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Language and Linguistics 2013 www.cambridge.org/linguistics2013


Contents

Highlights

Morphology 1 Grammar and syntax 1 Phonetics and phonology 5 Semantics and pragmatics 5 Sociolinguistics 7 Discourse analysis 9 Historical linguistics 9 History of the English Language 11 Evolution of Language 11 Psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics 12 Cognitive linguistics 14 Asian language, linguistics 14 Arabic, Middle Eastern Languages 14 African, Caribbean language, linguistics 15 European language, linguistics 15 Applied linguistics and second language acquisition 15 English language, linguistics (general) 17 Also of interest 18 Information on related journals Inside back cover

Cambridge Introductions to Language and Linguistics

Students will gain an understanding of the processes and representations involved in language use, aided by a comprehensive glossary, concepts defined in the margins and online flashcards that allow students to check their understanding of all the key terms and concepts of the subject.

Examples and exercises throughout each topic reinforce understanding and encourage students to consider what language users might carry around in their heads as part of their linguistic knowledge, and how this stored knowledge relates to the structures and rules proposed by theoretical linguistics.

Students will gain hands-on experience of experimental methods, with online demonstrations of techniques. This supports the theory within the book, reinforces a student’s grasp of the concepts and allows the student to apply their understanding to the analysis of data.

Introducing Psycholinguistics

“An engaging and impressively comprehensive view of psycholinguistics that will provide an excellent introduction for the novice reader, and inform the advanced reader as well. Lucid, balanced and thorough.” Shari R. Speer, The Ohio State University

The Cambridge Dictionary of

English Grammar Pa m P e T e r s

Introducing Psycholinguistics Paul Warren

www.cambridge.org/paulwarren

• Flashcard glossary • Demonstrations of experimental techniques • Additional exercises • Answers

➤ See page 2 ➤ See page 13 Using non-technical language, it explains how a second language is acquired; what the learner of a second language needs to know; and why some learners are more successful than others.

product. Begun in England 150 years ago, it took more than 60 years to complete,

knowledge of OED and its archives, powerful analytical skills, and personal warmth and

and when it was finally finished in 1928, the British prime minister heralded it as a

flair as a storyteller.’ John Considine, University of Alberta ‘Sarah Ogilvie, by forensically examining

2006 the English public voted it an ‘Icon of England’, alongside Marmite, Buckingham

the OED text, demonstrates convincingly that, as envisaged by James Murray, it was

Palace, and the bowler hat. But this book shows that the dictionary is not as ‘British’ as we all thought. The linguist and

a truly international enterprise, in both its contributors and the World Englishes represented.’

lexicographer, Sarah Ogilvie, combines her insider knowledge and experience with impeccable research to show that the OED is in fact an international product in both

Howard Jackson, Emeritus Professor of English Language & Linguistics, Birmingham City University

its content and its making. She examines the policies and practices of the various

‘a penetrating and brilliantly conceived work that decisively refutes the assumption

editors, applies qualitative and quantitative analysis, and finds new OED archival

that victorian prejudice disposed the original editors of the OED to neglect foreign

materials in the form of letters, reports, and proofs. She demonstrates that the OED, in its use of readers from all over the world

loanwords and non-British English. Ogilvie writes with a refreshingly brisk intelligence.’ Sidney Landau, author of Dictionaries:

and its coverage of World English, is in fact a global text.

The art and Craft of lexicography

Sa r a h OgIlv IE is Director of the australian National Dictionary Centre, reader in linguistics at the australian

Cover image: letter from the anthropologist

National University, and Chief Editor of Oxford Dictionaries, australia. Prior to that

E. B. Tylor to James Murray, discussing boyuna, a large black Brazilian snake. Tylor

she was alice Tong Sze research Fellow at Cambridge University. She holds a doctorate in linguistics from the University of Oxford

commiserates with Murray’s task of having ‘to decide whether such outlandish words have any place in an English Dictionary’.

and worked for many years as an editor on the Oxford English Dictionary in England

reproduced by permission of the Secretary to the Delegates of Oxford University Press.

Words of the World

‘national treasure’. It maintained this image throughout the twentieth century, and in

s A r A h o G i lv i e

This new edition of Muriel Saville-Troike’s bestselling textbook introduces in a step-by-step fashion a range of fundamental concepts, such as SLA in adults and children, in formal and informal learning contexts, and in diverse socio-cultural settings. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, it encourages students to consider SLA from linguistic, psychological, and social perspectives. Providing a solid foundation in SLA, this book has become the leading introduction to the field for students of linguistics, psychology, and education, and trainee language teachers.

New to this edition: • New sections on simultaneous bilingualism in early childhood, the role of computers in SLA, electronic communication, and nonverbal aspects of language • Updated theories including Chomskyan interfaces, Complexity Theory, and Computer-Mediated Communication • Greater emphasis on the practical applications and implications of the theories presented

Words of the World

and the Macquarie and Oxford dictionaries in australia.

• Suitable for beginners – assumes only a basic knowledge of linguistics

• Extra resources on the accompanying website, including ideas for student research projects, additional exercises, and suggestions for further reading

• “Questions for self-study” and “Questions for active learning” encourage critical thinking and provide new ideas for research topics • A comprehensive glossary provides clear definitions and ease of look-up for each concept introduced

A Global history of the Oxford English Dictionary

“Just what everyone teaching Second Language Acquisition has been waiting for – a truly undergraduate textbook. It explains the terms regularly used by those in the field but not always understood by beginners. It is non-partisan in its approach, well organized, clearly laid-out and provides good, worked-through examples. A most welcome addition – it is the first truly ‘joined up’ work in the field!” Vera Regan, University College Dublin

“ … a useful resource for both undergraduate and graduate students who would like to know more about the learning process and language acquisition and the teachers who need to explain these to them.” Asian EFL Journal

“By structuring an SLA course around the main questions the field investigates, Saville-Troike focuses students’ attention on the important issues that illuminate the study of SLA. The adaptable nature of the book also makes it ideal for courses that include both undergraduate and graduating students, and for courses that have both students who intend to continue taking courses in SLA, and those who do not. Saville-Troike’s text is a timely and welcome addition to the profession.”

MURIEL SAVILLE-TROIKE is Professor Emerita from the University of Arizona, named Regents’ Professor of English before her retirement. She has made significant contributions to the fields of sociolinguistics and applied linguistics, and has previously held posts at Texas A & M University, the University of Texas, Georgetown University, and the University of Illinois. Her previous publications include The Ethnography of Communication: An Introduction (Third Edition, 2003).

www.cambridge.org/saville-troike

Cambridge Introductions to Language and Linguistics

introducing Second Language Acquisition

‘Sarah Ogilvie brings a unique conjunction of abilities to this book: deep practical

Saville-Troike

Written for students encountering the topic for the first time, this is a clear and practical introduction to second language acquisition (SLA).

Most people think of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) as a distinctly British

o G i lv i e

9781107021839 ogilvie – words of the world C M Y K

Warren 9780521130561 Cover. C M Y K

Warren

How humans produce and understand language is clearly introduced in this textbook for students with only a basic knowledge of linguistics. With a logical, flexible structure Introducing Psycholinguistics steps through the central topics of production and comprehension of language and the interaction between them.

Second edition

Introducing Second Language Acquisition Muriel Saville-Troike

Wynne Wong, Ohio State University

SAVILLE-TROIKE: INTRO SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION PPC CMYBLK

➤ See page 17

➤ See page 16

This catalogue contains a selection of our most recent publishing in this area. Please visit our website for a full and searchable listing of all our titles in print and also an extensive range of news, features and resources. Our online ordering service is secure and easy to use.

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Language and Linguistics Journals from Cambridge Our collection of journals covers the full spectrum of the discipline

Theoretical Linguistics Volume 48 • Issue 2 • July 2012 • ISSN: 0022-2267

Language and Applied Linguistics

Volume 48 • Issue 2 • July 2012 • ISSN: 0022-2267

The journal of the Linguistics Association of Great Britain

Articles Juan Carlos Acuña-Fariña Agreement, attraction and architectural opportunism

257

Rui P. Chaves Conjunction, cumulation and respectively readings

297

Ken Hiraiwa The mechanism of inverted relativization in Japanese: A silent linker and inversion

345

Éric Mathieu Licensing by modification: The case of French de nominals

389

Sadaf Munshi & Megan J. Crowhurst Weight sensitivity and syllable codas in Srinagar Koshur

427

479

Announcement

483

Issue 2

473

Bao Zhiming Substratum transfer targets grammatical system

Journal of Linguistics

Volume 48

Notes and Discussion Jeff Siegel Constraints on substrate transfer revisited

Journal of Linguistics

Journal of Linguistics

July 2012 pp. 257–483

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Annual Review of Applied Linguistics

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English Today

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Phonology journals.cambridge.org/pho

Psycholinguistics and Child Language Bilingualism

-native Mexican Spanish simultaneous bilinguals and L2

nsparent Greek to opaque English

ulate oculomotor control? Evidence

oficiency on second language

ches in sentences: The role of

Michael T. Ullman. The storage and the influence of length of

volume 15 number 4 october 2012

sh: Personal a

number 4

october 2012

issn 1366-7289

Bilingualism

ng American Sign Language on

peech of Dutch–English bilinguals:

volume 15

Sociolinguistics

Language and Cognition

ter Indefrey. Acquiring L2 sentence

ederic Dick. A bilingual advantage

ontinued on the inside back cover.

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Morphology / Grammar and syntax

Morphology Word-Formation in the World’s Languages A Typological Survey Pavol Štekauer P. J. Šafárik University, Košice, Slovakia

Salvador Valera University of Granada

and Lívia Ko˝rtvélyessy P. J. Šafárik University, Košice, Slovakia

Fills a gap in cross-linguistic research by being the first systematic survey of the word-formation of the world’s languages. Data from fifty-five world languages reveals associations between word-formation processes in genetically and geographically distinct languages. 2012 228 x 152 mm 392pp 14 b/w illus.  145 tables   978-0-521-76534-3 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521765343

Morphological Typology From Word to Paradigm Raphael Finkel University of Kentucky

and Greg Stump University of Kentucky

In this radically new approach to morphological typology, the authors set out new and explicit methods for the typological classification of languages. Drawing on evidence from a diverse range of languages, they propose innovative ways of measuring inflectional complexity. Advance praise: ‘A highly interesting new approach to morphological typology based on a formalized measure of the complexity of inflectional systems. An essential contribution to theoretical morphology and to research on linguistic complexity.’ Matti Miestamo, Stockholm University Cambridge Studies in Linguistics

2013 228 x 152 mm 330pp 18 b/w illus. ��232 tables   978-1-107-02924-8 Hardback c. £65.00 Publication June 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107029248

Network Morphology A Defaults-based Theory of Word Structure Dunstan Brown University of York

and Andrew Hippisley University of Kentucky

A study of word structure using a specific theoretical framework known as ‘Network Morphology’.

whole host of clitic systems and presents data from over 100 languages. ‘… a reliable and well organized guide through the fascinating world of clitics. The authors deserve praise for the lucid and balanced way in which they present and analyze clitic phenomena in such a remarkably wide range of languages.’ Geert Booij, University of Leiden

Cambridge Studies in Linguistics, 133

Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics

2012 228 x 152 mm 346pp 15 b/w illus.  3 tables   978-1-107-00574-7 Hardback £65.00

2012 247 x 174 mm 388pp 8 tables   978-0-521-86428-2 Hardback £65.00 978-0-521-68292-3 Paperback £24.99

eBook available

eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107005747

Morphosyntactic Change A Comparative Study of Particles and Prefixes Bettelou Los Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen

www.cambridge.org/9780521864282

Grammar and syntax

Bureau Taal

Experimental Syntax and Island Effects

Geert Booij

Edited by Norbert Hornstein

Corrien Blom University of Leiden

University of Maryland, College Park

Marion Elenbaas

and John Sprouse

University of Leiden

University of California, Irvine

and Ans van Kemenade

This volume takes an empirical approach to an important syntactic phenomenon – the ‘island’. For the first time, leading linguists and psycholinguists set the topic within an empirical context. This book is ideal for students and researchers interested in cutting-edge experimental techniques in linguistics, psycholinguistics and psychology.

Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen

Particle verbs (combinations of two words but lexical units) are a notorious problem in linguistics. How did such hybrid verbs arise and how do they function? This book explains how these verbs fit into the grammatical systems of English and Dutch. ‘Offering a wealth of data material, the authors proceed far beyond the exploratory, presenting a coherent analysis of compositionality and conventionality, with important implications for diachronic and synchronic syntactic theory.’ Jan-Wouter Zwart, University of Groningen

2013 228 x 152 mm 450pp 32 b/w illus.   978-1-107-00870-0 Hardback c. £65.00 Publication August 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107008700

The Structural Design of Language Thomas S. Stroik

Cambridge Studies in Linguistics, 134

University of Missouri, Kansas City

2012 228 x 152 mm 266pp 11 tables   978-1-107-01263-9 Hardback £65.00

and Michael T. Putnam

eBook available

One of the most important principles which underlies biolinguistics is that Turing’s thesis must be satisfied: the structural design of biological systems obey physical and mathematical laws. This book proposes a structural design for human language which does exactly that, giving central importance to minimalist syntax.

www.cambridge.org/9781107012639

Clitics An Introduction Andrew Spencer University of Essex

and Ana R. Luis Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal

The first introduction to clitics, providing a complete summary of their properties, their uses, the reasons why they are of interest to linguists and the various theoretical approaches that have been proposed for them. The book describes a

1

Pennsylvania State University

2013 228 x 152 mm 224pp 2 b/w illus.   978-1-107-03483-9 Hardback c. £55.00 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107034839

eBooks available at www.cambridge.org/ebookstore


2

Grammar and syntax The Cambridge Dictionary of English Grammar Pam Peters Macquarie University, Sydney

The most up-to-date A-Z resource available for English grammar, this dictionary provides concise, practical definitions and explanations of hundreds of terms. Each term includes examples and cross references to related concepts. All the currently accepted terms of grammar are included, as well as older, traditional names, controversial new coinages, and items from the study of other languages. The dictionary pinpoints differences in the use of the same terminology, such as ‘adjunct’, ‘complement’, ‘verb phrase’, as well as alternative terms used for much the same concept, such as ‘noun phrase’, ‘nominal group’; ‘agentless passive’, ‘short passive’. It provides a wealth of examples, as well as notes on the relative frequencies of grammatical alternatives, such as ‘will’ and ‘shall’. It also draws attention to some of the differences between spoken and written English grammar. Advance praise: ‘Grammarians love to invent new terms for their categories and, with the advent within two decades of four comprehensive English grammars embracing different approaches, there is a need for a book like this. Professor Peters has made a splendid job of it. What she has achieved is not only a clear exposition of divergent nomenclature but also an impressive independent overview of English grammar with additional information based on her own research in areas like word formation, orthography and relative frequencies of grammatical alternatives. Unreservedly recommended.’ Jan Svartvik, Emeritus Professor, Lund University 2013 247 x 174 mm 400pp 978-0-521-86319-3 Hardback c. £50.00 Publication March 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521863193

Control in Generative Grammar A Research Companion Idan Landau Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

This is the first comprehensive survey of control theory, covering the results of five decades of research in generative grammar. Among the issues discussed are: the distinction between raising and control, syntactic interactions with case, lexical determination of the controller,

and phenomena like partial and implicit control. Advance praise: ‘Professor Landau, already a leading contributor to the theoretical literature on control, provides here an incisive, accessible, balanced guide to what is known and what needs to be known: essential reading for anyone interested in this central area of inquiry.’ Ken Safir, Distinguished Professor of Linguistics, Rutgers University 2013 228 x 152 mm 300pp 978-1-107-01697-2 Hardback c. £65.00 Publication February 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107016972

Textbook

Analysing English Grammar A Systemic Functional Introduction Lise Fontaine

in linguistic analysis, the book gives students a working knowledge of syntactic analysis from a minimalist perspective. ‘This is the book I would recommend to anyone who wants to be gently led to know what the new view of human language is all about – and how much one can get out of a tiny English word.’ Carlos P. Otero, University of California

Contents: 1. The computational nature of human language; 2. Knowledge of language as an object of inquiry; 3. Categories and constituents; 4. Phrase structure theory; 5. The structure of clauses; 6. The syntax of Spec-TP; 7. Head movement and the structure of root clauses; 8. Wh-movement; 9. Ellipsis: unpronounced syntax. 2012 247 x 174 mm 298pp 2 b/w illus.  2 tables  160 exercises   978-0-521-84427-7 Hardback £65.00 978-0-521-60578-6 Paperback £23.95 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521844277

Cardiff University

A practical step-by-step introduction to the analysis of English grammar, this is the first textbook to take an integrated approach to function and structure in grammatical analysis, allowing students to build experience, skills and confidence in working with grammar.

Contrasts and Positions in Information Structure

‘An exceptionally lucid university-level introduction to the structural grammar of English from the perspective of systemic functional linguistics.’

This volume brings together exciting new work on the relationship between syntax and information structure. It is aimed at specialists in information structure, as well as students and linguists in related fields who want to familiarise themselves with current issues in this fascinating area of research.

Michael Cummings, Professor Emeritus, York University, Toronto

Contents: 1. Introduction to functional grammatical analysis; 2. The units of language analysis; 3. The grammar of things: the nominal group; 4. Representing experience; 5. Orienting language; 6. Organizing language; 7. From text to clause; 8. Guidelines for grammatical analysis; 9. There and back again: interpreting the analysis; 10. Answers to exercises. 2012 247 x 174 mm 291pp 131 b/w illus.  44 tables  19 exercises   978-0-521-19066-4 Hardback £55.00 978-0-521-15193-1 Paperback £18.99 www.cambridge.org/9780521190664

Edited by Ivona Kucˇerová McMaster University, Ontario

and Ad Neeleman University College London

2012 228 x 152 mm 354pp 25 b/w illus.  3 tables   978-1-107-00198-5 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107001985

Data and Evidence in Linguistics A Plausible Argumentation Model András Kertész Debreceni Egyetem, Hungary

Textbook

Syntax Basic Concepts and Applications Robert Freidin Princeton University, New Jersey

Syntax: Basic Concepts and Applications provides a systematic introduction to core topics in syntax, focusing on how the basic concepts apply in the analysis of sentences. Assuming no background

and Csilla Rákosi Debreceni Egyetem, Hungary

The first book to comprehensively present the methodological problems associated with linguistic data and evidence. 2012 228 x 152 mm 312pp 12 b/w illus.  1 table   978-1-107-00924-0 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107009240


Grammar and syntax Textbook

Languages of the World An Introduction Asya Pereltsvaig Stanford University, California

Introduces readers to the rich diversity of human languages, familiarizing them with the variety of languages around the world. ‘This comprehensive and highly informative book offers a plethora of intriguing, richly documented facts. Written in an easy style, it is a great read for both beginning and advanced-level students and lay persons.’ Edith Moravcsik, Professor Emerita of Linguistics, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. IndoEuropean languages; 3. Non-IndoEuropean languages of Europe and India; 4. Languages of the Caucasus; 5. Languages of North Africa, Middle East, and Central Asia; 6. Languages of subSaharan Africa; 7. Languages of eastern Asia; 8. Languages of the South Sea islands; 9. Aboriginal languages of Australia and Papua New Guinea; 10. Native languages of the Americas; 11. Macro families; 12. Pidgins, Creoles and other mixed languages. 2012 247 x 174 mm 296pp 20 b/w illus.  18 maps  37 tables   978-1-107-00278-4 Hardback £55.00 978-0-521-17577-7 Paperback £19.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107002784

The Cambridge Handbook of Generative Syntax Edited by Marcel den Dikken City University of New York

Syntax – the study of sentence structure – has been at the centre of generative linguistics from its inception and has developed rapidly and in various directions. The Cambridge Handbook of Generative Syntax provides a historical context for what is happening in the field of generative syntax today, a survey of the various generative approaches to syntactic structure available in the literature and an overview of the state of the art in the principal modules of the theory and the interfaces with semantics, phonology, information structure and sentence processing, as well as linguistic variation and language acquisition. This indispensable resource for advanced students, professional linguists (generative and non-generative alike) and scholars in related fields of inquiry presents a comprehensive survey of the field of generative syntactic

research in all its variety, written by leading experts and providing a proper sense of the range of syntactic theories calling themselves generative. Contributors: Marcel den Dikken, Howard Lasnik, Terje Lohndal, Frederick Newmeyer, Željko Boškovic´, Hans Broekhuis, Ellen Woolford, Peter Sells, James Blevins, Ivan Sag, Robert Frank, Gillian Ramchand, Caroline Heycock, Norbert Corver, Luigi Rizzi, Artemis Alexiadou, Samuel David Epstein, Hisatsugu Kitahara, Miki Obata, T. Daniel Seely, Ken Safir, Maria Polinsky, Mark Baker, Antje Lahne, Jeroen van Craenenbroeck, Jason Merchant, Karen Zagona, Hedde Zeijlstra, Veneeta Dayal, Daniel Büring Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

2013 247 x 174 mm 750pp 1 b/w illus.  5 tables   978-0-521-76986-0 Hardback c. £95.00 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521769860

3

Textbook

English Words and Sentences An Introduction Eva Duran Eppler Roehampton University, London

and Gabriel Ozón University of Sussex

Hands-on, theory-neutral and nontechnical, this textbook is a basic introduction to the structure of English words and sentences. Assuming no prior knowledge of linguistic analysis, it presents the facts in a straightforward manner and offers a step-by-step guide from small to large building blocks of language. ‘It is remarkable how effortlessly this book moves from a very basic to a very complex level, making it suitable for both A-level and undergraduate students.’ Georg Marko, University of Graz

Textbook

Introducing Language Typology Edith A. Moravcsik University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Language typology identifies similarities and differences between languages of the world. This textbook provides an introduction to the subject which assumes minimal prior knowledge of linguistics. It offers the broadest coverage of any introductory book, with sections on historical change, language acquisition and language processing. ‘Textbooks like Moravcsik’s Introducing Language Typology are hard to find. In a clear, logical and readable style, she introduces students not only to the basic concepts and methods in linguistic typology but also to the fundamentals of linguistics. This textbook will be appreciated and loved by students and lecturers alike for many years to come.’ Jae Jung Song, University of Otago

Contents: 1. What is language typology?; 2. The worlds of words; 3. Assembling words; 4. Dissembling words; 5. The sounds of languages; 6. Language in flux; 7. Explaining crosslinguistic preferences. Cambridge Introductions to Language and Linguistics

2012 247 x 174 mm 328pp 11 b/w illus.  35 exercises   978-0-521-19340-5 Hardback £55.00 978-0-521-15262-4 Paperback £19.99 www.cambridge.org/9780521193405

Contents: 1. Language and this book; 2. Word classes; 3. Derivational morphology; 4. Inflectional morphology; 5. Phrase structure 1; 6. Phrase structure 2; 7. Functional analysis; 8. Coordination and subordination; 9. Clause types; 10. Syntactic Hokey C/Pokey: more on clause types. Cambridge Introductions to the English Language

2012 247 x 174 mm 250pp 8 b/w illus.  15 tables  105 exercises   978-1-107-00132-9 Hardback £55.00 978-0-521-17187-8 Paperback £17.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107001329

Null Subjects José Camacho Rutgers University, New Jersey

In this book, José Camacho provides an accessible and original account of null subject phenomena, reviews the key notions of null subject analyses over the past 30 years and encompasses the most recent findings and developments. Advance praise: ‘Camacho has surveyed and integrated a huge amount of material and come up with a coherent and original overall account of ‘Null Subject’ phenomena, exploiting a nice balance of data, sophisticated theoretical discussion and sensible formalisation.’ Neil Smith, Emeritus Professor of Linguistics, University College London Cambridge Studies in Linguistics

2013 228 x 152 mm 220pp 53 b/w illus.  10 tables   978-1-107-03410-5 Hardback c. £65.00 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107034105

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4

Grammar and syntax Symmetry Breaking in Syntax Hubert Haider Universität Salzburg

In this illuminating new theory of grammar, Hubert Haider explores the basic asymmetry in the phrase structure of any language, whatever sentence structure it takes. He identifies a new third type of structure, in addition to OV and VO and uses it to explore the cognitive evolution of grammar. ‘Professor Haider’s Basic Branching Constraint is a bold solution to the problem of word order and word order correlations in language … should be read and taken seriously by grammarians of all stripes.’ Frederick J. Newmeyer, Professor Emeritus, University of Washington Cambridge Studies in Linguistics, 136

2012 228 x 152 mm 300pp 2 tables   978-1-107-01775-7 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107017757

Textbook

Features Greville G. Corbett University of Surrey

A unique examination of a central concept of linguistic analysis: features, such as Number, Person and Tense. Corbett brings together two issues: how features vary between languages and how they work. The book has wide relevance across the discipline. ‘Grev Corbett’s latest book, Features, is the capstone in a portal of masterpieces. Like its predecessors on specific topics like gender, number and agreement, it exhibits Corbett’s unique blend of typological breadth, clarity and morphosyntactic acumen. But it goes beyond them to show how a properly developed theory of features can help linguists get beyond their current impasse – ‘like chemists without a list of the elements, or physicists with no account of particles’, as he puts it in his introduction – towards a point where morphosyntactic theory is supple and comprehensive enough to deal rigorously with the full panoply of the world’s linguistic diversity. Every linguist will benefit deeply from reading this book from cover to cover.’ Nicholas Evans, Australian National University

Contents: List of figures; List of tables; Preface; Abbreviations; 1. Why features?; 2. Formal perspectives: the internal structure of features; 3. Features for different components; 4. Justifying particular features and their values; 5. Typology; 6. Canonical typology and features;

7. Determining feature values: a case study on case; 8. Feature-value mismatches; 9. Conclusions; Appendix: standards and implementations; Reference; Author index; Language index; Subject index. Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics

2012 247 x 174 mm 338pp 10 b/w illus.  14 tables   978-1-107-02623-0 Hardback £65.00 978-1-107-66108-0 Paperback £22.95 www.cambridge.org/9781107026230

Clause Structure Elly Van Gelderen Arizona State University

Clause Structure is the most widelystudied phenomenon within syntactic theory. This accessible topic book synthesizes the most important research findings, examines a range of examples taken from data acquisition, typology and language change, and includes discussion questions, helpful suggestions for further reading and a useful glossary. Key Topics in Syntax

2013 216 x 138 mm 200pp 104 b/w illus.  28 tables   978-1-107-01774-0 Hardback c. £60.00 978-1-107-65981-0 Paperback c. £22.99 Publication June 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107017740

Syntactic Islands Cedric Boeckx ICREA (Catalan Institute for Advanced Studies) and University of Barcelona

The phenomenon of the syntactic ‘island’ – a clause or structure from which a word cannot be moved – is central to research and study in syntactic theory. This book provides a comprehensive overview of syntactic islands, discussing the pros and cons of all the major generative accounts of island effects. ‘Cedric Boeckx synthesizes five decades of research with Haj Ross and Noam Chomsky at the helm and recasts it in a manner only a select few scholars are capable of.’ Kleanthes K. Grohmann, University of Cyprus Key Topics in Syntax

2012 216 x 138 mm 190pp 7 b/w illus.   978-0-521-19146-3 Hardback £55.00 978-0-521-13878-9 Paperback £19.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521191463

Word Order Jae Jung Song University of Otago, New Zealand

A one-stop resource on the current developments in word order research, this comprehensive survey provides an up-to-date, critical overview of this widely debated topic, exploring and

evaluating research carried out in four major theoretical frameworks – linguistic typology, generative grammar, optimality theory and processing-based theories. ‘An amazing summary and critique of different approaches to word order, typological, grammatical and psycholinguistic. A fabulous resource for students and for all who work on this topic.’ Jack Hawkins, University of Cambridge and University of California, Davis Research Surveys in Linguistics

2012 228 x 152 mm 364pp 96 b/w illus.  26 tables   978-0-521-87214-0 Hardback £60.00 978-0-521-69312-7 Paperback £22.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521872140

Constructional Change in English Developments in Allomorphy, Word Formation, and Syntax Martin Hilpert Université de Neuchatel, Switzerland

Is construction grammar a useful framework for the study of language change? Hilpert combines the current linguistic theory of construction grammar with advanced corpusbased methodology in order to study language change in a new way. This new perspective has wide-ranging consequences for the way historical linguists think about language change. Advance praise: ‘A rigorous and lucidly-written application of quantitative corpus linguistics to language change from the perspective of Construction Grammar, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in historical linguistics.’ Stefan Th. Gries, University of California, Santa Barbara Studies in English Language

2013 228 x 152 mm 270pp 46 b/w illus.  17 tables   978-1-107-01348-3 Hardback c. £65.00 Publication March 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107013483

Grammatical Variation in British English Dialects A Study in Corpus-Based Dialectometry Benedikt Szmrecsanyi University of Manchester

An exploration of grammatical differences between British English dialects, drawing on authentic speech data collected in over thirty counties. The book presents a new approach


Grammar and syntax / Phonetics and phonology / Semantics and pragmatics known as ‘corpus-based dialectometry’, which focuses on the joint quantitative measurement of dozens of grammatical features to gauge regional differences. Studies in English Language

2012 228 x 152 mm 227pp 38 b/w illus.  4 colour illus.  68 maps  22 tables   978-1-107-00345-3 Hardback £60.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107003453

Phonetics and phonology The Phonological Mind Iris Berent Northeastern University, Boston

Humans weave phonological patterns instinctively. We contrast dogs and gods, favour blogs to lbogs; we form patterns at birth and, like songbirds, we do so spontaneously. This book explores the basis of this human capacity through a rich interdisciplinary perspective, ranging from linguistics and neuroscience to cognitive science and genetics. ‘Although research on sentence processing has long been informed by syntactic theory, there has been more of a disconnect between phonological theory and research on word/sub-word processing. No more! This monograph establishes firmly how phonological theory and theories of speech processing are intricately connected. With this book, Berent cements her position as a major contributor to the research on speech processing and phonological theory, and the interface between these two fields.’ Andries W. Coetzee, University of Michigan 2012 228 x 152 mm 384pp 30 b/w illus.  9 tables   978-0-521-76940-2 Hardback £65.00 978-0-521-14970-9 Paperback £22.95 www.cambridge.org/9780521769402

Audiovisual Speech Processing Edited by Gerard Bailly Université de Grenoble

Pascal Perrier Université de Grenoble

and Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson University of British Columbia, Vancouver

When we speak, we configure the vocal tract which shapes the visible motions of the face and the patterning of the audible speech acoustics. This book showcases a broad range of research investigating how these two types of signals are used in spoken communication.

2012 228 x 152 mm 506pp 102 b/w illus.  19 tables   978-1-107-00682-9 Hardback £75.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107006829

Textbook

Australian English Pronunciation and Transcription Felicity Cox Macquarie University, Sydney

This groundbreaking work addresses Australian English pronunciation characteristics and provides detailed instruction in phonetic and phonemic transcription of the dialect. Contents: 1. Introduction to Australian English speech production; 2. Consonants and vowels; 3. Syllables, word stress and sentence stress; 4. Phonemic transcription of Australian English; 5. Phonetic transcription of Australian English; 6. Evaluation of two phonemic transcription systems. 2012 247 x 174 mm 256pp 25 b/w illus.  8 tables   978-0-521-14589-3 Paperback £45.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521145893

Analyzing Sound Patterns An Introduction Bruce Long Peng State University of New York, Oswego

Analysing Sound Patterns is a clear and concise introduction to phonological phenomena, it includes extensive exercises which involve students in a variety of analytical tasks and shows students how to analyze phonological problems with a focus on practical tools, methodology, and step-by-step instructions. 2013 247 x 174 mm 550pp 978-0-521-19579-9 Hardback c. £60.00 978-0-521-14740-8 Paperback c. £23.99 Publication July 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521195799

Neutralization Daniel Silverman San José State University, California

Provides in-depth, nuanced and critical analyses of many theoretical approaches to neutralization in phonology and argues for a strictly functional characterization of the term. The book includes a glossary, discussion points and lists of further reading to help advanced phonology students consolidate the main ideas and findings on neutralization.

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‘Neutralization is a must-read for students and researchers interested in neutralization, a long-standing issue in phonological theory. Silverman’s comprehensive survey of traditional and current approaches is both useful and stimulating.’ Jongho Jun, Seoul National University Key Topics in Phonology

2012 216 x 138 mm 238pp 7 b/w illus.  10 tables   978-0-521-19671-0 Hardback £60.00 978-0-521-14501-5 Paperback £22.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521196710

Underlying Representations Martin Krämer Universitetet i Tromsø, Norway

Looks at the fascinating ways in which language provides insight into the workings of the human mind. By looking at the way in which the sounds of words are stored in the phonological lexicon, we learn about how the human mind analyses a blurry and distorted signal into abstract representations. ‘A timely and timeless topic ripe for in-depth investigation, with important and fundamental implications for rule- and constraint-based theories alike. A book that every theoretical phonologist should read and debate.’ Bert Vaux, University of Cambridge Key Topics in Phonology

2012 216 x 138 mm 276pp 30 b/w illus.   978-0-521-19277-4 Hardback £65.00 978-0-521-18003-0 Paperback £22.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521192774

Semantics and pragmatics From Utterances to Speech Acts Mikhail Kissine Université Libre de Bruxelles

A central aspect of linguistic communication is that most of the time our utterances are automatically interpreted as speech acts; as assertions, conjectures, orders, requests and promises. This book provides an interdisciplinary theory of speech acts, couched in non-technical terms, which will appeal to linguists, philosophers, psychologists and cognitive scientists.

Visit our website at www.cambridge.org/knowledge


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Semantics and pragmatics Advance praise: ‘Mikhail Kissine provides a most comprehensive and compelling case for the study of literal and nonliteral speech acts within a rigorously naturalistic approach. His data and arguments, which challenge theoretical confusions and prevalent assumptions, make up a major breakthrough. From Utterances to Speech Acts is an engaging read, novel and eye-opening – a lucid, evidencebased model of the study of direct and indirect language use among typically and atypically developing individuals.’ Rachel Giora, Tel Aviv University 2013 228 x 152 mm 210pp 3 b/w illus.   978-1-107-00976-9 Hardback c. £60.00 Publication March 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107009769

Meaning and Relevance Deirdre Wilson University College London

and Dan Sperber Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris

Enriches and updates relevance theory and explores its implications for linguistics, philosophy, cognitive science and literary studies.

Textbook

Relevance Theory Billy Clark Middlesex University, London

The definitive introduction to relevance theory. It covers the theory from the basics up, building a complete picture and providing the basis for further research in one, easy-to-read textbook. Worked examples in the text support student learning and exercises test understanding. Contents: Part I. Overview: 1. A first outline; 2. Origins and alternatives: Grice, relevance theory and modern pragmatics; 3. Principles of relevance; 4. Explaining inferences; Part II. Details and Developments: 5. Explicature and implicature; 6. Types of explicature; 7. Types of implicature; 8. Lexical pragmatics; 9. Figurative language: metaphor; 10. Figurative language: irony; 11. Linguistic semantics; 12. Conclusion: applications and recent developments; Appendix: key notions of relevance theory. Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics

2013 247 x 174 mm 430pp 21 b/w illus.  3 tables  60 exercises   978-0-521-87820-3 Hardback c. £65.00 978-0-521-70241-6 Paperback c. £23.99 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521878203

2012 228 x 152 mm 396pp 5 b/w illus.  11 tables   978-0-521-76677-7 Hardback £65.00 978-0-521-74748-6 Paperback £23.95

Metaphor

eBook available

Portland State University

www.cambridge.org/9780521766777

A summary, critique and comparison of the most important theories on how metaphors are used and understood, drawing on research from linguistics, psychology and other disciplines. Written in a non-technical style, the book includes clear definitions, examples, discussion questions and a glossary, making it ideal for graduate-level seminars.

The Semantics of Colour A Historical Approach C. P. Biggam University of Glasgow

Human societies name and classify colours in various ways. This book presents the basic principles of modern colour semantics, including the recognition of basic vocabulary, specialised terms and the significance of non-colour features. Each point is illustrated by case studies drawn from modern and historical languages from around the world. 2012 228 x 152 mm 274pp 12 tables   978-0-521-89992-5 Hardback £60.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521899925

L. David Ritchie

‘David Ritchie provides a broad, thought-provoking discussion of metaphor and its applications to the real world. His writing is highly accessible, making Metaphor suitable for a wide audience. Highly recommended!’ Jeannette Littlemore, University of Birmingham Key Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics

2012 228 x 152 mm 225pp 7 b/w illus.   978-1-107-02254-6 Hardback c. £60.00 978-1-107-60666-1 Paperback c. £22.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107022546

Meaning and Humour Andrew Goatly Lingnan University, Hong Kong

Using over a hundred jokes as linguistic examples, this book introduces and critiques a wide range of semantic and pragmatic theories in relation to humour. It is an entertaining and user-friendly textbook for advanced students of semantics, pragmatics and humour studies. ‘Humour is not always easy to understand, semantics is hard to grasp. Adroitly enunciating, Andrew Goatly mixes and matches, with a careful touch, and both teaches and captivates his readers.’ Richard J. Alexander, Vienna University of Economics and Business Key Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics

2012 216 x 138 mm 380pp 25 b/w illus.  40 tables  90 exercises   978-1-107-00463-4 Hardback £60.00 978-0-521-18106-8 Paperback £22.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107004634

Questions Formal, Functional and Interactional Perspectives Edited by Jan P. de Ruiter Universität Bielefeld, Germany

Bringing together a team of formal linguists, functional linguists, discourse analysts, anthropologists, psychologists and sociolinguists, this book asks what questions do and how a question can shape the answer it evokes. The volume includes data from a range of languages and cultures. Language Culture and Cognition, 12

2012 228 x 152 mm 268pp 76 b/w illus.   978-0-521-76267-0 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521762670

Antonyms in English Construals, Constructions and Canonicity Steven Jones University of Manchester

M. Lynne Murphy University of Sussex

Carita Paradis Lunds Universitet, Sweden

and Caroline Willners Lunds Universitet, Sweden

An investigation of antonyms in English, offering a model of how we mentally organize concepts and perceive contrasts between them. Studies in English Language

2012 228 x 152 mm 184pp 20 b/w illus.  34 tables   978-0-521-76179-6 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521761796


Semantics and pragmatics / Sociolinguistics Conversational Repair and Human Understanding Edited by Makoto Hayashi University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Geoffrey Raymond University of California, Santa Barbara

and Jack Sidnell University of Toronto

Humans are imperfect, and problems of speaking, hearing and understanding are pervasive in ordinary interaction. This book examines the way we ‘repair’ and correct such problems. The first book-length study of this topic, it brings together a team of scholars from the fields of anthropology, communication, linguistics and sociology. Advance praise: ‘Repair is absolutely central to any analysis of language and social life as self-organizing natural systems. Here, major scholars insightfully demonstrate repair’s relevance to action formation, human understanding and language diversity. A central resource!’ Charles Goodwin, University of California, Los Angeles Studies in Interactional Sociolinguistics, 30

2013 228 x 152 mm 400pp 14 b/w illus.  3 tables   978-1-107-00279-1 Hardback £65.00 Publication January 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107002791

Sociolinguistics Textbook

Sociolinguistics The Study of Speakers’ Choices Second edition Florian Coulmas German Institute for Japanese Studies, Tokyo

Why do we speak the way we do? What social factors influence our choices of expression? This best-selling introduction to the study of language and society encourages students to ask how and why we select from the vast range of different words, accents, varieties and languages available to us. Advance praise: ‘A masterpiece both because of its erudition and its coherent perspective.’ David Olson, University of Toronto

Contents: 1. Introduction: notions of language; Part I. Micro-choices: 2. Standard and dialect: social stratification as a factor of linguistic choice; 3. Gendered speech: sex as a factor of linguistic choice; 4. Communicating across generations: age as a factor of linguistic choice;

5. Choice and change; 6. Politeness: cultural dimensions of linguistic choice; Part II. Macro-choices: 7. Code-switching: linguistic choices across language boundaries; 8. Diglossia and bilingualism: functional restrictions on language choice; 9. Language spread, shift and maintenance: how groups choose their language; 10. Language and identity: individual, social, national; 11. Language planning: communication demands, public choice, utility; 12. Select letters: a major divide; 13. The language of choice; 14. Research ethics. 2013 247 x 174 mm 300pp 33 b/w illus.  2 maps  20 tables   978-1-107-03764-9 Hardback c. £65.00 978-1-107-67556-8 Paperback c. £23.99 Publication May 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107037649

The Language of Life and Death The Transformation of Experience in Oral Narrative William Labov University of Pennsylvania

Labov extends his widely used framework for narrative analysis to matters of greatest human concern: accounts of the danger of death, violence, premonitions, and large-scale community conflicts. This book provides a rich range of narratives that grip the reader’s attention together with an analysis of how it is done. Advance praise: ‘Erudite, thoughtful and personal, an engaging book to be read and pondered, as much for the fundamental issues raised and the fascinating data analyzed as for the solutions offered.’ Neal R. Norrick, Saarland University 2013 228 x 152 mm 225pp 2 b/w illus.   978-1-107-03334-4 Hardback c. £55.00 978-1-107-65681-9 Paperback c. £18.99 Publication May 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107033344

Textbook

Language and Gender Second edition Penelope Eckert Stanford University, California

and Sally McConnell-Ginet Cornell University, New York

The new edition of this introductory textbook has been updated and restructured to emphasise the deep, yet constantly changing relationship between gender and language use. It covers the full breadth of the course, including sexuality and non-normative sexual and gender identities.

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Advance praise: ‘This is no ordinary textbook. Eckert and McConnell-Ginet, two of the most important scholars writing in sociolinguistics and semantics today, have established a new direction for research in the field of language and gender. There is a reason that this now classic text is being reissued in second edition: no other book in this field makes a more convincing case for the crucial interdependence of language, gender, and sexuality in the formation of diverse twenty-first-century subjectivities. Revised to include all the provocative research directions of the last decade, this new edition of Language and Gender is a must-read for students and scholars who are engaged in the grounded analytics of social life.’ Kira Hall, University of Colorado

Contents: 1. An introduction to gender; 2. Introduction to the study of language and gender; 3. Linguistic resources; 4. Getting it said; 5. Making nice; 6. Being assertive… or not; 7. Where common sense comes from and where it hides; 8. Mapping the world; 9. Constructing nations, constructing boundaries; 10. Fashioning selves. 2013 247 x 174 mm 344pp 14 b/w illus.   978-1-107-02905-7 Hardback c. £65.00 978-1-107-65936-0 Paperback c. £24.99 Publication February 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107029057

Exploring Language in a Multilingual Context Variation, Interaction and Ideology in Language Documentation Bettina Migge University College Dublin

and Isabelle Léglise CNRS, SEDYL-CELIA

Proposing a new methodological approach to documenting languages spoken in multilingual societies, this book retraces the investigation of one unique linguistic space, the Creole varieties called Takitaki in multilingual French Guiana. It will be welcomed by researchers in sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, linguistic fieldwork and language variation and change. ‘Migge and Leglise have explored several borders in this groundbreaking study: between French Guiana and Suriname, between different ethnic groups, but foremost between critical discourse analysis and descriptive linguistics.’ Pieter Muysken, Radboud University Nijmegen 2012 228 x 152 mm 369pp 9 b/w illus.  8 maps  28 tables   978-0-521-19555-3 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521195553

eBooks available at www.cambridge.org/ebookstore


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Sociolinguistics Research Methods in Language Variation and Change

Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics

Edited by Manfred Krug

eBook available

Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg, Germany

www.cambridge.org/9780521837279

2012 247 x 174 mm 192pp 5 tables   978-0-521-83727-9 Hardback £60.00 978-0-521-54598-3 Paperback £19.99

and Julia Schlüter Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg, Germany

Novice researchers and professionals interested in extending their methodological repertoires will find practical guidance on and critical discussion of a variety of techniques essential for collecting, analysing and evaluating linguistic data. All 23 chapters are written by leading practitioners, who share their expertise in this systematic and state-of-the-art survey. 2012 247 x 174 mm 455pp 112 b/w illus.  69 tables   978-1-107-00490-0 Hardback c. £60.00 978-0-521-18186-0 Paperback c. £23.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107004900

The Cambridge Handbook of Language Policy Edited by Bernard Spolsky Bar-Ilan University, Israel

This is the first Handbook to deal with language policy as a whole and is a complete ‘state-of-the-field’ survey. Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

2012 247 x 174 mm 754pp 8 b/w illus.  24 tables   978-0-521-19565-2 Hardback £95.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521195652

Textbook

Linguistic Fieldwork A Student Guide Jeanette Sakel University of the West of England, Bristol

and Daniel L. Everett Bentley University

A handy beginner’s guide to linguistic fieldwork – from the preparation of the work to the presentation of the results. ‘… a perfect students’ guide through the intricate landscape of planning and conducting language research and documentation with the aid of native speakers.’ Thomas Stolz, Chair of Linguistics, University of Bremen

Contents: 1. Introduction: what is linguistic fieldwork?; 2. Fieldwork projects: two examples; 3. The languages; 4. The people; 5. Fieldwork preparation; 6. Fieldwork methods; 7. The outcomes.

Textbook

Sociolinguistic Fieldwork Natalie Schilling Georgetown University, Washington DC

Looking for an easy-to-use, practical guide to conducting fieldwork in sociolinguistics? This invaluable textbook will give you the skills and knowledge required for carrying out research projects in ‘the field’. Advance praise: ‘Natalie Schilling learned the ‘secrets of sociolinguistic fieldwork’ (as she so aptly puts it) in both urban and rural settings. Her hands-on experience gives her book uncommon breadth, and her sensitivity, both scientific and social, gives it unrivalled depth.’ J. K. Chambers, University of Toronto

Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Designing the study; 3. Data collection methods; 4. Designing research on style; 5. In the field: finding contacts, finding a place; 6. Recording and record keeping; 7. Giving back to the community. Key Topics in Sociolinguistics

2013 216 x 138 mm 310pp 4 b/w illus.  2 maps   978-0-521-76292-2 Hardback c. £65.00 978-0-521-12797-4 Paperback c. £23.99 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521762922

Writing and Society An Introduction Florian Coulmas German Institute for Japanese Studies, Tokyo

Drawing on contemporary and historical examples, from clay tablets to touchscreen displays, this book is a general account of the place of writing in society. It explores the functions of writing and written language, analysing its consequences for language, society, economy and politics. Advance praise: ‘A masterpiece both because of its erudition and its coherent perspective.’ David Olson, University of Toronto Key Topics in Sociolinguistics

2013 216 x 138 mm 200pp 14 b/w illus.  11 tables   978-1-107-01642-2 Hardback c. £55.00 978-1-107-60243-4 Paperback c. £17.99 Publication January 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107016422

English as a Contact Language Edited by Daniel Schreier Universität Zürich

and Marianne Hundt Universität Zürich

Highlights the complexity of contactinduced language change throughout the history of English by bringing together cutting-edge research from historical linguistics, variationist sociolinguistics, pidgin/creole linguistics and language acquisition. With contributions from leading experts, the book offers fresh and exciting perspectives as well as an up-to-date overview of the respective fields. ‘This multifaceted volume demonstrates the important role of language contact and dialect contact in the development of English and its many current varieties, providing new insights into questions of who were the agents of change and what were the processes involved. The list of authors of the eighteen chapters reads like a who’s who in contact linguistics and the history of English. Highly recommended reading for anyone interested in these areas.’ Jeff Siegel, University of New England, Australia Studies in English Language

2012 228 x 152 mm 425pp 23 b/w illus.  6 maps  31 tables   978-1-107-00196-1 Hardback c. £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107001961

Interactions across Englishes Linguistic Choices in Local and International Contact Situations Christiane Meierkord Ruhr-Universität, Bochum, Germany

The global spread of English has resulted in contact with an enormous variety of different languages worldwide, leading to the creation of many new varieties of English. This book takes an original look at what happens when speakers of these different varieties interact with one another. Studies in English Language

2012 228 x 152 mm 264pp 18 b/w illus.  13 maps  21 tables   978-0-521-19228-6 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521192286


Discourse analysis / Historical linguistics

Discourse analysis Discourse Analysis and Media Attitudes The Representation of Islam in the British Press Paul Baker Lancaster University

Costas Gabrielatos Edge Hill University

to apply them. A rich analysis of the concepts and metaphors for truth, love, hate and war.’ Andrew Goatly, Lingnan University, Hong Kong 2012 228 x 152 mm 262pp 2 b/w illus.   978-1-107-01064-2 Hardback £60.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107010642

Historical linguistics

and Tony McEnery Lancaster University

Is the British press prejudiced against Muslims? In what ways can prejudice be explicit and subtle? This thorough analysis of over 140 million words of newspaper articles explores that question. Using tools of critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, it produces an objective picture of media attitudes towards Muslims and Islam. Advance praise: ‘This book investigates the ways in which the lives and actions of Muslims and Islam are represented in the British press. The authors use the corpus method of analysing vast amounts of data to weigh the overall impact of the media coverage. This approach offers stimulating new insights which offer useful suggestions as to the ways in which the current situation might be improved.’ Rt Hon Charles Clarke, Former UK Home Secretary 2013 228 x 152 mm 280pp 40 b/w illus.  52 tables   978-1-107-00882-3 Hardback c. £65.00 Publication February 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107008823

Ethnolinguistics and Cultural Concepts Truth, Love, Hate and War James W. Underhill Université Stendhal, Grenoble

Offers an original approach to ethnolinguistics, discussing how abstract concepts such as truth, love, hate and war are expressed across cultures and ethnicities. It will be welcomed by those working in the fields of sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, discourse analysis, semantics and pragmatics. ‘This is a fascinating cross-cultural and cross-linguistic study of discourse, an energetic attempt to give ethnolinguistics its proper place. It is a profound discussion and exploration of major cultural concepts, the patterns of vocabulary and metaphor used to express and construct them, and the discourse strategies used

Historical Linguistics Toward a Twenty-First Century Reintegration Don Ringe University of Pennsylvania

and Joseph F. Eska Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Bringing the advances of theoretical linguistics to the study of language change, this textbook demonstrates the mutual relevance of historical linguistics and contemporary linguistics. It argues that this approach can and should lead to the re-integration of historical linguistics as one of the core areas in the study of language. ‘Engaging, clear, modern, and intellectually honest … this book will inspire a new generation of work in historical linguistics.’ Philomen Probert, University of Oxford 2012 247 x 174 mm 350pp 10 b/w illus.   978-0-521-58332-9 Hardback c. £65.00 978-0-521-58711-2 Paperback c. £22.99 www.cambridge.org/9780521583329

Multilingualism in the Graeco-Roman Worlds Edited by Alex Mullen All Souls College, Oxford

and Patrick James Jesus College, Cambridge

Explores the multilingual complexity of the Graeco-Roman worlds in antiquity and the medieval period. Employs the latest interdisciplinary approaches and contemporary multilingualism theory in order to examine the linguistic and visual clues left by those expressing multilingual identity, and how these compare across cultures and time. 2012 228 x 152 mm 405pp 41 b/w illus.  5 tables   978-1-107-01386-5 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107013865

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Textbook

Language Change Progress or Decay? Fourth edition Jean Aitchison University of Oxford

How and why do languages change? Where does the evidence of language change come from? How do languages begin and end? This introduction to language change explores these and other questions, considering changes through time. This updated edition remains non-technical and accessible to readers with no previous knowledge of linguistics. ‘Jean Aitchison’s Language Change: Progress or Decay? has been essential introductory reading for students of historical linguistics for many years: it manages the rare trick of combining theoretical sophistication and clear, simple (but not simplistic) expression. This new edition, which takes account of current issues in language-change studies while not discarding classic discussions, remains a fine and very approachable survey. I shall certainly recommend it to my undergraduates.’ Jeremy J. Smith, University of Glasgow

Contents: Part I. Preliminaries: 1. The ever-whirling wheel; 2. Collecting up clues; 3. Charting the changes; Part II. Transition: 4. Spreading the word; 5. Conflicting loyalties; 6. Catching on and taking off; 7. Caught in the web; 8. The wheels of language; 9. Spinning away; Part III. Causation: 10. The reason why; 11. Doing what comes naturally; 12. Repairing the patterns; 13. Pushing and pulling; Part IV. Beginnings and Endings: 14. Language birth; 15. Language death; 16. Progress or decay? Cambridge Approaches to Linguistics

2012 216 x 138 mm 320pp 37 b/w illus.  2 tables   978-1-107-02362-8 Hardback c. £55.00 978-1-107-67892-7 Paperback c. £21.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107023628

Southern Gaul and the Mediterranean Multilingualism and Multiple Identities in the Iron Age and Roman Periods Alex Mullen All Souls College, Oxford

The Celtic-speaking communities of Southern Gaul interacted with the ancient Mediterranean world during a period of constantly evolving cultural configurations. Using sociolinguistics and archaeology, this book investigates evidence for multilingualism and multiple identities from the foundation

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Historical linguistics of Greek Marseille in 600 BC to the final phases of Roman Imperial power. Cambridge Classical Studies

2013 247 x 174 mm 350pp 31 b/w illus.  5 maps  13 tables   978-1-107-02059-7 Hardback c. £60.00 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107020597

The Colloquia of the Hermeneumata Pseudodositheana Volume 1: Colloquia MonacensiaEinsidlensia, Leidense-Stephani, and Stephani Edited by Eleanor Dickey University of Exeter

Syllabic Writing on Cyprus and its Context Edited by Philippa M. Steele Magdalene College, Cambridge

The first comprehensive account of syllabic writing in ancient Cyprus, tackling epigraphic, archaeological and historical problems relating to the island’s writing systems in the Late Bronze Age and Iron Age and challenging some longstanding or traditional views. Invaluable for scholars studying Cypriot epigraphy or archaeology. Cambridge Classical Studies

2013 216 x 138 mm 224pp 13 b/w illus.  7 tables   978-1-107-02671-1 Hardback c. £55.00 Publication January 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107026711

Language and Linguistic Contact in Ancient Sicily Edited by Olga Tribulato Università degli Studi di Venezia

Contributes to the growing interest in ancient bilingualism by focusing on the linguistic history of Sicily down to the Roman Empire. The twelve chapters present overviews of the non-Classical languages as well as specialist studies of Greek and Latin literature, inscriptions, coins and onomastics. Cambridge Classical Studies

2012 216 x 138 mm 448pp 18 b/w illus.  3 maps  3 tables   978-1-107-02931-6 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107029316

Absolute Constructions in Early Indo-European Antonia Ruppel Cornell University, New York

A thorough examination of the nature and function of absolute constructions in Greek, Latin and Sanskrit, including a detailed description of how they interact with their syntactic environment. Of great interest and importance to historical linguists and to classicists and Sanskrit scholars concerned with the history of those languages. Cambridge Classical Studies

2012 216 x 138 mm 269pp 978-0-521-76762-0 Hardback £60.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521767620

The Colloquia are manuals written to help ancient Greeks and Romans get around in each other’s languages; they contain examples of how to conduct activities like shopping, banking, visiting friends, hosting parties, taking oaths, winning lawsuits, using the public baths, having fights, making excuses and going to school. They thus offer a unique glimpse of daily life in the Early Roman Empire and are an important resource for understanding ancient culture. They have, however, been unjustly neglected because until now there has not been any modern editions of the texts, no translations into any modern language, and little understanding of what the Colloquia are and where they come from. This book makes the Colloquia accessible for the first time by combining a new edition, translation and commentary with a ground-breaking, comprehensive study of their origins. It is clearly written and will interest students, non-specialists and professional scholars alike. Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries, 49

2012 276 x 219 mm 288pp 23 b/w illus.  12 tables   978-1-107-02010-8 Hardback £90.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107020108

Think On My Words Exploring Shakespeare’s Language David Crystal

For decades, people have been studying Shakespeare’s life and times and in recent years there has been a renewed surge of interest in aspects of his language. So how can we better understand Shakespeare? David Crystal provides a lively and original introduction to Shakespeare’s language, making his plays easily accessible to modern-day audiences. Covering the five main dimensions of language structure – writing system, pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary and conversational style – this book demonstrates how examining these linguistic ‘nuts and bolts’ can help us achieve a greater appreciation of Shakespeare’s linguistic creativity. ‘Here is a linguist [David Crystal] who knows not only how words work but how they work in theatre. Anyone who cares for Shakespeare will be informed and entertained by this intriguing and wide-ranging study.’ Stanley Wells Canto Classics

2012 216 x 138 mm 266pp 4 b/w illus.  2 tables   978-1-107-61768-1 Paperback £12.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107617681

Standards of English Codified Varieties around the World Edited by Raymond Hickey Universität Duisburg–Essen

The English Language Second edition Charles Barber Joan Beal University of Sheffield

and Philip Shaw University of Sheffield

This bestselling text by Charles Barber, with updating contributions from Joan C. Beal and Philip A. Shaw, recounts the history of the English language from its remote ancestry to the present day. ‘A clear, readable introduction to language … the layers of vocabulary are dealt with brilliantly …’ Good Book Guide Canto Classics

2012 216 x 138 mm 320pp 1 map   978-1-107-69393-7 Paperback £12.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107693937

This volume provides the first booklength exploration of ‘standard Englishes’, with chapters on areas as diverse as Canada, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, New Zealand and the South Pacific. This is a timely and important topic, with contributions by the leading experts on each major variety of English discussed. Studies in English Language

2012 228 x 152 mm 448pp 8 b/w illus.  20 maps  48 tables   978-0-521-76389-9 Hardback £70.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521763899


History of the English Language / Evolution of Language

History of the English Language Roots of English Exploring the History of Dialects Sali A. Tagliamonte

The Verb Phrase in English Investigating Recent Language Change with Corpora Edited by Bas Aarts University College London

Joanne Close University of Chester

Geoffrey Leech and Sean Wallis

This groundbreaking investigation examines four dialects from parts of northern Britain out of which came the founding populations of many regions in other parts of the world. Using numerous examples, Sali Tagliamonte comprehensively describes and analyses key features of the dialects and their implications for the development of English.

University College London

Peter Trudgill, University of Agder 2012 228 x 152 mm 266pp 54 b/w illus.  2 maps  19 tables   978-0-521-86321-6 Hardback £60.00 978-0-521-68189-6 Paperback £19.99 www.cambridge.org/9780521863216

Singapore English Structure, Variation and Usage Jakob R. E. Leimgruber Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany

Drawing on recent developments in the field of indexicality, world Englishes and corpus research, Jakob Leimgruber offers readers a new way of thinking about and analysing the unique syntactic, semantic and phonological structure of Singapore English. Studies in English Language

2013 228 x 152 mm 160pp 22 b/w illus.  2 maps  23 tables   978-1-107-02730-5 Hardback c. £55.00 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107027305

Studies in English Language

2012 228 x 152 mm 238pp 1 b/w illus.   978-0-521-51886-4 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521518864

Evolution of Language

Lancaster University

University of Toronto

‘English was born in England and Scotland. Over the centuries it spread from Britain to Ireland and across the Atlantic and beyond. But even in farflung locations, the roots of English in British dialects are detectable not only in broad outline but, if you are clever enough, in all sorts of fascinating detail. And Sali Tagliamonte is clever enough. This book is a tour de force of historical dialectology.’

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The chapters in this volume feature new and groundbreaking research carried out by leading scholars and promising young researchers from around the world on recent changes in the English verb phrase. This cutting-edge collection is essential reading for historians of the English language, syntacticians and corpus linguists. Studies in English Language

2013 228 x 152 mm 475pp 113 b/w illus.  92 tables   978-1-107-01635-4 Hardback c. £70.00 Publication January 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107016354

From Philology to English Studies Language and Culture in the Nineteenth Century Haruko Momma

How Language Began Gesture and Speech in Human Evolution David McNeill University of Chicago

Written by one of the pioneers of the field, this is the first book to explain how speech and gesture evolved together into a system that all humans possess. David McNeill challenges the popular ‘gesture-first’ theory and proposes a groundbreaking theory of the evolution of language. ‘Long before embodied cognition was a recognized field of study, David McNeill was demonstrating the inseparability of language and gesture. In this new work he extends this pioneering approach to encompass the origins of human language.’ Elena Levy, University of Connecticut

New York University

Approaches to the Evolution of Language

An examination of the influence of nineteenth-century philology on European thought. Haruko Momma considers, among other matters, the impact of William Jones’s discovery of Sanskrit on historical studies of language and culture, the Philological Society’s role in the making of the OED, and the rise of English studies at universities.

2012 247 x 174 mm 278pp 167 b/w illus.  11 tables   978-1-107-02121-1 Hardback £60.00 978-1-107-60549-7 Paperback £19.99

‘Critics have been advocating a ‘return to philology’ for decades. Leave it to Haruko Momma, a real philologist, to offer an erudite and fluent history of the discipline and a powerful claim for its endurance. She locates the origins of our contemporary teaching of literature in the traditions of Indo-European linguistics, English and German university scholarship, and American academic culture. From Philology to English Studies is the best critical engagement with the historical study of language – its institutions, ideologies, and idioms – since the groundbreaking studies of Hans Aarsleff nearly fifty years ago. It will be valued for as long.’ Seth Lerer, Dean of Arts and Humanities, University of California, San Diego

eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107021211

The Cambridge Handbook of Biolinguistics Edited by Cedric Boeckx The Catalan Institute for Advanced Studies

and Kleanthes K. Grohmann University of Cyprus

Biolinguistics involves the study of language from a broad perspective that embraces natural sciences, helping us better to understand the fundamentals of the faculty of language. This Handbook offers the most comprehensive state-of-the-field survey of the subject available. A team of prominent scholars working in a variety of disciplines is brought together to examine language development, language evolution and neuroscience, as well as providing overviews of the conceptual landscape of the field. The Handbook includes work at the forefront of contemporary research devoted to the evidence for a language instinct, the critical period hypothesis, grammatical

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Evolution of Language / Psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics maturation, bilingualism, the relation between mind and brain and the role of natural selection in language evolution. It will be welcomed by graduate students and researchers in a wide range of disciplines, including linguistics, evolutionary biology and cognitive science. Advance praise: ‘A thoughtfully constructed and didactically useful perspective on a vibrant, heterogeneous area. Many chapters succeed in illustrating the potential for future interdisciplinary progress in the alignment of linguistics and biology.’ David Poeppel, New York University

Contributors: Kleanthes K. Grohmann, Cedric Boeckx, Lyle Jenkins, Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini, James McGilvray, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, Jürgen M. Meisel, Séverine Millotte, Elodie Cauvet, Perrine Brusini, Anne Christophe, Ken Wexler, Lisa Pearl, Jeffrey Lidz, Mireia Hernández, Clara D. Martin, Núria Sebastián-Gallés, Albert Costa, Jon Sprouse, Diogo Almeida, Matthew Wagers, Brian McElree, Philip J. Monahan, Ellen F. Lau, William J. Idsardi, Matthias Schlesewsky, Ina Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Liina Pylkkänen, Jonathan Brennan, Douglas Bemis, Gary F. Marcus, Cristina D. Rabaglia, Hugh Rabagliati, Gregory Hickok, Naama Friedmann, Michal Biran, Dror Dotan, Antonio Benítez-Burraco, Klaus Zuberbühler, Kazuo Okanoya, Simon Kirby, Derek Bickerton, Sergio Balari, Víctor M. Longa, Guillermo Lorenzo Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

2013 247 x 174 mm 700pp 42 b/w illus.  3 tables   978-0-521-76153-6 Hardback c. £95.00 Publication January 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521761536

Textbook

Evolutionary Linguistics April McMahon Aberystwyth University

and Robert McMahon Aberystwyth University

How did the biological, brain and behavioural structures underlying human language evolve? When, why and where did our ancestors become linguistic animals, and what has happened since? This book provides a clear, comprehensive but lively introduction to these interdisciplinary debates. ‘Ideal material for my postgraduate course in evolutionary linguistics.’ Andrew Smith, University of Stirling

Contents: 1. Evolution and history; 2. Evidence for evolution; 3. The comparative methods; 4. Who, where and when?; 5. The vocal tract; 6. Language and the brain; 7. Language and genes; 8. Big bang or cumulative creep? Saltation versus gradual, adaptive evolution; 9. From protolanguage to language. Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics

2012 247 x 174 mm 326pp 21 b/w illus.  2 tables   978-0-521-81450-8 Hardback £65.00 978-0-521-89139-4 Paperback £23.99 www.cambridge.org/9780521814508

Psycho linguistics and neurolinguistics Mind, Brain and Narrative Anthony J. Sanford University of Glasgow

and Catherine Emmott University of Glasgow

Writers use a variety of language features to control readers’ experiences, from the way they construct fictional contexts and non-fictional contexts to the moral and emotional responses they have. In this timely, interdisciplinary work, Sanford and Emmott examine the psychological and neuroscientific evidence for the mechanisms which underlie narrative comprehension. ‘Sanford and Emmott’s Mind, Brain and Narrative is the book of the decade for those in the interdisciplinary discourse sciences who appreciate the nuances of multilayered narrative representation, comprehension, and communication. They discuss scenario-mapping theory, rhetorical focussing principles, and experiential immersion, which are central to a deep understanding of inferences, perspective, emotions, persuasion, figurative language, embodiment, and other phenomena that continue to mystify empirical researchers and literary scholars.’ Arthur C. Graesser, University of Memphis 2012 228 x 152 mm 336pp 7 b/w illus.  3 tables   978-1-107-01756-6 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107017566

Memory, Language, and Bilingualism Theoretical and Applied Approaches Edited by Jeanette Altarriba University at Albany, State University of New York

and Ludmila Isurin Ohio State University

From recent advances in studies on bilingual memory, to studies on the role of the brain in language processing and second language forgetting, this volume provides an integrated theoretical/realworld approach to second language learning, use and processing from a cognitive perspective. ‘This comprehensive collection of cutting-edge interdisciplinary research into bilingual cognition makes important contributions to theory and practice alike. A must for both students and experienced researchers.’ Nick Ellis, University of Michigan 2012 228 x 152 mm 384pp 39 b/w illus.  13 tables   978-1-107-00890-8 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107008908

Interpreting Figurative Meaning Raymond W. Gibbs, Jr University of California, Santa Cruz

and Herbert L. Colston University of Wisconsin, Parkside

Interpreting Figurative Meaning examines how people understand figurative language, including metaphor (e.g. ‘My lawyer is a shark’), metonymy (e.g. ‘They are reading Dickens’) and proverbs (e.g. ‘A rolling stone gathers no moss’). The book explores interdisciplinary debates on the process of comprehending and experiencing thoughts and emotions in everyday life. 2012 228 x 152 mm 390pp 978-1-107-02435-9 Hardback £60.00 978-1-107-60727-9 Paperback £21.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107024359

The Acquisition of Creole Languages How Children Surpass their Input Dany Adone University of Cologne

In this first book of its kind, Dany Adone demonstrates how children acquire Creoles as their first language and how this differs from the acquisition of nonCreole languages. She shows that in the absence of a conventional language model, Creole children acquire language and go beyond the input they receive.


Psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics ‘Dr Adone is, to date, the only scholar to deal with the acquisition of a creole language, and this book both broadens and deepens her pioneering 1994 study. It should prove indispensable as both stimulus and benchmark for those who, hopefully, will now study acquisition in other creoles.’ Derek Bickerton, Professor Emeritus, University of Hawaii, Manoa 2012 228 x 152 mm 248pp 28 b/w illus.  21 tables   978-0-521-19965-0 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521199650

New in Paperback

The Cambridge Handbook of Child Language Edited by Edith L. Bavin La Trobe University, Victoria

The best survey of the subject available, The Cambridge Handbook of Child Language brings together the world’s foremost researchers to provide a one-stop resource for the study of language acquisition and development. Grouped into five thematic sections, the handbook is organized by topic, making it easier for students and researchers to use when looking up specific in-depth information. It covers a wider range of subjects than any other handbook on the market, with chapters covering both theories and methods in child language research and tracing the development of language from prelinguistic infancy to teenager. Drawing on both established and more recent research, the Handbook surveys the crosslinguistic study of language acquisition; prelinguistic development; bilingualism; sign languages; specific language impairment, language and autism, Down syndrome and Williams syndrome. This book will be an essential reference for students and researchers working in linguistics, psychology, cognitive science, speech pathology, education and anthropology. Review of the hardback: ‘… a standard work … it succeeds magnificently in charting the advances made in theory, methodology and application over the last four decades.’ Paul Fletcher, University College Cork

Contributors: Edith L. Bavin, Virginia Valian, Eric Thiessen, Angela D. Friederici, Michael Tomasello, Sabine Stoll, Suzanne Curtin, Dan Hufnagle, Barbara Höhle, Susan Goldin-Meadow, Marilyn M. Vihman, Rory A. DePaolis, Tamar Keren-Portnoy, Katherine Demuth, Heike Behrens, Shanley Allen, Barbara C. Lust, Claire Foley, Cristina D. Dye,

Kamil Ud Deen, Eve V. Clark, Stephen Crain, Jesse Snedeker, Judith Becker Bryant, Ruth A. Berman, Barbara Zurer Pearson, Diane Lillo-Martin, J. Bruce Tomblin, Laurence B. Leonard, Rhiannon J. Luyster, Catherine Lord, Fiona M. Richardson, Michael S. C. Thomas Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

2012 247 x 174 mm 608pp 1 b/w illus.  13 tables   978-1-107-60542-8 Paperback £29.99 Also available 978-0-521-88337-5 Hardback £111.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107605428

The Cambridge Handbook of Psycholinguistics Edited by Michael Spivey University of California, Merced

Ken McRae University of Western Ontario

and Marc Joanisse University of Western Ontario

Psycholinguistics is a central topic in cognitive science. This collection of chapters is written by leading researchers from a wide array of subfields, who have been shaping the field of psycholinguistics over the last decade. This is required reading for advanced researchers, graduate students and upper-level undergraduates. Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology

2012 253 x 177 mm 680pp 61 b/w illus.  2 colour illus.   978-0-521-86064-2 Hardback £90.00 978-0-521-67792-9 Paperback £45.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521860642

Textbook

Introducing Psycholinguistics Paul Warren Victoria University of Wellington

How humans produce and understand language is clearly introduced in this textbook for students with only a basic knowledge of linguistics. With a logical, flexible structure Introducing Psycholinguistics steps through the central topics of production and comprehension of language and the interaction between them.

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Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Planning utterances; 3. Finding words; 4. Building words; 5. Monitoring and repair; 6. The use of gesture; 7. Perception for language; 8. Spoken word recognition; 9. Visual word recognition; 10. Syntactic sentence processing; 11. Interpreting sentences; 12. Making connections; 13. Architecture of the language processing system. Cambridge Introductions to Language and Linguistics

2012 247 x 174 mm 286pp 8 b/w illus.  31 colour illus.  9 tables   978-0-521-11363-2 Hardback £55.00 978-0-521-13056-1 Paperback £19.99 www.cambridge.org/9780521113632

The Emergence of Meaning Stephen Crain Macquarie University, Sydney

Using the examples of English and Mandarin Chinese, Crain demonstrates that the underlying expressions and structures in these typologically different languages directly correlate to those of classical logic. Moreover Crain presents experimental data which shows the emergence of these concepts in the languages spoken by young children. ‘This careful and sophisticated study provides powerful empirical evidence, from many sources, for logical nativism, the thesis that human languages make use of the logical concepts and laws of classical logic, and that these are contingent facts that are not learned and not required for a rational creature. It extends the conclusion to other aspects of natural language, its acquisition and use. The conclusions are compelling, and of great import for linguistics, philosophical logic, and psychology of language and mind quite generally.’ Noam Chomsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge Studies in Linguistics, 135

2012 228 x 152 mm 201pp 29 b/w illus.   978-0-521-85809-0 Hardback £65.00 978-0-521-67488-1 Paperback £23.95 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521858090

‘An engaging and impressively comprehensive view of psycholinguistics that will provide an excellent introduction for the novice reader, and inform the advanced reader as well. Lucid, balanced and thorough.’ Shari R. Speer, Ohio State University

eBooks available at www.cambridge.org/ebookstore


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Cognitive linguistics / Asian language, linguistics / Arabic, Middle Eastern Languages

Cognitive linguistics Viewpoint in Language A Multimodal Perspective Edited by Barbara Dancygier University of British Columbia, Vancouver

and Eve Sweetser University of California, Berkeley

This volume argues that human cognition is not only rooted in the human body, but also inherently ‘viewpointed’ as a result; consequently, so are language and communication. It uncovers surprising functional similarities across various communicative forms and provides a new understanding of the role and structure of viewpoint. 2012 228 x 152 mm 254pp 52 b/w illus.   978-1-107-01783-2 Hardback £60.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107017832

South Asian Languages A Syntactic Typology Kaˉrumuˉri V. Subbaˉraˉo University of Hyderabad, India

South Asian languages are rich in linguistic diversity and number. This book explores the similarities and differences of these languages. It will be of interest to linguists working on the description of South Asian languages and syntacticians wishing to discover more about the common structure of languages within this region. ‘A truly impressive scholarly achievement, capturing both the linguistic unity and diversity in South Asia through insightful theoryconnected analyses and an admirable range of well organized language data.’ James W. Gair, Professor Emeritus of Linguistics, Cornell University

Jiyoung Shin Korea University, Seoul

Jieun Kiaer

F. Nihan Ketrez

Chinese Characters Third edition Jiantang Han

Han Jiantang provides an accessible, illustrated introduction to the fascinating history and development of the written Chinese language. Introductions to Chinese Culture

and Jaeeun Cha

2012 260 x 156 mm 168pp 978-0-521-18660-5 Paperback £12.99 www.cambridge.org/9780521186605

This introduction to the sounds of Korean is designed for English-speaking students with no prior knowledge of the language and includes online sound files which demonstrate the sounds and pronunciation described. It will be an invaluable resource for students of Korean as well as those studying Korean linguistics. ‘Packed with information and extremely readable, this book is simply the most comprehensive and informative book on Korean phonetics and phonology available in English.’ Lucien Brown, University of Oregon 2012 247 x 174 mm 262pp 86 b/w illus.  82 tables  79 exercises   978-1-107-03005-3 Hardback £70.00 978-1-107-67268-0 Paperback £23.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107030053

2013 228 x 152 mm 225pp 978-1-107-03246-0 Hardback c. £55.00 978-1-107-66467-8 Paperback c. £19.99 Publication February 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107032460

eBook available

University of Oxford Kyonggi University, Korea

Contents: 1. Ancient Egyptian; Part I. Phonology: 2. Coptic phonology; 3. Coptic and Egyptian; 4. Correspondents and cognates; 5. Egyptian phonology; Part II. Grammar: 6. Nouns, pronouns, and adjectives; 7. Non-verbal predicates; 8. Verbs; 9. Verbs: Egyptian I; 10. Verbs: Egyptian II; 11. Verbs: Egyptian I-II; 12. Subordination.

A Student Grammar of Turkish

Tianjin Normal University, China

The Sounds of Korean

Mark Collier, University of Liverpool

2012 228 x 152 mm 400pp 978-0-521-86148-9 Hardback £65.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521861489

Asian language, linguistics

Advance praise: ‘A major contribution to our understanding of the development of Ancient Egyptian throughout its recorded history, richly exemplified and with a wealth of original insights. Essential reading.’

Arabic, Middle Eastern Languages

Istanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi

A Student Grammar of Turkish is a concise introduction to Turkish grammar, designed specifically for Englishspeaking students and professionals. Written with the needs of the learner very much in mind, it sets out the grammar of the language in a clear and jargon-free style. ‘… one of the most comprehensive language learning books on contemporary standard Turkish available in English. Few works in the field present such lucid explanations of grammar points and idiomatic expressions with rich self-study tasks as this one.’ Fikret Turan, Fatih Sultan Mehmet University and University of Manchester 2012 247 x 174 mm 334pp 80 tables   978-0-521-76346-2 Hardback £60.00 978-0-521-14964-8 Paperback £23.99 eBook available

Textbook

The Ancient Egyptian Language An Historical Study James P. Allen Brown University, Rhode Island

This book, the first of its kind, examines how the phonology and grammar of the ancient Egyptian language changed over more than three thousand years of its history, from the first appearance of written documents, c.3250 BC, to the Coptic dialects of the second century AD and later.

www.cambridge.org/9780521763462


African, Caribbean language, linguistics / European language, linguistics / Applied linguistics and second language acquisition

African, Caribbean language, linguistics The Afroasiatic Languages Edited by Zygmunt Frajzyngier University of Colorado, Boulder

and Erin Shay University of Colorado, Boulder

Afroasiatic languages are spoken by some 300 million people in Northern, Central and Eastern Africa and the Middle East. This book is the first typological study of these languages, which are comprised of around 375 living and extinct varieties. They are an important object of study because of their typological diversity in the areas of phonology (some have tone; others do not), morphology (some have extensive inflectional systems; others do not), position of the verb in the clause (some are verb-initial, some are verbmedial, and some are verb-final) and in the semantic functions they encode. This book documents this typological diversity and the typological similarities across the languages and includes information on endangered and littleknown languages. Requiring no previous knowledge of the specific language families, it will be welcomed by linguists interested in linguistic theory, typology, historical linguistics and endangered languages, as well as scholars of Africa and the Middle East. ‘Formerly dominated by research on historical reconstruction, this volume provides a new perspective on Afroasiatic by focusing on the typological wealth characterising this phylum.’ Bernd Heine, University of Cologne

Contributors: Zygmunt Frajzyngier, Erin Shay, Maarten Kossmann, Antonio Loprieno, Matthias Mueller, Gene B. Gragg, Robert D. Hoberman, Maarten Mous, Azeb Amha Cambridge Language Surveys

2012 228 x 152 mm 708pp 6 b/w illus.  6 maps  99 tables   978-0-521-86533-3 Hardback £100.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521865333

European language, linguistics The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages Volume 2 Edited by Martin Maiden J. C. Smith St Catherine’s College, Oxford

and Adam Ledgeway University of Cambridge

What is the origin of the Romance languages and how did they evolve? When and how did they become different from Latin, and from each other? Volume 2 of The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages offers fresh and original reflections on the principal questions and issues in the comparative external histories of the Romance languages. It is organised around the two key themes of influences and institutions, exploring the fundamental influence, of contact with and borrowing from, other languages (including Latin), and the cultural and institutional forces at work in the establishment of standard languages and norms of correctness. A perfect complement to the first volume, it offers an external history of the Romance languages combining data and theory to produce new and revealing perspectives on the shaping of the Romance languages. Advance praise: ‘A brilliant account of the social and historical context of the Romance languages from the earliest stages of Latin through to modern creoles … an indispensable point of reference for both the specialist and those new to the field of Romance linguistics.’ Nigel Vincent, Professor Emeritus of General and Romance Linguistics, University of Manchester

Contributors: Alberto Varvaro, Michel Banniard, Roger Wright, Johannes Kabatek, Marius Sala, Helena Sanson, Lorenzo Renzi, Alvise Andreose, Mari Jones, Christopher Pountain, Iris Bachmann 2013 228 x 152 mm 550pp 2 b/w illus.   978-0-521-80073-0 Hardback c. £105.00 Publication June 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521800730

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Social Variation and the Latin Language J. N. Adams All Souls College, Oxford

Major history of many of the developments undergone by the Latin language as it changed into Romance languages. A distinction is made between linguistic change emanating from higher social/educational groups (‘change from above’) and that emanating from lower social/educational groups (‘change from below’). 2013 228 x 152 mm 880pp 3 b/w illus.   978-0-521-88614-7 Hardback c. £110.00 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521886147

A Student Grammar of German Paul Stocker Uppingham School, Rutland

A Student Grammar of German is an invaluable reference guide for undergraduates and other intermediate and advanced students. Written with the needs of the learner very much in mind, it sets out the grammar of the language in a clear and jargon-free way. ‘A lifetime’s classroom experience has gone into this excellent survey. The student who masters its clear advice will go far.’ Christopher Young, University of Cambridge 2012 247 x 174 mm 274pp 978-0-521-81313-6 Hardback £60.00 978-0-521-01258-4 Paperback £21.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521813136

Applied linguistics and second language acquisition Native Speakers and Native Users Alan Davies University of Edinburgh

‘Native speakers’ and ‘native users’ are terms traditionally used to differentiate between speakers who have acquired a language from birth and speakers who have learnt a second language. Davies argues that there is no significant difference between native speakers and native users, and emphasises the importance of the Standard Language.

For regular email alerts visit www.cambridge.org/alerts


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Applied linguistics and second language acquisition 2013 228 x 152 mm 180pp 1 b/w illus.  5 tables   978-0-521-11927-6 Hardback c. £65.00 Publication August 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521119276

Writing Essays in English Language and Linguistics

Foreign Accent: The Phenomenon of Non-native Speech

University of South Australia

Alene Moyer University of Maryland, College Park

To what extent do our accents determine the way we are perceived by others? Is foreign accent inevitably associated with social stigma? In this fascinating account, Alene Moyer examines the social, psychological, educational and legal ramifications of sounding ‘foreign’. Advance praise: ’A wonderfully rich and readable treatment of accent in all its complexity … refreshingly nuanced in its comments on the practical matters it addresses.’ David Singleton, Trinity College Dublin 2013 228 x 152 mm 240pp 3 tables   978-1-107-00581-5 Hardback c. £60.00 Publication March 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107005815

Words of the World A Global History of the Oxford English Dictionary Sarah Ogilvie Australian National University, Canberra

Most people think of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) as a distinctly British product. The linguist and lexicographer, Sarah Ogilvie, combines her insider knowledge and experience with impeccable research to show rather that the OED is an international product in both its content and its making. ‘Sarah Ogilvie brings a unique conjunction of abilities to this book: deep practical knowledge of [the] OED and its archives, powerful analytical skills, and personal warmth and flair as a storyteller.’ John Considine, University of Alberta 2012 228 x 152 mm 256pp 56 b/w illus.   978-1-107-02183-9 Hardback £50.00 978-1-107-60569-5 Paperback £17.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107021839

Principles, Tips and Strategies for Undergraduates Neil Murray

A comprehensive and very readable resource to help students of English language and linguistics write essays, projects and reports. 2012 247 x 174 mm 248pp 5 b/w illus.   978-0-521-11119-5 Hardback £45.00 978-0-521-12846-9 Paperback £16.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521111195

Computer-Assisted Language Learning Diversity in Research and Practice Edited by Glenn Stockwell Waseda University, Japan

A much-needed overview of the diverse approaches to research and practice in computer-assisted language learning. 2012 228 x 152 mm 228pp 10 b/w illus.  11 tables   978-1-107-01634-7 Hardback £60.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107016347

The Cambridge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition Edited by Julia Herschensohn University of Washington

and Martha Young-Scholten University of Newcastle upon Tyne

What is language and how can we investigate its acquisition by children or adults? What perspectives exist from which to view acquisition? What internal constraints and external factors shape acquisition? What are the properties of interlanguage systems? This comprehensive 31-chapter handbook is an authoritative survey of second language acquisition (SLA). Its multi-perspective synopsis on recent developments in SLA research provides significant contributions by established experts and widely recognized younger talent. It covers cutting edge and emerging areas of enquiry not treated elsewhere in a single handbook, including third language acquisition, electronic communication, incomplete first language acquisition, alphabetic literacy and SLA, affect and the brain, discourse and identity. Written to be accessible to newcomers as well as experienced scholars of SLA, the Handbook is organised into six thematic

sections, each with an editor-written introduction. Advance praise: ‘This volume is a comprehensive overview of this interdisciplinary field: readable and yet uncompromising on accuracy; historically broad while detailed on recent and future research; and theoretically deep while reflecting a plurality of approaches. It will stand out for many years to come as a landmark in developmental linguistics and will be an essential reference tool for researchers and students alike.’ Antonella Sorace, University of Edinburgh

Contributors: Julia Herschensohn, Martha Young-Scholten, Jan Koster, Margaret Thomas, Florence Myles, Melinda Whong, Clare Wright, Claire Foley, Suzanne Flynn, Richard Towell, Bonnie D. Schwartz, Rex A. Sprouse, Jean-Marc Dewaele, Elaine Tarone, Kit Hansen, Martha Bigelow, María del Pilar García Mayo, Eva Alcón Soler, Elizabeth Miller, Ryuko Kubota, Daniel Véronique, Vera Regan, Astrid Ensslin, Cedric Krummes, Belma Haznedar, Elena Gavruseva, Silvina Montrul, Jason Rothman, Jennifer Cabrelli Amaro, Kees de Bot, Alice Foucart, Cheryl Frenck-Mestre, Andrea Mates, Anna Joaquin, James Milton, Giovanna Donzelli, Laurent Dekydtspotter, Roumyana Slabakova, Tania Ionin, Ellen Broselow, Yoonjung Kang, Michael Sharwood Smith, John Truscott, Roger Hawkins, Anne Vainikka, Randal Holme, Joe Barcroft, Wynne Wong, Amy Snyder Ohta, Donna Lardiere Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

2013 247 x 174 mm 700pp 13 b/w illus.  17 tables   978-1-107-00771-0 Hardback c. £95.00 Publication January 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107007710

New in Paperback

The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching Edited by Barbara E. Bullock University of Texas, Austin

and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio University of Texas, Austin

Code-switching – the alternating use of two languages in the same stretch of discourse by a bilingual speaker – is a dominant topic in the study of bilingualism and a phenomenon that generates a great deal of pointed discussion in the public domain. This handbook provides the most comprehensive guide to this bilingual phenomenon to date. Drawing on empirical data from a wide range of language pairings, the leading researchers in the study of bilingualism examine the linguistic, social and cognitive implications of code-switching


Applied linguistics and second language acquisition / English language, linguistics (general) in up-to-date and accessible survey chapters. The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching will serve as a vital resource for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, as a wide-ranging overview for linguists, psychologists and speech scientists and as an informative guide for educators interested in bilingual speech practices. Review of the hardback: ‘… reads like an international who’s who of the field. It covers all important dimensions of codeswitching, all the main theoretical frameworks, and representatives of all the major ‘schools’…’

Contents: 1. Introducing second language acquisition; 2. Foundations of second language acquisition; 3. The linguistics of second language acquisition; 4. The psychology of second language acquisition; 5. Social contexts of second language acquisition; 6. Acquiring knowledge for L2 use; 7. L2 learning and teaching.

The Cambridge Dictionary of Linguistics

Cambridge Introductions to Language and Linguistics

The Cambridge Dictionary of Linguistics provides concise and clear definitions of all the terms any undergraduate or graduate student is likely to encounter in the study of linguistics and English language or in other degrees involving linguistics, such as modern languages, media studies and translation. lt covers the key areas of syntax, morphology, phonology, phonetics, semantics and pragmatics but also contains terms from discourse analysis, stylistics, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, computational linguistics and corpus linguistics. It provides entries for 246 languages, including ‘major’ languages and languages regularly mentioned in research papers and textbooks. Features include cross-referencing between entries and extended entries on some terms. Where appropriate, entries contain illustrative examples from English and other languages and many provide etymologies bringing out the metaphors lying behind the technical terms. Also available is an electronic version of the dictionary which includes ‘clickable’ cross-referencing.

2012 247 x 174 mm 228pp 7 b/w illus.  2 colour illus.  24 tables   63 exercises   978-1-107-01089-5 Hardback £60.00 978-1-107-64823-4 Paperback £23.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107010895

Michael Clyne, University of Melbourne

Contributors: Barbara E. Bullock, Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, Marianne Gullberg, Peter Indefrey, Pieter Muysken, Mark Sebba, Jeanine Treffers-Daller, Ad Backus, Margreet Dorleijn, Penelope Gardner-Chloros, Joseph Gafaranga, Jacomine Nortier, Ghada Khattab, Brian Hok-Shing Chan, Natascha Müller, Katja Francesca Cantone, David Quinto-Pozos, Adele W. Miccio, Carol Scheffner Hammer, Bárbara Rodríguez, Agnes Bolonyai, Longxing Wei, Marta Kutas, Eva Moreno, Nicole Wicha, Jeff MacSwan, Carol Myers-Scotton, Janice Jake

English language, linguistics (general)

Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

Universität Hamburg

2012 247 x 174 mm 436pp 9 b/w illus.   978-1-107-60541-1 Paperback £29.99 Also available 978-0-521-87591-2 Hardback £99.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107605411

Textbook

Introducing Second Language Acquisition Second edition Muriel Saville-Troike University of Arizona

Written for students encountering the topic for the first time, this is a clear and practical introduction to second language acquisition (SLA). Providing a solid foundation in SLA, this book has become the leading introduction to the field for students of linguistics, psychology and education, and trainee language teachers. ‘Just what everyone teaching second language acquisition has been waiting for – a truly undergraduate textbook. It explains the terms regularly used by those in the field but not always understood by beginners. It is non-partisan in its approach, well organized, clearly laid out and provides good, worked-through examples. A most welcome addition – it is the first truly ‘joined up’ work in the field!’

Varieties of English A Typological Approach Peter Siemund

This coursebook is an introduction to the fascinating range of regional and social varieties of English encountered around the world. It is specially designed to meet the needs of students, each chapter contains useful exercises targeted at three different ability levels and succinct summaries help students to review important facts. Advance praise: ‘This book offers a unique exploration of morphosyntactic variation across varieties of English from a functional typological perspective. It is a meticulously designed textbook, and a treasure trove of new insights into vernacular Englishes worldwide.’ Donald Winford, Ohio State University 2013 228 x 152 mm 300pp 10 b/w illus.  1 map  65 tables  117 exercises   978-0-521-76496-4 Hardback c. £55.00 978-0-521-18693-3 Paperback c. £19.99 Publication April 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521764964

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Keith Brown University of Cambridge

and Jim Miller University of Edinburgh

Advance praise: ‘Just what any novice needs. The definitions are brilliantly clear, and the book’s 3,000 entries cover the entire field from AAVE to Zapotec and from A-bar-binding to Zero morph.’ Richard Hudson, University College London 2013 247 x 174 mm 450pp 37 b/w illus.  6 tables   978-0-521-76675-3 Hardback c. £60.00 Publication March 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521766753

The Meroitic Language and Writing System Claude Rilly Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris

and Alex de Voogt Museum of Natural History, New York

This book provides an introduction to the Meroitic language and writing system that was used between ca. 300 BC and 400 AD in the kingdom of Meroe, which existed in what is now Sudan and Egyptian Nubia. This book details advances in the understanding of Meroitic, a language that until recently was considered untranslatable.

Vera Regan, University College Dublin

Visit our website at www.cambridge.org/knowledge


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English language, linguistics (general) / Also of interest 2012 228 x 152 mm 262pp 14 b/w illus.  3 maps  237 tables   978-1-107-00866-3 Hardback £65.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107008663

The Science of Language Interviews with James McGilvray Noam Chomsky Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Compiled by James McGilvray McGill University, Montréal

In this previously unpublished series of interviews, Chomsky discusses his iconoclastic and important ideas concerning language, human nature and politics. 2012 228 x 152 mm 328pp 978-1-107-01637-8 Hardback £50.00 978-1-107-60240-3 Paperback £15.99 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9781107016378

Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics Genuinely broad in scope, each handbook in this series provides a complete state-of-the-field overview of a major sub-discipline within language study and research. This 3-volume pack brings together handbooks in sociolinguistics, pragmatics and language policy and will be a valuable addition to any linguistics library. Contributors: Kasia M. Jaszczolt, Keith Allan, Mira Ariel, Kent Bach, Laurence R. Horn, Michael Haugh, Berit Brogaard, François Recanati, Rachel Giora, Mikhail Kissine, Henk Zeevat, Jaroslav Peregrin, Napoleon Katsos, Arthur Sullivan, Rob van der Sandt, Jay David Atlas, Caterina Mauri, Johan van der Auwera, Luna Filipovic, Louis de Saussure, Anita Fetzer, Robyn Carston, Andreas H. Jucker, Emma Borg, Ruth Kempson, Elizabeth Closs Traugott, Tim Wharton, Jeanette K. Gundel, Istvan Kecskes, Marina Terkourafi, Rajend Mesthrie, John Baugh, Alessandro Duranti, Peter Robinson, Lowry Hemphill, Ceil Lucas, Bob Bayley, Cynthia Gordon, Jan Blommaert, Nikolas Coupland, Gregory Guy, Bill Kretzschmar, Barbara Johnstone, Natalie Schilling, Carmen Fought, Ana Deumert, John Singler, Silvia Kouwenberg, Pieter Muysken, Nicholas Ostler, Edgar Schneider, James Tollefson, Diana Eades, Susan McKay, Christopher Stroud, Kathleen Heugh, Abigail Locke, Bernard Spolsky, Björn Jernudd, Jírˇí Nekvapil, Denise Réaume, Meital Pinto, Sue Wright, Ofelia Garcia, Julia Sallabank, David Robichaud, Helder De Schutter, Fernand de Varennes, Colin Williams, Robert Phillipson, Peter Backhaus, Claudia V. Angelilli, Richard Brecht, William P. Rivers, Steve Walter, Carol Benson, Jasone Cenoz, Durk Gorter, Alexandre Duchêne, Monica Heller, Christina

Bratt Paulston, Jonathan M. Watt, Stephen J. Caldas, Sherman Wilcox, Verena Krausneker, David Armstrong, Kendall A. King, Adam C. Rambow, John Edwards, Florian Coulmas, Federica Guerini, Mary Carol Combs, Susan D. Penfield, Gibson Ferguson, Joseph Lo Bianco, Sinfree Makoni, Busi Makoni, Ashraff Abdelhay, Pedzisai Mashiri, Teresa McCarty, Ulrich Ammon, Gabrielle HoganBrun, Svitlana Melnyk, Richard B. Bauldauf, Jr, Thi Mai Hoa Nguyen Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

2012 247 x 174 mm 1994pp 978-1-107-02036-8 3 Volume Pack £220.00 www.cambridge.org/9781107020368

English as a Global Language Second edition David Crystal

David Crystal’s classic English as a Global Language considers the history, present status and future of the English language, focusing on its role as the leading international language. English has been deemed the most ‘successful’ language ever, with 1500 million speakers internationally, presenting a difficult task to those who wish to investigate it in its entirety. However, Crystal explores the subject in a measured but engaging way, always backing up observations with facts and figures. Written in a detailed and fascinating manner, this is a book written by an expert both for specialists in the subject and for general readers interested in the English language. ‘… the perfect introduction by an acknowledged linguistic expert.’ Observer Canto Classics

tremendous breadth of Anglo-Latin literature. Chapters on English learning and literature in the ninth century and the later formation of English poetry and prose also convey the profound cultural confidence of the period. Providing a discussion of essential texts, including Beowulf and the writings of Bede, this History captures the sheer inventiveness and vitality of early medieval literary culture through topics as diverse as the literature of English law, liturgical and devotional writing, the workings of science and the history of women’s writing. Contributors: Clare A. Lees, Julia M. H. Smith, Julia Crick, Catherine E. Karkov, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Rosalind Love, S. M. Rowley, Rolf H. Bremmer, Jr, Susan Irvine, Renée R. Trilling, Joshua Davies, Haruko Momma, Gillian R. Overing, Kathleen Davis, Diane Watt, L. M. C. Weston, Andrew Scheil, Christopher A. Jones, Patricia Dailey, R. M. Liuzza, Lisi Oliver, David Townsend, Elaine Treharne, Russell Poole, Thomas O’Donnell, Matthew Townend, Elizabeth M. Tyler, Thomas Clancy, Sioned Davies The New Cambridge History of English Literature

2012 228 x 152 mm 808pp 16 b/w illus.  1 map   978-0-521-19058-9 Hardback £100.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521190589

Also of interest Skills for Study Level 1 Craig Fletcher Kaplan International Colleges

and Blair Matthews Kaplan International Colleges

Ian Smallwood Kaplan International Colleges

2012 216 x 138 mm 228pp 11 maps  5 tables   978-1-107-61180-1 Paperback £10.99 www.cambridge.org/9781107611801

Skills for Study Level 1 provides students with skills such as understanding lectures, analysis of texts, selecting the best sources from libraries, referencing and structuring presentations.

The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature

2012 192pp 978-1-107-63544-9 Student’s Book with Downloadable Audio £24.90 www.cambridge.org/9781107635449

Edited by Clare A. Lees King’s College London

Informed by multi-cultural, multidisciplinary perspectives, The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature offers a new exploration of the earliest writing in Britain and Ireland, from the end of the Roman Empire to the mid-twelfth century. Beginning with an account of writing itself, as well as of scripts and manuscript art, subsequent chapters examine the earliest texts from England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and the


Also of interest English Grammar Today

Academic Vocabulary in Use

An A–Z of Spoken and Written Grammar Ronald Carter

Michael McCarthy

University of Nottingham

Academic Vocabulary in Use is the perfect study aid for anyone using English for their academic work.

Michael McCarthy University of Nottingham

Geraldine Mark and Anne O’Keeffe University of Limerick

A major grammar reference book of modern English, specially written for intermediate learners of English. 2011 654pp 978-0-521-73175-1 with CD-ROM £22.50 www.cambridge.org/9780521731751

CLIL Content and Language Integrated Learning Do Coyle University of Aberdeen

Philip Hood University of Nottingham

and David Marsh University of Jyväskylä, Finland

This CLIL book summarises the theory underpinning the teaching of a content subject through another language and discusses its practical application. 2010 183pp 978-0-521-13021-9 Paperback £25.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521130219

Grammar for English Language Teachers Second edition Martin Parrott

An invaluable resource helping teachers at all levels of experience to develop their understanding of English grammar. 2010 479pp 978-0-521-71204-0 Paperback £24.60 www.cambridge.org/9780521712040

English Phonetics and Phonology A Practical Course Fourth edition Peter Roach University of Reading

This is a complete basic course in English phonetics and phonology. 2009 242pp 978-0-521-71740-3 Paperback with Audio CDs (2) £33.20 www.cambridge.org/9780521717403

University of Nottingham

and Felicity O’Dell

2008 176pp 978-0-521-68939-7 with Answers £18.60 www.cambridge.org/9780521689397

English Pronunciation Illustrated John Trim

This very popular pronunciation practice book is for intermediate and more advanced students of English. 1975 210 x 148 mm 100pp 978-0-521-20634-1 Paperback £13.60 www.cambridge.org/9780521206341

Figurative Language, Genre and Register Alice Deignan Jeannette Littlemore and Elena Semino Carol A. Chapelle Susan Hunston

Figurative Language, Genre and Register brings together discourse analysis and corpus linguistics in a cutting-edge study of figurative language in spoken and written discourse. Figurative language is shown to be pervasive and inescapable, but it is also suggested that it varies significantly across genres. Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2013 978-1-107-40203-4 Paperback £25.60 Publication March 2013 www.cambridge.org/9781107402034

Teacher Research in Language Teaching A Critical Analysis Simon Borg University of Leeds

Carol A. Chapelle University of Iowa

Susan Hunston University of Birmingham

Teacher Research in Language Teaching uses empirical evidence taken from an international survey of over 1,700 teachers and educational managers, over a period of six years. It examines their views of research, whether they read ELT research, and whether they do their own research.

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Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2013 978-0-521-15263-1 Paperback £28.90 Publication March 2013 www.cambridge.org/9780521152631

Exploring ELF Academic English Shaped by Non-native Speakers Anna Mauranen University of Helsinki

Carol A. Chapelle Susan Hunston

The emergence and recognition of English used as a Lingua Franca (ELF) offers new opportunities for investigating language change and language contact. This volume explores the use of English in an academic context and between speakers from a range of language backgrounds, and is the only book to date to present spoken academic English from a non-native speaker perspective. Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2012 282pp 978-0-521-17752-8 Paperback £28.00 www.cambridge.org/9780521177528

Replication Research in Applied Linguistics Edited by Graeme Porte Universidad de Granada

Carol A. Chapelle Susan Hunston

This edited volume brings together a number of experts who argue in favour of a more central role for replication research in second language acquisition and applied linguistics. The book provides a theoretical argument to support this view, as well as practical examples and model replication studies. Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2012 302pp 978-1-107-67152-2 Paperback £27.20 www.cambridge.org/9781107671522

Disciplinary Identities Individuality and Community in Academic Discourse Ken Hyland The University of Hong Kong

Carol A. Chapelle Susan Hunston

Uses findings from corpus research to present fascinating insights into the relationship between author identity and disciplinarity in academic writing. Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2012 250pp 978-0-521-19759-5 Paperback £23.80 www.cambridge.org/9780521197595

eBooks available at www.cambridge.org/ebookstore


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Also of interest Genres across the Disciplines Student Writing in Higher Education Hilary Nesi Coventry University

and Sheena Gardner Coventry University

Carol A. Chapelle Susan Hunston

The authors discuss their findings taken from a genre analysis of assessed writing by students in three higher education sectors across varying levels and disciplines. Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2012 310pp 978-0-521-14959-4 Paperback £28.90 www.cambridge.org/9780521149594

Language Transfer Cross-Linguistic Influence in Language Learning Terence Odlin

How much influence can a learner’s native language have in making the acquisition of a new language easy or difficult? Cambridge Applied Linguistics

1989 228 x 152 mm 224pp 978-0-521-37809-3 Paperback £25.10 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521378093

Classroom Management Techniques Jim Scrivener Bell International

Exploring the Dynamics of Second Language Writing

A complete and essential activity-based guide to ELT classroom management.

Edited by Barbara Kroll

2012 314pp 978-0-521-74185-9 Paperback £24.90 www.cambridge.org/9780521741859

California State University, Northridge

The book addresses issues in the field of second language writing in academic contexts. Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2003 228 x 152 mm 358pp 10 b/w illus.  8 tables   978-0-521-52983-9 Paperback £28.00 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521529839

Cambridge Handbooks for Language Teachers

The Roles of Language in CLIL Ana Llinares Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Tom Morton Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

and Rachel Whittaker Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Cognition and Second Language Instruction Edited by Peter Robinson

The authors provide a rich description of how CLIL students’ language works and may be expected to develop.

Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan

Cambridge Language Teaching Library

This an excellent introduction to psycholinguistics for applied linguists and language teachers

2012 352pp 978-0-521-15007-1 Paperback £22.80 www.cambridge.org/9780521150071

Cambridge Applied Linguistics

2001 228 x 152 mm 464pp 10 exercises   978-0-521-00386-5 Paperback £30.70 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521003865

Learning Strategies in Second Language Acquisition J. Michael O’Malley and Anna Uhl Chamot

Reviews the literature on learning strategies and discusses why learning is affected in a positive manner when such strategies are used. Cambridge Applied Linguistics

1990 228 x 152 mm 276pp 978-0-521-35837-8 Paperback £25.10 eBook available

www.cambridge.org/9780521358378


Index A Aarts, Bas..............................................11 Absolute Constructions in Early IndoEuropean............................................10 Academic Vocabulary in Use...................19 Acquisition of Creole Languages, The......12 Adams, J. N............................................15 Adone, Dany..........................................12 Afroasiatic Languages, The.....................15 Aitchison, Jean.........................................9 Allen, James P.........................................14 Altarriba, Jeanette..................................12 Analysing English Grammar......................2 Analyzing Sound Patterns.........................5 Ancient Egyptian Language, The.............14 Antonyms in English.................................6 Audiovisual Speech Processing.................5 Australian English Pronunciation and Transcription..........................................5

B Bailly, Gerard............................................5 Baker, Paul...............................................9 Barber, Charles.......................................10 Bavin, Edith L.........................................13 Beal, Joan..............................................10 Berent, Iris...............................................5 Biggam, C. P.............................................6 Blom, Corrien...........................................1 Boeckx, Cedric................................... 4, 11 Booij, Geert..............................................1 Borg, Simon...........................................19 Brown, Dunstan.......................................1 Brown, Keith..........................................17 Bullock, Barbara E..................................16

C Camacho, José.........................................3 Cambridge Dictionary of English Grammar, The........................................2 Cambridge Dictionary of Linguistics, The.17 Cambridge Handbook of Biolinguistics, The.....................................................11 Cambridge Handbook of Child Language, The.....................................13 Cambridge Handbook of Generative Syntax, The............................................3 Cambridge Handbook of Language Policy, The.............................................8 Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, The............................16 Cambridge Handbook of Psycholinguistics, The...........................13 Cambridge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition, The...................16 Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics...........................................18 Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature, The..........................18 Cambridge History of the Romance Languages, The....................................15 Carter, Ronald........................................19 Cha, Jaeeun...........................................14 Chamot, Anna Uhl..................................20 Chapelle, Carol A.............................. 19, 20 Chinese Characters................................14 Chomsky, Noam.....................................18 Clark, Billy................................................6 Classroom Management Techniques.......20

Clause Structure.......................................4 CLIL.......................................................19 Clitics.......................................................1 Close, Joanne.........................................11 Cognition and Second Language Instruction...........................................20 Colloquia of the Hermeneumata Pseudodositheana, The........................10 Colston, Herbert L..................................12 Computer-Assisted Language Learning...16 Constructional Change in English.............4 Contrasts and Positions in Information Structure...............................................2 Control in Generative Grammar................2 Conversational Repair and Human Understanding......................................7 Corbett, Greville G....................................4 Coulmas, Florian.................................. 7, 8 Cox, Felicity..............................................5 Coyle, Do...............................................19 Crain, Stephen.......................................13 Crystal, David................................... 10, 18

D Dancygier, Barbara.................................14 Data and Evidence in Linguistics...............2 Davies, Alan...........................................15 de Ruiter, Jan P.........................................6 de Voogt, Alex........................................17 Deignan, Alice........................................19 den Dikken, Marcel..................................3 Dickey, Eleanor.......................................10 Disciplinary Identities..............................19 Discourse Analysis and Media Attitudes....9

E Eckert, Penelope.......................................7 Elenbaas, Marion......................................1 Emergence of Meaning, The....................13 Emmott, Catherine.................................12 English as a Contact Language.................8 English as a Global Language.................18 English Grammar Today..........................19 English Language, The............................10 English Phonetics and Phonology............19 English Pronunciation Illustrated.............19 English Words and Sentences...................3 Eppler, Eva Duran.....................................3 Eska, Joseph F..........................................9 Ethnolinguistics and Cultural Concepts.....9 Everett, Daniel L.......................................8 Evolutionary Linguistics..........................12 Experimental Syntax and Island Effects.....1 Exploring ELF.........................................19 Exploring Language in a Multilingual Context.................................................7 Exploring the Dynamics of Second Language Writing................................20

F Features...................................................4 Figurative Language, Genre and Register.19 Finkel, Raphael.........................................1 Fletcher, Craig........................................18 Fontaine, Lise...........................................2 Foreign Accent: The Phenomenon of Non-native Speech..............................16 Frajzyngier, Zygmunt...............................15 Freidin, Robert..........................................2

21

From Philology to English Studies...........11 From Utterances to Speech Acts................5

G Gabrielatos, Costas..................................9 Gardner, Sheena.....................................20 Genres across the Disciplines..................20 Gibbs, Jr, Raymond W..............................12 Goatly, Andrew........................................6 Grammar for English Language Teachers.19 Grammatical Variation in British English Dialects.................................................4 Grohmann, Kleanthes K..........................11

H Haider, Hubert..........................................4 Han, Jiantang.........................................14 Hayashi, Makoto......................................7 Herschensohn, Julia................................16 Hickey, Raymond....................................10 Hilpert, Martin..........................................4 Hippisley, Andrew.....................................1 Historical Linguistics.................................9 Hood, Philip...........................................19 Hornstein, Norbert....................................1 How Language Began............................11 Hundt, Marianne......................................8 Hunston, Susan................................ 19, 20 Hyland, Ken............................................19

I Interactions across Englishes....................8 Interpreting Figurative Meaning..............12 Introducing Language Typology................3 Introducing Psycholinguistics..................13 Introducing Second Language Acquisition..........................................17 Isurin, Ludmila........................................12

J James, Patrick...........................................9 Joanisse, Marc........................................13 Jones, Steven...........................................6

K Ko˝rtvélyessy, Lívia.....................................1 Kemenade, Ans van..................................1 Kertész, András.........................................2 Ketrez, F. Nihan......................................14 Kiaer, Jieun.............................................14 Kissine, Mikhail........................................5 Krämer, Martin.........................................5 Kroll, Barbara.........................................20 Krug, Manfred..........................................8 Kucˇerová, Ivona........................................2

L Labov, William..........................................7 Landau, Idan............................................2 Language and Gender..............................7 Language and Linguistic Contact in Ancient Sicily.......................................10 Language Change....................................9 Language of Life and Death, The...............7 Language Transfer..................................20 Languages of the World............................3

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Index Learning Strategies in Second Language Acquisition..........................................20 Ledgeway, Adam....................................15 Leech, Geoffrey......................................11 Lees, Clare A..........................................18 Léglise, Isabelle........................................7 Leimgruber, Jakob R. E............................11 Linguistic Fieldwork..................................8 Littlemore, Jeannette..............................19 Llinares, Ana..........................................20 Los, Bettelou............................................1 Luis, Ana R...............................................1

M Maiden, Martin......................................15 Mark, Geraldine.....................................19 Marsh, David..........................................19 Matthews, Blair......................................18 Mauranen, Anna....................................19 McCarthy, Michael.................................19 McConnell-Ginet, Sally.............................7 McEnery, Tony..........................................9 McGilvray, James....................................18 McMahon, April.....................................12 McMahon, Robert..................................12 McNeill, David........................................11 McRae, Ken............................................13 Meaning and Humour..............................6 Meaning and Relevance...........................6 Meierkord, Christiane...............................8 Memory, Language, and Bilingualism......12 Meroitic Language and Writing System, The.....................................................17 Metaphor.................................................6 Migge, Bettina.........................................7 Miller, Jim...............................................17 Mind, Brain and Narrative.......................12 Momma, Haruko....................................11 Moravcsik, Edith A....................................3 Morphological Typology............................1 Morphosyntactic Change..........................1 Morton, Tom..........................................20 Moyer, Alene..........................................16 Mullen, Alex.............................................9 Multilingualism in the Graeco-Roman Worlds..................................................9 Murphy, M. Lynne.....................................6 Murray, Neil...........................................16

N Native Speakers and Native Users...........15 Neeleman, Ad..........................................2 Nesi, Hilary.............................................20 Network Morphology...............................1 Neutralization..........................................5 Null Subjects............................................3

O O’Dell, Felicity........................................19 O’Keeffe, Anne.......................................19 O’Malley, J. Michael................................20 Odlin, Terence........................................20 Ogilvie, Sarah.........................................16

Ozón, Gabriel...........................................3

P Paradis, Carita..........................................6 Parrott, Martin.......................................19 Peng, Bruce Long.....................................5 Pereltsvaig, Asya.......................................3 Perrier, Pascal...........................................5 Peters, Pam..............................................2 Phonological Mind, The............................5 Porte, Graeme........................................19 Putnam, Michael T....................................1

Q Questions.................................................6

R Rákosi, Csilla............................................2 Raymond, Geoffrey...................................7 Relevance Theory......................................6 Replication Research in Applied Linguistics...........................................19 Research Methods in Language Variation and Change............................8 Rilly, Claude...........................................17 Ringe, Don...............................................9 Ritchie, L. David........................................6 Roach, Peter...........................................19 Robinson, Peter......................................20 Roles of Language in CLIL, The...............20 Roots of English.....................................11 Ruppel, Antonia.....................................10

S Sakel, Jeanette.........................................8 Sanford, Anthony J..................................12 Saville-Troike, Muriel...............................17 Schilling, Natalie......................................8 Schlüter, Julia...........................................8 Schreier, Daniel........................................8 Science of Language, The........................18 Scrivener, Jim..........................................20 Semantics of Colour, The...........................6 Semino, Elena........................................19 Shaw, Philip...........................................10 Shay, Erin...............................................15 Shin, Jiyoung..........................................14 Sidnell, Jack.............................................7 Siemund, Peter.......................................17 Silverman, Daniel.....................................5 Singapore English...................................11 Skills for Study Level 1............................18 Smallwood, Ian......................................18 Smith, J. C..............................................15 Social Variation and the Latin Language.. 15 Sociolinguistic Fieldwork..........................8 Sociolinguistics.........................................7 Song, Jae Jung.........................................4 Sounds of Korean, The............................14 South Asian Languages..........................14 Southern Gaul and the Mediterranean......9 Spencer, Andrew.......................................1

Sperber, Dan............................................6 Spivey, Michael......................................13 Spolsky, Bernard.......................................8 Sprouse, John...........................................1 Standards of English...............................10 Steele, Philippa M...................................10 Štekauer, Pavol.........................................1 Stocker, Paul...........................................15 Stockwell, Glenn....................................16 Stroik, Thomas S.......................................1 Structural Design of Language, The...........1 Student Grammar of German, A..............15 Student Grammar of Turkish, A...............14 Stump, Greg.............................................1 Subbaˉraˉo, Kaˉrumuˉri V..............................14 Sweetser, Eve.........................................14 Syllabic Writing on Cyprus and its Context...............................................10 Symmetry Breaking in Syntax....................4 Syntactic Islands.......................................4 Syntax......................................................2 Szmrecsanyi, Benedikt..............................4

T Tagliamonte, Sali A.................................11 Teacher Research in Language Teaching.. 19 Think On My Words................................10 Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline.....................16 Tribulato, Olga........................................10 Trim, John..............................................19

U Underhill, James W...................................9 Underlying Representations......................5

V Valera, Salvador.......................................1 Van Gelderen, Elly....................................4 Varieties of English.................................17 Vatikiotis-Bateson, Eric.............................5 Verb Phrase in English, The.....................11 Viewpoint in Language...........................14

W Wallis, Sean............................................11 Warren, Paul..........................................13 Whittaker, Rachel...................................20 Willners, Caroline.....................................6 Wilson, Deirdre........................................6 Word Order..............................................4 Word-Formation in the World’s Languages............................................1 Words of the World................................16 Writing and Society..................................8 Writing Essays in English Language and Linguistics...........................................16

Y Young-Scholten, Martha.........................16


Notes

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CUP Language and Linguistics 2013 catalogue