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SELECTED WORKS MONICA HARVEY


ACADEMIC WORK

Roosevelt Row’s Net-Zero Brewery: The Phoenician Brewhaus Phoenix, Arizona Mending the Gap: Cracovia Square [Pella Prize Winner] Krakow, Poland The LEED Platinum Workplace: LEAP Collaborative Knoxville, Tennessee

PROFESSIONAL WORK

Regional Bank Tennessee Lover’s Leap Tennessee Town Center Tennessee

Monumental Stair Tennessee

FINE ART

Selected Works

MONICA HARVEY

c. 423.505.4813 e. mharve10@gmail.com


ACADEMIC WORK


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INVESTIGATING THE NON-PLACE: A REGIONAL AIRPORT IN BOULDER, COLORADO advisor: year: time: size: location:

Tricia Stuth Fifth year, Fall + Spring 1 year 45,000 square feet Boulder, Colorado

A piece of architecture can be thought of as poly-territorial place. There are major zones of programs that are linked together by connecting spaces, the interstitial zones1. They often become left-over spaces.”2 This is the “in-between space”. A place full of interrelations” where the zone acts as a threshold between major spatial programs. The in-between space belongs to both, and therefore, it is part of both.3 The importance of these non-places stems from allowing one to appropriate and associate to a territory in their own way, that in turn, forms their identity of the space4.

An airport acts as a larger representation of the idea of a non-place. There is no doubt that an airport is an actual place. However, because this space lies between two defined spaces (where you are and the location you want to be), it is perceived as a place that is “weak or heterogeneous… in between stronger and more homogeneous” areas. How the homogenous zones interact with one another creates the in-between space.4 This examination is not only about offering my design point of view on a standard typology but to ask if the way this typology has been done over and over again is it working in the sense of thoughtful series of transient space?

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Observation Deck

Boulder

Airport connection Public Corridor

42 miles ~42 minutes

3 miles 30 miles 37 minutes

Denver Itnl Airport

28 miles 36 minutes

Denver

Existing Greenways Proposed RunWay Pedestrian Bridge

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Boulder, CO has a strong regional identity that could transfer its strength of place to a that space which is often heterogeneous. The airport could easily connect to its surroundings because Boulder provides an inescapable sense of place through views, urban connection nodes, and its occupants.

There are several interrelated themes at play: producing a formal response based on the psychology of those in transition, using the airport typology to represent the identity of place, and extrapolating sense of identity of place by incorporating new program that involves the community in order to enhance the sense of place.

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The process of making the final boards was an incredibly enjoyable, yet nerve-racking experience. The term “happy-mistake” comes to mind during the final two weeks of production as watercolor is all-revealing. Any “mistake” made is unerasable, there is no CTRL-Z button, and certainly no photoshopping to enhance the image. By the end of the process, there were five boards that created a dance between plan, section, and elevation to make an over-all understandable composition. 13


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ROOSEVELT ROW’S NET-ZERO BREWERY: THE PHOENICIAN BREWHAUS advisor: year: time: size: location:

Mark DeKay Fifth year, Fall 8 weeks 15,000 square feet Phoenix, Arizona

Within the city of Phoenix, there is a small art district located just a little over a mile away from downtown. This art district, known as Roosevelt Row (RoRo) possesses a charming character that adds personality to the city. It also is one of the main projects for the redevelopment of Phoenix’s master plan. Our goal was to enhance the area by taking into consideration the goals already set out by the city council for the redesign of this area and produces a design that is not only net-zero, but also adds to the character of the district. The design responds by taking in several ideas about the site and its forces. These provide several zones within the site: open zones, semi-transparent

zones, solid zones, and a main circulation route. Several ideas were implemented in the design in order to reach net-zero. There are two evaporative cooling towers that provide stack and cross ventilation. The roof system is composed of monopitched roofs to allow light to come in the spaces. Within this system are concrete louvers that help diffuse the light before it reaches the main space. This allows for natural lighting, but detracts from solar heat gain in the process. Since shade doesn’t exist on our site, it had to be made. Deep overhangs create shade amongst the site for comfort. Garage doors allow for natural ventilation.

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Ground Floor Plan A 21

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Ground Floor Plan Section AA

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Alcove for Darts + Pool Beer Hall Evaporative Cooling Tower Service Station Outdoor Seating Beer Gardens Indoor Planter Entrance Pub Bar Satellite Brewery

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Bathroom Kitchen Service Outdoor Courtyard Fountain Outdoor Bar Brewery Cool Storage Mechanical Dry Storage Pedestrian Zone


RESPONSE TO SITE FORCES

Boundaries of existing buildings create a diagonal pull across the site. Main circulation zone realized through the center Zones of prosperous wind via micro-climate analysis Juxtaposition of micro-climate zone analysis and the site force analysis Resulting solution: two alternating solid zones connected by circulation path that moves diagonally across the site situated by two zones of green space South Elevation


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[Left] Vignette of the beer garden at night It was important that the beer garden be a very sociable space. Basic components of successful beer garden space such as tree groves, benches, and lights were important to consider in the layout. [Right] Vignette of the beer hall at night In order for there to be plenty of activity and movement within the beer hall, it was important that there be several ideas of spatial quality incorporated into the design. Alcoves for activities such as darts and pool provide seating to the main beer hall level. The beer hall then transitions into the beer garden through garage doors.

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MENDING THE GAP: CRACOVIA SQUARE Winner of the Pella Prize International Design Competition advisor: year: time: size: location:

Bartek Hominski Fourth year, Spring 10 weeks 150,000 square feet Krakow, Poland

The history of Krakow can be seen through its composition of concentric rings that make up the city. Each ring is composed of a period of history that is now physically bound by its perimeter. The two most defined rings are that of the medieval city center and the generation that followed. A third ring is now in the process of being formed that contains architecture and parks that have just recently been built. The first two sets of rings are very well defined by their borders. However, the third ring is lacking some rigidity in some areas, mainly in area defined by BĹ‚onia Park. The strength this part of town is supposed to provide for Krakow is falling short of its purpose. This site currently faces many

challenges. It needs something that frames it and provides boundaries. Its only boundaries are a historic hotel that is out of business and a museum that is usually desolate. These two pieces of architecture have no relation to one another, and therefore the space in between is lost. The only strength the current site layout has is the Cracovia Soccer Stadium that provides a modern piece of architecture that adds definition to the triangular site. It is very clear that this project needs to do several things: provide a strong gateway to the park, provide a filter from busy street to peaceful park, and provide a public space in which people actually occupy the space to give the site a sense of liveliness. 13


Ground Floor Plan

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Entry Courtyard Entrance Atrium Business Entrance Service Car Access Retail Restaurant Outdoor Dining Residential Entrance

SECTION BB Ground Floor Plan Section AA

First and Second Floor Plan

SECTION


CREATING LAYERS OF PROCESSION AND PORTAL TO BLONIA

RESPONSE TO SITE FORCES

The form of a square with a horizontal form slicing through provides a more defined public space. TWO INTERSECTING VOLUMES

Groves of trees provide a barrier between the busy street and the square. 1

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SECTION BB

Arcaded facades mimic the faรงade of the adjacent museum and also offer points of interaction for pedestrians with places to sit and enjoy the company of friends.

INITIATING PUBLIC SPACE

Section BB


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CRACOVIA SQUARE

MENDING THE GAP

This park is supposed to represent a gateway to the city and connects views of very important landmarks within the city to one another. The projected building and site design provides a strong gateway to the park, provide a filter from busy street to peaceful park, and provide a public space in which people actually occupy the space to give the site a sense of liveliness. The form of a square with a horizontal form slicing through provides a more defined public space that enhances a connection with the adjacent museum, there is now a literal space for which people to occupy. Water features provide white noise to block out the sound of the bustling traffic. Within the program, there are restaurants located on the main floor that provide places of “staying power”—that is program that makes people sit out side for long periods of time and to make the space busier.

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THE LEED PLATINUM WORKPLACE: LEAP COLLABORATIVE advisor: year: time: size: location:

Bill Martella Fourth year, Fall 16 weeks 50,000 square feet Knoxville, Tennessee

The client, LEAP Collaborative, is a progressive stainability consulting firm. Their services include leadership in environmental design strategies and performance analysis and design development of building systems. This project description lead to the driving force behind the design of the new LEAP Collaborative headquarters. With a major emphasis on green design, this project has earned a LEED Platinum rating with major emphasis on sustainable efforts in design. Not only was being green the driving force behind many parts of the design, but also an effort to make an enjoyable space for both the client and the occupants of the building. The space within the project was

designed for the enjoyment of the occupants-- smaller spans for better daylighting and views to the outside, generous floor to ceiling heights, and a major outdoor space that provides both a relaxing and vibrant space for all that encounter the project. There was also an emphasis on making a relation to surrounding buildings while still allowing the project to have its own personality in downtown Knoxville. Not only does the louvered facade add visual interest to the project, but it also serves functionally as well. The project is energy efficient, it is a facility that is distinctive, and the landscape amenity is a major component of the design proposal. 19


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[Left] Vignette of main circulation corridor Circulation was emphasized in the plan in order to create a very organized and logical layout. Drop ceilings and material choice emphasized the corridor. Office spaces became tributary spaces to the corridor in order to take advantage of the day lighting and views to the outdoors. [Right] Vignette of the main entrance and lobby space The design featured a major atrium space that visually connected all of the floors together. It provided a natural progression to subsequent floors. The volumetric space was contained by the core piece.

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Roof Assembly Exterior Steel Ramification Panel Anchored by Screws Gravel Backfill Fiberglass Geotextile Polyethylene Drainage Layer Bitumen Waterproofing Layer Roof Decking Sloping Rigid Insulation Fiberglass Geotextile 4” Composite Decking W14 Primary Space-Spanning Beam Rigid Insulation Kalwal Aerogel Fenestration Shadoglass Louver System Gypsum Suspended Ceiling Floor Assembly Carpeted Floor Panels W8 Column (beyond) Double Glazed Low U-Value Fenestration Aluminum Mullions Painted Glass Spandrel Panel Air Space Rigid Insulation Diffuser Pressurized Plenum Damper VAV Box Fan Heating Coil Concrete In-filled Steel Posts 4” Composite Concrete Decking W12 Steel Joist 5’ OC (beyond) Rigid Insulation Plaster Foundation Assembly Polished Concrete Floor Silicone Membrane Moisture Barrier Rigid Insulation Gravel Backfill Perforated Drain Pipe Turned-down Slab 10’-6” x 10’-6” Spread Footing (beyond)

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PROFESSIONAL WORK


REGIONAL BANK

River Street Architecture. LLC advisors: year: time: location:

Terry Barker Craig Peavy Michael McGowan Fourth year, Winter 1 week Tennessee

Rendered with 3dsMax and Photoshop


LOVER’S LEAP

River Street Architecture. LLC advisors: year: time: location:

Terry Barker Blythe Bailey Fourth year, Winter 1 week Tennessee

Rendered with 3dsMax and Photoshop


MONUMENTAL STAIR

River Street Architecture. LLC

advisors: year: time: location:

Rob Fowler Craig Peavy Fourth year, Summer 2 weeks Tennessee Designed and detailed in Revit


TOWN CENTER

River Street Architecture. LLC

advisors: year: time: location:

Terry Barker Michael McGowan Fourth year, Winter 3 weeks Tennessee

Hand rendered with watercolor and prismacolor


FINE ARTS


Connection. Colored Pencil on tissue paper.

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Wheat Field. Oil Paint on Canvas.


Railroad Ties. Graphite on Paper.

Self Portrait. Pastels on Paper.

Bike Gear. Colored Pencil on Paper.

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Contrast. Venice, Italy.

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En Route. Chicago, Illinois.


Processes. Marfa, Texas.

Placid. Barcelona, Spain.

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Monica Harvey_Portfolio_2014