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PROJECT / CHHATRAPATI SHIVAJI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, MUMBAI, INDIA

The departure hall offers a stunning goodbye to a stunning city. Check-in and gate agent task lighting was provided by Selux, while the terminal is floodlit at night using fixtures from Bega. In the day the terminal is reliant on daylighting with skylights and a glass wall playing a major role in the daytime scheme.

Mumbai is a city that sits at the centre of India’s aviation history. In the days of the British Raj the area, then named Bombay, boasted only one commercial airfield, Juhu Aerodrome, the home of the Bombay Flying Club, its intrepid members zipping about in de Havilland Leopard Moths. The Flying Club was responsible for launching the first flight to London that you could catch, in a rickety biplane, getting you back to Northolt Aerodrome in Uxbridge in time to catch Mr Flotsam and Mr Jetsam at the London Palladium. Times have very much-changed in Mumbai, India’s financial centre, and Indian aviation now helps to project the nation’s economic might around the globe. The latest step was the opening of the impressive new Terminal 2 at the city’s Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport. Chhatrapati Shivaji International is the second busiest airport in India and the 48th busiest in the world, the new terminal adding a further 4.4 million square feet of space to the airport site. The completion of the new structure means that the airport

is now capable of dealing with 40 million passengers a year, operating 24 hours a day, making it the true gateway to twenty-first century India. Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) and with a lighting scheme provided by Brandston Partnership Inc (BPi), the new terminal was conceived to be a ‘monument to the beautiful spirit of Mumbai and its people,’ and the architecture acts to mirror the grandeur of the traditional Indian style, while articulating a convincing vision of India’s future as a bourgeoning economic powerhouse. The architectural appearance of the building is based upon the traditional Indian style and the impressive columns and vaulted ceilings are reminiscent of the Persian influenced buildings created in India during the Middle Ages. The terminal aims to offer a modern interpretation of the past with its articulated headhouse columns and intricate window screens that filter dappled natural light into the concourses. Comprised of four stories, the building avoids the compartmentalizing of the

terminal’s many functions, creating an open space, the symmetrical concourses radiating outwards, from a central processing core, making it easier for passengers to transfer between the domestic and international sections of the terminal, while reducing walking times. “We designed an airport that is intimately connected to its surroundings,” explains Roger Duffy, FAIA, Design Partner at SOM. “By subtly incorporating regional patterns and textures at all scales, Terminal 2 resonates with a sense of place and serves as a spectacular symbol for India and Mumbai.” Passengers enter the building on the fourth floor after traveling towards the terminal on an elevated and dramatically sweeping road. The concourse in front of the terminal provides ample space for traditional Indian departure ceremonies at the wide kerb-side drop of points and the drop-off area itself is completely covered offering protection from the heat and unpredictable monsoon weather. The first view arriving passengers receive of the departure hall is through a 50-foot-tall

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mondo*arc Jun/Jul 2014 - Issue 79  

mondo*arc is the leading international magazine in architectural lighting design. Targeted specifically at the lighting specification market...

mondo*arc Jun/Jul 2014 - Issue 79  

mondo*arc is the leading international magazine in architectural lighting design. Targeted specifically at the lighting specification market...

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