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Bats, Babes & Broccoli

Wisconsin Magic Realists


MONGERSON GALLERY

875 N MICHIGAN AVENUE | SUITE 2520 | CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611


This catalogue is published to accompany the exhibition Bats, Babes & Broccoli September 23 – December 31, 2016 Copyright © 2016 Mongerson Gallery Mongerson Gallery 875 N Michigan Avenue Suite 2520 Chicago, IL 60611 www.mongersongallery.com For inquiries, please contact (312) 943-2354

Inner cover: see pages 80–81


Bats, Babes & Broccoli Wisconsin Magic Realists


Index 1

Introduction Tyler Mongerson

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Surrealism, Wisconsin Style Robert Cozzolino

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Exhibition Sylvia Fein Marshall Glasier Dudley Huppler Karl Priebe John Wilde

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Checklist


Bats, Babes & Broccoli Introduction | Tyler Mongerson

In Bats, Babes & Broccoli I wish to explore the similarities between the Magic Re-

alists of Wisconsin and, as seen in my recent Far Out Females: Mid–Century Chicago Surrealists. Magic Realism, by definition, refers to genre in which realistic narratives and naturalistic techniques are combined with surreal elements of dream or fantasy. Surrealism, by definition, sought to release the creative possibilities of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images. However, if one compares the works within both exhibitions, just where dream and fantasy gives way to an inward, unconscious exploration, is difficult to measure. Both groups painted at the same time and in many cases, as with Karl Priebe and Getrude Abercrombie, its members knew each other and were close friends (Figure 1). So influence was inevitable. But unlike Thecla, Barton and Abercrombie, the Wisconsin group made up of Wilde, Priebe, Huppler, Fein and Glasier seemed less concerned with a collaboration and moreso with work serving as a direct reaction to the accepted genre of the time, Regionalism. John Steuart Curry was artist in residence at the University of Wisconsin FIGURE 1. Gertrude Abercrombie (1909–1977) –Madison starting in 1936. Still Life – Shell, 1951, Oil on board 3 x 3 1/2 inches

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Having experience in representing his estate, I had first hand exposure to the landscapes of Wisconsin Curry executed during his tenure. Where Curry left off with the depiction of barns, farmers and crops, his predecessors seemed to strip the figures of their clothing, rob the landscape of its fertileness and release a haunting vision of life beyond the simplicity of the field. I have many to thank for the success of this exhibition, especially the collectors who generously lent works: Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari, Mr. Bernard Friedman, Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen, Mrs. Mary Gilson Feay, Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte, Mr. & Mrs. Bram and Sandra Dijkstra, Mr. Phil Schiller, Mrs. Kathy Kinsella, and others whom wish to remain anonymous. Finally I wish to thank Margot Mache for developing this catalogue and her collaboration with the collectors, and Kelly Reaves for the title idea and art transport.

Tyler Mongerson President Mongerson Gallery

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Bats, Babes & Broccoli Surrealism, Wisconsin Style| Dr. Robert Cozzolino

Surrealism permeated the Midwest early in its history. Chicago was a receptive

environment for the founding artists of the movement and its subsequent practitioners. The Arts Club of Chicago and the Katherine Kuh Gallery exposed collectors and local artists to the work first-hand.1Some Chicagoans, such as Gertrude Abercrombie (1909-1977) found that the Surrealists’ emphasis on subjectivity and the unconscious clarified their own impulses. Others considered it but one tool among many methods and used it strategically to amplify mood or subject matter. With the eruption of World War II and its devastating impact on individuals and humanity, Surrealism seemed to some the visual language most compatible with the state of the world. Among those artists in the Midwest who took its lessons to heart and shaped it to their personal needs were Sylvia Fein (b. 1919), Marshall Glasier (1902–1988), Dudley Huppler (1917–1988), Karl Priebe (1914–1976), and John Wilde (1919-2006). Based in Wisconsin and active in Madison and Milwaukee, these five artists had close ties to their peers in Chicago and in New York. Their friendships formed by 1939 while some were students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (Fein, Huppler, and Wilde). Priebe had been a childhood friend of Wilde’s older brother growing up in Milwaukee and Glasier was a charismatic mentor cultivating a bohemian persona around the university. They shared art intensely as competitors and supporters, intimates and muses, critics and champions. Each valued craft and carefully studied historical techniques. Fein and Wilde researched and made Medieval and Renaissance mediums; Glasier fashioned his technique after 16th-century German artists; Huppler, self-taught and inspired by his friends developed an

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idiosyncratic approach to drawing; Priebe became a master of casein techniques. They developed personal iconography in response to their experience of the Second World War as well as their intimate lives. Embracing nature, the irrational and searching for magic in the everyday, they sought meaning in cycles of life and death.2 Glasier was more than a decade older than everyone else in the group. He brought his experience in the Marines and then at the Art Students League in New York back to his native Wisconsin in 1936 where he set up a studio in his parents’ home. In New York he had studied with George Grosz (1893-1959) and became a lifelong friend of the German émigré. Glasier took over Grosz’s drawing classes at the League when he retuned to Germany in 1957. After Grosz died in 1959 Glasier took over his role permanently and became a profoundly influential drawing teacher. His gifts as a mentor already had an impact on the group in Wisconsin, especially Fein and Wilde. Fein credited Glasier with teaching her “the value of drawing above anything else, drawing in a way I had not understood it before. He showed me how to make a line that had strength and life force…He has been of inexpressible importance to me, for his personality as much as his work. His influence has been in deeper and less traceable regions than design and subject.” 3

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Glasier hosted drawing sessions at his studio in which the artists and hired models posed (often nude). These events often morphed into parties and a broad range of colorful members of the community participated from across the spectrum of the humanities at the university. Wilde appreciated access to Glasier’s extensive library including subscriptions to the Surrealist journals View and VVV. Music also played an important role in Glasier’s circle. He was close with the members of the Pro Arte Quartet as well as the visionary composer Harry Partch (1901-1974) and each gave concerts at the Glasier home. Priebe was an intimate of Billie Holiday (1915-


1959) and painted her portrait many times. Huppler, Priebe, and Wilde would often visit Abercrombie in Hyde Park and corresponded frequently about the blues and jazz musicians who visited her and played at her home in Chicago. Nature was critical to the group’s values as well and they often piled into a car and drove many miles outside of Madison to draw the Driftless Area (or Paleozoic Plateau) and its gorgeous river valleys. These places became the settings of dozens of Glasier’s drawings and paintings. As he told one writer, “There is a poetry and expression in the jutting rocks, the bluffs and gnarled trees of the driftless area, a happy fusion of the real and the unreal in the landscape.” 4 Greek heroes, soldiers returning from the war, friends depicted as Artemis and Actaeon, and Christian saints all make appearances in Glasier’s work of the 1940s. All are set amid the fantastic rock formations and lush flora and fauna of the Wisconsin landscape. Chinese Cabbage (Figure 2) was one in a series of paintings in which Glasier placed a plant swelling with life in the immediate foreground to suggest monumentality FIGURE 2. Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Chinese Cabbage, 1944 Oil on board 18 x 30 inches Collection of Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari

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and the mythic proportions of the landscape he loved. Priebe was an avid birder (as was Wilde), Huppler made close studies of animals in life and death, and both Fein and Wilde surrounded themselves with gardens and orchards, living in nature as much as possible right into their later years. These formative years made a lasting impact on the group and established intense life-long friendships. Huppler, who began his creative life as a writer, became a prolific chronicler of the group. His extraordinary letters race along with detailed, bawdy, and insightfully hilarious observations on his friends.5 Fein and Wilde especially and set the tone for the lives they wanted to live and the way they conducted their artistic careers. It was a circle that in 1940s Wisconsin welcomed their African-American and queer contemporaries. Priebe, for instance was in a long-term interracial relationship with Frank Roy Harriott (1921-1955), an editor at Ebony. Huppler insinuated himself into the New York circle of Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) and later, Andy Warhol (1928-1987), with whom he exchanged artwork. According to Wilde, they talked ART, drank ART, did ART, loved ART and, as a group felt very superior and rather exclusive. We began to participate in exhibitions, local and national. Also we felt radical, advanced, liberal, liberated. All of this established my natural inclination toward and for the odd, the other, the neglected, the unacceptable, the quirky. This led to criticism and raised eyebrows…I, and others of our group, not only ignored but cherished and embraced criticism. 6

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World War II intruded on the group, temporarily forcing them apart. It transformed Fein and Wilde’s art and lives. Both Wilde and Fein’s husband William Scheuber (1918-2013) were drafted in 1942. Fein directed her grief and anxiety into a series of drawings and paintings in which she “dealt with ancient traditions, myths, and legends in a contemporary form of expression.” 7 Fein often depicted herself in the alter ego of Persephonê to develop an analogy between her


emotional state and the abducted daughter of Demeter (Ceres). She declared, “Persephonê spent 6 months in Hell. I spent over three years in Hell.” 8 The war had forcibly taken Fein’s loved ones away and thrust her into a state of mourning. Scheuber was sent to the Pacific theater while Wilde remained in the U.S. perpetually reassigned to agencies within the army that ranged from the Medical Corps to the O.S.S. His unit was often told they were about to be deployed, only to have orders changed at the last moment. His wife, the artist Helen Ashman, remarked, “It out Kafkas Kafka…I am convinced the world won’t be much better, nor living either, after the armistice, which shouldn’t be too many years off…The only living will be in obscure places, Lynxville [WI] or a Canadian town, or a middle Mexico village…the rest of this country shall seethe.” 9 After working a war industry job for Cutler-Hammer in Milwaukee in 1942-43, Fein’s emotional state began to affect her physical health. She was briefly hospitalized for pneumonia and pleurisy in the Fall of 1943. In March 1944 she left for Mexico City to join her mother on a trip. After bumping into an old high school friend she decided to stay in the country to live and work in the village of Ajijic and remained there until 1947. Fein’s The Tea Party (Figure 3), painted in 1943, reveals the artist in the role of Alice at a table set for absent friends in a landscape that nearly echoes to reinforce the void they have left in her life. The beloved Driftless Area is Fein’s Wonderland and she reclines against a rock formation that swells and writhes with the suggestion of concealed images – birds, lizards, faces, hands – as though the very Earth was mutable, unstable, ready to change itself and challenge her understanding of reality. A card on the table is inscribed “WKS/Hawaii,” revealing the picture’s dedication to her husband, off in the Pacific. Another inscription reveals the eccentric

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ornamental objects on the table (and at the table’s foot) to be homages to Huppler, who began making little gouaches of abstracted creatures in 1943. Fein contemplates the contents of a little blue teacup and has lifted an animal cookie from a nearby dish. Will consuming them transport her to Scheuber? Or will they bring on oblivion as an escape? Will they magically materialize her lost friends? Fein’s self-portrait as Alice suggests magical thinking and the will to have control over the whims of fate.

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Wilde spent 1942 to 1946 in the army where he worked in the medical corps, drew venereal disease prevention propaganda, made and lectured about camouflage, before making strategic maps for the OSS (Office of Strategic Services, the precursor to the CIA). During what he called his illegal confinement, he filled a FIGURE 3. Sylvia Fein (b. 1919) The Tea Party, 1943, 275-page sketchbook with Egg Tempera and oil on masonite panel drawings and text (1942–46), 23 1/4 x 37 1/4 inches Collection of Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari made over thirty-five major paintings. Long, horrifically embellished, excruciatingly detailed letters sent to friends charted Wilde’s growing state of anxiety and breakdown beneath the strain of the service. Although Wilde was not posted overseas, the constant threat that he might be and the feeling that he had been “sentenced” to complicity with aggression wore hard on his conscience. His letters describe a miserable existence spent waiting to be mobilized, listening to


racist rhetoric from his superiors, and finding symbols of absurd, tragic humanity in daily incidents. Early on, during basic training Wilde wrote to Glasier: A fellow shooting by me accidentally shot his foot off—it was beautiful—his shoe was ripped open and it was all black and dry—and then the bright red blood came in spurts like a spilt bottle—and it flowed in little rivulets over the sand. And the man was pale and he smiled sheepishly. He had made, a mistake—oh, yes a rotten mistake. It was a lovely symbol—such a funny thing. 10

Much of Wilde’s subject matter was developed during the stress of his war experience, drawn directly into his sketchbook. Like Fein, he frequently depicted himself in imaginative and often monstrous self-portraits bearing lesions, dark patches of rot, and hopes in his misshapen, swollen head. Wilde’s visible wounds and transformed body revealed the emotional effects of war despite his distance from the battlefield. Fein’s experience as a war bride and the channeling of grief through symbolic figures revealed a similar effect. Wilde’s technique changed during the war and he felt that the intensity of his manic periods and rushing thoughts pushed his ability as a draughtsman. He reflected, “I felt such a need to get things out that my ability to render transcended my technical expertise at the moment; I actually believe that it rose to meet my needs.” 11 That shift can be traced between a prewar oil and collage painting that depicts a series of freestanding walls in a landscape. The whitewashed wall closest to the viewer bears a trompe l’oeil image of Christ as though on a sheet of cloth. In Work Reconsidered Scene II No. 6 (Figure 4), made many decades later, Wilde has dutifully mimicked the rudimentary forms of the early painting but has playfully made everything sit credibly in space, complete with depth, shadows, and the suggestion of light and movement. Wilde’s complementary threads throughout his career of

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FIGURE 4. John Wilde (1919–2006) Work Reconsidered, Scene II #6, 1943 1985, Oil on board, 11 x 16 inches

the fantastic and the meditatively, supernaturally observed owe their roots to his experience during the war. The war made him believe that the absurd was not merely a literary mode, but true to life. His will to express exactly how it felt to be alive in his body, with all of its perceptions (phantom as well as verifiable) came out a desperate need to assert his connection to the world. The group has often been called “magic realists” precisely because of these qualities in all of their work. However invented or arbitrary a term, it was adopted in the United States by Alfred H. Barr, Jr. in the 1940s to describe artists who employed some tools of illusionistic Surrealism but did not depict dreams or Freudian symbols. Among the most succinct descriptions of these differences is that offered by Jeffrey Wechsler who stressed that, “Magic realism does not invent a new order of things; it simply reorders reality to make it seem alien. Magic realism is an art of the implausible not the impossible; it is imaginative, not imaginary.” 12 Reflecting on the art of this group of friends, it is more productive to consider how much they deviated from the straightforward agrarian or urban realism that characterized the work of innumerable peers. Their friendships pushed 10


one another to invention and surprise, emotional vulnerability and bold sexuality. There is a depth to each of the bodies of work that demands reconsideration for a new audience.

Robert Cozzolino Patrick and Aimee Butler Curator of Paintings Minneapolis Institute of Art

Footnotes 1

Mary Jane Jacob, “Chicago: ‘The City of Surrealism’,” in Terry Ann R. Neff, ed. In the Mind’s Eye: Dada and Surrealism (New York: Abbeville Press and Chicago: Museum of Contemporary Art, 1985), 9-21.

2

For more on this group see Robert Cozzolino, With Friends: Six Magic Realists 1940-1965 (Elvehjem [Chazen] Museum of Art, 2005).

3

Sylvia Fein, application for a Guggenheim Fellowship, September 1943. Sylvia Fein Papers, Archives of American Art, Washington, D.C.

4

“Marshall Glasier, Artist, Returns Here to Renew the Roots of His Art,” Capital Times, October 1941[?]. Clipping in the Fein Papers. 11


5

For more on Huppler see Robert Cozzolino, Dudley Huppler: Drawings (Elvehjem [Chazen] Museum of Art, 2002).

6

John Wilde letter to author, November 15, 2002.

7

Sylvia Fein to Roland McKinney, regarding Eve (1943–44; Pennsyvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia), June 11, 1946. Fein Papers.

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Sylvia Fein, letter to the author, February 14, 2003.

9

Helen Ashman to Sylvia Fein, January 14, 1943. Fein Papers.

10 John Wilde to Marshall Glasier, November 15, 1942. Marshall Glasier Papers, Houghton Library, Harvard University. 11 For more on Wilde’s war sketchbook, see Robert Cozzolino, “’Myself During the War’: John Wilde’s World War II Sketchbook.” Elvehjem Museum of Art Bulletin (1999-2001): 41-54. 12 Jeffrey Wechsler, “Magic Realism: Defining the Indefinite,” Art Journal 45, no. 4 (Winter, 1985), 293. For more on this see Robert Cozzolino, “Magic Realism and Modernism,” in Thomas Fransioli (New York: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, 2015).

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Sylvia Fein (b. 1919) The Tea Party, 1943 Egg Tempera and oil on masonite panel 23 1/4 x 37 1/4 inches Collection of Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari


Sylvia Fein (b. 1919) Fairy Scene Pencil on paper 23 3/4 x 12 inches


Sylvia Fein (b. 1919) Cerce Oil on board 18 x 11 1/2 inches 17


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Sylvia Fein (b. 1919) The Nude Egg Tempera and oil on masonite panel 17 3/4 x 29 1/4 inches Collection of Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari

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Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Oregon Coast 1 Oil 10 x 8 inches 2 Beach in Oregon Oil 10 x 12 inches 3 Shell at Sea Oil 10 x 12 inches Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen 1


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Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Woman on the Beach Mixed media on paper 20 x 26 inches

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Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Night Tournament, 1947 Oil on panel 13 1/2 x 20 inches Mrs. Mary Gilson Feay

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Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Chinese Cabbage, 1944 Oil on board 18 x 30 inches Collection of Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari

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Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Johan Bjorksten, c. 1951–2 Oil on masonite panel 23 1/2 x 17 1/2 inches 29


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Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Unknown title (Two People in Garden), 1947 Oil on board 16 ½ x 19 inches

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Marshall Glasier (1902–1988) Untitled, 1948 Egg Tempura 19 3/8 x 25 1/2 inches Collection of Mr. Bernard Friedman

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Dudley Huppler (1917–1988) Owl Ink on paper 11 x 7 inches 34


Dudley Huppler (1917–1988) Sandpiper on Toy Chair Ink and wash on paper 8 3/4 x 4 3/4 inches 35


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Dudley Huppler (1917–1988) Corn Ink on paper 6 1/3 x 17 1/2 inches

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Dudley Huppler (1917–1988) Owls Within Trees Ink on paper 15 x 11 inches

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Dudley Huppler (1917–1988) Melons Ink on paper 16 x 20 1/2 inches 41


Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Woman at Bar, 1942 Gouache and ink on board 14 3/4 x 12 inches

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Spotted Bird Watercolor on paper 7 x 9 inches Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte


Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Fish IV, 1973 Watercolor on paper 9 ¾ x 11 inches Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Unknown title (Woman Napping Under Tree) Oil on board 12 x 15 inches

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Still Life with Goblets and Lemons, 1941 Gouache and ink on board 13 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) The Big Hat Oil on board 20 1/2 x 16 inches Mr. & Mrs. Bram and Sandra Dijkstra

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Hat with Artificial Roses, 1972 Casein on paper 15 1/4 x 11 inches Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Fallen Feather, 1952 Oil and gouache on paper 8 x 10 inches Collection of Mr. Phil Schiller

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Tiara, 1954 Oil on board 8 x 8 inches Collection of Mr. Phil Schiller

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Karl Priebe (1914–1976) Untitled (Dancing Figure) Gouache on paper 15 ½ x 12 ¼ inches Collection of Mr. Phil Schiller

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Wall Oil on board 17 1/2 x 29 1/2 inches Collection of Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Work Reconsidered, Scene II #6, 1943, 1985 Oil on board 11 x 16 inches

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John Wilde (1919–2006) At Dawn Oil on board 14 x 17 inches Mr. & Mrs. Bram and Sandra Dijkstra

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Moonlight Fantasy, 1951-62 Oil on board 8 x 9 ½ inches Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Still Life with Green Basket, 1978 Oil on board 18 x 28 inches Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Still Life with Melons Oil on board 14 1/2 x 20 inches Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Skulls of Small Mammals, 1973 Oil on board 9 x 15 inches

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Downstairs, the Red Cat, 1955 Oil on panel 14 x 24 inches Private collection

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Oh, Wow!, 1997 Oil on panel 9 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches Private collection

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Where To? Oil on panel 10 x 12 inches Private collection

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John Wilde (1919–2006) Day, 1968 Oil on panel 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches

Night, 1968 Oil on panel 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches

Collection of Mrs. Kathy Kinsella Details of each work are visible on inner cover pages

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Bats, Babes & Broccoli Checklist Sylvia Fein (b. 1919)

Marshall Glasier (1902–1988)

The Tea Party, 1943 Egg Tempera and oil on masonite panel 23 1/4 x 37 1/4 inches Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari

Oregon Coast Oil 10 x 8 inches Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen

Fairy Scene Pencil on paper 23 3/4 x 12 inches Cerce Oil on board 18 x 11 1/2 inches The Nude Egg Tempera and oil on masonite panel 17 3/4 x 29 1/4 inches Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari

Beach in Oregon Oil 10 x 12 inches Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen Shell at Sea Oil 10 x 12 inches Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen Woman on the Beach Mixed media on paper 20 x 26 inches Night Tournament, 1947 Oil on panel 13 1/2 x 20 inches Mrs. Mary Gilson Feay

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Dudley Huppler (1917–1988) Chinese Cabbage, 1944 Oil on board 18 x 30 inches Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari Johan Bjorksten, c. 1951–2 Oil on masonite panel 23 1/2 x 17 1/2 inches Unknown title (Two People in Garden), 1947 Oil on board 16 ½ x 19 inches Untitled, 1948 Egg Tempura 19 3/8 x 25 1/2 inches Mr. Bernard Friedman

Owl Ink on paper 11 x 7 inches Sandpiper on Toy Chair Ink and wash on paper 8 3/4 x 4 3/4 inches Corn Ink on paper 6 1/3 x 17 1/2 inches Owls Within Trees Ink on paper 15 x 11 inches Melons Ink on paper 16 x 20 1/2 inches

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Karl Priebe (1917–1988) Woman at Bar, 1942 Gouache and ink on board 14 3/4 x 12 inches Spotted Bird Watercolor on paper 7 x 9 inches Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte Fish IV, 1973 Watercolor on paper 9 ¾ x 11 inches Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte Unknown (Woman Napping Under Tree) Oil on board 12 x 15 inches Still Life with Goblets and Lemons, 1941 Gouache and ink on board 13 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches

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The Big Hat Oil on board 20 1/2 x 16 inches Mr. & Mrs. Bram and Sandra Dijkstra Hat with Artificial Roses, 1972 Casein on paper 15 1/4 x 11 inches Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen Fallen Feather, 1952 Oil and gouache on paper 8 x 10 inches Mr. Phil Schiller Tiara, 1954 Oil on board 8 x 8 inches Mr. Phil Schiller Untitled (Dancing Figure) Gouache on paper 15 ½ x 12 ¼ inches Mr. Phil Schiller


John Wilde (1919–2006) Wall Oil on board 17 1/2 x 29 1/2 inches Mrs. Thea Tenenbaum–Malferrari Work Reconsidered, Scene II #6, 1943, 1985 Oil on board 11 x 16 inches At Dawn Oil on board 14 x 17 inches Mr. & Mrs. Bram and Sandra Dijkstra Moonlight Fantasy, 1951-62 Oil on board 8 x 9 ½ inches Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte Still Life with Green Basket, 1978 Oil on board 18 x 28 inches Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm and Karen Whyte Still Life with Melons Oil on board 14 1/2 x 20 inches Mr. & Mrs. Dan and Elizabeth McMullen

Skulls of Small Mammals, 1973 Oil on board 9 x 15 inches Downstairs, the Red Cat, 1955 Oil on panel 14 x 24 inches Oh, Wow!, 1997 Oil on panel 9 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches Where To? Oil on panel 10 x 12 inches Day, 1968 Oil on panel 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches Mrs. Kathy Kinsella Night, 1968 Oil on panel 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches Mrs. Kathy Kinsella

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This catalogue is published to accompany the exhibition Bats, Babes & Broccoli September 23 – December 31, 2016 Copyright © 2016 Mongerson Gallery Mongerson Gallery 875 N Michigan Avenue Suite 2520 Chicago, IL 60611 www.mongersongallery.com For inquiries, please contact (312) 943-2354

Inner cover: see pages 80–81


MONGERSON GALLERY

875 N MICHIGAN AVENUE | SUITE 2520 | CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611

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Bats, Babes & Broccoli  

Wisconsin Magic Realists

Bats, Babes & Broccoli  

Wisconsin Magic Realists

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