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Program

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curtis on tour

dan zanes and friends

st. petersburg philharmonic orchestra

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takรกcs quartet with Nobuyuki Tsujii

alvin ailey american dance theater

the silk road ensemble with yo-yo ma

lara downes Long Time Coming

sarah silverman

Issue 7: mar-apr 2011

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Young artists competition winners

Terence Blanchard quintet branford marsalis quartet


Before the show

Before the Curtain Rises, Please Play Your Part

Photo: Lynn Goldsmith

• As a courtesy to others, please turn off all electronic devices. • If you have any hard candy, please unwrap it before the lights dim.

a message from

Don Roth, Ph.D. Executive Director Mondavi Center

• Please remember that the taking of photographs or the use of any type of audio or video recording equipment is strictly prohibited.

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n our final playbill for this season, we will have a lot of exciting news about our just announced 10th season at the Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts. We will be bringing a wide range of music and dance, important speakers and films— the full gamut of arts from around the world. Watch in particular for the most important premiere of our 10-year history. So many people are involved in nurturing young talent—parents, teachers, performers. In a day when arts in the schools often are just hanging on, the Mondavi Center continues to invest in the talent of tomorrow. One way we have done that for the last six years has been through our Young Artists Competition. On Sunday, March 27, we will be presenting the winners in concert in the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. The winners range in age from 8 to 21 and will be performing on piano, strings and voice. Earlier this year former grand prize winner Kenric Tam performed a solo piano recital as part of our Debut Series. Those of you who heard Kenric can see how the talent nurtured in the Young Artists Competition continues to grow and flourish. Our partnership with the Curtis Institute of Music is now in its fourth year. Curtis has educated some of the great artists of our time (violin virtuoso Hilary Hahn, New York Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert, for example) and of the past (Samuel Barber, Leonard Bernstein). “Where Legends Begin” is how Curtis puts it these days, and they are not wrong. Mondavi Center patrons get to be among the first to experience the Curtis students of today in concert when Curtis on Tour returns to the VST March 19 and 20. This year pianist Ignat Solzhenitsyn (Curtis ’95) is joined by a group of Curtis students in a commissioned piece by Daron Hagen (Curtis ’84). This is one of the hidden treasures of every Mondavi Center season—do not miss it. Wikipedia says that Chamber Music is “art music that is performed by a small number of performers with one performer to a part.” I don’t know exactly why some music is “art music” and other not, but we certainly have an abundance of great chamber music coming our way in a short period of time. Most of us immediately recognize the Takács Quartet, in recital with Nobuyuki Tsujii, as chamber music. Takács, which has been together for more than 35 years, is one of the finest string quartets around—what a treat to hear them with Van Cliburn competition winner Tsujii. In my view, some of the best “chamber music” of our time is created by great jazz ensembles, two of which are appearing on the stage of Jackson Hall: the Terence Blanchard Quintet and the Branford Marsalis Quartet. Wikipedia continues: “Because of its intimate nature, chamber music has been described as ‘the music of friends.’” This definitely figures in the case of Blanchard and Marsalis, who have been touring with other members of their quartets for many years.

• Please look around and locate the exit nearest you. That exit may be behind you, to the side or in front of you. In the unlikely event of a fire alarm or other emergency please leave the building through that exit. • As a courtesy to all our patrons and for your safety, anyone leaving his or her seat during the performance may not be re-admitted to his/her ticketed seat while the performance is in progress.

info Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities 530.754.2787 • TDD: 530.754.5402 In the event of an emergency, patrons requiring physical assistance on the Orchestra Terrace, Grand Tier and Upper Tier levels please proceed to the elevator alcove refuge where this sign appears. Please let us know ahead of time for any special seating requests or accommodations. See p. 75 for more information.

Membership 530.754.5436 Member contributions to the Mondavi Center presenting program help to offset the costs of the annual season of performances and lectures, and provide a variety of arts education and outreach programs to the community. Friends of Mondavi Center 530.754.5000 Contributors to the Mondavi Center are eligible to join the Friends of Mondavi Center, a volunteer support group that assists with educational programs and audience development. Volunteers 530.754.1000 Mondavi Center volunteers assist with numerous functions, including house ushering and the activities of the Friends of Mondavi Center and the Arts and Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee.

Tours 530.754.5399

Enjoy the performances.

One-hour guided tours of the Mondavi Center’s Jackson Hall, Vanderhoef Studio Theatre and Yocha Dehe Grand Lobby are given regularly by the Friends of Mondavi Center. Reservations are required.

Don Roth Executive Director Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

Lost and Found Hotline 530.752.8580

P.S.: Both our Jackson Hall and Studio Crossings Series come to a close this month. I hope you have enjoyed our adventures across musical cultures and genres!

main exit on your way out.

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Recycle We reuse our playbills! Thank you for returning your recycled playbill in the bin located by the

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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march

Complimentary wine pours in the Bartholomew Room 7–8PM and during intermission for Inner Circle Donors. Pouring C.G. Di Arie Wines on: Mar 26 St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

Sponsored by

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Curtis on Tour A Debut Series Event Saturday, March 19, 2011 • 8PM Sunday, March 20, 2011 • 2PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

There will be one intermission.

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Davis Hospitality...

Proud Sponsors of The Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis

Amenities Include:

 Breakfast Buffet with Cook To Order Omelets  Nightly Cocktail Reception  Deluxe Plush Bedding  WIFI Throughout  Bee Kind Amenities  32” LCD TV’s

Now Featuring: Complimentary Bicycle Program* For reservations or more information* Please contact us at: (800) 753-0035 110 F Street Davis, CA 95616 • www.hallmarkinn.com

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curtis on tour

Curtis on Tour Hommage à R. Sch., Op. 15d for clarinet, viola and piano György Kurtág [merkwürdige Pirouetten des Kapellmeisters Johannes Kreisler]: Vivo “Kapellmeister Johannes Kreisler’s Curious Pirouettes” [E.: der begrenzte Kreis...]: Molto semplice, piano e legato “Eusebius: The Delimited Circle” [...und wieder zuckt es schmerzlich F. um die Lippen...]: Feroce, agitato “…and again Florestan’s lips tremble in anguish” [Felhő valék, már süt a nap...] [töredék-töredék]: Calmo, scorrevole “I was a cloud, now the sun is already shining...” In der Nacht: Presto “At Night” Abschied [Meister Raro entdeckt Guillaume de Machaut]: Adagio, poco andante “Parting (Meister Raro discovers Guillame de Machaut)” Kelly Coyle, clarinet Ayane Kozasa, viola Ignat Solzhenitsyn, piano Sonata for Clarinet (or Viola) and Piano, Op. 120, No. 1 Johannes Brahms Allegro appassionato Andante un poco adagio Allegretto grazioso Vivace (Saturday, March 19 only) Ayane Kozasa, viola Ignat Solzhenitsyn, piano Sonata for Clarinet (or Viola) and Piano, Op. 120, No. 2 Allegro amabile (1833–97) Allegro appassionato Andante con moto—Allegro (Saturday, March 20 only) Kelly Coyle, clarinet Ignat Solzhenitsyn, piano Intermission Book of Days, for clarinet, viola and piano Daron Hagen Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Trio in E-flat Major, K. 498, for clarinet, viola and piano (“Kegelstatt”) Andante Menuetto Rondeaux: Allegretto

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Kelly Coyle, clarinet Ayane Kozasa, viola Ignat Solzhenitsyn, piano Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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curtis on tour

Program Notes

Sonatas for Clarinet (or Viola) and Piano, Op. 120, No. 1 Johannes Brahms (Born May 7, 1833, in Hamburg; died April 3, 1897, in Vienna)

Hommage à R. Sch., Op. 15d, for clarinet, viola and piano György Kurtág (Born February 19, 1926, in Lugoj, Romania) György Kurtág’s output is filled with homages, epitaphs and requiems for friends, musicians and composers dead or alive. Perhaps this is only natural; his long career has brought him into contact with most of the great musicians of our time, beginning at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest, where he befriended György Ligeti and studied with Pál Kadosa, Sándor Veress, Ference Farkas and Leó Weiner. After the Hungarian uprising in 1956, he left to study in Paris with Olivier Messiaen and Darius Milhaud and heard Stockhausen’s Gruppen and Ligeti’s Artikulation in Cologne; all had a profound impact. Returning to Hungary, he composed his Op. 1 String Quartet—which some have characterized as having fused the idiom of Bartók with the concentrated brevity of Webern. He taught piano and chamber music at the Liszt Academy from 1967 to 1993, and from the 1990s onward his international reputation continued to grow, initially through residencies in Berlin, Vienna, the Netherlands and Paris. He has been named Officer of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and has received the Kossuth Award in Hungary, the Prize of Honor in Austria and the Ernst von Siemens Prize in Germany. In 2001, Kurtág became an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 2006, he received the prestigious Grawemeyer Award for the concertante..., Op 42, for violin, viola and orchestra. One of the most striking of Kurtág’s “homages” is that for Robert Schumann, scored (significantly, perhaps) for the same unusual ensemble as the 19th-century composer’s Märchenerzählungen, Op. 132: clarinet, viola and piano. Like many of Kurtág’s works, the Hommage à R. Sch (the abbreviation of the composer’s name seemed to underscore the music’s condensed nature) had a long gestation period: It was begun in the 1970s, and after 15 years of “tinkering” it was completed in 1990. The score fascinates the ear with an austere density and sort of sheer surface sonic beauty, while witty allusions further reward listeners familiar with Schumann’s music. Its six movements are of widely varying lengths and moods.

The Sonata No. 2 (performed only on Sunday, March 20), in three movements, opens with a pastorale movement (Allegro amabile) in which the clarinet takes the lead initially but engages in intriguing and indeed “amiable” interplay with the piano throughout. The searing Allegro, molto appassionato contains a stately, trio-like middle section. The third movement is a delightful set of variations on a theme of restful quietude which is submitted to the widest variety of possible moods, from the playful to the turbulent and the majestic.

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But it was not long before inspiration struck again, and he was back at his writing desk. In March 1891, he met Richard Mühlfeld, principal clarinetist of the Meiningen Court Orchestra, an ensemble that had figured heavily in Brahms’s early symphonic style. He was enchanted by Mühlfeld’s gloriously rounded sonority, and he resolved immediately to compose something for the man he called “Fräulein Klarinette” because of the soft sensuousness of his tone. In rapid succession the composer produced the Trio for clarinet, cello, and piano, Op. 114 and its companion, the magnificent Quintet for clarinet and strings, Op. 115. But he was not finished yet; in 1894, with Mühlfeld’s sound still “in his ear” as it were, Brahms delivered up his final chamber masterpieces, the two Sonatas for clarinet (or viola) and piano, Op. 120. The sonatas received their premiere the following January in Vienna, with Mühlfeld on clarinet and the composer on piano. Brahms later produced versions for viola and violin, and the former are a staple of the viola repertoire. The Sonata No. 1 (performed only on Saturday, March 19) is cast in four movements, with a turbulent, melancholy initial Allegro appassionato and a sweet-natured Andante un poco adagio whose restless middle section reveals just a tad of the opening movement’s darkness. An Allegretto grazioso, more minuet than scherzo, features a pensive trio section. The happy-go-lucky Vivace finale contains ever-so-brief reminders of the disquieting moments heard earlier, but the music at last charges to a triumphant conclusion.

The undulating initial “Kapellmeister Johannes Kreisler’s Curious Pirouettes” refers to the playful character that Schumann borrowed from E.T.A. Hoffmann for his Kreisleriana. “Eusebius, the Proscribed Circle” (again, alluding to a figure from Hoffmann) is a gentle canon that leads directly into “And again Florestan’s lips tremble in pain,” where Eusebius’ wildly outgoing alter-ego bursts forth. “I was a cloud, now the sun is shining” is a mystical conversation, some 15 seconds in length, that gives way to a ghostly nocturnal “In the Night” (itself recalling a movement from Schumann’s Phantasiestücke). The haunting final “Abschied” is an extraordinary thought-piece, longer than all the other movements put together. Again referencing a character familiar from Schumann’s piano works, “Master Raro Discovers Guillaume de Machaut” features oddball harmonies and allusions to medieval polyphony. Its persistent piano chords leave the listener in a pensive mood.

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In the summer of 1890, the 57-year-old Brahms, at the peak of his creative powers, rather impetuously declared that the Op. 111 String Quintet would be his final composition. With exaggerated finality he allegedly cleared his house of unfinished works, writing to his publisher that he had “thrown a lot of ripped-up manuscripts into the [river] Traun.” (True or not, it’s terrifying to think about.) To be sure the Quintet, sunny and ebullient, would have capped his career on a joyous note.


Daron Hagen has established himself as one of the most significant compositional voices of his generation. He writes “restless, questioning music that never loses its heart,” according to the Chicago Tribune. Born in Milwaukee in 1961, at age 19, he became the youngest composer since Samuel Barber to have a work premiered by the Philadelphia Orchestra. A graduate of Curtis and Juilliard, he has been commissioned by major orchestras and soloists and was composer-in-residence for several major festivals and other organizations. Among his many awards is the Friedheim Prize. His works enjoy hundreds of performances a year. He has served on the faculties of Bard College, City College of New York, the Curtis Institute of Music and New York University. Of Book of Days, Hagen writes: “I have never wondered ‘from whence,’ as did Theodore Roethke so famously, ‘cometh song.’ Music, as far back as I can remember, has flowed unbidden through my mind. But when it is gone, I have often wondered, to paraphrase Keats, whence it has fled. For better or worse, music has provided both the context in which I have experienced my life and the method by which I have measured its progress. “What does ‘Monday’ mean, then? Or ‘Thursday’? Or even ‘Book of Days’? To me, music in itself is a pure abstraction that means everything and nothing at all. Descriptive titles serve as useful tools for helping the listener find a way to enjoy the piece. But lately I have begun to think that it is more honest to simply designate when the music came, rather than try to describe what it might be about. I have measured out my life not with coffee spoons like Eliot’s Prufrock, but with days. Here are seven.”

Trio in E-flat Major, K. 498, for clarinet, viola and piano (“Kegelstatt”) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Born January 27, 1756, in Salzburg; died December 5, 1791, in Vienna) If Mozart lived today he’d likely be a “gamer” as well as a composer. Whether at billiards or bowling, the composer loved to while away the hours at games with friends,and was apparently quite adept at skittles, the Viennese version of bowling. The latter habit seems to be responsible for the subtitle of his K. 498 Trio, even though it’s unclear whether the piece was indeed composed at the Kegelstatt (essentially, the bowling alley). True, just a week before completing the Trio he had written atop a manuscript for his Twelve Duos for Bassett-Horns “written while playing skittles,” so the notion is not implausible. But in the case of the Trio, the source of the nickname seems to have been a publisher, not Mozart himself. Almost everything in Mozart’s “Kegelstatt” goes against the expectations we bring to Classical-period piano trios, beginning with the scoring itself. The clarinet was still a new phenomenon. Both Mozart and clarinetist Anton Stadler had helped advocate its use

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curtis on tour

Book of Days, for clarinet, viola and piano Daron A. Hagen (Born November 4, 1961, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin)

in both orchestral and chamber music; Mozart wrote his Clarinet Quintet and the famous Clarinet Concerto for Stadler. The Trio was written in August 1786 and published two years later. At the center of its inception was friendship; it was first performed in the home of the composer’s friends the Jacquins, with daughter Franziska (a Mozart pupil) on piano, the composer on viola and Stadler on clarinet. It is an amiable and relatively uncomplicated piece, very much the sort of thing one might play at home among friends. Instead of an Allegro it begins with a laid-back Andante, involving an elaborate but agreeable conversation between participants. The Menuetto features an assertive principal theme and a mildly mysterious trio in which the viola carries on a quirky, rapid-running discourse of its own. The Rondeaux (Allegretto) finale opens with a leisurely subject introduced by the clarinet and taken up by the piano; its sunny, idyllic mood is only briefly darkened by a wispy cloud or two. —Paul Horsley

The Curtis Institute of Music educates and trains exceptionally gifted young musicians for careers as performing artists on the highest professional level. One of the world’s leading conservatories, Curtis is highly selective and provides full-tuition scholarships to all of its 160 students. In this intimate environment, students receive personalized attention from a celebrated faculty. A busy schedule of performances is at the heart of Curtis’s distinctive “learn by doing” approach. This philosophy has produced an impressive number of notable artists since the school’s founding in 1924, from such legends as Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber to current stars Juan Diego Flórez, Alan Gilbert, Hilary Hahn, Jennifer Higdon, Leila Josefowicz, Lang Lang and Time for Three. Kelly Coyle, from Naperville, Illinois, entered the Curtis Institute of Music in 2007 and studies clarinet with Donald Montanaro, retired associate principal of the Philadelphia Orchestra. All students at Curtis receive merit-based full-tuition scholarships, and Coyle is the Nellie Lee Bok Fellow. As a member of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, she has worked with renowned conductors such as Simon Rattle, Robert Spano and Michael Tilson Thomas. She was a featured player in Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique under Christoph Eschenbach and Musorgsky’s Pictures from an Exhibition under Peter Oundjian. Coyle has appeared at Carnegie, Walt Disney Concert and Verizon halls, in addition to Chicago’s Symphony Center. She was recently offered a fellowship at the C.W. Post Chamber Music Festival at Long Island University in New York and subsequently performed Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto as a winner of the C.W. Post Concerto Competition. She has participated in master classes with Yehuda Gilad, Richie Hawley, Anthony McGill, Eugene Mondie, Ricardo Morales and Michael Rusinek. Coyle performs as a substitute in the New World Symphony and is a Philadelphia Orchestra Teaching Artist. Coyle earned a certificate in the Arts in Healthcare program from Temple University. Prior to entering Curtis, she attended Northern Illinois University, where she studied with Melvin Warner and Gregory Barrett and was a member of the Dean’s List and National

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Ayane Kozasa, from Chicago, entered the Curtis Institute of Music in 2009 and studies with renowned violist Misha Amory and Roberto Díaz, former principal viola of the Philadelphia Orchestra and president of Curtis. At Curtis she has also studied with Michael Tree, viola and founding member of the Guarneri String Quartet. All students at Curtis receive merit-based fulltuition scholarships, and Kozasa is the George and Marie Hecksher Annual Fellow. Since beginning her musical studies at age four, Kozasa has achieved recognition as a soloist and chamber musician. She has been awarded first prize in numerous competitions, including the Kingsville International Competition and Skokie Valley Symphony Concerto Competition. She has been a prizewinner in the Cleveland Institute of Music Concerto Competition, as well as the prestigious Irving M. Klein International String Competition. Kozasa currently performs as a substitute in the viola sections of the Philadelphia Orchestra and Symphony in C.

curtis on tour

Society of Collegiate Scholars. She began studying piano at age five, voice at age six and clarinet at age seven. In addition to music, she has a passion for working with and caring for animals.

An avid chamber musician, Solzhenitsyn has collaborated with the Emerson, Borodin, Brentano, and St. Petersburg string quartets, and in four-hand recital with Mitsuko Uchida. He has frequently appeared at international festivals, including Salzburg, Evian, Ludwigsburg, Caramoor, Ojai, Marlboro, Nizhniy Novgorod and Moscow’s famed December Evenings.   Ignat Solzhenitsyn is Conductor Laureate of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, having served as its Music Director for the previous six years. He is also Principal Guest Conductor of the Moscow Symphony Orchestra. Much in demand as a guest conductor, Solzhenitsyn has recently led the orchestras of Baltimore, Dallas, North Carolina, Seattle and Toronto and partnered with such world-renowned soloists as Richard Goode, Gary Graffman, Sylvia McNair, Mstislav Rostropovich and Mitsuko Uchida. A winner of the Avery Fisher Career Grant, Solzhenitsyn serves on the piano faculty of the Curtis Institute of Music. He has been featured on many radio and television specials, most recently CBS Sunday Morning and ABC’s Nightline. Born in Moscow, Solzhenitsyn resides in New York City with his wife and three children.

An avid chamber musician, Kozasa has been a part of several active chamber ensembles. She was a participant in the Fischoff National Chamber Music Association as violinist of the Aurora Trio in 2004. As the violist of the Iannis Quartet, she was invited to participate in the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival and studied chamber music with many distinguished artists including the Tokyo and Vermeer quartets. The Iannis also participated in outreach programs sponsored by the Cleveland Chamber Society and was selected to perform at the Kennedy Center as a part of the Conservatory Project. In 2010, Kozasa participated in Ravinia’s Steans Institute for Young Artists and Music from Angel Fire’s Young Artist Program. Kozasa graduated with a Bachelor of Music in viola performance from the Cleveland Institute of Music studying with Kirsten Docter. She also studied violin performance with William Preucil while at CIM and has worked with such notable teachers as Nathan Cole, Cyrus Forough and Philip Lewis. Ignat Solzhenitsyn is recognized as one of today’s most gifted artists and enjoys an active career as both pianist and conductor. In recent seasons, his touring schedule in the U.S. and Europe has included concerto performances with numerous major orchestras, including those of Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Saint Louis, Los Angeles, Seattle, Baltimore, Washington, Montreal, Toronto, London, Paris, Israel and Sydney, and collaborations with such distinguished conductors as Herbert Blomstedt, James Conlon, James DePreist, Charles Dutoit, Lawrence Foster, Valery Gergiev, Krzysztof Penderecki, André Previn, Mstislav Rostropovich, Yuri Temirkanov and David Zinman. In addition to his recital appearances in the U.S. at New York’s 92nd Street Y, Philadelphia’s Kimmel Center, Ann Arbor’s Hill Auditorium, Salt Lake City’s Abravanel Hall, San Francisco’s Herbst Theatre and many others from coast to coast, Solzhenitsyn has also given numerous recitals in such major musical centers as London, Milan, Zurich, Moscow, Tokyo and Sydney.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Dan Zanes and Friends A Scholarshare/Fidelity Children’s Stage Series Event Sunday, March 20, 2011 • 3PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

Sponsored by

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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dan zanes and Friends

Hello Friends and Neighbors, It’s with great pleasure and anticipation that we’ve tuned up our instruments and warmed up our voices in your city today. Thank you for coming out to join us in the festivities! Since our gathering is a musical one I have some musings on the subject... When my daughter was born, I spent quite a while trying to decide what song she would first hear when she came home from the hospital. The first song in her life! What record would I play for her? I had been playing guitar and singing since I was 8 years old and yet it never occurred to me that I could sing her that first song myself. Although we ended up listening to some great recorded music that day (the Melodians, a Jamaican rocksteady vocal trio, just fantastic) lately I’ve been considering the place where the recordings end and the soulful homemade singing and playing can begin. Yes, these days I have a vision of a new and improved America! A singing, dancing, freewheeling, shaking, inclusive America. Someone once asked me, “Dan, how can we sing Cock-a-doodledoo when there are all these crazy things happening in the world?” That’s just it! That’s why we sing! It restores our spirits and gives us hope for the future; it gives us a sense of life’s best possibilities. When we make music together we share our stories. We welcome each other into our lives. We give our children new ideas for social living and in return they show us how to dance like bears, or birds or ice cream cones. And we have fun...unbelievable fun. I love being in the world of families because these are the people (from lack of sleep perhaps) who seem most likely to step into the unknown, and spontaneous casual music making is, for most people, the unknown. I can’t say that it won’t feel a little awkward the first time someone suggests to dinner guests that they all sing “Go Down Moses” or “El Canario” before the meal, but I can guarantee that it will be memorable and probably exciting. The first time family and friends sing together in any capacity new traditions are made, bonds are created, spirits are lifted and the world suddenly becomes a more musical and peaceful place. Thank you for joining us today. It may look at first like a show or a performance with a band and an audience, but in truth, we’re all in it together. Think of it as a house party or family reunion or neighborhood block party. Some of us have instruments, but everyone has a voice or dancing feet or clapping hands. This is our day together, and when the house lights go up and we all head on down the road, let’s be sure to make it a musical one! —Dan Zanes

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H

ere are two things you should know right off about Dan Zanes, two things that set him apart from the huge and festive field of individuals who have in the past few years begun making music for families and people of all ages in a way that is, frankly, changing the face of America, or the sound of it, at least. First, he is making homemade family music and encouraging similar behavior in friends and neighbors. Second, he is the guy who is always interested in singing along with people, people everywhere. Which brings us to his mission, if you can call it a mission: Zanes is introducing his musical friends to his neighborhood friends, and then showing everybody not just that they, yes, can play together, but that they can also feel pretty good while doing so. In this sense, Zanes is a 21st-century version of the guy who in the old days used to conduct the town band from the gazebo, though in lieu of a gazebo he’s playing places like Carnegie Hall and the Melbourne International Arts Festival, where no matter how you say it, good music is good. He is a ringmaster, introducing new songs and reconnecting people to songs that have always been there, and still are—it’s just that people forgot about them. Take, for example, Dan Zanes and Friends’ Catch That Train!, the 2007 Grammy Award winner for Best Musical Album for Children. It is the one CD in America today that brings together the Kronos Quartet, Blind Boys of Alabama, Father Goose, Zanes’ mother-inlaw and the children of South Africa’s Agape Orphanage to sing Zulu folk songs, an old labor organizing tune, a song about the joys of farming the English countryside and of course a few train songs—all in an instrumental mix that highlights cuatros and lap steels and does not in any way discourage the use of trombone. Speaking of trombones, his latest album, 76 Trombones, is a collection of classic Broadway tunes. Joined by Tony Award winners Carol Channing, Matthew Broderick and Brian-Stokes Mitchell, these timeless songs were stripped down to their ragged essence and re-worked as 21st-century all-ages music, introducing a new generation to the classic Broadway that everyone knows and loves. The Fine Friends Are Here!, Dan Zanes and Friends’ first live DVD, filmed at the Jalopy Theater in Brooklyn, was released in 2009. Fine Friends showcases what the band’s trademark rollicking concerts are all about and allows kids and fans alike to participate in the wildly popular and regularly sold-out experience. The DVD set includes three animated videos and four new, unreleased solo recordings. One of Zanes’s favorite recording projects is ¡Nueva York!, or what he is often heard calling his “pro-immigration CD.” While the debate about who is eligible to live in the United States rages on, Zanes has been having a rocking time with new musical friends from the Latino world, celebrating some of the vibrant culture that comes with immigration. The result: a collection of songs from Puerto Rico, Mexico, Colombia, the Dominican Republic and other parts of the Spanish-speaking Americas that was released in 2008 and received an Independent Music Award. The Welcome Table: Songs of Inspiration, Mystery and Good Times is a collection of old and (mostly) new DZAF recordings of tunes drawn primarily from North American gospel traditions put together to help create awareness for the New Sanctuary Movement—a coalition of interfaith religious leaders and participating congregations called


For the record, Zanes was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, in 1961. He was a member of the Del Fuegos from the beginning to the end of the 1980s, and with them made four records. In 1994, he released a solo CD, Cool Down Time, shortly after which he moved to Brooklyn, New York, where he then released Rocket Ship Beach (2000), an immediate hit with families around America, as well as with the New York Times Magazine, which said, “Zanes’s kids music works because it is not kids music; it’s just music—music that’s unsanitized, unpasteurized, that’s organic even.” His next CD, Family Dance (2001), with guest appearances by Loudon Wainwright III and Roseanne Cash, is comprised of songs that are difficult not to dance to. Next in the Festival Five family series came Night Time! (2002)—featuring collaborations with Aimee Mann and Lou Reed—followed by the Grammy-nominated House Party (2003), a rambunctious 20-song collection that includes Deborah Harry, Bob Weir and Philip Glass, as well as the Rubí Theater Company and Rankin Don (a.k.a. Father Goose). Sea Music, a collection of maritime songs that was the first CD in the Festival Five Folk Series, was cited in Rolling Stone’s Hot Issue in the category of Hot Maritime Sounds. The next CD in the folk series—Parades and Panoramas: 25 Songs Collected by Carl Sandburg for the American Songbag—is the disc on which Zanes’s scruffy troupe of musicians dragged the poet’s 1927 collection of songs kicking and screaming into this century, with traditional instruments, with tuba-driven electric guitars, with whatever it takes. And while no one was looking, Zanes co-authored two picture book collaborations with the artist Donald Saaf, Jump Up! and Hello Hello, and appeared in the Dan Zanes and Friends concert DVD, All Around the Kitchen! (2005), recorded at the Knitting Factory in New York City. Colin Brooks (drums) is from Little Rock, Arkansas. He started playing piano at age five and drums when he was seven. He moved to Brooklyn in 1998 to join the band Skeleton Key. After its demise, he traveled to New Zealand and Australia as the drummer for Bic Runga. After stints with various New York based singersongwriters, drumming on jingles and playing with the Brooklyn band Sea Ray, he found himself drumming in the off-Broadway musical Betty Rules, where he met Dan Zanes in 2003. He has been drumming with Dan ever since. Outside of that, he still makes records with the Little Rock-based band the Big Cats and records songs of his own in his bedroom.

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dan zanes and Friends

by their faith to respond actively and publicly to the suffering of our immigrant brothers and sisters living in the United States. Dan’s label Festival Five Records celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2010. The band is celebrating by touring constantly and often performing with young groups, particularly orchestras and African drum and dance ensembles. Dan just finished Contradance, a collaboration with Pilobolus Dance Company. He spends much of his free time trying to make up shifts at the Park Slope Food Co-op in Brooklyn and rediscovering the guitar while writing and digging up songs for the upcoming family CD tentatively titled Songs from the Yard. He’s also been wandering into exotic territory writing songs for films like Wonderful World and even making a cameo appearance here and there like he did in Wonderful World and Revolutionary Road.

John Foti (accordion) was born in West Caldwell, New Jersey. Inspired by his father and older sister, he took piano lessons through college—even when some of the kids said it “wasn’t cool” to play piano. John thought it was cool and kept playing. He’s been playing with DZAF for more than three years and is thrilled to always be learning new songs and instruments, all while being surrounded by such good friends and musicians. John is involved in several musical groups and often plays around the New York City area when not on tour with DZAF. www.johnfoti.com Saskia Lane (bass, vocals), born and raised in San Francisco, began her classical training on the violin at the age of four and took up the bass the day she turned 11. She received her master’s degree from the Juilliard School. After graduating, Saskia began exploring other genres and now has her hands in jazz, rock, pop, folk, klezmer and hip-hop. In addition to playing with Dan and his friends, Saskia can be heard playing in and around New York with her new band Hey Sailor and with her beloved cocktail-pop quartet the Lascivious Biddies. Saskia is active in education and outreach via Carnegie Hall’s Musical Connection program, performing in homeless shelters, hospitals, correctional facilities and senior centers. This coming season she is developing a children’s show for CarnegieKids. www.saskialane.com   Sonia de los Santos (vocals, guitar and mandolin) was born and raised in Monterrey, Mexico. In 2000, she joined the rock band Esphera as the lead singer. As an actress, Sonia has toured nationally in Mexico with the musicals Jesus Christ Superstar, Fiddler on the Roof, Jekyll & Hyde and A Chorus Line. Sonia can be seen in the film Off Jackson Ave and in the short film Furore. She was the lead singer in the rock and roll tap dancing show Revolution in its national tour and at the Joyce Theater in 2007. Sonia has been touring with Dan Zanes and Friends as a singer and guitarist since 2007. She appears on their albums ¡Nueva York!, The Welcome Table, 76 Trombones and the DVD The Fine Friends Are Here. Sonia studied musical theater at Circle in the Square Theater School in New York City and holds a B.A. in communications from the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey. www.soniadelossantos.com   Elena Moon Park (violin), from Oak Ridge, Tennessee, began playing the violin and dancing at a young age. Although she moved to New York City primarily to complete a master’s degree in urban policy, she was also very excited to meet and play fun, spontaneous music with many different kinds of musicians along the way. Now she is happy to be playing fiddle and trumpet (and some mandolin and ukulele) with Dan Zanes and Friends. Elena lived in the hills of Tennessee and the flatlands of Chicago before proudly calling Brooklyn, New York, her home.   Rankin Don a.k.a Father Goose (vocals) was already an underground superstar in Jamaica and the streets of Brooklyn—thanks to hits like “Can’t Find Me Love” and “Sex You Up”—when his big hit “Baddest DJ” sold more than 100,000 copies in the U.S. and abroad. A year later, “Real McCoy” took the Caribbean and U.S. by storm, selling more than 250,000 copies. He also recorded “The Big Race” with Roundhead, Screchie Don, General B and Baja Jedd. Rankin Don is now a producer for Rock Tower Studios, known for its rich history in reggae music. In his other life as Father Goose, he appears on many releases by Dan Zanes.

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Lili Received the GIFT of LIFE Born two months early, Lili Jimenez had a difficult start in life. Weighing barely three pounds, Lili suffered a host of ailments, including a life-threatening intestinal disease unique to preemies. With little time to spare, Lili was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit at UC Davis Children’s Hospital—the region’s only comprehensive children’s hospital. After two complex surgeries, four months of round-the-clock care and lots of TLC, Lili was sent home to a future now in full bloom. At UC Davis Health System, our next medical breakthrough just may have your name on it.

Lili’s care team included neonatologist Mark Underwood, nurse Christa Mu and other specialists in the research and treatment of preterm birth complications.

A gift for advancing health.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra Yuri Temirkanov, Music Director and Chief Conductor Alisa Weilerstein, Cello A Western Health Advantage Orchestra Series Event Saturday, March 26, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission.

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Mozart

Christian Baldini, music director and conductor

with the University Chorus Gershwin: Catfish Row (Suite from Porgy and Bess) Rohde: Double Viola Concerto (world premiere) with Kurt Rohde and Ellen Ruth Rose, viola Mozart: Mass in C Minor ("Great Mass") with the University Chorus

Sunday, May 15, 2011 Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center

7:00 PM

$8 ST U de n T S & C H i l dr e n, $12 /15 /17 A dU lT | STA n dA r d Se AT ing Tickets are availa ble through the Mondavi Center Box Office 1 2 – 6 p m M o n d ay–S at u r d ay | ( 5 3 0) 7 5 4 . 2 7 8 7 | m o n d av i a r t s . o r g

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St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra Yuri Temirkanov, Music Director and Chief Conductor Alisa Weilerstein, Cello

Russian Easter Overture, Op. 36

Rimsky-Korsakov

Concerto No. 1 for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 107 Allegretto Moderato Cadenza Allegro con moto

Shostakovich

Intermission

Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 98 Allegro non troppo Andante moderato Allegro giocoso Allegro energico e passionate

Brahms

Ms. Weilerstein is an exclusive recording artist for Decca Classics. Ms. Weilerstein appears courtesy of Opus 3 Artists.

Exclusive Tour Management: Opus 3 Artists 470 Park Avenue South, 9th Floor North New York, NY 10016 www.opus3artists.com

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St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra First Violin Lev Klychkov Concertmaster Pavel Popov Alexander Zolotarev Yury Ushchapovsky Valentin Lukin Sergey Teterin Olga Rybalchenko Natalia Sokolova Alexey Vasilyev Alexander Rikhter Grigory Sedukh Nikita Novoselskiy Maria Irashina-Pimenova Nikolay Tkachenko Tatiana Makarova Mikhail Alexeev Anton Chausovskiy Second Violin Ilya Kozlov Principal Dmitry Petrov Tatiana Shmeleva Liudmila Odintsova Zhanna Proskurova Liubov Khatina Anatoly Babitsky Nikolay Dygodyuk Ruslan Kozlov Konstantin Basok Dmitry Koryavko Igor Zolotarev Olga Kotlyarevskaya Viola Andrey Dogadin Principal Yury Dmitriev Artur Kosinov Yury Anikeev Dmitry Kosolapov Alexey Bogorad Roman Ivanov Konstantin Bychkov Leonid Lobach Mikhail Anikeev Alexey Koptev Tatiana Gromova Elena Panfilova Denis Gonchar

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Cello Dmitry Khrychev Principal Sergey Chernyadyev Mikhail Slavin Taras Trepel Yaroslav Cherenkov Iosif Levinzon Nikolay Matveev Alexander Kulibabin Stanislav Lyamin Nikita Zubarev

Clarinet Andrey Laukhin Principal Valentin Karlov Denis Sukhov Igor Gerasimov

Double Bass Artem Chirkov Principal Rostislav Iakovlev Oleg Kirillov Alexander Shilo Mikhail Glazachev Nikolay Chausov Alexey Ivanov Alexey Chubachin Nikolay Syray Arseny Petrov

Contra Bassoon Alexey Silyutin

Flute Marina Vorozhtsova Principal Dmitry Terentiev Olga Viland Natalia Sechkareva Piccolo Ksenia Kuelyar-Podgaynova Oboe Ruslan Khokholkov Principal Artsiom Isayeu Pavel Serebryakov

Bassoon Oleg Talypin Principal Sergey Bazhenov Maxim Karpinsky

Horn Igor Karzov Principal Anatoly Surzhok Anatoly Musarov Vitaly Musarov Oleg Skrotsky Elena Akhmetgareeva Trumpet Igor Sharapov Principal Mikhail Romanov Vyacheslav Dmitrov Alexey Belyaev Trombone Maxim Ignatyev Principal Dmitry Andreev Denis Nesterov Vitaly Gorlitsky Tuba Valentin Avvakumov

English Horn Mikhail Dymsky

For Opus 3 Artists David V. Foster, President & CEO Earl Blackburn, Senior Vice President, Manager, Artists & Attractions Leonard Stein, Senior Vice President, Director, Tour Administration John C. Gilliland III, Associate, Tour Administration Naya Chang, Assistant to Earl Blackburn John Pendleton, Company Manager Richmond Davis, Stage Manager

Percussion Dmitry Klemenok Valery Znamensky Mikhail Lestov Konstantin Solovyev Ruben Ramazyan Alexander Mikhaylov Harp Anna Makarova Andres Izmaylov Piano and Celesta Maxim Pankov Librarian Leonid Voronov Stage Manager Alexander Novikov Technician Alexander Vinogradov Deputy Director Galina Logutenko Executive Director Ilya Teplyakov


In 1917, the orchestra became the State Orchestra and in accordance with the Decree of 1921, it was incorporated into the newly founded Petrograd Philharmonic, the first of its kind in the country. Shortly after, unprecedented tours began with a whole pleiad of western conductors whose names enjoy unquestioned authority in today’s musical world: Otto Klemperer (the conductor also conducted subscription concerts), Bruno Walter and Felix Weingartner. Vladimir Horowitz and Sergey Prokofiev (with his piano concertos) performed as soloists with the orchestra. On the initiative of the foreign conductors, the orchestra began to play the modern repertoire—Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Berg, Hindemith, Honegger and Poulenc. In 1918, directed by the composer, the orchestra performed the premiere of the Classical Symphony of Prokofiev. In 1926, Shostakovich debuted his First Symphony in the Grand Hall of Philharmonia (conducted by Nikolay Malko). In 1934, the orchestra was the first in the country to receive the title of the Honored Orchestra of the Republic. Four years later, Evgeny Mravinsky, the winner of the First Prize of the National Contest of Conductors, joined the orchestra, and for the next 50 years, he gradually transformed it into one of the best orchestras in the world, known especially for performances of Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich symphonies. The virtuoso orchestra was recognized (with the orchestras of Herbert von Karajan, Bruno Walter and the Amsterdam Royal Concertgebouw) as the best interpreter of Mozart music in the Viennese festival dedicated to the 200th anniversary of the composer. In the 1960s, along with the music of the 20th century (first performances in U.S.S.R. of pieces by Honegger, Hindemith, Bartók, Pendercki, Schönberg, Britten and Poulenc), the orchestra’s repertoire included music by old masters: Bach, Vivaldi, Purcell, Corelli, Telemann and Pergolesi. The orchestra worked with such famous conductors as Leopold Stokowski, Igor Markevich, Kurt Sanderling, Arvid Jansons, Mariss Jansons, Gennady Rozhdestvensky and Evgeny Svetlanov. In 1988, on the initiative of the orchestra, Yuri Temirkanov became its principal conductor. During recent years the ensemble has added a few more glorious pages to its history: a season opening in Carnegie Hall; a large-scale tour in Russia with the final concert at the Second Festival of the World’s Symphony Orchestras in Moscow; the Russian premiere of the Polish Requiem by Penderecki under Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra The St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Russia’s oldest symphonic ensemble, was founded in 1882 on the Order of Alexander III. In 2007, the orchestra celebrated its 125th anniversary. It was founded to perform in the royal presence at receptions and official ceremonies and at the balls, plays and concerts at the Royal Court. The pinnacle of this type of activity was the participation in 1896 in the pageantry of coronation of Nicholas II. In 1897, the Court Choir became the Court Orchestra, and its musicians were transferred from the military department and given the same rights as other actors of royal theaters. In the early 20th century, the orchestra performed at commercial concerts for the general public. The series of concerts known as “Orchestral Collections of Musical News” saw the first Russian performances of Richard Strauss’s symphonic poems Ein Heldenleben and Also sprach Zarathustra, Mahler’s First Symphony, Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony and Scriabin’s Poem of Ecstasy. Among the conductors were such internationally renowned musicians as Richard Strauss, Arthur Nikisch, Alexander Glazunov and Serge Koussevitsky.

baton of the composer; premieres of symphonies by Slonimsky and Tishchenko; performances of the major works by Beethoven, Verdi (Requiem), Orff (Carmina Burana) and Honegger (Jeanne d’Arc au bûcher). This season was opened by concerts in Annecy (France) at the Crescendo Festival, which was dedicated to the Year of Russia in France and the Year of France in Russia. The orchestra will also tour in France (twice), Asia, and the U.S. Highlights of the season will be the Russian premiere of “Il canto sospeso” by Nono and the Seventh Symphony by Schubert. For the first time in St. Petersburg, the orchestra will present The Snowman ballet music and violin concerto by Korngold, The Childhood of Christ Christmas Oratorio by Berlioz and A Mass of Life by Delius. Also performed will be the Turangalila-Symphonie by Messiaen, excerpts from The Martyrdom of St. Sebastian and the Russian premiere of The Third and the Last Covenant by Obukhov. Yuri Temirkanov The artistic director of the St. Petersburg Philharmonia and the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Yuri Temirkanov is one of today’s great conductors. A recent example of his recognition was an invitation to the 2009 Nobel Prize ceremony to conduct the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. The year before, Temirkanov became the only Russian maestro who was twice awarded the Abbiati Prize. Temirkanov was appointed music director of the Parma Royal Theatre (Teatro Regio di Parma, Italy) until his contract expires in 2013 with the Verdi Bicentennial Festival. The conductor has collaborated with world famous orchestras for many years. As early as 1978, he began working with the London Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, and in 1992, he became its chief conductor. From 1992-97, he also acted as principal guest conductor of the Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1998, he moved from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra to the Danish National Radio Symphony Orchestra. From 2000-06, Temirkanov was the chief conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The main focus of his activity has been St. Petersburg, where he began his professional career and where he became the artistic director and chief conductor of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra in 1988. One of the key events in his career was his victory at the 2nd National Contest of Conductors in 1966. Thereafter, Temirkanov, a graduate student at the Conductor Faculty of the Leningrad Conservatory, joined the ranks of the most in-demand conductors of his generation. Together with Kirill Kondrashin and David Oistrakh, he toured abroad and performed with orchestras from the United States, France and Germany. In 1967, Temirkanov performed in the Philharmonic Hall; it was after this performance that Evgeny Mravinsky offered him the position of assistant conductor. Starting in 1968, he was head of the Academic Symphony Orchestra of the Philharmonia. He enlarged the orchestra’s repertoire and often went on tour to Europe, Japan and the U.S. Temirkanov is connected with the revival of the Kirov (Mariinsky) Theatre. In 1976, Temirkanov became its artistic director and chief conductor. He created classic productions of Eugene Onegin and Queen of Spades by Tchaikovsky, War and Peace by Prokofiev, the recent Peter I by Petrov and Dead Souls by Shchedrin. The Kirov started performing abroad, touring in the U.S., Japan and many countries in Europe, including England for the first time in history. Temirkanov began organizing symphony concerts by the theater

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St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

orchestra both in Russia and abroad. In 2005, under the baton of Temirkanov, the St. Petersburg Philharmonic orchestra became the first Russian orchestra to perform at the season opening concert in New York’s famed Carnegie Hall. Last year the conductor led orchestra concerts in St. Petersburg, Moscow, Italy, Austria, Germany, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Greece, Hungary and Croatia. Temirkanov’s activities have been recognized with numerous awards and titles. Yuri Temirkanov holds the title “People’s Artist of the USSR,” and he has received several state awards and orders, including the Order of Merit of the 2nd grade, the President of Russia Award, the Abbiati award (twice), the St. Petersburg Government Award, and the “Order of Merit for the Country” of the 1st degree. Temirkanov is the honorable academician of the St. Cecilia Academy and honorable doctor of the Rimsky-Korsakov St. Petersburg State Conservatory. In 2009, Temirkanov became an honorary freeman of St. Petersburg. Despite the intensity of the concert schedule, his life is not limited just to the theater scene. For the preservation and nurturing of St. Petersburg’s spiritual and cultural inheritance, Temirkanov created the International Foundation of Cultural Initiatives. In 1998, the conductor established his award for talented young musicians, granted on a yearly basis to students of the music school of the St. Petersburg Conservatory. Alisa Weilerstein, Cellist Cellist Alisa Weilerstein has attracted widespread attention for playing that combines a natural virtuosic command and technical precision with impassioned musicianship. The intensity of her playing has regularly been lauded, as has the spontaneity and sensitivity of her interpretations. In addition to the 15-city U.S. tour with the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, highlights of Weilerstein’s 2010-11 season have included recitals with pianists Inon Barnatan and Gabriel Kahane, and performing the Beethoven Triple Concerto with pianist Jeremy Denk, violinist Chee Yun and conductor Marek Janowski with the San Francisco Symphony. Weilerstein made her debuts with the National Orchestra of Spain, the Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra, and the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra performing Osvaldo Golijov’s Azul. In September 2010, EuroArts released a DVD of Weilerstein’s performance of the Elgar Cello Concerto with the Berliner Philharmoniker and Daniel Barenboim in the orchestra’s European Concert, a performance that was also televised live worldwide and broadcast on the BBC in the U.K. In 2009, Weilerstein was one of four artists selected to perform at a White House classical music event that included student workshops hosted by First Lady Michelle Obama and performing in concert for guests including President Obama. In 2008, Weilerstein was awarded Lincoln Center’s Martin E. Segal Prize for exceptional achievement, and she was named the winner of the 2006 Leonard Bernstein Award, which she received at the Schleswig-Holstein Festival in Germany. She received an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 2000 and was selected for two prestigious young artists programs in 2000-01: the ECHO (European Concert Hall Organization) “Rising Stars” recital series and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s Chamber Music Society Two.

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Weilerstein, who was born in 1982, made her Cleveland Orchestra debut in 1995 at age 13, playing the Tchaikovsky “Rococo” Variations. She made her Carnegie Hall debut with the New York Youth Symphony in 1997. Weilerstein is a graduate of the Young Artist Program at the Cleveland Institute of Music, where she studied with Richard Weiss. In 2004, she graduated from Columbia University in New York with a degree in Russian history. Weilerstein, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when she was nine, is a Celebrity Advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. www.alisaweilerstein.com

Program Notes Russian Easter Overture, Op. 36 (1888) Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (Born March 18, 1844, in Tikhvin, near Novgorod; died June 21, 1908, in St. Petersburg) Rimsky-Korsakov loved the old ways. Born and raised in Tikhvin, a city some hundred miles east of St. Petersburg that was known for its monastery, he often recalled later in life the sound of the monastery bells tolling over the town and the tales of the traditional peasant life that his grandmothers—one a serf, the other a priest’s daughter—told him as a boy. It is not surprising, therefore, that he turned to perhaps the greatest annual church event in 19th-century Russia as a subject for one of his colorful orchestral compositions: “The Bright Holiday,” Easter. Early in 1888 in St. Petersburg, shortly after the Capriccio Espagnol had been premiered, he began an overture based on themes associated with the Easter celebration from the Obikhod, a collection of the best-known canticles of the Orthodox Church. He completed the score that summer during a country retreat at Nezhgovitsi, near Luga, when he was also finishing Scheherazade. He led the premiere of the Russian Easter Overture in St. Petersburg’s Club of Nobility on December 15, in the middle of Advent. Rimsky-Korsakov wrote, “The rather lengthy, slow introduction to the Overture, on the theme ‘Let God Arise!’ alternating with the ecclesiastical theme ‘An Angel Wailed,’ appeared to me, in its beginning, as it were, the ancient Isaiah’s prophecy concerning the resurrection of Christ. The gloomy colors seemed to depict the Holy Sepulcher before it had been filled with ineffable light at the moment of Resurrection. The beginning of the Allegro, based on ‘Let Them That Hate Him Flee Before Him,’ suggested the holiday mood of the Greek Orthodox Church service on Christ’s matins; the solemn trumpet voice of the Archangel was replaced by a tonal reproduction of the joyous, almost dance-like bell tolling, alternating now with the sexton’s rapid reading and now with the conventional chant of the priest’s reading the glad tidings of the Evangel. The Obikhod theme ‘Christ Is Arisen,’ which forms a sort of subsidiary part of the Overture, appears amid the trumpet blasts and the bell tolling, constituting also a triumphant coda.” Concerto No. 1 for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 107 (1959) Dmitri Shostakovich (Born September 25, 1906, in St. Petersburg; died August 9, 1975, in Moscow) By the mid-1950s, Dmitri Shostakovich had developed a musical language of enormous subtlety, sophistication, and range, able


“Shostakovich gave me the manuscript of the First Cello Concerto on August 2, 1959. On August 6th, I played it for him from memory, three times. After the first time he was so excited, and of course we drank a little bit of vodka. The second time I played it not so perfect, and afterwards we drank even more vodka. The third time I think I played the Saint-Saëns Concerto, but he still accompanied his Concerto. We were enormously happy...” “Shostakovich suffered for his whole country, for his persecuted colleagues, for the thousands of people who were hungry. After I played the Cello Concerto for him at his dacha in Leningrad, he accompanied me to the railway station to catch the overnight train to Moscow. In the big waiting room we found many people sleeping on the floor. I saw his face, and the great suffering in it brought tears to my eyes. I cried, not from seeing the poor people but from what I saw in the face of Shostakovich...” The ability of Shostakovich’s music, like the man himself, to display the widest possible range of moods in succession or even simultaneously is one of his most masterful achievements. (The same may be said of Mahler, whose music was an enormous influence on Shostakovich.) The opening movement of the First Cello Concerto may be heard as almost classical in the clarity of its form and the conservatism of its harmony and themes, yet there is a sinister undercurrent coursing through this music, a bleakness of spirit not entirely masked by the ceaseless activity. The following Moderato grows from sad melodies of folkish character, piquantly harmonized, which are gathered into a huge welling up of emotion before subsiding to close the movement. The extended solo cadenza that follows without pause is an entire movement in itself. Thematically, it springs from the preceding slow movement, and reaches an almost Bachian depth of feeling. The cadenza leads directly to the finale, one of Shostakovich’s most witty and sardonic musical essays. With disarming ease, the main theme of the first movement is recalled in the closing section of the finale to round out the Concerto’s form. Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 98 (1884-85) Johannes Brahms (Born May 7, 1833, in Hamburg; died April 3, 1897, in Vienna) In the popular image of Brahms, he appears as a patriarch: full grey beard, rosy cheeks, sparkling eyes. He grew the beard in his late forties as, some say, a compensation for his late physical maturity—he was in his twenties before his voice changed and he needed to shave—and it seemed to be an external admission that Brahms had allowed himself to become an old man. The ideas did not seem to flow so freely as he approached the age of 50, and he even put his publisher on notice to expect nothing more. Thankfully, the ideas did come, as they would for more than another decade, and he soon completed the superb Third Symphony. The philosophical introspection continued, however,

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St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

to encompass such pieces of “Socialist Realism” as the Second Piano Concerto, the Festive Overture and the Symphonies No. 11 (“The Year 1905”) and No. 12 (“Lenin”), as well as the profound outpourings of the First Violin Concerto, the 10th Symphony and the late string quartets. The First Cello Concerto, written for Mstislav Rostropovich during the summer of 1959, straddles both of Shostakovich’s expressive worlds, a quality exemplified by two anecdotes told by the great cellist himself:

and was reflected in many of his works. The Second Piano Concerto of 1881 is almost autumnal in its mellow ripeness; this Fourth Symphony is music of deep thoughtfulness that leads “into realms where joy and sorrow are hushed, and humanity bows before that which is eternal,” wrote the eminent German musical scholar August Kretzschmar. Repeatedly accused of being forbiddingly metaphysical or overly serious, the Fourth Symphony was not easily accepted by audiences. The crux of the problem was the stony grandeur of the finale, which confirms the tragedy of the work. The normal expressive function for a symphonic finale is to be an uplifting affirmation of the continuity of human experience. The classic models are Beethoven’s Fifth and Ninth Symphonies, and the eminent English musicologist Sir Donald Tovey pointed out that in all of that master’s works, only three have minor tonality endings. Even that great prophet of Weltschmerz, Gustav Mahler, ended only his Sixth Symphony on a pessimistic note. So, in this last of his symphonies, it would seem that Brahms grappled with his innermost feelings and found a hard-fought acceptance of his own mortality. The outward sign of his perceived great age, his magnificent beard, found its counterpart in tone in this grand Symphony, perhaps the greatest work in the form since those of Schubert and even Beethoven. The Symphony’s first movement begins almost in mid-thought, as though the mood of sad melancholy pervading this opening theme had existed forever, and Brahms had simply borrowed a portion of it to present musically. The movement is founded upon the tiny two-note motive (short-long) heard immediately at the beginning. Tracing this little germ cell demonstrates not only Brahms’s enormous compositional skills but also the broad emotional range that he could draw from pure musical expression. To introduce the necessary contrasts into this sonata form, other themes are presented, including a broadly lyrical one for horns and cellos and a fragmented fanfare. The movement grows with a wondrous, dark majesty to its closing pages. “A funeral procession moving across moonlit heights” is how the young Richard Strauss described the second movement. Though the tonality is nominally E major, the movement opens with a stark melody, pregnant with grief, in the ancient Phrygian mode. The mood brightens, but the introspective sorrow of the beginning is never far away. The third movement is the closest Brahms came to a true scherzo in any of his symphonies. Though such a dance-like movement may appear antithetical to the tragic nature of the Symphony, this scherzo is actually a necessary contrast within the work’s total structure since it serves to heighten the pathos of the surrounding movements, especially the granitic splendor of the finale. The finale is a passacaglia—a series of variations on a short, recurring melody. There are some 30 continuous variations here, though it is less important to follow them individually than to feel the massive strength given to the movement by this technique. The opening chorale-like statement, in which trombones are heard for the first time in the Symphony, recurs twice as a further supporting pillar in the unification of the movement. ©2011 Dr. Richard E. Rodda

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Young Artists Competition Winners Concert Sunday, March 27, 2011 • 2PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Generous support for the Sixth Annual Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition has been provided by Lois and John Crowe, Mary Horton and Barbara K. Jackson. Special thanks to the jurors of the Sixth Annual Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition: Christian Baldini, Ryan Brown, Rod Gideons, Sheri Greenawald and Aileen James

The Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition is directed by Lara Downes, Mondavi Center Curator of Young Artist Programs. Downes helped the Mondavi Center found the competition in 2004 with the generous support of Founding Sponsors Lois and John Crowe, Mary Horton and Barbara K. Jackson. The Young Artists Competition attracts pre-professional young musicians at the highest level from throughout the United States, offering scholarships and performance opportunities for pianists, instrumentalists, chamber ensembles, and vocalists ages 8-21. The 2012 competition will be held at Mondavi Center beginning January 7, 2012.

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal. 22

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Young Artists Competition Winners concert

Results from the Semifinal Round of the 2011 Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition have been announced. Contestants advancing to the Final Auditions, March 26, were:

ENSEMBLE CATEGORy Mondo Trio

INSTRUMENTAL CATEGORY JUNIOR DIVISION Tiffany Kang Jeremy Tai SENIOR DIVISION Will Chow Mimi Jung Sage Po

PIANO CATEGORY JUNIOR DIVISION Ann Deng Charis Tang Grace Zhou SENIOR DIVISION Carrie Chen Alison Chiang Yasha Yakhnis

VOCAL CATEGORY Ellen Chew Ali King Nicole Shorts Julia Heron Metzler Brian Vu

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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BALLET DIRECTOR

RON CUNNINGHAM ISSUE #6

PLAYWRIGHT

GREGG COFFIN ISSUE #7

TONY WINNER

FAITH PRINCE ISSUE #8 ACTOR

COLIN HANKS ISSUE #15

PERFORMANCE ARTIST

DAVID GARIBALDI ISSUE #16

BROADWAY STAR

MARA DAVI ISSUE #19

Available at Raley's, Nugget Markets, Borders and Barnes & Noble.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Terence Blanchard Quintet Branford Marsalis Quartet A Capital Public Radio Jackson Hall Jazz Series Event Friday, April 1, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Sponsored by

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Terence Blanchard Quintet and Branford Marsalis Quartet

terence blanchard quintet Terence Blanchard – trumpet Brice Winston – tenor saxophone Fabian Almazan – piano Joe Sanders – bass Kendrick Scott – drums

Branford Marsalis Quartet Branford Marsalis – saxophones Joey Calderazzo – piano Eric Revis – bass Justin Faulkner – drums

John Brewer – tour manager Terence Blanchard Terence Blanchard has established himself as one of the most influential jazz musicians and film score masters of his generation, a member of a jazz legacy that has shaped the contours of modern jazz today. With more than 29 albums to his credit, as a musician Blanchard is a multi-Grammy Award winner and nominee, winning earlier this year for his instrumental solo for “Be-Bop” on Live at the 2007 Monterey Jazz Festival. In addition to receiving the award, Blanchard performed live on the telecast along with other New Orleans artists including Lil’ Wayne, Allen Toussaint and the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, who were all joined on-stage by singer Robin Thicke. In 2008, Blanchard also won a Grammy for his CD, A Tale of God’s Will (A Requiem for Katrina), a beautifully haunting and impassioned song cycle about Hurricane Katrina and the ravages incurred upon the city of New Orleans and its residents. As a film composer, Blanchard has more than 50 scores to his credit and received a Golden Globe nomination for Spike Lee’s 25th Hour. In 2008, he completed the score for Lee’s Miracle at St. Anna, as well as the soundtrack for Cadillac Records. Other films for which Blanchard has written music include Eve’s Bayou, Talk to Me, Oprah Winfrey’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, Barbershop, Dark Blue and Disney’s Princess and the Frog. He is currently working on the score for George Lucas’s Red Tails. As Artistic Director of the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, which he was instrumental in relocating from Los Angeles to New Orleans, Blanchard works with students in the areas of artistic development, arranging, composition and concert programming. He also participates in master classes around the world as well as local community outreach activities in his beloved hometown of New Orleans. Blanchard won the 2010 Grammy for Best Improvised Solo and was awarded the French Grand Prix du Disque in 2009. Choices, Blanchard’s new CD, was released on Concord Jazz. Recorded in New Orleans at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Choices addresses the choices we all make in life—both as a society and on a personal level. Blanchard premiered Choices at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Accompanying Blanchard on the album are longstanding band members Fabian Almazan on piano, Derrick Hodge on bass and Kendrick Scott on drums, along with newcomer Walter Smith III on saxophone, all of whom wrote significant contributions to the CD as well. Guest artists include writer, speaker, educator and activist Dr. Cornel West, criticallyacclaimed guitarist and Blanchard protégé Lionel Loueke and singer, musician and composer Bilal. West performs spoken word pieces on the album with Bilal providing vocals on several of the tracks. 26

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Branford Marsalis World-renowned saxophonist Branford Marsalis, born in 1960, has always been a man of numerous musical interests, from jazz, blues and funk to such classical music projects as his 2008 tour with Marsalis Brasilianos. The three-time Grammy winner has continued to exercise and expand his skills as an instrumentalist, composer and head of Marsalis Music, the label he founded in 2002 that has allowed him to produce both his own projects and those of the jazz world’s most promising new and established artists. The New Orleans native was born into one of the city’s most distinguished musical families, which includes patriarch/pianist/ educator Ellis and Branford’s siblings Wynton, Delfeayo and Jason. Branford gained initial acclaim through his work with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and his brother Wynton’s quintet in the early 1980s before forming his own ensemble. He has also performed and recorded with a “who’s who” of jazz giants including Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Herbie Hancock and Sonny Rollins. Known for his innovative spirit and broad musical scope, Branford is equally at home on the stages of the world’s greatest clubs and concert halls, where he has performed jazz with his quartet and his own unique musical approach to contemporary popular music with his band Buckshot LeFonque. In recent years, Branford also has become increasingly active as a featured soloist with such acclaimed orchestras as the Chicago, Detroit, Düsseldorf and North Carolina symphonies and the Boston Pops, in a growing repertoire that includes compositions by Copland, Debussy, Glazunov, Ibert, Mahler, Mihaud, Rorem and Vaughan Williams. As Marsalis continues to establish his presence in the classical realm, his propensity for innovative and forward thinking compels him to seek new and challenging works by modern classical composers. One such composer, Sally Beamish, after hearing Branford perform her composition “The Imagined Sound of Sun on Stone” at the 2006 North Sea Jazz Festival, was inspired to re-conceive a piece in progress, “Under the Wing of the Rock,” which he premiered as part of the Celtic Connections festival in Beamish’s home country of Scotland in 2009. This performance followed on the heels of his two-month classical tour with the Philarmonia Brasileira in a program featuring the music of Brazil’s master composer Heitor Villa-Lobos and his friend, French composer Darius Milhaud, allowing the saxophonist the opportunity to more thoroughly engage the music and make it his own. Marsalis’s nearly two dozen recordings in these various styles have received numerous accolades, with his latest CD, Metamorphosen, released in 2009. Metamorphosen marks the 10th anniversary of


Terence Blanchard Quintet and Branford Marsalis Quartet

Marsalis’s quartet, which features pianist Joey Calderazzo, bassist Eric Revis and drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts, and includes original compositions by all four members in a variety of moods, as well as features for Marsalis on tenor, soprano and alto saxophones. Shortly following the release of Metamorphosen, the Branford Marsalis Quartet’s personnel changed for the first time in more than a decade. With the departure of protean drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts, the bandleader was faced with the enormous task of finding another drummer, and what he found in 18-year old Justin Faulkner was nothing short of astonishing. The “new” Branford Marsalis Quartet includes Faulkner on drums, Eric Revis on bass, Joey Calderazzo on piano and, of course, Branford Marsalis on saxophone. His previous disc, the Grammy-nominated Braggtown, was acknowledged as his quartet’s greatest recorded achievement to date. The Marsalis quartet’s Eternal also received a Grammy nomination as well as virtually universal inclusion in lists and polls for the best jazz recordings of 2004. Marsalis’s playing on the DVD Coltrane’s ‘A Love Supreme’ Live in Amsterdam also received a Grammy nomination for best instrumental jazz solo, while also garnering awards for music and video excellence from the DVD Association. Marsalis is also dedicated to changing the future of jazz in the classroom. He has shared his knowledge at such universities as Michigan State, San Francisco State, Stanford and North Carolina Central, with his full quartet participating in an innovative extended residency at the NCCU campus. Beyond these efforts, he is also bringing a new approach to jazz education to student musicians and listeners in colleges and high schools through Marsalis Jams, an interactive program designed by Marsalis in which leading jazz ensembles present concert/jam sessions in mini-residencies. Marsalis Jams has visited campuses in the northeast, mid-Atlantic, southeast and southwest, and established an ongoing Marsalis Berklee Jams series with the Berklee College of Music in 2008. These diverse interests are also reflected in Marsalis’s other activities. He spent two years touring and recording with Sting and was the musical director of The Tonight Show with Jay Leno for two years in the 1990s. He has collaborated with the Grateful Dead and Bruce Hornsby, acted in films including Throw Mama from the Train and School Daze, provided music for Mo’ Better Blues and other films and hosted National Public Radio’s syndicated program Jazz Set. Among the most socially conscious voices in the arts, Marsalis quickly immersed himself in relief efforts following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. He is the honorary chair of the New Orleans Habitat for Humanity effort to rebuild the city, and together with his friend Harry Connick, Jr. conceived the Habitat Musicians’ Village currently under construction in the city’s historic Ninth Ward. Whether on the stage, in the recording studio, in the classroom or in the community, Branford Marsalis represents a commitment to musical excellence and a determination to keep music at the forefront.

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Hyatt P lace is a proud sponsor

of The robert and margrit Mondavi Center for the performing arts, UC Davis

Hyatt Place UC Davis 173 Old Davis Road Extension Davis, CA 95616, USA Phone: +1 530 756 9500 Fax: +1 530 297 6900

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Takács Quartet with Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano A Concert Series Event Saturday, April 2, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

There will be one intermission. Support provided by the Memory of Alison S. and Richard D. Kramer. Pre-Performance Talk Speakers: Edward Dusinberre, first violinist, Takács Quartet, in conversation with Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis April 2, 2011 • 7PM further listening see p. 32

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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instruments • accessories • sheet music • lessons • rentals • repairs

National Volunteer Week

April 10-16

In honor of National Volunteer Week, Mondavi Center gives thanks to our ushers! Our volunteer ushers give their time and hospitality to provide our audiences with a memorable performance experience. We could not open our doors without them. Visit www.MondaviArts.org for more info on volunteer opportunities.

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• Locally owned and operated since 1996 • • We stock over 20,000 print music titles • • We offer “guaranteed lowest price” on our huge and diverse inventory of instruments •

Watermelon Music

207 E Street • Davis • C A • 9 5616 • 53 0.7 5 8.4010 M-F • 10-7 • Sa • 10-6 • Su 12-6 • www.watermelonmusic.com


Takács quartet with Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano

Takács Quartet Edward Dusinberre, violin Károly Schranz, violin

Geraldine Walther, viola

András Fejér, cello with

Nobuyuki Tsuji, piano

String Quartet in G Minor, Op. 74, No. 3 (H. III:74), “The Rider” Allegro (non troppo) Largo assai Menuet: Allegretto Finale: Allegro con brio

Haydn

String Quartet No. 1, Op. 7 Lento Allegretto Introduzione (Allegro)—Allegro vivace

Bartók

Intermission

Quintet for Piano and String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 44 Allegro brillante In modo d’una marcia, un poco largamente Scherzo molto vivace Allegro ma non troppo

Schumann

The Takács Quartet appears by arrangement with Seldy Cramer Artists, and records for Hyperion and Decca/London Records. The Takács Quartet is Quartet-in-Residence at the University of Colorado in Boulder and are Associate Artists at the South Bank Centre, London. www.takacsquartet.com

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Takács Quartet

further listening

by jeff hudson The last time the Takács Quartet came to town was December 1998—a long time ago, and under very different circumstances. They performed as part of the old UC Davis Presents series at Freeborn Hall (a venue not fondly recalled for its acoustics). In those days, the proposed building then dubbed the UC Davis Center for the Arts (which we now know as the Mondavi Center) was only a nice looking blueprint on the drawing board. Back in 1998, the Takács Quartet was not exactly new—the group was founded in 1975. But its twodisc set covering the quartets of Béla Bartók, released in January 1998, received the Gramophone magazine award for “Best Chamber Recording,” and was nominated for the 1999 Grammy Award for “Best Chamber Music Performance.” It was, for all intents, the beginning of a distinguished recording career. The project was dedicated to the memory of violist Gabor Ormai, a founding member of the Takács Quartet, who had died of cancer at age 40 in 1995. Among the highlights of the group’s subsequent discography: Beethoven: The Middle Quartets (Decca): 2002 Grammy Award winner, Best Chamber Music Recording; Gramophone Award Winner, Best Chamber Music Recording; Japanese Recording Academy Award; Chamber Music America Award Beethoven: The Early Quartets (Decca): 2004 Japanese Recording Academy Award Beethoven: The Late Quartets (Decca): 2005 BBC Music Magazine Record of the Year; Gramophone Award, Chamber Music; Classical Brits Award, Chamber Music; Japanese Recording Academy Award

Brahms: String Quartets, Op. 67 & 51/1 (Hyperion): 2009 Gramophone Award Finalist. In October/November 2010, the Takács Quartet teamed with the Colorado Shakespeare Festival for a theater piece called Quartet. The drama explored the circumstances surrounding Beethoven’s composition of the late quartets, integrating musical examples performed by the Takács. Following the drama, the quartet performed Beethoven’s String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 132. Northern California audiences may recall that Colorado Shakespeare’s producing artistic director Philip Charles Sneed was once an instructor in the UC Davis Department of Theatre & Dance; Sneed also had a long run as artistic director at the late, great Foothill Theatre Company in Nevada City (where he produced a number of innovative collaborative projects). Maybe Colorado Shakespeare and the Takács Quartet will take their Beethoven production on the road someday. The Takács Quartet is still very much involved with the music of Bartók. On April 29-30, the quartet will perform the complete Bartók quartets in Sydney, Australia. Mondavi Center audience members may also recognize Geraldine Walther, one of the world’s leading viola players, who joined the Takács Quartet in 2005. Walther was principal viola with the San Francisco Symphony for 29 years, and performed several times at the Mondavi Center as a member of that orchestra. She also appeared with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra at Mondavi in 2003 as soloist in Harold in Italy (the Berlioz symphony with viola) and co-soloist in the Mozart Sinfonia Concertante (with violinist Jorja Fleezanis).

Brahms: String Quartet & Piano Quintet with pianist Stephen Hough (Hyperion): 2008 Grammy Award nominee

Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise and Sacramento News and Review.

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Based in Boulder at the University of Colorado, the Takács Quartet performs 90 concerts a year worldwide, throughout Europe as well as in Australia, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea. The 201011 season includes a Bartok Cycle in Sydney and a three-concert series focusing on Schubert in New York City (92nd Street Y) and at the University of Michigan. The series will feature the New York premiere of a new work composed for the Quartet by Daniel Kellogg, based on the slow movement theme of Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden” Quartet. The Quartet’s award-winning recordings include the complete Beethoven Cycle on Decca. In 2005, Late Beethoven Quartets won Disc of the Year and Chamber Award from BBC Music Magazine, a Gramophone Award and a Japanese Record Academy Award. Their recordings of the early and middle Beethoven quartets collected a Grammy, another Gramophone Award, a Chamber Music of America Award and two further awards from the Japanese Recording Academy. Of their performances and recordings of the Late Quartets, the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote, “The Takács might play this repertoire better than any quartet of the past or present.” In 2006, the Takács Quartet made its first recording for Hyperion Records, of Schubert’s D804 and D810. A disc featuring Brahms’s Piano Quintet with Stephen Hough was released to great acclaim in 2007 and was subsequently nominated for a Grammy. Brahms’s Quartets Op. 51 and Op. 67 was released in 2008 and a disc featuring the Schumann Piano Quintet with Marc-Andre Hamelin was released in 2009. The complete Haydn “Apponyi” Quartets, Op. 71 and 74, will be released in November. The Quartet has made 16 recordings for the Decca label since 1988 of works by Beethoven, Bartok, Borodin, Brahms, Chausson, Dvorak, Haydn, Mozart, Schubert and Smetana. The ensemble’s recording of the six Bartok String Quartets received the 1998 Gramophone Award for chamber music and was nominated for a Grammy in 1999. In addition to the Beethoven String Quartet cycle recording, the ensemble’s other Decca recordings include Dvorak’s String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 51 and Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 with pianist Andreas Haefliger; Schubert’s Trout Quintet with Haefliger, which was nominated in 2000 for a Grammy Award; string quartets by Smetana and Borodin; Schubert’s Quartet in G Major and Notturno Piano Trio with Haefliger; the three Brahms string quartets and Piano Quintet in F Minor with pianist András Schiff; Chausson’s Concerto for violin, piano, and string quartet with violinist Joshua Bell and pianist Yves Thibaudet; and Mozart’s String Quintets, K515 and 516 with Gyorgy Pauk, viola. The quartet is known for innovative programming. In 2007, it performed Everyman (inspired by the Philip Roth novel) with Academy Award-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman at Carnegie Hall. The group collaborates regularly with the

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Takács quartet with Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano

Takács Quartet Recognized as one of the world’s great ensembles, the Takács Quartet plays with a unique blend of drama, warmth and humor, combining four distinct musical personalities to bring fresh insights to the string quartet repertoire. Commenting on their latest Schubert recording for Hyperion, Gramophone magazine noted, “The Takács have the ability to make you believe that there’s no other possible way the music should go, and the strength to overturn preconceptions that comes only with the greatest performers.”

Hungarian folk ensemble Muzsikas, performing a program that explores the folk sources of Bartok’s music. The Takács performed a music and poetry program on a 14-city U.S. tour with the poet Robert Pinsky. At the University of Colorado, the Takács Quartet has helped to develop a string program with a special emphasis on chamber music, where students work in a nurturing environment designed to help them develop their artistry. The Quartet’s commitment to teaching is enhanced by summer residencies at the Aspen Festival and the Music Academy of the West, Santa Barbara. The Takács is a Visiting Quartet at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. The Takács Quartet was formed in 1975 at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest by Gabor Takács-Nagy, Károly Schranz, Gabor Ormai and András Fejér, while all four were students. It first received international attention in 1977, winning First Prize and the Critics’ Prize at the International String Quartet Competition in Evian, France. The Quartet also won the Gold Medal at the 1978 Portsmouth and Bordeaux competitions and First Prizes at the Budapest International String Quartet Competition in 1978 and the Bratislava Competition in 1981. The Quartet made its North American debut tour in 1982. Violinist Edward Dusinberre joined the Quartet in 1993 and violist Roger Tapping in 1995. Violist Geraldine Walther replaced Tapping in 2005. In 2001, the Takács Quartet was awarded the Order of Merit of the Knight’s Cross of the Republic of Hungary. Nobuyuki Tsuji Nobuyuki Tsujii is in high demand by presenters and orchestras worldwide and has catapulted to rock star status in Japan. In the 2009-10 season alone, he performed more than 50 engagements throughout Asia, in addition to appearances at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., Aspen Music Festival and Academy in Colorado, Houston Society for the Performing Arts, Klavier-Festival Ruhr in Germany and in recitals across the United States and Europe. In the summer of 2010, Tsujii made an acclaimed debut at the Ravinia Festival, which the Chicago Tribune praised for “fearless technical assurance, accuracy and musicality...the rounded tone, suppleness of line and lyrical grace he brought.” Highlights of Tsujii’s 2010-11 season include appearances at the Mondavi Center and UCLA Performing Arts Center with the Takács Quartet and a tour of Japan with the BBC Philharmonic under the baton of Yutaka Sado. He will perform solo recitals in all regions of the United States during October and April, as well as in concert with the Edmonton, Hudson Valley and Corpus Christi symphony orchestras. A European tour in the winter took him to Lugano, Locarno, Manchester, Belgrade, Berlin, Basel and Moscow. Blind since birth, Nobuyuki Tsujii, who is referred to as “Nobu,” believes that “there are no barriers in the field of music.” His philosophy was first affirmed at the age of seven when he was named first-prize winner at the All Japan Blind Students Music Competition. At the age of 12, he made noted recital debuts at Tokyo’s Suntory Hall and Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall. Since then, he has appeared throughout the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East and played with most of Japan’s leading orchestras, as well as the Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux, Slovak

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Takács quartet with Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano

Philharmonic Orchestra, the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra and the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus. In 2005, at the age of 16, he was presented the Critic’s Award at the 15th International Frédéric Chopin Piano Competition in Poland. In 2009, he won the Gold Medal at the Thirteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in Fort Worth, Texas. He also won the Beverley Taylor Smith Award for the Best Performance of a New Work. Peter Rosen’s documentary of the Thirteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, A Surprise in Texas, features Tsujii prominently and was released to critical acclaim. Nobuyuki Tsujii is currently a participant in the performer’s program at Ueno Gakuen University and has studied with Masahiro Kawakami, Yukio Yokoyama, and Kyoko Tabe. Tsujii enjoys swimming, skiing, hiking and communing with nature. When he met with 275 piano students in the Dallas-Fort Worth area following the competition, he advised them to “please practice your best, but also please remember that you have to take the time to experience life to give your music meaning. I do things like mountain climbing, swimming, skiing, walking by the river. Whatever you like to do, this will help you enjoy your music more.” Program Notes String Quartet in G Minor, Op. 74, No. 3 (H. III:74), “The Rider” (1793) Joseph Haydn (Born March 31, 1732, in Rohrau, Lower Austria; died May 31, 1809, in Vienna) Haydn’s first triumph in London ended in July 1792, and it took little effort for the venture’s impresario, Johann Peter Salomon, to exact a promise from the lionized composer to return for another series of performances several months hence. The 60-year-old Haydn spent the intervening time at home in Vienna, recouping his strength after the rigors of the London trip, composing, teaching a few pupils (including Beethoven) and attending to domestic matters, most pressingly seeing to the demand for new quarters by his shrewish wife (whom he referred to, privately, as the “House-Dragon”). Anna Maria had discovered a house in the Viennese suburb of Gumpendorf that she thought would be just perfect, she explained to her husband, when she was a widow. Haydn was understandably reluctant to see the place, but he found it pleasing, and bought it the next year. It was the home in which, in 1809, he died, a decade after Anna Maria. One of the greatest successes of Haydn’s first London venture was the performance of several of his string quartets by Salomon, whose abilities as an impresario were matched by his virtuosity on the violin. Such public presentations of chamber works were still novel at the time, and their enthusiastic reception made it easy for Salomon to convince Haydn to create a half-dozen additional quartets for his projected visit in 1794-95, which were divided into two sets as Op. 71 and Op. 74 when they were published in London in 1795. The most popular of the six quartets is the Op. 74, No. 3 in G minor, known as “The Rider” because of the galloping rhythms in its outer movements. A gruff unison introduction opens the work. The cello initiates the dark-hued main subject, which is taken up by the other instruments before acquiring the galloping triplet rhythm that energizes much of the movement. The second

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theme, a dance-like strain reminiscent of the Polish mazurka, turns to brighter harmonic regions. The development section treats motives from the introduction and the second subject. A full recapitulation of the exposition’s themes rounds out the movement. The hymnal Largo is simple in form—A (major)—B (minor)—A (decorated)—but profound in expression, “one of Haydn’s most solemn utterances,” according to his biographer Rosemary Hughes. This music found considerable favor among the composer’s contemporaries, and it appeared in at least five piano arrangements during his lifetime. The cheerful elegance of the Menuet is balanced formally and expressively by the movement’s somber minor-mode central trio. The sonata-form finale, filled with rushing figurations, unsettling syncopations and dramatic contrasts, is a harbinger of the dawning Romantic age. String Quartet No. 1, Op. 7 (1907-08) Béla Bartók (Born March 25, 1881, in Nagyszentmiklós, Hungary; died September 26, 1945, in New York City) The year 1907, when he was 26, was a crucial time both personally and professionally for Béla Bartók. In January, he was appointed to the faculty of the Budapest Academy of Music as teacher of piano, and he soon became recognized as one of Hungary’s most talented keyboard virtuosos and pedagogues. By 1907, he had begun to establish himself as a composer and folk music researcher, though his original works to that time, largely under the sway of late German Romanticism, had not yet revealed his distinctive creative personality. He was then also much occupied with thoughts of Hungarian nationalism (he even eschewed business suits for a short period in favor of traditional peasant dress), and the manner in which the music he was documenting on his research trips through the Transylvanian countryside could be most effectively incorporated into his original works. These matters—the advancement of his professional life as a composer, performer and teacher; the foundation of a personal compositional language; the way to mold his music to his patriotic feelings—became enmeshed that summer in an affair of the heart, his first serious love entanglement. On vacation in the town of Jászberény, a short distance east of Budapest, he met the Hungarian violinist Stefi Geyer, then just 19, and fell in love with her. He wrote a concerto for Stefi, filled with allusions to his emotions, but she kept the score to herself, and the work was not played publicly until two years after her death in 1956, when it was published as the Violin Concerto No. 1, Opus Posthumous. On July 1, 1907, still in Jászberény, Bartók began sketching a string quartet (he had suppressed three youthful efforts in the form dating from 1896 and 1899; they are lost), but did not undertake further work on it until the beginning of the following year. By then, the affair with Stefi had come painfully, at least for him, to an end, as he indicated in his last letter to her (March 1908): “I have begun a quartet; the first theme is [borrowed from] the theme of the second movement of the Violin Concerto; this is my funeral dirge.” Tours to Switzerland, France and Italy that summer and fall precluded much progress on the Quartet, so the score was not completed until January 27, 1909. In August, Bartók, apparently recovered from his passion for Stefi, married Márta Ziegler, a 16-year-old student of his at the Academy. The premiere of the


The first movement of the String Quartet No. 1, Bartók’s first published chamber work and his earliest generally recognized masterpiece, is a darkly emotional essay grown from the harmonic richness of Wagner’s Tristan and not unrelated to the ripe Expressionism of Schoenberg’s 1899 Verklärte Nacht. The Quartet begins with a close canon in slow tempo on a lamenting theme (i.e., the theme derived from the principal motive of Stefi’s Concerto), whose imitative technique was probably influenced by the fugue that opens Beethoven’s C-sharp minor Quartet, Op. 131. Formal contrast is provided by the movement’s central section, based on a descending theme in worried rhythms (marked “very impassioned”) initiated by the viola above a drone in the cello. (As a means of unifying the overall structure of the Quartet, the opening interval of this melody—a falling half-step—serves as the germ from which the themes of the two later movements grow.) A return of the opening canon, floating high in the violins, rounds out the movement’s form. An inconclusive harmony leads without pause to the next movement. The Allegretto combines the formal elements of a traditional opening movement with the expression of a spectral scherzo. Its form is related to that of Classical sonata-allegro with three themes: a falling melody of short phrases introduced by the second violin after a hesitant introduction; a flowing waltz-like strain given by the inner strings above an ostinato murmur from the cello and first violin; and a quiet, subdued motive accompanied by pizzicato notes from the cello. After a tightly woven development section, however, the themes are recapitulated not in their expected order, but in reverse, a technique that creates a structural symmetry (1–2–3–development–3–2–1) for which Bartók showed great fondness in many of his later compositions. It is in the finale that Bartók moved beyond the extended Romantic style of the earlier movements toward the characteristic compositional idiom, grown from the distinctive melodic leadings and fiery dance rhythms of Hungarian folk music that inform his greatest works. The movement is introduced by a preludial paragraph in which the cello makes bardic pronouncements that are separated by excited punctuations from the upper strings. The main part of the movement is a sort of modern sonata-rondo whose structural demarcations are often blurred by the continuous thematic working-out. The movement’s folkish second theme is placed in high relief by its slow tempo and Impressionistic trilled accompaniment. Though the First String Quartet is among the earliest of Bartók’s works to exhibit the stylistic gestures that were to place him among the great composers of the modern era, it is music of undeniable personality and remarkable artistic vision and craftsmanship. Quintet for Piano and String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 44 (1842) Robert Schumann (Born June 8, 1810, in Zwickau, Germany; died July 29, 1856, in Endenich, Germany)

Takács quartet with Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano

new Quartet was given on March 19, 1910, at the Royal Concert Hall in Budapest by the Waldbauer-Kerpely Quartet, a group of young string players organized with the composer’s encouragement for the purpose of performing contemporary Hungarian music.

zeal. Entries in his diary attest to the frantic pace of his inspiration: “June 4th: started the Quartet in A minor. June 6th: Finished the Adagio of the Quartet. June 8th: My Quartet almost finished. June 11th: A good day, started a Second Quartet. June 18th: The Second Quartet almost finished up to the Variazioni. July 5th: Finished my Second Quartet. July 8th: Began the Third Quartet. July 10th: Worked with application on the Third Quartet.” Schumann’s three string quartets, published together under the single opus number 41, were completed in a frenzy of creative activity within just two months, after which he never wrote another work in the form. Having nearly exhausted himself, he and Clara took a holiday at a Bohemian spa in August, but he again threw himself into composition soon after his return: the Piano Quintet (Op. 44) was begun in September and the Piano Quartet (Op. 47) on October 24; both were finished before the Phantasiestücke for Piano, Violin, and Cello (Op. 88) were created in December. Schumann, drained by three months of feverish work, then slumped into a state of nervous collapse, and he was unable to compose again until the following February, though his achievement of 1842—the composition of six chamber music masterpieces in five months—stands as one of the greatest bursts of creative inspiration in the history of the art. Schumann sketched the Quintet for Piano, Two Violins, Viola and Cello, the first work ever written for that combination of instruments, in just five days during September 1842 and completed the score only two weeks later. The work opens with a striding, heroic theme played by the full ensemble. A gentler motive is posited by the piano and the violin as a transition to the second theme, a lovely scalar melody initiated by the cello. A recall of the vigorous opening theme closes the exposition. The development section, led by the piano (as is most of the work—the keyboard has only six measures of rest in the entire composition), deals mostly with permutations of the main theme. The recapitulation provides balance and closure by recalling the earlier thematic material in appropriately adjusted tonalities. The second movement is in the mode and manner of a solemn funeral march into which are inserted two contrasting episodes. The first intervening paragraph is a lyrical effusion for the violin and cello in duet supported by a restless accompaniment from the inner strings and the keyboard. The second episode is a tempestuous passage of angry triplet rhythms which are not soothed until the lyrical melody from the earlier episode returns in a heightened setting. The funeral march, nearly exhausted, is heard one final time to bring the movement to a dying close. The Scherzo, called by one commentator “the glorification of the scale,” is strewn with long ribbons of ascending and descending notes. Two trios, one sweet and flowing, the other impetuous and Gypsy-inspired, provide contrast. The finale, one of Schumann’s most masterful formal accomplishments, begins in the shadow of defiant tragedy but, before its end, achieves a soaring, lifeaffirming proclamation through an expertly constructed double fugue based on the conjoined main themes of the finale and the opening movement. ©2011 Dr. Richard E. Rodda

In 1842, after a year concentrating on works for orchestra, Schumann turned to chamber music with nearly monomaniacal

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

A Mondavi Center Special Event Tuesday-Wednesday, April 5-6, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be two intermissions. Support provided by Ken and Joyce Adamson. Post-performance Q&A moderated by Ruth Rosenberg, Artist Engagement Coordinator, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal. 36

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alvin ailey american dance theater

Alvin Ailey – FOUNDER

Judith Jamison – ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Masazumi Chaya – ASSOCIATE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Company Members

Guillermo Asca

Demetia Hopkins

Briana Reed

Kirven James Boyd

Abdur-Rahim Jackson

Jamar Roberts

Hope Boykin

Olivia Bowman Jackson

Samuel Lee Roberts

Clifton Brown

Megan Jakel

Renee Robinson

Rosalyn Deshauteurs

Yannick Lebrun

Glenn Allen Sims

Ghrai DeVore

Amos J. Machanic, Jr.

Linda Celeste Sims

Khilea Douglass

Michael Francis McBride

Constance Stamatiou

Antonio Douthit

Rachael McLaren

Jermaine Terry

Vernard J. Gilmore

Aisha Mitchell

Tina Monica Williams

Daniel Harder

Akua Noni Parker

Marcus Jarrell Willis

Robert Battle – Artistic Director Designate Sharon Gersten Luckman – Executive Director

Major funding is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, American Express, Diageo, JPMorgan Chase, the Prudential Foundation, the Shubert Foundation, the Starr Foundation and Target. Southwest Airlines is the Official Airline of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Official Vehicle Partner

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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alvin ailey american dance theater

Program for Tuesday, April 5

NIGHT CREATURE (1974) Choreography by Alvin Ailey Music by Duke Ellington Costumes by Jane Greenwood Costumes recreated by Barbara Forbes Lighting by Chenault Spence “Night creatures, unlike stars, do not come OUT at night—they come ON, each thinking that before the night is out he or she will be the star.” —Duke Ellington Movement 1 Renee Robinson, Guillermo Asca & The Company Movement 2 Renee Robinson, Clifton Brown, Rachael McLaren, Akua Noni Parker, Megan Jakel, Aisha Mitchell, Ghrai DeVore, Demetia Hopkins, Yannick Lebrun, Marcus Jarrell Willis, Michael Francis McBride, Samuel Lee Roberts, Daniel Harder, Jermaine Terry Movement 3 Renee Robinson, Guillermo Asca & The Company This production was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Ford Foundation and with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts. Born in Washington, D.C. in 1899, American composer, pianist and jazz band leader Duke Ellington was one of the most influential figures in the history of music. In the early l930s his band became renowned at the legendary Cotton Club in Harlem. Later, the band toured nationally and internationally. The “Duke” wrote more than 900 compositions before his death in l974; among his classics are Mood Indigo, Solitude, Caravan, Sophisticated Lady and Black, Brown, and Beige. Fabric dyeing of costumes by Elissa Tatigikis Iberti. “Night Creature” used by arrangement with G. Schirmer, Inc., publisher and copyright owner.

PAUSE

THE EVOLUTION OF A SECURED FEMININE (2007) Choreography by Camille A. Brown Assistants to the choreographer: Jasmine Forest & Francine E. Ott Music sung by Ella Fitzgerald, Betty Carter, Nancy Wilson Lighting by Brenda Gray Costumes by Carolyn Meckha Cherry Briana Reed Camille A. Brown attended Bernice Johnson and Carolyn Devore Dance Studios, LaGuardia High School and The Ailey School and received her B.F.A. from UNCSA. She was a member of Ronald K. Brown/Evidence from 2001-07, and has guest performed with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Rennie Harris, Dianne McIntyre and and with the cast of The Color Purple, choreographed by Darrell Grand Moultrie, for Broadway Cares. Ms. Brown has received The Princess Grace Award in Choreography, a NYFA Fellowship, The Project Next Generation Award and The Presidential Scholar Award in Dance, and she has been featured in Dance Magazine, Dance Spirit and Marie Claire, among others. Brown previously set her ballet The Groove to Nobody’s Business on the Company. Other commissions include Hubbard Street II, Urban Bush Women, Ailey II, Ballet Memphis, Dallas Black, New York Fashion Week, YAGP, and Philadanco. In August, her ensemble debuted at Jacob’s Pillow and the Joyce Theater. “Lover, Come Back To Me” ©1928 (Renewed) WB Music Corp. (ASCAP) Music by Sigmund Romberg.  Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. This selection is used by special arrangement with Williamson Music, on behalf of Bambalina Music. All rights reserved.  Used by permission. “Tight” performed by & composed by Betty Carter. “Guess Who I Saw Today” written by Elisse Boyd and Murray Grand. Published by Sony/ATV Tunes LLC (ASCAP).

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alvin ailey american dance theater

INTERMISSION

VESPERS (1986) Choreography and costumes by Ulysses Dove Music by Mikel Rouse Lighting by William H. Grant III

Linda Celeste Sims, Rachael McLaren, Hope Boykin, Tina Monica Williams, Olivia Bowman Jackson, Constance Stamatiou

The commissioning of this work was made possible, in part, by generous grants from the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund and J.P. Morgan. Vespers was originally created for the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company in 1986 through a grant from the National Choreography Project. The late beloved Ulysses Dove was a “choreographer with a bold new voice,” whose works can be seen in the repertories of major dance companies such as the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, The Culberg Ballet, Bayerische Statsoper and Ballet France de Nancy. A native of Columbia, South Carolina, Dove began studying modern dance and ballet with Carolyn Tate, Xenia Chilstowa, Jack Moore, Judith Dunn, Bertram Ross, Helen McGehee and Mary Hinkson. After receiving his bachelor’s degree from Bennington College, Dove moved to New York City where he studied with Maggie Black and Alfredo Corvino, and performed with Jose Limon, Mary Antony, Pearl Lang and Anna Sokolow. In 1970, he received a scholarship to the Merce Cunningham School and later joined the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Shortly thereafter, he made his choreographic debut in 1979 with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. From 1980-83, Dove was the assistant director of Groupe Recherche Choreographique de l’Opera de Paris, where he taught company classes and choreographed. Jamison is committed to his works as a continuing legacy to the Ailey repertory. Mikel Rouse’s Quorum, the music for Ulysses Dove’s Vespers, is available on iTunes.

PAUSE

THE HUNT (2001) Choreography by Robert Battle Assistant to the choreographer: Erika Pujikic Music by Les Tambours du Bronx Costumes by Mia McSwain Lighting by Burke Wilmore

Abdur-Rahim Jackson, Guillermo Asca, Vernard J. Gilmore, Samuel Lee Roberts, Amos J. Machanic, Jr., Marcus Jarrell Willis

Generous support for this Company premiere was provided by the Pamela D. Zilly & John H. Schaefer New Works Endowment Fund and Linda Stocknoff. “Jungle Jazz” by L. Blomme, performed by Les Tambours du Bronx. “Les Boulets Se Rebiffent” by A. Dipace, J.Y. Lefloch, Y. Nisgand, B. Pingon, and J.M. Tramoy, performed by Les Tambours du Bronx. “Black Bull” by L. Le Mapihan, performed by Les Tambours du Bronx. Music from the recording Silence (1999). Used with permission by Right Bank Music, Inc.

INTERMISSION

CELEBRATING REVELATIONS AT 50 FILM Produced and Directed by Judy Kinberg Director of Photography: Tom Hurwitz Animation Designer: Todd Ruff Edited by Andrew Morreale Generous support was provided by the Jean L. & Robert A. Stern Foundation. Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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alvin ailey american dance theater

REVELATIONS (1960) Choreography by Alvin Ailey Music: Traditional Décor and costumes by Ves Harper Costumes for “Rocka My Soul” redesigned by Barbara Forbes Lighting by Nicola Cernovitch

PILGRIM OF SORROW I Been ‘Buked Music arranged by Hall Johnson*

The Company

Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel

Yannick Lebrun, Hope Boykin, Tina Monica Williams

Music arranged by James Miller+

Fix Me, Jesus

Linda Celeste Sims, Glenn Allen Sims

Music arranged by Hall Johnson*

TAKE ME TO THE WATER Processional/Honor, Honor Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts Wade in the Water

Abdur-Rahim Jackson, Olivia Bowman Jackson, Yannick Lebrun, Samuel Lee Roberts Constance Stamatiou, Vernard J. Gilmore, Renee Robinson

Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts “Wade in the Water” sequence by Ella Jenkins “A Man Went Down to the River” is an original composition by Ella Jenkins

I Wanna Be Ready

Amos J. Machanic, Jr.

Music arranged by James Miller+

MOVE, MEMBERS, MOVE Sinner Man

Jamar Roberts, Clifton Brown, Kirven James Boyd

Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts

The Day is Past and Gone

The Company

Music arranged by Howard A. Roberts and Brother John Sellers

You May Run On

The Company

Music arranged by Howard A. Roberts and Brother John Sellers

Rocka My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham

Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts * Used by arrangement with G. Schirmer, Inc., publisher and copyright owner. + Used by special arrangement with Galaxy Music Corporation, New York City.

All performances of Revelations are permanently endowed by a generous gift from Donald L. Jonas in celebration of the birthday of his wife Barbara and her deep commitment to Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Watch a special video message from Judith Jamison and share your own Revelations memories at www.AlvinAiley.org/rev50card. AileyConnect: 212.514.0010 To learn more about The Evolution Of A Secured Feminine press 18#. To learn more about The Hunt press 50#. To learn more about Revelations press 17#.

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The Company


alvin ailey american dance theater

Program for Wednesday, April 6

NIGHT CREATURE (1974) Choreography by Alvin Ailey Music by Duke Ellington Costumes by Jane Greenwood Costumes recreated by Barbara Forbes Lighting by Chenault Spence “Night creatures, unlike stars, do not come OUT at night—they come ON, each thinking that before the night is out he or she will be the star.” —Duke Ellington Movement 1 Olivia Bowman Jackson, Guillermo Asca & The Company Movement 2 Olivia Bowman Jackson, Glenn Allen Sims, Khilea Douglass, Akua Noni Parker, Megan Jakel, Aisha Mitchell, Ghrai DeVore, Demetia Hopkins, Yannick Lebrun, Marcus Jarrell Willis, Michael Francis McBride, Samuel Lee Roberts, Daniel Harder, Jermaine Terry Movement 3 Olivia Bowman Jackson, Guillermo Asca & The Company This production was made possible, in part, by a grant from Ford Foundation and with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts. Born in Washington, D.C. in 1899, American composer, pianist and jazz band leader Duke Ellington was one of the most influential figures in the history of music. In the early l930s his band became renowned at the legendary Cotton Club in Harlem. Later, the band toured nationally and internationally. The “Duke” wrote more than 900 compositions before his death in l974; among his classics are Mood Indigo, Solitude, Caravan, Sophisticated Lady and Black, Brown, and Beige. Fabric dyeing of costumes by Elissa Tatigikis Iberti. “Night Creature” used by arrangement with G. Schirmer, Inc., publisher and copyright owner.

PAUSE

THE EVOLUTION OF A SECURED FEMININE (2007) Choreography by Camille A. Brown Assistants to the choreographer: Jasmine Forest & Francine E. Ott Music sung by Ella Fitzgerald, Betty Carter, Nancy Wilson Lighting by Brenda Gray Costumes by Carolyn Meckha Cherry Rachael McLaren Camille A. Brown attended Bernice Johnson and Carolyn Devore Dance Studios, LaGuardia High School and The Ailey School and received her B.F.A. from UNCSA. She was a member of Ronald K. Brown/Evidence from 2001-07, and has guest performed with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Rennie Harris, Dianne McIntyre and and with the cast of The Color Purple, choreographed by Darrell Grand Moultrie, for Broadway Cares. Ms. Brown has received The Princess Grace Award in Choreography, a NYFA Fellowship, The Project Next Generation Award and The Presidential Scholar Award in Dance, and she has been featured in Dance Magazine, Dance Spirit and Marie Claire, among others. Brown previously set her ballet The Groove to Nobody’s Business on the Company. Other commissions include Hubbard Street II, Urban Bush Women, Ailey II, Ballet Memphis, Dallas Black, New York Fashion Week, YAGP, and Philadanco. In August, her ensemble debuted at Jacob’s Pillow and the Joyce Theater. “Lover, Come Back To Me” ©1928 (Renewed) WB Music Corp. (ASCAP) Music by Sigmund Romberg.  Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. This selection is used by special arrangement with Williamson Music, on behalf of Bambalina Music. All rights reserved.  Used by permission. “Tight” performed by & composed by Betty Carter. “Guess Who I Saw Today” written by Elisse Boyd and Murray Grand. Published by Sony/ATV Tunes LLC (ASCAP).

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

41


alvin ailey american dance theater

INTERMISSION

VESPERS (1986) Choreography and costumes by Ulysses Dove Music by Mikel Rouse Lighting by William H. Grant III

Briana Reed, Ghrai DeVore, Megan Jakel, Rosalyn Deshauteurs, Khilea Douglass, Akua Noni Parker

The commissioning of this work was made possible, in part, by generous grants from the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund and J.P. Morgan. Vespers was originally created for the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company in 1986 through a grant from the National Choreography Project. The late beloved Ulysses Dove was a “choreographer with a bold new voice,” whose works can be seen in the repertories of major dance companies such as the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, The Culberg Ballet, Bayerische Statsoper and Ballet France de Nancy. A native of Columbia, South Carolina, Dove began studying modern dance and ballet with Carolyn Tate, Xenia Chilstowa, Jack Moore, Judith Dunn, Bertram Ross, Helen McGehee and Mary Hinkson. After receiving his bachelor’s degree from Bennington College, Dove moved to New York City where he studied with Maggie Black and Alfredo Corvino, and performed with Jose Limon, Mary Antony, Pearl Lang and Anna Sokolow. In 1970, he received a scholarship to the Merce Cunningham School and later joined the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Shortly thereafter, he made his choreographic debut in 1979 with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. From 1980-83, Dove was the assistant director of Groupe Recherche Choreographique de l’Opera de Paris, where he taught company classes and choreographed. Jamison is committed to his works as a continuing legacy to the Ailey repertory. Mikel Rouse’s Quorum, the music for Ulysses Dove’s Vespers, is available on iTunes.

PAUSE

THE HUNT (2001) Choreography by Robert Battle Assistant to the choreographer: Erika Pujikic Music by Les Tambours du Bronx Costumes by Mia McSwain Lighting by Burke Wilmore

Abdur-Rahim Jackson, Guillermo Asca, Vernard J. Gilmore, Samuel Lee Roberts, Amos J. Machanic, Jr., Marcus Jarrell Willis

Generous support for this Company premiere was provided by the Pamela D. Zilly & John H. Schaefer New Works Endowment Fund and Linda Stocknoff. “Jungle Jazz” by L. Blomme, performed by Les Tambours du Bronx. “Les Boulets Se Rebiffent” by A. Dipace, J.Y. Lefloch, Y. Nisgand, B. Pingon, and J.M. Tramoy, performed by Les Tambours du Bronx. “Black Bull” by L. Le Mapihan, performed by Les Tambours du Bronx. Music from the recording Silence (1999). Used with permission by Right Bank Music, Inc.

INTERMISSION

CELEBRATING REVELATIONS AT 50 FILM Produced and Directed by Judy Kinberg Director of Photography: Tom Hurwitz Animation Designer: Todd Ruff Edited by Andrew Morreale Generous support was provided by the Jean L. & Robert A. Stern Foundation. 42

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alvin ailey american dance theater

REVELATIONS (1960) Choreography by Alvin Ailey Music: Traditional Décor and costumes by Ves Harper Costumes for “Rocka My Soul” redesigned by Barbara Forbes Lighting by Nicola Cernovitch

PILGRIM OF SORROW I Been ‘Buked

Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel

Samuel Lee Roberts, Megan Jakel, Tina Monica Williams

Music arranged by James Miller+

Fix Me, Jesus

The Company

Music arranged by Hall Johnson*

Briana Reed, Amos J. Machanic, Jr.

Music arranged by Hall Johnson*

TAKE ME TO THE WATER Processional/Honor, Honor

Michael Francis McBride, Olivia Bowman Jackson, Samuel Lee Roberts, Marcus Jarrell Willis

Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts

Wade in the Water

Rosalyn Deshauteurs, Glenn Allen Sims, Aisha Mitchell

Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts “Wade in the Water” sequence by Ella Jenkins “A Man Went Down to the River” is an original composition by Ella Jenkins

I Wanna Be Ready

Guillermo Asca

Music arranged by James Miller+

MOVE, MEMBERS, MOVE Sinner Man

Daniel Harder, Jermaine Terry, Abdur-Rahim Jackson

Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts

The Day is Past and Gone

The Company

Music arranged by Howard A. Roberts and Brother John Sellers

You May Run On

The Company

Music arranged by Howard A. Roberts and Brother John Sellers

Rocka My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham

The Company

Music adapted and arranged by Howard A. Roberts * Used by arrangement with G. Schirmer, Inc., publisher and copyright owner. + Used by special arrangement with Galaxy Music Corporation, New York City.

All performances of Revelations are permanently endowed by a generous gift from Donald L. Jonas in celebration of the birthday of his wife Barbara and her deep commitment to Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Watch a special video message from Judith Jamison and share your own Revelations memories at www.AlvinAiley.org/rev50card.

AileyConnect: 212.514.0010 To learn more about The Evolution Of A Secured Feminine press 18#. To learn more about The Hunt press 50#. To learn more about Revelations press 17#.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

43


alvin ailey american dance theater

All About Ailey Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater grew from a now-fabled performance in March 1958 at the 92nd Street Y in New York. Led by Alvin Ailey and a group of young African-American modern dancers, that performance changed forever the perception of American dance. The Ailey company has gone on to perform for an estimated 23 million people in 48 states and in 71 countries on six continents, including two historic residencies in South Africa. In 2008, the U.S. Congress designated the company as “a vital American cultural ambassador to the world,” promoting the uniqueness of the African-American cultural experience and the preservation and enrichment of the American modern dance heritage. Born in Rogers, Texas, on January 5, 1931, Alvin Ailey was introduced to dance by performances of the Katherine Dunham Dance Company and the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. His formal dance training began with an introduction to Lester Horton’s classes by his friend Carmen de Lavallade. When Ailey began creating dances, he drew upon his “blood memories” of Texas, the blues, spirituals and gospel as inspiration, which resulted in the creation of his most popular and critically acclaimed work, Revelations. Although he created 79 ballets over his lifetime, Alvin Ailey maintained that his company was not exclusively a repository for his own work. Today, the company continues Ailey’s mission by presenting important works of the past and commissioning new ones. In all, more than 200 works by more than 80 choreographers are part of the Ailey company’s repertoire. Before his untimely death in 1989, Alvin Ailey asked Judith Jamison to become Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Remaining committed to furthering Alvin Ailey’s legacy, she brought the company to unprecedented success. In July 2011, Jamison will pass her mantle to Artistic Director Designate Robert Battle. In announcing Battle’s appointment, Jamison stated, “Combining an intimate knowledge of the Ailey company with an independent perspective, he is without question the creative force of the future.”

Photo by Andrew Eccles

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater gratefully acknowledges the Joan & Sandy Weill Global Ambassador Fund, which provides vital support for Ailey’s national and international tours.

Judith Jamison, Artistic Director Judith Jamison was appointed Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in December 1989 at the request of her mentor, Alvin Ailey, who personally chose her to succeed him before his untimely death. A native of Philadelphia, she studied with Marion Cuyjet, was discovered by Agnes de Mille and made her New York debut with American Ballet Theatre in 1964. She became a member of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1965 and danced with the company for 15 years to great acclaim. Recognizing her extraordinary talent, Ailey created some of his most enduring roles for her, most notably the tour-de-force solo Cry. After leaving the company in 1980, Jamison appeared as a guest artist with ballet companies all over the world and starred in the hit Broadway musical Sophisticated Ladies. In 1988, she formed 44

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her own company, the Jamison Project; a PBS special depicting her creative process, Judith Jamison: The Dancemaker, aired nationally the same year. As a highly regarded choreographer, Jamison has created works for many companies. Her most recent work, Among Us (Private Spaces: Public Places), premiered in 2009. Her 2005 ballet Reminiscin’ was inspired by great female jazz artists and Edward Hopper’s famous painting Nighthawks. Love Stories, with additional choreography by Robert Battle and Rennie Harris, was created in 2004. In 2002, HERE...NOW was commissioned for the Cultural Olympiad in Salt Lake City. Jamison choreographed Double Exposure for the Lincoln Center Festival in 2000. In 1993, Jamison created Hymn as a stirring tribute to Ailey. Echo: Far From Home (1998), Sweet Release (1996), Riverside (1995), Rift (1991), Forgotten Time (1989) and Divining (1984) are other major works she has choreographed for the Company. Jamison is an author whose autobiography, Dancing Spirit, was edited by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and published by Doubleday in 1993. She is the recipient of many awards and honorary degrees, including a primetime Emmy Award and an American Choreography Award for the PBS special Great Performances: Dance In America, A Hymn for Alvin Ailey and an honorary doctorate from Howard University. In 1999, Jamison was presented with the Kennedy Center Honor, recognizing her lifetime contributions to American culture through the performing arts. In 2001, she received the Algur H. Meadows Award from Southern Methodist University and was presented with a National Medal of Arts, the most prestigious award presented to artists in the United States. She received the “Making a Difference” Award from the NAACP ACT-SO, the Paul Robeson Award from Actors’ Equity Association in recognition of her outstanding contribution to the performing arts and commitment to the right of all people to live in dignity and peace and a Bessie Award for her lifetime commitment to the preservation and development of dance and the arts. In 2009, Jamison was honored at “The BET Honors,” an event that recognizes the lives and achievements of leading African-American luminaries, and she was listed in the Time 100: The World’s Most Influential People. She was also awarded the highest rank of the Order of Arts and Letters, an award that recognizes eminent artists and writers, and those who have contributed significantly to furthering the arts in France and throughout the world. In 2010, Jamison’s costume from Alvin Ailey’s 1975 ballet The Mooche was added to the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, and she received the 2010 Montblanc de la Culture Arts Patronage Award, presented annually to an individual who has given exceptional time and energy to artists and the arts. She was also honored by First Lady Michelle Obama at the first White House Dance Series: A Tribute to Judith Jamison and was named the 2010 recipient of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s prestigious Phoenix Award. Most recently, Mayor Bloomberg presented Jamison with the Handel Medallion, the highest honor awarded by the City of New York. Today, Judith Jamison presides over the artistically and fiscally vibrant Ailey organization. Her presence has been a catalyst, propelling the organization in new directions—the development of the Women’s Choreography Initiative; performances at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games and the 2002 Cultural Olympiad in Salt Lake City where she carried the Olympic torch during the relay


Masazumi Chaya, Associate Artistic Director Masazumi Chaya was born in Fukuoka, Japan, where he began his classical ballet training. Upon moving to New York in 1970, he studied modern dance and performed with the Richard Englund Repertory Company. Chaya joined Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1972 and performed with the company for 15 years. In 1988, he became the Company’s Rehearsal Director after serving as Assistant Rehearsal Director for two years. A master teacher, both on tour with the Company and in Japan, he served as choreographic assistant to Alvin Ailey and John Butler. In 1991, Chaya was named Associate Artistic Director of the company. He continues to provide invaluable creative assistance in all facets of its operations. In 2002, Chaya coordinated the Company’s appearance at the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting ceremony, broadcast on NBC. Chaya has restaged numerous ballets including Alvin Ailey’s Flowers for the State Ballet of Missouri (1990) and The River for the Royal Swedish Ballet (1993), Ballet Florida (1995), National Ballet of Prague (1995), Pennsylvania Ballet (1996) and Colorado Ballet (1998). He has also restaged The Mooche, The Stack-Up, Episodes, Bad Blood, Hidden Rites, Urban Folk Dance and Witness for the Company. At the beginning of his tenure as Associate Artistic Director, Chaya restaged Ailey’s For “Bird” — With Love for a Dance in America program titled Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Steps Ahead. In 2000, he restaged Ailey’s Night Creature for the Rome Opera House and The River for La Scala Ballet. In 2003, he restaged The River for North Carolina Dance Theatre and for Julio Bocca’s Ballet Argentina. Most recently, Chaya restaged Blues Suite, Mary Lou’s Mass, Three Black Kings, and Judith Jamison’s Forgotten Time and Hymn for the Company.

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Photo by Brian Guilliaux Photo by Andrew Eccles

Photo by Andrew Eccles

She has continued Ailey’s practice of showcasing the talents of emerging choreographers from within the ranks of the company. As Artistic Director of The Ailey School, official school of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Jamison has helped to implement a multicultural curriculum including the dances of West Africa and South India. She is an advocate for education in the arts and was a guiding force in establishing the B.F.A. program between The Ailey School and Fordham University, which offers a unique combination of world-class dance training and a superior liberal arts education. Following the tradition of Alvin Ailey, Jamison is dedicated to asserting the prominence of the arts in our culture, spearheading initiatives to bring dance into the community and programs that introduce children to the arts. She remains committed to promoting the significance of the Ailey legacy—dance as a medium for honoring the past, celebrating the present and fearlessly reaching into the future. The move to Ailey’s permanent home, the Joan Weill Center for Dance, in 2004, a state-of-the-art building located at 55th Street and 9th Avenue, was the realization of her long-awaited dream.

alvin ailey american dance theater

prior to the opening ceremonies; and two historic engagements in South Africa. Recently, she led the company on a 50-city global tour celebrating Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s 50th anniversary with a year-long series of special performances, collaborations, events and commemorative merchandise including an Ailey Barbie Doll by Mattel designed by Jamison.

Robert Battle, Artistic Director Designate In July 2011, Robert Battle will succeed Judith Jamison as Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, becoming only the third person to head the Company since its founding by Mr. Ailey in 1958. In announcing her selection, Jamison said that “choosing Robert Battle is the giant leap I want to take to ensure that this company stays vibrant in the future.” Battle has already had a long association with the Ailey organization, as a choreographer and an artist-in-residence. Since 1999, he has set eleven of his works on Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Ailey II, and at The Ailey School—including three works being performed by the Ailey company this season: The Hunt, In/Side, and Love Stories (a collaboration with Ms. Jamison and Rennie Harris). Battle’s journey to the top of the modern dance world began in the Liberty City neighborhood of Miami, Florida. He showed artistic talent early and studied dance at a high school arts magnet program before moving on to Miami’s New World School of the Arts, under the direction of Daniel Lewis and Gerri Houlihan, and finally to the dance program at The Juilliard School, under the direction of Benjamin Harkarvy, where he met his mentor Carolyn Adams. Upon his graduation from Juilliard, Mr. Battle joined the Parsons Dance Company and danced with them from 1994 to 2001, and he also set his own choreography on that company starting in 1998. Battle then founded his own Battleworks Dance Company, which made its premiere in 2002 in Düsseldorf, Germany as the U.S. representative to the World Dance Alliance’s Global Assembly. Battleworks subsequently performed extensively at venues including the Joyce Theater, Dance Theater Workshop, American Dance Festival and Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival. He has also created new works and restaged his ballets for such companies as Hubbard Street Repertory Ensemble, River North Chicago Dance Company, Koresh Dance Company, Introdans, PARADIGM, and Ballet Memphis. He has regularly conducted residencies at universities throughout the United States and gives master classes around the globe. Battle was honored as one of the “Masters of African American Choreography” by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 2005, and he received the prestigious Statue Award from the Princess Grace Foundation-USA in 2007. This past July, he was a guest speaker at the United Nations Leaders Programme in Turin, Italy. Matthew Rushing, Rehearsal Director Matthew Rushing was born in Los Angeles. He began his dance training with Kashmir Blake in Inglewood, and continued his training at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts. He received a Spotlight Award and was named a Presidential Scholar in the Arts. He trained at The Ailey School and later became a member of Ailey II, where he danced for a year. During his career, Rushing has performed as a guest artist for galas in Vail, as well as in France, Russia, Canada, Austria and Italy. He has performed for presidents George H. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama, as well as at the 2010 White House tribute to Judith Jamison. During his time with the Company he has choreographed two ballets: Acceptance in Surrender (2005), a collaboration with Company members Hope Boykin and Abdur Rahim-Jackson, and Uptown (2009), a tribute to the Harlem Renaissance. He is a 2010 recipient of the Dance Magazine Award. Rushing joined the company in 1992 and became Rehearsal Director in June 2010.

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Who’s Who in the Company Guillermo Asca (Rego Park, NY) or Moe, as he is affectionately known, graduated from LaGuardia High School of the Performing Arts. He was a fellowship student at The Ailey School and danced with Ailey II, Ballet Metropolitano de Caracas, Ballet Hispanico, Dance Compass, Shapiro & Smith and Footprints Dance Project. He performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Asca joined the Company in 1994. Kirven James Boyd (Boston, MA) began his formal dance training at the Boston Arts Academy and joined Boston Youth Moves in 1999 under the direction of Jim Viera and Jeannette Neill. He also trained on scholarship at the Boston Conservatory and as a fellowship student at The Ailey School. Boyd has danced with Battleworks Dance Company, the Parsons Dance Company and Ailey II. He performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Boyd joined the Company in 2004. Hope Boykin (Durham, NC) is a three-time recipient of the American Dance Festival’s Young Tuition Scholarship. She attended Howard University, and while in Washington, D.C. she performed with Lloyd Whitmore’s New World Dance Company. Boykin was a student and intern at The Ailey School, an assistant to the late Talley Beatty, and an original member of Complexions. Boykin was a member of Philadanco and received a New York Dance and Performance “Bessie” Award. In 2005, Boykin choreographed Acceptance in Surrender in collaboration with Abdur-Rahim Jackson and Matthew Rushing for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. She choreographed Go in Grace with award-winning singing group Sweet Honey in the Rock for the Company’s 50th anniversary season. Boykin joined the Company in 2000. Clifton Brown (Goodyear, AZ) trained at Take 5 Dance Academy, Ballet Arizona, New School for the Arts and The Ailey School, where he was a student in the Ailey/Fordham B.F.A. Program in Dance. Brown is a recipient of a Donna Wood Foundation Award, a Level 1 ARTS award given by the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts and was a 2005 nominee in the U.K. for a Critics Circle National Dance Award for best male dancer. In 2007, Brown received a “Bessie” Award in recognition of his work with the Ailey company. He has performed with Earl Mosley’s Diversity of Dance and as a guest artist with the Miami City Ballet. He performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Brown joined the Company in 1999 and was named Assistant to the Rehearsal Director in June 2010. Rosalyn Deshauteurs (New Orleans, LA) studied at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. She trained at Perry Mansfield, the School of American Ballet and The Ailey School. After receiving her B.F.A. degree from the Juilliard School, Deshauteurs became a member of Ailey II. She performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Deshauteurs joined the Company in 2000. Ghrai DeVore (Washington, D.C.) began her formal dance training at the Chicago Multicultural Dance Center. DeVore has completed summer programs at the Kirov Academy, Ballet Chicago, Deeply Rooted Dance Theater, American Ballet Theatre and Alonzo King’s Lines Ballet, and was a fellowship student at The Ailey School. She was a member of Ailey II, Deeply Rooted Dance Theater 2, Hubbard Street 2 and Dance Works Chicago. DeVore joined the Company in 2010. Khilea Douglass (Baltimore, MD) received her dance training from Dance Theatre of Harlem, the Baltimore School for the Arts and The Ailey School, where she was a fellowship student. Douglass danced with the Lula Washington Dance Theatre and was a member of Ailey II. She joined the Company in 2005. 46

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Antonio Douthit (St. Louis, MO) began his dance training at age 16 at the Center of Contemporary Arts and the Alexandra School of Ballet. He also trained at North Carolina School of the Arts, the Joffrey Ballet School, San Francisco Ballet and the Dance Theatre of Harlem School. After graduating from high school in 1999, Douthit became a member of Dance Theatre of Harlem, where he appeared in featured roles in the ballets South African Suite, Dougla, Concerto in F, Return and Twist. He also performed with Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal. Douthit joined the Company in 2004. Vernard J. Gilmore (Chicago, IL) began dancing at Curie Performing and Creative Arts High School in Chicago and later studied at the Joseph Holmes Chicago Dance Theatre. He attended Barat College as a dance scholarship recipient and received first place in the all-city NAACP ACT-SO Competition in Dance in 1993. He studied as a fellowship student at The Ailey School and was a member of Ailey II. He performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Gilmore is an active choreographer for the Ailey Dancers Resource Fund and has choreographed for Fire Island Dance Festival 2008 and Jazz Foundation of America Gala 2010; he also produced the Dance of Light Project in 2010. He teaches workshops and master classes around the world. Gilmore joined the Company in 1997. Daniel Harder (Bowie, MD) began dancing at Suitland High School’s Center for the Visual and Performing Arts in Maryland. He is a recent graduate of the Ailey/Fordham B.F.A. program in dance, where he was awarded the Jerome Robbins/Layton Foundation Scholarship and participated in the Holland Dance Festival with the school and as a member of the Francesca Harper Project. After dancing in the European tour of West Side Story, Harder became a member of Ailey II. He joined the company in 2010. Demetia Hopkins (Orange, VA) began her dance training at the Orange School of Performing Arts under the direction of her uncle Ricardo Porter and Heather Powell. She has also studied with the National Youth Ballet of Virginia, Virginia School of the Arts, the Summer Dance International Course in Burgos, Spain, the Rock School and Dance Theatre of Harlem School. Hopkins graduated with honors from the Ailey/Fordham B.F.A program in Dance in 2009. She was a member of Ailey II and joined the Company in 2010. Abdur-Rahim Jackson (Philadelphia, PA) is a graduate of Franklin Learning Center High School and received his B.F.A. from the Juilliard School. He received scholarships from Freedom Theatre, Philadanco, Dance Theatre of Harlem, Boston Ballet and the Ailey School. Jackson received a Marion D. Cuyjet Award and was featured in the 2003 PBS American Masters documentary Juilliard. He danced with Ailey II in 2000 and joined the company in 2001. Olivia Bowman Jackson (Brooklyn, NY) graduated from LaGuardia High School of the Performing Arts. She received scholarships from North Carolina School of the Arts and was a fellowship student at The Ailey School. Jackson was a member of Donald Byrd/The Group and Complexions. She joined the Company in 2001. Megan Jakel (Waterford, MI) trained in ballet and jazz in her hometown. As a senior in high school, she spent a year dancing with the City Ballet of San Diego. In 2005, Jakel was an apprentice and rehearsal director for the Francesca Harper Project. She graduated with honors in 2007 from the Ailey/Fordham B.F.A. program in dance. Jakel was a member of Ailey II and joined the Company in 2009.


Amos J. Machanic, Jr. (Miami, FL) studied dance at the New World School of the Arts and continued his training at The Ailey School, where he was a fellowship recipient. He performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. He was a member of Ailey II and joined the Company in 1996. Michael Francis McBride (Johnson City, NY) recently graduated magna cum laude from the Ailey/Fordham B.F.A. program in dance. He began his training at the Danek School of Performing Arts and later trained at Amber Perkins School of the Arts. In addition to The Ailey School, McBride attended Earl Mosley’s Institute of the Arts for two consecutive summers. He was also the assistant to choreographer Earl Mosley when he set the piece Saddle UP! on the Company in 2007. McBride joined the Company in 2009. Rachael McLaren (Manitoba, Canada) began her formal dance training at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School. After graduating high school, she joined the Toronto cast of Mamma Mia! McLaren moved to New York to study at The Ailey School as a fellowship student and later joined Ailey II. McLaren joined the Company in 2008. Aisha Mitchell (Syracuse, NY) received her primary dance training at the Onondaga Dance Institute, Dance Centre North and Syracuse University. She studied at North Carolina Dance Theatre, Lines Ballet School, the Joffrey Ballet School and the Ailey School as a fellowship student. Mitchell is a graduate of the Ailey/Fordham B.F.A. program in dance and was a member of Ailey II. Mitchell was a bronze medalist at the 2001 NAACP National ACT-SO competition. She joined the company in 2008. Akua Noni Parker (Kinston, NC) began her ballet training at the age of three and moved to Wilmington, Delaware, at 12 to continue her professional training at the Academy of the Dance. In 2000, she joined Dance Theatre of Harlem. She also danced with Cincinnati Ballet and Ballet San Jose. Parker joined the Company in 2008. Briana Reed (St. Petersburg, FL) began her dance training at the Academy of Ballet Arts and the Pinellas County Center for Arts. She studied at The Ailey School as a fellowship student. In 1997, Reed graduated from the Juilliard School and became a member of Ailey II. She performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Reed joined the Company in 1998. Jamar Roberts (Miami, FL) graduated from the New World School of the Arts. He trained at the Dance Empire of Miami and as a fellowship student at The Ailey School. Roberts was a member of Ailey II and Complexions Contemporary Ballet. He joined the Company in 2002. Samuel Lee Roberts (Quakertown, PA) began his dance training under the direction of Kathleen Johnston and attended the Juilliard School. He performed in the first international show of Radio City Christmas Spectacular in Mexico City and during the award ceremony at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, worked with Corbin Dances and Keigwin and Company and was a founding member of Battleworks Dance Company. In 2006, Roberts was named Dance Magazine’s “On the Rise” Dancer. Roberts joined the Company in 2009.

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alvin ailey american dance theater

Yannick Lebrun (Cayenne, French Guiana) began training at the Adaclam School under the guidance of Jeanine Verin. In 2004, he moved to New York City to study at The Ailey School as a fellowship student. Lebrun danced with the Francesca Harper Project Modo Fusion and was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch” in 2011. Lebrun was a member of Ailey II and joined the Company in 2008.

Renee Robinson (Washington, D.C.) began her training in classical ballet at the Jones-Haywood School of Ballet. She was the recipient of two Ford Foundation scholarships to the School of American Ballet and was awarded full scholarships to the Dance Theatre of Harlem School and The Ailey School. She performed at the White House State Dinner in 2003 in honor of the President of Kenya, Mwai Kibaki, and at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Robinson was a member of Ailey II and joined the Company in 1981. Glenn Allen Sims (Long Branch, NJ) began his classical dance training at the Academy of Dance Arts. He attended the Juilliard School under the artistic guidance of Benjamin Harkarvy. He has been seen in several network televisions programs, including BET Honors, Dancing with the Stars and The Today Show. In 2010, Sims taught as a master teacher in Ravenna, Italy, for Dance Up Ravenna, sponsored by International Dance Association, and performed in the White House tribute to Judith Jamison. Sims joined the Company in 1997. Linda Celeste Sims (Bronx, NY) began her dance training at Ballet Hispanico School of Dance and is a graduate of LaGuardia High School of the Performing Arts. She was highlighted in the “Best of 2009” list in Dance Magazine and has performed as a guest star on So You Think You Can Dance, Dancing with the Stars and The Today Show. She has also made guest appearances at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison, Youth America Grand Prix, Vail International Dance Festival and galas in Budapest and Vienna. Sims joined the Company in 1996 and was named Assistant to the Rehearsal Director in 2010. Constance Stamatiou (Charlotte, NC) began her dance training at Pat Hall’s Dance Unlimited and North Carolina Dance Theatre. In 2002, she graduated from Northwest School of the Arts and studied at SUNY Purchase before becoming a fellowship student at The Ailey School. In 2009, Stamatiou received the Leonore Annenberg Fellowship in the Performing and Visual Arts, which is awarded to exceptionally talented and promising artists. She performed at the White House tribute to Judith Jamison in 2010. Stamatiou was a member of Ailey II and joined the Company in 2007. Jermaine Terry (Kissimmee, FL) began his dance training in Kissimmee at James Dance Center. He graduated cum laude with a B.F.A. in dance performance from the University of South Florida, where he received scholarships for excellence in performance and choreography. Terry was a fellowship student at The Ailey School and a member of Ailey II, and he has performed with Buglisi Dance Theater, Arch Dance, Dance Iquail and Philadanco. Terry joined the Company in 2010. Tina Monica Williams (Elizabeth, NJ) started dancing at a local dance school at an early age. In 1994, Williams began her formal training at The Ailey School, receiving a fellowship after her first year. She danced with Footprints Dance Company, the Millennium Project and the Shore Ballet Company and was invited to perform in Italy in 1994 as part of a youth cultural exchange tour. In 1998, she was invited to join Ailey II. Williams joined the Company in 2000. Marcus Jarrell Willis (Houston, TX) began his formal training at the Johnston Performing Arts Middle School, the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts and Discovery Dance Group in Houston. He studied at The Ailey School as a fellowship student. Willis is a recipient of a Level 1 ARTS award given by the National Foundation for the Advancement in the Arts and has received scholarships to many schools, including the Juilliard School. He was a member of Ailey II and also worked with Pascal Rioult Dance Theater, Dominic Walsh Dance Theater and Tania Pérez-Salas Compañía de Danza. Willis joined the Company in 2008. The Ailey dancers are supported, in part, by The Judith McDonough Kaminski Dancer Endowment Fund. MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

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Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation Board of Trustees Joan H. Weill, Chairman Henry McGee, President Simin N. Allison, Guido Goldman, Philip Laskawy, Arthur J. Mirante II, John H. Schaefer, Christopher J. Williams, Vice-Chairmen James G. Abruzzo Gina F. Adams Eleanor S. Applewhaite Debby Ballard Antoinette Cooper Blair Judith Byrd Anthony M. Carvette Kathryn C. Chenault David S. Daniel

Catherine Davis Anita-Agnes O. Hassell Judith Jamison Richard L. Kauffman Robert Kissane Debra L. Lee Michelle Y. Lee Anthony A. Lewis

Linda M. Lindenbaum Sharon Gersten Luckman Leslie L. Maheras Arthur J. Mahon Gabriella E. Morris Nicolas S. Rohatyn Richard Speciale Lemar Swinney Julia A. Walker

Stanley Plesent, Esq., Harold Levine, Chairmen Emeriti

Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation Administrative Staff Recipient of a National Medal of Arts Sharon Gersten Luckman – Executive Director Calvin Hunt – Senior Director, Performance and Production Bennett Rink – Senior Director, Development and External Affairs Pamela Robinson – Chief Financial Officer

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Matthew Rushing Clifton Brown & Linda Celeste Sims Dacquiri T’Shaun Smittick E.J. Corrigan Isabelle Quattlebaum Kristin Colvin Young Nicole A. Walters Jon Taylor Al Crawford David Kerr Joe Gaito Adam Omeljaniuk Edward De Jesus Andrew Blacks Brian Luftig Corin Wright Erika Kuehn Joy L. Pelham Christina Collura Gina Costagliola Donald J. Rose M.D. Shaw Bronner Sheyi Ojofeitimi 48

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Rehearsal Director Assistants to the Rehearsal Director Company Manager Technical Director Business Manager Stage Manager Assistant Stage Manager Wardrobe Supervisor Lighting Director Master Electrician Master Carpenter Sound Engineer Property Master Flyman Assistant Electrician Senior Wardrobe Assistant Wardrobe Assistant Assistant Company Manager Performance and Production Associate Production Assistant Director of the Harkness Center for Dance Injuries, Hospital for Joint Disease Director of Physical Therapy Physical Therapist


alvin ailey american dance theater

touring contacts North American Agent OPUS 3 ARTISTS 470 Park Avenue South, 9th Fl North New York, NY 10016 Telephone: 212 584 7500 Fax: 646 300 8200 www.opus3artists.com International Agent ASKONAS HOLT LTD. Lincoln House, 300 High Holborn, London WC1V 7JH, United Kingdom Telephone: +44 20 7400 1700 Fax: +44 20 7400 1799 Jonathan Fleming, Senior Project Manager jonathan.fleming@askonasholt.co.uk Paul Szilard, Impresario Emeritus

PRODUCTION CREDITS Lighting system provided by 4Wall Entertainment. Touring sound system provided by New York Audio Services Inc. Photo of Linda Celeste Sims by Andrew Eccles. Body art by Dante Baylor. CELEBRATING REVELATIONS AT 50 FILM Special thanks to the 92nd Street Y Archives; Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; and THIRTEEN. Photo of Alvin Ailey and Judith Jamison Š Jack Mitchell. High Definition video playback equipment provided by Scharff Weisberg and Gibson Entertainment Services. Sylvia Cahill, Research/Clearances; Peter Miller, Sound Recordist; John Bowen, Sound Editor; Ken Hahn, Sound Mixer; John Roche, Gaffer; Don Wylie, Online Editor; Post Production Facilities: Frame Runner, Subvoyant, and Sync Sound. AILEY TOUR MERCHANDISE Ailey Tour Merchandise and AileyShop.com are managed by The Araca Group www.AileyShop.com or 866-55-AILEY

Alvin Ailey is a proud member of Dance/USA, the national service organization for professional dance.

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater The Joan Weill Center for Dance 405 West 55th Street New York, NY 10019-4402 Tel: (212) 405-9000 Fax: (212) 405-9001 www.AlvinAiley.org www.facebook.com/AlvinAileyAmericanDanceTheater

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april

Complimentary wine pours in the Bartholomew Room for Inner Circle Donors. Pouring Boeger Wines on: Apr 8

The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma 7-8PM with winemaker Justin Boeger and during intermission

Apr 22 Buddy Guy

7-8PM and during intermission

Sponsored by

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma A Crossings Series Event Friday, April 8, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Support provided by Grant and Grace Noda. Pre-Performance Talk: 7PM • Vanderhoef Studio Theatre Speaker: Henry Spiller, Associate Professor, Department of Music, UC Davis.

further listening see p. 58

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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silk road ensemble with yo-yo ma

The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma Program

Silk Road Suite Gallop of a Thousand Horses1 Night Thoughts Rionji Muiñeiras from Cancionero Musical de Galicia Empty Mountain Spirit Rain2 Taranta Project3

Kayhan Kalhor Wu Man Joseph Gramley Traditional, Arr. Cristina Pato Angel Lam Giovanni Sollima

Intermission

¡Chayraq!: Rough Guide to a Modern Day Tawantinsuyu3

Gabriela Lena Frank

Improvisations for Kamancheh

Kayhan Kalhor

Air to Air2 Wah Habbibi Aiini Taqtiru K’in Sventa Ch’ul Me’tik Kwadalupe Tancas Serradas a Muru

Osvaldo Golijov

1 Commissioned for the Kronos Quartet by Hancher Auditorium/University of Iowa 2 Commissioned by Carnegie Hall through The Weill Music Institute in partnership with the Silk Road Project.

The world premiere was given at Carnegie Hall, New York City on September 16, 2006. 3 Commissioned by the Silk Road Project

Ingela Bohlin’s appearance is supported by a grant from the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation.

Hyosung Corporation is a Lead Sponsor of the Silk Road Project.

MetLife Foundation is the Official 2011 Tour Sponsor of the Silk Road Project.

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silk road ensemble with yo-yo ma

The Silk Road Ensemble Yo-Yo Ma, Artistic Director Jeffrey Beecher, contrabass Mike Block, cello Shanir Blumenkranz, oud Nicholas Cords, viola Jonathan Gandelsman, violin Joseph Gramley, percussion Colin Jacobsen, violin Kayhan Kalhor, kamancheh Yo-Yo Ma, cello Cristina Pato, gaita (Galician bagpipes) Shane Shanahan, percussion Mark Suter, percussion Kojiro Umezaki, shakuhachi Wu Man, pipa Tour Management: Mary Pat Buerkle, Senior Vice President Manager, Artists & Attractions Opus 3 Artists New York, NY Silk Road Project Tour Staff: Laura Freid, CEO and Executive Director Isabelle Hunter, Program Director Heidi Koelz, Communications Manager Chris Marrion, Development Director Ed Sweeney, Comptroller/Business Manager Sound Postings: Catherine Gevers Production Staff: Aaron Copp, Production Manager Jody Elff, Sound Engineer Tim Grassel, Company Manager John Torres, Stage Manager

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Voted “Best Place to Eat Before a Mondavi Center Performance.” —Sacramento Magazine (2010) Offering Private INDOOR & OUTDOOR Dining Rooms

Perfect for your next:  Cocktail Reception  Company Mixer  Family Reunion  Retirement Party  or Special Occasion 102 F Street, Davis | (530) 750-1801 www.seasonsdavis.com

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The historical Silk Road, a series of land and sea trade routes that crisscrossed Eurasia, enabled the exchange of goods and innovations from China to the Mediterranean Sea for nearly two thousand years, until the 14th century. Over the centuries, many important scientific and technological innovations migrated to the West along the Silk Road, including gunpowder, the magnetic compass, the printing press, silk, mathematics and ceramic and lacquer crafts. In this way, the Silk Road created an intercontinental think tank of human ingenuity. Interactions among cultural groups spread knowledge, religious beliefs, artistic techniques and musical traditions, so much so that long after its decline, the Silk Road remains a powerful metaphor for cultural exchange. This historic trade network provides a namesake-worthy metaphor for the Silk Road Project’s vision of connecting artists and audiences around the world. Yo-Yo Ma has called these routes, which resulted in the first global exchange of scientific and cultural traditions, the “internet of antiquity.” Both historic and symbolic elements are central to the work of the Silk Road Project, which takes inspiration from this age-old tradition of learning from other cultures and disciplines. The repertoire of the Silk Road Ensemble includes traditional music (both as an oral tradition—passed down from generation to generation—and in melodies arranged by and for members of the ensemble) as well as newly commissioned works, many of which combine nonWestern and Western instruments, creating a unique genre that transcends customary musical classification.

stones to 13 beats but followed the same principle: the players on the piece begin together on the same note, which represents the hidden rock. The scraping sound of bamboo reco-recos intrigued Gramley when he studied samba music in Brazil. Other instruments include the kanjira and the udu drum, whose solos reveal small changes in pitch during short “hiccups” just before what would have been the 13th beat. In the second section, two sevenbeat cycles are followed by a three-beat silence. “The interruptions are key,” Gramley explains. “Just as in that rock garden, what you can’t see is as important as what you can.” To complete the Suite, Spanish-born composer and performer Cristina Pato created Muiñeiras for the ensemble. The muiñeira is the traditional dance of Galicia in fast 6/8 tempo, played at parties and social gatherings; everyone is welcome to join in and dance. Traditionally practiced with gaita (Galician bagpipes) and percussion, a dancer typically shares a move that is then learned and repeated by the rest of the dancers. This sense of connection and sharing is implicit in the muiñeira and is the basis of tonight’s arrangement. A medley of two popular muiñeiras from different regions of Galicia, the piece starts with a traditional percussion call that establishes the essential rhythmic pattern. Illustrating the importance of this dance as a social occasion, shakuhachi, strings, and gaita progressively join voices, culminating in an all-play party that celebrates the joy of community. Angel Lam, who grew up in Hong Kong and Los Angeles, dedicates Empty Mountain, Spirit Rain to “a memory of my grandmother,” and provides the following note for the piece: “Thirty minutes passed but Grandma still hadn’t arrived. My kindergarten sat on top of a hill, overlooking a narrow street with a muddy pedestrian pathway alongside traffic. It was another hot summer day; the aggressive sun seemed to slow my time but activated the scenery in front of me. Trees moved in the heat like monsters stretching their palms; pedestrians walked slowly, dragged by their long shadows.

Tonight’s concert opens with a Silk Road Suite featuring works developed by members of the Silk Road Ensemble and representing a broad swath of history and cultures. The first piece in the Suite, Gallop of a Thousand Horses, was composed by Kayhan Kalhor, master of the kamancheh (a Persian spiked fiddle). Kalhor based the work on the folk melodies of the Turkmen people, who live in northeastern Iran, Turkmenistan, and parts of several other nations. The nomadic Turkmen are deeply connected to their horses, and this piece suggests the wild freedom of a large herd crossing the plains. The rhythms of the tombak (Persian drum) are complemented by the sense of motion provided by the kamancheh and other strings.

Suddenly it rained, but the sun still shone. I decided to run home. I was only five. I sprinted down that busy street, people shouting behind me, like low-pitched murmurings of ancient emperors. The sounding of horns screamed sharply with long mystic tails... When a distant temple bell drummed, I saw Grandma— her peaceful smile, and an air of gracefulness that is memorable to this day. This time she seemed bigger... when I reached out to touch her, she floated through me and I turned around, the sun shone directly into my eyes, and Grandma disappeared into the core of the afternoon sun. The evening sun suddenly closed, and rain stopped.

The next piece, Night Thoughts, was inspired by a ninth-century Buddhist pipa tune and represented for pipa virtuoso and composer Wu Man a chance to rediscover the pipa’s native, regional language. She was particularly drawn to its ancient tune scale, which is very different from today’s mostly pentatonic pipa music, and to the peaceful, meditative sound of the pipa in the low register. The title of the percussion trio that follows, Rionji, represents a fusion of two far-flung points on the globe that inspired composer and percussionist Joseph Gramley: the city of Rio de Janeiro and the Ryoanji Temple in Kyoto, Japan. The rock garden at Ryoanji, which also inspired a composition by John Cage in the 1980s, famously displays a series of 15 stones. But viewers can never see more than 14 at a time—a Zen reminder of our imperfect enlightenment. In making music of this concept, Gramley reduced the 15

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silk road ensemble with yo-yo ma

Program Notes

When I got home, everybody was crying, but I didn’t cry. I went to my little desk and started a letter: Dear Grandma...” Cellist and composer Giovanni Sollima, born into a family of Sicilian musicians, reveals his fascination with all styles of music

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by combining elements of classical, rock and jazz, as well as ethnic musical traditions from Sicily and from other Mediterranean lands such as North Africa, Israel, the Middle East, the Balkan States, Turkey and Andalusia. Many of these influences are evident in Taranta Project, commissioned by the Silk Road Project for its 2008 workshop at Tanglewood Music Center. The dream-like entryway to the six-movement work is followed by sequences that alternately suggest feverish dances and reveal intricate interlocking rhythmic patterns. In an innovative duet, the cello part calls for scordatura to achieve “power chords” by tuning the C string an octave lower than normal, and the score calls for the percussionist to add vocalization and body rhythms to the instrumentation. Gabriela Lena Frank drew on the Peruvian and Chinese influences of her richly mixed heritage and on her ethnomusicology research to create ¡Chayraq!: Rough Guide to a Modern Day Tawantinsuyu. The fanciful title hints at the content of the piece. “Chayraq” is an Indian expression of excitement—“hooray!” Tawantinsuyu was the Indian name given to the pre-Conquest Incan Empire. “Rough Guide” alludes to field recordings gathered in researching music from a foreign culture, typically compilations of short tracks of music caught on the fly at indigenous events such as festivals, religious ceremonies and harvest fiestas. These examples were instrumental in Frank’s own self-education as a composer, when she was a student looking for musical clues in her Latin American travels. In a similar spirit, she constructed this piece with more than a dozen short movements, which mix and match percussion, pipa, violin and cello, and which may be played individually or, as in this evening’s concert, as a full series.

“It is a blurry changing frontier between Christian and Arab music, where one note or inflection can make the music Christian or Arab,” Golijov notes. The second movement, Aiini Taqtiru (My Eyes Weep), a traditional Christian-Arab Easter Song, is followed by K’in Sventa Ch’ul Me’tik Kwadalupe (Ritual for the Holy Mother of Guadalupe), a direct reference to prayers in Chiapas, Mexico, in which the instruments blend with a recording of actual indigenous voices. About the final movement, Tancas Serradas a Muru (Walls are Encircling the Land), a protest song from 18th-century Sardinia, Golijov notes, “The sentiment of oppressed people struggling to overthrow power can be applied to all persecuted people today.” The Silk Road Project Connecting traditions and celebrating innovation since 1998 About the Silk Road Project The Silk Road Project is a nonprofit arts and educational organization with a vision of connecting the world’s neighborhoods by bringing together artists and audiences around the globe. Founded by cellist Yo-Yo Ma in 1998 as a catalyst to promote innovation and learning through the arts, the Silk Road Project takes inspiration from the historic Silk Road trading routes as a modern metaphor for multicultural and interdisciplinary exchange. Under the artistic direction of Yo-Yo Ma and the leadership of CEO and Executive Director Laura Freid, the Silk Road Project presents performances by the acclaimed Silk Road Ensemble, engages in cross-cultural exchanges and residencies, leads workshops for students and partners with leading cultural institutions to create educational materials and programs. Developing new music is a central undertaking of the Silk Road Project, which has been involved in commissioning and performing more than 60 new musical and multimedia works from composers and arrangers around the world.

Next, composer and performing artist Kayhan Kalhor invites the audience to explore the rich and intricate modes of Persian traditional music through Improvisations for Kamancheh. Traditionally played in the improvised Islamic music known as mugham, the kamancheh’s warm, elegant sound is reminiscent of the human voice, making it conducive to solo-virtuoso or small-ensemble playing. With early written references dating to the 12th century, the kamancheh has been featured in courtly, folk, religious and secular settings for centuries. Through Kalhor’s interpretations, we sense the profound spirituality of Persian classical music, which can be at once meditative, poetic and mystical. It has often been noted that the intricate melodic structures and the endless combinations of ornamentation in this music mirror the complex designs found in such distinctive Persian art forms as carpets, tiles and manuscripts.

About the Silk Road Ensemble The Silk Road Ensemble is a collective of internationally renowned performers and composers from more than 20 countries. Each ensemble member’s career responds to one of the preeminent artistic challenges of our times: to maintain the integrity of art rooted in authentic traditions while nourishing global connections.

Completing tonight’s program is Air to Air by Osvaldo Golijov, developed in 2006 at a workshop that challenged composers to write for indigenous Silk Road instruments with varying combinations of strings and percussion. Golijov describes Air to Air as “music born from community.” To him, both the music and the musicians of the Silk Road Ensemble exemplify this concept. Golijov felt that, because of the extraordinary sensibility of the ensemble musicians, “for them the connection between Western and non-Western is now almost a mutation; they’ve opened the gates of communication. This is good for music.” The first movement, Wah Habbibi (My Beloved), juxtaposes a sacred song with violent contemporary music through the use of traditional Christian-Arab and Muslim-Arab melodies.

The Silk Road Ensemble has performed to critical acclaim throughout Asia, Europe and North America and has recorded five albums. The Ensemble’s most recent recording, Off the Map (2009, In a Circle Records/World Village), was nominated for a Grammy Award. It explores uncharted territory with globe-spanning music commissioned from Osvaldo Golijov, Gabriela Lena Frank, Evan Ziporyn and Angel Lam.

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Many of the musicians first came together under the artistic direction of Yo-Yo Ma at a workshop at Tanglewood Music Center in Massachusetts in 2000. Since then, in various configurations, ensemble artists have collaborated on a diverse range of musical and multimedia projects, presenting innovative performances that spring from Eastern and Western traditions and contemporary musical crossroads.

For more information on the Silk Road Project and the Silk Road Ensemble, please visit www.silkroadproject.org.


Ma maintains a balance between his engagements as soloist with orchestras throughout the world, his recital and chamber music activities and his recording projects. In each he works to expand the cello repertoire through both performances of lesser-known 20th-century music and the commissioning of new works. Ma has made more than 70 albums, including 15 Grammy winners, reflecting his wide-ranging interests. Besides the standard concerto repertoire, he has recorded many of the works he has commissioned or premiered and has made several successful crossover discs. Yo-Yo Ma serves as the artistic director of the Silk Road Project. He is also a creative consultant to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, a member of the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities and a recipient of the 2010 Presidential Medal of Freedom. A Message from the Artistic Director: A Musical Model Over several decades, my travels have given me the opportunity to learn from a wealth of different voices—from the immense compassion and grace of Bach’s Cello Suites to the ancient Celtic fiddle traditions alive in Appalachia to the soulful strains of the bandoneón of Argentina’s tango cafés. I have met and been guided by musicians who share my wonder at the creative potential that exists where cultures intersect. The Silk Road Ensemble is a musical model that requires curiosity, collaboration and wholehearted enthusiasm from all the participants. The music we play does not belong to just one culture or even to only the Silk Road region. Ensemble members are united in their demonstration of virtuosity and generosity, and that combination has led us to perform in an astonishing range of locations, from the premier forum for global conversation, the United Nations General Assembly Hall, to the hushed, sacred space of Todai-ji Temple in Nara, Japan. Bringing together much of the world on one stage requires music that Chinese pipa, Persian kamancheh, Indian tabla and Western strings can play together. For this we rely on the readiness of composers to write and arrange for our distinctive group. Perhaps because they support experimentation and innovation, our commissioning workshops have a remarkable record of producing successful works for our repertoire. Our creativity begins with play—exploring sounds, testing ideas—and I am delighted that this has allowed several of our performers to compose and arrange music for us as well. Above all, I am tremendously grateful for the opportunity to undertake this work and for the abiding friendships we have developed along the way. —Yo-Yo Ma

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About Yo-Yo Ma Whether performing a new concerto, revisiting a familiar work from the cello repertoire, coming together with colleagues for chamber music, reaching out to young audiences and student musicians or exploring cultures and musical forms outside the Western classical tradition, Yo-Yo Ma seeks connections that stimulate the imagination.

A Message from the CEO and Executive Director: A Silk Road for Our Time It is difficult to comprehend the scope of the Silk Road, the ancient trade network that connected Asia to the Mediterranean. For centuries this primary route for the exchange of goods, arts and scientific discoveries also enabled the spread of religions, the growth of languages and the migrations of people and their ideas. Historically, the Silk Road offers unparalleled insight into how ancient societies intersected. As metaphor, it speaks to our ongoing fascination with cultural exchange. It is in this broad sense that the Silk Road has captivated the imaginations of not only scholars and artists but people the world over. This living Silk Road reveals the truth that nothing, and no one, exists in isolation. The Silk Road Project takes inspiration from this crossroads as a model for constant exchange. While we often focus on the Silk Road region, our approach to music, and to education as well, embraces knowledge from many sources, enriching our understanding of our complex and interconnected world. At its heart, the Silk Road Project is a catalytic organization. Since the Project was incorporated in 1998, audiences on three continents have embraced the multinational Silk Road Ensemble. The Silk Road metaphor continues to encourage artists, educators and institutions to collaborate in new ways. We hope that you are similarly inspired. —Laura Freid The Silk Road Project gratefully acknowledges the following individuals for their extraordinary generosity: William and Karen Ackman Gerry Cardinale Judith Goldberg Nezhat and Hassan Khosrowshahi Diann Kim and John Frank Daniel Ng John and Constance Sargent

Some Silk Road Instruments Gaita Spain The bagpipe is found in many cultures around the world. Known as the gaita in Galicia, an autonomous region in the northwest of Spain, the instrument was popularized there during the 15th century and has recently enjoyed resurgence in both folk and contemporary music. With probable ancient origins in the Mediterranean, the bagpipe consists of a bag in which air is trapped and manipulated to produce prolonged tones with various effects. Once made from animal skins, the bags are now more commonly made from synthetic materials. The Galician bagpipe features a blowpipe and a chanter, or melody pipe, which contains two reeds and is played by covering and uncovering the holes with the hands. Up to three wooden drone pipes rest on the player’s shoulder or arm. The instrument is frequently played in folk dances and is also often accompanied by a drum or vocalist.

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further listening

by jeff hudson You say you adore Yo-Yo Ma, and want the ultimate CD collection of his music? Check out Yo-Yo Ma: Thirty Years Outside the Box. It’s a boxed set (get it?) containing all 88 albums involving Ma from the 1970s through 2009—we’re talking classical albums, soundtracks, crossover material, the whole shebang. The music comes in a CD format (in some cases remastered), along with two bonus discs containing rare/unreleased material. The discs are nested inside a velvet-lined box, accompanied by a 312-page hardcover book. The set retails for $502.90, but can be found at a discount (or even as a prize in a contest) from time to time. What’s that? You say you’re a struggling undergraduate student, living on a tight budget Well, Ma’s official website (www.yo-yoma.com) has what’s known as a “player.” For the benefit of readers of a certain age (who don’t live online), a player is an interactive service that lets you listen to a performer’s recordings for free, on demand. Click around on the tab marked “Yo-Yo Ma Albums” and you’ll find tracks from 49 of his recordings, going back to his early releases like his 1981 disc of Haydn concertos. You can use the player to add your favorite tracks to your personal playlist, forward a link for your favorite track to your friends, etc. Is Ma “giving it all away,” to borrow a line from a Roger Daltrey song from the early 1970s that not many people remember? Not entirely. The Yo-Yo Ma player comes with attention-getting animated ads (which presumably generate income), and there’s also a convenient little button labeled “Buy It,” if you decide you want to own a copy. (And it works—I’ve ordered several albums by assorted artists after hearing their music using the player on their website. Hey, in days of yore, they also used to have listening rooms in record stores.)

Since Ma’s current visit to the Mondavi Center involves his Silk Road Project, let’s note that the Silk Road Ensemble’s album Off the Map was a 2010 Grammy Nominee. There are four earlier Silk Road albums: New Impossibilities (2007), Silk Road Journeys: Beyond the Horizon (2005); Silk Road Journeys: When Strangers Meet (2002) and The Silk Road: A Caravan (2002). And yes, if you go to www.silkroadproject.org, click on the “Silk Road Radio” button, you’ll find a player where you can sample tracks from these albums. We should also mention that the busy Yo-Yo Ma recently collaborated with veteran rocker Carlos Santana and singer India Arie on a cover version of George Harrison’s “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.” (And didn’t you know all along that a guitarist like Carlos would put his own stamp on that song someday?) Ma (born 1955) and Santana (born 1947) are old enough to remember the Beatles. Arie (born 1975) would be a bit too young to recall the Fab Four firsthand. One last note: In November, President Barack Obama tabbed Yo-Yo Ma as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which is “the Nation’s highest civilian honor, presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise and Sacramento News and Review.

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Pipa China The pipa is a short-necked wooden lute. The head of the instrument is often carved with a bat’s head, because the word for “bat” in Chinese sounds similar to the word for “luck.” The strings were traditionally made of twisted silk, but are now typically synthetic. The pluck-playing technique is characterized by spectacular finger dexterity and virtuosic effects, including rolls and percussive slaps. Pipa repertoire includes extensive tone poems vividly describing famous battles and other exciting stories. Shakuhachi Japan The shakuhachi is made from the base of a bamboo stalk with holes drilled into the center and the sides. The instrument is played by blowing air across the beveled edge at the top end while covering and uncovering the holes with fingertips. The shakuhachi has been used in Japanese Zen Buddhist meditation since the 15th century. The sounds produced by the instrument range from soft whispers to strong piercing tones. They are intended to reflect sounds in nature, such as birdcalls, wind and water. Today the shakuhachi is also often played in jazz, orchestral and popular music ensembles. Oud orig. Iraq, Egypt The oud is a wooden string instrument with close ties to the European lute. Its oldest known pictorial record dates back 5,000 years to southern Mesopotamia, in what is now Iraq. Although there are structural variations, the instrument is typically characterized by 11 strings and a bowl-shaped wooden back that allows for maximum resonance and tonal complexity. The neck does not have frets, making the oud a particularly expressive instrument and conducive to improvisation. It is played by plucking or strumming the strings with a plectrum (pick).

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Kamancheh Iran The kamancheh is a small fiddle with a long conical neck, a round wooden body covered in animal skin and a spike protruding from the base. The instrument rests on the player’s knee or on the ground and is swiveled on the spike to meet the bow as it is played. Traditionally played in the improvised Islamic music known as mugham, the kamancheh’s warm, elegant sound is reminiscent of the human voice, making it conducive to solo-virtuoso or small-ensemble playing. With early written references dating to the 12th century, the kamancheh has been featured in courtly, folk, religious and secular settings for centuries.

The Silk Road Project gratefully acknowledges the generous individuals, corporations and foundations that support its efforts to connect the world’s neighborhoods. The following list comprises donations received between July 1, 2009, and December 1, 2010. Distinguished Sponsors Mr. Richard Li Pershing Square Foundation Sponsors American Express Ms. Judith Goldberg Hyosung Corporation Mr. and Mrs. Hassan Khosrowshahi National Endowment for the Arts Guarantor Patrons Mr. Gerry Cardinale Evelyn Stefansson Nef Foundation Diann Kim and John Frank New York Community Trust Mr. Daniel Ng Mr. and Mrs. John Sargent Union Square Fund Sustaining Patrons Prince Amyn Aga Khan Anne Peretz Martin Peretz Contributing Patrons Mr. and Mrs. Alan Alda Mr. Avi Arad Bank Rhode Island Katie and Paul Buttenweiser Con Edison of New York City Drs. Peter B. and Anna L. Davol Richard and Barbara Debs Hart and Nancy Fessenden Michael and Diane Gorfaine Hunt Alternatives Fund Michael and Jena King Dorothy Lemelson Trust Elizabeth Meyer Jack and Beth Meyer Opus 3 Artists Mr. and Mrs. Paul Shang Patrons Ernest Chung Ms. Gwenn Earl Evitts Dr. Merton C. Flemings and Dr. Elizabeth ten Grotenhuis Harman Family Foundation Joseph Koerner and Meg Koster The Frank B. Mazer Foundation Mr. Norman E.W. McCulloch Garrett and Mary Moran Vicki and Roger Sant Harry and Florence Sloan Foundation Supporters Matthew and Kay Bucksbaum Jon Eager and Nancy Klehr David and Carol Richards Mr. James Stern Mortimer Zuckerman Fellows Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence D. Ackman Ms. Rosamond Allen Alexander Bagnall and Cristin Canterbury Bagnall Mr. and Mrs. John S. Carter Dr. Joseph A. Chazan Britt D’Arbeloff Jane C. Dudley Nancy Fitzpatrick Laura Freid and David Gottesman Catherine Gevers and John Fernandez

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gordon The Irving Harris Foundation Liz Hume and Jay Jacobs Mr. Chris Hyman Theodore Levin Bill and Marcia Levy The Honorable Jan Lodal and Elizabeth V. Lodal Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Oberfeld Neil and Jane Pappalardo Charles and Danica Perez Mr. David Perlman Mr. William Poorvu Ms. Lorraine Sheinberg Deming and Jane Sherman Gazel Tan and Lew Thorson Kenneth and Jean Telljohann Associates Robert Arbeit and Susan Abelson Roger and Whitney Bagnall Milo C. and Robin Beach Philip and Hillary Deely Deborah Del Prete and T.J. O’Brien Ann V. Dulye Mr. and Mrs. Steve Emmett Morton and Normalee Funger Hallberg-Wiseley Designers Mr. Paul Hilal Ann and Michael Loeb Michael Dadap and Yeou-Cheng Ma Adam and Amanda Quinton Friends William Alford Ms. Dede Bartlett Thomas and Jeanne Baur Norton Belknap Christine Brown Ms. Mechelle Casciotta Jerome Cohen and Joan Lebold Cohen Ms. Janice Cook Roberts Ms. Suzanne Dworsky Pat Elvin Dr. Howard Gardner Marji Gere Ray and Thelma Goldberg Gary Graham Ms. Megan M. Gregory Mr. Wallace Higgins John and Catherine Hornor Maria Hunter William and Yvette Kirby Rick and Nancy Lamb John and Nancy LeGates Craig Mar-Chun Ms. Kristen Marchesano Mr. Alan Morse Ms. Veronique Peck Nancy E. Pinn Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pratt Barbara and Mike Richmond Dorothy Shattuck Ms. Rachael Silverman Mr. Jim Smith Dr. Diana Sorensen Shamim and Iqbal Talib Elsie Wilson Thompson Mr. Patrick Wachsberger Jay Werb and Ellen Katz Werb Dr. Alan C. Winfield Ms. Kitty Winter Raymond and Teresa Wise Peggy and Richard Wolman Richard and Sally Zeckhauser

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Lara Downes, piano Long Time Coming: The Music of Duke Ellington and David Sanford A Studio Classics: Crossings Series Event Saturday, April 9, 2011 • 8PM Sunday, April 10, 2011 • 2PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Pre-performance Talk: Saturday, April 9, 2011 • 7PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre Sunday, April 10, 2011 • 1PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre Speaker: David Sanford in conversation with Lara Downes, Artist-in-Residence, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Sponsored by

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal. 60

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Conceived and created by Lara Downes “It’s been a long time coming, but tonight...change has come to America.” —President Barack Obama, 11/5/2008

New World A Comin’ (arr. Sam Crowe) Lara Downes: solo piano The Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet

lara downes, piano

Lara Downes, piano Long Time Coming: The Music of Duke Ellington and David Sanford

Duke Ellington

Dream Variations: announced from the stage Lara Downes: solo piano Long Time Coming (2011) World Premiere 1. heaven just a whisper 2. promise 3. everything still to come Lara Downes: solo piano Kylie Batlin: speaker Sam Bass: cello Sam Crowe: alto sax Bill Vonderhaar: bass

David Sanford

Commissioned by the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition at Brigham Young University Rita Dove: Testimonial from On the Bus with Rosa Parks. © 1999 by Rita Dove. Used by permission of the author everything still to come video featuring ArtsBridge students from Dingle and Orchard Elementary Schools Directed by Jesse Meeker Directed for the stage by Mindy Cooper

Long Time Coming tells a story. It’s a story about hope and courage. It’s a story about people coming together, and the struggles and triumphs along the way. It’s my story; it’s your story; it’s the story of an American century and our American music. This project is inspired by the life and work of Duke Ellington, and his vision of a New World where all people would live together in brotherhood and peace. Looking back, that dream was a landmark of hope on the long journey that has led us to our own place here in 21st century America. Long Time Coming celebrates the many travelers who made that journey, and the next generation who will lead the voyage ahead. This is a story about yesterday, today and tomorrow. It’s a story about change that has been a long time coming, and about change still to come. for my parents —Lara Downes Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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Artist Biographies Lara Downes A captivating presence both on and off stage, critically acclaimed pianist Lara Downes is redefining the solo recital format with visionary, cutting-edge performances at prestigious concert venues worldwide. Lauded by NPR as “a delightful artist with a unique blend of musicianship and showmanship” and praised by the Washington Post for her stunning performances “rendered with drama and nuance,” Lara presents the piano repertoire—from iconic favorites to newly commissioned works—in new ways that bridge musical tastes, genres and audiences. Lara’s unique performance style, called “a voyage of discovery and fun” (Sacramento Bee), combines dazzling interpretations of both traditional and less familiar works with engaging, insightful and sometimes humorous narratives that weave musical and historical context around the music she plays. Often accompanied by multimedia visual and spoken-word components, Lara’s enthralling performances construct multi-sensory landscapes that explore the conditions and inspirations that brought the music to life, creating a continuum from composer to performer to listener. Lara’s performance works have received funding support from prominent organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts’ American Masterpieces program, the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition and American Public Media’s Classical Music Initiative. As she continues to move the solo piano recital in exciting new directions, Lara’s fresh interpretations bring her acclaim as one of the most exciting, communicative young pianists of today’s generation. Since making concert debuts at Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, the Vienna Konzerthaus, and the Salle Gaveau in Paris, she has won over audiences at Carnegie Hall, Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the American Academy in Rome, San Francisco Performances, the University of Vermont Lane Series, the Montreal Chamber Music Festival, the El Paso Pro Musica Festival and the University of Washington World Series, among many others. Lara has been heard on NPR’s Performance Today, WNYC’s New Sounds and WBGO’s Jazz Set. She will be featured in an upcoming documentary produced by WQXR Chicago. Lara’s chamber music appearances include collaborations with other noted soloists and ensembles, including violinists Rachel Barton Pine and Lara St. John, cellists Zuill Bailey and Denis Brott, the Miami and Alexander string quartets, and the Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet. Commissions and premieres of new works for Lara have come from composers Aaron Jay Kernis, David Sanford, Benny Golson, Eve Beglarian and Dan Coleman. In addition to the excitement Lara brings to the concert stage, her commercial recordings have met with tremendous critical and popular acclaim. Her debut CD, Invitation to the Dance, was called “a magical little recording” by NPR, and her second release, American Ballads, was ranked by Amazon.com among the four best recordings of American music ever made. Dream of Me (2006) was praised for “exquisite sensitivity” by American Record Guide. Lara’s busy performance career is strongly impacted by her commitment to expanding and developing new audiences for the arts. She is the founder and president of the 88 KEYS Foundation, a non-profit organization that fosters opportunities for music experiences and learning in America’s public schools, and she regularly works and performs with the next generation of talented young musicians as Curator of the Young Artists program at the Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, where she serves as Artist-in-Residence and host and co-curator of the Studio Classics series. Lara Downes is a Steinway Artist. www.laradownes.com 62

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David Sanford Composer David Sanford credits a variety of influences with igniting his musicianship. “I started on trombone when I was about 10 and liked big band music early. I wanted to be a jazz musician. Charles Mingus inspired me to be a composer later on.” Sanford was also influenced by rhythm and blues/funk groups like Parliament, the Isley Brothers, and Sly and the Family Stone and, later, by orchestral and more mainstream popular music. After completing undergraduate music studies at the University of Northern Colorado, he earned a master’s degree in theory and composition from the New England Conservatory of Music and an M.F.A. and Ph.D. at Princeton University. Sanford has won many awards and honors, including the Koussevitzky Commission, the Guggenheim Fellowship and the 2002 Samuel Barber Rome Prize in composition. One of the referees for his work wrote: “David Sanford is the real thing, a composer in the American tradition of brash, open-eared exploration: no material is too exalted or too debased for him to transform into his living art.” Sanford’s works have been performed by the Chamber Society of Lincoln Center, San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, Chicago Symphony Chamber Players, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Harlem Festival Orchestra, cellist Matt Haimovitz, the Meridian Arts Ensemble, Speculum Musicae, the UC Davis Empyrean Ensemble and dozens of other groups and performers. In addition, he has onducted performances of his own works at Monadnock Music, New England Conservatory, the Knitting Factory and the Five Colleges New Music Festival, and he leads his own big band, the Pittsburgh Collective. Sanford’s most recent recording, Meeting of the Spirits, received a 2010 Grammy nomination for Best Classical Crossover Album.

The Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet The Brubeck Institute was established by the University of the Pacific in 2000 to honor distinguished alumni Dave and Iola Brubeck. The mission of the Institute is to build on Dave Brubeck’s legacy and his lifelong dedication to music, creativity, education and the advancement of important social issues including civil rights, international relations, environmental concerns and social justice. The members of the Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet (BIJQ) are in the Institute’s Fellowship Program. Winners of numerous DownBeat awards, including the 2007, 2009 and 2010 awards for best collegiate jazz group in the country, this group has performed at the Monterey Jazz Festival, Playboy Jazz Festival, Brubeck Festival, Detroit International Jazz Festival and others, and has given concerts in California, New York, Washington, Florida, Texas, Chicago, Toronto, Minneapolis, Washington, D.C. and on a State Department tour in Spain. They have also performed in jazz clubs such as Yoshi’s in Oakland, Herb Alpert’s club Vibrato in Los Angeles, Blues Alley in Washington, D.C., the Dakota in Minneapolis and the Jamboree Jazz Club in Barcelona. The members of the 2010-11 Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet are Sam Crowe, saxophone; Nick Frenay, trumpet; Colin McDaniel, drums; Bill Vonderhaar, bass; and Alec Watson, piano. Saxophonist Sam Crowe is from Denver and is a 2010 graduate of the Denver School of the Arts. His teachers include jazz drummer Paul Romaine and others in the Colorado Conservatory for the Jazz Arts and jazz artists including Dave Liebman, Ron Blake, Jeff Coffin, Terri Lynn Carrington, John McNeil, Jeff Clayton and Bob


Trumpeter Nick Frenay is from Syracuse, New York, and is a 2009 graduate of Manlius Pebble Hill High School. He was a member of the Grammy Jazz Ensembles (2007-09), Next Generation Jazz Orchestra (2007-08) and Jazz Band of America. He has won DownBeat awards for outstanding high school soloist, was a member of the duo with Noah Kellman that won the 2009 award for best high school jazz group and won the 2010 DownBeat award for outstanding performance in an original composition. Nick has studied with John LaBarbera, Bobby Shew, Erik Jekabson, Gilbert Castellanos and Terell Stafford. He has played at the Detroit Jazz Festival, Brubeck Festival, Syracuse Jazz Fest, Vail Jazz Festival, Monterey Jazz Festival and North Sea Jazz Festival. He has performed with Nicholas Payton, Herbie Hancock, Cassandra Wilson, McCoy Tyner, Phil Woods, James Moody, Terence Blanchard and Christian McBride. Drummer Colin McDaniel is from Davis and is a 2010 graduate of Davis High School. He won the 2010 DownBeat award for outstanding extended composition, the Sabian outstanding drummer award at the Reno Jazz Festival, played in the JazzSchool’s Advanced H.S. Jazz Workshop that won the 2010 DownBeat award for outstanding performance and received the 2009 DownBeat Student Award for Best Performing Arts High School Jazz Group. Colin has studied with Jason Lewis, Rick Lotter, Mike Zilber, Akira Tana and Jeff Alkire, and has taken master classes with Allison Miller, Bill Stewart, Peter Erskine, Jeff “Tain” Watts, Carl Allen, Albert “Tootie” Heath and Scott Amendola. He has performed at the Monterey Jazz Festival, Davis Jazz Festival, Berkeley Jazz Festival, Santa Cruz Jazz Festival and the International Jazz Las Casas Festival in Mexico. Bassist Bill Vonderhaar is from Houston and is a 2010 graduate of the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. He has studied jazz with Joe Locascio at Houston Community College, Ray Drummond at the Brubeck Institute Summer Jazz Colony, at the Skidmore Jazz Institute and Berklee College of Music summer programs. Bill has received an Outstanding Soloist Award for performance with the HSPVA Jazz Combo with the Thelonious Monk Institute, an Outstanding Soloist Award for performance at the North Texas Jazz Festival, and was a 2010 Merit Award winner with the NFAA Young Arts. Bill has performed with many jazz artists including Dennis Dotson, Tony Campizi, Warren Sneed, Wood Witt, Richard Cruz, Joe Locascio, Chris Cortez, Make Nase, Joel Fulgham, Tiana Hall, Diane Landry and Dan Strba. Pianist Alec Watson is from Geneva, Ilinois, and is a 2010 graduate of Geneva Community High School. He has studied in the Thelonious Monk Institute Jazz Program in Chicago, the Merit School of Music Jazz Studies Program in Chicago, classical piano with Danik Kooistra and jazz piano with Josh Moshier, Stuart Mindeman, Steve Million, Reggie Thomas and Bill Cunliffe. He has performed at the Jazz Institute of Chicago, Millennium Park in Chicago, Chicago Cultural Center, Jazz History Museum in Kansas City and in Chicago’s Symphony Center. Alec is in his first year as a Brubeck Fellow.

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Sam Bass, cello A cellist with many interests, Sam performs and composes works for solo cello, cello and piano, and several eclectic pop and jazz ensembles. His compositions have appeared in several independent feature films. Recent projects include a commission and performance with the Ballet San Jose, and a sound installation by Sam’s live looping cello and voice duo Loop!station for the S.F. MOMA’s new audio tour. As a performer Sam has appeared on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno and the Jimmy Kimmel Show, and has shared stages with wellknown pop artists David Byrne, Thomas Dolby, Les Clapool and many others. From 2008-10, Sam toured the world as part of rock star bassist Les Claypool’s rock/fusion ensemble. This involved a lot of improvising, and playing the electric cello very loud and very fast. Currently pursuing interests in live looping, jazz performance, Bach, Haydn and composition, Sam performs around the United States and the world. www.loopthis.com.

lara downes, piano

Montgomery. He has performed at the Telluride Jazz Festival, UNC Greeley Jazz Festival and Vail Jazz Festival, the IAJE annual conference in 2008, in the 2009 Grammy Jazz Ensembles and as principal clarinet in the Denver Young Artists Orchestra. He has performed with Herbie Hancock, Terence Blanchard, Winard Harper, Ellis Marsalis and Edgar Meyer.

Rita Dove Rita Dove served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 199395. Among her many honors are the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in poetry, the 1996 Heinz Award in the Arts and Humanities, and the 2006 Common Wealth Award. President Bill Clinton bestowed upon her the 1996 National Humanities Medal. Her books of poetry include Sonata Mulattica; American Smooth; On the Bus with Rosa Parks, which was named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Mother Love; Selected Poems; Grace Notes; Thomas and Beulah, which won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry; Museum; and The Yellow House on the Corner. Poetry Out Loud The National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation have partnered with state arts agencies of the United States to develop Poetry Out Loud, a national program that encourages youth to learn about great poetry through memorization and recitation. Poetry Out Loud helps students master public speaking skills, build self-confidence and learn about their literary heritage. After successful pilot programs in Washington, D.C. and Chicago, the national phase of Poetry Out Loud was launched in high schools across America in the spring of 2006 with tens of thousands of students participating. Kylie Batlin was a California State finalist of the program in 2009. The 2010-11 program will culminate in the 2011 National Finals in Washington, D.C., on April 29, 2011. http://poetryoutloud.org UC Davis ArtsBridge ArtsBridge offers immersive, sequential classroom projects in art, dance, drama, music and the digital arts. Projects are tailored to individual classroom needs, with an emphasis on culturally relevant pedagogy that promotes community and student empowerment through the arts. Through ArtsBridge projects in urban and lowincome areas, using performing and visual arts and digital technology, students develop their creativity and imagination, improve their language skills, increase their motivation to succeed in academic learning and reinforce their values of peace, community and diversity. ArtsBridge is also a means for university students to provide creative service to their communities while learning the value of social activism and developing long-term commitments to help the disadvantaged. The children featured in the film everything still to come are students in Jessica Friedman’s 4th grade class at Dingle Elementary School, Woodland Joint Unified School District, and Jennifer Ray’s 4th grade class at Orchard Elementary School, Twin Rivers Unified School District. They created original writings for this project under UC Davis ArtsBridge Theater Scholars Elizabeth Tremaine and Matthew Canty.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Sarah Silverman Sarah Silverman Live A Mondavi Center Special Event Sunday, April 10, 2011 • 7PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal. 64

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sarah silverman

Sarah Silverman

E

mmy winner Sarah Silverman is as versatile a performer as they come. Her repertoire includes everything from film, television and stand-up comedy to iconic online videos, and she just added “author” to this list when she released her first book last spring. Silverman was most recently seen starring in the third season of The Sarah Silverman Program on Comedy Central, and her book, a memoir called The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee, debuted in stores in April 2010. Silverman was nominated in 2009 for a Primetime Emmy in the Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series category for her portrayal of a fictionalized version of herself in The Sarah Silverman Program, Comedy Central’s first ever Emmy nomination in a scripted acting category. She also received a WGA nomination last year for her work on the show. Silverman won a Primetime Emmy in 2008 in the Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics category for her musical collaboration with Matt Damon. In addition, she was honored with a Best Actress Webby Award last year for her online video The Great Schlep, in which she persuaded young Jewish kids to encourage their grandparents in Florida to vote for Obama prior to the 2008 election.   On the film side, Silverman has wrapped production on the comedy Peep World opposite Rainn Wilson and Michael C. Hall about a group of dysfunctional adult siblings who are fighting over a novel that one of them is writing about the family. In 2004, Silverman made an impressive splash with her concert film Sarah Silverman: Jesus is Magic. Directed by Liam Lynch, the film garnered major attention at the Toronto Film Festival and created huge national buzz. Silverman also garnered critical praise in the documentary feature The Aristocrats, in which 100 of the industry’s most prominent comedians tell a version of the same joke. Her other film credits include Saint John of Las Vegas, I Want Someone to Eat Cheese With, School for Scoundrels, The School of Rock, There’s Something About Mary, The Way of The Gun, The Bachelor and Say It Isn’t So.   Silverman co-starred on the Fox comedy Greg the Bunny and has guest starred in a slew of acclaimed and notable television shows such as Monk (which earned her an Emmy nomination in 2008 in the Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series category), The Larry Sanders Show, Seinfeld and Mr. Show with Bob and David. Silverman also lent her voice to the Comedy Central show Crank Yankers.     Silverman was dubbed “the most outrageously funny woman alive” by Rolling Stone. With her comedic timing and stage presence, it’s no surprise that Sarah has been asked to host major award shows. In 2007, she hosted the MTV Movie Awards and has twice hosted the Independent Spirit Awards. Silverman grew up in New Hampshire and attended New York University. In 1993, she joined Saturday Night Live as a writer and feature performer and has not stopped working since. Silverman currently resides in Los Angeles with her dog Duck.

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Indulge

dance

for Parkinson’s

Fine ITALIAN CUISINE

2657 Portage Bay East, Davis CA 95616 (530) 758-1324 osteriafasulo.com FREE PARKING FASTEST & EASIEST WAY TO THE MONDAVI CENTER

CAMP REGISTRATION

BEGINS MARCH 17

The Mondavi Center and the Mark Morris Dance Group proudly announce the launch of Dance for Parkinson’s, a partnership with the Pamela Trokanski Dance Theatre and the Parkinson Association of Northern California. The program offers weekly dance classes to people with Parkinson’s Disease and their caregivers. Following an initial class on February 1 taught by members of the Mark Morris Dance Group, classes have been taught by local dance teachers who received training in the company’s program. The class is being held in Davis with the possibility of expanding to Sacramento in the future.

ONLINE REGISTRATION NOW AVAILABLE

For more information, or to enroll in the class, contact Mondavi Center Artist Engagement Coordinator Ruth Rosenberg, 530.752.6113 or rrosenberg@ucdavis.edu.

Youth Programs at UC Davis offers a diverse range of high-quality camps, classes, trips and swimming lessons for youth of all ages. Camps begin June 20. Register for all your favorite camps and activities from the comfort of your home. For more information on how to register or to download your copy of the Summer 2011 Youth Guide visit our website.

530.754.4304 campusrecreation.ucdavis.edu/youth

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Robert and Margrit

Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts


Mondavi Center Arts Education

Globe Education

2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1

Globe Education Academy for Teachers The Mondavi Center, UC Davis, UC Davis’s School of Education, the Los Rios Community College District and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London, England, are partners in a one-of-a-kind professional development program for selected drama and English teachers in the Sacramento region. Now in its fifth year, a panel of Academy alums and partners choose 12 teachers each year to receive training in creative approaches to inspire teaching and learning. The Academy offers an immersion in the world of Shakespeare both at UC Davis and in London. Teachers and their students take workshops from UC Davis faculty and Globe Education practitioners in the spring, experience an intensive two-week residency at Shakespeare’s Globe in London in the summer and complete the program with a festival day of theater and celebration with their students at the Mondavi Center in November.

The following teachers will participate in the 2011 Academy: Jennifer Benner Del Campo High School San Juan Unified School District

Katherine Rodgers American River College Los Rios Community College District

Linda Darling Highlands High School Twin Rivers Unified School District

Jennifer Schmelzer Ponderosa High School El Dorado Union High School District

Donna Goodman Fairfield High School Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District

Jewel Schrader Orem Fowler High School Fowler Unified School District

Hillary Jones Hiram W. Johnson High School Sacramento City Unified School District

Deni Scofield Mesa Verde High School San Juan Unified School District

Melanie Lewis Cosumnes River College Los Rios Community College District

Marsha Stanley A.A. Benjamin Health Professions High School Sacramento City Unified School District

Michael Mahoney Rio Americano High School San Juan Unified School District Robert Prichard East Union High School Manteca Unified School District

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Mondavi Center support

mondavi center

corporate support

DONORS

Platinum

Our generous donors allow us to bring world-class artists and speakers to the region’s doorstep, and energize and inspire tens of thousands of school children and teachers through our nationally recognized Arts Education programs. gold

In thanks for their generous gifts, donors receive a host of benefits including: Office of Campus Community Relations

· Priority Seating · Access to Donor-Only Events · Advance ticket sales for Just Added shows · Meet the artists · Much, much more... Remember: Ticket sales cover only 40% of our costs.

silver

Help support the art you love: Donate today! For more information, visit us at MondaviArts.org/supportus or contact our Development Staff at 530.754.5436

bronze

Mondavi Center Grantors and arts education sponsors

Friends of Mondavi Center

Event & Additional Support Partners Boeger Winery Ciocolat

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Seasons Restaurant Watermelon Music Orteria Fasulo


Individual Supporters MondaviCenter InnerCircle Inner Circle donors are dedicated arts patrons whose leadership gifts to the Mondavi Center are a testament to the value of the performing arts in our lives. Mondavi Center is deeply grateful for the generous contributions of the dedicated patrons who give annual financial support to our organization. These donations are an important source of revenue for our program, as income from ticket sales covers less than half of the actual cost of our performance season. Their gifts to the Mondavi Center strengthen and sustain our efforts, enabling us not only to bring memorable performances by worldclass artists to audiences in the capital region each year, but also to introduce new generations to the experience of live performance through our Arts Education Program, which provides arts education and enrichment activities to more than 35,000 K-12 students annually. For more information on supporting the Mondavi Center, visit MondaviArts.org or call 530.754.5437.

† Mondavi Center Advisory Board Member * Friends of Mondavi Center

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Mondavi Center support

mondavi center

Impresario Circle $25,000 and up

John and Lois Crowe †* Barbara K. Jackson †* Grant and Grace Noda* virtuoso Circle $15,000 - $24,999

Joyce and Ken Adamson Friends of Mondavi Center* In memory of Alison S. and Richard D. Cramer Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Anne Gray † Benjamin and Lynette Hart †* William and Nancy Roe †* Lawrence and Nancy Shepard † Joe and Betty Tupin † Shipley and Dick Walters* Maestro Circle $10,000 - $14,999

Oren and Eunice Adair-Christensen* Wayne and Jacque Bartholomew †*

Ralph and Clairelee Leiser Bulkley* Dolly and David Fiddyment † Samia and Scott Foster † Mary B. Horton* M. A. Morris* Tony and Joan Stone † Benefactors Circle $6,000 - $9,999 Michael Alexander California Statewide Certified Development Corporation Camille Chan † Patti Donlon † First Northern Bank † Bonnie and Ed Green †* Dee and Joe Hartzog † The One and Only Watson Margaret Hoyt* Sarah and Dan Hrdy William and Jane Koenig Greiner Heat, Air, and Solar Garry Maisel † Stephen Meyer and Mary Lou Flint † Grace and John Rosenquist Raymond and Jeanette Seamans Ellen Sherman Della Aichwalder Thompson Larry and Rosalie Vanderhoef †*

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Mondavi Center support

Producers Circle $3,000 - $5,999

Neil and Carla Andrews Hans Apel and Pamela Burton Cordelia S. Birrell Neil and Joanne Bodine Barry and Valerie Boone Brian Tarkington and Katrina Boratynski Cantor & Company, A Law Corporation Michael and Betty Chapman Robert and Wendy Chason Chris and Sandy Chong* Michele Clark and Paul Simmons Tony and Ellie Cobarrubia* Claudia Coleman Eric and Michael Conn DLMC Foundation Nancy DuBois Catherine and Charles Farman Mr. and Mrs. Domenic Favero Donald and Sylvia Fillman Judith and Andrew Gabor Kay Gist Kathleen and Robert Grey Judith and William Hardardt* Lorena Herrig* Dr. Ronald and Lesley Hsu Debra Johnson, M.D. and Mario Gutierrez Gerald and Virginia Jostes Teresa and Jerry Kaneko* Dean and Karen Karnopp* Nancy Lawrence, Gordon Klein, and Linda Lawrence Drs. Richard Latchaw and Sheri Alders Ginger and Jeffrey Leacox Robert and Barbara Leidigh John T. Lescroart and Lisa Sawyer Nelson Lewallyn and Marion Pace-Lewallyn Betty J. Lewis Dr. and Mrs. Ashley T. Lipshutz Paul and Diane Makley* In memory of Jerry Marr Janet Mayhew* Robert and Helga Medearis Verne Mendel* Derry Ann Moritz Richard and Mary Ann Murray Charles and Joan Partain Gavin Payne Suzanne and Brad Poling Lois and Dr. Barry Ramer Roger and Ann Romani Melodie Rufer Hal and Carol Sconyers* Tom and Meg Stallard* Tom and Judy Stevenson* Donine Hedrick and David Studer Jerome Suran and Helen Singer Suran* Nathan and Johanna Trueblood Ken Verosub and Irina Delusina 70

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In loving memory of John Max Vogel, M.D. Claudette Von Rusten John Walker and Marie Lopez Elizabeth F. and Charles E. Wilts Bob and Joyce Wisner* Richard and Judy Wydick And five donors who prefer to remain anonymous Directors Circle $1,100 - $2,999 Beulah and Ezra Amsterdam Russell and Elizabeth Austin Murry and Laura Baria* Lydia Baskin* Paul and Connie Batterson Virginia and Michael Biggs Kay and Joyce Blacker* Jo Anne Boorkman* Clyde and Ruth Bowman Edwin Bradley Linda Brandenburger Robert Burgerman and Linda Ramatowski Davis and Jan Campbell David J. Converse, ESQ. Gail and John Cooluris Jim and Kathy Coulter* John and Celeste Cron* Terry and Jay Davison Jim and Carolyn DeHayes Cecilia Delury and Vince Jacobs Mike and Cheryl Demas Bruce and Marilyn Dewey Martha Dickman* Dotty Dixon* Richard and Joy Dorf* Merrilee and Simon Engel Thomas and Phyllis Farver* Tom Forrester and Shelly Faura Nancy McRae Fisher Pam Gill-Fisher and Ron Fisher* Dr. Andy and Wendy Huang Frank Joseph George and Elaine LaMotta Karl Gerdes and Pamela Rohrich Henry and Dorothy Gietzen Fredic and Pamela Gorin John and Patty Goss* Florence and Jack Grosskettler* Diane Gunsul-Hicks Charles and Ann Halsted Paul and Kathleen Hart In memory of William F. McCoy Timothy and Karen Hefler Charles and Eva Hess Sharna and Mike Hoffman Suzanne and Chris Horsley* Claudia Hulbe Ruth W. Jackson Clarence and Barbara Kado Barbara Katz* Robert Kingsley and Melissa Thorme Cheryl and Matthew Kurowski Hansen Kwok Brian and Dorothy Landsberg Mary Jane Large and Marc Levinson

Edward and Sally Larkin* Claudia and Allan Leavitt Hyunok Lee and Daniel Sumner Yvonne LeMaitre* Linda and Peter Lindert Spencer Lockson and Thomas Lange Angelique Louie Natalie and Malcolm MacKenzie* Dennis H. Mangers and Michael Sestak Susan Mann Judith and Mark Mannis Marilyn Mansfield Michael and Maxine Mantell Yvonne L. Marsh Robert Ono and Betty Masuoka Shirley Maus* Kenneth McKinstry Steve and Sonja Memering Joy Mench and Clive Watson Fred and Linda Meyers* John Meyer and Karen Moore Eldridge and Judith Moores Patricia and Surl Nielsen Dr. James Nordin and Linda Orrante Philip and Miep Palmer Prewoznik Foundation Linda and Lawrence Raber* Larry and Celia Rabinowitz Kay Resler* Alessa Johns and Christopher Reynolds Thomas Roehr Don Roth and Jolán Friedhoff Liisa A. Russell Beverly “Babs” Sandeen and Marty Swingle Ed and Karen Schelegle The Schenker Family Neil and Carrie Schore Jeff and Bonnie Smith Wilson and Kathryn Smith Ronald and Rosie Soohoo* Richard L. Sprague and Stephen C. Ott Maril Revette Stratton and Patrick Stratton Karmen Streng Tony and Beth Tanke George and Rosemary Tchobanoglous Dr. Haluk and Ayse Tezcan Brandt Schraner and Jennifer Thornton Claude and Barbara Van Marter Louise and Larry Walker Janda J. Waraas Bruce and Patrice White Dale and Jane Wierman Paul Wyman Elizabeth and Yin Yeh And five donors who prefer to remain anonymous


Donors Encore Circle

$600 - $1,099 Gregg T. Atkins and Ardith Allread Michael and Tootie Beeman Drs. Noa and David Bell Susan and Kent Calfee Donald and Dolores Chakerian Gale and Jack Chapman William and Susan Chen John and Cathie Duniway Nell Farr and Anna Melvin Doris and Earl Flint Murray and Audrey Fowler Carole Franti* Paul J. and Dolores L. Fry Charitable Fund Gatmon-Sandrock Family Craig Gladen Paul N. and E. F. “Pat” Goldstene David and Mae Gundlach Robin Hansen Roy and Miriam Hatamiya Katherine Hess Barbara and Robert Jones Kent and Judy Kjelstrom Paula Kubo Anesiades Leonard Stanley and Donna Levin Maria Manoliu Frances Mara Gary C. and Jane L. Matteson Barbara Moriel James Morris Hedlin Family Don and Sue Murchison Robert Murphy Richard and Kathleen Nelson Alice Oi John Pascoe Jerry L. Plummer Ann and Jerry Powell* J and K Redenbaugh John Reitan Heather and Jeep Roemer Jeannie and Bill Spangler Lenore and Henry Spoto Sherman and Hannah Stein Les and Mary Stephens Dewall Lynn Taylor and Mont Hubbard Roseanna Torretto* Henry and Lynda Trowbridge* Robert and Helen Twiss Steven and Andrea Weiss Denise and Alan Williams Kandi Williams and Dr. Frank Jahnke Karl and Lynn Zender And four donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Sean and Sabine McCarthy Del and Doug McColm Julie and Craig McNamara Don and Lou McNary Glen And Nancy Michel Robert and Susan Munn* William and Nancy Myers Anna Rita and Bill Neuman Forrest Odle John and Carol Oster Sally Ozonoff and Tom Richey Frank Pajerski Jack and Sue Palmer Dr. John and Barbara Parker Bonnie A. Plummer* Deborah Nichols Poulos and Prof. John W. Poulos Harriet Prato Edward and Jane Rabin J. David Ramsey Rosemary Reynolds Guy and Eva Richards Ronald and Sara Ringen John and Marie Rundle Bob and Tamra Ruxin Tom and Joan Sallee Dwight E. and Donna L. Sanders Mark and Ita Sanders* Howard and Eileen Sarasohn Jerry and Kay Schimke Mervyn Schnaidt Maralyn Scott Mark E. Ellis and Lynn Shapiro Nancy Sheehan and Rich Simpson In memory of Charles R.S. Shepard Kathie Shigaki Elizabeth Smithwick Al and Sandy Sokolow Edward and Sharon Speegle Curtis and Judy Spencer Elizabeth St Goar Tim and Julie Stephens Pieter and Jodie Stroeve, and Diane Barrett Kristia Suutala Nancy Teichert Cap and Helen Thomson Butch and Virginia Thresh Dennis and Judy Tsuboi Ann-Catrin Van Ph.D. Robert Vassar and Nanci Manceau George and Denise Gridley Donald Walk, M.D. Geoffrey and Gretel Wandesford-Smith Norma and Richard Watson Dr. Fred and Betsy Weiland Daniel Weiss and Elena Friedman-Weiss Chuck White Lisa Yamauchi and Michael O’Brien Iris Yang and G. Richard Brown Wesley Yates Ronald M. Yoshiyama Hanni and George Zweifel

Orchestra Circle

$300 - $599 Michelle Adams Mitzi S. Aguirre Susan Ahlquist Paul and Nancy Aikin Steven Albrecht and Jessica Friedman Drs. Ralph and Teresa Aldredge Thomas and Patricia Allen Al and Pat Arthur Michael and Shirley Auman* Robert and Joan P. Ball Robert Hollingsworth and Carol Beckham Don and Kathy Bers* Elizabeth Bradford Paul Braun Rosa Marquez and Richard Breedon Joan Brenchley and Kevin Jackson Irving and Karen Broido* In memory of Rose Marie Wheeler John and Christine Bruhn Manuel Calderon De La Barca Sanchez Jackie Caplan Michael and Louise Caplan Michael and Susan Carl Richard Carlsen Doreen T. Chan Amy Chen and Raj Amirtharajah Dorothy Chikasawa* Charles and Mary Anne Cooper James and Patricia Cothern Catherine Coupal* Larry Dashiell and Peggy Siddons Thomas B. and Eina C. Dutton Micki Eagle Sheila and Steve Epler Janet Feil David and Kerstin Feldman Susan Flynn Tom and Barbara Frankel Sevgi and Edwin Friedrich* Dr. Deborah and Brook Gale Marnelle Gleason and Louis J. Fox* Marvin and Joyce Goldman S.D. Gray Donald Green William Green and Martin Palomar Stephen and Deirdre Greenholz Marilyn and Alexander Groth Judy Guiraud Gwen and Darrow Haagensen Sharon and Don Hallberg David and Donna Harris Stephen and Joanne Hatchett Cynthia Hearden Len and Marilyn Herrmann Fred Taugher and Paula Higashi Frederick and Tieu-Bich Hodges Frederick and B.J. Hoyt Pat and Jim Hutchinson* Don and Diane Johnston Weldon and Colleen Jordan Mary Ann and Victor Jung David Kalb and Nancy Gelbard Edith Kanoff Charles Kelso and Mary Reed Ruth Ann Kinsella* Richard and Rosie Kirkland Joseph Kiskis Peter Klavins and Susan Kauzlarich Norma Klein Charlene R. Kunitz Allan and Norma Lammers Darnell Lawrence Katie Thomas and Richard Lawrence Ruth Lawrence Frances and Arthur Lawyer* Carol and Robert Ledbetter Michael and Sheila Lewis* David and Ruth Lindgren Bill and Harriet Lovitt Helen Ma Bunkie Mangum Pat Martin* Robert Mazalewski and Yvonne Clinton

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And 10 donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Mainstage Circle $100 - $299

Leal Abbott Thomas and Betty Adams Mary Aften Jill Aguiar Suzanne and David Allen David and Penny Anderson Valeriejeanne Anderson Elinor Anklin and George Harsch Janice and Alex Ardans Clemens Ford Arrasmith Debbie Arrington Fred Arth and Pat Schneider Jerry and Barbara August George and Irma Baldwin Charlotte Ballard Beverly and Clay Ballard Charlie and Diane Bamforth* Elizabeth Banks Michele Barefoot and Luis Perez-Grau

Lupie and Richard Barton Cynthia Bates Paul and Linda Baumann Lynn Baysinger* Delee and Jerry Beavers Claire and Marion Becker* Mark and Betty Belafsky Lorna Belden Merry Benard Carol L. Benedetti William and Marie Benisek Robert C. and Jane D. Bennett Márta Battha Béres Bevowitz Family Boyd and Lucille Bevington Ernst and Hannah Biberstein John and Katy Bill Andrea Bjorklund and Sean Duggan Lewis J. and Caroline S. Bledsoe Fred and Mary Bliss Marchia Bond Brooke Bourland* Mary and Jill Bowers Adney and Steve Bowker Alf and Kristin Brandt Robert Braude and Maxine Moser Dan and Millie Braunstein* Pat and Bob Breckenfeld Margaret Brockhouse Don and Liz Brodeur David and Valerie Brown Linda Clevenger and Seth Brunner Martha Bryant* Mike and Marian Burnham Margaret Burns and Roy W. Bellhorn Victor and Meredith Burns William and Karolee Bush Robert and Lynn Campbell Robert Canary John and Nancy Capitanio James and Patty Carey Anne and Gary Carlson Jan Carmikle, ‘90 John Carroll Bruce and Mary Alice Carswell* Jan B. and Barbara J. Carter* Caroline Chantry and James Malot Frank Chisholm Michael and Paula Chulada Arthur Chung and Karen Roberts Betty M. Clark Gail Clark L. Edward and Jacqueline Clemens Bill and Linda Cline Barbara Cody Stephan Cohen Sheri and Ron Cole Harold and Marj Collins Steve and Janet Collins Patricia Conrad and Ann Brice Jan and Gayle Conroy Judith Cook Pauline Cook Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cook Victor Cozzalio and Lisa Heilman-Cozzalio Bill and Myra Cusick Elizabeth Dahlstrom-Bushnell* John W. and Joanne M. Daniels Dena Davidson Johanna Davies Mary Hanf Dawson Jody Deaderick Ed and Debby Dillon Joel and Linda Dobris Richard Epstein and Gwendolyn Doebbert Val Dolcini and Solveig Monson Val and Marge Dolcini* Gordon Douglas Sue Drake* Ray Dudonis Anne Duffey Leslie Dunsworth Marjean Dupree Victoria Dye and Douglas Kelt J. Terry and Susan Eager Harold and Anne Eisenberg Eliane Eisner Brian Ely and Robert Hoffman Allen Enders Adrian and Tamara Engel Sid England Carol Erickson and David Phillips M. Richard and Gloria M. Eriksson

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Mondavi Center support

mondavi center


Mondavi Center support

Jeff Ersig Christine Facciotti Adrian Farley and Greg Smith Andrew D. and Eleanor E. Farrand* Elizabeth Fassler Elizabeth and Timothy Fenton Steven and Susan Ferronato Martin Filet and Mary McDonald Margery Findlay Kieran and Martha Fitzpatrick Judy Fleenor* Manfred Fleischer David and Donna Fletcher Glenn Fortini Marion Franck and Bob Lew Frank Brown Barbara and Edwin Frankel Anthony and Jorgina Freese Joel Friedman Kerim and Josina Friedrich Joan M. Futscher Myra A. Gable Lillian Gabriel Charles and Joanne Gamble Claude and Nadja Garrod Xiaojia Ge and Ronghua Li* Ivan Gennis Peggy Gerick Gerald Gibbons and Sibilla Hershey Mary Lou and Robert Gillis Eleanor Glassburner Roberta R. Gleeson Burton Goldfine Robert and Pat Gonzalez* Robert and Velma Goodlin Michael Goodman Susan Goodrich Victor Graf Tom Graham Jacqueline Gray* Kathleen and Thomas Green Paul and Carol Grench Cindy and Henry Guerrero June and Paul Gulyassy Wesley and Ida Hackett* Jim and Jane Hagedorn Frank and Rosalind Hamilton William and Sherry Hamre Jim and Laurie Hanschu Marylee and John Hardie Richard and Vera Harris Cathy Brorby and Jim Harritt Sally H. Harvey Marjorie Heineke Donald and Lesley Heller Paul and Nancy Helman Martin Helmke and Joan Frye Williams Rand and Mary Herbert Eric Herrgesell, DVM Roger and Rosanne Heym Elizabeth and Larry Hill Alouise Hillier Calvin Hirsch and Deborah Francis Michael and Peggy Hoffman Jan and Herb Hoover Steve and Nancy Hopkins Allie Huberty David and Gail Hulse Deborah Hunter Eva Peters Hunting Lorraine J. Hwang Gabriel Isakson William Jackson Kathryn Jaramillo Dr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Jensen Pamela R. Jessup Carole and Phil Johnson John and Jane Johnson Steve and Naomi Johnson Michelle Johnston Warren and Donna Johnston In memory of Betty and Joseph Baria Andrew and Merry Joslin Martin and JoAnn Joye* John and Nancy Jungerman Fred and Selma Kapatkin Shari and Timothy Karpin Jean and Stephen Karr Anthony and Beth Katsaris Yasuo Kawamura Phyllis and Scott Keilholtz* Gary Kieser Dave and Gay Kent Michael Kent and Karl Jandrey Cathryn Kerr

72

| mondaviarts.org

Pat and John Kessler Larry Kimble and Louise Bettner Ken and Susan Kirby Dorothy Klishevich Paulette Keller Knox Muriel Knudsen Winston and Katy Ko Paul and Pamela Kramer Dave and Nina Krebs Marcia and Kurt Kreith Sandra Kristensen Elizabeth and C.R. Kuehner Nate Kupperman Leslie Kurtz Cecilia Kwan Donald and Yoshie Kyhos Ray and Marianne Kyono Terri Labriola Bonnie and Kit Lam* Marsha M. Lang Lawrence and Ingrid Lapin Bruce and Susan Larock Kathleen Larson Leon E. Laymon C and J Learned Marceline Lee and Philip Smith Nancy P. Lee The Hartwig-Lee Family Nancy and Steve Lege The Lenk-Sloane Family Edward N. Lester Evelyn A. Lewis Melvyn and Rita Libman Guille Levin Libresco Jim and Jami Long Kim Longworth Mary Lowry Henry Luckie Paul and Linnae Luehrs Diana Lynch Maryanne Lynch Ed and Sue MacDonald Leslie Macdonald and Gary Francis Julin Maloof and Stacey Harmer Sandra Mansfield Joseph and Mary Alice Marino Pam Marrone and Mick Rogers Donald and Mary Martin Garth and Linda Martin J. A. Martin Mr. and Mrs. William R. Mason Bob and Vel Matthews Leslie Maulhardt Katherine F. Mawdsley* Karen McCluskey* John McCoy Nora McGuinness* Donna and Dick McIlvaine Tim and Linda McKenna Blanche McNaughton* Richard and Virginia McRostie Martin A. Medina and Laurie Perry Wener Paul Harder III DeAna Melilli Barry Melton and Barbara Langer Sharon Menke The Merchant Family Roland Meyer Leslie Michaels and Susan Katt Lisa Miller Phyllis Miller Sue and Rex Miller Douglas Minnis Steve and Kathy Miura* Kei and Barbara Miyano Sydney Moberg Vicki and Paul Moering Joanne K. Moldenhauer Amy Moore Debra Moore Hallie Morrow Marcie Mortensson Tony and Linda Mras Robert and Janet Mukai The Muller Family Terry and Judith Murphy Steve Abramowitz and Dr. Alberta Nassi Joni Neibert M.A. Nelson Margaret Neu* Cathy Neuhauser and Jack Holmes Robert and Donna Curley Nevraumont* Keri Mistler and Dana Newell Kan Ching Ng Malvina Nisman

Nancy Nolte and James Little John Chendo and Esther Novak Patricia O’Brien* Kay Ogasawara Dana Olson James Oltjen Marvin O’Rear David and Debra Oshige Bob and Beth Owens Carlene and Mike Ozonoff* Michael Pach Joan S. Packard Thomas Pavlakovich and Kathryn Demakopoulos Bob and Marlene Perkins Lee/Michael Perrone Ann Peterson and Marc Hoeschele Pat Piper Vicki and Bob Plutchok Ralph and Jane Pomeroy* Bea and Jerry Pressler Ann Preston John Provost Evelyn and Otto Raabe Jan and Anne-Louise Radimsky Kathryn Radtkey-Gaither Lawrence and Norma Rappaport Evelyn and Dewey Raski Olga Raveling Sandi Redenbach* Mrs. John Reese, Jr. Martha Rehrman* Michael A. Reinhart and Dorothy Yerxa Eugene and Elizabeth Renkin Judy, David, and Hannah Reuben Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rice Bill Rich John Richards Fred and Bernadeen Richardson Joyce Rietz Ralph and Judy Riggs* Caroline and Stephen Roberts Warren G. Roberts David and Kathy Robertson Tracy Rodgers Richard and Evelyne Rominger Mary F. Rosa Sharon and Elliott Rose Jean and George Rosenfeld Barbara and Alan Roth David and Catherine Rowen Paul and Ida Ruffin Hugh Safford Terry Sandbek and Sharon Billings* Kathleen and David Sanders Fred and Polly Schack John and Joyce Schaeuble Tyler Schilling Leon Schimmel and Annette Cody Fred and Colene Schlaepfer Janis J. Schroeder and Carrie L. Markel Jean Schwarzkopf Robert and Jenifer Segar Brian Sehnert and Janet McDonald Dan Shadoan and Ann Lincoln Jay and Jill Shepherd Ruth and Robert Shumway Dr. and Mrs. R.L. Siegler Sandra and Clay Sigg Andrew Sih and Caitlin McGaw Mark Berman and Lynn Simon Michael and Elizabeth Singer Joy Skalbeck Barbara Slemmons Judith Smith Jean Snyder Roger and Freda Sornsen Greg and Pam Sparks Joseph and Dolores Spencer Marguerite Spencer Miriam Steinberg Harriet Steiner and Miles Stern John and Johanna Stek Judith Stern Raymond Stewart Deb and Jeff Stromberg Patricia Sturdevant Becky and James Sullivan Thomas Swift Joyce Takahashi Stewart and Ann Teal Pouneh Tehrani Francie Teitelbaum Jeanne Shealor and George Thelen Julie Theriault, PA-C

Virginia Thigpen Janet Thome Robert Thorpe Brian Toole Robert and Victoria Tousignant Katharine Traci Michael and Heidi Trauner Gary and Jan Truesdail Barbara and Jim Tutt Chris Van Kessel Bart and Barbara Vaughn* Marian and Paul Ver Wey Richard and Maria Vielbig Merna and Don Villarejo Charles and Terry Vines Evelyn Matteucci and Richard Vorpe Carolyn Waggoner* M. Therese Wagnon Maxine Wakefield and William Reichert Marny and Rick Wasserman Caroline and Royce Waters Marya Welch* Dan and Ellie Wendin Martha West Robert and Leslie Westergaard* Susan Wheeler Regina White Linda K. Whitney Kristin Wiese Phillip and JoAnne Wile Ward Willats Mrs. Jane L. Williams Suzanne and Keith Williams Janet Winterer The Wolf Family Jennifer Woo Linda Yassinger Timothy and Vicki Yearnshaw Norman and Manda Yeung Phillip and Iva Yoshimura Heather M. Young and Peter B. Quinby Larry Young and Nancy Lee Phyllis Young Melanie and Medardo Zavala Drs. Matthew and Meghan Zavod Phyllis and Darrel Zerger* Timothy Zindel Karen Ziskind Mark and Wendy Zlotlow And 55 donors who prefer to remain anonymous

CORPORATE MATCHING GIFTS American Express Foundation Gift Matching Program Bank of America Matching Gifts Program Chevron/Texaco Matching Gift Fund ExxonMobil Foundation McGraw-Hill Company Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation Monsanto Company The Sacramento Bee Wachovia Foundation Matching Gifts Program Wells Fargo Foundation We appreciate the many Members who participate in their employers’ matching gift program. Please contact your Human Resources department to find out about your company’s matching gift program. Note: We are pleased to recognize the Members of Mondavi Center for their generous support of our program. We apologize if we inadvertently listed your name incorrectly; please contact the Development Office at 530.754.5436 to inform us of corrections.


Friends

of Mondavi Center

Like the many activities of Friends of Mondavi Center, the Tours and Adult Education committees have dedicated and knowledgeable members, ready to help enhance your experience at the Mondavi Center.

TOUR THE MONDAVI CENTER Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre—Up Close and Personal When you visit the Mondavi Center, you can’t miss the unique sandstone on the walls and the slate on the floor (both from India). Within the Mondavi Center, you will find the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre (featuring a sprung wood floor) and Jackson Hall with its beautiful wood paneling (Douglas fir from the bottom of Ruby Lake in British Columbia). If you would like to learn more about these and other features of the Mondavi Center, we invite you to tour the facility. Friends of Mondavi Center Tour Guides can make the performance spaces come alive for you. To schedule a tour, call the Tour Hotline at 530-754-5399. Tours can be arranged for one to 100 guests. A Friend of Mondavi Center will return your call to discuss your tour request.

The Friends of Mondavi Center is an active

ADULT EDUCATION

donor-based volunteer organization that

The Friends of Mondavi Center Adult Education Committee provides education and

supports activities of the Mondavi Center’s

outreach to the community by hosting a series of free public talks before selected

presenting program. Deeply committed to arts

performances. You may hear anything from an intricate explanation of a symphony

education, Friends volunteer their time and

piece to a conversation with an artist from the performing company. These talks are

financial support for learning opportunities

designed to increase the audience’s understanding and enjoyment of the featured

related to Mondavi Center performances.

performances. A list of pre-performance talk dates and speakers is available online

When you join the Friends of Mondavi Center,

at www.mondaviarts.org/education/talks.cfm.

you are able to choose from a variety of activities and work with other Friends who share your interests.

The Adult Education Committee has been hosting the pre-performance talks for more than 15 years. It also organizes Spotlight Series gatherings in private homes and is exploring new ways to expand adult education outreach into the community.

For information on becoming a Friend of Mondavi Center, email Jennifer Mast at jmmast@ucdavis.edu or call 530.754.5431.

Thank you to Friend Mary Horton for use of her photographs.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

73


Mondavi Center staff

Mondavi Center staff DON ROTH, Ph.D. Executive Director Jeremy Ganter Associate Executive Director

PROGRAMMING Jeremy Ganter Director of Programming Erin Palmer Programming Manager Ruth Rosenberg Artist Engagement Coordinator Lara Downes Curator: Young Artists Program

AUDIENCE SERVICES Emily Taggart Audience Services Manager/ Artist Liaison Coordinator Yuri Rodriguez Events Manager Natalia Deardorff Assistant Events Manager Nancy Temple Assistant Public Events Manager

BUSINESS SERVICES Debbie Armstrong Senior Director of Support Services

ARTS EDUCATION Joyce Donaldson Associate to the Executive Director for Arts Educaton and Strategic Projects

Carolyn Warfield Human Resources Analyst

Jennifer Mast Arts Education Coordinator

Russ Postlethwaite Billing System Administrator

Mandy Jarvis Financial Analyst

DEVELOPMENT Debbie Armstrong Senior Director of Development

MARKETING Rob Tocalino Director of Marketing

production Christopher Oca Stage Manager

Elisha Findley Donor Relations Manager

Will Crockett Marketing Manager

Christi-Anne Sokolewicz Stage Manager

Erin Kelley Senior Graphic Artist

Jenna Bell Production Coordinator

Morissa Rubin Senior Graphic Artist

Zak Stelly-Riggs Master Carpenter

Amanda Caraway Public Relations Coordinator

Daniel Goldin Master Electrician

FACILITIES Greg Bailey Lead Building Maintenance Worker

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Darren Marks Programmer/Designer Mark J. Johnston Lead Application Developer Tim Kendall Programmer

TICKET OFFICE Sarah Herrera Ticket Office Manager Steve David Ticket Office Supervisor Russell St. Clair Ticket Agent

Michael Hayes Head Sound Technician Adrian Galindo Scene Technician Kathy Glaubach Scene Technician Daniel Thompson Scene Technician Head Ushers Huguette Albrecht George Edwards Linda Gregory Donna Horgan Mike Tracy Susie Valentin Janellyn Whittier

Dena Gilday Payroll and Travel Assistant

Mondavi Center advisory Board The Mondavi Center Advisory Board is a university support group whose primary purpose is to provide assistance to the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis, and its resident users, the academic departments of Music and Theatre and Dance, and the presenting program of the Mondavi Center, through fundraising, public outreach and other support for the mission of UC Davis and the Mondavi Center. 10-11 Season Board Officers John Crowe, Chair Lynette Hart, Vice-Chair Joe Tupin, Vice-Chair Dee Hartzog, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Lawrence Shepard, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Garry P. Maisel, Corporate Relations Co-Chair Camille Chan, Corporate Relations Co-Chair

Ex Officio

Members Wayne Bartholomew Camille Chan John Crowe Lois Crowe Patti Donlon David Fiddyment Dolly Fiddyment Mary Lou Flint Samia Foster Scott Foster

Anne Gray Bonnie Green Ed Green Benjamin Hart Lynette Hart Dee Hartzog Joe Hartzog Barbara K. Jackson Garry P. Maisel Stephen Meyer Randy Reynoso

Nancy Roe William Roe Lawrence Shepard Nancy Shepard Joan Stone Tony Stone Joe Tupin Larry Vanderhoef Rosalie Vanderhoef

Linda Katehi, Chancellor, UC Davis Enrique Lavernia, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor, UC Davis Jessie Ann Owens, Dean, Division of Humanities, Arts & Cultural Studies, College of Letters & Sciences, UC Davis Margaret Neu, President, Friends of Mondavi Center Sally Ryen, Chair, Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center

Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee

friends of mondavi center

The Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee is made up of interested students, faculty and staff who attend performances, review programming opportunities and meet monthly with the director of the Mondavi Center. They provide advice and feedback for the Mondavi Center staff throughout the performance season.

10-11 Executive Board Margaret Neu, President Laura Baria, Vice President/Membership Francie Lawyer, Secretary Jo Anne Boorkman, Adult Education Sandra Chong, K-12 Education John Cron, Mondavi Center Tours Phyllis Zerger, Outreach Martha Rehrman, School Matinee Ticket Program Fundraising Eunice Adair Christensen, Gift Shop Manager, Ex Officio Joyce Donaldson, Director of Arts Education, Ex Officio

10-11 Committee Members Sally Ryen, Chair Prabhakara Choudary Adrian Crabtree Susan Franck Kelley Gove Holly Keefer

74

Sandra Lopez Danielle McManus Bella Merlin Lee Miller Bettina Ng’weno Rei Okamoto

| mondaviarts.org

Hearne Pardee Isabel Raab Kayla Rouse Erin Schlemmer Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie


Ticket Exchange Policy • Once a season ticket request is processed, there are no refunds. • If you exchange for a higher priced ticket, you will be charged the difference. The difference between a higher and lower priced exchanged ticket is not refundable. • Tickets must be exchanged at least one business day prior to the performance. • Tickets may not be exchanged after your performance date. • Gift certificates will not be issued for returned tickets. Parking You may purchase parking passes for individual Mondavi Center events for $6 for each event at the parking lot or with your ticket order. Rates are subject to change. Parking passes that have been lost or stolen will not be replaced. Group Discounts Entertain friends, family, classmates or business associates and save money. Groups of 20 or more qualify for a 10% discount. Payment must be made in a single check or credit card transaction. Please call 530.754.2787 or 866.754.2787. Student Tickets (50% off the full single ticket price*) Eligibility: Full-time students age 12 & over enrolled for the current academic year at an accredited institution and matriculating towards a diploma or a degree. (Continuing education enrollees are not eligible). Proof Requirements: School ID for the current academic year OR photocopy of your transcript/report card/tuition bill receipt for the current academic year. Children For events other than the family series it is recommended that children under the age of five not be brought to the performance for the enjoyment of all patrons. A ticket is required of all children regardless of age; any child attending a performance should be able to sit quietly throughout the performance. Privacy Policy Mondavi Center collects information from patrons solely for the purpose of gaining necessary information to conduct business and serve our patrons more efficiently. We also sometimes share names and addresses with other not-for-profit arts organizations. If you do not wish to be included in our e-mail communications or postal mailings, or if you do not want us to share your name, please notify us via e-mail, U.S. mail, or telephone. Full Privacy Policy at www.MondaviArts.org.

POlicies

POlicies and information

Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities Mondavi Center is proud to be a state-of-the-art public facility that meets or exceeds all state and federal ADA requirements and is fully accessible to patrons with disabilities. Parking for patrons with DMV placards is available on the street level (mid-level) of the nearby parking structure, and on the surface lots near the covered walkway. There is also a short-term drop-off area directly in front of the entrance. Patrons with disabilities or special seating needs should notify the Mondavi Center Ticket Office of those needs at the time of ticket purchase. Requests for sign language interpreting, real-time captioning, Braille programs and other reasonable accommodations should be made with at least two weeks notice. Mondavi Center may not be able to accommodate special needs brought to our attention at the performance. Seating spaces for wheelchair users and their companions are located at all levels and prices for all performances. Ushers are available at the doors to Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Please explain to the usher how best to assist you, if needed. Special Seating Mondavi Center offers special seating arrangements for our patrons with disabilities. Please call the Ticket Office at 530.754.2787 [TDD 530.754.5402]. Listening Enhancement Devices Listening Infrared Systems are installed in both Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Receivers that can be used with or without hearing aids are available for patrons who have difficulty understanding dialogue or song lyrics. They may be checked out at no charge from the Patron Services Desk near the lobby elevators. Elevators Mondavi Center has two passenger elevators serving all levels. They are located at the north end of the Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby, near the restrooms and Patron Services Desk.

Service Animals Mondavi Center welcomes working service animals that are necessary to assist patrons with disabilities. Service animals must remain on a leash or harness at all times. Please contact the Mondavi Center Ticket Office if you intend to bring a service animal to an event so that appropriate seating can be reserved for you.

Restrooms All public restrooms are equipped with accessible sinks, stalls, baby-changing stations and amenities. There are six public restrooms in the building: two on the Orchestra level; two on the Orchestra Terrace level; and two on the Grand Tier level. *Only one discount per ticket.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011 |

75


September 2010

Imago, ZooZoo sun, nov 7

march 2011

Madeleine Albright

Delfeayo Marsalis Group

mon, mar 7

Wed, Sep 29

San Francisco Symphony

Center

Thur, Sep 30

Christopher O’Riley, piano sat-sun, nov 13-14

october 2010

Paul Taylor Dance Company

Bayanihan, National Folk Dance Company of the Philippines

Tous les Matins du Monde

sat, nov 13

fri, Oct 1

thu, nov 18

Dianne Reeves

Ornette Coleman

sat, Oct 2

sat, nov 20

Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers

Jeanine De Bique, soprano

sun, Oct 3

Rising Stars of Opera

Mondavi 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1

wed-fri, nov 10-12

sat-sun, nov 20-21

december 2010

Los Lobos

Tord Gustavsen and Solveig Slettahjell

Dresden Staatskapelle

Alexander String Quartet

Gamelan Çudamani

Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano

Stew and The Negro Problem

Kronos Quartet

Jonah Lehrer

Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum

Music and Madness Festival

Lara Downes Family Concert

sat, Oct 9

wed, Oct 13 sat, Oct 23

sun, Oct 24

tue-wed, Oct 26-27 wed, Oct 27

thu-sun, Oct 28-31

wed-sat, dec 1-4 sun, dec 5 sun, dec 5 thu, dec 9

fri, dec 10

sun, dec 12

American Bach Soloists, Messiah

Tango Fire: Tango Inferno thu, mar 10

Yefim Bronfman, piano sat, mar 12

Alexander String Quartet sun, mar 13

San Francisco Symphony and Chorus thu, mar 17

Curtis On Tour

sat-sun, mar 19-20

Dan Zanes and Friends sun, mar 20

St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra sat, mar 26

Young Artists Competition Winners sun, mar 27

april 2011 Branford Marsalis & Terence Blanchard fri, apr 1

Takács Quartet, with Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano sat, apr 2

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater tue-wed, apr 5-6

The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma fri, apr 8

sat, dec 18

Lara Downes with David Sanford

Venice Baroque Orchestra with Robert McDuffie, violin

january 2011

Sarah Silverman

Delfeayo Marsalis Octet

sat-sun, jan 15-16

Buika

thu, jan 20

Alexander String Quartet

sat, jan 22

november 2010 wed, nov 3

wed-sat, nov 3-6 sat, nov 6 sun, nov 7

Kenric Tam

Mark O’Connor and Julian Lage Itzhak Perlman, violin Daniel Handler wed, jan 26

25th Hour

thu, jan 27

MOMIX, Botanica

sat-sun, jan 29-30

Simone Dinnerstein and Tift Merritt sat-sun, jan 29-30

february 2011 Mark Morris Dance Group wed, feb 2

Vijay Iyer

wed-sat, feb 2-5

Joshua Bell, violin wed, feb 9

Bill Frisell Trio John Scofield Trio

| mondaviarts.org

sat-sun, apr 9-10 sun, apr 10

China Philharmonic Orchestra tue, apr 12

Max Raabe and Palast Orchester wed, apr 13

Béla Fleck, Zakir Hussain, & Edgar Meyer thu, apr 14

Der Untergang (Downfall) thu, apr 21

Buddy Guy

fri, apr 22

David Sedaris thu, apr 28

Pablo Ziegler, Beyond Tango fri, apr 29

may 2011 Lucinda Childs, DANCE tue, may 3

Roby Lakatos Ensemble thu, may 5

Tony Bennett

wed, may 25

fri, feb 11

june 2011

New Century Chamber Orchestra with Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg

Alexander String Quartet

La Rondine

MondaviArts.org

sat, feb 12

76

Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

thu, feb 17

sun, june 5

530.754.2787

866.754.2787 (toll-free)

Playbill Issue 7: Mar-Apr 2011  

Curtis On Tour, Dan Zanes and Friends, St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Young Artists Competition Winners, Terence Blanchard Quintet a...

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