.taggle.com.au

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REMOTE MONITORING: KEEP IT SIMPLE


WAST E WAT E R

Utility Partner Solutions

A new frontier IN RENEWABLE ENERGY

Nestled in the town of Combrée in western France, a highly specialised biowaste-to-energy recovery centre is transforming organic waste into energy and fertiliser products. The technology is set to become a significant player in the circular economy, and is on its way to Australia.

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trategically located near the bustling urban centres of Rennes, Nantes, Angers, Le Mans, Cholet and Laval, the Méta Bio Energies waste recycling centre converts the high volumes of biowaste produced in these cities – predominantly from agriculture and industry, major food production and municipal green waste – into new and sustainable resources. Opened in 2012 by the Chazé Environnement Group, the site includes a deconditioning unit that feeds a one megawatt-capacity methanation facility generating green electricity. A composting unit produces organic soil conditioners for the Angers region’s farmers, and market and commercial gardeners; and an on-site depackaging facility prepares packaged goods for processing. SUEZ acquired a majority stake in Méta Bio Energies in September 2015 as part of its global commitment to green energy research and development. It is the fourth methanisation unit to be operated by SUEZ in France and to benefit from the company’s expertise in biological and energy recovery from waste.

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The facility is supported by a substantial program of research into the methanogenic potential of diverse organic resources and innovative processes to more effectively harness them. “SUEZ has a five-year plan to increase its capacity to produce energy with the biogas from waste by 30 per cent, and the technology and processes refined at the Méta Bio Energies Plant will be an important contributor to this,” said General Manager Business Development for SUEZ in Australia, Stuart Gowans. The anaerobic digestion plant can process a wide range of different biomasses. With annual capacity for up to 25,000 tonnes of packaged waste from supermarkets, liquid industrial waste and solid cereals waste, it produced 8.5 GWHel in 2016 – enough to power more than 2000 households. Electricity is distributed through the local mains network while the residual heat generated is sold to the nearby Solairgies plant, which specialises in the drying of industrial and urban sludge. The green electricity and heat produced by the facility offers a carbon dioxide emissions saving of

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

approximately 1400 tonnes per annum. Around 35,000 tonnes of green waste, poultry droppings and food industry solid waste is processed each year through the on-site composting plant. Solid digestate that represents only 1000 tons per year is eco-composted with green waste, and marginally contributes to a global quality standardised compost and organic fertiliser marketed tonnage that reached 21,000 tons in 2016, replacing fossil fuel-intensive inorganic fertilisers. Digestate liquid fraction that represented more than 18,000m³ in 2016 is land spread on agricultural parcels of more than 30 local farms. Gowans said SUEZ is working hard to bring the expertise and operational knowledge of managing such facilities, as well as the technology and processes refined at Méta Bio Energies to Australian shores in the near future. “We are keen to integrate this biowaste-from-energy expertise into existing facilities locally and enable our customers to reap the rewards,” he said. “There is huge potential for cost benefit – not only for energy producers and consumers, but also for the environment.”

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WAST E WAT E R

Improving odour management AT SA PUMP STATION

SA Water is set to install new control equipment at its Port Adelaide Wastewater Pump Station located in West Lakes that will minimise odour from the station.

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he new management system will provide a long-term, permanent solution to minimise odours from the natural by-products of sewage that have emanated from the pump station.

INSTALLATION OF NEW CONTROLS AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS The Port Adelaide Wastewater Pump Station serves around 30,000 homes and businesses in Adelaide’s western suburbs and receives an average of 22.5 million litres of sewage every day. It was built in 2004 to replace the former Port Adelaide Wastewater Treatment Plant that had operated at the Frederick Road site for around 80 years. The facility completes basic sewage treatment by removing solids before pumping it to Bolivar for further processing. A tender for the new system will soon be issued, with the replacement work planned to take place between December 2017 and July 2018.

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As part of the upgrade, the pump station’s existing carbon filters will be maintained to manage odours from the plant until the permanent solution is completely installed. SA Minister for Water and River Murray, Ian Hunter, said the completely new odour management system has been designed specifically for the Port Adelaide Wastewater Pump Station so it can continue to play an important role in the local area. “The wastewater facilities that have characterised this site for over 80 years have been adapted to support the area’s transition from industrial to residential, and this modernisation will continue,” Mr Hunter said.

A LONG-TERM WASTEWATER SOLUTION Mr Hunter said current challenges in the wastewater sector have meant odour management systems are working overtime.

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

“Water wise measures and the uptake of more environmentally friendly household products have combined to alter the composition and concentration of today’s sewage, challenging the original odour management system,” Mr Hunter said. Member for Lee, Stephen Mullighan, said he had been raising the issue with SA Water and the Minister for some time and he is happy the treatment plant is now receiving this new equipment. “Residents will be looking forward to being able to go about their daily lives without being impacted by the odours in the area,” Mr Mullighan said. SA Water has been in regular contact with local residents, updating them on both the short-term and long-term solutions for managing odours from the Port Adelaide Wastewater Pump Station and will continue to keep them informed about the project’s progress.

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

THE FUTURE OF ASSET MANAGEMENT

AT SYDNEY WATER

by Paul Plowman, General Manager – Liveable City Solutions, Sydney Water

As Australia’s largest water and wastewater services provider, Sydney Water manages about $60 billion worth of assets. Between 2016 and 2020, almost $2.2 billion will be invested in upgrading these and building new assets as the city grows. Sydney will welcome another 1.3 million people in the next two decades – and Sydney Water plays a critical role in Sydney’s future. We have already started working with key agencies, industry and our customers to develop smart, sustainable water, wastewater and recycled water solutions for Sydney for generations to come.

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uccessful strategies of the past are not always indicators of what’s needed for the future. Those of us who have been in the water sector for a number of years have noticed changes to our community’s expectations and norms. We’ve also noticed the advancement of technology and contemplated the opportunities that they can bring to the way we do our work. I have listened to asset managers in the latter years of their careers reflecting on how their jobs are fundamentally different from when they started. It’s not hard to imagine the pace of change is going to accelerate and undoubtedly the role of the Asset Manager will evolve and look quite different in the years to come. However, in the short to medium

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term there are some enduring themes that will influence direction for Asset Managers in water utilities and that will significantly change the way we work.

THE ‘AGE OF THE CUSTOMER’ IS UPON US Customers depend on many services everyday – whether it be banks, telecommunications or energy, and for the most part they have choice. These customers are more informed and more connected than ever before. Competition means that if they don’t believe they are getting value for money, they vote with their feet. While Sydney Water’s customers may not have the same levels of choice, it is not unreasonable for them to expect the same levels of service and value. So, within our

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

organisation a cultural transformation has been underway, where we imagine ourselves as a service business, not a utility or asset management entity. But, without assets there is no service to provide. Customer-driven asset management means that our fleet of assets are tailored to deliver value to our customers. Customers drive our asset strategies, not the other way around. Success requires commitment and resolve to really understand what our customers value and involving them in our decisions - an outward perspective rather than an introspective one. This adds complexity to asset management practice as we translate customer preference into action and service delivery.

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

A WHOLE-OF-WATER-CYCLE APPROACH WILL CHANGE THE TYPES OF ASSETS WE BUILD AND MANAGE Our city faces a growing trend of increasing net migration, as people continue to move to Sydney from interstate, attracted by our enviable climate, strong economy and jobs. In the same length of time since Sydney hosted the Olympic Games in 2000 more than one million extra people will call Sydney home. This presents both challenges and opportunities. Sydney has always enjoyed the reputation of being one of the world’s most liveable cities, giving us a competitive advantage. We must innovate to maintain our position in the context of our quickly growing city. From a water infrastructure perspective, this means we must re-think the role of urban water and its contribution to vibrant and prosperous communities. Our thinking will need to evolve from traditional product lines of potable water and sanitation, involving pumps, pipes and treatment plants, to catchment-based solutions and systems thinking. Water infrastructure will be a valued and integrated part of our urban landscape, not just under it and out of sight. An integrated water-cycle approach will no doubt see the emergence of alternative solutions such as decentralised systems, ‘green and blue infrastructure’ and opportunities for closer links between water, energy and waste management. Our traditional asset base has and will continue to underpin the liveability of our cities – imagine what life would be like without a wastewater system and dependable water supply. However, we will need to grow our capabilities to plan, build, operate and maintain these next generation assets. TECHNOLOGY WILL ENABLE A GREATER CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE AT A LOWER COST Sensor technology, the Internet of Things, Big Data and increased access to third party information, either formally or informally through social media, provide great opportunity

to improve the way we manage and operate our assets, and provide the best possible service for our customers. The increasing accessibility and affordability of sensor technology, data analytics tools and computing power allows water utilities like Sydney Water to think about our information differently. In the next few years, we will have the ability to cross reference real-time operational performance data with customer insights, rich spatial information layers, live traffic feeds, multi-faceted asset data, social media inputs and financial information. The insights and patterns derived from this data, when linked to dynamic hydraulic models enables us to plan scenarios for Sydney’s future that balance cost, risk and customer needs. To leverage these possibilities, we must be open to what the information tells us and allow our traditional assumptions to be challenged.

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Technology will enable the uptake of alternative servicing solutions that will ultimately be designed to meet the needs and preferences of our customers. Our ultimate ambition is to know about problems well before our customers ever do. Necessary, timely and planned preventative maintenance is always safer, more efficient and a better experience for our customers than reactively fixing something that’s gone wrong. In the future we see our customer contact as predominantly positive and outbound. None of these emerging themes can be seen as mutually exclusive. The possibilities are exciting and full of challenge and opportunity. One thing is for certain - the future will be very different from the past. At Sydney Water, we are eagerly leaning into this future where we are an essential part of Sydney’s communities for generations to come.

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

Asset management’s best grapple

WITH INNOVATION, STANDARDS AND SUSTAINABILITY Leading managers of critical infrastructure in Australia recently gathered in Sydney to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing the asset management industry, at a conference attended by asset owners, utilities and senior figures from within the utility sector.

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sset Management for Critical Infrastructure was held from 16-17 August at the Swissotel in Sydney, providing more than 70 members of the asset management community with an opportunity to learn from the industry’s best, network with clients and colleagues and discover some of the latest innovations when it comes to the art of managing critical infrastructure.

DEBATING THE KEY ISSUES The expert panel of speakers lined up for the event was spearheaded by two keynotes – Steve Doran, Director of Infrastream and Chair of the Sydney Chapter of the Asset Management Council, and Antony Sprigg, CEO of the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia. Mr Doran’s keynote presentation, Leading innovation in asset management, kicked off day one of the conference. According to Mr Doran, strong industry competition and shareholder perception that companies are not future-proofing are two of the critical reasons why innovation has become a necessity for today’s asset managers, rather than a luxury. Mr Doran warned delegates that they needed to consider risks such as

their traditional technologies becoming obsolete, and more agile start-ups providing more cost-effective solutions when weighing up how heavily to invest in innovative new methods of managing assets. Antony Sprigg’s keynote presentation provided the opening for day two of the conference, with his presentation focusing on The role for ‘sustainability’ to inform and evaluate asset management for critical infrastructure. According to Mr Sprigg, the last few years have seen a shift in industry attitudes towards sustainable thinking when it comes to our assets, and in his presentation he explored the role a sustainable approach to asset management should play in Australia’s future. Mr Sprigg urged companies to think about sustainability as an essential part of their planning, rather than just something extra.

THE ASSET OWNER’S PERSPECTIVE The keynote presentations were supported by a number of speakers who directly manage assets themselves. Peter Harcus, General Manager of Asset Strategy Gas at Jemena, discussed recent changes in Australia’s

UTILITY PUBLISHER CHRIS BLAND

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

PAUL PLOWMAN, SYDNEY WATER'S GENERAL MANAGER, LIVEABLE CITY SOLUTIONS

energy landscape which have led to Jemena adapting its approach to managing pipelines. Also providing the asset owner’s perspective was Paul Higham, Head of Service Planning and Asset Strategy at Sydney Water, who explored the way in which a consumer-centric view of asset management can drive innovation for the water sector. Representing the rail industry was Michael Killeen, Asset Manager at NSW TrainLink, who explored the topic Establishing the desired balance of cost, risk and performance in his presentation.

PANEL DISCUSSIONS GET TO THE HEART OF THE ISSUES The program for Asset Management for Critical Infrastructure included two panel sessions, allowing speakers to interact and freely discuss some of the key issues they face on a daily basis. On day one, the speakers representing asset owners participated in the Predictive Maintenance Panel, where they discussed some of the techniques they’re all using to predictively maintain their assets. On day two, delegates enjoyed the Innovation Panel, led by Andrew McAlpine, Asset Performance and

STEVE DORAN, DIRECTOR OF INFRASTREAM & CHAIR OF THE SYDNEY CHAPTER OF THE ASSET MANAGEMENT COUNCIL

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

Systems Manager at TransGrid, and comprised of keynote speaker Steve Doran, Keith Paintin, Principal Consultant Asset Management at Jacobs and Greg Tyrrell, the Executive Director of the Australian Association for Unmanned Systems (AAUS). During this session, the panelists considered how innovative asset owners currently are when it comes to the management of their assets, and discussed some of the innovative technologies they are each excited about.

ESTABLISHING INDUSTRY CONNECTIONS Asset Management for Critical Infrastructure allowed delegates plenty of time to network and get to know other members of the asset management community a bit better. On day one, delegates participated in a formal networking session in the form of the Speed Networking session. During this session, all delegates had the chance to meet many of their fellow delegates, and compare notes on their individual roles within the industry, the useful information they’d picked up during the sessions so far, and to consider potential opportunities to work together in the future. Feedback from delegates from this

session was particularly positive, with many noting that the timing of the session – right before lunch on day one – allowed particularly fruitful conversations to continue and go into further detail over the extended break. At the close of day one, delegates also enjoyed a more informal networking drinks, where they were able to continue conversations started in the speed networking and meal break

sessions in a relaxed environment. With plenty of opportunities to connect with colleagues, combined with the intimate nature of the event, delegates left the event particularly pleased with the new connections they were able to make over the two day event.

Keynote Steve Doran, Director of Infrastream and Chair of the Sydney Chapter of the Asset Management Council, will be presenting an in-depth workshop Innovating in Asset Management on 22-23 November in Sydney. For more information or to register visit assetmanagementforcriticalinfrastructure.com.au/courses.

DELEGATES ENJOYED THE CLASSROOM STYLE SET UP DURING THE CONFERENCE SESSIONS

The inaugural Asset Management for Critical Infrastructure was a highly successful event, with delegates commenting on the quality of the speakers, the depth of the presentations and the surplus of networking opportunities as the key benefits of attending the event.

THE SPEED NETWORKING SESSION ALLOWED DELEGATES TO MAKE NEW CONNECTIONS WITHIN THE INDUSTRY

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The second annual Asset Management for Critical Infrastructure will be held again in August next year – keep reading Utility in print and online so you can stay up to date with all of the details about next year’s event, and head to www.assetmanagementforcriticalinfrastructure.com.au for more information.

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

Utility Partner Solutions

SYDNEY WATER DRIVES COLLABORATION WITH TOOL TO PREVENT ROADWORKS DISORDER Discover how Sydney Water is using a cloud-based scheduling tool to reduce traffic congestion by ensuring road opening and resurfacing is minimised.

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ausing angst and frustration for commuters and ratepayers of Sydney, poorly planned underground maintenance projects can result in traffic congestion - only for separate maintenance works to dig up the same location within weeks or months. With Sydney Water citing an annual water main renewal program of over $50 million, there is a need to better collaborate with the New South Wales (NSW) councils, utilities and agencies, working smarter to plan and share proposed works and coordinate costs, resources and schedules.

SYDNEY WATER Australia’s largest water and wastewater service provider, Sydney Water, delivers water, wastewater and some recycled water services to over five million people across Sydney, the Blue Mountains and Illawarra, spanning over twelve thousand square kilometres. The Sydney Water network is made up of 21,000 kilometres of water mains, 24,500 kilometres of sewer mains and 450 kilometres of stormwater channels and pipes. Sydney Water identified the need to take a new approach to planned works across the region, using unprecedented technology.

"Too often when utilities and councils work independently, projects aren’t aligned, causing re-work, customer frustration and waste". Stuart McDonald Wastewater & Stormwater Team Leader, Sydney Water. THE CHALLENGE Currently, councils provide their planned works in an excel or PDF format which makes it hard to overlay Sydney Water’s planned works and requires significant resources to manually check each location for opportunities. Utilities also only share their planned works as they become state significant projects such as CBD Light Rail or North West Rail Link.

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

In some situations, roads are resurfaced before the renewal of assets can be identified or planned for construction. Sydney Water felt that there had to be a better way to use technology to ‘cut to the chase’ and find opportunities to collaborate with other infrastructure providers. Specifically, they required: • A shared tool for capital works management among councils, utilities and agencies to save time, cut costs and reduce inconvenience to the community and staff • A solution to prevent unnecessary repeat roadworks, underground maintenance or repairs made in the same location • A central platform of information to visualise planned works across multiple organisations in real-time

THE SOLUTION To achieve a large-scale adoption of a capital works tool, Sydney Water approached NSW Streets Opening Coordination Council (SOCC), a voluntary association of utilities dedicated to achieving cooperative and efficient practices associated with street services, to champion a ground-breaking intelligent mapping platform. Sharing Sydney Water’s vision, SOCC coordinated the development of iWORCS™, a collective platform to inform and manage capital works, using Esri Australia’s SmarterWX platform. A pilot online platform was tested. From June 2015 to September 2016, Sydney Water and nine Sydney councils uploaded their work programs to create a central live display of planned works. During this period, several opportunities were identified and savings were recorded through sharing the cost of road surfacing and better timing of works. The current iWORCS™ collaboration tool was then custom built in January – February 2017, delivered through a Software as a Service (SaaS) scalable cloud platform powered by SmarterWX. Councils, utilities and agencies utilise iWORCS™ using simple steps: • Each organisation manages their capital works by uploading their project data into iWORCS™ WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU


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Data is published within the application and instantly becomes viewable by all participating organisations Users can upload data and set exclusion zones - areas where projects cannot occur during a certain period, for example during public events such as a fun run, parade, or community festival The system intuitively identifies works programs occupying the same space and time range as other scheduled projects The system identifies scheduled conflicts and notifies all relevant project owners via an alert, allowing for smoother communication and collaboration between stakeholders

"Using iWORCS™ we forecast savings of up to $1 million in the next two years, and with more than 50 NSW councils, utilities and agencies expected to join, the money saved will increase significantly". Stuart McDonald Wastewater & Stormwater Team Leader, Sydney Water. THE INNOVATION iWORCS™ provides a central record of planned works to assist in the future planning, scheduling, and coordination of activities between participating organisations. Its purpose is to improve collaboration and to minimise the cost and disruption of roadworks, while addressing community concerns over multiple excavations of a road by different project teams. In a typical scenario for Sydney Water, such as replacing a water main, iWORCS™ may prevent situations where previously large costs were spent to excavate and reinstate a road, soon after the road had been resurfaced for maintenance. It can also highlight design conflicts of other planned underground works early in the planning process, leading to cost savings.

ASSET MANAGEMENT

Utility Partner Solutions

THE OUTCOMES iWORCS™ presents an opportunity to adopt a best practice approach to capital works management – which puts community stakeholders first. Key outcomes from the platform include: • Better coordination between underground utility works, avoiding damage to other underground services • Minimised impacts of underground utility works on both natural and built environments • Minimised interference to traffic and pedestrian flow caused by road openings for the installation, operation and maintenance of utility services • Reduced disruption to local communities • Reduced duplication of remediation efforts • Reduced costs of roadworks • Minimised disruption to road users • Better quality roads • Reduced impact of roadworks on the lifecycle of the road network Stakeholders from across NSW that have already joined the collaborative platform include: • SOCC • Sydney Water • Roads and Maritime Services • City of Sydney • Wollongong City Council • Lane Cove Council • Jemena Gas • Randwick City Council • Georges River Council • Canterbury-Bankstown Council • Northern Beaches Council "For current footpath improvement work on Bourke Street, Surry Hills, iWORCS™ has delivered immediate benefits for the community by improving coordination and avoiding the cost and disruption of any unnecessary duplicated work". Clover Moore, Lord Mayor, City of Sydney.

For information on how to apply SmarterWX GIS technology in your business visit www.esriaustralia.com.au.

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

Utility Partner Solutions

MOBILE SOLUTIONS TO MANAGING ASSETS The ubiquitous use of smartphones and tablets today means that utilities need to get on board and ensure their staff are comfortable with internet-enabled devices in the field.

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he efficiency gains that utilities can enjoy when using mobile devices range from five to 15 per cent, and the use of these technologies is viewed favourably by regulators – making mobile software applications an increasingly appealing option. K2Fly is a leading consulting systems integrator with extensive experience in successfully delivering software solutions to the electricity, gas and water sectors. This real-world experience comes from leading edge implementations in Australia, Asia, the US and the UK. The company has a strong focus on solving the problems of its clients. Rather than trying to fit their software

into their customers’ businesses, they instead focus on how they can adapt their software to the client’s individual needs. K2Fly works across different business areas and has relationships with a number of partners. A specialty is the area of mobility, where the company works with leading field management provider Capita (UK), as well as the topranked mobile application development platform (MADP) from Kony (US). The Fieldreach solution from Capita is used by more than 50,000 users on a daily basis and is deployed in electricity, gas and water companies. Most of the UK’s water companies deploy Fieldreach with their mobile field workers, and have reported

improvements when it comes to ensuring the right work is being done at the right time, against the right assets with the correct certifications, tools and materials. Kony’s MADP is used extensively in global organisations such as Engie, where clients are helped to develop their own suite of apps, as well as exploiting numerous “out-of-the-box” offerings. K2Fly has a strong history of working with utility industry clients. Current clients include Western Power, Horizon Power, Woodside, Programmed and Fortescue Metals Group. Previous international clients include National Grid, EDF Energy, E.On and Southern Water.

For more information on how K2Fly can help your organisation, visit www.k2fly.com or call (08) 6333 1833.

enabling essential industries

We’re the Consulting Systems Integrator focusing on the digital transformation of Electricity, Water, Gas and Rail organisations. We’re the specialists in delivering advisory and implementation services to the asset intensive sectors.

info@k2fly.com www.k2fly.com

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

Utility Partner Solutions

INTELLIGENT INTEGRATION FOR UTILITY DISASTER MANAGEMENT by Tarun Bhandari, Head of Location Based Services, Utilities and Geospatial, Cyient

Many utilities find themselves under prepared for disasters due to a number of constraints within their core IT systems. However, there are techniques and tools they can use to improve their management of disasters.

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or electrical utility companies, the task of planning and managing the aftermath of natural disasters is a daunting and difficult one, fraught with a multitude of decisions to be made using the information from multiple sources. For the public, however, restoration of power in the event of a disaster is a critical activity and to many, a life-saving one. In order to minimise both disturbances and recovery times to the public when a natural disaster strikes, regulators are imposing heavy fines on utilities for extended outages, which are defined as services not being restored within a stipulated time. During 2016 alone, natural disasters around the world cost utilities a combined economic loss of approximately $210 billion in repairs and fines, attributed to 315 separate events. The initial costs of implementing comprehensive and robust disaster operations management might be perceived as a drawback by some, but the investment means avoiding lengthy downtime, power restoration delays and subsequent hefty fines from regulators.

USING THE POWER OF DATA Some of the constraints within a utility’s core IT system can include poor integration, the limited availability of information and a lack of sufficient time to respond to disasters. An intelligent disaster operations management (DOM) solution will prepare the groundwork to enable utilities to align and prepare themselves for some of the newer changes on the horizon, such as performance based regulation (PBR). The introduction of intelligently integrated systems for location-based DOM would provide the assessment and

management that utilities require to improve responsiveness. It would enable them to move away from being reactive, towards a process that helps them anticipate, plan and execute methods to reduce the impact of disasters. Even utilities that proactively mobilise without an outage or damage forecast model get it wrong; most either over or under prepare.

INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS Predictive damage assessment tools can now leverage Machine Learning, historical and Big Data analytics to improve damage forecast modelling, drawing on past data sets to produce accurate and reliable estimates of the damage that assets can sustain. The latest data sources generated and used by utilities, such as Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), 3D imagery and Internet-Of-Things (IoT) sensor data, can also be integrated to enable better decision making. For example, the use of IoT in the electric power industry enhances the grid’s resilience and durability from outages. Smart meters are used as grid sensors that support decision making systems in several ways, including demand response, voltage management, outage management, accelerated restoration and overall operational efficiency. If utilities adopt a more predictive and data-driven approach, they can acquire the operational power to quickly coordinate with emergency response services. They can also leverage historical data to improve their effectiveness and reaction time in the future. Teams are supported with tools to collaborate effectively and remove delays caused by disparate, unconnected systems.

For more information please write to UandGmarketing@cyient.com or visit www.cyient.com WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU

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PRODUCTS

Utility Partner Solutions

LEVERAGING THE CLOUD TO MANAGE DATA COLLECTION AND DISTRIBUTED FIELD TEAMS Companies with geographically distributed offices and field crews face challenges in the continuous and near real-time management and tracking of their employees, vehicles and equipment. While there can be many different non-interconnected tools and methods involved in exchanging data, managing schedules and documenting tasks, when they are combined with manual steps and media distractions, this can actually increase the risk of errors, thereby costing time and money.

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here are tools on the market that deliver project and task management, including software packages for field forms and reports, and others that track time. These are mostly divided into highly complex project task management, surveying and GIS applications, as well as more or less trivial “mapping” applications. Often you need a high degree of technical skill to use these tools, or sometimes they might not have a focus on the utility sector. They also lack enterprise functionality and interoperability, often requiring many steps to complete the field-to-office process.

AN INTEGRATED SOLUTION Utility Mapping Australia, a leading consultancy service provider that delivers underground utility survey and mapping, needed a powerful and integrated solution to operate its business across four operational offices spread across Australia. C.R. Kennedy, Australia’s largest supplier of surveying equipment and geospatial solutions, offered to Utility Mapping Geolantis.360, an enterprise-grade, next generation platform, to manage workforce operations, data collection, inspections, and company assets. In an initial project, Utility Mapping got the chance to use Geolantis.360 in conjunction with the powerful Leica Zeno 20 GNSS handheld and EMI locator, also supplied by C.R. Kennedy. In this integrated solution, measurements from the EMI locator are automatically transmitted to the Zeno 20 via Bluetooth, enabling the asset information to be integrated with the GNSS position, and utility attributes to be uploaded to the Geolantis portal in real-time. After exploring its powerful real-time mapping capabilities, Utility Mapping then became interested in the extensive workforce management capabilities of Geolantis.360, in order to envisage a complete end-to-end process. An in-depth analysis showed that many of the operational workflows and business requirements could be managed using a single integrated cloud based software package. BENEFITS FOR FIELD WORKERS Access to maps, project related information and instructions is important to complete daily duties and maintain personnel safety. The challenge is to bring this information to the field and have it in one central place.

Geolantis.360 is the only platform we have found that aligns with our core philosophy of data management with project planning and operational management – a case of GIS meets ERP. This system gives us the ability to manage more with less. — Bruce Baker, Director at Utility Mapping.

Previously, workflows required multiple applications and field workers could not access information while they were in areas without cellular coverage. This made the process of updating data, timesheets or job dockets time consuming, especially if transposed from paper forms to digital. Introducing Geolantis.360 as a central smart phone and tablet based application and dashboard results in improved productivity, allowing personnel to concentrate on the main tasks and finish documentation and reporting more easily.

ADVANTAGES FOR OPERATION MANAGEMENT TEAMS Having real-time access to data and the status of tasks allows managers to see what field teams are doing without having to wait until the end of the workday. Faster access to data, timesheets and job dockets also allows for better decision-making, easier planning of next steps and faster project progress. Overall, the replacement of error-prone paper processes with a digital workflow, including validation logic, results in fewer inquiries to the field team and more consistent and accurate data. Utility Mapping was able to streamline its processes by eliminating paper forms. The streamlining of workflow for post-field work tasks such as data processing and reviewing therefore increases efficiency and response times. ADVANTAGES FROM A MANAGER’S POINT OF VIEW One of the biggest challenges for management teams lies in having a general overview of previous, current and future projects, and foreseeing bottlenecks on personnel and equipment resources. This is mitigated by the cloudbased Geolantis.360 platform, as it delivers a higher level of productivity, faster decision making, and improved customer communication, estimates and approvals, which all reduce operational costs.

Contact C.R. Kennedy to explore how the Geolantis.360 platform can provide the foundation for optimisation, growth and stability you require. Call 1300 886 982 for more information or visit survey.crkennedy.com.au/gis

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MANAGE TASKS


PRODUCTS

Utility Partner Solutions

Ensure reliability and longevity

WITH DF2 SWITCHGEAR

When it comes to medium voltage switchgear, installing equipment that will stand the test of time, as well as delivering safety and availability of power supply is crucial.

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omparatively speaking NHP delivers a medium voltage switchgear range that guarantees the highest projected life span to market, through specific designs and rigorous testing.

AGING FACTORS AFFECTING DURABILITY Service life span of medium voltage switchgear is largely limited by aging factors which inevitably decrease the initial specified life span. 1. Loss of tightness of the vessel containing the insulating and arc quenching gas (where used), mainly influenced by ambient temperature, insulating gas temperature and consequent pressure. Gas leakage leads to the following failure modes: a. Failure to break load current by gas-filled load break switches b. Insulation failure in gas insulated switchgear due to leakage from the gas-filled tank containing busbars and all switching devices (RMU) 2. Degradation of the insulating parts under the influence of moisture, heat and dielectric stress, leading to eventual insulation failure. 3. Corrosion of metal parts under the influence of humidity and heat. The most critical failure mode is corrosion of driving mechanisms leading to increased friction and eventual failure to operate switching devices. NHP’s DF2 is an air-insulated switchgear with SF6-filled load break switch, therefore only factors 1a, 2 and 3 apply from the list above. DESIGN AND TESTING TO DETERMINE ENDURANCE NHP’s European switchgear supplier SGC has designed and tested a DF2 series switchgear for a service life span of 50 years, by using a special product design, materials and technologies to mitigate each of the above mentioned aging factors. A 50-year life span has been confirmed by applying far more stringent test regimes than required by IEC 62271.200 and applied to a typical switchgear rated for 30 years’ service life.

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STANDARD IEC 60068-2-17

TYPE TEST Gas tightness test on DF2

RESULT

AGING FACTOR ADDRESSED

834 years @ 80C

SF6 gas leakage

SF6 gas leakage

Load Break Switch

IEC

Damp heat aging test

Design Class 2 (for

62271-304

on DF2

frequent pollution &

IEC 60068-2-11

Salt mist test on DF2

168 hours

driving mechanisms

<0.05% rusting

Tracking current test on

Class 1A4,5

heavy condensation

IEC 60587

DF2 insulating parts

Corrosion

Insulation degradation

Figure 1

The DF2 has passed three non-mandatory environmental type tests to a highest criteria set in the relevant IEC standard as summarised in Figure 1, and thus has proved its excellent longevity while subjected to extreme levels of major aging factors. This has allowed NHP to claim 50 years life span under normal service conditions. DF2 modular switchgear design allows for creating rational, economical and custom-made combinations of medium voltage cubicles at 17.5kV. A truly versatile solution, it is used in primary distribution substations, secondary distribution ring networks, motor control, wind generation and more. Robust driving mechanisms and interlocks, combined with clear synoptics ensure safety of manual operation. A patented internal arc quenching system ‘The Arc Killer’ enhances personnel safety and protects switchgear from internal arc faults.

NHP SERVICE AND SUPPORT Not only does NHP offer medium voltage switchgear that is robust with the highest level of safety, but it ensures significantly reduced downtime, reduced maintenance costs and low installation costs. As well as equipment that is purposely built to last, NHP promises ongoing service and support throughout the entire project lifecycle from tendering through to switchgear commissioning and required life span services. For more information on how NHP can help implement a medium voltage solution providing reliability, efficiency and superior performance at your next project, contact your local sales representative or call 1300 NHP NHP.

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Head upstream with robust and reliable medium voltage solutions

NHP ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PRODUCTS 1300 NHP NHP | nhp.com.au |

From quality medium voltage switchgear to long-lasting transformers and market leading substation and automation solutions, the NHP medium voltage range can be customised to suit your specific performance criteria and are reliable, robust and built to last.

Providing the optimal balance of knowledge and experience, a partnership with NHP promises to last the life of your project, providing quality, assurance and peace of mind. When it comes to medium voltage, trust NHP to engineer a customised solution to help you gain a competitive edge. NUMAGADV_79702_0917

Reflecting the need for reliability in water and wastewater applications, NHP offers an extensive range of medium voltage solutions, allowing application flexibility as well as higher productivity and safety.


LAND ACCESS

HOW JEMENA

SUCCESSFULLY SECURED LAND ACCESS FOR NGP After 12 months of negotiations, Jemena has secured land access arrangements with all traditional land owners across the 622km route of its Northern Gas Pipeline (NGP) in both the Northern Territory and Queensland.

BOBBY THOMSON, DAMIEN BAHR-KELLY, PAUL ADAMS AND NICK GREINER.

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LAND ACCESS

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decision to reschedule the NGP project was made in early 2017 to allow Jemena more time to finalise outstanding land access approvals. Jemena underwent extensive negotiations with Traditional Owners in order to begin construction of the $800 million gas pipeline, and in late March, it reached an agreement with all relevant Traditional Owner groups and construction began in July. Northern Gas Pipeline Project Director, Jonathan Spink said Jemena believed resequencing was the right thing to do to allow them to work closely with Traditional Owners to understand their concerns and reach an agreement. “Ultimately, this proved effective as it allowed us to finalise those negotiations without impacting the project’s overarching timeframe,” Mr Spink said. As part of the re-sequencing, Jemena released its partner McConnell Dowell from its contractual obligations and re-tendered key construction contracts. After the Northern Territory Government approved the construction

of the first 344km portion of the pipeline in June, McConnell Dowell was reappointed to construct 481km of the 622km pipeline, starting in the Northern Territory. The construction of the remaining 141kms of the Queensland border to the pipeline’s end-point in Mount Isa, was awarded to Spiecapag Australia.

COMPLEX NEGOTIATIONS Negotiations took place with eight Aboriginal Language groups who were represented by six Aboriginal organisations. As a result of these negotiations, Jemena established nine Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUAs), two Aboriginal Land Rights Act (ALRA) agreements and four separate Cultural Heritage Management Plans. Mr Spink said the NGP negotiations were a unique challenge as they had to coordinate with a variety of groups across a large and remote geographical space in a relatively short period of time. Negotiations between Jemena and the Traditional Owner groups took a variety of forms including one-on-one and group meetings, field visits and inspections, expos and roadshows, as

JEMENA NORTHERN GAS PIPELINE PROJECT DIRECTOR JONATHAN SPINK

well as online information and feedback. “We conducted a robust consultation process with Traditional Owners and Land Councils to finalise field survey works, develop cultural heritage management plans and secure land access across the pipeline route,” Mr Spink said

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LAND ACCESS

How Jemena successfully secured land access for NGP

“A particular focus of the consultations was the economic benefit of the project, specifically around jobs and training opportunities for communities across the pipeline route, and local contracting opportunities.” Senior Traditional Wakaya Elder, Tony Willy, was positive about the negotiation process with Jemena. “I am pleased to reach agreement with Jemena for the NGP. The jobs and contracts for my people will lay a strong foundation for their future. Jemena has worked well with us to understand our needs and hopes and we look forward to working together in the future,” said Mr Willy. As part of the agreement, Jemena will work with the Wakaya People to ensure they benefit from the NGP’s $6 million Jobs and Training Package alongside all Traditional Owners on the pipeline route. The agreement package will be delivered by local providers including Group Training Northern Territory

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(GTNT), Myuma Group, and Remote Concrete NT, and is one element of the NGP’s commitment to providing training, employment and contracts for business in the region. The NGP expects to employ approximately 600 people across the Tennant Creek and Mount Isa regions and will establish a number of training and development programs, investing around $112 million in contracts for local businesses. Mr Spink said he was very pleased to be providing the Wakaya People and any Traditional Owner groups with training, development and other opportunities for work on the NGP as part of their agreement. “We are grateful for the hard work and efforts of the Northern Land Council and Central Land Council. It was an extremely tough consultation process given the vast physical distance needed to be covered to ensure agreement by all parties,” said Mr Spink.

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FLEXIBILITY IS KEY Mr Spink said the experience Jemena gained through the process of negotiating the land access could potentially help other utilities who may face similar challenges. “Projects of this size and scale all present their own challenges, lessons and opportunities. My advice is to be flexible, listen to the community, and not be afraid to change your approach based on the feedback you’ve received,” Mr Spink said. Jemena expects to complete construction of around half the pipeline by the end of 2017, including all of the Tennant Creek and half of the Mt Isa compressor stations. The NGP remains on track to schedule the first gas to flow in late 2018.

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TRANSFORMERS & SUBSTATIONS

REPLACEMENT PROGRAM ENSURES A SAFE AND RELIABLE SUPPLY Ausgrid’s program of works to replace aged assets on its network is progressing, with a number of replacement substations recently reaching major milestones.

THE NEW TORONTO WEST ZONE SUBSTATION.

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usgrid spends about $1 billion a year on maintaining its distribution network in Sydney, the Central Coast and Hunter Valley. This includes large capital works projects.

SECURING POWER FOR LOCAL RESIDENTS Ausgrid’s new Toronto West zone substation has been powered up to help secure the power supply to more than 5,000 local homes and businesses. Ausgrid Chief Operating Officer Trevor Armstrong said an innovative approach to design and construction had delivered the substation at 20 per cent under budget. “This project is a milestone for the network and the way we deliver new infrastructure to maintain the community’s safe and reliable power supply while keeping their bills down,” Mr Armstrong said. “It also stands out for its unique building construction, our dedicated electrical equipping team and some sensible recycling of equipment. “It’s a great example of the way forward when it comes to replacing aging equipment on the network.” The $19.4 million substation replaces the nearby Toronto zone substation, built in 1961, and allows for the retirement of the Awaba sub-transmission substation, which was built in 1960.

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The site is subject to future underground coal mining. Ausgrid has designed the new substation with a unique steel skeleton frame that allows for ground movement without damaging the building or electrical equipment. “The team involved questioned everything and were able to overcome challenges specific to this site. They used our resources as efficiently as possible to replace equipment that has served the area well but is now due for replacement,” Mr Armstrong said. The Toronto West zone substation has almost double the capacity of the old equipment at Toronto, securing the power supply to the local area now and for decades to come. “We used local manufacturers to fabricate and install all the yard steelwork structures before site handover, so our crews were able to come in and focus on our strengths – the electrical equipping and commissioning.” The delivery method also included reuse of equipment already owned by Ausgrid. 132,000 volt circuit breakers have been refurbished and spare transformers were relocated and installed. The industry standard electrical design included a rationalisation of the amount of electrical earthing needed on site, without compromising the safety or reliability of the network. Construction waste fees were also reduced by ensuring the maximum reuse of displaced soil on site. WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU


TRANSFORMERS & SUBSTATIONS AERIAL VIEW OF THE TORONTO WEST SUBSTATION.

NEW POWER SOURCE FOR SYDNEY’S SOUTH WEST The preferred design and layout of Ausgrid’s new $30 million substation to be constructed in Greenacre in Sydney’s south west has now been established, following consultation with the local community. It will replace an existing zone substation which was commissioned back in 1970. “The current substation has been in service for 47 years, nearing the end of its working life, and needs to be replaced,” Mr Armstrong said. “This development will help secure the power supply for 16,000 local homes and businesses into the future.” The new Greenacre substation will be built on Ausgridowned land next to the existing substation, with construction set to begin in November. The substation will be initially equipped with two 132/11kV 50MVA transformers. The layout of the substation also allows for construction of a third transformer bay, if the electrical demand in the area increases in the future. Following the construction of the new substation the 11kV load will be transferred to the new substation and the existing substation will be decommissioned. Equipment snapshot: • Eight panels of 132kV SF6 GIS • Three 132kV feeders will be connected to the new substation • 132kV switchgear will be gas insulated • 34 panels of 11kV switchgear A Review of Environmental Factors for the project has been prepared and Ausgrid is seeking further feedback from the community. UPGRADING THE HUNTER More than 8000 Throsby Creek area residents and businesses will have their power supply secured with a new $23 million substation at Tighes Hill. Crews have begun installing the electrical equipment, following the recent completion of civil construction. Ausgrid’s Hunter Regional Manager Steven Andrews said it will replace an existing substation in Carrington, which was originally commissioned in 1967. “This project is important for the local community and the broader economy. It supplies important infrastructure at WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU

the Newcastle port as well as residential and commercial customers in parts of Islington, Tighes Hill and Maryville,” Mr Andrews said. “The equipment at Carrington zone substation has reached the end of its serviceable life and needs to be replaced. This project ensures we can continue to provide a safe and reliable power supply. “We have planned for the future and there is room to incorporate more capacity into the substation if needed down the track.” Ausgrid has been working with the local community and neighbours to the site for several years, ensuring its impact during construction was minimised as much as possible. The project also includes improved public access to the Throsby Creek foreshore. Equipping is expected to be completed by late 2017 and the substation will be powering local homes and businesses early next year.

MANAGING GROWTH IN THE INNER WEST Ausgrid’s new Croydon zone substation has been powered up, replacing aged equipment and helping to secure the power supply to 16,000 local homes and businesses. Mr Armstrong said the substation replaces the nearby Five Dock substation built in the 1950s. “The equipment at Five Dock has been serving our community well for about 60 years,” Mr Armstrong said. “It has had a number of upgrades over the years, but it is now time for it to be replaced to make sure we can continue to provide a safe and reliable electricity supply to our customers in Sydney’s inner west.” The new Croydon substation will play an important role in supplying electricity to the area, connected at 132,000 volts. This upgrade means the substation is well placed to meet any growth in the area for years to come. The electrical transfer of 11,000 volt power circuits is due to be complete at the end of this year, which means the zone substation at Five Dock can be safely decommissioned. Equipment includes two 50MVA transformers, six panels of 132kV switchgear and 21 11,000 volt power circuit panels, which distribute the electricity throughout surrounding suburbs.

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TRANSFORMERS & SUBSTATIONS

Utility Partner Solutions

CABLE AUGMENTATION LIGHTING UP THE WHITSUNDAYS

STEEP, ROCKY, LOW OVERHEAD LINES, SENSITIVE ENVIRONMENT, NARROW EASEMENT: THIS PROJECT HAS IT ALL!

Up on the beautiful tropical coast of Queensland, Zinfra crews are ensuring holidaymakers and residents at the Whitsundays have continuous power supply – irrespective of what mother nature may have in mind.

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elivering under a long-term services arrangement with Ergon Energy, Zinfra has almost completed an Emergency Works package on the outskirts of Airlie Beach in Queensland, known as the Ergon Energy Stoney Creek Whitsunday Cable Augmentation Project. Aerial bundled cable (ABC) overhead power lines previously ran approximately one kilometre from the Shute Haven 66/22kV substation to submarine cables at Coral Beach. These cables were the main supply of power to Hamilton, Hayman and Daydream Islands in the Whitsundays. Regular, severe weather events, including recurring cyclones, kept impacting these overhead feeders causing power outages on the islands. Zinfra was engaged initially to advise on the viability of installing underground cables, given the sensitive location and difficult terrain. A positive determination from these initial discussions, coupled with Zinfra’s capabilities and can-do attitude, meant they were engaged to deliver the works. The scope of works included trench excavation along with conduit,

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cable, RMU and pole installation, cable jointing, then removal of the old poles and ABCs, followed by the reinstatement of the track’s surface. This challenging project took place on the ridgeline of Mount Rooper in Conway National Park, whose incline varies between 11 and 22 degrees and is clearly visible to passing tourists as they make their way to and from the islands. The ridgeline’s canopy and undergrowth are home to an array of environmentally sensitive flora and fauna. As a result, Zinfra crews had to complete the work within a narrow easement only 4.5 metres wide and adhere to strict environmental controls. Undulating subterranean rock formations presented difficult conditions for trenching. An undocumented (no DBYD) fibre optic cable within the alignment and high voltage overhead mains just 4.2m from the ground added to the challenges experienced on site. Additional excavation was required to maintain minimum approach distances, and due to the terrain, manual potholing was required to

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

identify services in the rocky ground. The rock was such an impediment that trenching on some days advanced only 20 metres. The logistics of moving crews, plant and materials safely and efficiently along the narrow ridgeline easement to and from the work sites had to be carefully planned and choreographed. Open radio communication between all crew members and external deliverers was essential to the success of the project, as it allowed the crews to coordinate and stage the delivery of materials and equipment using a “just in time” strategy to prevent materials and plant from blocking the access route. Maintaining clear access and egress routes was challenging but an extremely important part of the emergency evacuation plan. Excellent planning, innovating and adapting by the Zinfra team on site, with outstanding collaboration and support from the client, has contributed greatly to the success of the project to date and no health, safety or environmental incidents have occurred.

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ZINFRA. BUILDING REPUTATIONS

Ed Gaykema ActewAGL Manager Gas Networks “The decision to appoint Zinfra as the primary contractor on a number of ActewAGL’s major projects was easy. We chose them based on their extensive experience in high pressure gas pipeline and facility construction and their reputation for delivering. They didn’t disappoint. Their ability to deal with challenging urban environments and deliver innovative solutions, whilst maintaining station operation, was second to none. In our experience, they have delivered fully operational upgrades safely, on time and on budget. I wouldn’t hesitate to work with them again”.

www.zinfra.com.au


TRANSFORMERS & SUBSTATIONS

Utility Partner Solutions

SMART POWER TRANSFORMER MAINTENANCE

P

ower transformer testing has just become a whole lot easier with the release of OMICRON’s Primary Test ManagerTM software. The Primary Test ManagerTM (PTM) software is optimised for initial screening, diagnostic testing and condition assessment of power transformers with the release of software version 4.00. All common chemical, electrical and dielectric tests on power transformers are now supported by one software.

With proper testing and maintenance, the lifetime of a power transformer can be extended by identifying and fixing defects before they can cause severe failures. A smart combination of an initial screening, e.g. a dissolved gas analysis (DGA), power/ dissipation factor tests and focused diagnostic testing is often utilised to keep the lifecycle management process more cost efficient.

Dr. Michael Krüger Principal engineer

Benefit from our experience in comprehensive power transformer diagnostics All of the experiences that I have as a principal engineer flow into our transformer test systems. Designed by engineers for engineers, our solutions are reliable, portable and robust for daily field use, with individual wiring diagrams and an integrated assessment according to various standards. Our wide range of transformer test sets covers everything from conventional tests such as power factor up to modern methods like dielectric frequency response and SFRA. www.omicronenergy.com/transformer info.australia@omicronenergy.com Australia: 03 9473 8400 New Zealand: 0800 6642 766

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2017-08-24 15:26:14

A variety of other electrical test methods, such as transformer turns ratio, DC winding resistance and short-circuit impedance, as well as advanced methods such as dielectric response analysis or sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) can be used to diagnose different problems within the power transformer. In the past, all test data had to be transferred manually from individual test devices to one common file. Comparisons and reports also had to be prepared manually. Since the software release 4.00, PTM supports all common diagnostic tests performed with various OMICRON test systems, as well as the corresponding condition assessment, such as the assessment of DGA test data. Therefore all data can be collected in one database, resulting in advantages such as overall assessment, easy data management, data comparison, trending, one comprehensive report and less training effort for employees. Combined with the time-saving advantages of new OMICRON test systems such as the TESTRANO 600 three-phase power transformer test system and the DIRANA for dielectric frequency response analysis, power transformer testing can be done in a fraction of the time needed in the past. In addition to diagnostic testing and condition assessment of power transformers and associated equipment such as bushings and on-load tap changers (OLTC), PTM can also be used for circuit breakers, current and voltage transformers, and rotating machines. The software guides its user through the testing process with comprehensive testing procedures and detailed wiring diagrams. The performed tests can be automatically assessed in accordance with the applicable international IEEE and IEC standards. Powerful reporting functionalities, such as customised, individual reports on test objects, test results and assessments, complete the service.

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SMART INNOVATIONS, BUILT FOR THE FUTURE We have a successful history of providing transformer solutions for the renewable sector, particularly in the wind, solar and hydro energy projects. Our product range includes: Power Transformers (≤550MVA) Distribution Transformers (≤5,000kVA) Compact MV Substations Open Skid Solar Substations Padmount Substations for Data Centers Special Transformers Fault Current Limiters Special Applications Monitoring & Control Solutions

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THE TRANSFORMER PEOPLE


CORROSION AND INTEGRITY

DETECTION DOGS HELP TO SNIFF OUT WATER PIPELINE LEAKS

Water Corporation manages more than 34,000km of water mains across 2.6 million square kilometres of Western Australia, making it the largest water utility in the world in terms of geographical area serviced. This makes it a challenge to detect leaks and save water, so the utility is always looking for new and innovative ways to manage the pipe network. In June 2017, in an Australian first, Water Corporation trialled two sniffer dogs to detect water leaks, and now, a new dog is set to start soon.

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he vast length of water mains Water Corporation manages could stretch across Australia, east to west, more than 8.5 times, and demonstrates what a huge undertaking it is to detect non-visible leaks in its system. Water Corporation spokesperson Louise Fleming said most traditional leak detection technologies are not effective at detecting leaks on long sections of underground water mains across farmlands areas in the Wheatbelt. But an innovative solution to this was found in the use of sniffer dogs which can detect leaks in areas where the traditional methods, such as acoustic or insertion type leak detection, are unsuitable. “We began a research and development project after one of our employees heard about dogs in South Africa being trained to detect leaks underground by sniffing a substance with a distinctive smell, which had been added to the water,” Ms Fleming said. “Through our research and development program we carried out a field trial in June using two dogs, which was the first time they had been used for this purpose by a water utility in Australia.” Ms Fleming said spaniels from working lines, such as English Springer Spaniels, were chosen as they are preferred for this type of detection work in the field. “These dogs are high energy and nimble, and love hunting out a scent they have been trained to detect; in our case,

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treated water,” Ms Fleming said. “Spaniels are traditionally bred to be hunting dogs and are used widely as sniffer dogs due to their acute sense of smell, willingness to work and ability to cover rough terrain.”

LEARNING TO SNIFF OUT LEAKS To find underground water leaks, the detection dogs undergo around 12 weeks of scent and obedience training, the exact duration of which depends on the dog’s age and maturity. The obedience training ensures they will always respond immediately to three commands that their handler may give out in the field: stop, change direction and come. Ms Fleming said the dogs are trained to recognise the scent of scheme water, and ignore all other scents such as rainwater, pipes and fittings. Their reward for finding the target scent is to chase a tennis ball. “In June, we carried out trials through our research and development program, using an English Springer Spaniel called Tommy and a Cocker Spaniel called Emma. They were trained in Sydney by one of Australia’s leading dog trainers, Steve Austin, and have now returned to their usual line of work in feral animal, narcotics and explosives detection,” Ms Fleming said. “The trials were successful, and confirmed that a detection WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU


THE WINNING NAME FOR WATER

WHERE ACCURACY MATTERS

CORPORATION’S NEWEST RECRUIT IS KEP, A NOONGAR WORD FOR ‘WATER’.

dog is capable of locating a leak in an underground main buried up to 60cm deep. The accuracy of the dogs actually surprised us! “As a result of the success of the trials we made the decision to invest in our own leak detection dog. It’s a little too early to say if we will bring on more dogs in future – we need to first work with our new pup over the next year to get a better idea of how effective she is in comparison to other programs we run to detect leaks.”

WATER CORPORATION’S NEW RECRUIT Recently, the utility held a community poll to help name its new recruit, a four-month-old English Springer Spaniel. “We held a Facebook poll so the community could vote for their favourite name for our new puppy, with Kep the clear winner from more than 7,450 votes. Kep is a Noongar word for ‘water’ and has one syllable, making it a perfect name for our dog. Noongar people are the traditional owners of the South West of Australia,” Ms Fleming said. “Four month old Kep has begun 12 weeks of intensive training with Steve Austin in Sydney, before she makes the journey to Perth in the new year to put her nose to work to save our precious water. “Once she’s finished her training we have already scheduled about 1,000km of mains for our dog to start work on around the Dalwallinu, Pithara, Wongan Hills, Goomalling and Dowerin area. “In terms of Kep’s paw-formance, we’re confident from the trials we ran earlier this year that Kep will be effective at finding leaks but we will have a better idea of how much she can save once we get further into the program.” A WIDER WATER PIPELINE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Along with the new leak detection dogs, Water Corporation has a number of programs to reduce the frequency of leaks and breaks. This includes the use of acoustic technology to locate non-visible leaks for repair, which, in 2015-16, saved around 2.8 billion litres of water. This program involves walking near underground pipes with listening technology and if a nonvisible leak is present, specialist equipment is brought in to pinpoint its location. 250 permanent acoustic sensors are also installed on water mains in the Perth CBD to identify hidden leaks early and reduce the frequency of breaks by listening to the flow of water, picking up anomalies in noise produced by potential damage to the water main. Water Corporation also has an ongoing water pressure management program, which aims to help save over ten billion litres of water each year, creates separate water supply zones which can be easily monitored and managed so that water pressure can be reduced when it is found to be significantly higher than average.

1300 JACKE D

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CORROSION AND INTEGRITY

CORROSION CHALLENGES FACING UTILITY COMPANIES

by Wes Fawaz, Executive Officer, Australasian Corrosion Association

My organisation often reports that the continuing challenge for utility companies is the management, mitigation and remediation of the corrosion of their assets. This is both costly and inconvenient to the companies themselves, their customers and in many cases the general public.

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CORROSION AND INTEGRITY

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uring discussions with members of the ACA I have learnt that there are common concerns for those rising to meet this challenge. Many—like the effects on structures in aggressive, marine environments—have been known and studied for decades. Some, though, are surprising. Stray electrical current that leak from the power systems of trains and industrial facilities can have an effect on other structures, such as buried pipelines, that are nowhere near the source. There is also research being carried out into the impact of bacteriological corrosion on materials: marine wharves submerged in shallow, often stagnant water or the 'blue green water' effect in copper piping. Another area being extensively researched is the effects of hidden corrosion that occurs behind the insulating cladding of commercial buildings. 'Urban sprawl' and the concentration of infrastructure in cities—both large and small—are also being studied. The latter two can interfere in a variety of ways with corrosion management and asset maintenance; not only the risk of construction work damaging existing buried services of all kinds but also restriction of physical access to sites for maintenance work. Much of the equipment and infrastructure owned and operated by utility companies is in these environments, in addition to some also being in remote and isolated locations. Monitoring and maintaining all this is an expensive exercise. One challenge that is mentioned frequently is the need to have an asset management plan. Today, the utility industry has the capability to thoroughly assess the corrosion degradation of structures such as pylons and pipelines and implement an effective remediation and maintenance solution based upon detailed assessment of the cause and extent of the deterioration; it is no longer good enough to simply say “That looks to be OK; I can't see any rust” and hope for the best. Fortunately, experienced practitioners tell me that asset owners are today much more willing to build corrosion protection and management into a project at the design stage. Proactive management is becoming the norm for nearly all infrastructure and major construction projects.

Being unaware of the current condition of infrastructure may lead to the premature failure of the asset, leaving limited options to the asset owner, with replacement being the most expensive option. Unforeseen failure of an asset provides major consequences that constitute a risk to business operations or potential loss to the organisation. It is therefore crucial to determine the remaining lifecycle of an asset and its capability to meet the designed performance and level of service requirements. This can be done by

means of a thorough asset condition assessment and corrosion audit. Once this is completed we can then produce a complete maintenance program for the lifecycle of the structure. The ACA has an ongoing program of technical seminars and training courses teaching effective and efficient management of corrosion. Knowledge and understanding of the latest corrosion technologies and processes is a key factor in managing the threat that corrosion poses. I am proud to say that one of the key ACA events that facilitates the

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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exchange of ideas and experience of the many hundreds of people working to manage corrosion is the annual Corrosion and Prevention conference and trade exhibition, that this year will be held in Sydney. Since its inception in the 1950s, this annual event has been the preeminent forum for all those working in the field. One thing helping corrosion practitioners to achieve their goals is the implementation of the technological advances taking place in the areas of remote sensing, monitoring and control. The latest wireless data loggers allow real time adjustments of parameters to equipment so that physical visits by technicians can be minimised. Similarly, drone technology today allows direct viewing of remote structures such as pipelines and transmission towers from a safe and secure location. It has been estimated that the cost of corrosion each year is billions of dollars for organisations and governments around the world. There are continuing challenges facing utility industries, but by ongoing collaboration in research between practitioners and the ACA, as well as discussions and knowledge exchange at events such as Corrosion and Prevention 2017, we can all strive to improve the management of and minimise the impact and cost of corrosion.

About the Australasian Corrosion Association The Australasian Corrosion Association Incorporated (ACA) is a not-for-profit, membership association, that disseminates information on corrosion and its prevention through the provision of training courses, seminars, conferences, publications and other activities. For further information, please visit www.corrosion.com.au

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PROUDLY PRESENTED BY: Standard

12 – 15 November 2017 | Sydney, Australia conference.corrosion.com.au

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PLENARY LECTURERS Maria Forsyth Australian Laureate Fellow Chair Electromaterials and Corrosion Sciences Deakin University, Australia

Professor Jing-Li Luo Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering University of Alberta, Canada

Nick Birbilis Woodside Innovation Chair and Head, Department of Materials Science and Engineering Monash University, Australia

Professor Peter Robery Director, Robery Forensic Engineering Ltd

Miles Buckhurst Global Concept Director – HPI Jotun, Norway

Dr Brian Skerry Global Director – Corrosion Programs The Sherwin-Williams Company, USA

FOR MORE INFORMATION & To register go to conference.corrosion.com.au


CORROSION AND INTEGRITY

Utility Partner Solutions

Maintaining pipeline integrity

IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT Increased population growth and wastewater volume coupled with aging pipe infrastructure means Australia’s sewage systems are under increasing amounts of stress, which can result in integrity loss and a high potential for emergency situations.

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n January 2017, three of Melbourne’s public beaches were contaminated due to summer flash flooding that strained the sewage systems. In May, Sydney reported sustained odour in the city’s inner west due to sewer leakage. Additionally, heavy downpour in Western Australia has resulted in the contamination of Swan River which runs through Perth. Finding integrity issues before they become emergency situations that increase asset downtime and maintenance costs highlights the importance of a well maintained sewer system and the necessity to perform leak detection investigations on a regular basis. Austeck Owner and Principal, Tristan Day, said, “In a time where water utilities can’t afford to ignore pipeline inspection and maintenance, we need to see more innovative and adaptable solutions that provide quick and accurate results. “Measures such as pressure testing for measuring joint integrity; reach tests; and testing of manholes and liquid separators, are becoming crucial in maintaining a high standard of pipeline integrity. This is why equipment that can perform all the necessary air, water and vacuum testing is becoming an invaluable asset to the industry. “Rausch’s Premus 600 system has been designed to detect pipeline leaks using these three tests, allowing users to choose which test will be best for the pipeline they are assessing. The

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systems also comply with national and international requirements so users can be assured they are getting a high quality and safe product.” The Premus 600 system is available as a built-in or portable system which can perform air, water and vacuum tests. The air and vacuum can test sections of pipe from 70mm 2500mm, while water/air pressure can test main lines from 70mm - 2000mm and includes a separate crane to lower test plugs and bubbles into a manhole.

IDENTIFYING INTEGRITY ISSUES WITH USER-FRIENDLY SOFTWARE All of the tests conducted with the Premus 600 - and any Rausch products, for lines, joints, manholes and separators - are controlled by the data acquisition software PipeCommander. The software solution’s user-friendly controls enables flexibility of functions for the operator. Being compatible with air, water and vacuum tests means this adaptable software makes light work for operators who need to consolidate information from all types of tests into an accessible report. “It is important for software of this nature to be flexible and user-friendly to maximise the benefits of the products being used. PipeCommader produces meaningful data that is easily translatable in order to effectively identify any integrity issues,” Mr Day said.

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

The Premus 600 coupled with PipeCommander software offers a modular concept, enabling the installation of new components for expansion and adaption of the system as required. These expansion systems include: • Reach testing with air, vacuum or water • Manhole testing with vacuum or water • Joint testing with air or water • Seperator testing with water • Extensive documentation and protocolling including line charts • Graphical schematic of manholes (and reservoirs)

A COMPLETE SOLUTIONS PROVIDER Austeck has operated as a complete solutions provider for pipeline inspection and maintenance equipment since 1992, and is now the exclusive supplier of Rausch products in Australia. With the exciting introduction of Rausch products to its extensive and unique catalogue of products, Austeck remains dedicated to offering industry expertise, product reliability and longlife solutions. For more information, visit www.austeck.com.

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S E C THI O DN D

WATER PIPE NEARS COMPLETION FOR NEW 'INLAND FREIGHT PORT' Queensland Urban Utilities (QUU) is making use of horizontal directional drilling (HDD) on a number of projects across its South East Queensland network.

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he water utility is currently undertaking more than $175 million dollars’ worth of major water and sewerage projects in its service area. The works include a new trunk sewer main, two new cross-river pipelines, and an upgrade to the city’s oldest and largest sewer pipe. QUU is in the final stages of installing a $6.5 million trunk water main connecting the Beaudesert Water Treatment Plant to the Bromelton State Development Area (SDA). When completed, the pipe will run almost 7km along Beaudesert Boonah Road, Bromelton, providing an essential water service to the new hub. Queensland Urban Utilities spokesperson, Michelle Cull, said the last important piece of the puzzle involved installing 530m of pipe under the Logan River. “Using horizontal directional drilling, we’ve tunnelled to depths of more than 30m beneath the riverbed and then pulled the pipe back through the bored hole,” she said. “It’s an exciting milestone, especially after the construction site, including the drilling rig, was inundated from Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie. Scenic Rim Regional Council and Queensland Urban Utilities are each contributing around $1.6m to the project, while the State Government is contributing around $3.3 m from its ‘Building our Regions’ (BoR) program. The water pipe will feed the 15,000 hectare SDA site, which will soon be home to a new $30m regional rail freight terminal, currently under construction.

Scenic Rim Regional Council Mayor, Cr Greg Christensen, said access to water infrastructure will provide a vital catalyst for the activation of the SDA. “It’s a case of build it and they will come. Water supply is a key ingredient to kick start development of the local area, job creation and economic growth,” he said. “The Bromelton SDA is set to become an economic engine for new employment and business opportunity in the Scenic Rim and wider South East Queensland. “We are talking about the creation of literally thousands of new jobs over the coming decades.”

FORWARD FOCUS Queensland Urban Utilities plans 30 years into the future to ensure the right infrastructure goes in the ground at the right time. Ms Cull said water and sewerage is an essential service that more than 1.4 million people relied on every day. “With all the cranes across the city, it’s easy to see the skyline changing right before your eyes. That’s not the case for the water and sewerage network,” she said. “It’s a hidden service, but as projects like these demonstrate, a lot goes on behind the scenes to deliver fresh, clean drinking water to your tap and allow you to flush and forget. “These works increase the resilience and reliability of our water and sewerage network and ensure we’re catering for South East Queensland’s growing population.”

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QUEENSLAND URBAN UTILITIES SPOKESPERSON MICHELLE CULL AND SCENIC RIM REGIONAL COUNCIL MAYOR CR GREG CHRISTENSEN SURVEY THE INSTALLATION OF THE NEW TRUNK WATER MAIN.

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HDD

DOUG CHEWS THROUGH ROCK FOR NEW SEWAGE PIPELINE DOUG THE ROCK REAMER, UNITYWATER NETWORK PROJECTS MANAGER ASHLEY MASSIE, SUNSHINE COAST COUNCIL DEPUTY MAYOR TIM DWYER, DIV 3 COUNCILLOR PETER COX AND PIPELINE DRILLERS MANAGING DIRECTOR JOHN WHITBREAD.

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HDD

Meet Doug the rock reamer. He’s German, 2.2 metres long, weighs 2.8 tonnes and looks like he belongs with The Transformers.

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s the first of his kind in Australia, he is going to chew his way through extremely hard rock underneath Nicklin Way to help construct a new 2.5km sewerage pipeline to service the southern end of the Sunshine Coast. He has six sets of teeth made of tungsten carbide, which is twice as hard as steel. So he’s rough, he’s tough and in August he began to power his way through the earth to a depth of 35m. The project is one of two new major sewerage pipelines Pipeline Drillers is constructing on behalf of Unitywater. The other pipeline will be 3.2km from Mountain Creek under Kawana Way to the Kawana Sewage Treatment Plant. Sunshine Coast Council Deputy Mayor Tim Dwyer and Division 3

Councillor Peter Cox took a tour of the Caloundra site in August and got up close and personal with Doug before he went underground. Deputy Mayor Dwyer said it was great to have such an innovative project on the Sunshine Coast. “It will improve the sewerage pipeline for the southern part of the region and the investment by Unitywater is absolutely fantastic,” Deputy Mayor Dwyer said. “Not only will this improve our infrastructure, but the innovative nature of the project means there’ll be minimal impact on the community.” Unitywater Executive Manager Infrastructure Planning and Capital Delivery, Simon Taylor, said the new pipelines will cater for the growing area. “With new developments happening

and future population growth, we need to ensure we have the right infrastructure in place,” he said. “This project is one of the largest drilling projects by a water utility in Australia, and horizontal directional drilling is a fantastic way of doing this work compared to excavation as it minimises impacts on the community and environment.” The two pipelines are expected to be completed in January 2018. Fun fact about Doug: Doug got his name through a Facebook competition Unitywater ran in April. The “Name the rock star” competition received 90 suggestions and “Doug” was selected as the winner!

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HDD

Utility Partner Solutions

THE DRILL TRIFECTA:

SPEED, SIMPLICITY AND SOUND THE NEW S3 RANGE OF DRILLS FROM VERMEER ARE DEFINED BY THREE KEY FEATURES: SPEED, SIMPLICITY AND SOUND.

When completing HDD projects in urban areas, having equipment that gets the job done quickly, is easy to use, and reduces disturbance to the community are some of the key considerations identified by contractors. After listening to feedback, Vermeer has developed the third generation of directional drills addressing these three factors. 70


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he development of the S3 Navigator® HDD product line, which ranges from 20,000 up to 220,000 pound class rigs, came about after extensive consultation with end users who identified three key considerations for drilling on modern job sites: speed, simplicity and sound. Jeff Lawson, National Construction Sales Manager at Vermeer, said, “Vermeer Corporation invested a lot of time with our customers to understand the things that really mattered to operators and owners. They distilled the feedback received into the three elements that define the Vermeer S3 drill range: speed, simplicity and sound.”

GETTING THE JOB DONE QUICKLY HDD contractors are increasingly facing tighter project deadlines and margins, so having equipment that can complete jobs quickly while maintaining a high quality of work, plays a key role in helping contractors secure contracts. Mr Lawson said the Vermeer S3 drill range was designed with this in mind. “The new S3 drills feature increased tracking, spindle and carriage speed, meaning contractors can get to the job quicker and get more product in the ground sooner, reducing project time and costs, as well as reducing disturbance to the community. “For example, the D24x40 S3 features a classleading carriage speed of 73.1 m/min — over 20 per cent faster than its closest competitor — and a 270 rpm rotational speed that is around 18 per cent faster than drills in the same pound class.” KEEPING CONTROLS SIMPLE One of the problems identified by contractors was having different controls on different equipment reducing efficiency and increasing the amount of training needed for new operators. Mr Lawson said to address this Vermeer has standardised the controls on the S3 drill range to reduce the learning curve for new operators. “A dual joystick control system, previously utilised on Vermeer’s larger Navigator Series II drills, is now common across the S3 drill range, enabling a better user experience and less time spent getting operators up to speed.” THE DUAL JOYSTICK CONTROL SYSTEM KEEPS OPERATIONS SIMPLE.

HDD

Utility Partner Solutions

All drill functions can also be performed without the operator taking their hands off the joysticks, even rod loading on models equipped with automatic rod loaders, with communication of key information simplified by common display interfaces across the range.

LOWERING THE SOUND LEVELS Noise levels can be a problem on construction sites, as it can disturb residents, increase stress and fatigue for operators, and limit working hours. Mr Lawson said that while noise from drills will never be fully diminished, the noise levels of the new S3 drills have been significantly decreased. “Operators rely on the sound of the drill to assess its performance and make adjustments if required, so it’s important that there is still some noise to ensure operator performance isn’t impaired. “However, project owners are also demanding quieter equipment on job sites to reduce the impact of drill operations in neighbourhoods and other noise sensitive job sites. “Taking these into account, we have significantly reduced the sound levels of the S3 drill range while not compromising on operator performance. “For example, the sound levels of the D23x30 S3 have been reduced by over 25 per cent compared to its predecessor the D20x22 Series II. “Every 10 decibels you drop equates to the volume being halved, so we’re talking a significant reduction in noise. This has a number of benefits, including easier job site communications, less disturbance to others, reduced complaints from communities, longer operating hours may be possible in some instances, and stress and fatigue is reduced in operators.”

OTHER KEY FEATURES In addition to these three key advantages, the S3 drill range marks the widespread adoption of several significant technical features that make a positive impact on operators and business owners. These features include: • DigiTrak® Aurora™ interactive touch-screen displays • CAN-BUS electrical network for simplified wiring, and reduced vulnerability to wear and damage • Optional radio remote control for tracking and setup of the drill from convenient locations • High performance on a small footprint • Positive rack gear loading for optimum engagement of the rack and pinion teeth for reduced gear and rack wear

For more information, contact your local Vermeer dealer on 1300 VERMEER or visit vermeer.com.au

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E MBE DDE D N E TWO RKS

Utility Partner Solutions

A NEW RULE FOR EMBEDDED NETWORKS by James Pearce, Director, ENM Solutions

On 1 December 2017, an amendment to the National Electricity Rules by the Australian Energy Market Commission will take effect, reducing barriers to Embedded Network customers accessing retail competition in the National Electricity Market.

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n Embedded Network is a privately owned and operated electricity network confined within a multi-tenant development. Customers’ consumption is consolidated to a single connection point, called the Parent Meter, which connects directly to the National Electricity Market (NEM) and is used to purchase all electricity. The electricity is then ‘on-sold’ to each of the customers at the site based on their measured consumption. A person who engages in the activity of owning, controlling or operating an Embedded Network is known as the Exempt Embedded Network Service Provider (EENSP). When managed correctly, an Embedded Network can create financial benefits that can be utilised at the development; for example, to reduce customer electricity rates (better than those in the NEM) or invest in renewable initiatives. Unfortunately, these benefits do not always flow to the customer and sometimes a monopoly forms where a customer has no choice but to purchase electricity from the EENSP. For a customer wishing to access retail competition, the absence of clear regulation makes the process difficult to navigate and the associated cost disproportionate to the benefit. For small consumers, such as residential customers, this has been a problem; however, for medium to large consumers, such as business customers, the scale of savings may warrant the cost. It is in response to these issues that the National Electricity Rules (NER) have been amended.

WHAT IS THE NEW RULE? The Australian Energy Market Commission’s National Electricity Amendment (Embedded Networks) Rule 2015 No.15 (Rule) outlines a series of amendments to the NER specific to Embedded Networks that will commence on 1 December 2017. The Rule creates a new Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) accredited role called the Embedded Network Manager (ENM) that will be

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appointed to an Embedded Network. The ENM will have the responsibility of performing the market interface functions that link Embedded Network customers to the NEM. The amendments will enable Embedded Network customers to: • Choose the price and structure of their electricity supply, • Choose from a variety of products and services, and • Gain easier access to government schemes and consumer protections. The changes will not prevent current EENSP’s from continuing to sell electricity to customers. It will, however, increase the requirement on Embedded Networks to provide competitive rates and services in line with the NEM.

WHAT DOES THE EMBEDDED NETWORK MANAGER DO? The ENM provides embedded network management services and maintains information about the Embedded Network. These services are only performed at a site for which an ENM is appointed. The embedded network management services include facilitating the market interface for ‘Off-Market’ customers to become ‘On-Market’ and access retail competition. An ‘OnMarket’ customer is a customer that purchases electricity from a retailer of their choice from within an Embedded Network, after being allocated a National Meter Identifier (NMI) by the ENM. The NMI enables the address of the customer to be identified in the NEM. Once a customer is ‘On-Market’, they may re-enter the Embedded Network, and become ‘Off-Market’, if they accept an offer from the EENSP. The ENM acts as the Local Network Service Provider (LNSP) for ‘On-Market’ customers, and, as such, requires site-specific information to be maintained. Information that must be maintained for each Embedded Network includes: the type and configuration of metering installations, relevant Embedded Network wiring information, Distribution Loss Factors (DLF), Transmission Node Identity (TNI), and all WWW.UTILITYMAGAZINE.COM.AU


NON-EMBEDDED NETWORK

EMBEDDED NETWORK

E MBE DDE D N E TWO RKS

Utility Partner Solutions

EMBEDDED NETWORK WITH ON-MARKET CHILD METER

correspondence with persons. The maintained information will be utilised to support customers that wish to become ‘On-Market’, as well as assisting AEMO with the settlement process. The ENM’s obligations are set out within AEMO’s Service Level Procedure – Embedded Network Manager.

DO YOU NEED TO APPOINT AN ENM? Under the National Electricity Law (NEL) and the National Electricity Rules (NER), any party that engages in the transmission or distribution of electricity must either be registered with the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) as a network service provider (NSP), or gain an exemption from the requirement to be registered from the Australian Energy Regulator (AER). Obtaining an exemption from the AER requires the EENSP to comply with certain ‘conditions’ pertaining to safety, dispute resolutions, network pricing, metering and retail competition. The extent to which these conditions are applicable is determined by the ‘activity classes’ the site has been registered for (‘Registerable’) or is deemed to be a part of (‘Deemed’). Failure to comply with these conditions is a breach of the NEL and could invalidate the exemption and expose civil penalties. The appointment of an ENM is a condition of the following ‘applicable activity classes’: ND10, NR1, NR2, NR3, NR5 and NR6. All existing Embedded Networks that fall into an ‘applicable activity class’ that are equal to or greater than 30 customers, residential or commercial, must appoint an ENM by 1 December 2017, unless they are subject to a non-appointment or reversion entitlement. These conditions will extend to new sites once they commence operation. For all other classes, the AER has determined that the cost of appointing an ENM will outweigh the benefit.

If an ENM is not appointed at an Embedded Network due to the size or activity class, an ENM will still be required to be appointed if an ‘ENM Trigger Event’ occurs. An ‘ENM Trigger Event’ occurs when an Embedded Network customer, or their chosen retailer, provides notice that the customer wishes to access retail competition; a counter offer by the EENSP is not accepted by the customer; and, the cooling off period for the market retail contract has expired. If all three elements transpire, an ENM must be appointed at the Embedded Network.

CONSIDERATIONS FOR EMBEDDED NETWORKS The Rule change represents a substantial impost to Embedded Networks across the NEM. Not only will an ENM have to be appointed at each site, the EENSP will also have to ensure that their offering, through rates and services, are market compatible. It will be important for Embedded Networks to understand: • Site access for participants, • Manual meter reading, • Access to meter data, • Recovery of network charges, • Subtraction of energy charges, • Costs associated with ‘On-Market’ Child Meters, and • Meter leasing. For operators of Embedded Networks, the ENM role represents an opportunity to increase revenue by providing additional services to their clients. It will be important to understand the responsibilities and requirements of the ENM before undertaking accreditation for commencement on 1 December 2017. To find out how the changes will affect your Embedded Network, please contact us.

ENM Solutions provides Embedded Network consultancy services and is undertaking accreditation as an independent Embedded Network Manager. Phone: 03 98 366 366 Email: Info@ENMSolutions.com.au Website: www.ENMSolutions.com.au

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R E TA I L

Divorcing

ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PROFIT

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R E TA I L

James Myatt isn’t afraid to disrupt a market. As co-founder and former CEO of Mojo Power, he showed the utility industry an alternative model for power retail – one which he firmly believes modern utilities will need to adopt in order to thrive in a rapidly changing energy market. We sat down with James to get his views on where this changing market is heading, and what retailers will need to do to keep up.

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r Myatt’s career in the energy sector spans more than two decades across Australia and the US. Over this time he has seen the industry grow, change and expand, and in 2015, he launched Mojo Power, introducing Australians to a world-first system of purchasing energy: power by subscription. For Mr Myatt, the standard energy retail model, where profit is linked to consumption, did not make sense in a market with rising renewable options. Rather than sit back and wait for change, Mojo launched its own model of energy sales. The Mojo model has consumers pay a subscription fee to access power at wholesale prices. Profits are not bound up with consumption, and the wholesale rate means savings for consumers. Mr Myatt believes other retailers are likely to follow suit and revisit their own models of charging for power. As consumers are encouraged to purchase less from the grid and substitute their power needs with energy from solar and batteries, Mr Myatt believes standard consumption is likely to drop and linked profits will do the same. “I think ultimately retailers are going to have to adjust their model to be something like Mojo’s. The Mojo model essentially divorced profitability from consumption,” Mr Myatt said. “Every other retailer derives their profit from how much energy their customers use from the grid – the more kilowatts that someone used, the more profit they made. That’s a challenging model when you have a substitution threat coming.” Since leaving Mojo in July, Mr Myatt has been consulting with other energy retailers and businesses in Australia and overseas and said energy substitution options will force change in the industry. “I think retailers are going to have to reinvent themselves ultimately to follow a model where a customer pays for a service, rather than just for how much energy they use from the grid,” said Mr Myatt.

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TECHNOLOGY DRIVING CHANGE Like many industries before it, technology is a large driver behind the change in energy retail. As we have seen with banking, print media, taxis and the music industry, technology can create options that have never been considered. Mr Myatt said the threat to electricity company profits began with solar, but is really being accelerated with the advancing development and use of batteries. The old retail model has faced no major threat since its inception, as consumers had little choice but to buy their power from one of the main retailers selling from the grid. Mr Myatt said that consumers now have the choice to engage directly with the energy market through the use of solar and batteries. Mr Myatt said the challenge for existing energy retailers is to find a way to integrate and adopt new technologies, which may mean developing an entirely new billing system. “It’s a massive challenge for the existing retailers with their current billing systems, which will need to evolve. “They need to work out if they can evolve their existing billing system, do they have to try and create second billing systems, and really at what point do they have to transition from the old to the new, so to speak.” With substitutions being a relatively new and untested threat to the current power model, retailers are faced with the challenge of not knowing how quickly they need to adapt to the change, and where they should be focusing their efforts to remain competitive. Mr Myatt said energy retailers should be considering how much of their business is under threat and what timeframe they have to work with. “I think it is a big challenge for them to think about how they do this. I would assume they’re all starting to question themselves about what is this model of the future. “Do we need to acquire businesses, do we need to develop technology internally ourselves? But I think one thing’s for sure, that they won’t be able to sit with the same model for an extended period of time without adapting it. I think they’ve got to do something.”

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R E TA I L

Divorcing energy consumption and profit

AUSTRALIA LEADING THE WAY Mr Myatt also has considerable experience in the US energy retail market as one of the founders of Texas-based energy retailer Entrust Energy. According to Mr Myatt, while there are large variances between the US and Australian energy markets, Australia is the market that is at the forefront of change when it comes to energy retail. This is partly due to the fact that Australian consumers are more engaged with the energy market due to the higher prices consumers are faced with. The low cost of energy in Texas, thanks to low gas prices, mean there are fewer opportunities for renewable energy to hit that market. However Mr Myatt said that other US markets, such as California, currently have a strong drive for renewable energy; while New York and other north-eastern states of the US are seeing trials of innovative energy retail models due to higher consumer engagement.

“The fact is, these new technologies are here. In particular, solar and batteries are becoming a stronger proposition. They’re here to stay, so retailers have to understand how they’re going to integrate and adopt them. They need to have a strategy for how they’re going to try and integrate those and manage them.”

PROVIDING ENERGY PRICE CLARITY However, while Australian consumers are more engaged and aware of the energy market, there are still a lot of people who haven’t switched between retailers. Mr Myatt believes confusion with energy pricing and discounts plays a part in this. “I think there’s definitely been an issue in the confusion in energy retail offers, and the way that the marketing occurs, particularly in things like discounts. Headline discounts, 20 per cent off, 30 per cent off. There is no reference rate, so it’s off what? “That was one of the essences of the Mojo models and some of the other models that are coming out and trying to create price transparency, and make it more simpler for consumers to understand what they’re getting in a fairly low involvement product category.” “That’s maybe why you’ve seen people who haven’t switched to a lot of retailers. It probably does play into the hands of incumbents a little bit to keep confusion in the marketplace, so people are more nervous about switching away,” Mr Myatt said. THE NEXT STEPS FOR ENERGY RETAIL It’s not just current energy retailers who stand to hold a place in the future industry. Mr Myatt predicts we may see unexpected companies delving into the energy retail market, with companies such as Google, Amazon or Apple having the potential to create waves in the industry. “We’ll see some unusual players starting to enter into that marketplace that maybe we weren’t really looking at. Perhaps it may be a battery manufacturer that will step up into that space and offer an integrated offer. Or maybe it will be someone more left field than what we were probably initially thinking,” Mr Myatt said. Advances in technology are forcing energy retailers to adapt, and Mr Myatt said changing will be inevitable for those retailers who want to survive in this market.

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SAFETY

PRACTICING CONFINED SPACE

SAFETY FOR SYPHON INSPECTION Murray Irrigation’s inspection of its Lawson Syphon irrigation site was an exercise in confined space condition assessment. Thanks to careful planning and modern technology, specialist engineers were able to safely enter the syphon and gather vital information needed to assess the state of the asset.

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he 700m long river management asset diverts the Mulwala Canal under the Edward River, helping to deliver water to over 140,000ha of land around Deniliquin, New South Wales. As this aging piece of infrastructure is so vital to the community, Murray Irrigation needed to know its current condition and expected lifespan. So in July, a ground-breaking inspection did some testing and collected concrete core and soil samples from the Edward River Escape and the Lawson Syphon.

The structural condition assessment was planned and carried out by Murray Irrigation and tier one engineers from AECOM and Interflow. Due to the high risks associated with working in confined spaces, the job required some additional considerations. Murray Irrigation Project Lead, Jorge Luengas, said confined space entry was necessary to assess the condition of the syphon. “The engineers descended 25m into the syphon entry points, which will provide a thorough indication of the condition of the asset and an estimate of its remaining life,” Mr Luengas said. WHS Supervisor, Tat Whaleboat, said there were a number of safety considerations that were taken into account before entering or working within the confined space. Mr Whaleboat said ensuring adequate air quality is very important to ensuring worker safety.

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“We make [a confined space] safe by ventilating the area. That might mean putting some equipment inside the confined space to ventilate the area over a period of time, or open up doorways and entry points to let the confined space breathe for a while.” Initial atmospheric testing is also done in the confined space before any work commences. This helps to mitigate many of the risks associated with a project of this nature. The inspection of the Lawson Syphon was a success, with Nick Roth, Field Operations Manager at Interflow, crediting the outcome to a number of parties that worked together. “Due to good planning from the project team and everyone involved, the job was completed safely and everyone was able to go home safely at the end of their workday,” Mr Roth said. A full report on the inspection will be released later this year. UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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SAFETY

If you don’t know,

DON’T DIG

Endeavour Energy has joined forces with SafeWork NSW, Dial-Before-You-Dig, Ausgrid and Essential Energy to stop an alarming increase in construction workers striking underground electricity cables over the past two years.

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he Don’t Know Don’t Dig campaign was developed following a 65 per cent increase in underground cable strikes in the Sydney region over the past two years. “Finding out what’s below ground before excavating can save your life,” said Endeavour Energy’s General Manager Safety, Human Resources and Environment, Andrew Pitman. “Only one in four workers that reported underground cable strikes over the past two years had DialBefore-You-Dig plans as required under NSW law. “This campaign is designed to keep workers safe, prevent damage and disruption to electricity supplies and avoid businesses facing large financial penalties for negligent behavior.” To combat this rising problem, NSW’s electricity distribution networks have joined forces with SafeWork NSW and Dial-Before-You-Dig to develop and deliver Don’t Know Don’t Dig as a public safety initiative.

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The campaign is a statewide collaboration between Endeavour Energy, Ausgrid, Essential Energy, SafeWork NSW and Dial-Before-YouDig NSW. “Anyone with a job in this state has the right to a safe and healthy workplace, and workplace safety is everyone’s responsibility,” Executive Director of SafeWork NSW, Peter Dunphy said. “Being aware of the risks of electric shock or serious burns from striking live electricity cables while excavating is critical and the message is simple; if you don’t know, don’t dig. “We are encouraging all construction industry business owners and workers to view the safety video as part of their efforts to create a safety culture in their workplace so that everyone returns home safe at the end of the working day.”

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SPREADING THE WORD ON DON’T KNOW DON’T DIG Mr Pitman said Don’t Know Don’t Dig centered on a short educational video to raise awareness and provide workers and employers with practical tips to stay safe and prevent damage to electricity cables. “These messages have been spread across NSW with a radio campaign cobranded radio campaign with SafeWork NSW from February – June 2017. “The partners in the campaign have worked collaboratively to spread the safety message to the construction workers and the broader industry at specific forums and industry events including: • Attendance at over 100 community events to promote the campaign • Presence at building and construction industry gatherings to raise awareness on working near underground assets

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SAFETY

SafeWork inspectors spreading the safety message through various stakeholder groups, industry associations and electricity safety networks Collaboration with the National Electrical and Communications Association, the NSW Industry Safety Steering Committee (ISSC), the Master Builders, HIA and other civil contractor associations, as well as the Industries Electrical Safety Networks in Sydney, the Illawarra and the Hunter

“A Don’t Know Don’t Dig webinar is also proposed for later in the year,” Mr Pitman said.

CONTINUING TO KEEP WORKERS SAFE Mr Pitman said the results from the campaign had been promising thus far with Endeavour Energy finding a 30 per cent improvement in construction sites with accurate Dial-Before-You-Dig plans as following the release of the Don’t Know Don’t Dig campaign. “It is impossible to be too careful about safety and vigilance when it

comes to electricity. Finding out what’s below ground before excavating can save your life. “When it comes to working near electricity, knowing the few simple steps outlined by this campaign could save yours or your workers’ lives,” Mr Pitman said.

The four ‘P’s of safety PROCEEDING

Don’t Know Don’t Dig centres around

and surrounding area of the dig

a short educational video providing

site. This includes checking site

workers with practical knowledge

conditions, looking for faults or rock

and protecting has been carefully

about how to prepare for any dig, and

fractures and ensuring the use of

carried out, only then is it safe to

the precautions that will keep them

proper tools and equipment. It is

proceed with the dig.

safe as well as prevent damage to

also important to screen for physical

electricity cables.

hazards like traffic, environmental

electricity cable, the first step is

factors and other nearby utilities.

to call the local electricity provider

It also raises awareness of the responsibility of everyone on the site to ensure the safety of themselves, their colleagues and the general population. To remove this risk, the campaign emphasises the four ‘P’s that need to be considered, no matter the size of the excavation: •

Planning

Potholing

Protecting

Proceeding

PLANNING A referral needs to be made to Dial-Before-You-Dig, which then gets passed on to the asset owners who provide direct information about the location of nearby pipes and cables. Planning also involves extensive risk assessment in the immediate

POTHOLING Potholing, or soft digging, can be undertaken in two ways: non-destructive digging or manual potholing. These measures are crucial to establishing the exact location of any underground infrastructure.

PROTECTION Protecting the work area is the

Once the planning, potholing

If damage is caused to an

to report the damage and they will turn off electricity to the area. If the damage is uncontrollable, call 000 immediately and keep everyone at least eight meters away from the damaged cable. If someone has suffered from an electric shock, it is important not to touch them. If a machine comes in contact with a live cable, the operator should remain on or inside the

responsibility of the excavator. The key

machine until the electricity has been

things to consider when protecting

disconnected.

the dig site include ensuring the stability of the trench, and keeping in mind the need for safe and secure access for workers and asset owners. It is also important to appropriately fence the area and provide adequate safety signage.

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SAFETYSYSTEMS


SAFETY

Utility Partner Solutions

DELIVERING CONNECTED SAFETY FOR THE WORKFORCE

The G7 is a safety solution that provides immediate notifications in the event a worker needs assistance. Revolutionising the global lone worker/gas detection industry, the G7 provides built-in 3G and satellite communication, a two-way speakerphone, live monitoring and modular gas detection.

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he G7 offers wireless connectivity, which increases situational awareness, accounting for everyone’s whereabouts – every safety incident and gas alert is communicated to live monitoring personnel in real time, empowering an active and optimised emergency response, making a huge difference for an employee who needs help.

TAKING PROTECTION TO THE NEXT LEVEL With two-way 3G or satellite connectivity and a built-in speakerphone, a live company self-monitored portal or live 24/7 monitoring, teams automatically connect with an employee and can manage a real-time emergency response when required – should they call for help using the SOS latch, a fall be detected, or a gas alert is triggered – delivering an optimised emergency response to their exact location. Traditional personal gas detector programs have struggled to ensure ongoing compliance and to keep employees safe, but G7 sets the bar for the gas detection industry where businesses can see the compliance status of all equipment, in real time. Every calibration, bump test and all equipment used is summarised in an intuitive, online dashboard and through weekly reporting. Hazards posed by gases can be classified into three categories: toxic, asphyxiating and combustible. Four gas monitors are typically configured with sensors to address each of these scenarios for a given worksite or scenario. For example, in the energy industry, sour gas presents a significant risk of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) exposure to workers. Many businesses supplement monitoring of H2S with combustible gases, oxygen and carbon monoxide. Combustible gas sensors are a smart addition to locations where natural gas is present with H2S, addressing the detection of a potentially explosive atmosphere. Everyone requires oxygen, which can be displaced by other gases, causing a deficiency. Further, incomplete combustion can generate carbon monoxide, an asphyxiating gas.

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REAL-TIME EMERGENCY RESPONSE MANAGEMENT Following an incident, every second counts. In life-threatening situations, how an emergency response is managed could mean the difference between an optimised rescue and a recovery. When an alarm is triggered, for example a H2S detector reading, live monitoring personnel are prepared to take action. • Within one second: G7 sends a high H2S alarm to the Blackline Live network • Within two seconds: the live monitoring team receives the H2S detector reading and worker location • Within 31 seconds: voice call is established with the worker • Within 40 seconds: team member receives voice alert, mustering them to a safe area OR nearest responders are notified and directed to the worker’s location With G7, rescues are optimised so more lives can be saved. Lone worker safety With G7, all incident and gas detection data is communicated in real time to the Blackline Safety Network for storage and reporting. With G7 incident reporting, areas with persistent incidents or leaks can be identified so appropriate safety precautions can be taken. A gas detector or personal safety monitor cannot warn of a threatening event if they are not properly used. G7 is an all-in-one solution, cutting down the number of devices a worker needs to carry with them, and constantly tracks usage for reporting. Should an employee neglect to wear their device or use it appropriately, safety managers have the data to follow up with them accordingly. For more information on the G7 safety solution, visit www.thermofisher.com.au

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Maintenance from the palm of your hand Optima Excel Local Display (OELD) The Honeywell OELD is a smart junction box for the Point IR Optima and Open Path Excel detectors for flammable hydrocarbons. When you pair a smartphone with OELD, you can perform many tasks for your Searchpoint Optima Plus and Searchline Excel detectors wirelessly and from a convenient position.

Find out more at thermofisher.com.au/honeywell-oeld Š 2017 Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. All rights reserved. All trademarks are the property of Thermo Fisher Scientific and its subsidiaries unless otherwise specified.


EQUIPMENT & MACHINERY

Utility Partner Solutions

CREATE THE UTILITY VEHICLE YOU’VE ALWAYS DREAMED ABOUT MFI Service Bodies helps you run a more efficient business because they understand that service bodies have to be more than just good looking.

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hey have to be tough, lightweight and exceed any safety or legal requirement. MFI’s designs all utilise the strength of lightweight, high tensile, zinc plated steel, and include weather and dust exclusion that works just as well in suburbia or the Simpson Desert. While MFI custom designed bodies are usually the first thing people notice, it’s their expertise and innovation that keeps their clients excited. MFI prides itself on delivering the best value and a key part of that is the added efficiency extracted from the service body design. Whether it’s smarter storage, more intelligent placement or enhanced access, every advantage is an incremental benefit and money in the pocket of the client’s business. From an entire fleet, to a single vehicle, MFI applies the same willingness to provide innovative solutions for your requirements.

This focus on clever, robust designs totally driven by customer satisfaction continues to impress on a practical and aesthetic basis. For a single vehicle or a fleet, MFI is the custom service body specialist.

From an entire fleet, to a single vehicle, MFI applies the same willingness to provide innovative solutions for your requirements.

From an entire fleet, to a single vehicle, MFI applies the same willingness to provide innovative solutions for your requirements. Call 1300 634 669 or visit mfiservicebodies.com.au

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MFI custom design, for emergency & commercial vehicles

Many emergency & commercial bodies are ‘off the rack’ with a limited range of options and adaptations. MFI are different. At MFI the client’s needs are the basis for a completely custom solution every time. Every MFI body is tough and practical without diminishing the features and flexibility that will optimise its day to day value to the business. Choose MFI and enjoy the optimum in vehicle and personnel safety, load and cargo management, operational ease and productivity, dust and water exclusion and corrosion resistance.

For a single vehicle or a fleet we are the custom service body specialists Talk to us about how we can help customise your vehicle 17 Southeast Boulevard Pakenham 3810 sales@mfisb.com.au www.mfiservicebodies.com.au

1300 634 669

View over 100 customised designs on our website and call for a FREE consultation


WOMEN IN UTILITIES Charmaine Quick is the Executive General Manager, Service Delivery at Melbourne Water. She was recently recognised as one of Victoria’s Top 50 Public Sector Women, and we caught up with her to discuss her career in the utility sector.

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grew up on a farm near Horsham and had an understanding of the importance of water from an early age. Access to reliable, quality water means survival and success on a farm. At the same time, I was also good at maths and sciences. I went along to an information session about engineering held by the local council one day, and despite being the only woman in the room, I decided then and there that I would be an engineer. In 1991 I joined Melbourne Water in the waterways and drainage area, undertaking floodplain modelling. My first job was modelling the 100-year flood maps for the Yarra River. I then moved into various roles until I landed my first leadership role, supervising the Sewage Transfer Operations Team. I then moved into Asset Management and developed a strong and immediate interest in maintenance and lifecycle planning of assets. From here I went on to manage Melbourne Water’s Eastern Treatment Plant, before being appointed General Manager of all wholesale services activities, and then finally Executive General Manager, Service Delivery. I would sum up my career as taking on new challenges approximately every three years and covering all products (water, sewage, waterways and drainage) and areas from operations, maintenance and planning.

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT YOUR CURRENT ROLE? My current role sees me ultimately responsible for leading a large workforce of over 700 operational, professional and contract staff. The Service Delivery Group is responsible for delivering customer value through the provision of water, sewage, waterways, drainage and recycled water services. I rely heavily on great managers across all of my teams to help me ensure we are delivering for the community.

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I’m proud to be the first woman to lead the organisation’s service delivery group, and have been very pleased to be able to utilise this position to champion efforts to make our water systems more sustainable and to continuously improve customer value in water and sewerage service provision through better asset management and operations. There are few jobs in the water sector where you get to work with big mechanical assets like the Eastern and Western treatment plants, major dams like the Thomson, and natural assets like the Yarra River, which all contribute to making Melbourne one of the most liveable cities in the world.

CAN YOU TELL US A BIT MORE ABOUT A RECENT PROJECT YOU’VE WORKED ON – WHAT ARE YOUR KEY RESPONSIBILITIES, WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES YOU’VE FACED ON THIS PROJECT SO FAR AND HOW HAVE YOU SUCCESSFULLY OVERCOME THESE? As the Executive General Manager of Service Delivery I am responsible for the delivery of strategies following their development. A good example of this would be the delivery of our Flood Management Strategy for Port Phillip and Westernport. Melbourne Water prepared the strategy by consulting widely with those involved in delivering flood management, and people affected by floods. Consultation included discussions and workshops with many stakeholders including state government departments, councils, emergency services, and communities. This strategy reflects the effort and activities of all organisations contributing to floodplain management across the region. My challenge was to take this strategy into the implementation phase, ensuring we worked collaboratively with our stakeholders and customers through this process and then measuring and reporting on our milestones and ensuring we were meeting our projected delivery timeframes. To bring important new initiatives, like a plan to better protect Melbourne from the impacts of flooding, to fruition, it’s immensely satisfying. HOW DID YOU GET YOUR START IN THE UTILITY SECTOR? Being passionate about water from an early age as above. I also did vacation work at the then Board of Works at the end of the third year of my engineering degree. WHAT ARE THE MAIN THINGS YOU ENJOY ABOUT WORKING IN THE UTILITY SECTOR? I get to do a kind of engineering which has real community benefits. In my personal travels to developing countries and my farming background, I have got a real

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SECTION

Article title

appreciation for how water is the lifeblood of a community. It is highly rewarding and very people-focused, which I’m sure is not something everyone associates with engineering traditionally.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MAIN CHALLENGES FACING UTILITIES AT THE MOMENT? WHAT OPPORTUNITIES WILL ARISE FROM THESE CHALLENGES? Significant population growth in a city like Melbourne, combined with the increasing impacts of climate change and the need to upgrade or replace aging infrastructure, present major challenges for us, but they also provide opportunities. The evolution of Integrated Water Management, and how we use all forms of water, including recycled and stormwater, are some of the ways we are seeking to meet these challenges. It is a particularly exciting time to work in the sector, as water security worldwide becomes an increasingly critical issue. CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT SOME OF THE MENTORS YOU’VE HAD THROUGHOUT YOUR CAREER? I have had some wonderful mentors throughout my career, both male and female. I am pleased to be able to acknowledge some people who have made a difference to my career over the years, in particular Ken Ely, Phil Neville, Grant Wilson and Lucia Cade. Ken Ely was one of my first managers who provided me with my first opportunity to lead a group, and who also made me spend some time in the strategic planning side of the business. Grant Wilson gave me my first role reporting directly to a General Manager and looking after asset information when I did not even know what GIS was, and then had the trust in me to take on asset management (be careful what you wish for!). I worked for Phil Neville briefly as a graduate, and we went on to become equals in a structural sense. He was invaluable to bounce ideas off. Lucia Cade, the Chair of South East Water, has been a different type of mentor, as we are similar in age and experience, and have come through the water sector together. Our informal lunchtime chats were invaluable for me thinking about my career – Lucia was always much more planned about her career and it helped me to consider my own career strategy in a broader sense. CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT SOME OF THE WOMEN WHO’VE INSPIRED YOU BY THEIR WORK IN THE UTILITY SECTOR? Nancy Millis was an outstanding individual and an acclaimed scientist across a range of disciplines. Nancy served on the

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Melbourne Metropolitan Board of Works when I was in my 20s. I had to present in front of her and was so nervous, but she made me feel so comfortable. I was also amazed at her intellect and her no nonsense talking. Another inspirational women is Cheryl Batagol, who has served as the Chair of Melbourne Water and now the Chair of the EPA. Cheryl is a fine example of how you can make a difference within an organisation through her passion for building culture and her work in the industry to improve the environment in which we live.

CAN YOU GIVE US SOME INSIGHT INTO YOUR EXPERIENCE WORKING IN SUCH MALE-DOMINATED SECTORS – HAVE THERE BEEN ANY PARTICULAR CHALLENGES THAT YOU HAVE HAD TO OVERCOME? I tend to look at the positives of working in the maledominated field of engineering. I have been provided enormous opportunities in my field because I am a female. In my early days, I got involved in national conference committees because they wanted diversity, which also got me exposure across the industry. The thing that disappoints me the most is that I was accused of only getting my first promotion because I am a female, and I still hear people say that today. Melbourne Water is committed to diversity and inclusion, and there are many other great utilities and public sector organisations

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here in Victoria with the same commitment, so I’m confident of positive change in that regard.

DO YOU SEE YOURSELF CONTINUING TO WORK IN THE UTILITY SECTOR? I cannot imagine working in an industry that does not contribute to the broader community, which the utility sector provides. That is one of the great drivers for me, being able to actively contribute to community and environmental health through the work we do and working in an organisation like Melbourne Water in the utility sector allows me to do that. CAN YOU PROVIDE A BIT OF BACKGROUND ON YOUR LIFE OUTSIDE OF WORK – ANY HOBBIES OR INTERESTS YOU CARE TO MENTION? ANY ACTIVITIES YOU ENJOY TO BALANCE THE DEMANDS OF A CHALLENGING PROFESSIONAL LIFE? One of my great loves is adventure travel. I’m very grateful that I work for an employer who has allowed me the flexibility to pursue this interest, and I usually head overseas at least once per year on a major hiking or kayaking trip or to just generally be outdoors. I played netball all my life, until my knees gave way, so I am now a keen supporter of the Vixens and Diamonds netball teams.

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NEM Future Forum Advertising 28-08-2017 r2.pdf 1 12-09-2017 09:32:43

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HDD

HOW HAS HDD CHANGED THE WAY PROJECTS TACKLE SHORE CROSSINGS? PART 2

In this article, the second of a two-part series, our HDD expert Charles Stockton takes a closer look at the impact HDD technology has had on shore crossings in pipeline installations. HOW IS USING HDD IN WATER ENVIRONMENTS DIFFERENT TO STANDARD USE OF HDD? The main difference in the HDD operation is that the pipe-side is managed over water by a marine spread. It is essential to correctly specify the vessel requirements and establish what duties it will be performing and in what conditions; this may include seabed preparations, dive support, lifting and recovery of downhole tooling, winching, alignment and hook up of pipe string and placement of clump weights/ mattresses for temporary stabilisation, as well as flooding and gauging of the pipeline. Another technique that has evolved is to drill and leave the bore closed just prior to exit. This then allows for the bore to be opened by forward reaming, thereby limiting offshore operations and ensuring drill fluids are returned to entry for recycling rather than being lost to the ocean floor. The final section of the bore can then be reamed out using biodegradable fluids to limit any potential environmental impacts of the break through to the seabed. HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED IN ANY PROJECTS WHICH EMPLOYED HDD AT WATER CROSSINGS? Stockton Drilling Services has been involved with the majority of complex shore crossings constructed in Australia over the past 15 years, including: • Minerva Shore Crossings (two) in Victoria for BHP Billiton • Gorgon Shore Crossings (nine) in Western Australia for Chevron • Kupe Shore Crossings in New Zealand for Technip/Origin Energy • Victorian Desalination Pilot Plant Shore Crossings (two) in Victoria • Narrows Shore Crossings (four) in Queensland for APLNG/QGC • Gladstone Harbour Shore Crossing Design for Arrow Energy • Anglesea WRP Shore Crossing replacement in Victoria for Barwon Water

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Two projects that are interesting to note are the Gorgon shore crossings, which were constructed on a Class A Nature Reserve and won the national Environmental Engineering Excellence Award at the 23rd annual Australian Engineering Excellence Awards in Canberra. In presenting the award, Ian Pedersen, Chair of the National Engineering Excellence Awards Judging Panel said, “The uncompromising environmental commitment to this project suggests engineering construction techniques can be ecologically sensitive, allowing us to maintain our natural environment for the future.” The second project which clearly indicates how the development of new construction techniques have allowed for improved design is the Anglesea WRP replacement, located 25m above sea level on the Anglesea coastal cliffs. The previous outfall consisted of a 30m deep drop structure which transfers flows from the treatment plant level to the base of the cliffs. A 185m outfall pipe then discharged flows from the base of the drop structure to the ocean. The outfall was constructed in 1995. Since construction cliff erosion had exposed the section of the outfall pipe that runs through the base of the cliff, from the drop structure to the beach. The current rate of erosion is estimated at four metres every ten years. In May 2006, a rock fall crushed a section of the exposed pipe and emergency repairs were required. The pipe was repaired and a concrete block was formed around the exposed pipe. Since this work, the cliff eroded further, exposing the pipe again, undermining the concrete block and placing the pipe at risk of failure again. The instability of the cliff and risk of further collapse meant it was too dangerous to carry out temporary repairs to the broken pipe. As a result, Barwon Water initiated a project which required the design and construction of a new outfall pipeline and associated works.

UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

In August 2017, Barwon Water awarded the design and construction of an emergency outfall replacement to Dunstans Construction Group. Stockton Drilling Services was engaged by Dunstans to provide engineering support and construction supervision. A geotechnical desktop assessment was undertaken to allow for the design of alternative preliminary drilling profiles and to define the scope for further geotechnical investigations. The project team then undertook bathymetric surveys and seabed sampling of the works corridor to establish suitable exit point locations. Seabed profile, water depth, currents, geology and environmental impacts were then evaluated to determine the lowest risk and optimised length and location for the drill exit and diffuser installation. Considering the peak flows from the Water Reclamation Plant and installation forces, it was determined that a 450mm diameter HDPE pipeline would be required. The pipeline would extend 700m from within the plant boundary to approximately 500m offshore to a water depth of 15m, where a 16m long diffuser would be installed. The pipeline was installed within three weeks of mobilising to site.

ABOUT CHARLES STOCKTON UK-born Charles Stockton has been a part of the HDD sector in Australasia since 2003. He is the Managing Director of Stockton Drilling Services, a leading engineering consultancy specialising in HDD and other trenchless pipeline installation methods. For more information please visit www.stocktondrillingservices.com or contact Charles on 0400 623 441 and charles@ stocktondrillingservices.com to discuss your next trenchless project.

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MICROTUNNELLING How has laser guided microtunnelling revolutionised the industry?

B

eing able to install pipelines on-grade is a must these days. This is especially the case in urban areas where a deviation from the route can result in damage to existing underground infrastructure. Microtunnelling is a trenchless method designed to achieve a high level of accuracy to prevent this. Laser guided machines, in particular, aid contractors in consistently installing pipelines on-grade.

GUIDING THE WAY Microtunnelling is one of three main trenchless technologies for pipe installation that are pit-launched. Compared to the other main pitlaunched technologies, thrust boring (also known as auger boring) and bed boring, microtunnelling offers the best accuracy. The reason that microtunnelling is seen as the most accurate pit-launched installation technique is because a high end laser guidance system is used to position the target with live monitoring, allowing the operator to watch what is happening during the installation and make hydraulic steering corrections as needed. Measured from the design line, microtunnelling machines are able to install pipelines with accuracy of +/-10mm commonly achieved, allowing contractors to precisely install gravity pipelines within a tight tolerance. This is different to thrust boring machines, which have traditionally been unguided. For machines without guidance systems, manufacturers state an accuracy of one per cent. To put that in perspective, over an installation distance of 100m, a typical result is a

less than one metre of deviation from the target end point. Bed boring is also traditionally an unguided technology used for short installations up to 25m. The accuracy of such installations depends upon the accuracy of setup, consistency of the ground and the individual operator’s feel for drilling. However, greater accuracy over longer distances has been achieved by combining pitlaunched HDD and bed borers.

THE KEYHOLE FACTOR Laser guided systems have also allowed for the development of keyhole installations, where a pipe is installed via small vertical shafts, leaving everything in between undisturbed. Extreme accuracy is required for such installations due to the size of the shaft. For example, if you were working from a four metre internal diameter shaft, you need to allow 500mm to set up the laser, so you’re left with less than 3.5m to establish a perfect line. If there is any error in the line, this will be multiplied over the length of the installation and the error will only be realised on the breakthrough at the reception shaft. As the laser guidance system is monitored by a camera at all times, the contractor can see the trajectory of the drill head at all times, and can make steering corrections to ensure the drill is on course. Keyhole installations also provide further benefits due to the reduced site footprint. As only entry and exit pits need to be excavated, and by only coring out the minimum amount

of ground required to install a pipe, disruption to the ground is kept to a minimum and the impact to the surrounding environment, and flora and fauna is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the Vermeer AXIS guided boring system, a tool for precision on-grade microtunnelling installations, has been proven to have low carbon emissions. During a project in the US which used the AXIS system, Dr Sam Ariaratnam and his team at Arizona State University did an emissions study utilising the ‘E Calc’ emissions calculator. The study compared the results to alternative methods, with the AXIS system conclusively presenting the least emissions of the methods.

INCREASED PRODUCTIVITY While the increased accuracy provided by laser guided machines has been a great benefit, many microtunnelling machines tend to be cumbersome and time consuming to work with, lacking the productivity to compete with open-cut methods. The Vermeer AXIS guided boring system was designed to fill this gap in the market so that contractors can install pipelines accurately while also getting the job done quickly. It is also versatile so it can meet a wide range of product pipe, sizing specifications, and other jobsite requirements. This combination gives the on-grade accuracy and high efficiency customers demand while minimising restoration and installation costs.

ABOUT STUART HARRISON Global microtunnelling pioneer Stuart Harrison is the Managing Director of Edge Underground, where he specialises in on­-grade microtunnelling installations with millimetre accuracy. Stuart is also the inventor of the Vermeer AXIS Guided Boring system, and he is constantly working to improve the effectiveness of this and other trenchless systems used in the installation of gravity sewers. To discuss your next microtunnelling installation,

contact Stuart on 1300 JACKED or at stuart@edgeunderground.co.

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UTILITY • NOVEMBER 2017

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Profile for Monkey Media

Utility November 2017 Digital Edition  

Separating energy consumption and profit, corrosion: the hidden assassin, and sniffer digs detect water leaks

Utility November 2017 Digital Edition  

Separating energy consumption and profit, corrosion: the hidden assassin, and sniffer digs detect water leaks