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2016

darc awards / architectural

15 SEP TEM B ER 2 0 1 6 / L O N D O N


Welcome... The 2016 darc awards / architectural carried on the baton from the impressive start that was made by the inaugural darc awards last year. Instead of a combined architectural and decorative lighting awards we have split the structure into two streams so we can dedicate more space to both of these important facets of design. The 2016 darc awards / decorative will be launched in late September and will culminate in its own darc night in May in London. The 2016 darc awards / architectural process came to an end on September 15th with a spectacular event in the wonderful surroundings of MC Motors in London. Light installations, street food, a free bar and a unique presentation format all contributed to a hugely enjoyable and creative evening. If you are a designer this event is for you and changes the dynamic of traditional lighting awards where you have to buy a ticket or wait to be invited by a manufacturer - something that is out of the grasp of many junior designers and small practices. This was borne out by how many designers came to darc night, turning the usual attendance dynamic on its head. But without the voters the peer-to-peer concept of the awards would mean nothing and I’d like to thank all the independent lighting designers that participated. 6,000 votes is a massive stamp of approval for this fresh, subversive and democratic format. But of course, without the entries the good people of lighting design would have nothing to vote for! 400 entries from 40 different countries, purely for architectural lighting design projects and products, is beyond what we imagined. We look forward to your participation in the next darc awards / decorative and darc awards / architectural. And we look forward to welcoming you to darc night decorative in May and darc night architectural next September! Paul James Director, darc awards


STRUCTURES:

Best Exterior Lighting Scheme Low Budget

WINNER

Spillepengen, Sweden The project was a collaboration between the Swedish Transport Administration and the Municipality of Malmo, which was responsible for running, managing and owning the project. The majority was managed by the City of Malmo. The project was led by a project manager with an appointed steering committee consisting of executives from the City of Malmo and the Swedish Transport Administration. Construction form was decided to be a turn-key contract, but the lighting design was strongly controlled by the client. The bridge can act as the Gateway to Europe. Simple lighting that provides an interesting light image of the bridge and bronze street lights that could be seen as a string of pearls. Safe cycle route for the commuting cyclists through interchange. Retaining the masts and strengthen lights to create a backlight of the area. After lighting calculation can be possible reinforcement need to be supplemented. The

alternative was to take down the masts and have the traditional street lights around the circle. We wanted to signal from a long distance the significance of the interchange for all users. The bridge piers would be illuminated from below to have a common method used for bridges along the Inner Ring Road. White or another colour was suggested; Warm white streetlights on the bridge to create the feeling of a “string of pearls”. We lowered lighting height of the bridge to 8m and a slightly shorter distance between lighting points. Street lights on the bridge would also shed light on the ground between the bridges with their warm white lighting. Lighting helped to strengthen the safety aspect by enhancing lighting inside the pedestrian and bicycle tunnel with the completion of targeted ground lighting on their wing walls.

Project: Spillepengen Location: Malmo, Sweden Lighting Design: Johan Moritz, Sweden Client: City of Malmo Architect: Ramboll, Sweden Lighting Suppliers: ERCO, Philips, Malux


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil Lighting Design: Fernanda Carvalho Design da Luz Estudio, Brazil Client: Casa Triangulo Gallery Architect: Metro Arquitetos, Brazil Lighting Suppliers: Osvaldo Matos, Lumini

Location: Seoul, South Korea Lighting Design: KGM Architectural Lighting, USA Client: Hyundai Card Architect: Gensler, USA Lighting Suppliers: Pacific Technical Products

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: Amersfoort, Netherlands Lighting Design: New Urban View, Netherlands Client: City of Amersfoort Lighting Suppliers: CLS, Osram

Location: Tampere, Finland Lighting Design: WhiteNight Lighting, Finland Client: Tampere City Additional Design: Regional Artist of Pirkanmaa – Vesa Varrela, Finland Lighting Suppliers: Philips Lighting, Simes, Ledisol

Casa Triangulo Gallery, Brazil

Koppelpoort, Netherlands

Hyundai Understage Open Performance Plaza, South Korea

Streetart Underpass, Finland


STRUCTURES:

Best Exterior Lighting Scheme High Budget

WINNER

CEPSA Flagship Station, Spain In order to transmit the values of the company through the architecture of the new station, the choice of materials and forms became essential, as the central idea of creating a structure that is nearly invisible and acquires an edgy presence at night, indicating the presence of the station on the road. The use of a material such as ETFE in the marquee above the suppliers helped to convey the idea of lightness and also achieved one of the main objectives of the cover, which is to allow the passage of natural light, minimising the use of artificial lighting during the day. A significant reduction in energy consumption, given that sunlight is spread over more than 10 hours a day in Spain during half of the year, not being necessary to use artificial light until 22:00 in the summer. ETFE permitted a very light steel structure with a profile of 40cm instead of 100cm standard canopies, turning the marquee in a line in the landscape. A red line during night.

The Y shape columns give support to the entire canopy elegantly, maintaining the same engineering design language used on the marquee. Efficiency and sustainability have been very present in the lighting design values: all luminaires used are LEDs: very low consumption and maintenance, high visual effect, full integration into the metal structure… The lighting has been regarded as one of the canopy’s main components, which illuminates itself at night with the corporate red, creating a strong visual impact within the environment. Lines of white LEDs integrated in the structure provide functional lighting to the entire area, which is complemented by sub-canopies with integrated lighting, located over the pump islands. These provide a better illumination level required in the area, creating a more localised experience for the customer and reducing energy consumption by avoiding flooding the space with light. Furthermore,

using sensors, the station identifies when there are no customers to reduce the luminous flux. The C-store building becomes a new beacon itself, signaling the presence of the station by its red polycarbonate skin, shining bright both day and night. The main lighting goals were: Simple and clear lighting solution Transmit company values Illuminate at night materials that should be transparent during the day Full integration of the luminaires

Project: CEPSA Flagship Station Location: Arevalo (Avila), Spain Lighting Design: AUREOLIGHTING, Spain Client: CEPSA Architect: Malka + Portus Architects, Spain Lighting Suppliers: Philips, Sakma


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: Kirikkale, Turkey Lighting Design: ZEVE, Turkey Client: Türkiye Diyanet Foundation Architect: Necip Dinç, Turkey Lighting Suppliers: Philips Lighting

Location: Lac-Mégantic, Canada Lighting Design: Ombrages, Canada Client: Fabrique de la Paroisse Sainte-Agnès de Lac-Mégantic Additonal Design: Rémi Boucher / Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic, Canada Lighting Suppliers: Lumenpulse

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: Shanghai, China Lighting Design: Inverse Lighting Design, UK Client: Ports 1961 Architect: UUfie, Canada Additional Design: YabuPushelberg, Canada; Eightsixthree Architects, China Lighting Suppliers: Local alternative suppliers, Luci

Location: Los Angeles, USA Lighting Design: Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design, USA Client: Petersen Automotive Museum Architect: House & Robertson Architects, USA; Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF), USA Lighting Suppliers: Lumenpulse

Kirikkale Merkez Nur Mosque, Turkey

Ports 1961, China

Sainte-Agnès Church Lac-Mégantic, Canada

Petersen Automotive Museum, USA


PLACES:

Best Interior Lighting Scheme Low Budget

WINNER

Bolon Eyewear, China Bolon is China’s largest spectacles manufacturer and the third largest sunglasses brand worldwide. The overall architectural lighting design idea is based on a truly brilliant product presentation with high visual comfort. Developed as an integral part of the new brand architecture, the lighting concept designed for the eyewear (“display fins”) dominates the overall image of this first Bolon Flagship Store. In perception hierarchy, the products are the focus - with all further lighting features designed to work in the background. The horizontal glass display panel is illuminated by an invisible LED strip behind the rear panel edge. The three remaining (and visible) edges are coated in solid white with high opacity, to create contrast, and

to enhance the homogenous appearance of the panel. Integrated in the vertical fin (panel thickness is 12mm), a bespoke LED spot with oval lens radiates a strong light on the displayed eyewear below. Both lighting techniques jointly evoke a spectacular “wow” product presentation, virtually with a surreal pulling effect. The reflection of the white floor has been used as a reflector to illuminate the highly reflective, golden ceiling – it gives the space a warm and glowing ambience, recalling a warm sunny day at the beach. The designers wanted to prevent any light from the ceiling touching the walls or displays, in order to keep their spatial impact clean from scallops, shadows etc. Further lighting elements (homogenous lightpad) are

integrated in the free standing vitrines. The displayed products are also lit from above by very narrow-beam angled, adjustable spotlights. All wall-integrated niches are equipped with lightpads and focused product lights.

Project: Bolon Eyewear Location: Shanghai, China Lighting Design: pfarré lighting design, Germany Client: Xiamen Artgri Optical Co. Architect: Ippolito Fleitz Group, Germany Lighting Suppliers: Fushida


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: Thessaloniki, Greece Lighting Design: L4A, Greece Client: Ministry of Culture and Sports, Ephorate of Antiquities of Thessaloniki Lighting Suppliers: iGuzzini Middle East

Location: London, UK Lighting Design: Lighting Design International, UK Client: Edwardian Group Interior Design: Edwardian Group, UK Lighting Suppliers: John Cullen Lighting, Totallux, Lightgraphix

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: London, UK Lighting Design: Into Lighting, UK Client: Flight Club Darts Interior Design: Russell Sage Studio, UK Lighting Suppliers: Soraa, Leisurelites, LED Linear, Mode, Enigma Lighting

Location: Shanghai, China Lighting Design: DJCoalition, Australia & Thailand Client: MQ Studio Lighting Supplier: Super Nature

Rotunda, Greece

Flight Club, UK

May Fair Bar, UK

Nest Bar, China


PLACES:

Best Interior Lighting Scheme High Budget

WINNER

The Broad Museum, USA “Arup has been an amazing partner in the building of The Broad. They understand the sensitivities of building a space for a collection of contemporary art and helped develop efficient and innovative solutions for the physical and aesthetic needs of the institution.” - Joanne Heyler, founding director of The Broad. Drawing natural light into The Broad – Los Angeles’ newest museum – in a way that protects the art was central to Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s design. The building’s architecture is defined by the finely honed geometry of the solar path in LA. The entire structure, including the carefully calibrated veil and skylights serve as a light filtration device, bringing controlled natural light into the galleries. The skylights include blackout shades, enabling lower light conditions for all or portions of the third floor, giving the museum maximum flexibility to exhibit any medium of artworks. The top floor gallery is illuminated by expansive north-facing skylights and a fully-shaded glazed south wall. The skylights are configured

to allow filtered daylight while preventing direct sunlight. The natural daylight passing through the north canted light slots of the veil’s roof section create an absolutely even lucency right through the 23ft depth of the upper gallery. This passive daylighting approach means that daylight levels in the galleries will vary with the season, time of day and weather, altering the ambience of gallery interiors on each occasion a visitor walks around. Some exhibitions may require reduced light levels, either for conservation reasons (e.g. works on paper) or for display reasons (e.g. video works). Lower daylight levels can be achieved by the deployment of blackout shades – the shades can move between full deployment during closed hours to a pre-set position during open hours. For the electric lighting, Arup assisted with the development of custom track mounted LED wallwashers which are used to uniformly illuminate the 23ft gallery walls when daylight levels are insufficient. Several fixture reviews

were carried out to evaluate the performance of the luminaires in terms of light quality, distribution and levels of illumination. Energy savings strategies include the extensive use of the architectural ‘veil’ as an external shading device, harvesting daylight through the gallery spaces, and the use of low energy LED light fixtures. The museum was recently awarded a LEED Gold certification, being the first major art museum in Los Angeles to achieve such a certification and one of only a handful of museums nationwide to achieve LEED Gold Status.

Project: The Broad Museum Location: Los Angeles, USA Lighting Design: Arup, UK Client: The Broad Museum Architect: Diller Scofidio + Renfro, USA; Gensler, UK Lighting Suppliers: Litelab, Sistemalux


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: London, UK Lighting Design: Sutton Vane Associates, UK Client: Berry Bros & Rudd Architect: MJP Architects, UK Lighting Suppliers: Fibre Optics, Mike Stoane, Light Grafix, Projection Lighting, Lucent Lighting, Linear LED, Architainment, KKDC, Lutron

Location: Florence, Italy Lighting Design: Massimo Iarussi, Italy Client: Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore Architect: Natalini Architetti; Guicciardini & Magni Architetti, Italy Interior Design: Guicciardini & Magni Architetti, Italy Additional Design: Electrical Plants: Giancarlo Martarelli; Daniele Baccellini, Italy Lighting Suppliers: Erco

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: Rouen, France Lighting Design: WONDERFULIGHT, France Client: Normandy Region Architect: Atelier d’Architecture King Kong, France Additional Design: dUCKS scéno, France; Kalhe Acoustics, Belgium; Khephren, France; Euro VRD, France; LBE, UK; 2,26 Graphic Design, France Lighting Suppliers: Bega, Soka Disderot, Philips, Artek, Erco, Zumtobel, Ridi, Deltalight, Métalobil

Location: Brussels, Belgium Lighting Design: Lightemotion, Canada Client: SNBC, Eurostation Architect: ExpoDuo, Belgium Interior Design: François Schuiten, Belgium Lighting Suppliers: ETC, iGuzzini, Lighting Services Inc (LSI), Lumenpulse, Luminergie

Sussex Cellar, UK

Chapelle Corneille, France

Museum of the Cathedral of Florence, Italy

Train World, Belgium


SPACES:

Best Landscape Lighting Scheme Low Budget

WINNER

Into The Glacier, Iceland Europe’s second-largest glacier, at a height of 1,200 metres, lies Iceland’s newest tourist attraction: a magnificent, man-made, 500-metre ice cave tunnel, the longest in the world. The aim of the project was to provide a natural and unique experience, well planned light scenes with natural light colours and limited use of other colours. Guests are to experience the lighting without any visible equipment or cables. This project presented many challenges, including the fact that the temperature is consistently around 0 degrees Celsius, so heat from LED lighting had to be minimal in order to prevent melting. This was done by raising lighting equipment from the ice so that it is never in direct contact with it, as well as having a tight network of sensors and precisely programmed DMX controllers to limit the light-time of each light source to 5–7 minutes. All equipment had to be placed inside the walls and ceilings, with light sources of up to 6 metres in length, without visible cables, control tables or light sources. Holes were drilled with a specially built steam drill for illumination, and slots were made in the tunnel corners for control and power cables. It was often difficult to reach the tunnel opening in winter, in a blinding snowstorm and at a height of 1,200 metres, we had to rely on GPS to find

the opening and tunnel in to begin our work. The built-in lighting in the walls and ceiling of the tunnel provides pleasant illumination through the ice, which varies depending on the thickness and age of the ice, as well as highlights layers of ash from times past, including ash from the infamous Eyjafjallajökull eruption. The visitor experience is divided into segments with darkened passages in between to provide contrast. When guests view the Eyjafjallajökull ash layer, for example, the passage ahead is darkened, with only a back-lit wall at a 50-metre distance providing soft and billowing blue and white colours. When the guide has finished his/ her account, the lights in the tunnel walls are turned on, slowly and gradually, until reaching the visitors by the Eyjafjallajökull ash layer 50 metres above. The purpose is to provide the visitors with a unique and powerful experience. There are several themed spaces on the 500-metre trek through the glacier, including an assembly hall, chapel and pillar hall where lighting was installed in locations such as an altar, benches, walls and the floor without any visible installations. This was one of the major challenges in this project. The most spectacular experience on this journey is the large crevasse

that crosses the tunnel and provides guests with a spectacular and mystical connection to the natural forces from the bottom of the crevasse, 30 metres below the glacier surface. The lighting, provided by powerful LED projectors and controls, is a major factor in capturing the magnificence and drawing out the contrasts of this 200-metre- long, 5-metre-wide and 30-metre-deep crevasse. The crevasse is darkened when the guests reach it but is then illuminated in stages, enhancing the experience even further. The video sent in was recorded early in the process when lighting equipment was still being installed and work lighting was still present (light strands).

Project: Into The Glacier Location: Langjökull Glacier, Iceland Lighting Design: EFLA Consulting Engineers, Iceland Client: Isgöng Architect: Arni Pall Johannesson – Reynir Sævarsson, Iceland Lighting Suppliers: Osram, Anolis, Griven, Robe, Pharos


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: London, UK Lighting Design: Michael Grubb Studio, UK Client: Bootstrap Additional Design: Lamps & Amps, UK Lighting Suppliers: Rosco, Architainment, Optelma, Holders Components

Location: Olot, Spain Lighting Design: unparelld’arquitectes, Spain Client: Dolors Rusiñol, Quim Domene

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: Stockholm, Sweden Lighting Design: Sweco, Sweden Client: School KTH Royal Institute of Technology Architect: Tengbom, Sweden Lighting Suppliers: Philips, Louis Poulsen, Targetti

Location: Tivat, Montenegro Lighting Design: Visual Energy, UK Client: Adriatic Marinas Architect: Arhi.Pro, Belgrade Interior Design: Mlinaric, Henry and Zervudachi, UK Lighting Suppliers: iGuzzini, i-LED, Deltalight, LED Linear, Lumenpulse, Megaman

Dalston Roof Park, UK

KTH Square, Sweden

Full Moon, Spain

Porto Montenegro Yacht Club (PMYC), Montenegro


SPACES:

Best Landscape Lighting Scheme High Budget

WINNER

Gasholder No 8 – UK Located in the northern residential quarter of the new King’s Cross redevelopment, Gasholder No 8 is the largest of the iconic gasholders that once dominated the skyline at King’s Cross. This magnificent heritage structure has undergone a major offsite restoration and been repurposed as the frame to contain a new public pocket park and event space. Bell Phillips Architects added a mirror polished stainless steel canopy and a landscaped lawn to create a tranquil green space for use by local families and the children from the neighbouring school. With a long standing involvement in the wider King’s Cross regeneration, lighting designers Speirs + Major were engaged to ensure that the new ‘Gasholder Park’ would be as attractive and as usable by night as it is by day. The lighting is designed to ensure that park users feel safe and secure as natural light fades, but also to make the most of the uniquely juxtaposing materiality and forms of the new park. The circular layout led to the idea of using light to create both a beautiful nighttime landmark and an enlivening immersive experience inspired by the idea of a solar eclipse.

In an eclipse, the form of the moon is revealed by a soft corona of light, which shifts in intensity and position as the sun and moon move relative to each other. Within the park, each of the canopy uprights are uplit with cool white light on the inside using a very narrow beam that enforces the architectural rhythm. This light reaches the interior of the canopy and is reflected back onto the path, creating a glowing ‘corona effect’ that highlights the circular form and creates a sense of enclosure. The historic gasholder frame itself is uplit with cool white light from the inside. The resulting silhouette is not only highly legible from a distance but also creates the illusion that the light is emanating from the corona generated by the interior canopy. This reinforces the sense of enclosure, marking the park out as a truly special place to be. As with a solar eclipse, much of the beauty of the experience lies in how the light animates the form as it moves. The pavilion lighting is programmed over twenty minute cycles, beginning with all lights on and cross fading from east to west over three minutes, followed by a pause of two minutes in darkness (full eclipse) and then a slow east to west cross

fade back up to full brightness. This creates fabulous shifts in the shadows and interreflections from the polished surfaces, gently animating both park and users. The management of the lighting program is based on an astronomical time clock, with the timing of the light cycles also changing in accordance with the lunar calendar. The light scheme is completed with warm white lighting to the steps and ramps neatly integrated into the handrails to ensure the safety of all visitors to the park and to integrate into the wider public realm.

Project: Gasholder No 8 Location: London, UK Lighting Design: Speirs + Major, UK Client: Argent Architect: Bells Phillips Architects, UK Additional Design: Dan Pearson Studio, UK; Townshend Landscape Architects, UK; Arup, UK; Hoare Lea, UK , Carillion, UK; Michael J Lonsdale, UK Lighting Suppliers: Photonstar, WE-EF, Mike Stoane Lighting, Control Lighting


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: Oslo, Norway Lighting Design: ÅF Lighting, Norway Client: Oslo Municipality Architect: Sundt & Thomassen, Norway; Hjellnes Consult, Norway; Rambøll, Norway Lighting Suppliers: ERCO, iGuzzini, Philips

Location: Losinj, Croatia Lighting Design: Skira, Croatia Client: Jadranka Hotels Architect: Rusan Arhitektura, Croatia Lighting Suppliers: Lam32, iGuzzini

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: Doha, Qatar Lighting Design: Studio Lumen Lighting Design & Consultancy, UAE Client: PEO Architect: HRC, USA Interior Design: Woods Bagot, UAE Lighting Suppliers: Credo Lighting

Location: Santiago, Chile Lighting Design: DIAV, Chile Client: MOP (Ministry of Public Works) Architect: Boza Arquitectos, Chile Additional Design: Daniela Orellana, Sofia Valderrama & Carol Litin, Chile Lighting Suppliers: Philips, local suppliers

Verdensparken, Norway

Banana Island Resort, Qatar

Čikat Bay, Croatia

Renato Poblete Park, Chile


ART:

Best Light Art Scheme Low Budget

WINNER

Untitled, Belgium The installation is a rectangular shaped hole, which borders the water surface and forms an abstract interruption in the water. The unexpected aspect of this hollow space is amplified by cutting through the water, feeling like an unnatural, near to impossible gesture. The pond limits the work’s accessibility. Its experience remains on a visual level, enforced by curiousness. Standing on the pond’s shore, it’s hard to define the hole exactly. Its depth is unclear, as is its material and construction method. The hole appears as a container of emptiness, of indefiniteness. This bare, rectangular void stands opposed to the surrounding water. The pressure between them appears maximised and almost tangible. A constantly shifting contrast appears between the rigid black of the hole and the visual play of currents, reflections and colours surrounding it. The work’s perimeter includes these elements, their serenity and force, their effort and indifference.

At night, the dark hole turns into a white, bright element within a vast dark surface. The lights, invisibile, seemingly at the bottom of the hole, define a certain but unclear activity within this area.

searches consciously and unconsciously for assignments within such a specific context. These assignments come commissioned or self-initiated. After a personal, instinctive reading of the context, an answer is articulated.

Dimensions: 12m x 1,20m, depth undisclosed Materials: steel, LED-lighting; the sculpture was on view until 11th of October 2015.

The artistic research consists of measuring the relevance of form, typology, physicality and materiality, but even so the void, the absence of intervention within this context. This relevance is defined again and unconditioned for each project. The contribution is questioned continuously during development, until the moment the answer on it is irrevocable.

88888 is the collaboration of Karel Burssens (b. 1984, Belgium) and Jeroen Verrecht (b. 1984, Belgium). They share a general interest in spatial conditions and establish this in a practice of installation art, scenography, architecture and photography. Together or separate, they work on several international projects in the worlds of museums, fashion, contemporary dance and architecture. Their expertise grew on both conceptual and productional levels, the broad interests and experience nurturing mutually. In projects, a research on the experience and use of space is unfolded. The spatial and contextual play a crucial, defining role. 88888

Project: Untitled Location: Horst, Belgium Lighting Design: 88888, Belgium Client: Horst Arts & Music Festival Architect: 88888, Belgium Lighting Suppliers: Luxlumen


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: Light+Building, Frankfurt, Germany Artist: Aleksandra Stratimirovic, Sweden; Athanassios Danilof, Greece Client: Targetti Lighting Suppliers: Targetti, Duralamp

Location: Bradford, UK Artist: Liz West, UK Client: National Media Museum (Science Museum Group) Architect: Nissen Richards Studio, UK Lighting Suppliers: LEE Filters, Osram

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: Islamic Arts Festival, Sharjah, UAE Lighting Design: Chris Wood Light, UK Client: Sharjah Art Foundation

Location: Durham, UK Artist: Mick Stephenson, UK Client: Artichoke/Durham County Council Lighting Suppliers: Mick Stephenson

Color Wheels, Germany

Light Rain, UAE

An Additive Mix, UK

Litre of Light, UK


ART:

Best Light Art Scheme High Budget

WINNER

Deep Web, Germany Deep Web is a monumental immersive audiovisual installation created by light artist Christopher Bauder and composer / musician Robert Henke. Sublimating the spectacular industrial architecture of Kraftwerk Berlin, Deep Web plunges the audience into a ballet of iridescent kinetic light and surroundsound. The generative, luminous architectural structure weaves 175 motorised spheres and 12 high power laser systems into a 25-metre wide and 10-metre high super-structure, bringing to life a luminous analogy to the nodes and connections of digital networks. Moving up and down, and choreographed and synchronised to an original multi-channel musical score by Robert Henke, the spheres are illuminated by blasts of colourful laser beams resulting in three-dimensional sculptural light drawings and arrangements in Kraftwerk Berlin’s cavernous darkness. The installation brings together decades of separate research and experimentation by two artists with unique visions and passions for sound and light, and by innovative companies working in these fields. High-end laser system manufacturer LaserAnimation Sollinger provided the technical expertise and development for this very specific spatial laser setup, while the motor winch systems and main control software are provided courtesy of

design studio WHITEvoid and Kinetic Lights. The work was originally commissioned by the Festival of Lights Lyon 2015, and developed in cooperation with local producer Tetro. Due to the festival’s cancellation after the tragic events in Paris, Berliners have the unique chance to attend an exclusive preview before the project will be presented in December 2016 in Lyon. An artist and designer working in the fields of light and installation art, media design and scenography, Christopher Bauder focuses on the translation of bits and bytes into objects and environments, and vice versa. Space, object, sound, light and interaction are key elements of his work. In 2004 he founded the multidisciplinary art and design studio WHITEvoid, which specialises in interactivity, media, interior architecture, and electronic engineering. He is best known for his city-wide light art installation “Lichtgrenze”, created in 2014 together with his brother Marc, for the 25th anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall. Alongside his numerous releases as Monolake, Robert Henke is also well known for the music, audiovisual installations and performances he has been creating under his own name since the early 90s. Due to his background in engineering and fascination with the beauty of

technical objects, the development of his own instruments and algorithms has always been an integral part of his creative process. Henke also co-developed the omnipresent Ableton Live music software, which since its invention in 1999 has become the standard tool for electronic music production and completely redefined live performance practice. Henke has continuously pushed his love for music and programming to new levels, most recently with “Lumière” and “Lumière II”, an audiovisual composition for lasers and sound, and long term artistic project that explores syntax, meaning and narration within a newly developed and self-written audio-visual language.

Project: Deep Web Location: Berlin, Germany Artist: Christopher Bauder & Robert Henke, Germany Client: Originally commissioned by: Fête de Lumière Lyon, Tetro Additional Design: Ralph Larmann Photography, Netherlands; LaserAnimation Sollinger, Germany Lighting Suppliers: WHITEvoid, Kinetic Lights, Kraftwerk Berlin, CTM Festival, Lichtblick, satis&fy


www.darcawards.com/architectural

SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: Moscow, Russia Lighting Design: Koptseva Natalya & Vasily Tarasenko, Russia Client: Lukoil Lighting Suppliers: Seekway

Location: Lima, Peru Lighting Design: Claudia Paz Lighting Studio, Peru Client: San Isidro Local Government Architect: Cesar Castro, Peru Additional Design: Colour Burst (Interactive Programming); Future Sound Design (Sound Artist) Lighting Suppliers: Philips Color Kinetics, VVVV, Software Kinect

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: London, UK Lighting Design: Mary Branson, UK Client: Houses of Parliament Additional Design: Adam Aaronson, UK; WLX Productions, UK; Musson Engineering, UK Lighting Suppliers: Applelec

Location: London, UK Lighting Design: ACT Lighting Design, Belgium Client: The Crown Estate & Regent Street Association

LIGHT CUBE, Russia

New Dawn, UK

Pixel Flow, Peru

Timeless Elegance, UK


EVENT:

Best Creative Lighting Event

WINNER

Night of Heritage Light, UK The Society of Light and Lighting (SLL) responded to the United Nations International Year of Light with the Night of Heritage Light (NoHL) “It’s about inspiring the next generation of minds to make the great breakthroughs in lighting by thinking big and realising the industry’s potential.” Liz Peck. On 1st October, in an event to showcase the talents of SLL members and the lighting community, teams of dedicated lighting designers shone a ‘new light’ on UNESCO World Heritage Sites across the UK and Ireland to celebrate the International Year of Light (IYoL). Starting at William the Conqueror’s Tower of London, the NoHL worked its way up the country as the natural light faded. The 9 sites across the British Isles included Giant’s Causeway, Liverpool Maritime, Edinburgh Old and New Towns, Fountains Abbey, Ironbridge Gorge, Blaenhavon, Blenheim Palace, and the Jurassic Coast. Each installation was captured in images taken by volunteers from the Royal Photographic Society. The sites were either lit for the first time, or the lighting designers supplemented existing lighting installations. “The RPS welcomes the NoHL which offered amateur photographers a unique opportunity to record some the UK’s best known heritage sites in a unique and exciting way.” Dr Prichard (RPS). Each site was allocated a design team leader taken from SLL volunteers across the nation.

Design teams were asked to develop a design specifically for their site, mindful of the set-up time available, while being respectful of the World Heritage status and the owners wishes. Design teams then produced scheme designs to the Core NoHL team with a shopping list of dream equipment to be sourced. Logistics formed a huge part of the challenge, with the equipment list consisting of in the region of 1000 luminaires, 2.5km of cable, filters, baffles and mounting accessories sourced from NoHL partner organisations. All shipped up hill and down dale to carefully coordinated rendezvous’ points with design teams. By combining a love for light and art, design teams showcased the practical applications of lighting and how it can improve and enhance architecture. The event was conceived and organized by Members of the Society of Light and Lighting donating their time and talents to deliver this unique event. The success of the event can be measured against the NoHL’s core team’s original goal – to showcase the lighting communities skills and creativity to the nation as a whole, raising the profile of the UK and Ireland’s talents while celebrating the UNESCO IYoL. In terms of achieving these aspirations NoHL was a resounding success: 26 separate pieces of media coverage including: 9 regional broadcast; 1 national broadcast; 2 national press and 14 regional press. Extensive press coverage across trade and consumer media (including a 5-minute slot on BBC’s The One

Show, filmed on location at the Durdle Door installation) provided an estimated audience reach of over 13 million. On the night: 899 twitter posts, 1.35 million interactions, 2.84 million impressions with a 47% engagement rate (advertising quality Tweets average 3%).

Event: Night of Heritage Light Location: 9 UNESCO World Heritage Sites across the UK Organiser: Society of Light and Lighting, UK Client: 9 UNESCO World Heritage Site Stakeholders across the UK Main Partners: Arup, BDP Lighting, F Mark Ltd, LPA Lighting, Apollo Lighting, Cundall Light4, Designphase, DPA Lighting, G3 Lighting Design, Hoare Lea, Light and Design, Lite-Ltd, Michael Grubb Studio, Edinburgh Napier University, Ramboll, Speirs + Major, Troup Bywaters & Anders Main Sponsors: Amerlux, Black Light, Blue Parrot, Chroma Lighting, Core Lighting, Cree, Double Take Projections, DW Windsor, ERCO, Fagerhult, GE, HSS Hire, iGuzzini, Kemps, LED Linear, Light Projects, Lumenpulse, Martin Professional, Meyer, Osram, Performance In Lighting, Philips, Reggiani, Rosco, Rose Bruford, Soraa, Thorn, Zumtobel


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SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Location: London, UK Organiser: Artichoke Trust Main Partners: Sarah Blood, Cédric Le Borgne, Cleary Connolly, Elaine

Location: Paris, France Organiser: Elephant Paname Main Partners: Temeloy Advanced Lighting Solutions Main Sponsors: Concord

Lumiere London 2016, UK

Buckholtz, Benedetto Bufalino & Benoit Deseille, Janet Echelman / Studio Echelman, FIELD.io, Ron Haselden, Beth J Ross, Tae gon KIM, Lab[au], Luzinterruptus, NOVAK, Deepa Mann-Kler, Ocubo, Julian Opie, Floating Pictures, Porté par le vent, Nathaniel Rackowe, Bernd Spiecker, Mick Stephenson, Central Saint Martin’s Students & MyShelter Foundation, TILT, Groupe LAPS / Thomas Veyssiére, Patrice Warrener

Lumière – The Play of Brilliants, France

Main Sponsors: Mayor of London, Arts Council England, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Heart of London King’s Cross, London & Partners, The Crown Estate, Grange Hotels, The Grosvenor Estate, Regent Street Association, Shaftesbury, Westminster City Council, The David and Claudia Harding Foundation, Transport for London, Unusual Rigging, Atom Bank, British Land Land Rover, Regent’s Place, Veolia

FOURTH PLACE:

FIFTH PLACE:

Location: London, UK Organiser: Keith Watson Main Partners: Canary Wharf Group Main Sponsors: Canary Wharf Group

Location: Stockholm, Sweden Organiser: City of Stockholm and ÅF Lighting Client: Stockholms Stad – The City of Stockholm Main Sponsors: ÅF Lighting + SGM

Winter Lights @ Canary Wharf, UK

Lighting up the Royal Seaport’s Gas Holders, Sweden


KIT:

Best Architectural Lighting Products Interior Luminaires

WINNER

Billet – Mike Stoane Lighting Mike Stoane Lighting have developed the Billet fitting as a flexible magnetic solution for cove lighting and other applications where the multiple plane flexibility allows it to be manipulated to integrate with the architectural features. As a magnetic product it can be attached to ferrous surfaces but if they don’t exist, nail tape (as photographed) can be pre-attached to the mount surface or set in the desired location. The magnetic feature allows subtle and flexible repositioning of the product to

tailor the lighting effect during the focusing stages of a project. This product can also be supplied without magnets for bonding to surfaces. Ideally delivered in pre-agreed lengths the system can also be site trimmed. Billet uses high quality LEDs with great colour rendering properties, densely packed together and with even diffusion. Each billet is just 52mm long and 12mm wide.

Product: Billet Manufacturer: Mike Stoane Lighting


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SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

FOURTH PLACE:

Laser

Splitbox

View

FIFTH PLACE:

SIXTH PLACE:

SEVENTH PLACE:

Lucy

KKLN-01 Linear Lens

NOD

Manufacturer: iGuzzini

Manufacturer: Delta Light

Manufacturer: ERCO

Manufacturer: KKDC

Manufacturer: iGuzzini

Manufacturer: XAL

JOINT EIGHTH PLACE:

EOS LED Circular

TILE Premium – Tunable White

Manufacturer: LED Luks

Manufacturer: Cooledge

JOINT NINTH PLACE:

JOINT TENTH PLACE:

CAVO

3D LED Flex 100 Z3

Manufacturer: XAL

Yori Linear

Manufacturer: Reggiani

(Xicato XTM version)

Manufacturer: Radiant Architectural Lighting

Hidden Flex

Manufacturer: Mizar Lighting


KIT:

Best Architectural Lighting Products Exterior Luminaires

WINNER

Ghost Rectangular – SIMES Architectural outdoor lighting specialist SIMES, offers a raw and stylish, Sadler designed, exterior lighting solution with Ghost Rectangular. The new luminaire is fashioned from concrete creating a rugged lit effect for exterior spaces. The light blade comes from the concrete. When it’s off, it disappears, with no visible luminaire structure but just a cut in the concrete with brutal and magic inspiration. Actually a technical prodigy, directly cast into the concrete, the product is of a sophisticated and invisible genius tha fuses architecture and light in a natural way. Ghost is a lighting void that is created using a polypropylene housing anchored to two retaining panels before pouring in concrete to make the structure. Once the concrete is dry, the housing is removed and a space is left, it is a natural and sharp cast created in the drying

process. Ghost is composed of two elements; the housing and the lighting element. The housing has two separate parts, firstly, a jig, which forms the housing, and is extracted together with the retaining panel after completing the casting and removing the anchor screws. Secondly, a housing that remains embedded inside the casting and houses the lighting lement when the jig is removed. The housing is supplied with bolts, locking system and stickers to be applied on the outside of the retaining panels to ensure the perfect alignment if installing multiple luminaires. The lighting element is die cast aluminium and is anchored to the casing through proper screws. It remains completely hidden in the void and is hard wired with a three-metre cable. The LED lighting is supplied for a 230V circuit and comes in a 3,000K colour temperature with a CRI of 80. Ghost Rectangular has a

luminaire luminous flux of up to 360lm. The IP65 rated luminaire is ideal for concrete based structures including residential and commercial properties as well as walls and facades. The flexible luminaire can be created in a horizontal or vertical position and can be positioned wherever is required. SIMES manufactures superbly-finished exterior lighting solutions for parks, gardens, buildings, humid areas, swimming pools, fountains and pedestrian zones. The company, with its R&D and manufacturing base in Italy, produces stylish and slimline fixtures that use the latest LED technology to combine minimalist design aesthetics with maximum energy-efficiency ratings.

Product: Ghost Rectangular Manufacturer: SIMES


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SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Ness Outdoor

Cells

Manufacturer: Design LED Products

Manufacturer: Reggiani

JOINT FOURTH PLACE

Mini Look Wood Bollard

VarioLED OCEANOS

FIFTH PLACE:

SIXTH PLACE:

SEVENTH PLACE:

Blade

Lumenbeam

Lif

EIGHTH PLACE:

NINTH PLACE:

TENTH PLACE:

VarioLED Flex AMOR

G-Spot POI

Underscore InOut

Manufacturer: SIMES

Manufacturer: acdc

Manufacturer: LED Linear

Manufacturer: LED Linear

Manufacturer: Lumenpulse

Manufacturer: SGM Light

Manufacturer: Selux

Manufacturer: iGuzzini


KIT:

Best Architectural Lighting Products Technology

WINNER

OLED Light Panels – LG Display It’s time to let your imagination run away with you. LG Display’s OLED Light Panels, in rigid and groundbreaking flexible options, have been designed to give freedom to creativity. Incredibly thin and lightweight, OLED Light Panels ensure designers can develop much more creative shapes than existing lighting can provide. With a bending radius of 20mm, the flexible panels can be twisted into the most extraordinary shapes whilst maintaining homogeneous light from their surface. Freedom of movement creates freedom of expression as the flexible OLED Light Panels present entirely new ways to seamlessly blend light into interior and lighting design. As a surface light source, OLED Light Panels have a completely flat and even light output with no glare and no shadow. This is the first of a unique combination of human-friendly characteristics that are provided by OLED light.

Running at a cool <35 C, the panels do not require additional heat sinking meaning the 0.88mm thickness of the rigid panel and 0.41mm flexible panel depth is not compromised. This cool-running operation ensures the panels are touchable and easy to handle. The light produced by the OLED panels has spectral power distributions that are close to natural daylight. As well as reducing glaring light, OLED Light Panels have no UV and their blue levels are much lower than non-organic LEDs. People feel emotionally comfortable under OLED light which makes it ideal for places where there is limited natural light. With 3,000K and 4,000K CCT, the rigid OLED panels have an efficacy of up to 65lm/W whilst the flexible panels achieve 50lm/W. OLED Light Panels have a high CRI of over 90 without compromising the efficiency of the panels. A variety of rigid panel sizes are now available, from the smallest 53x55mm to the largest 320x320mm. The flexible panel types

are currently available in 200x50mm and 406x50mm. Further sizes are in prototype. The combination of impressive product features and human-friendly benefits of OLED light means the range of OLED Light Panels are ideal for integration in furniture, objects, luminaires and lighting schemes. LG Display’s OLED lighting can be experienced in the UK by visiting Applelec’s central London showroom. The showroom features a lighting scheme composed entirely in OLED which makes it the ideal place to discover this unique technology and to understand how it can be used by designers.

Product: OLED Light Panels Manufacturer: LG Display


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SECOND PLACE:

THIRD PLACE:

Xicato Intelligent Module with

Flicker Free MR16 LED Lamp

Bluetooth Smart (XIM BLE) Manufacturer: Xicato

Manufacturer: Soraa

JOINT FOURTH PLACE:

Beauty Series

Micro wall washer MDB-W

FIFTH PLACE:

SIXTH PLACE:

SEVENTH PLACE:

Lumentalk

Casambi Control Technology

Color-Amp

EIGHTH PLACE:

NINTH PLACE:

TENTH PLACE:

Media Wall Content Management

IoT Ecosystem

Active+

Manufacturer: Xicato

Manufacturer: Lumenpulse

Manufacturer: illumination Physics

Manufacturer: Bartenbach

Manufacturer: Casambi Technologies

Manufacturer: Gooee

Manufacturer: GVA Lighting

Manufacturer: Helvar


DARC AWARD: Best of the Best

WINNER

Into The Glacier, Iceland Europe’s second-largest glacier, at a height of 1,200 metres, lies Iceland’s newest tourist attraction: a magnificent, man-made, 500-metre ice cave tunnel, the longest in the world. The aim of the project was to provide a natural and unique experience, well planned light scenes with natural light colours and limited use of other colours. Guests are to experience the lighting without any visible equipment or cables. This project presented many challenges, including the fact that the temperature is consistently around 0 degrees Celsius, so heat from LED lighting had to be minimal in order to prevent melting. This was done by raising lighting equipment from the ice so that it is never in direct contact with it, as well as having a tight network of sensors and precisely programmed DMX controllers to limit the light-time of each light source to 5–7 minutes. All equipment had to be placed inside the walls and ceilings, with light sources of up to 6 metres in length, without visible cables, control tables or light sources. Holes were drilled with a specially built steam drill for illumination, and slots were made in the tunnel corners for control and power cables. It was often difficult to reach the tunnel opening in winter, in a blinding snowstorm and at a height of 1,200 metres, we had to rely on GPS to find

the opening and tunnel in to begin our work. The built-in lighting in the walls and ceiling of the tunnel provides pleasant illumination through the ice, which varies depending on the thickness and age of the ice, as well as highlights layers of ash from times past, including ash from the infamous Eyjafjallajökull eruption. The visitor experience is divided into segments with darkened passages in between to provide contrast. When guests view the Eyjafjallajökull ash layer, for example, the passage ahead is darkened, with only a back-lit wall at a 50-metre distance providing soft and billowing blue and white colours. When the guide has finished his/ her account, the lights in the tunnel walls are turned on, slowly and gradually, until reaching the visitors by the Eyjafjallajökull ash layer 50 metres above. The purpose is to provide the visitors with a unique and powerful experience. There are several themed spaces on the 500-metre trek through the glacier, including an assembly hall, chapel and pillar hall where lighting was installed in locations such as an altar, benches, walls and the floor without any visible installations. This was one of the major challenges in this project. The most spectacular experience on this journey is the large crevasse

that crosses the tunnel and provides guests with a spectacular and mystical connection to the natural forces from the bottom of the crevasse, 30 metres below the glacier surface. The lighting, provided by powerful LED projectors and controls, is a major factor in capturing the magnificence and drawing out the contrasts of this 200-metre- long, 5-metre-wide and 30-metre-deep crevasse. The crevasse is darkened when the guests reach it but is then illuminated in stages, enhancing the experience even further. The video sent in was recorded early in the process when lighting equipment was still being installed and work lighting was still present (light strands).

Project: Into The Glacier Location: Langjökull Glacier, Iceland Lighting Design: EFLA Consulting Engineers, Iceland Client: Isgöng Architect: Arni Pall Johannesson – Reynir Sævarsson, Iceland Lighting Suppliers: Osram, Anolis, Griven, Robe, Pharos


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with thanks to our manufacturer partners

15 SEPT EMBE R 2016 / LOND ON

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MAY 2017 / LOND ON

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darc awards 2016 / Architectural  

Celebrating the best in lighting design