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ADF’S SPLIT SCENES For the first time in its history, ADF presents six and a half weeks of shared programs showcasing some of the most important works in the modern dance repertory past and present! This season is made possible through the generous support of the SHS Foundation.

Battleworks (photo: Tom Caravaglia)

companies


THE 2008 AMERICAN DANCE FESTIVAL PERFoRMANCES Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Connect Transfer (new version) § by Shen Wei Dance Arts

For tickets: 919.684.4444 www.tickets.duke.edu 1

Caught by David Parsons Revelations by Ailey II• Reynolds Industries Theater 8 pm

2

3

JUNE 5

4

José Limón’s Chaconne, The Moor’s Pavane and Jirí Kylián’s evening Songs by Limón Dance Company

6

PPD

Alwin Nikolais’ Crucible and Tensile Involvement by Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company•

by Dayton Contemporary Dance Company

Page Auditorium 8 pm

Page Auditorium 8 pm PPD

9

10

11

12

PPD

Rust by Eiko & Koma

Reynolds Industries Theater 8 pm

Page Auditorium 8 pm

PPD

17

18

Dunya Road and Rapture by Khadija Marcia Radin•

Baldwin Auditorium 7:30 pm

24

Matinee 2 pm PPD

Page Auditorim 8 pm

25

26

Page Auditorium July 3 & 5 at 8 pm July 4 at 7 pm Children’s Matinee 1 pm

Reynolds Industries Theater 8 pm

JULY 1

30

2

For You and Walking Out the Dark by Ronald K. Brown/EVIDENCE

3

PPD

by Meredith Monk

by Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble

Page Auditorium 8 pm

Reynolds Industries Theater 8 pm PPD

8

9

PAST/FoRWARD

Faculty Concert Page Auditorium 7:30 pm

13

Laura Dean’s Tympani ‡ Mark Dendy’s World Premiere § erick Hawkins’ New Moon ‡ Hanya Holm’s Jocose ‡ by ADF Dancers Reynolds Industries Theater 8 pm

14

PPD

15

5

Another evening: A Serenade § by Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company

Home and Lux by Doug Varone and Dancers 7

4

Solo from education of the Girlchild: an opera (1972)

Donald McKayle’s Games ‡

6

28

Twyla Tharp’s Sinatra Suite and Sweet Fields by Aspen Santa Fe Ballet•

Robert Battle’s Two Redux § and Larry Keigwin’s World Premiere § by PARADIGM•

PPD

27

PPD

Teaching Tribute Griffith Theatre 5 pm

3 epitaphs, CHANGeS and Promethean Fire by Paul Taylor Dance Company

Air § and Water by Keigwin + Company

29

21

Concerto Six Twenty-Two

ella, Promenade and Reel Time § by Battleworks

Page Auditorium 7:30 pm

Children’s Matinee 1 pm

by Lar Lubovitch Dance Company

Reynolds Industries Theater 8 pm

23

20

Diversion of Angels, Lamentation and Steps in the Streets (excerpt from Chronicle) by Martha Graham Dance Company

aKabi by Aydin Teker and Dancers•

Musicians Concert

19

PPD

Umwelt by Compagnie Maguy Marin

Scripps/ ADF Award

Children’s Matinee 1 pm 14

World Premiere § by John Jasperse Company

16

22

13

World Premiere § and others TBA and Martha Clarke’s Nocturne ‡ by Pilobolus

Les Noces by ZviDance•

15

7

Accumulation, PReSeNT TeNSe and Spanish Dance by Trisha Brown Dance Company

Asadata Dafora’s Awassa Astrige/Ostrich, eleo Pomare’s Las Desenamoradas and Talley Beatty’s Mourner’s Bench

8

Matinee 2 pm

10

11

PPD

Akaji Maro’s Secrets of Mankind § by Dairakudakan Takuya Muramatsu’s

...gosh, I am alive... § by Kochuten

16

Circus by Natural Dance Theatre• Against Newton 2 by Dance Theatre LUDENS• Woman Washing Rice by Kei Takei Shinju ten no Amijima by Teruko Fujisato• Reynolds Industries Theater 8 pm

Page Auditorium 8 pm

§ 2008 ADF Commission/World Premiere ‡ Reconstruction • Company’s ADF Debut PPD Post Performance Discussion

12 Matinee 2 pm

JAPANESE FESTIVAL

17

18

PPD HU/ADF MFA Performance Page Auditorium 8 pm

19

All programs are subject to change (Calendar as of 3.24.2008)


From the Directors

Dear Friends, The American Danc e Festival celebrate s its 75th annivers with 60 of the gr ary eatest works in th e history of mod dance. From Twyla ern Tharp’s Sinatra Su ite and Alvin Ailey Revelations to wo ’s rld premieres by Ja pa n’s Dairakudakan and Kochuten, th e ADF presents a season of mod masterpieces, ha ern ndpicked to show case the finest modern dance’s pa of st and present. In order to pull off this monumental feat, the ADF pres ents Split Scenes, six and a half we eks of performan ce s shared by two or more of the fie ld’s most dynamic companies. This summer the ADF will bring 37 com panies to perform the season ’s historic line-up a season comprise . With d of 11 ADF com premieres, 5 recons missions/world tructed masterpiec es and 10 company debuts at the festi ’s val, the ADF’s Split Scenes offers a ra of extraordinary da nge nce experiences. In addition to ou r stellar perform ances, the Festiv beams with great al anniversar y activ ities for dance fa of all ages. From ns Community Day to Dancing for th Camera, the Fest e ival of fers excitin g opportunities to enhance your AD F experience. W e are delighted to celebrate the Fe stival’s 75th anni versar y and hope you will join us fo r this memorable occa sion!

Charles L. Reinha rt ADF Director

Jodee Nimerichter ADF Co -Director

1


CONNECT TRANSFER (new version) by Shen Wei Dance Arts Heralded by The New York Times as “startlingly imaginative,” the China-born Shen Wei incorporates Eastern and Western aesthetics into exquisite works of timeless originality. Since its early inception at the ADF in 2000, Shen Wei Dance Arts continues to gather critical acclaim for its world-class performers and riveting premieres. Blowing ADF audiences away with the original’s premiere in 2004, Shen Wei continues with a new version of Connect Transfer to make its world debut at the ADF this summer. Connect Transfer (new version) is commissioned by the ADF with support from the Doris Duke/SHS Foundations Awards for New Work.

Connect Transfer is a modern masterpiece. To miss it is to miss an exhilarating work by one of the most expansive, creative minds in the arts.

Connect Transfer (photo: Stephanie Berger)

–The New York Sun

Thursday–Saturday June 5–7 at 8 pm June 7 at 2 pm Reynolds Industries Theater

2

&


by Ailey II

& CAUGHT

by David Parsons

Revelations is modern dance’s unquestionable greatest hit, anchoring countless performances…inspiring applause before it even starts. –The New York Times

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Alvin Ailey’s Revelations (photo: William Hilton)

& REVELATIONS

Caught (photo: Steven Caras)

Revelations, Revelations, Revelations! Inspired by Ailey’s “blood memories” of Texas, the blues, faith and the gospel, Revelations (1960) is a spiritually wrenching work that explores the deepest sorrows and highest joys of the ever-resilient human heart. Performed by Ailey II, this signature work stands as a tribute to the pioneering vision of Alvin Ailey and the classic beauty of African American modern dance. For over 30 years Ailey II has brought audiences to their feet with its technique-driven dancers who dazzle the heart and bring life to the soul.

The uncontested wit and wizard of contemporary dance. –The Chicago Tribune

Getting his start as a lead dancer with Paul Taylor, David Parsons is one of America’s most favored artists. His signature piece Caught (1982) is a clever solo of atmospheric dimensions featuring one performer’s defiance against a web of strobic flashes, inducing the illusion of a dancer in free flight. Performed to the enticing music of Robert Fripp, Caught is one hot ticket that is wildly exciting.

3


José Limón’s CHACONNE, THE MOOR’S PAVANE & Jirí Kylián’s EVENING SONGS by Limón Dance Company For José Limón, to pursue the “American dream” was to become a choreographer of modern dance. Years after Limón’s death, director Carla Maxwell and the Limón Dance Company continue to bring this artist’s work and vision to audiences across the globe. The company will perform The Moor’s Pavane (1949), widely regarded as Limón’s masterpiece, which premiered at ADF over 50 years ago. Based on the drama and passion of Othello, Limón’s work is yet another version of this Shakespearian classic. The program will also include Limón’s solo Chaconne (1942), and the company shows off its classic lines in Jirí Kylián’s Evening Songs (1987), set to the deep choral sounds of Antonín Dvorák.

…the millennial Limón dancers still satisfy and inspire.

The Moor’s Pavane (photo: Rosalie O’Connor)

–Los Angeles Times

4

&


&

Asadata Dafora’s AWASSA ASTRIGE/OSTRICH, Eleo Pomare’s LAS DESENAMORADAS & Talley Beatty’s MOURNER’S BENCH by Dayton Contemporary Dance Company (DCDC)

Awassa Astrige/Ostrich (photo: Andy Snow)

For over 30 years, DCDC has worked to bring high quality dancing and education to diverse communities across the country. Holding the largest collection of classic works by African American choreographers, the company will revive three works uniquely rooted in the African American tradition. Talley Beatty’s Mourner’s Bench (1947) presents a sorrowful but empowering account of a life lost to racial bias, while Eleo Pomare’s Las Desenamoradas (1967) offers the tunes of jazz legend John Coltrane. Choreographed by Sierra Leone native Asadata Dafora, the company’s performance of Awassa Astrige/ Ostrich (1932) will feature the first African dance formally staged in U.S. theaters in this stunning enactment of the ostrich as a stately animal.

June 8–10 at 8 pm

Its dancers are talented and scrupulously rehearsed. Even more important they believe in what they are doing.

Page Auditorium

–The New York Times

Sunday–Tuesday

DCDC performances at the ADF are funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Southern Arts Federation and the North Carolina Arts Council.

5


Tensile Involvement (photo: Brent Herridge)

Alwin Nikolais’ CRUCIBLE & TENSILE INVOLVEMENT by Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company

Danced with dedication and stylistic surety, the Ririe-Woodbury project conserves important American cultural resources in a way as pleasurable as it is enlightening. –Los Angeles Times Remarkably savvy in his use of choreography, music, lighting design and costume, choreographer Alwin Nikolais (1910-1993) actively combined his talents to produce full multimedia productions. Founded in 1964, the Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company has remained dedicated to its own work as well as preserving the legacy of dance/theater wizard Alwin Nikolais. Twenty-three years after its world premiere, the Ririe-Woodbury dancers will perform Crucible (1985), an ADF original commission that dreams up a 3-D kaleidoscope leaving audiences in awe. The company will also perform Tensile Involvement (1955), which uses stretch fabric architecturally to create a cat’s cradle of choreography.

6

&


, PRESENT TENSE & SPANISH DANCE & ACCUMULATION by Trisha Brown Dance Company

Present Tense (photo: Nan Melville, 2005)

A formative member of the Judson Dance Theater in the 1960s, Trisha Brown quickly emerged as one of the greatest choreographers from that era. This summer the ADF will present three of Brown’s most celebrated works. Debuting in France in 2003, PRESENT TENSE offers aerial choreography to the brilliant sounds of renowned experimentalist John Cage. The company’s dynamic program will also include Accumulation (1971), a witty solo performed to music by the Grateful Dead, and Spanish Dance (1973), a classic work set to the Bob Dylan rendition of Early Morning Rain by Gordon Lightfoot.

Thursday–Saturday June 12–14 at 8 pm Children’s Matinee June 14 at 1 pm Page Auditorium

From Brown’s early days as a vanguard hellion, her pieces have always been fundamentally serene, however windblown and impulsive her style and however obstreperous and/or witty her structures. –The Village Voice

7


WORLD PREMIERE by John Jasperse Company Masters of stillness and dominators of grace, the Japanese-American couple Eiko & Koma are widely known for their exquisitely slow dances which resonate with focus and radiate with good intent. The couple’s work focuses on the power and strength found in the subtle nuances of movement commonly overshadowed by the excessive flash and busyness of everyday life. This summer the truly original couple will perform Rust* nearly two decades after the premiere at the ADF in 1989. *Performance contains nudity

Noted by The New York Times as “one of the hottest—and brainiest—choreographers on the downtown scene,” John Jasperse and his company aim to challenge and engage audiences through dances that present enticing thoughts with rich delivery. The New York company’s work has been seen widely in Europe and in South America. This summer the company will perform a world premiere commissioned by the ADF. John Jasperse Company (photo: Julieta Cervantes)

New work commissioned by the ADF with support from the Doris Duke/SHS Foundations Awards for New Work.

8

Mr. Jasperse is one of the most successful choreographers in New York. –The New York Times

&


RUST by Eiko & Koma They take us way beyond the excitement of what will happen next and into uncharted areas of intense emotion.

&

LES NOCES by ZviDance ZviDance stands out among today’s modern dance groups…not a weak link in these eleven. –Danceviewtimes.com

Monday–Wednesday June 16–18 at 8 pm Reynolds Industries Theater

ZviDance (photo: Klaus Schoenwiese-NYC, 2006)

Eiko & Koma (photo: Beatriz Schiller)

–The New York Times

Israeli choreographer Zvi Gotheiner is “one of those rare choreographers who is able to convey human dilemma and aspiration through movement” (The Village Voice). This summer the “impressive movers,” (The New York Times), of ZviDance will perform Les Noces (2006), a work that takes a contemporary look at the institution of marriage, reanimating the aggressive paganism of Stravinsky’s score. The piece will incorporate lighting design by Mark London and video projection by Ray Roy.

9


Martha Clarke’s NOCTURNE by Pilobolus Creator of the sensational Garden of Earthly Delights (1984; re-envisioned 2007 at the ADF), Martha Clarke returns to bring more fanciful visions back to life. Having joined Pilobolus as its first female member in 1973, Clarke reunites with the company in the reconstruction of Nocturne* (1979). “Frightening, poignant and grotesquely funny,” (The New York Times) this classic solo presents a decrepit ballerina who dances nostalgically for her past as a talented performer. *Performance contains nudity.

…a poignant comment on the fate of the aged dancer.

Martha Clarke’s Nocturne (photo: Rebecca Lesher)

–The New York Times

“Pilobolus is a mind-blowing troupe of wildly creative and physically daring dancers who leap, fly, intertwine and break all the rules…audiences should expect the unexpected with Pilobolus” (NYC Newsday). Here to shake things up with their creative ingenuity, Pilobolus returns wrapped and stapled with one wildly exciting twist. Incorporating the talents of third generation puppeteer Basil Twist, the company “famous for wit and sensuality,” (The New York Times) will collaborate with the New York City artist to string-up some movement in an ADF commissioned world premiere. New work commissioned by the ADF with support from the Doris Duke/SHS Foundations Awards for New Work.

10

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Jonathan Wolken, Robby Barnett and Basil Twist’s WORLD PREMIERE & other works by Pilobolus

If the dance world has a summer movie blockbuster equivalent, it must be Pilobolus. –The Associated Press

Thursday–Saturday June 19–21 at 8 pm Children’s Matinee June 21 at 1 pm Page Auditorium Pilobolus (photo: John Kane)

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11


Umwelt (photo: Christian Ganet)

UMWELT by Compagnie Maguy Marin

Umwelt is a angry yet lucid reflection of what [Marin] sees in the world around her. –The Irish Times

Aydin Teker defies the laws of choreographic gravity.

aKabi (photo: Levent Öget)

-Libération

12

& AKABI

by Aydin Teker and


Dancers

& DUNYA ROAD

& RAPTURE by Khadija Marcia Radin

Aydin Teker’s aKabi (2005) is a dance that denies security and walks on the edge. Performed in large platform shoes created by Istanbul shoemaker Ahmet Inceel, this dynamic excerpt of Teker’s work plays with the shoes’ geometric shape to create forms that are strangely beautiful and images that make for sweet visual rewards. All the way from Istanbul, Teker and her dancers visit the ADF to perform the U.S. premiere of this sculptural work.

Stunning! She took my breath away and I wept! –Lucas Hoving Tuesday–Wednesday June 24–25 at 8 pm June 25 at 2 pm Reynolds Industries Theater

Khadija Marcia Radin (photo: Rebekah Radin)

Maguy Marin of France returns to the ADF where she made her U.S. debut in 1983. Recipient of the 2003 Scripps/ADF Award, Marin has since been heralded as a French national treasure and one of the world’s most imaginative choreographers. This summer, the “ever ingenious” (The New York Times) Compagnie Maguy Marin will perform Umwelt (2004). Staged in front of an arrangement of mirrors, this serious funhouse carries a stern underscore of rising tension as the dancers use simple gestures to create a visual sandstorm of everyday moments. Provocative and visually stunning, Umwelt leaves audiences vulnerable to the raw intimacy of human interaction.

A unique dance of enraptured grace and bewildering beauty, whirling is a practice and ritual of the Islamic Sufis. Well-professed in this mystical order, Khadija Marcia Radin shares her knowledge of the whirling tradition in a dual performance of Rapture (2005) and Dunya Road (the Road of Apparent Reality) (2006). Danced and choreographed by Radin, Rapture is performed to the recited poetry of Jelaluddin Rumi (b. 1207), founder of the Mevlevi Order of Whirling Dervish. Performed to live improvisation on the oud by Mahabud John Burton, Dunya Road is a story whose relevance spans the halls of time from the orders of ancient Babylon to present day. Support for the performance of Umwelt by Maguy Marin is provided by the Florence Gould Foundation.

13


DIVERSION OF ANGELS, LAMENTATION and STEPS IN THE STREETS (excerpt from Chronicle) by Martha Graham Dance Company

One of the seven wonders of the artistic universe.

Chronicle (photo: John Deane)

–The Washington Post

14

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CONCERTO SIX TWENTY-TWO by Lar Lubovitch Dance Company One of the field’s foremost choreographers, Lar Lubovitch stormed the New York City art scene bringing strong musicality, rhapsodic style and complex choreography to the playful worlds of dance and theater. Of his many works created for ballet companies and Broadway, Concerto Six TwentyTwo (1986) stands among the greatest. Set to Mozart’s Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, the piece is a jubilant visualization of the composer’s rhythms. Based in New York City since 1968, the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company has performed in nearly all of America’s 50 states as well as more than 30 countries overseas.

Concerto Six Twenty-Two (photo: Jack Mitchell)

&

Thursday–Saturday June 26–28 at 8 pm Page Auditorium

Founded in 1926 by the legend herself, the Martha Graham Dance Company is the oldest and most celebrated contemporary dance company in America. Dancing to the original score by Wallingford Riegger, the company will perform Steps in the Streets, the second section of Graham’s Chronicle (1936), created in response to the Euro-fascism of the 1930s. From the universal tragedies of war to the infinite blessings of love, Graham’s Diversion of Angels (1948) is a valentine performance inspired by the work of modern artist Wassily Kandinsky. The program will also feature Lamentation (1930), one of Graham’s most noted solos which focuses on the overwhelming power of grief.

This ingenious work to Mozart deliver[s] a cornucopia of glorious dancing. –The New York Times

15


AIR and WATER by Keigwin + Company

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ELLA, PROMENADE and REEL TIME by Battleworks

The quirky, sexy, fun Keigwin + Company entertains in a way that is infectiously delightful. Founded in 2003, this cabaret of a company combines physicality and theatricality to create witty and engaging dances. Be prepared to battle against the elements when this wild force of nature takes you on a ride with Water (2008) and the ADF commissioned world premiere of Air.

Monday–Wednesday June 30–July 2 at 8 pm

Keigwin + Company (photo: Tom Caravaglia)

Reynolds Industries Theater

16

Keigwin achieves astonishing feats of dancing…a parcel of pure explosive energy mediated by impressive technical skills. –The New York Times

“An immensely talented choreographic mover and shaker,” (The New York Times) Robert Battle leads his company of nine in a fierce three-piece performance of tantalizing zest. The company will present Reel Time, an ADF commisioned world premiere based on the deconstruction of a traditional gig performed to original music by composer John Mackey. The company will also present Promenade (2005) and Ella (2007). Described by The New York Sun as “a Viennese waltz” meets the “neurotic patients of Dr. Freud,” Promenade will leave you charged and invigorated, while Ella offers a solo tribute to the great Ella Fitzgerald.

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–The New York Sun

DeLavallade is one of the dance world’s great beauties…And Solomons…has acquired warmth and magisterial power with age. –The Village Voice

Battleworks (photo: Tom Caravaglia)

Mr. Battle makes an audience sit up and take notice, marvel, even laugh. His work reaches over the edge of the stage and communicates with people.

PARADIGM (photo: Tom Caravaglia)

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Robert Battle’s TWO REDUX & Larry Keigwin’s WORLD PREMIERE by PARADIGM

PARADIGM unites senior performers Carmen deLavallade and Gus Solomons jr for a performance that resonates with personality like the aging of fine wine. The multigenerational collaboration will feature two short ADF commissioned duets, choreographed separately by Robert Battle and Larry Keigwin to showcase the effervescent passion of these two admired performers. Battle’s premiere, Two Redux, will play as a rework of his comical Two (1995), while Keigwin’s duet will shake things up to the smash hit sounds of Billy Idol’s Dancin’ With Myself.

New works by Robert Battle and Larry Keigwin are commissioned by the ADF with support from the Doris Duke/SHS Foundations Awards for New Work.

17


3 EPITAPHS, CHANGES and PROMETHEAN FIRE by Paul Taylor Dance Company Acclaimed by TIME Magazine as “the reigning master of modern dance,” Paul Taylor is unstoppable with more than 50 years of ingenuity and a myriad of dances to his name. Flowing with creativity Taylor continues with CHANGES, a new work based on the radicalism of the 1960s. Noted as “One of the few indisputably great dance companies in the world,” (The New York Post) the Paul Taylor Dance Company will also perform 3 Epitaphs, an earlier work set to a mix of New Orleans jazz and Southern American folk music. The program will close with a riveting performance of Promethean Fire (2002), an ADF commissioned work choreographed to J.S. Bach and lighting design by Jennifer Tipton.

The American spirit soars whenever Taylor’s dancers dance.

Prometian Fire (photo: Lois Greenfield)

–San Francisco Chronicle

18

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Twyla Tharp’s SINATRA SUITE and SWEET FIELDS by Aspen Santa Fe Ballet Do you love Frank Sinatra? Do you love dance? Then come see the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet perform two classic works by sensational Movin’ Out choreographer Twyla Tharp. Set to the hymns of composer William Billings, Sweet Fields (1996) is a spiritual work that pays homage to the Shakers who danced themselves into religious ecstasies. Contrastingly, Sinatra Suite (1984) features a ballroom couple dancing in and out of young love to a medley of Sinatra classics. A “…sophisticated, young company that has the dance world talking,” Twyla Tharp is an American ( The Star-Ledger) the artist of the first order. Aspen Sante Fe Ballet is –The New York Times the chosen company to perform this classically Twyla program.

Thursday–Saturday July 3 & 5 at 8 pm July 4 at 7 pm Children’s Matinee July 5 at 1 pm Page Auditorium

Sweet Fields (photo: Rosalie O’Connor)

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19


Donald McKayle’s GAMES by Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble

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FOR YOU and by Ronald

Created by one of the greatest choreographers in modern dance, Games (1951) is a bittersweet tale of a group of rambunctious street kids. Described by The New York Times as “an instant classic,” Donald McKayle’s Games has captivated audiences for over 50 years. This summer the Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble will perform an ADF commissioned reconstruction of this classic work. Founded in 1970, the Denver-based ensemble continues its mission of bringing dance and appreciation for the arts to groups and individuals across the nation. The reconstruction of Games by Donald McKayle has been made possible through support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Games performed by AADE in 1987 (photo: Jay Anderson)

Mr. McKayle’s choreography is stylized, never a mere illustration of the old rhymed games chanted or sung by the dancers and vocalists. For all its charm…Games is a serious work. –The New York Times

Monday–Wednesday July 7–9 at 8 pm Reynolds Industries Theater

Since 1985, Ronald K. Brown/EVIDENCE has created quite the buzz with its sophisticated fusion of West African dance, modern, ballet and street/club styles. Known for its spiritually centered content, the company’s repertoire features storytelling and the frequent theme of redemption through transformation. Set to music by Philip Hamilton and the vocal ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock, the first section of Walking Out the Dark (2001) offers a resolving look into what impedes our ability to help others in a time of need. Brown will also perform For You (2003), a solo tribute to the legacy of the late ADF Co-Director Stephanie Reinhart and for all those we have lost too early in life.

20


WALKING OUT THE DARK K. Brown/Evidence .

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HOME and LUX by Doug Varone and Dancers Varone puts a beating heart at the center of his work.

Lux (photo: Richard Termine)

–The Washington Post

Ronald K. Brown has emerged in recent years as one of the strongest, most distinctive choreographers around. –The New York Times

Walking Out the Dark (photo: Basil Childers)

“Rarely do you find a choreographer so dedicated to the full and generous complexity of the human spirit” (The Chicago Tribune). Exceptionally passionate, Doug Varone presents two intricately woven works both saturated with intensity and filled with strong emotion. Critics claim Home (1988) is a touching duet depicting the “subtle shades of acceptance, rejection, tender passion and greedy need between two people sharing a life,” (The Baltimore Evening Sun) while Lux (2006) is a precious 22 minutes of nonstop dancing. Holding over eleven New York Dance and Performance Awards as a company, Doug Varone and Dancers will definitely impress.

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Solo from EDUCATION OF THE GIRLCHILD: an opera (1972) composed, choreographed and performed by Meredith Monk

Thursday–Saturday July 10–12 at 8 pm

When the time comes, perhaps a hundred years from now, to tally up achievements in the performing arts, one name that seems sure to loom large is that of Meredith Monk. In originality, in scope, in depth, there are few to rival her. –The Washington Post

22

Education of the Girlchild (photo: Peter Moore)

Page Auditorium

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ANOTHER EVENING: A SERENADE by Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company Tony award-winner Bill T. Jones and his stellar company return with the world premiere of Another Evening: A Serenade. Laying its roots at the ADF as Another Evening (original title) in 2005, this powerful work continues as an ever-evolving examination of life’s big questions and the role of hope in the wake of tragedy and disaster. Initially inspired by the events of 9/11, this sociopolitical hybrid of dance and theater examines the intimacy of the human spirit through a meaningful deconstruction of personal stories, eclectic sound and sophisticated movement. The new version will feature a blended accompaniment of music by electric cellist Christopher Lancaster and dialogue by Andrea Smith.

Another Evening (photo: Paul B. Goode)

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Some choreographers are born dancemakers…And some choreographers are geniuses who just happen to choose dance…Bill T. Jones is of the latter variety, and the dance world is fortunate to have him. –San Francisco Chronicle Meredith Monk is perhaps the most profoundly unique performer in any genre of performing arts today. She combines the talents of a composer, vocalist, choreographer and performance artist into a wholly original presentation. Recipient of countless honors and the 1996 Scripps/ADF Award, she has performed to critical acclaim in prestigious venues throughout the world. Awarded first prize in musical theater at the Venice Biennale in 1975, Education of the Girlchild: an opera (1972) is one of Monk’s most celebrated works. This summer Meredith Monk will grace the ADF with her exquisite voice and renowned presence in the solo which comprises Part II of this legendary work.

23


Past/Forward Laura Dean’s Tympani, Mark Dendy’s World Premiere Erick Hawkins’ New Moon & Hanya Holm’s Jocose

Erick Hawkins’ New Moon (photo: Tony Cenicola)

performed by ADF Dancers

How very new the old can look, and how persistent good ideas may be. –The New York Times

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Laura Dean’s Tympani (photo: Tom Brazil)

Back by popular demand, the ADF announces the second Past/Forward program. The ADF will present three reconstructed works and one ADF commissioned world premiere. Drawing from the success of last year’s Sky Light , the ADF brings back another work of the 2008 Scripps/ADF recipient Laura Dean. Rodger Belman, a former member of Laura Dean Musicians and Dancers, will reconstruct the choreography of Tympani (1980) and Jason Cirker will reconstruct the music. Don Redlich will collaborate with ADF dancers, Dance Notation Bureau stager Sandra Aberkalns, and Pamela Pietro to bring Hanya Holm’s Jocose (1984) back to life, a work originally created by Holm for the Don Redlich Dance Company. Katherine Duke, Artistic Director of the Erick Hawkins Dance Company, will collaborate with ADF dancers in the reconstruction of Hawkins’ New Moon (1989), and New York dance and theater artist Mark Dendy to create an ADF commissioned world premiere.

Monday–Wednesday July 14–16 at 8 pm Reynolds Industries Theater

The reconstruction of Tympani by Laura Dean, New Moon by Erick Hawkins, and Jocose by Hanya Holm are supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The new work by Mark Dendy is commissioned by the ADF with support from the ADF/Stephanie Reinhart Fund.

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Japanese Festival

Wednesday–Thursday July 16–17 at 8 pm

SECRETS OF MANKIND by Dairakudakan

Dairakudakan (photo: Matsuda Junichi)

Not since 1982 has the ADF presented such a dazzling array of Japanese companies

Page Auditorium

Kochuten (photo: Matsuda Junichi)

With a name meaning “great, battleship camel” in Japanese, the Tokyo-based Dairakudakan is a tour-de-force ensemble. First introduced to American audiences by the ADF in 1982, the company is known for its TempuTenshiki style of ghostly white faces and eerily silent screams. Producing over 60 works for the company, director Akaji Maro will present the ADF commissioned world premiere of a new work entitled Secrets of Mankind. The premiere will feature collaborations with musician Robert Kaplan, ADF dancers and Dairakudakan performers.

…GOSH, I AM ALIVE…. by Kochuten Joining Dairakudakan as a company member in 1994, dancer Takuya Muramatsu has since developed as a choreographer in his own right. In 2003 the ADF performance of his work Takara Jima (Treasure Island) provoked The New York Times to compare his level of charisma to that of dance mentor Akaji Maro. This summer the dancers of Kochuten will perform the world premiere of Muramatsu’s …gosh, I am alive… Secrets of Mankind is commissioned by the ADF with partial support from the Japan Foundation and additional support from the SHS Foundation. Support for the Japanese Festival is provided in part by the Asian/Pacific Studies Institute, Duke University.

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Circus by Natural Dance Theatre

Kei Takei photo: Fumio Takashima

Circus (photo: Hideyo Tanaka)

Natural Dance Theatre and its funked-out carnies transform the stage into a bohemian fairground with the U.S. premiere of Circus (excerpt). Choreographed by Mako Kawano under the direction of Shinji Nakamura in 2006, this theatrical work combines elements of contemporary modern dance, butoh traditions and Japanese funk in a nostalgic look at the circus as a hopeful entity in post-WWII Japan. From Tokyo to Durham, these 12 performers dance to trade the ghost of forgotten memories with beaming optimism for the future.

Woman Washing Rice by Kei Takei

Shinju ten no Amijima (photo: Kotaro Negishi)

Against Newton 2 (photo: Naoya Ikegami)

“A forceful performer, involving spectators with her extraordinary energy” (OGS News) Kei Takei grabs audiences as a stark minimalist. “An original and true creative talent” (The New York Times) Takei Friday–Saturday represents a Japanese seed cultivated on U.S. soil combining international influences July 18–19 at 8 pm with a 25-year career in the States. Most July 19 at 2pm remembered in the U.S. for her striking Light Reynolds Industries Theater (Parts 1-15) in 1981, Takei returns with a riveting solo. The performance will mark the U.S. premiere of Woman Washing Rice (2004) set to AgainsT Newton 2 by Dance Theater LUDENS Yukio Tsuji’s experimental sound score. Founded by Artistic Director Takiko Iwabuchi, Dance Theatre LUDENS began in 1999 with a name meaning Shinju ten no Amijima by Teruko Fujisato “playful people” and a mission to create intriguing For over 50 years Teruko work. In a crafted excerpt of Against Newton 2 (2004), Fujisato has stood as a Iwabuchi and her dancers play with gravity, time and prominent figure in the the cleanliness of space. First presented at the New Japanese dance world. National Theater Tokyo, this analytical work layers the Based on the Japanese simple movements of falling, rolling and jumping in a legend of Osan, Shinju ten complicated structure that plays with the comforts and no Amijima (2003) is a solo depicting one woman’s aggressions of gravity and struggle to control her weight. Come emotions of mortification, watch as these anger, passion and love three dynamic when she ends an affair women rebel between her husband against the Jihei and his mistress laws of gravity Koharu. Be there this to the delicate summer when Fujisato sounds of Bach makes her choreographic U.S. Debut. and Hendel.

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FOR THE KIDS! Children’s Saturday Matinee Series Make ADF performances a summer tradition for the whole family! From some of the world’s most gifted creators, this performance series is sure to delight the imaginations of all children. Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company & Trisha Brown Dance Company Saturday, June 14

Paul Taylor & Aspen Santa Fe Ballet Saturday, July 5 These one-hour performances begin at 1 pm in Page Auditorium. The Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company performance of Tent was made possible by the National Endowment for the Arts American Masterpiece: Dance initiative, administered by the New England Foundation for the Arts.

photo: Fred Hayes

Pilobolus Saturday, June 21

Kids Night Out With the purchase of an adult ticket to any ADF evening performance, you can bring a young adult, ages 6-16, for free. In order to provide an affordable way to introduce young people to a more complete range of modern dance, Kids Night Out (KNO) will include all evening performances in 2008. A limited number of KNO tickets will be available for each performing company. As some programs may contain adult themes or nudity, the purchase of KNO tickets is left to the discretion of parents and guardians. Programs with known adult content will be noted.

Visit www.americandancefestival.org for up to date information

CELEBRATE ADF’S 75th ANNIVERSARY SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE Pick 4–6 different performances to save 25% or Pick 7+ to save 35%!* As an ADF subscriber, you are guaranteed the best seats in the house, easy ticket exchange, ticket insurance and a tax deduction receipt for unused tickets. Enjoy additional benefits including the subscriber coupon book, including a coupon for 25% off ADF merchandise and complimentary tickets to the events listed in this section! *When completing the ticket order form, please circle the prices in the appropriate columns. Multiple tickets for one performance do not count as different performances. Children’s Matinees are not included in this offer.

ADF Musicians Concert June 22, 7:30 pm in Baldwin Auditorium A musical interlude amidst a summer of dance, the Festival’s virtuosic instrumentalists and vocalists take center stage for a moving evening with a wide range of musical styles.

ADF Faculty Concert July 13, 7:30 pm in Page Auditorium Each day during the Festival, the ADF’s internationally renowned faculty members share their talent and expertise with over 400 students from around the world. Then, on one memorable evening, in an imaginative array of dance style and ideas, these performers and choreographers share their artistry with the public.

Balasaraswati/Joy Ann Dewey Beinecke Endowed Chair for Distinguished Teaching Award Ceremony June 28, 5 pm in Griffith Theater Dianne McIntyre will be honored for distinguished teaching in a special ceremony. The Chair was established in 1991 and recognizes the dual role of teachers in passing on dance history and tradition and in guaranteeing the future creativity of the art form. It is endowed through a generous contribution from Luise Elcaness Scripps with additional support by Walter Beinecke, the daughters of Joy Ann Dewey Beinecke, and the ADF.

Samuel H. Scripps/ADF Award Ceremony June 29, 7:30 pm in Page Auditorium The Samuel H. Scripps/American Dance Festival Award of $50,000 was established in 1981 to honor choreographers for lifetime achievement in modern dance. In recognition of her accomplishments as a choreographer and composer, the 2008 Scripps/ADF Award will be presented to North Carolinian Laura Dean.

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The Festival’s Festivities ADF Tours June 16–July 11, M–T, Th–F at 10:30 am & 1:45 pm Duke University’s East Campus Free and open to the public, ADF tours are informative, educational and fun. Take a guided tour of ADF classes on Duke’s East Campus and go behind the scenes to watch dancers being trained and work being created. Tour participants will also get an inside peak at the new Generations Video, a short documentary on the ADF’s 75 years of modern dance. ADF tours are great for individuals, community groups and dance fans of all ages. Call 919.684.6402 to make your reservations now.

Up close with the artists Up Close with the Artists is a free and open to the public seminar series that brings artists and ADF community members together in moderated discussions which focus on the nature of the creative process, the collaborative experience and other issues relevant to the dance world. The series features choreographers and dancers performing as part of the ADF season.

Post Performance Discussions (PPDs) Have you ever wondered what inspired a certain piece or how the dancers can remember all the choreography? Discussions moderated by ADF faculty members give audience members the chance to meet the artists, ask questions and learn more about the creators’ work and vision. Check the performance calendar for dates.

ADF Modern Scene—Six Nights at Six Plates Fridays following the performances* Hosted by Six Plates Wine Bar at Erwin Terrace, Durham Whether you are new to the area and looking for a party or simply in need of a night out on the town, grab a friend and join in the six best social events of the summer. Returning as Six Nights at Six Plates, ADF Modern Scene is back and better than ever with a half-dozen nights of wine tasting and mingling immediately following ADF performances. Entrance and hors d’oeuvres are complimentary. Wine and beer are available by cash bar. Subscribe to four or more performances on Modern Scene Fridays and save 25% off the total ticket cost. *with the exception of the Fourth of July.

or call 919.684.6402 with questions.

mark your calendars! Community Day Saturday, June 21, 2–4:30 pm Come join as the Festival celebrates its North Carolina audiences with ADF Community Day. Events will take place at the Nasher Museum of Art on Duke Campus immediately following the Pilobolus Children’s Matinee. Whether you like to kick off your shoes and dance in the grass with Paperhand Puppet Intervention or glitter it up with Scrap Exchange arts and crafts, Community Day offers fun events for children of all ages. Alumni Weekend Saturday, June 28 & Sunday, June 29 Celebrate the ADF’s 75th Anniversary with your favorite ADF classmates, faculty, performers and colleagues. Whether you have been longing to jump back into your favorite classes, attend traditional ADF ceremonies or take advantage of the ADF’s incredible performance line-up, come back and experience an ADF that’s even better than you remember. If you are an ADF alum please call 919.684.6402 for more detailed information.

Dancing for the Camera: International Festival of Film and Video Dance Friday, July 11–Sunday, July 13 Showcasing the best of fusions between cinematographic skill and choreographic vision, Dancing for the Camera features both juried and curated works of dance designed specifically for the camera. Directed and curated by video dance maker Douglas Rosenberg, the festival will overlap with the ADF’s Screendance: State of the Art 2, Curating the Practice/ Curating as Practice. HU/ADF MFA Performance July 19, 8 pm in Page Auditorium The Hollins University/American Dance Festival Master of Fine Arts, in its fourth year, is a highly selective program that admits students from around the world. Students will present new works and year-long creative thesis projects in a shared one-night performance.

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how to order & SEATING Tickets on sale Monday, May 5! By Mail Please fill out both sides of the ticket order form (pages 31 & 32) and mail along with your payment to: ADF University Box Office Box 90940 Durham, NC 27708 (checks made payable to UNIVERSITY BOX OFFICE)

By Fax Please fax both sides of the ticket order form to 919.660.1729. Credit card orders only. Online Please visit www.tickets.duke.edu and select the ADF link in the menu. Credit card orders only. By Phone Please call the University Box Office at 919.684.4444. Credit card orders only.

stage

PAGE AUDITORIUM

A–Q

Orchestra A–Q Balcony A–J

R–Z

$41

Orchestra R–Z Upper Balcony K–O

Balcony A–J

$33

Upper Balcony P–R $26

Upper Balcony

K–O Upper Balcony

P–R

stage

REYNOLDS INDUSTRIES THEATER

right

left center

In Person The University Box Office is located in the Bryan Center on Duke University’s West Campus.

BOX OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday, 10 am–5 pm Saturdays (June 7–July 19) 4 pm through first intermission The box office will open at the performance location two hours prior to event time for all evening, matinee, Sunday and children’s matinees.

Pick 4+ and single ticket orders are seated in the order in which they are received. All sales are final. Tickets are non-refundable.

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2008 Adf Ticket Order Form circle pricing in appropriate column

dates

PERFORMANCES Reynolds

Th 6/5

Fri 6/6

(circle)

Sat 6/7 2pm

pick 4-6 25% off

pick 7+ 35% off

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$33

$24.75

$21.45

$26

$19.50

$16.90

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$33

$24.75

$21.45

$26

$19.50

$16.90

$25

$18.75

$16.25

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$33

$24.75

$21.45

$26

$19.50

$16.90

$35

$26.25

$22.75

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$33

$24.75

$21.45

$26

$19.50

$16.90

$25

$18.75

$16.25

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$33

$24.75

$21.45

$26

$19.50

$16.90

$35

$26.25

$22.75

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$33

$24.75

$21.45

$26

$19.50

$16.90

$25

$18.75

$16.25

$41

$30.75

$26.65

$33

$24.75

$21.45

$26

$19.50

$16.90

$30

$22.50

$19.50

# of tics

# KNO

tics*

subtotal

$_______

8pm Mon 6/9

Tues 6/10

Orch

Th 6/12

Fri 6/13

Sat 6/14

Orch

Tues 6/17

Wed 6/18

Fri 6/20

Sat 6/21

Wed 6/25 2 pm

Wed 6/25 8 pm

Fri 6/27

Sat 6/28

Tues 7/1

Wed 7/2

Fri 7/4 7 pm

Sat 7/5

Tues 7/8

Wed 7/9

Fri 7/11

Sat 7/12

Tues 7/15

Wed 7/16

Th 7/17

Fri 7/18

Sat 7/19 2 pm

Pilobolus Martha Clarke

Th 6/19

Compagnie Maguy Marin Aydin Teker and Dancers Khadija Marcia Radin Martha Graham Dance Company Lar Lubovitch Dance Company

Th 6/26

Keigwin + Company Battleworks Paradigm Paul Taylor Dance Company Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

Th 7/3

Ronald K. Brown/EVIDENCE Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble Doug Varone and Dancers

Th 7/10

PAST/FORWARD Laura Dean, Mark Dendy, Erick Hawkins, Hanya Holm

Reynolds

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company Meredith Monk

Mon 7/14

JAPANESE FESTIVAL Dairakudakan Kochuten

Page

Mon 7/7

Wed 7/16

JAPANESE FESTIVAL Natural Dance Theatre, Kei Takei, Dance Theatre LUDENS, Teruko Fujisato

Reynolds

Reynolds

Mon 6/30

Page

Reynolds

Tues 6/24

Page

Reynolds

Mon 6/16

Page

Reynolds

ZviDance Eiko & Koma John Jasperse Company

Sun 6/8

Page

Trisha Brown Dance Company Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company

Page

Dayton Contemporary Dance Company Limón Dance Company

(circle)

Page

Shen Wei Dance Arts David Parsons Ailey II

seats

single ticket

Balc

Balc

Orch Balc

Orch Balc

Orch Balc

Orch Balc

Orch Balc Sat 7/19 8 pm

* KNO tics: Kids Night Out tickets

Children’s Matinee Series and ADF Concert tickets can be ordered on the reverse side of this form.

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

$_______

Ticket Subtotal $________ (please transfer this total to reverse)

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ADF Concerts

dates

price

ADF Musicians Concert (Baldwin)

Sun 6/22 at 7:30 pm

$21

$_______

ADF Faculty Concert (Page)

Sun 7/13 at 7:30 pm

$21

$_______

subtotal

NOW! SAVE ts are free e ! onc r

ADF C k 4+ tickets ic with P

dates

price

6/14, 6/21, 7/5

$30

$_______

Trisha Brown Dance Company & Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company

Sat 6/14 1pm

$12

$_______

Pilobolus

Sat 6/21 1pm

$12

$_______

Paul Taylor Dance Company & Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

Sat 7/5 1pm

$12

$_______

Children’s Saturday 1 hour Matinee Series in Page Auditorium

Subscription for all 3 Children’s Matinees

for the s! kid

# of tickets

# of tickets

subtotal

Name___________________________________________________________________ Address__________________________________________________________________ City_________________________________________ State________ Zip____________ Day Phone (_____) _______________________ Evening (____) ____________________ Email ____________________________________________________________________ Ticket Subtotal (from reverse side) $__________________ ADF Concerts Total (above) $__________________ Free with Pick 4+

Children’s Matinee Series Total (above) $__________________ Parking Vouchers (#______ x $3) $__________________

One voucher per car, per show for Page & Reynolds shows only.

Tax-Deductible Contribution* $__________________ Ticket Handling Fee

+$3.00

GRAND TOTAL $__________________ O Check (payable to University Box Office)

O Visa

O Mastercard

O AMEX

O Discover

Credit Card #______________________________________________________________

Name (as appears on card) __________________________________________________

Billing Zip Code _________________________________Exp. Date ________________

Signature__________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________ *If you are making a tax-deductible contribution, print name(s) exactly as it should appear in the ADF playbill. All tickets are non-refundable. Discounts and promotions cannot be combined.

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Support the ADF The ADF looks to individual supporters like you to help sustain our high-quality dance programming, world-renowned education programs, community outreach projects and archival efforts. Ticket sales and tuition cover less than half of what it costs to produce an ADF season, so your support is very important to us. We hope you will consider adding a tax-deductible contribution to your ticket order form. ADF contributors are acknowledged (if you wish) in our season playbill and season report. Thank you for your contributions and support!

A copy of the ADF’s latest annual report may be obtained, upon request, from ADF or from the New York State Attorney General’s Charities Bureau, Attn: FOIL Officer, 120 Broadway, New York, NY 10271.

Financial information about this organization and a copy of its license are available from the NC State Solicitation Licensing Branch at (888) 830-4989. This license is not an endorsement by the State.

Discounts/Parking Discounts Group Sales Groups of 10 or more are eligible for special discounts. Please call ADF for more information at 919.684.6402.

Parking and Parking Vouchers Parking is available in the Bryan Center parking garage, located on Science Drive, behind the Bryan Center. The Duke Parking Office charges a special-event parking fee of $5.

Student Rush Tickets With a valid student ID, half-priced tickets are sold at the box office one hour prior to the beginning of the performance and are subject to availability.

Discounted parking vouchers (one voucher per car, per show) are available for $3 each when you place your order. Duke University employees with a Duke University parking permit do not need to purchase parking vouchers. Patrons must inform parking attendants of any vouchers held at Will Call. You do not need to purchase a parking voucher for the ADF Musicians Concert in Baldwin Auditorium.

Senior Discount If you are 65 or over, take $3 off single ticket purchases. Duke Employees Duke Employees receive 15% off single tickets with a valid Duke ID. Additional Discounts To find out about other available discounts, please visit www.americandancefestival.org

Directions For directions to the theaters, please visit our website or visit the University Box Office website at www.tickets.duke.edu

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www.americandancefestival.org | 919.684.6402

“The World’s Greatest Dance Festival.” –The New York Post

American Dance Festival Box 90772 Durham, NC 27708-0772

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American Dance Festival 2008 Season Brochure