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Center

Mondavi

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Program

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kenric tam, piano

mark o'connor and julian lage

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itzhak perlman, violin

daniel handler

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MOMIX Botanica

simone dinnerstein and tift merritt

mark morris dance group

vijay iyer

joshua Bell, violin

Issue 5: jan–Feb 2011


Before the show

Before the Curtain Rises, Please Play Your Part • As a courtesy to others, please turn off all electronic devices.

Photo: Lynn Goldsmith

• If you have any hard candy, please unwrap it before the lights dim. • Please remember that the taking of photographs or the use of any type of audio or video recording equipment is strictly prohibited.

a message from

Don Roth, Ph.D. Executive Director Mondavi Center

• Please look around and locate the exit nearest you. That exit may be behind you, to the side, or in front of you. In the unlikely event of a fire alarm or other emergency please leave the building through that exit.

A

s we welcome you, the audience members, back for the second half of our ninth Mondavi Center season, we also are very pleased to welcome back a great ensemble which has been missing from our hall for too long—the Mark Morris Dance Group. Mark Morris, who has become a leading choreographer of our time, is as much a musical artist as he is a dance artist. I don’t believe there is any creator of dance who is more strongly grounded in the music he selects. Morris manages to find in movement an absolutely perfect extension of the music. He chooses from a varied selection of musical styles (mostly what we call “classical”), an aesthetic reflected in his upcoming Jackson Hall program which ranges from Beethoven to Ives to the great California composer Lou Harrison. Morris is one of the few choreographers who insists on always performing to live music, so we will have the double treat of witnessing his wonderful dances with an excellent group of chamber musicians. Just as Mark Morris believes there is no substitute for live music, I’m convinced there is no substitute for the live experience of the arts. I love the technology that allows me to carry 30 days of music in my pocket and an entire film festival on my laptop. But those experiences are essentially “canned,” frozen at a point in time, often a rather perfect point in time, but canned nonetheless. We are social animals, we humans, and every time we come to the theater, we create a once-in-a-lifetime “social network” with our fellow audience members and the artists on stage. There is no replacement for the comfort, stimulation, and excitement which comes out of that joining together. This month you can “network” with three of the great fiddlers of our time: Mark O’Connor, who will burn up the stage with guitarist Julian Lage; our good friend Itzhak Perlman; and the ever-growing and changing virtuoso Joshua Bell. You can befriend one of our three amazing pianists—the young Kenric Tam, here for his professional Mondavi Center debut; the classicist Simone Dinnerstein crossing over into a genre-busting program with singer-songwriter Tift Merritt that ranges from George Harrison to Chopin; or the rising jazz star Vijay Iyer and his trio in our Vanderhoef Studio Theatre cabaret.

• As a courtesy to all our patrons and for your safety, anyone leaving his or her seat during the performance may not be re-admitted to his/her ticketed seat while the performance is in progress.

info Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities 530.754.2787 • TDD: 530.754.5402 In the event of an emergency, patrons requiring physical assistance on the Orchestra Terrace, Grand Tier, and Upper Tier levels please proceed to the elevator alcove refuge where this sign appears. Please let us know ahead of time for any special seating requests or accommodations. See p. 63 for more information.

Membership 530.754.5436 Member contributions to the Mondavi Center presenting program help to offset the costs of the annual season of performances and lectures, and provide a variety of arts education and outreach programs to the community. Friends of Mondavi Center 530.754.5000 Contributors to the Mondavi Center are eligible to join the Friends of Mondavi Center, a volunteer support group that assists with educational programs and audience development. Volunteers 530.754.1000 Mondavi Center volunteers assist with numerous functions, including house ushering and the activities of the Friends of Mondavi Center and the Arts and Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee.

Tours 530.754.5399 One-hour guided tours of the Mondavi Center’s Jackson Hall, Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, and Yoche Dehe Grand Lobby are given regularly by the Friends of Mondavi Center. Reservations are required.

Thank you for being part of 2011 in the Mondavi Center.

Lost and Found Hotline 530.752.8580 Recycle We reuse our playbills! Thank you for returning your recycled playbill in the bin located by the main exit on your way out.

Don Roth Executive Director Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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Davis Hospitality...

Proud Sponsors of The Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis

Amenities Include:

  Breakfast Buffet with Cook To Order Omelets  Nightly Cocktail Reception  Deluxe Plush Bedding  WIFI Throughout  Bee Kind Amenities  32” LCD TV’s

Now Featuring: Complimentary Bicycle Program* For reservations or more information* Please contact us at: (800) 753-0035 110 F Street Davis, CA 95616 • www.hallmarkinn.com

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Kenric Tam, piano 2007 Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition winner A Debut Series Event Saturday, January 15, 2011 • 8PM Sunday, January 16, 2011 • 2PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Pre-Performance Talk Speakers: Ryan Brown, composer, in conversation with Lara Downes, Artist in Residence, Mondavi Center, UC Davis January 15, 2011 • 7PM January 16, 2011 • 1PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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kenric tam, piano

Kenric Tam, piano

Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48, No. 1

Chopin

Barcarolle in F-sharp major, Op. 60

Beethoven

Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110

Moderato cantabile molto espressivo

Allegro molto

Adagio, ma non troppo — Arioso dolente — Fuga: Allegro, ma non troppo —

L’istesso tempo di Arioso — L’istesso tempo della Fuga poi a poi di nuovo vivente —

Meno allegro — Tempo primo

Intermission

Four Pieces for High Solo Piano (World Premiere)

Cellar Door

Buckle

Stage Whisper (for Kate)

Shoestring

Symphonic Etudes, Op. 13

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Ryan Brown

Schumann

Thema: Andante — Etude I: Un poco più vivo— Etude II: Andante —

Etude III: Vivace — Etude IV: Allegro marcato— Etude V: Scherzando — Etude VI: Agitato —

Variation IV — Variation V — Etude VII: Allegro molto — Variation III —

Etude VIII: Sempre marcatissimo — Etude IX: Presto possibile — Variation II —

Etude X: Allegro con energia — Etude XI: Andante espressivo — Etude XII: Allegro brillante

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Program Notes by Dr. Richard E. Rodda Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48, No. 1 (1841) Frédéric Chopin (Born February 22, 1810 in Zelazowa-Wola [near Warsaw], Poland Died October 17, 1849 in Paris) The two Nocturnes, Op. 48 were products of 1841, the time of Chopin’s greatest happiness with George Sand, when he was at the height of his creative powers. They were published in Paris later that year and in Leipzig soon thereafter with a dedication to Laura Duperré, who inspired the following beguiling description in the memoirs of the composer’s friend Wilhelm von Lenz: “I always made my appearance [at Chopin’s apartment] long before the hour of my appointment, and waited. Ladies came out, one after another, each more beautiful than the others. On one occasion, there was Mlle. Laura Duperré, daughter of Admiral Victor-Guy Duperré [commander of the French forces at the siege of Algiers in 1830], whom Chopin accompanied to the head of the stairs. She was the most beautiful of all, and as slender as a palm tree. To her, Chopin dedicated two of his most important Nocturnes [Op. 48]; she was his favorite pupil at the time.” Chopin’s high regard for Laura could have found no more fitting vehicle than the C minor Nocturne, Op. 48, No. 1, which musicologist Herbert Weinstock called “Chopin’s major effort in that genre. Here is one of his compositional triumphs.” The work’s breadth of scale, range and intensity of emotion, and peerless control of form and figuration make it one of the supreme masterpieces of the Romantic keyboard literature. Barcarolle in F-sharp major, Op. 60 (1845-1846) Frédéric Chopin The barcarolle is the traditional song of the Venetian gondoliers (barca in Italian means boat), characterized by the languid nature of its melodies and the rocking accompaniment which simulates the gentle action of the waves. Felix Mendelssohn transmuted the form into a small genre for piano in several of his Songs Without Words, and his friend Frédéric Chopin may have become acquainted with the idiom of the barcarolle through them, or from examples included in popular French operettas by Hérold (Zampa) and Auber (Fra Diavolo) in the early 1830s. (Chopin never visited Italy.) Chopin undertook his only Barcarolle in 1845, a time when his health was beginning to fail from tuberculosis and he was still deeply grieved by the death of his father the year before. He completed the piece the following summer at Nohant, the country house of George Sand near Châteauroux, some distance south of Paris in the province of Berry. The Barcarolle is related in mood and scale to the Nocturnes, though its individual traits, notably the gently swaying accompaniment and the melody-duet in close harmonies, make it unique in Chopin’s output. Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110 (1821) Ludwig van Beethoven (Born December 16, 1770 in Bonn Died March 26, 1827 in Vienna) The Op. 110 Sonata of 1821 is one the towering peaks of the piano literature, or, perhaps more appropriately, one of its sublimely

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kenric tam, piano

Program Notes

peaceful Alpine valleys, since its essence is halcyon rather than heaven-storming. In his fine book on Beethoven’s last decade, Martin Cooper noted that in this music the composer moved away “from the dramatic principle of contrast with its implicit idea of struggle. In its place we find a unified vision where music borrows nothing from the theater ... and aspires to its own unique condition ... The listener is taken as a friend whose interest and understanding can be taken for granted, rather than an audience to be captured, dazzled, touched or excited. In this work, the rhetorical element is virtually non-existent.” In place of the dramatic gesture, which he had used so successfully in his middle-period works, Beethoven here posited a language of pure music, one impenetrable by mere words and upon which even the most learned technical analysis seems little more than an inquisitive flea upon an elephant. Cooper: “However we regard it, we can hardly avoid the impression that Beethoven’s [goal] is the contemplation of a harmonious world whose laws are absolute and objective, neither subject to human passion nor concerned with anything beyond themselves.” The forms and balances of the movements of Beethoven’s late works were no longer subject to the traditional Classical models, but grew inexorably from the unique qualities and potentials of each individual composition. The opening movement of the Op. 110 Sonata is technically in sonata form, but one so seamlessly made and so consistently sunbright in mood that unity rather than contrast is its dominant characteristic. Next comes an energetic movement in the spirit (though not the meter) of a scherzo whose thematic material was apparently inspired by two Austrian folksongs for which Beethoven had provided simple piano accompaniments in 1820. Closing the Sonata is a musical essay whose lyricism and ultimate gentleness belie its stupendous formal concept. A mournful scena, an arioso dolente, is given as the opening chapter and leads without pause to the life-confirming retort of a tightly argued fugue. This fugue is not, however, one of those mighty, gnarled constructions that Beethoven employed elsewhere in his last years, but a pellucid, songful, joyous example of the form. The arioso, with its thrumming, chordal accompaniment, intrudes itself upon the undulant flow of the fugue, and is again answered by Beethoven’s celebratory counterpoint, marked, on this last appearance, to be infused by the pianist “more and more with new life.” Four Pieces for High Solo Piano (2010 — World Premiere) Ryan Brown (Born October 21, 1979) San Francisco-based composer, guitarist, and electric bassist Ryan Brown spent his formative years playing rock and jazz guitar in various bands before beginning formal musical studies at age seventeen. He did his undergraduate work in composition at California State University at Long Beach, graduating in 2002, and earned his master’s degree from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music in 2005; he is currently completing his doctorate at Princeton University. Brown’s music has been performed by the Brooklyn Philharmonic, pianist Lisa Moore, California E.A.R. Unit, Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, Paul Dresher Ensemble, Carlsbad Festival, Gaudeamus Festival (Amsterdam), MATA Festival and other notable groups, artists and presenters; he has also been featured on NPR’s Forum with Michael Krasney and Richard Friedman’s Music from Other Minds. Brown has received an Emerging Composer Award from the Gerbode and Hewlett Foundations and a Morton Gould Young Composer Award from ASCAP, and was Composer-in-Residence

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with the Brooklyn Philharmonic in 2008-2009; he begins a residency at the Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts at UC Davis in January 2011. In 2006, with composer Jonathan Russell and clarinetist Jeff Anderle, Brown co-founded San Francisco’s annual Switchboard Music Festival, an eight-hour music marathon bringing together composers and performers “who are challenging traditional genre lines.” (The 2011 Festival is on April 3. See http://www.switchboardmusic.com for details.) Ryan Brown wrote of his Four Pieces for High Solo Piano, “I think writing for solo piano is one of the hardest things a composer can do. The sheer volume of wonderful music that has already been written for it (across many, if not all, genres), plus the sonic explorations pioneered by many 20th-century masters make it hard to imagine ever forming a fresh approach to the instrument. This was the problem I faced when asked to write a solo piece in 2007 for the incredible Lisa Moore [the Australian-born avantgarde specialist now based in New York who was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All Stars, the contemporary music group that was Musical America’s 2005 ‘Ensemble of the Year’]. My solution, in a fit of desperation, was to restrict myself solely to the top few octaves, and only white notes at that. I’ve always loved that range of the piano, largely because of its ‘non-piano-ness,’ but also because of the percussive quality and the brittle timbre. That piece, titled Ceramics, opened up a new world of piano writing that I couldn’t wait to get back to. These four short pieces are a further exploration of that world, that new instrument that we’ve loved for so long.” Symphonic Etudes, Op. 13 (1834-1835; revised in 1837 and 1852) Robert Schumann (Born June 8, 1810 in Zwickau, Germany Died July 29, 1856 in Endenich, near Bonn) Early in 1834, Baron von Fricken of Asch in Bohemia heard little Clara Wieck play a recital in Plauen. So impressed was the Baron with the results of Papa Friedrich Wieck’s method of piano tutelage that he determined to send his own daughter, Ernestine, to Leipzig to study with the noted pedagogue. Ernestine duly presented herself as a student and boarder at the Wieck household in April, and she immediately became acquainted with Robert Schumann, the gifted 24-year-old pianist, composer, and writer who was Wieck’s chief protégé at the time. When Fricken inquired about Schumann, he was told by Wieck, “There is no limit to the number of things I could write you about this rather fantastic person; headstrong he may be, but also noble, splendid,

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enthusiastic, wonderfully gifted, highly cultured, and a writer and musician of genius.” Ernestine, then seventeen, also found much to admire about the dashing Robert, an affection returned by Schumann, who had been advised by his physician that to fully recover from his nervous breakdown of the previous year, “You need a wife. Medicine is no good here.” The affair proved serious enough that he presented Ernestine with a ring in September and presumably proposed marriage, though the engagement was never announced publicly. The following month, her course of study with Wieck apparently completed, Ernestine was summoned back to Asch by the Baron. This amatory adventure was pretty well spent by the end of the year, when Schumann began to turn his attention to Clara Wieck, with whom he was to create one of the great love stories of the 19th century, but he remained friends with Ernestine, and dedicated to her the Allegro for Piano, Op. 8 (composed in 1831, and published in 1835) and the Three Songs, Op. 31 (1840). Schumann’s brief fling with Ernestine von Fricken helped to inspire two of his most important piano compositions of those years. In one, Carnaval, a tiny musical motive built from pitches corresponding to the letters of her home town, Asch, is woven throughout; in the other, the Symphonic Etudes, he erected a splendid set of variations upon a theme composed by Baron von Fricken, a talented musical amateur. Though the theme of the Symphonic Etudes is decidedly somber in countenance, it displays a richness of harmonic color that Schumann exploited with dramatic effect in the variationetudes that follow. He eschewed the theme in the finale, however, in favor of a brilliant movement based on Du stolzes England, freue dich (“Proud England, Delight Yourself”) from Marschner’s oncepopular opera Der Templer und die Jüdin (“The Templar and the Jewess”), based on Scott’s Ivanhoe. Such an apparent incongruity in this testament to young German love is explained by the fact that the published score was dedicated not to Ernestine von Fricken but to William Sterndale Bennett, the English composer who had come to Leipzig to commune with his idol Mendelssohn, then conductor of the Gewandhaus concerts, and met Schumann during his stay. Schumann admired Bennett, calling him “a complete Englishman, a glorious artist and a beautiful and poetic spirit,” and left an enduring monument to him in the finale of the Symphonic Etudes. ©2011 Dr. Richard E.Rodda


kenric tam, piano

Kenric Tam, 20, was the Grand Prize winner of the 2007 Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition. He made his debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in 2006. His playing has been recognized as “remarkable for its voluptuous sound and perfection” by the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, praised for “his dazzling technique and his maturity of interpretation” by the Oakland Tribune, and lauded for his “exquisite subtlety and sensitivity … poetic and heartfelt performance” by Harvard Art Review. In 2008, Kenric was awarded the silver medal at the prestigious Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition, was named a Presidential Scholar at the White House by President Bush, and performed at the Kennedy Center. Kenric is the prize-winner of numerous international competitions, including the first prize of the 2009 Stravinsky Awards Piano Competition, first prize of the 2007 Schimmel International Piano Competition in Arizona, grand prize of the 2007 Mondavi Young Artists Competition, second prize of the 2007 MTNA National Piano Competition, first prize of the 2006 “Individualis” International Music Competition in Ukraine, second prize of the 2006 Eastman International Piano Competition in New York, first prize of the 2006 Bronislaw Kaper Awards, and first prize of the 2005 Lennox International Young Artists Competition in Texas. As the first prize winner of the 2005 Palatino Solo Piano Competition, Kenric was awarded a grand piano. Last May, Kenric was the only pianist featured in the HBO documentary Master Class, where he worked with Michael Tilson Thomas for a week in Miami. Kenric has performed extensively with such orchestras as the Symphony of the Southwest in Arizona, Richardson Symphony in Texas, Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, Music Academy Festival Orchestra, Fremont Symphony, Peninsula Symphony, and numerous other San Francisco Bay Area orchestras. In 2007, he toured Eastern Europe with the San Jose Youth Symphony as the featured soloist, playing in world-class venues such as the Liszt Academy in Budapest, the Dvorak Hall in Prague, and the Chopin Academy of Music in Warsaw. In addition to his orchestra performances, Kenric has been invited to play solo recitals for the Holland International Music Festival in the Netherlands, the Braunschweig Classix Festival in Germany, Sundays Live at Los Angeles County Museum of Arts, the Steinway Society, the 10th Annual World Pedagogy Conference, and the Piano Technician’s Guild of California. Kenric Tam, a California native, is a junior at Harvard University majoring in human developmental and regenerative biology. He studies piano with Wha-Kyung Byun at the New England Conservatory of Music through the Harvard/NEC joint degree program. In his high school years, Kenric studied piano with Hans Boepple and John McCarthy in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Mark O’Connor’s Hot Swing with Julian Lage A Chevron American Heritage Series Event Thursday, January 20, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Sponsored by

Individual support provided by John and Lois Crowe and Joe and Betty Tupin

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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Lili Received the GIFT of LIFE Born two months early, Lili Jimenez had a difficult start in life. Weighing barely three pounds, Lili suffered a host of ailments, including a life-threatening intestinal disease unique to preemies. With little time to spare, Lili was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit at UC Davis Children’s Hospital—the region’s only comprehensive children’s hospital. After two complex surgeries, four months of round-the-clock care and lots of TLC, Lili was sent home to a future now in full bloom. At UC Davis Health System, our next medical breakthrough just may have your name on it.

Lili’s care team included neonatologist Mark Underwood, nurse Christa Mu and other specialists in the research and treatment of preterm birth complications.

A gift for advancing health.

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mark o’connor’s hot swing with julian lage

Mark O’Connor’s Hot Swing with Julian Lage Mark O’Connor, violin Julian Lage, guitar Heather Masse, vocals Matt Munisteri, guitar Kyle Kegerreis, bass

Selections will be announced from the stage.

Mark O’Connor (born August 5, 1961, Seattle, Washington) A product of America’s rich folk tradition as well as classical music, Mark O’Connor’s creative journey began at the feet of a pair of musical giants. The first was the folk fiddler and innovator who created the modern era of American fiddling, Benny Thomasson; the second, a French jazz violinist who is considered one of the greatest improvisers in the history of the violin, Stephane Grappelli. Along the way, between these marvelous musical extremes, Mark O’Connor absorbed knowledge and influence from the multitude of musical styles and genres he studied. Now, at age 49, he has melded and shaped these influences into a new American Classical music, and a vision of an entirely American school of string playing. As the Los Angeles Times recently noted, he has “crossed over so many boundaries that his style is purely personal.” O’Connor’s first recording for the Sony Classical label, Appalachia Waltz, was a collaboration with Yo-Yo Ma and Edgar Meyer. The works O’Connor composed for the disc, including its title track, gained him worldwide recognition as a leading proponent of a new American musical idiom. The tremendously successful follow-up release, Appalachian Journey, received a Grammy Award in 2001. With more than 200 performances, his first full-length orchestral score, Fiddle Concerto, has become the most-performed modern violin concerto composed in the last 40 years. It was recorded for Warner Bros in 1995. O’Connor’s second concerto, Fanfare for the Volunteer, was recorded with the London Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Steven Mercurio and released by Sony Classical in 1999. The Newark Star Ledger notes: “As a composer, he understands the power of a thematic transfiguration and development throughout a 40-minute work.” In 2000, O’Connor premiered his fourth violin concerto, The American Seasons: Seasons of an American Life, at Troy Music Hall in Troy, New York. According to The New York Times, “If Dvorak had spent his American leisure time in Nashville instead of Spillville, Iowa, New World Symphony would have sounded like this.” The American Seasons was recorded with the Metamorphosen

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Chamber Orchestra and released in 2001. Richard Dyer of the Boston Globe called the work “concise, lyrical, and irresistibly rhythmic.” Wayne Gay of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram said, “The American Seasons is destined to rank among the greatest masterpieces of American music … the first musical masterpiece of the 21st century.” Also in 2000, O’Connor’s third concerto, Double Violin Concerto, received its premiere with Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg as soloist and the Chicago Symphony, Christoph Eschenbach conducting. In 2003, O’Connor and Salerno-Sonnenberg recorded the work with Marin Alsop conducting the Colorado Orchestra. Fanfare enthusiastically wrote: “All aficionados of the violin and all listeners in general will pass up this recording at their peril. The very highest commendation.” In 2001, O’Connor released Hot Swing!, a tribute to his great friend and mentor, the legendary French jazz master Stephane Grappelli. Released on his own OMAC label, the CD was recorded live with Frank Vignola on guitar and Jon Burr on bass. The Chicago Tribune called it “one of the finest discs of his career and one of the greatest jazz violin albums ever.” The ensuing Hot Swing CD, Live in New York, received similar praise and ushered in a new group line-up with original member Frank Vignola on guitar, and new to the ensemble, guitarist Julian Lage, bassist Gary Mazzaroppi, and vocalist Heather Masse. The Americana Symphony: Variations on Appalachia Waltz was recorded by Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony in 2009. David McGee of Rolling Stone says “Americana Symphony may well be regarded one day as one of this country’s great gifts to the classical music canon, as well as being a pivotal moment in the rise of the new American classical music.” In 2003, O’Connor was commissioned by the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields to compose a concerto for violin and chamber orchestra. Violin Concerto No. 6 “Old Brass” takes its inspiration from a Beaufort, South Carolina, plantation designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The recording, conducted by Joel Smirnoff, was released in 2009 as the companion work to the Americana

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mark o’connor’s hot swing with julian lage

Symphony. O’Connor recorded his String Quartet No. 2 “Bluegrass” and String Quartet No. 3 “Old-Time” with Ida Kavafian, Paul Neubauer, and Matt Haimovitz and released in 2009. O’Connor’s most recent recording, Jam Session, offers dazzling live acoustic recordings that combine bluegrass and gypsy jazz. Jam Session features Chris Thile (mandolin), Frank Vignola (guitar), Bryan Sutton (guitar), Jon Burr (bass), and Byron House (bass). As word of his considerable compositional talents has spread, Mark O’Connor’s musical works have been embraced by a variety of performers. Yo-Yo Ma has recorded the solo cello adaptation of Appalachia Waltz, and Renee Fleming has performed and recorded vocal arrangements of O’Connor’s music and a new Christmas song to come out on an upcoming holiday release by O’Connor. Strings and Threads Suite, a duet that O’Connor composed for violin and guitar for guitarist Sharon Isbin, won a Grammy Award for Best Classical Instrumental Performance. O’Connor performs with piano trio his Poets and Prophets, inspired by the music of Johnny Cash, often in a collaborative concert with Rosanne Cash, daughter of the legendary singer. The Eroica Trio commissioned the Poets and Prophets piano trio and released it on EMI in 2008. Dance troupes, including Twyla Tharp Dance Co., the New York City Ballet, Alvin Ailey, and Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, are staging and choreographing O’Connor’s lyrical American music, and O’Connor frequently collaborates with director Ken Burns for the sound tracks of his documentary films. O’Connor regularly conducts three-day residencies, giving lectures, demonstrations, and workshops at a variety of music programs around the country. Some of his recent hosts include the Juilliard School, Harvard University, Berklee College of Music, Cleveland Institute of Music, Rice University, University of Maryland, University of Texas, Curtis Institute, Eastman School of Music, Tanglewood, and Aspen Summer Festival. O’Connor was Artistin-Residence at UCLA for the 2008-09 season. He currently serves as Artist-in-Residence at the University of Miami. O’Connor is the founder and president of the internationally recognized Mark O’Connor String Camp, held each summer in Johnson City, Tennessee, and at Berklee College of Music in Boston. The O’Connor Violin Method has been widely praised since its debut in 2009 as “an American-grown rival to the Suzuki method” (The New Yorker). It takes an American Classical approach to modern violin playing, offering a technical foundation using songs from the diverse range of traditional American string playing. The groundbreaking method is the first violin method to feature all American music and has been hailed by teachers from across the country as filling a significant gap in classical music education. It was inspired by the thousands of students O’Connor has taught at his string camps and at universities and conservatories across the country, and by his belief that the modern classical violin student who develops a working knowledge of folk fiddling, jazz music, and world music styles can enjoy a lifetime of music-making and be more successful in the new music environment. Mark O’Connor resides in New York City.

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Julian Lage When Julian Lage emerged on the music scene 13 years ago, the young San Francisco Bay Area-based musician was not only deemed a guitar-playing prodigy, but he was also offered record deals on numerous occasions. Playing a unique style that melded blues, classical, folk and jazz influences, Lage decided to wait for the right moment to document his own music. He chose instead to become a sideman with established instrumentalists like Gary Burton and to collaborate with contemporaries such as pianist Taylor Eigsti. Along the way, Lage received recognition from musical luminaries, including Herbie Hancock and Béla Fleck, and patiently waited until he was ready to go into a studio with a band of like-minded players to realize his own musical vision. At the age of 21, the Boston-based Lage released his debut album, Sounding Point on EmArcy Records, an imprint of Universal Records. The CD was remarkably the most striking—and sophisticated—premiere of a young instrumental artist and composer in years. The music ranged from through-composed works and impromptu improvisations in duo and trio settings to solo excursions and a finale capped by a masterful rendering of Miles Davis’s “All Blues.” Lage also delivered impressively original covers of Elliott Smith’s “Alameda” and Neil Hefti’s “Lil’ Darlin.” “I’ve been in a position where I could have recorded an album when I was younger but was never in a rush because I wanted to allow these compositions to grow and evolve in their own time.” says Lage. “And within the past four years, I have felt the music really take shape in the way I had always imagined. I feel grateful that there were no pressures on me to make a record until I felt it was time.” Heather Masse New York City singer-songmaker Heather Masse grew up in rural Maine and began singing at an early age. Trained at the New England Conservatory of Music as a jazz singer, she is steeped in the jazz tradition, which informs her distinct approach to singing folk, pop, and bluegrass. A member of the  folk super-group the Wailin’ Jennys, Heather has performed at top venues, sharing the stage with the world’s most acclaimed pop, classical, and jazz acts, including Elvis Costello, Wynton Marsalis, Sheryl Crow, Bruce Cockburn, and the Boston Pops Orchestra. She has been a frequent guest on Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion, both as a solo performer and as a member of the Jennys. In addition to Heather’s involvement with Mark O’Connor’s Hot Swing, Heather has performed with the renowned contemporary bluegrass band the Wayfaring Strangers and in 2006, she recorded an album with Joy Kills Sorrow, a contemporary stringband from Boston. She also released Tell Me Tonight with the Brooklyn-based collaboration Heather & the Barbarians. In 2008, Heather released Many Moons, an EP of jazz-inspired folk duets with pianist Jed Wilson. Releasing her first full-length album in 2009, she delivered Bird Song—her solo debut on Red House Records. Showcasing her luscious alto voice and superb songwriting, the CD is acoustic pop music at its best, thoughtful and soulful and sure to be a hit with fans of Norah Jones and Alison Krauss.


As one of “New York’s finest vintage guitar stylists” (Downbeat Magazine), but also a player who’s at home in a range of musical styles and eras, Matt has been called upon to play on a wide range of CDs, movie soundtracks, television shows, and commercials. Among the Hollywood soundtracks that he has played on are The Aviator, Finding Forrester, Ghost World, Blast from the Past, and Two to Tango. He regularly plays concerts and festivals, domestic and abroad. Recent concerts include national tours with violinist Mark O’Connor’s Hot Swing; Lincoln Center with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra; Carnegie Hall with the New York Pops Orchestra and Vince Giordano’s Nighthawks. He’s also toured with Kenny Davern, Ed Polcer, Andy Stein, Jenny Scheinman, and Rachelle Garniez and is a regular member of Steven Bernstein’s Millennial Territory Orchestra. Matt has recorded with many of today’s finest and most unique singers, including Holly Cole, Madeline Peyroux, Liz Wright, “Little” Jimmy Scott, Geoff Muldaur, Catherine Russell, and Loudon Wainwright, contributing arrangements, guitar, and banjo to Wainwright’s 2010 Grammy-winning release High, Wide and Handsome.

mark o’connor’s hot swing with julian lage

Matt Munisteri Guitarist, singer, and songwriter Matt Munisteri is a Brooklyn native who grew up as almost assuredly the only bluegrass banjo player on his block. His lifelong interest in early American music led him from country and ragtime guitar through blues to Tin Pan Alley and jazz. His own compositions and playing reflect this lifelong devotion to the history of American popular song, linking rural and urban, long-gone and contemporary.

Kyle Kegerreis Originally from Indianapolis, bassist Kyle Kegerreis began his career in jazz and rock. He moved to Nashville in 2001 and began touring and recording with a multitude of artists in the Americana, blues, rock, and jazz arenas. For six years, he was the “house bassist” for Mark O’Connor’s fiddle camp in Tennessee and was on faculty at O’Connor’s San Diego String Conference for two summers. He is a regular member of Mark’s American String Celebration Ensemble as well as his Hot Swing Trio. Active on the tour circuit, Kyle has been traveling in the U.S. and Europe as a member of the Carrie Rodriguez Band since 2006 and also performs on tour with legendary songwriter Chip Taylor (“Wild Thing,” “Angel of the Morning”) and the rockabilly band Heavy Trash, the brainchild of Jon Spencer (Blues Explosion) and Matt Verta-Ray (Speedball Baby). Kyle can be heard on Chip Taylor’s recordings New Songs of Freedom and Songs from a Dutch Tour, as well as She Ain’t Me and Live in Louisville with the Carrie Rodriguez Band. He is featured on Carrie’s 2010 album, Love and Circumstance, alongside special guests Bill Frisell, Greg Leisz, and Buddy Miller. Kyle has performed on A Prairie Home Companion, Mountain Stage, World Café, Austin City Limits, and the Grand Ole Opry. Currently residing in Brooklyn, he is also a member of the Triborough Trio with Mike Block and Hans Holzen and performs locally with singer-songwriter Peter Bradley Adams.

Matt’s debut CD Love Story (recorded with his band Brock Mumford) wound up on many critics’ “Best Of” lists, including garnering the number two slot on Amazon’s Top Ten Jazz CDs of 2003. A formidable lyricist (“Jazz musicians aren’t supposed to be able to write lyrics that good” – The Village Voice), his literate songs have been compared to Randy Newman, Mose Allison, and Bob Dorough. He has recently completed work on two new CDs: one was recorded live in Italy with Brock Mumford and the other is his eagerly anticipated exploration of the compositions of quintessential American songwriter Willard Robison.

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Itzhak Perlman, violin Rohan De Silva, piano A Concert Series Event Saturday, January 22, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

further listening see p. 16

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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itzhak perlman

further listening

by jeff hudson How do you define “iconic”? In Itzhak Perlman’s case, one component of the definition is his starring role in high occasions, like his performance at President Obama’s inauguration in January 2009, or his four concerts playing the Mendelssohn Concerto with the New York Philharmonic under conductor Alan Gilbert last September (kicking off the orchestra’s new season), or his appearance on December 1 in the nation’s capital, celebrating the lighting of the National Chanukah Menorah on the Ellipse near the White House. Perlman has now given recitals at the Mondavi Center several times—he has a huge (and very loyal) following. Now 65, he’s spent the last 15 years or so diversifying his musical portfolio. He continues to play the violin, of course. But he also teaches; he and wife Toby launched the Perlman Music Program near their Long Island home in 1993. What began as a two-week summer program grew to the point that a 28-acre campus was acquired in 2000. Perlman also teaches at the Juilliard School. And Perlman spends a portion of his time conducting. He was the music advisor of the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra from 2002-04. And in 2007, he was named the artistic director and principal conductor of the Westchester Philharmonic (in Westchester County, New York). Perlman discussed his portfolio of roles with public television’s Charlie Rose last year. Whether he’s working as the soloist, the conductor, or the teacher, “Everything has to do

with playing,” Perlman said. “Because what happens, when you are in a certain atmosphere, you can get inspired, and involved. But if you think too much of other stuff … if you think you have to practice all the time so that you can become ‘successful,’ it’s not always the right way to go.” Perlman added “If you’re really talented, my rule is: more than five hours a day is not necessary.” Perlman said that he enjoys conducting “because it’s a lot of fun. It involves getting exposed to a lot of repertory I really love, and I haven’t had a chance in the past to be involved in,” such as symphonies by Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, Mozart, and Haydn. He says that “some people think conducting is all about power. I would like to hereby say that it’s not true. The orchestra has the power, not the conductor. If the orchestra does not respect what the conductor does and what the conductor has to say, they will not give out.” You can check out Perlman as both conductor and soloist on his 2003 all-Mozart disc for the EMI label, which includes the Violin Concerto No. 3 and the Symphony No. 41 (“Jupiter.”) Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise, and Sacramento News and Review.

in our lobby The Mondavi Center display previews pieces from: American Gothic: Regionalist Portraiture from the Collection January 15- March 13, 2011 Opening January 15, 11am-5pm One of the inaugural exhibitions at the Nelson Gallery’s new home in the University Club. American Gothic: Regionalist Portraiture from the Collection presents a survey of portraiture over the past 100 years. Through this centennial review a genealogy of stylistic development emerges with a special focus on artists and activities in and around UC Davis and Northern California. The strength of the UC Davis collection allows for a vivid trip through American art history, a colorful story of independent thought and the ongoing fight for liberty and equality.

Gordon Cook: Out There January 15- March 13, 2011 Opening January 15, 11am-5pm One of the inaugural exhibitions at the Nelson Gallery’s new home in the University Club. Guest curator: Bill Berkson Out There, selection of twenty paintings, drawings and lithographs by the San Francisco artist Gordon Cook (1927-1985), will be one of two exhibitions to inaugurate the new quarters of the Richard Nelson Gallery at University of California, Davis. Opening on January 15, 2011, and continuing until March, the Cook show focuses on Cook’s fascination with water views – including many sites in the Sacramento Delta – at the same time giving a strong sense of the wide range of his work.

At the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, we are deeply interested in the visual arts and the ways in which painting, photography, and other forms may enhance the experience of the performing artists we present.

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Itzhak Perlman, violin

Itzhak Perlman, violin Rohan De Silva, piano

Sonata for Violin and Piano in D Major, Op. 9, No. 3 Adagio molto maestoso Allegro Sarabanda: Largo Tambourin: Allegro vivace

Leclair

Sonata No. 7 for Piano and Violin in C Minor, Op. 30, No. 2 Allegro con brio Adagio cantabile Scherzo: Allegro Finale: Allegro

Beethoven

Intermission

Saint-Saëns

Sonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in D Minor, Op. 75 Allegro agitato — Adagio Allegro moderato — Allegro molto

Mr. Perlman records for EMI/Angel, Sony Classical/Sony BMG Masterworks, Deutsche Grammophon, London/Decca, Erato/Elektra International Classics and Telarc. www.itzhakperlman.com Mr. Perlman appears by arrangement with IMG Artists. Carnegie Hall Tower 152 W 57 St., 5th Floor New York, NY 10019

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Itzhak Perlman, violin

Program Notes by Dr. Richard E. Rodda Sonata for Violin and Piano in D Major, Op. 9, No. 3 (1738) Jean-Marie Leclair (Born May 10, 1697, in Lyons, France; died October 22, 1764, in Paris) Jean-Marie Leclair, among the earliest of the great French violinists and composers for his instrument, was one of eight children born to a cellist and master lacemaker in Lyons; all but two of his siblings became professional musicians. Little is known of Leclair’s early life, though he was apparently trained in his father’s trade and spent some time in the family lace business. By the age of 19, however, he was dancing with the ballet of the Lyons Opéra, and six years later he was engaged for a season as principal dancer and choreographer at the Teatro Regio Ducale in Turin. Leclair was also active as a violinist at the time, and composed several sonatas in 1721; while in Turin, he studied the instrument with Giovanni Battista Somis, a pupil of Corelli and conductor at the theater. Leclair moved to Paris in 1723, and came under the patronage of Joseph Bonnier, one of France’s richest men, while he prepared 12 of his violin sonatas for publication as his Op. 1. Leclair returned to Turin in 1726 for two further years of study with Somis, after which he settled again in Paris. Leclair created a sensation with his debut in 1728 as a violinist in his own music at the celebrated Concerts Spirituels, where he appeared regularly for the next eight years. His reputation spread to England, Holland, and Germany, where he was acclaimed on his concert tours. In 1733, he was appointed to Louis XV’s household orchestra, but four years later had a falling out with the violinist Pierre Guignon over who was to serve as concertmaster and resigned. From 1738 to 1743, Leclair held positions at the court of Orange and with a wealthy commoner in The Hague. For a short period in 1744, he was in the employ of the Spanish Prince Don Philippe at his estate at Chambéry in the French Alps, but soon returned to Paris, where he continued to compose and teach a few private students. In 1748, he accepted a position with the Duke of Gramont in the Parisian suburb of Puteaux. Twice married, he separated in 1758 from his second wife, largely retired from public life, and moved to a seedy, distant section of Paris. Cut off from his family, he became reclusive and immersed himself in the study of literature. On the night of October 22, 1764, he was stabbed to death as he entered his house. Among the suspects were the gardener who found the body, Leclair’s nephew (with whom he had recently quarreled), and Mme. Leclair herself; all three were cleared after a police investigation. According to Neal Zaslaw in the New Groves Dictionary of Music and Musicians, “The evidence (in the French Archives Nationales) is so clearly against the nephew, who was a violinist and author of L’arbre généalogique de l’harmonie (1767), that the only remaining mystery is that he was never brought to trial.” Leclair published the dozen violin sonatas of his Op. 9 in Paris in 1738; the third, in D major, is among his best-known creations. The opening movement is stately and processional, a Classicized reworking of the old French ouverture. The following Allegro scampers along in the dashing rhythm and style of a gigue. When the Sarabanda emigrated to Spain from its birthplace in Mexico in the 16th century, it was so wild in its motions and so lascivious in its implications that Cervantes ridiculed it and Philip II suppressed

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it. The dance became considerably more tame when it was taken over into French and English music during the following century, and it had achieved the dignified manner in which it was known to Leclair by 1700. The vivacious Tambourin was a Provençal country dance originally accompanied by a fife and drum (“tambour” in French). Sonata No. 7 for Piano and Violin in C Minor, Op. 30, No. 2 (1802) Ludwig van Beethoven (Born December 16, 1770 in Bonn; died March 26, 1827 in Vienna) In the summer of 1802, Beethoven’s physician ordered him to leave Vienna and take rooms in Heiligenstadt, today a friendly suburb at the northern terminus of the city’s subway system, but two centuries ago a quiet village with a view of the Danube across the river’s rich flood plain. It was three years earlier, in 1799, that Beethoven first noticed a disturbing ringing and buzzing in his ears, and he sought medical attention for the problem soon thereafter. He tried numerous cures for his malady, as well as for his chronic colic, including oil of almonds, hot and cold baths, soaking in the Danube, pills, and herbs. For a short time he even considered the modish treatment of electric shock. On the advice of his latest doctor, Beethoven left the noisy city for the quiet countryside with the assurance that the lack of stimulation would be beneficial to his hearing and his general health. On October 6, 1802, following several months of wrestling with his diminishing hearing (as well as a constant digestive distress and the wreck of a recent affair of the heart—the thought of Beethoven as a husband threatens the moorings of one’s presence of mind!), Beethoven penned the most famous letter ever written by a musician—the “Heiligenstadt Testament.” Intended as a will written to his brothers (it was never sent, though he kept it in his papers to be found after his death), it is a cry of despair over his fate, perhaps a necessary and self-induced soul-cleansing in those pre-Freudian days. “O Providence—grant me at last but one day of pure joy—it is so long since real joy echoed in my heart,” he lamented. But—and this is the miracle—he not only poured his energy into self-pity, he also channeled it into music. The Symphonies Nos. 2-5, a dozen piano sonatas, the Fourth Piano Concerto and the Triple Concerto, Fidelio, three violin and piano sonatas (Op. 30), many songs, chamber works, and keyboard compositions were all composed between 1802 and 1806. The three Op. 30 Sonatas for Piano and Violin that Beethoven completed by the time he returned from Heiligenstadt to Vienna in the middle of October 1802 stand at the threshold of a new creative language, the dynamic and dramatic musical speech that characterizes the creations of his so-called “second period.” The C minor Sonata opens with a pregnant main theme, announced by the piano and echoed by the violin, which, according to British musicologist Samuel Midgley, “is like a taut spring about to snap.” This motive returns throughout the movement both as the pillar of its structural support and as the engine of its tempestuous expression. The second theme is a tiny military march in dotted rhythms. The development section, which commences with bold, slashing chords separated by silences (the exposition is not repeated), encompasses powerful mutations of the two principal themes. A full recapitulation and a large coda round out the movement.


Sonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in D Minor, Op. 75 (1885) Camille Saint-Saëns (Born October 9, 1835 in Paris; died December 16, 1921, in Algiers) Saint-Saëns was nearly 50 before he applied his elegant craft to the composition of a violin sonata. The Sonata in D minor, dedicated to the Belgian violinist and Paris Conservatoire faculty member Martin-Pierre-Joseph Marsick, was composed in 1885, when the composer had finally regained his health on a trip to Algiers after the exhaustion occasioned by the premiere two years earlier of Henry VIII, the fifth of his 13 operas. The Sonata is an evidence of the French interest in the traditional Classical genres of symphony, concerto, and chamber music that flourished following the founding of the Société Nationale in 1871 by Saint-Saëns and some of his colleagues to foster the musical life of the country (and to redress the pervasive influence in France of Germanic Wagnerism after the humiliation of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870). The Violin Sonata No. 1, like Saint-Saëns’ Third Symphony (“Organ”) and Fourth Piano Concerto, is divided into two large parts, each of which contains a pair of linked movements. The opening section of the Sonata is built from two themes: a melody of anxious melancholy in compound triple meter, and a broadly heroic strain given by the violin above the rippling accompaniment of the piano. These handsome themes are juxtaposed until they lead without pause to the Adagio, which is built on a contemplative song entrusted to the violin. The music becomes more animated as it proceeds, but rediscovers its halcyon demeanor by the end of the movement. Part II begins with a sparkling scherzo that recalls similar movements of Mendelssohn in its aerial sprightliness; a long-note melody in the violin provides contrast in the central trio section. The finale, which follows without pause, is an uninhibited display of blazing virtuosity for both participants (Saint-Saëns was a master pianist throughout his life; he practiced for two hours on the morning of the day that he died in Algiers in 1921), one of the greatest showpieces in the violin sonata repertory. ©2011 Dr. Richard E. Rodda

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Itzhak Perlman, violin

The Adagio, one of those inimitable slow movements by Beethoven that seem rapt out of quotidian time, is based on a hymnal melody presented first by the piano and reiterated by the violin. A passage in long notes for the violin above harmonically unsettled arpeggios in the keyboard constitutes the movement’s central section before the opening theme is recalled in an elaborated setting. The coda is dressed with ribbons of scales by the piano. The Scherzo, with its rhythmic surprises and nimble figurations, presents a playful contrast to the surrounding movements. The Finale, which mixes elements of rondo (the frequent returns of the halting motive heard at the beginning) and sonata (the extensive development of the themes), renews the troubled mood of the opening movement to close the expressive and formal cycle of this excellent Sonata.

Itzhak Perlman, violin Undeniably the reigning virtuoso of the violin, Itzhak Perlman enjoys superstar status rarely afforded a classical musician. Beloved for his charm and humanity as well as his talent, he is treasured by audiences throughout the world who respond not only to his remarkable artistry, but also to the irrepressible joy of making music, which he communicates. In 2009, Perlman was honored to take part in the inauguration of President Barack Obama, premiering a piece written for the occasion by John Williams and performing with clarinetist Anthony McGill, pianist Gabriela Montero, and cellist Yo-Yo Ma. In 2003, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts granted Perlman a Kennedy Center Honor celebrating his distinguished achievements and contributions to the cultural and educational life of our nation. In 2007, he performed at the State Dinner for Her Majesty the Queen and His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, hosted by President George W. Bush and Mrs. Bush at the White House. Born in Israel in 1945, Perlman completed his initial training at the Academy of Music in Tel Aviv. He came to New York and soon was propelled into the international arena with an appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1958. Following his studies at the Juilliard School with Ivan Galamian and Dorothy DeLay, Perlman won the prestigious Leventritt Competition in 1964, which led to a burgeoning worldwide career. Since then, Itzhak Perlman has appeared with every major orchestra and in recitals and festivals around the world. Perlman is a frequent presence on the conductor’s podium, and through this medium he is further delighting his audiences. This season marks his third as artistic director of the Westchester Philharmonic Orchestra. He has performed as conductor with the New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, Boston Symphony, National Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and the symphony orchestras of San Francisco, Dallas, Houston, Pittsburgh, Seattle, Montreal, and Toronto, as well as at the Ravinia and OK Mozart festivals. He was Music Advisor of the St. Louis Symphony from 2002-04 where he made regular conducting appearances, and he was Principal Guest Conductor of the Detroit Symphony from 2001-05. This season, he conducts the Indianapolis, Atlanta, Toronto, and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestras. Internationally, Perlman has conducted the Berlin Philharmonic, Concertgebouw Orchestra, London Philharmonic, English Chamber Orchestra, and the Israel Philharmonic. Perlman’s 2010-11 season will take his performances as soloist to both new and familiar major centers throughout the world. In fall 2010, he went to Chile and Brazil, with orchestral performances in Santiago and recitals in Rio de Janeiro, Paulinia, and Sao Paulo. In October, he once again thrilled audiences in Japan and South Korea with nine recitals with pianist and frequent collaborator Rohan De Silva. He joins the New York Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall for its opening subscription week under Music Director Alan Gilbert. Other highlights of his 2010-11 season include a special performance with the Chicago Symphony to benefit the Rotary Foundation’s campaign, End Polio Now; a performance with the Toronto Symphony at Carnegie Hall; and recitals across North America including in San Francisco, Los Angeles, West Palm Beach, and San Antonio. Perlman also appears with students and alumni from the Perlman Music Program at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Terrace Theater

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at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and the McCarter Theatre in Princeton, New Jersey. A major presence in the performing arts on television, Itzhak Perlman has been honored with four Emmy Awards, most recently for the PBS documentary Fiddling for the Future, a film about the Perlman Music Program and his work as a teacher and conductor there. In 2004, PBS aired Perlman in Shanghai, which chronicled a historic and unforgettable visit of the Perlman Music Program to China, featuring interaction between American and Chinese students and culminating in a concert at the Shanghai Grand Theater and a performance with 1,000 young violinists, led by Perlman and broadcast throughout China. Perlman’s third Emmy Award recognized his dedication to klezmer music, as profiled in the 1995 PBS television special In the Fiddler’s House, which was filmed in Poland and featured him performing with four of the world’s finest klezmer bands. Perlman has entertained and enlightened millions of TV viewers of all ages on popular shows as diverse as The Late Show with David Letterman, Sesame Street, the PBS series The Frugal Gourmet, The Tonight Show, the Grammy awards telecasts, numerous Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts, including The Juilliard School: Celebrating 100 Years in 2006, and PBS specials, including A Musical Toast and Mozart by the Masters, in which he served both as host and featured performer. In 2008, Perlman joined renowned chef Jacques Pépin on Artist’s Table to discuss the relationship between the culinary and musical arts. Perlman lent his voice as the narrator of Visions of Israel, the 20th program in WLIW New York’s acclaimed Visions series, which premiered on PBS in 2008. In 1994, Perlman hosted the live U.S. broadcast of the Three Tenors, Encore! from Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. In 2006, a worldwide audience in the hundreds of millions saw Perlman perform live on the 78th Annual Academy Awards telecast, as he performed a medley from the five film scores nominated in the category of Best Original Score. One of Perlman’s proudest achievements is his collaboration with composer John Williams in Steven Spielberg’s Academy Award-winning film Schindler’s List, in which he performed the violin solos. He can also be heard as the violin soloist on the soundtrack of Zhang Yimou’s film Hero (music by Tan Dun) and Rob Marshall’s Memoirs of a Geisha (music by John Williams). In 2008, Itzhak Perlman was honored with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award for excellence in the recording arts. His recordings regularly appear on the best-seller charts and have garnered 15 Grammy Awards. His most recent releases include an all-Mozart recording with the Berlin Philharmonic (EMI) with Perlman performing as both soloist and conductor and a recording for Deutsche Grammophon with Perlman conducting the Israel Philharmonic. Other recordings reveal Perlman’s devotion to education, including Concertos from my Childhood with the Juilliard Orchestra under Lawrence Foster (EMI) and Marita and Her Heart’s Desire, composed and conducted by Bruce Adolphe (Telarc). Other recordings over the past decade have included a Grammy-nominated live recording with pianist Martha Argerich performing Beethoven and Franck sonatas (EMI); Cinema Serenade, featuring popular hits from movies with John Williams conducting (Sony); A la Carte, a recording of short violin pieces with orchestra (EMI), and In the Fiddler’s House, a celebration of klezmer music (EMI) that formed the basis of the PBS television special. In 2004, EMI released The Perlman Edition, a limited-edi-

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tion 15-CD box set featuring many of his finest EMI recordings as well as newly compiled material, and RCA Red Seal released a CD titled Perlman reDISCOVERED, which includes material recorded in 1965 by a young Itzhak Perlman. Perlman has a long association with the Israel Philharmonic, and he has participated in many groundbreaking tours with this orchestra from his homeland. In 1987, he joined the IPO for history-making concerts in Warsaw and Budapest, representing the first performances by this orchestra and soloist in Eastern bloc countries. He again made history as he joined the orchestra for its first visit to the Soviet Union in 1990, and was cheered by audiences in Moscow and Leningrad who thronged to hear his recital and orchestral performances. This visit was captured on a PBS documentary Perlman in Russia, which won an Emmy. In 1994, Perlman joined the Israel Philharmonic for its first visits to China and India. Over the past decade, Perlman has become more actively involved in educational activities. He has taught full time at the Perlman Music Program each summer since it was founded and currently holds the Dorothy Richard Starling Foundation Chair at the Juilliard School. Numerous publications and institutions have paid tribute to Itzhak Perlman for the unique place he occupies in the artistic and humanitarian fabric of our times. Harvard, Yale, Brandeis, Roosevelt, Yeshiva, and Hebrew universities are among the institutions which have awarded him honorary degrees. He was awarded an honorary doctorate and a centennial medal on the occasion of Juilliard’s 100th commencement ceremony in 2005. President Reagan honored Perlman with a Medal of Liberty in 1986, and in 2000, President Clinton awarded Perlman the National Medal of Arts. His presence on stage, on camera, and in personal appearances of all kinds speaks eloquently on behalf of the disabled, and his devotion to that cause is an integral part of Perlman’s life. Rohan De Silva, Piano Rohan De Silva’s partnerships with violin virtuosos Itzhak Perlman, Cho-Liang Lin, Midori, Joshua Bell, Benny Kim, Kyoko Takezawa, Vadim Repin, Gil Shaham, Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, and Julian Rachlin have led to highly acclaimed performances at recital venues all over the world. With these and other artists he has performed at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall and Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center, Library of Congress, Philadelphia Academy of Music, Ambassador Theater in Los Angeles, Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Wigmore Hall in London, Suntory Hall in Tokyo, the Mozarteum in Salzburg, La Scala in Milan, and in Tel Aviv, Israel. His festival appearances include the Aspen, Interlochen, Manchester, Ravinia, and Schleswig-Holstein festivals, the Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo, Japan, and the Wellington Arts Festival in New Zealand. He performs frequently with Itzhak Perlman and was seen with Perlman on PBS’s Live from Lincoln Center broadcast in 2000. De Silva regularly tours Japan with Perlman, and in 2002, they toured the Far East, including performances in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. In 2006, he toured with Perlman and Pinchas Zukerman, including stops in Chicago, Boston, New York, and Washington, D. C. In 2009, De Silva performed with Perlman in Mexico City and in recital at the Moscow Conservatory. In 2010, De Silva appeared in recital with Perlman throughout tours of Japan, South Korea, and South America. De Silva has been a faculty member at the Perlman Music Program on Long Island since 2000. De Silva


Itzhak Perlman, violin

and Perlman performed at the State Dinner for Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip at the White House in 2007.

January

De Silva, a native of Sri Lanka, began his piano studies with his mother, the late Primrose De Silva, and with Mary Billimoria. He spent six years at the Royal Academy of Music in London as a student of Hamish Milne, Sydney Griller, and Wilfred Parry. While in London, he received many awards, including the Grover Bennett Scholarship, Christian Carpenter Prize, Martin Music Scholarship, Harold Craxton Award for advanced study in England, and, upon his graduation, the Chappell Gold Medal for best overall performance at the Royal Academy. De Silva was the first recipient of a special scholarship in the arts from the Presidents Fund of Sri Lanka. This enabled him to enter the Juilliard School, where he received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music, studying piano with Martin Canin, chamber music with Felix Galimir, and working closely with violin pedagogue Dorothy DeLay. He was awarded a special prize as Best Accompanist at the 1990 Ninth International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow. He received the Samuel Sanders Collaborative Artist Award presented to him by Itzhak Perlman at the 2005 Classical Recording Foundation Awards Ceremony at Carnegie Hall. Rohan De Silva joined the collaborative arts and chamber music faculty of the Juilliard School in 1991, and in 1992, he was awarded honorary Associate of the Royal Academy of Music. In 2001, he joined the faculty at the Ishikawa Music Academy in Japan, where he gives master classes in collaborative piano. Radio and television credits include The Tonight Show with Midori, CNN’s Showbiz Today, NHK Television in Japan, National Public Radio, WQXR and WNYC in New York, and Berlin Radio. He has recorded for Deutsche Grammophon, CBS/SONY Classical, Collins Classics in London, and RCA Victor.

Complimentary wine pours in the Bartholomew Room for Inner Circle Donors. Pouring Hagafen Wines on: Jan 22

Itzhak Perlman

Jan 26

Daniel Handler

Sponsored by

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Hyatt P lace is a proud sponsor

of The robert and margrit Mondavi Center for the performing arts, UC Davis

Hyatt Place UC Davis 173 Old Davis Road Extension Davis, CA 95616, USA Phone: +1 530 756 9500 Fax: +1 530 297 6900

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Daniel Handler

Why Does Lemony Snicket Keep Following Me? A Distinguished Speakers Series Event Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Post-Performance Q&A Moderated by Lucy Corin, Associate Professor, UC Davis Department of English

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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Voted “Best Place to Eat Before a Mondavi Center Performance.” —Sacramento Magazine (2010) Offering Private INDOOR & OUTDOOR Dining Rooms

Perfect for your next:  Cocktail Reception  Company Mixer  Family Reunion  Retirement Party  or Special Occasion 102 F Street, Davis | (530) 750-1801 www.seasonsdavis.com

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daniel handler

Daniel Handler (a.k.a Lemony Snicket)

D

aniel Handler is the author of the literary novels The Basic Eight, Watch Your Mouth, and, most recently, Adverbs. Under the name Lemony Snicket, he has also written a sequence of books for children, known collectively as A Series of Unfortunate Events, which have sold more than 60 million copies and were the basis of a feature film. His intricate and witty writing style has won him numerous fans for his critically acclaimed literary work and his wildly successful children’s books.

Born and raised in San Francisco, Handler attended Wesleyan University and returned to his hometown after graduating. He co-founded the magazine American Chickens! with illustrator Lisa Brown (with whom he soon became smitten). They moved to New York City, where Handler eventually sold his first novel after working as a book and film critic for several newspapers. He continued to write, and he and his wife returned to San Francisco, where they now live with their son Otto. Handler has worked intermittently in film and music, most recently in collaboration with composer Nathaniel Stookey on a piece commissioned and recorded by the San Francisco Symphony, The Composer Is Dead, which has been performed all over the world and is now a book with CD. An adjunct accordionist for the music group the Magnetic Fields, he is also the author of Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Biography, The Beatrice Letters, Horseradish: Bitter Truths You Can’t Avoid, and two books for Christmas: The Lump of Coal and The Latke Who Couldn’t Stop Screaming: a Christmas story. He is the screenwriter of the film Rick, a revamp of the Verdi opera Rigoletto, and the film adaptation of Joel Rose’s novel Kill the Poor. Handler has written for The New York Times, Newsday, San Francisco Chronicle, The Believer, Chickfactor, and various anthologies, and was the chair of the Judging Panel for the National Book Awards in Young People’s Literature in 2008. His current projects include a fourth novel for adults, a children’s picture book titled 13 Words in collaboration with Maira Kalman, and the script for the long-awaited second Snicket movie. He is also at work on a top-secret new Snicket series.

Indulge

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BALLET DIRECTOR

RON CUNNINGHAM ISSUE #6

PLAYWRIGHT

GREGG COFFIN ISSUE #7

TONY WINNER

FAITH PRINCE ISSUE #8 ACTOR

COLIN HANKS ISSUE #15

PERFORMANCE ARTIST

DAVID GARIBALDI ISSUE #16

BROADWAY STAR

MARA DAVI ISSUE #19

Available at Raley's, Nugget Markets, Borders and Barnes & Noble.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MOMIX Botanica A Marvels Series Event Saturday, January 29, 2011 • 8PM Sunday, January 30, 2011 • 3PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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MOMIX

BOTANICA PRESENTED BY

MOMIX

Artistic Director MOSES PENDLETON with

TSARRA BEQUETTE, AARON CANFIELD, JOSH CHRISTOPHER, JONATHAN EDEN, EDDY FERNANDEZ, RIE HYODO, ROB LAQUI, JENNY LEVY, EMILY MCARDLE, and SARAH NACHBAUER Associate Director CYNTHIA QUINN Lighting Design JOSHUA STARBUCK

Costume Design Puppet Design PHOEBE KATZIN MICHAEL CURRY Production Electrician BECCA BALL Production Stage Manager CORRADO VERINI Company Manger CARLA DEBEASI RUIZ

MOMIX • Box 1035 Washington, Connecticut 06793 Tel: 860.868.7454 Fax: 860.868.2317 Email: momix@snet.net Website: www.momix.com Representation: Margaret Selby CAMI Spectrum LLC 1790 Broadway, NYC, NY 10019-1412 Ph: 212.841.9554 Fax: 212.841.9770 e-mail: mselby@cami.com

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MOMIX

BOTANICA Conceived & Directed by:

MOSES PENDLETON

First Assistant:

CYNTHIA QUINN

Assisted by:

Tsarra Bequette, Eric Borne, Jennifer Chicheportiche, Joshua Christopher, John Corsa, Simona Ditucci, Jonathan Eden, Michael Holdsworth, Donatello Iacobellis, Rob Laqui, Natalie Lamonte, Nicole Loizides, Heather Magee, Steven Marshall, Tim Melady, Sarah Nachbauer, Roberto Olvera, Cynthia Quinn, Rebecca Rasmussen, Brian Sanders, Pedro Silva, Cassandra Taylor, Jaime Verazin & Jared Wootan

Performed by:

Tsarra Bequette, Aaron Canfield, Josh Christopher, Jonathan Eden, Eddy Fernandez, Rie Hyodo, Rob Laqui, Jenny Levy, Emily McArdle, and Sarah Nachbauer

Lighting Design: Costume Design: Costume Construction: Costume Assistants: Puppet Design: Prop Construction and Art Work: Video Projection: Video Editing: Music Collage: Music Editing: Production Assistant:

Joshua Starbuck and Moses Pendleton Phoebe Katzin, Moses Pendleton, Cynthia Quinn Phoebe Katzin Beryl Taylor, Dawn Arico, Danielle McFall Michael Curry Pedro Silva Moses Pendleton Woodrow F. Dick III Moses Pendleton Joshua Christopher, Andrew Hansen, Brian Simerson Pedro Silva

Lighting Equipment Supplied by GSD Productions, Inc., West Hempstead, NY

Special Thanks: Sharon Dante, Nutmeg Ballet; James Patrick, Warner Theatre; Diana Vishneva; Phillip Holland; Joan Talbot; Laura Daly; Julio Alvarez and Margaret Selby

BOTANICA “The plant strains its whole being in one single plan: to escape above ground from the fatality below; to elude and transgress the dark and weighty law, to free itself, to break the narrow sphere, to invent or invoke wings, to escape as far as possible, to conquer the space wherein fate encloses it, to approach another kingdom, to enter a moving, animated world.”

—Maurice Maeterlinck, The Intelligence of Flowers

Performance time is approximately 110 minutes.

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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MOMIX

Botanica Soundtrack: 1. Tuu, “Frozen Land” from the album The Frozen Lands (Amplexus Records). Composed and performed by Martin Franklin. And BlueTech, “Leaving Babylon” from the album Prima Materia. www.waveformrecords.com. 2. BlueTech, “Cliff Diving” the album Prima Materia. www.waveformrecords.com. 3. zer0 0ne, “NaNO” and “braiNwavE” from the album oz0ne. www.waveformrecords.com. And Lang Elliot, “Loons” from Nature Sound Studio. 4. Lisa Gerrard, “Space Weaver.” Written by Lisa Gerrard and Michael Edwards. Performed by Lisa Gerrard. 5. Delerium, “Amongst the Ruins.” Performed by Delerium. Written by B.Leeb. Sample of “Trance Mission” under license from City of Tribes Communication and A Train Management. 6. Transglobal Underground, “This is the Army of Forgotten Souls” from the album, Dream of 100 Nations. 7. Robert Rich, “Elemental Trigger” from the album Stalker. “Elemental Trigger” ©1995 by Robert Rich and Brian Williams. 8. Vivaldi’s Four Seasons: Primavera as played by Anne-Sofie Muter. 9. Lang Elliot, “Winter Wren” from Nature Sound Studio 10. Suphala, “Destinations” on “The Now.” 11. Eastern Dub Tactick, “Easter Winds” and “Spark of Sound” from the album Blood is Shining. www.waveformrecords.com. 12. Legion of Green Men, “Zero Equals Infinity” from the album Spatial Specifics. 13. Peter Gabriel, “The Heat” Peter Gabriel appears courtesy of Peter Gabriel Lts., Special thanks to Julie Lipsius and Rob Bozas. 14. Peter Gabriel, “Slow Water” Peter Gabriel appears courtesy of Peter Gabriel Lts., Special thanks to Julie Lipsius and Rob Bozas. 15. Delerium, “Sphere.” Performed by Delerium. Written by B. Leeb and R. Fulber. 16. Deva Premal, “Gayatri Mantra” is used in this performance with permission of Prabhu Misoc. Music composed by Deva Premal and Miten. 17. Delerium, “Embryo.” Performed by Delerium. Written by B. Leeb and R. Fulber. And Higher Intelligence Agency, “Hubble” from the album Freefloater. 18. A Positive Life, “Aqua Sonic” from the album Two A.D. www.waveformrecords.com. 19. Lloyd Grotjan, “Apogee” from the album Twelve Moons. 20. BlueTech, “Mezzamorphic” from the album Prima Materia. www.waveformrecords.com. 21. Celtic Woman, “The Voice” from the album A New Journey. 22. Azam Ali, “Aj Ondas” on Portals of Grace. 23. Brent Lewis, “Mr. Mahalo Head,” written and performed by Brent Lewis www.brentlewis.com.

*Aqua Flora sponsored in part by Brandon Fradd in honor of Dancers Responding to Aids

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MOMIX

SYNAPSES PART ONE WINTER SPRING

PART TWO

Aurora Rose The Dead Of Winter Cateraction Geese Return Overhead Beckoning Fantasy Tree-Flower to Tempt Three Graces from the Foam to Taste of Pollen Snow And Fall Back into the Flow

God’s Hammer August of Wind Storms Rain The Beaded Web INSEX Meet the Beetles and Egg On Birds of a Feather to Drop Seed on Sun Flower

Loons Laugh in Darkness for Swans to Dream of Genesis and New Green

Finches Startled by the Avant Gardner as the Green Man is Leading the Charge of Indian Summer

Fro ZEN Awakening Love from Above Delivers Persephone to the Subsoil Riding Old Bones to Romance with Ancient Stones

Branches Gathering for Autumnal Ball Last Leaf Catches the First Snow Fall

The Worm Turns Night Crawlers into a Sea of Green Spring Pools Marigolds Bloom Hornets Hop Owls Hoot the Arrival of Centaurs Amid Summer Night’s Dream Fire Flies

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

SUMMER FALL

Cold River Runs Again But There’s More a Solar Flare Tonight’s Encore!

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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MOMIX

About the Company MOMIX is a company of dancer-illusionists under the direction of Moses Pendleton. In addition to stage performances worldwide, MOMIX has worked in film and television, recently appearing in a national commercial for Hanes underwear and a Target ad that premiered during the airing of the 67th Annual Golden Globe Awards. With performances on PBS’s Dance in America series, France’s Antenne II, and Italian RAI television, the company’s repertory has been broadcast to 55 countries. Joining the Montreal Symphony in the Rhombus Media film of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, winner of an International Emmy for Best Performing Arts Special, the company’s performance was distributed on laser disc by Decca Records. MOMIX was also featured in IMAGINE, one of the first 3-D IMAX films to be released in IMAX theaters world-wide. MOMIX dancers Cynthia Quinn and Karl Baumann, under Moses Pendleton’s direction, played the role of Bluey in the feature film FX2, and White Widow, co-choreographed by Moses Pendleton and Cynthia Quinn, was featured in Robert Altman’s movie The Company. Participating in the Homage a Picasso in Paris, the company was also selected to represent the U.S. at the European Cultural Center at Delphi. With the support of the Scottsdale Cultural Council/Scottsdale Center for the Arts in Scottsdale, Arizona, Pendleton created Bat Habits to celebrate the opening of the San Francisco Giants’ new spring training park in Scottsdale. This work served as the forerunner of Baseball and joins such acclaimed original productions as Lunar Sea, Opus Cactus, Orbit, Passion, and Botanica. With nothing more than light and shadow, props, the human body, and an epic imagination, MOMIX has astonished audiences on five continents for more than 30 years. Who’s Who in the Company Moses Pendleton (Artistic Director) has been one of America’s most innovative and widely performed choreographers and directors for more than 40 years. A founding member of the groundbreaking Pilobolus Dance Theater in 1971, he formed his own company, MOMIX, in 1980. Pendleton has also worked extensively in film, TV, and opera and as a choreographer for ballet companies and special events. Pendleton was born and raised on a dairy farm in northern Vermont. His earliest experiences as a showman came from exhibiting his family’s dairy cows at the Caledonian County Fair. He received his B.A. in English literature from Dartmouth College in 1971 and immediately began touring with Pilobolus, which had grown out of dance classes with Alison Chase at Dartmouth. The group shot to fame in the1970s, performing on Broadway under the sponsorship of Pierre Cardin, touring internationally, and appearing in PBS’s Dance in America and Great Performances series. By the end of the decade, Pendleton had begun to work outside of Pilobolus, performing in and serving as principal choreographer for the Paris Opera’s Integrale Erik Satie in 1979 and choreographing the Closing Ceremonies of the Winter Olympics at Lake Placid in 1980. In 1981, he created MOMIX, which rapidly established an international reputation for highly inventive and often illusionistic choreography. The troupe has been touring steadily and is currently performing several programs internationally. The company has made numerous special programs for Italian and French television and received the Gold Medal of the Verona Festival in 1994.

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Pendleton has also been active as a performer and choreographer for other companies. He has staged Picabia’s Dadaist ballet Relache for the Joffrey Ballet and Tutuguri, based on the writings of Artaud, for the Deutsch Opera. He created the role of the Fool for Yuri Lyubimov’s production of Mussorgsky’s Khovanschina at La Scala and choreographed Rameau’s Platee for the U.S. Spoleto Festival in 1987. He contributed choreography to Lina Wertmuller’s production of Carmen at the Munich State Opera in 1993. More recently, he has choreographed new works for the Arizona Ballet and the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. He teamed up with Danny Ezralow and David Parsons to choreograph AEROS with the Romanian gymnastics team. His film and television work includes the feature film FX2, Moses Pendleton Presents Moses Pendleton for ABC ARTS cable (winner of a Cine Golden Eagle award), and Pictures at an Exhibition with Charles Dutoit and the Montreal Symphony, which received an International Emmy for Best Performing Arts Special in 1991. He has also made music videos with Prince, Julian Lennon, and Cathy Dennis, among others. Pendleton is an avid photographer with works presented in Rome, Milan, Florence, and Aspen. Images of his sunflower plantings at his home in northwestern Connecticut have been featured in numerous books and articles on gardening. He is the subject of the book Salto di Gravita by Lisavetta Scarbi, published in Italy in 1999. Pendleton was a recipient of the Connecticut Commission on the Arts Governor’s Award in 1998. He received the Positano Choreographic Award in 1999 and was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1977. He is a recipient of a 2002 American Choreography Award for his contributions to choreography for film and television. In 2010, Pendleton received an honorary doctorate of fine arts and delivered the keynote address to the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Cynthia Quinn (Associate Director) grew up in southern California, graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of California, Riverside, and continued there as an Associate in Dance for five years. In 1988, she received the university’s Alumni Association’s “Outstanding Young Graduate Award.” As a member of Pilobolus, she performed on Broadway and throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Israel, and Japan. Quinn began performing with MOMIX in 1983 and has since toured throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, South America, and Japan. She has assisted Moses Pendleton in the choreography of Pulcinella for the Ballet Nancy in France, Tutuguri for the Berlin Opera Ballet, Platee for the Spoleto Festival USA, Les Maries de la Tour Eiffel in New York, AccorDION for the Zurich-Vorbuhne Theatre, and Carmen for the Munich State Opera. She has also appeared as a guest artist with the Ballet Theatre Francaise de Nancy, the Berlin Opera Ballet, and the Munich State Opera. Quinn made her film debut as “Bluey” (a role she shared with Karl Baumann) in FX2. She was a featured performer in the Emmy Award-winning film Pictures at an Exhibition with the Montreal Symphony. Quinn is a board member of the Nutmeg Conservatory in Torrington, Connecticut, and is on the advisory board of the Susan B. Anthony Project, also in Torrington. Quinn is co-choreographer of “White Widow,” which is featured prominently in the Robert Altman film The Company. Quinn will also appear in the upcoming film First Born with Elisabeth Shue.


Aaron Canfield (Dancer) from Baltimore, Maryland, received his training from Southwest Virginia Ballet with Pedro Szalay, Post School of Ballet with Terri Post, New Castle School of Dance with Sandra Smeltzer, and was a trainee with the Richmond Ballet for two years. He has been a guest artist with the Lexington Ballet, Una Dance Theatre, Community Dance Connection Theatre, Rockingham Ballet Theatre, and Southwest Virginia Ballet. In addition to his dance training, Aaron has a first degree black belt in Taekwondo and was a national medalist for four consecutive years. Joshua Christopher (Dancer) is a native of Michigan, where he began dancing under the tutelage of Jefferson Baum. He attended North Carolina School of the Arts, and graduated with his B.F.A. in dance. Joshua also studied for a short time with the Hungarian National Ballet Academy in Budapest. He has worked with South African Ballet Theatre, the Hungarian National Opera, Kansas City Ballet, and Ballet Tucson, as well as on other projects such as Quixotic Performance Fusion. Josh joined MOMIX in 2005. Jonathan Eden (Dancer/Dance Capt.) was born in Columbia, South Carolina. Jonathan began studying dance with Debbie Spivey at the Classical Youth Ballet of Columbia. He later attended the Nutmeg Conservatory for the Arts and graduated from its two-year residency program. Jonathan joined MOMIX in 2004. Eddy Fernandez (Dancer) is native of West Palm Beach, Florida. He began dancing as part of the performing organization called the Young Americans. Eddy continued his studies at Chapman University in Orange County, where he received his B.A. in dance in 2009. Rob Laqui (Dancer) hails from Minnesota, where he received a B.F.A. in musical theater performance from Saint Mary’s University. He has performed with numerous theater/dance companies, including Cardinal Theatricals, LaMama etc., Tamar Rogoff Performance Projects, H. T. Chen and Dancers, LOCO 7, Nicholas Andre Dance Theatre, and many others. Rob joined MOMIX in 2004. Emily McArdle (Dancer) trained at both the McArdle Schools of Irish Dance (championship) and the Nutmeg Conservatory for the Arts. Emily trained at such prestigious ballet schools as SAB, HARID Conservatory, Boston Ballet, Washington School of Ballet, and the Joffrey Ballet, as well as work with the world-renowned Tony Nolan of the Irish Dance Commission. In 2008, Emily performed on the national tour of Magic Tree House: The Musical as featured dancer. When she isn’t on the road with MOMIX, Emily can be found performing throughout Manhattan with Niall O’Leary’s Dance Troupe. This is Emily’s fifth season with MOMIX. Sarah Nachbauer(Dancer/Dance Capt.) began dancing in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, with the Albany Berkshire Ballet, Terpsichore Dance Theatre, and Jacob’s Pillow. She moved to Boston, where she studied with the Emerson Dance Ensemble and Prometheus Dance Company and then attended Boston Conservatory, where she received her B.F.A. Sarah has been honored with a Best of Boston Award and was Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MOMIX

Tsarra Bequette (Dancer) was born in Boise, Idaho, and received her earliest dance training from Leah Clark, director of Balance Dance Company. She studied with Jeff and Cathy Giese at the dance academy of Ballet Idaho and served as an apprentice to the company. After receiving her B.F.A. in dance from Boston Conservatory, Bequette performed with the Adam Miller Dance Project in Body Art before joining MOMIX in 2007.

a recipient of the Ruth Sandholm Ambrose Award. Nachbauer has taught at the Nutmeg Conservatory for the Arts and at a residency with the Moscow Ballet. Sarah joined MOMIX in 2003. Becca Ball (Production Electrician/Stage Manager) is a native Philadelphian and graduate of Oberlin College. She completed the Juilliard Professional Intern Program in Electrics in 2006 and works as a freelance production manager, master electrician, lighting designer, and theater technician in New York City. She has served as a production stage manager at the American Dance Festival, as technical director for Doug Varone, and as electrician/ projection technician for Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Becca joined MOMIX in 2006. Michael Curry (Puppet Design) has worked on numerous Broadway shows, including Crazy For You and Kiss of the Spider Woman. He was awarded the 1998 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Puppet Design for The Lion King and the 1999 Eddy Award for Outstanding Contribution in the Technical and Design Field. Michael owns and operates Michael Curry Design, Inc. in St. Helens, Oregon, which produces large, live-performance oriented production designs, such as those seen at the 1996 Olympic Opening Ceremonies, Super Bowl 2000, and New York City’s Times Square 2000 Millennium event. Phoebe Katzin (Costume Designer) has been designing and constructing dresses and costumes for more than 20 years. After graduating from Endicott College’s fashion design program, she worked for Kitty Daly, building dance costumes, and dressmaking. For several years she lived in New York making costumes for Kitty Leach, Greg Barnes, and Allison Conner, among others. For the past few years, she has been working for MOMIX and Pilobolus. Katzin lives in Connecticut with her three children and husband, James. Carla Debeasi Ruiz (Company Manager) graduated from Western Kentucky University with a degree in public relations and a concentration in performing arts management. Ruiz was the public relations director for her alma mater’s Theatre and Dance Department. She studied photojournalism under NPPA Lifetime Achievement award winner Michael Morse and interned at Vanderbilt Hospital as a surgical photographer. Carla joined MOMIX in 2007. Joshua Starbuck (Lighting Designer) collaborated with Moses Pendleton on his world premiere of Opus Cactus for Ballet Arizona. He has designed numerous productions and tours for Ballet Arizona. He has toured five continents with many of his designs for dance, ice skating, opera, industrials, concerts, and theater. He has designed for Arena Stage, Playwrights Horizons, the Manhattan Theater Club, the Public Theater, Coconut Grove Playhouse, Walnut Street Theater, Williamstown Theater Festival, and others. He has also worked with the Kirov Ballet, Royal Ballet, Spanish National Ballet, and English National Ballet. Corrado Verini (Production Stage Manager) began his career in the theater world in 1983 with the Lindsay Kemp Co. In 1994, he started touring with MOMIX as Stage Manager and then Technical and Lighting Director, participating in extensive tours in Asia, Central America, and North America. He also teaches Theater Techniques in Rome for European Community and Region Lazio projects.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Simone Dinnerstein and Tift Merritt Night A Studio Classics: Crossings Series Event Saturday, January 29, 2011 • 8PM Sunday, January 30, 2011 • 2PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Pre-Performance Talk Speakers: Simone Dinnerstein and Tift Merritt in conversation with Lara Downes, Artist in Residence, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Saturday, January 29, 2011 • 7PM Sunday, January 30, 2011 • 1PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 5: Jan–Feb 2011

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35


Simone Dinnerstein and Tift Merritt

The Dinnerstein – Merritt Collaboration Though Simone Dinnerstein—a classical pianist—and Tift Merritt—a singer-songwriter whose father taught her to play by ear—could not come from more different musical backgrounds, when the two met they immediately realized that their passion for music and performance were kindred, if not the same. Night is a unique collaboration between these two artists in which they unite classical, folk, and rock musical worlds, exploring common terrain and uncovering new musical landscapes.  Night features a set of new songs written especially for the duo by artists including Brad Mehldau, Patty Griffin, and Philip Lasser. Jenny Scheinman, whose previous collaborators include Bill Frissell, David Byrne, and Madeleine Peyroux, has contributed arrangements of some of Tift’s and Simone’s favorite songs. Both artists will perform solo as well—Tift in her own songs, and Simone in some of her favorite selections from the solo classical piano repertoire.  Grammy-nominated songstress Tift Merritt is a North Carolina native. With her longtime band, she has built a unique and critically acclaimed body of work of sonic short stories and poignant performances. The Wall Street Journal reports that she has a “sound that weaves through country, folk and rock…working in the tradition of Joni Mitchell, James Taylor, and Leonard Cohen.” Of her latest album, See You on the Moon (Fantasy), Paste Magazine raves, “The singer fully inhabits the characters in her songs, whether assuming the role of her grandfather in ‘Feel Of The World’ or wringing out every weary note in the pleading ‘All the Reasons We Don’t Have to Fight.’”  Simone Dinnerstein has been called “the pianists’ pianist of Generation X” by The New Yorker and praised by Time for her “arresting freshness and subtlety.” The New York-based pianist gained an international following because of the remarkable success of her recording of Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Released in 2007 on Telarc, it ranked No. 1 on the Billboard Classical Chart in its first week of sales and was named to many “Best of 2007” lists, including those of The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and New Yorker. In 2008, the recording received the prestigious Diapason d’Or Award in France. Her follow-up album, The Berlin Concert, also gained the No. 1 spot on the chart.

Simone Dinnerstein Known for her intelligent and emotionally powerful performances, Simone Dinnerstein has been called “a throwback to such high priestesses of music as Wanda Landowska and Myra Hess,” by Slate. Dinnerstein recently signed an exclusive recording agreement with Sony Classical. Her first album, to be released in early 2011, will be an all-Bach disc with Kammerorchester der Staatskapelle Berlin. Dinnerstein’s performance schedule has taken her around the world since her triumphant New York recital debut at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall in 2005, performing Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Recent and upcoming performances include recitals at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Berlin Philharmonie, Vienna Konzerthaus, Lincoln Center Mostly

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Mozart Festival, La Roqued’Anthéron International Piano Festival, Festival of Radio France and Montpellier, and the Aspen and Ravinia festivals; as well as in Cologne, Paris, London, Tokyo, Copenhagen, Vilnius, Bremen, Rome, and Lisbon, and at the Stuttgart Bach Festival. Highlights also include debut performances with the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, Dresden Philharmonic, Czech Philharmonic, New York Philharmonic, Minnesota Orchestra, Atlanta Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra of St. Luke’s, Kristjan Järvi’s Absolute Ensemble, Tokyo Symphony, Verdi Orchestra in Milan, and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. In New York, she has performed on Lincoln Center’s Great Performers series, and in three sold-out recitals at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She is also a frequent performer at (Le) Poisson Rouge, a club presenting all genres of music in the West Village. Dinnerstein has played concerts throughout the United States for the Piatigorsky Foundation, an organization dedicated to bringing classical music to non-traditional venues. Among the places she has played are nursing homes, schools, and community centers. Most notably, she gave the first classical music performance in the Louisiana state prison system when she played at the Avoyelles Correctional Center. She also performed at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women, in a concert organized by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra to coincide with her BSO debut. In addition, Dinnerstein founded P.S. 321 Neighborhood Concerts, an evening concert series at the Brooklyn public elementary school that her son attends and where her husband teaches fifth grade. The concerts, which feature musicians Dinnerstein has admired and collaborated with during her career, is open to the public and raises funds for the school’s Parent Teacher Association. The musicians performing donate their time and talent to the program. Over the past few years, Dinnerstein has been featured in Gramophone, BBC Music Magazine, Classic FM Magazine, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, “O” The Oprah Magazine, Time. com, Slate.com, Sunday (London) Times Magazine, Daily Telegraph, The Independent, The Guardian, and Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, among others, and has appeared on radio programs including BBC Radio 3’s In Tune, BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour, NPR’s Morning Edition, Public Radio International’s Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, American Public Media’s Performance Today, Minnesota Public Radio, XM Radio’s Classical Confidential, and on national television in Germany. Dinnerstein is a graduate of the Juilliard School where she was a student of Peter Serkin. She was a winner of the Astral Artist National Auditions and has twice received the Classical Recording Foundation Award. She also studied with Solomon Mikowsky at the Manhattan School of Music and in London with Maria Curcio, the distinguished pupil of Artur Schnabel. Simone Dinnerstein lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and son. She is managed by Tanja Dorn at IMG Artists and is a Sony Classical artist. For more information please visit www.simonedinnerstein.com


Songstress Tift Merritt is a North Carolina native. Her father taught her guitar chords and Percy Sledge songs. In her early twenties, though Tift had gigged by herself, she decided she was not very good at music and better suited for writing short stories. She and her dog Lucy started school at the University of North Carolina to study creative writing. There, she met Zeke Hutchins, whose band had just taken a hiatus and who had decided to become a school teacher. With his encouragement and a big box of LPs from the 1970s that they both liked, they started a band. Zeke set drums up in the kitchen of Tift’s farmhouse on the outskirts of town, and they practiced songs at her red piano. The Carbines played Chapel Hill haunts like the Cave, the Cat’s Cradle, and the front porch of the General Store in Bynum. Tift also made a guest appearance on the Two Dollar Pistols with Tift Merritt EP.

Simone Dinnerstein and Tift Merritt

Tift Merritt

Tift Merritt also produces The Spark for KRTS Marfa, Texas Public Radio. The Spark explores the real lives and processes of the people behind great works of art. Guests have included writer Nick Hornby, artist Kiki Smith, and singer-songwriter and Merge co-founder Mac McCaughan. Emmylou Harris, when asked about Tift, said, “I first heard Tift Merritt some years ago during a writers’ night at a small club in Nashville. She stood out like a diamond in a coal patch, and everyone there knew she carried a promise of great things to come.” In 2009, Tift married longtime collaborator Zeke Hutchins. They live in New York City. Tift loves surfing, singing with her longtime bass player Jay Brown, farmers’ markets, independent record stores, anything French, and thunderstorms. If you can’t find her, she has probably rented an apartment with a piano in a town where she doesn’t know anyone and will be back before too long.

In 2000, Tift won Merlefest’s Chris Austin Songwriting Contest, and with the help of Ryan Adams, found herself with a manager and a recording contract with Lost Highway Records. The band headed to Los Angeles to record her first release, Bramble Rose, in 2002, produced by Ethan Johns. The record landed on Time’s and The New Yorker’s top ten lists and was called the best debut of the year in any genre by the Associated Press. Tambourine followed in 2004. Produced by George Drakoulias and featuring Mike Campbell of the Heartbreakers on guitar, Tambourine was a soul-rock throwdown, Grammy-nominated for Country Album of the Year, even though it was really not a country album. It was also nominated for three Americana Music Awards. Merritt opened for Elvis Costello, recorded Austin City Limits, releasing the performance as a live DVD, and made Home Is Loud, a document of the tour’s homecoming concert in Raleigh, North Carolina. As the tour was winding down, Tift ran away to Paris looking for her mojo and, without intending to, started writing songs that would become Another Country. Another Country was released on Fantasy Records in 2008, again with George Drakoulias and her longtime band at the helm. Buckingham Solo, recorded in England, is an intimate concert released on Fantasy in 2009. Also in 2009, Tift had her first art exhibit, Other Countries, bringing the journals and pictures behind Another Country to light. Tift’s latest release, See You On The Moon, produced by Tucker Martine, is her most visceral work to date, and finds her doing what she does best more directly—and better—than she ever has.

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Mondavi Center Arts Education 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1

TARGET school matinee Series Mondavi Center Arts Education encourages all K-12 teachers to bring their students to Mondavi Center, UC Davis this season for at least one school matinee performance. Especially designed for students, the School Matinee program is curriculum based and focuses on the cultural authenticity and international exchange possible only through live performance.

MOMIX, Botanica Monday, January 31, 2011 Curtis On Tour Thursday, March 17, 2011 Dan Zanes and Friends Monday, March 21, 2011 Alvin Ailey american dance theater Tuesday, April 5, 2011

s & Design Dixon High School Art again for helping the u yo nk tha to d nte “Just wa riachi show this week! ar. We LOVED the ma ye s thi s art the ess Academy acc . ord the transportation ve so that we could aff dri to ts ren pa 10 t s ge of our driver We were able to musicians, about seven ed Mexican-American tur fea w sho s t. Thank you for thi jec ce Sin r interest in the sub ula rtic pa a h wit nts de stu chers for were parents of Latino kids together with tea t brought parents and tha w sho nt have eva rel the ly e offering a tru was the first tim y e of our parents, this som For at. to tre us ay of lid nity for all a festive, pre-ho What a great opportu m. oo ssr cla the in ing volunteered for someth the trip happen.” work together to make s & Design Academy r, Dixon High School Art — Lisa Krebs, Teache

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All shows at 11AM


Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Mark Morris Dance Group A Hallmark Inn Davis Dance Series Event Wednesday, February 2, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Post-performance Q&A Moderated by Ruth Rosenberg, Artist Engagement Coordinator, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Sponsored by

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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Mark Morris Dance Group

Mark Morris Dance Group

MARK MORRIS DANCE GROUP SAMUEL BLACK RITA DONAHUE

JOE BOWIE

ELISA CLARK

DOMINGO ESTRADA, JR. LAUREN GRANT

JOHN HEGINBOTHAM

AARON LOUX* LAUREL LYNCH

DALLAS McMURRAY AMBER STAR MERKENS

MAILE OKAMURA

SPENCER RAMIREZ* WILLIAM SMITH III NOAH VINSON JENN WEDDEL JULIE WORDEN

MICHELLE YARD

*APPRENTICE

Artistic Director MARK MORRIS Executive Director NANCY UMANOFF MMDG MUSIC ENSEMBLE Wolfram Koessel

COLIN FOWLER

JESSE MILLS

MetLife Foundation is the Mark Morris Dance Group’s Official 30th Anniversary Sponsor. Major support for the Mark Morris Dance Group is provided by Brooklyn Community Foundation, JP Morgan Chase Foundation, Fund for the City of New York, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Billy Rose Foundation, Inc., The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, The Shubert Foundation, Jane Stine and R.L. Stine and Trust for Mutual Understanding. The Mark Morris Dance Group New Works Fund is supported by The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, Meyer Sound/Helen and John Meyer, The PARC Foundation and Poss Family Foundation. The Mark Morris Dance Group’s performances are made possible with public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency; and National Endowment for the Arts Dance Program.

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Mark Morris Dance Group

PROGRAM

Visitation Music: Ludwig van Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 4 in C Major, Op. 102, No. 1 Costume Design: Elizabeth Kurtzman Lighting Design: Nicole Pearce Wolfram Koessel, cello; Colin Fowler, piano Maile Okamura I. Andante—Allegro vivace Samuel Black, Rita Donahue, Noah Vinson, Michelle Yard II. Adagio—Tempo d’andante—Allegro vivace Samuel Black, Rita Donahue, Domingo Estrada Jr., John Heginbotham, Noah Vinson, Jenn Weddel, Julie Worden, Michelle Yard Commissioned in part by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Premiere: August 5, 2009; Seiji Ozawa Hall, Tanglewood Music Center, Lenox, MA

PAUSE Empire Garden Music: Charles Ives - Trio for Violin, Violoncello, and Piano, S. 86 Costume Design: Elizabeth Kurtzman Lighting Design: Nicole Pearce I. Moderato II. TSIAJ – Presto III. Moderato con moto Jesse Mills, violin; Wolfram Koessel, cello; Colin Fowler, piano Samuel Black, Elisa Clark, Rita Donahue, Domingo Estrada Jr., Lauren Grant, John Heginbotham, Laurel Lynch, Dallas McMurray, Amber Star Merkens, Maile Okamura, Spencer Ramirez, Noah Vinson, Jenn Weddel, Julie Worden, Michelle Yard Commissioned in part by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Premiere: August 5, 2009; Seiji Ozawa Hall, Tanglewood Music Center, Lenox, MA Music by arrangement with Peer International Corporation, publisher and copyright owner. Intermission Grand Duo Music: Lou Harrison - Grand Duo for Violin & Piano Costume Design: Susan Ruddie Lighting Design: Michael Chybowski Prelude Stampede A Round Polka Jesse Mills, violin; Colin Fowler, piano Samuel Black, Elisa Clark, Rita Donahue, Domingo Estrada Jr., Lauren Grant, John Heginbotham, Laurel Lynch, Dallas McMurray, Amber Star Merkens, Maile Okamura, William Smith III, Noah Vinson, Julie Worden, Michelle Yard Premiere: February 16, 1993; Fine Arts Center, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

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Tuesday–Wednesday, April 5–6

Clifton Brown in “Revelations.” Photo by Nan Melville.

Call for Tickets!

530.754.2787 Media Clips & More Info:

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Morris is noted for his musicality and has been described as “undeviating in his devotion to music.” He has worked extensively in opera, directing and choreographing productions for the Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, Gotham Chamber Opera, English National Opera, and the Royal Opera, Covent Garden. In 1991, he was named a Fellow of the MacArthur Foundation. He has received 10 honorary doctorates to date. In 2006, Morris received the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Mayor’s Award for Arts & Culture and a WQXR Gramophone Special Recognition Award for “being an American ambassador for classical music at home and abroad.” He is the subject of a biography, Mark Morris, by Joan Acocella (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) and Marlowe & Company published a volume of photographs and critical essays entitled Mark Morris’ L’Allegro, ilPenserosoedil Moderato: A Celebration. Morris is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. In 2007, he received the Samuel H. Scripps/ American Dance Festival lifetime achievement award. In 2010, he received the prestigious Leonard Bernstein Lifetime Achievement Award for the Elevation of Music in Society. The Mark Morris Dance Group was formed in 1980 and gave its first concert that year in New York City. The company’s touring schedule steadily expanded to include cities both in the U.S. and in Europe, and in 1986, it made its first national television program for the PBS series Dance in America. In 1988, MMDG was invited to become the national dance company of Belgium and spent three years in residence at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels. The company returned to the United States in 1991 as one of the world’s leading dance companies, performing across the U.S. and at major international festivals. Based in Brooklyn, the company has maintained and strengthened its ties to several cities around the world, most notably its West Coast home, Cal Performances in Berkeley, and its Midwest home, the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Illinois in Urbana. MMDG also appears regularly in New York, Boston, and Seattle.

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Mark Morris Dance Group

Mark Morris was born on August 29, 1956, in Seattle, Washington, where he studied with Verla Flowers and Perry Brunson. In the early years of his career, he performed with the dance companies of Lar Lubovitch, Hannah Kahn, Laura Dean, Eliot Feld, and the Koleda Balkan Dance Ensemble. He formed the Mark Morris Dance Group in 1980, and has since created more than 120 works for the company. From 1988-91, he was Director of Dance at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, the national opera house of Belgium. Among the works created during his time there were three evening-length dances: L’Allegro, ilPenserosoedil Moderato; Dido and Aeneas; and The Hard Nut. In 1990, he founded the White Oak Dance Project with Mikhail Baryshnikov. Morris is also a ballet choreographer and has created seven works for the San Francisco Ballet since 1994 and received commissions from many others. His work is also in the repertory of the Pacific Northwest Ballet, Boston Ballet, Dutch National Ballet, New Zealand Ballet, Houston Ballet, English National Ballet, and the Royal Ballet.

MMDG made its debut at the Mostly Mozart Festival in 2002 and at the Tanglewood Music Festival in 2003 and has since been invited to both festivals annually. From the company’s many London seasons, it has also garnered two Laurence Olivier Awards. MMDG is noted for its commitment to live music, a feature of every performance on its international touring schedule since 1996. MMDG collaborates with leading orchestras, opera companies, and musicians including cellist Yo-Yo Ma, on the Emmy Award-winning film Falling Down Stairs (1997); percussionist and composer Zakir Hussain, Yo-Yo Ma, and jazz pianist Ethan Iverson in Kolam (2002); The Bad Plus in Violet Cavern (2004); pianists Emanuel Ax, Garrick Ohlsson, and Yoko Nozaki for Mozart Dances (2006); and with the English National Opera in Four Saints in Three Acts (2000) and King Arthur (2006), among others. MMDG’s film and television projects also include Dido and Aeneas, The Hard Nut, two documentaries for the U.K.’s South Bank Show, and PBS’s Live From Lincoln Center. In 2001, the Mark Morris Dance Center opened in Brooklyn to provide a home for the company, rehearsal space for the dance community, outreach programs for local children, and a school offering dance classes to students of all ages. For more information, visit www.mmdg.org. The MMDG Music Ensemble, formed in 1996, performs with the Dance Group at home and on tour and has become integral to the company’s creative life. The core group, supplemented by musicians from a large roster of regular guests, presents concerts at the Mark Morris Dance Center and other venues, and participates in the Mark Morris Dance, Music, and Literacy Project in the New York City public school system. Company Members Samuel Black is originally from Berkeley, where he began studying tap at the age of nine with Katie Maltsberger. He received his B.F.A. in dance from SUNY Purchase, and also studied at the Rotterdamse Dansacademie in Holland. He has performed in New York with David Parker, Takehiro Ueyama, and Nelly van Bommel. Sam first appeared with MMDG in 2005, and became a company member in 2007. Joe Bowie was born in Lansing, Michigan, and began dancing while attending Brown University, where he graduated with honors in English and American literature. In New York, he danced with the Paul Taylor Dance Company for two years before going to Belgium to work with Mark Morris in 1989. Elisa Clark received her early training from the Maryland Youth Ballet, and her B.F.A. from the Juilliard School, under the direction of Benjamin Harkarvy. She danced with the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company, Nederlands Dans Theater, and Battleworks Dance Company before joining MMDG in 2006. Clark has also worked with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. She has been on faculty at the American Dance Festival and teaches for MMDG. She is a 2008-09 Princess Grace Modern Dance Honorarium Award Winner.

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Mark Morris Dance Group

Domingo Estrada, Jr., a native of Victoria, Texas, received a B.F.A. in ballet and modern dance from Texas Christian University. He made his debut with MMDG during The Hard Nut at Cal Performances, Berkeley, in 2007, and became a company member in 2009. Lauren Grant, born and raised in Highland Park, Illinois, has danced with MMDG since 1996. She performs leading roles in The Hard Nut and Mozart Dances. Grant has been featured in Time Out New York, Dance Magazine, and the book Meet the Dancers. She graduated with a B.F.A. from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Grant is on faculty at MMDG’s school and also teaches dance internationally. John Heginbotham is from Anchorage, Alaska. He is a graduate of the Juilliard School (B.F.A., 1993) and has danced in the companies of Susan Marshall, Pilobolus Dance Theater (guest artist), John Jasperse, and Ben Munisteri. His choreography is featured in the work of recording artists Fischerspooner, and in Champ: A Space Opera (New York International Fringe Festival). As a teacher, John works regularly with members of the Brooklyn Parkinson Group. He joined MMDGp in 1998. Aaron Loux grew up in Seattle and began dancing at the Creative Dance Center as a member of Kaleidoscope, a youth modern dance company. He began his classical training at the Cornish College Preparatory Dance Program and received a B.F.A. from the Juilliard School in 2009. He danced at the Metropolitan Opera and with Arc Dance Company before joining MMDG as an apprentice in 2010. Laurel Lynch began her dance training in Petaluma. She moved to New York to attend the Juilliard School. Since graduation in 2003, Laurel has danced for Dušan Týnek Dance Theatre, Sue Bernhard Danceworks, Pat Catterson, Stephan Koplowitz, and T.E.A. (Transpersonal Education and Art). She performed at the Festival Oltre Passo in Lecce, Italy, and appeared as a guest artist with Petaluma City Ballet. Laurel performed with MMDG as an apprentice in 2006 and became a company member in 2007.

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Dallas McMurray, from El Cerrito, began dancing at age four, studying jazz, tap, and acrobatics with Katie Maltsberger and ballet with Yukiko Sakakura. He received a B.F.A. in dance from the California Institute of the Arts. Dallas performed with the Limón Dance Company in addition to works by Jiri Kylian, Alonzo King, Robert Moses, and Colin Connor. Dallas performed with MMDG as an apprentice in 2006 and became a company member in 2007. Amber Star Merkens is originally from Newport, Oregon, where she began her dance training with Nancy Mittleman. She received a B.F.A. from the Juilliard School in 1999 and then danced with the Limón Dance Company for two years. She is a recipient of the 2001 Princess Grace Award and has presented her own choreography both in New York and abroad. Amber joined MMDG in 2001. Maile Okamura is originally from San Diego. She was a member of Boston Ballet II in 199293 and Ballet Arizona in 1993-96. She has danced with choreographers Neta Pulvermacher, Zvi Gotheiner, and Gerald Casel, among others. Maile began working with MMDG in 1998 and became a company member in 2001. Spencer Ramirez began his training in Springfield, Virginia, studying under Melissa Dobbs, Nancy Gross, Kellie Payne, and Marilyn York, and the Maryland Youth Ballet with faculty such as Michelle Lees, Christopher Doyle, and Harriet Williams. In 2008, he entered the Juilliard School under the direction of Lawrence Rhodes. Ramirez joined MMDG in July 2010. William Smith III grew up in Fredericksburg, Virginia, and attended George Mason University under a full academic and dance talent scholarship. He graduated Magna Cum Laude in 2007. His piece 3-Way Stop was selected to open the 2006 American College Dance Festival Gala at Ohio State University. Billy danced with Parsons Dance from 2007-10. He became an apprentice with MMDG in April 2010 and was promoted to full company member in November. Noah Vinson received a B.A. in dance from Columbia College, Chicago, where he worked with Shirley Mordine, Jan Erkert, and Brian Jeffrey. In New York, he has danced with Teri and Oliver Steele and the Kevin Wynn Collection. He began working with MMDG in 2002 and became a company member in 2004.

mark morris dance group

Rita Donahue was born and raised in Fairfax, Virginia, and attended George Mason University, where she graduated with honors in dance and English in 2002. She danced with bopi’s black sheep/dances by kraigpatterson and joined MMDG in 2003.


Julie Worden graduated from the North Carolina School of the Arts and joined MMDG in 1994.

Michelle Yard was born in Brooklyn and began her professional dance training at the New York City High School of the Performing Arts. Upon graduation she received the Helen Tamiris and B’nai Brith awards. For three years she was a scholarship student at the Alvin Ailey Dance Center and also attended New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, where she graduated with a B.F.A. Michelle joined MMDG in 1997. Colin Fowler (piano) is a graduate of the Interlochen Arts Academy and holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Juilliard School. He has recorded and performed throughout the world with numerous soloists and ensembles, including Deborah Voigt, the American Brass Quintet, James Galway, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. In addition to performing and conducting numerous Broadway shows, Fowler is a professor at NYU and Nyack College. He began collaborating with MMDG in 2006. Wolfram Koessel (cello), since moving to New York in 1991, has established himself as a much sought-after chamber musician, soloist, recording artist, and contractor in the New York music scene. He has performed with MMDG since 1999 and was music director from 2004-08. In 2006, Koessel joined the renowned American String Quartet, with which he performs in the foremost concert halls throughout the world, collaborating frequently with today’s leading artists. Koessel appears with a wide range of ensembles and groups, most notably and frequently with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. He has organized hundreds of classical orchestra and chamber music concerts during the last decade in New York City. He is on the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music and the Aspen Music Festival. Koessel resides with his wife, pianist and writer J. Mae Barizo, in Manhattan.

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mark morris dance group

Jenn Weddel received her early training from Boulder Ballet Company near where she grew up in Longmont, Colorado. She holds a B.F.A. from Southern Methodist University and also studied at Boston Conservatory, Colorado University, and the Laban Center, London. Since moving to New York in 2001, Weddel has created and performed with Red Wall Dance Theater, Sue Bernhard Danceworks, Vencl Dance Trio, Rocha Dance Theater, TEA Dance Company, and with such choreographers as Alan Danielson and Ella Ben-Aharon.  Weddel performed with MMDG as an apprentice in 2006 and became a company member in 2007.

Jesse Mills (violin) graduated with a Bachelor of Music degree from the Juilliard School in 2001. He has performed as soloist with the Juilliard PreCollege Chamber Orchestra, the Teatro Argentino Orchestra in Buenos Aires, New Jersey Symphony, Sarah Lawrence College Symphony, Plainfield Symphony, Hudson Valley Philharmonic, and Aspen Music Festival’s Sinfonia Orchestra as winner of the Festival’s E. Nakamichi Violin Concerto Competition. Mills received an Aspen Music Festival String Fellowship in 1997. As a chamber musician Mills has performed at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, New York City’s Merkin Concert Hall and Bargemusic, the Rising Stars series at Caramoor, the Ravinia Festival’s BennettGordon Hall, and at the Marlboro Music Festival. He has performed chamber music with such artists as Richard Goode, David Soyer, Donald Weilerstein, Anton Kuerti, Peter Wiley, Miriam Fried, Claude Frank, and Fred Sherry. He was a member of the FLUX Quartet from 2001-03. Mills is a member of Nurse Kaya, an ensemble comprised of string quartet plus bass and drums, which exclusively plays compositions written by its members. Mills is also a member of the Denali Trio, with cellist Sarah Carter and pianist Ashley Wass.

Mark Morris Dance Group Staff Artistic Director: Mark Morris Executive Director: Nancy Umanoff Production Technical Director: Johan Henckens Rehearsal Director: Matthew Rose Lighting Supervisor: Michael Chybowski Wardrobe Supervisor: Jennifer Perry Costume Coordinator: Stephanie Sleeper Sound Supervisor: Jim Abdou Finance Assistant: Katharine Urbati General Manager: Huong Hoang

Administration Chief Financial Officer: Elizabeth Fox Finance Associate: Marea Chaveco Company Manager: Sarah Robinson Management Assistant: Shanleigh Philip Marketing/Development Director of Development and External Relations: Lauren Cherubini Director of Marketing: Helen Frank Special Projects Manager: Alexandro Pacheco Development Associate: Kelly Sheldon Development Assistant: Moss Allen Marketing Assistant: Ashley Matthews Office Assistant: Jay Selinger

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Bluebeard’s Castle (Fully Staged)

UC Davis Symphony Orchestra Christian Baldini, music director and conductor Peter Lichtenfels, director Gregory Stapp, bass (Duke Bluebeard) Jessica Medoff, soprano (Judith)

February 25, 2011 8:00 PM Sunday, February 27, 2011 7:00 PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center

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for Parkinson’s

mark morris dance group

dance

Education Outreach Director: Eva Nichols School Director: Sarah Marcus Program Manager: David Leventhal School Bursar: Marc Castelli Dance Center Operations Studio Manager: Karyn Treadwell Production and Facilities Manager: Matthew Eggleton Assistant Facilities Manager: Chris Sperry Front Desk Manager: Jackie Busch Music Coordinator: Bruce Lazarus Maintenance: Gregory Collazo, Jose Fuentes, Orlando Rivera Booking Representation: Michael Mushalla (Double M Arts & Events) Media and General Consultation Services: William Murray (Better Attitude, Inc) Legal Counsel: Mark Selinger (McDermott, Will & Emery) Accountant: O’Connor Davies Munns & Dobbins, LLP Orthopaedist: David S. Weiss, M.D. (NYU-HJD Department of Orthopaedic Surgery) Hilot Therapist: Jeffrey Cohen Physical Therapist: Marshall Hagins, PT, PhD Thanks to Maxine Morris.

The Mondavi Center and the Mark Morris Dance Group proudly announce the launch of Dance for Parkinson’s, a partnership with the Pamela Trokanski Dance Theatre and the Parkinson Association of Northern California. The program offers weekly dance classes to people with Parkinson’s Disease and their caregivers. Following an initial class on February 1 taught by members of the Mark Morris Dance Group, classes will be taught by local dance teachers who have received training in the company’s program. The class is being held in Davis with the possibility of expanding to Sacramento in the future. For more information, or to enroll in the class, contact Mondavi Center Artist Engagement Coordinator Ruth Rosenberg, 530.752.6113 or rrosenberg@ucdavis.edu.

Sincerest thanks to all the dancers for their dedication, commitment, and incalculable contribution to the work. Additional funding has been received from the Altman Foundation; The Amphion Foundation, Inc.; The Buck Family Foundation; Capezio Ballet Makers Dance Foundation; Joseph and Joan Cullman Foundation for the Arts, Inc.; Mertz Gilmore Foundation; The Harkness Foundation for Dance; The Iovino Family Foundation; The Charles Ives Society, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson/Society for the Arts in Healthcare Partnership to Promote the Arts in Healing; Leon Lowenstein Foundation; Materials for the Arts; McDermott, Will & Emery; The David & Mildred Morse Charitable Trust Foundation; New England Foundation for the Arts; USArtists International; and the Friends of the Mark Morris Dance Group. For more information contact: Mark Morris Dance Group 3 Lafayette Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11217-1415 Tel: 718.624.8400 Fax: 718.624.8900 info@mmdg.org www.mmdg.org

Robert and Margrit

Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Vijay Iyer Historicity Trio A Capital Public Radio Studio Jazz Series Event Wednesday-Saturday, February 2-5, 2011 • 8PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

Selections will be announced from the stage. Vijay Iyer Composer-pianist Vijay Iyer is one of today’s most acclaimed and respected young American jazz artists. He received the Musician of the Year award in the 2010 Jazz Journalists Association Jazz Awards, the 2010 Echo Award (the “German Grammy”) for best international ensemble with his trio, and the Downbeat Critics Poll for Rising Star jazz group of the year. His latest recordings on the ACT label include Solo (2010) and the trio album Historicity (2009). Historicity was named jazz album of the year by The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, National Public Radio, the annual Village Voice jazz critics poll, and the Downbeat International Critics Poll. The album has also been nominated for a Grammy in the category of Best Instrumental Jazz Album. In the past decade, Iyer has won the Downbeat Poll in multiple categories, the JJA Jazz Award for Up & Coming Musician of the Year, the CalArts Alpert Award in the Arts, the New York Foundation

for the Arts Fellowship, and numerous composer commissions. Iyer has also composed orchestral and chamber works; scored for film, theater, radio, and television; collaborated with poets and choreographers; and joined forces with artists in hip-hop, rock, experimental, electronic, and Indian classical music. He has performed and recorded with Steve Coleman, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Mike Ladd, Roscoe Mitchell, Wadada Leo Smith, Amiri Baraka, Amina Claudine Myers, Butch Morris, Oliver Lake, dead prez, Karsh Kale, Talvin Singh, Imani Uzuri, Craig Taborn, DJ Spooky, and Das Racist, among others. He teaches at Manhattan School of Music, New York University, the New School, and School for Improvisational Music. His writings appear in Music Perception, Journal of Consciousness Studies, Current Musicology, JazzTimes, Wire, The Guardian, and the anthologies Uptown Conversation, Sound Unbound, Arcana IV, and The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2010. For more info, visit www.vijay-iyer.com

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal. 48

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Stephan Crump is a Memphis-bred bassist/composer and a rising star on the New York music scene. Shunning barriers of genre, he has performed and recorded in the U.S. and across the globe with a diverse list of artists, from late blues legend Johnny Clyde Copeland to Portishead’s Dave McDonald, Patti Austin, the Violent Femmes’ Gordon Gano, Big Ass Truck, Dave Liebman, Billy Hart, Sonny Fortune, Greg Osby, Kenny Werner, the Mahavishnu Project, and Bobby Previte, among others. As a longtime collaborator with adventurous jazz composers (since 1999 with Vijay Iyer) as well as guitar wizard Jim Campilongo and radiant singersongwriter Jen Chapin, he has become known for the elegance and purposeful groove of his acoustic and electric bass playing, and for transforming his instrument into a speaking entity with magnetic pull on audiences. As a composer, Crump is emerging as a singular voice, one who “avoids obvious routes but manages never to lose his way” (New York Times). His music can be heard in numerous films and on his four critically acclaimed albums, the latest of which, Reclamation, featuring his all-string Rosetta Trio, has been lauded by The New Yorker for its “ingenious originals,” named one of the year’s best by NPR, and declared “a low-key marvel” by JazzTimes. Crump recently launched his solo performance career as an invited artist at the 2009 International Society of Bassists conference. He has two new recordings documenting his freeimprovised duo collaborations with both alto saxophonist Steve Lehman and pianist James Carney. Marcus Gilmore was inspired by the music of his grandfather, legendary jazz drummer Roy Haynes, who gave him his first set of drums at age 10. He took naturally to jazz as well as to classical theory and percussion. He has performed around the world with some of today’s best known jazz artists, including Chick Corea, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Natalie Cole, Clark Terry, Cassandra Wilson, Steve Coleman, Ravi Coltrane, Dave Douglas, John Clayton, Christian Scott, Najee, and many others. Gilmore joined Vijay Iyer’s group in 2003, at the age of 16. He also leads his own ensemble and recently premiered a commissioned suite of his music, American Perspicacity.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Joshua Bell, violin Sam Haywood, piano A Concert Series Event Wednesday, February 9, 2011 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

further listening see p. 52

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off all electronic devices. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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joshua bell, violin

Joshua Bell, violin Sam Haywood, piano

Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Piano in A Major, Op. 100 Allegro amabile Andante tranquillo — Vivace — Andante — Vivace a più — Andante — Vivace Allegretto grazioso (quasi Andante)

Brahms

Fantasy for Violin and Piano in C Major, Op. 159 (D. 934) Andante molto — Allegretto — Andantino — Tempo I — Allegro vivace — Allegretto — Presto

Schubert

Intermission Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Piano in G Major, Op. 13 Lento doloroso — Allegrovivace Allegretto tranquillo Allegro animato

Grieg

Additional works to be announced from the stage. Program is subject to change.

Joshua Bell records exclusively for Sony Classical, a Masterworks Label www.joshuabell.com Mr. Bell appears by arrangement with IMG Artists, LLC Carnegie Hall Tower, 152 West 57th Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10019 www.imgartists.com For more information on Sam Haywood, please visit www.samhaywood.com Mr. Bell will autograph programs and recordings in the lobby following the performance.

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joshua Bell

further listening

by jeff hudson The last time Joshua Bell played at the Mondavi Center (on February 27 of last year, sharing the stage with pianist Jeremy Denk), the program included the Sonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in D minor, Op. 75, by Camille Saint-Saëns. Last fall, Bell and Denk took the Saint-Saëns into the studio, along with the Sonata for Violin and Piano (1927) by Maurice Ravel, and the Violin Sonata in A major by César Franck. The album, still untitled at this point, is scheduled for early summer release on the Sony Masterworks label.

Mondavi Center 2 0 1 0 2011

San Francisco Opera Grand Cinema Series

La Rondine

Bell was featured recently on the soundtrack to the film For Colored Girls, composed by Aaron Zigman. The movie, based on Ntozake Shange’s award-winning choreopoem “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Enuf,” played in Sacramento area cineplexes last November and December. In July, Bell got to play a 1741 Guarneri instrument that was once owned by French musician Henri Vieuxtemps (1820-81), who was considered the greatest violinist of his day. In a video interview with the British newspaper The Guardian, Bell performed a flashy piece (including variations on the tune known to Americans as “Yankee Doodle”) that Vieuxtemps had composed and played on the instrument. Bell suggested that the violin sounded good “partially because who played on it.” (Others who have played the Vieuxtemps Guarneri include Yehudi Menuhin, Itzhak Perlman, and Pinchas Zukerman). “Vieuxtemps chose this instrument because of its incredible inherent qualities. I just find I play better when I have an instrument like this.” The Vieuxtemps Guarneri went up for sale over the summer, with an asking price of $18 million. Ordinarily, Bell plays a Strad, known as the Gibson Stradivarius, dating from 1713, which Bell bought in 2001. The history of the Gibson Strad is a long and tangled tale of considerable intrigue, which you can read on Bell’s website, www.joshuabell.com/biography.

Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise, and Sacramento News and Review.

Thursday, February 17, 2011 | 8PM JH Superstar soprano Angela Gheorghiu made her longawaited San Francisco Opera debut in this lush filmed version of Puccini’s elegant and poignant opera. A thoroughly Italian work inspired by Viennese operetta, it tells the story of a worldly woman who falls in love with a naïve younger man. The vibrant story will spring to life on Jackson Hall’s state-of-the-art projection and sound system.

Tickets, Media Clips & More Info:

MondaviArts.org Or Call: 530.754.2787 866.754.2787 (toll-free)

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Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Piano in A Major, Op. 100 (1886) Johannes Brahms (Born May 7, 1833, in Hamburg; died April 3, 1897, in Vienna) Brahms’s three violin sonatas are works of his fullest maturity. In 1853, he had written a scherzo for a collaborative sonata (Schumann and Albert Dietrich chipped in with the other movements) for Joseph Joachim, but during the following 27 years he began and destroyed four further attempts in the genre. (Brahms was almost pathologically secretive about his sketches and unfinished works, virtually all of which he destroyed.) It was not until the G major Sonata (Op. 78) of 1879 that he was pleased enough with any of these violinistic progeny to admit one into the world; the Op. 100 Sonata followed in 1886 and Op. 108 came two years later. His reasons for concentrating on this form at the time may have been personal as well as musical—as each of these works was finished, he sent it as a sort of peace offering to Joachim, from whom he had been estranged for some time. Brahms, it seems, had sided with Joachim’s wife, the mezzosoprano Amalie Weiss, in the couple’s divorce proceedings, and bitter feelings were incited between the old friends, though Joachim never wavered in his support and performance of Brahms’s music. The rift was not fully healed until Brahms offered Joachim the Double Concerto in 1887. The A major Violin Sonata is one of Brahms’s most limpidly beautiful creations. It has been nicknamed “Thun,” for the place of its composition, and “Meistersinger,” because of the resemblance of its opening motive to Walther’s “Prize Song” in Wagner’s opera, but the most appropriate appellation was suggested by Robert Schauffler: “Song.” Schauffler’s sobriquet not only notes the score’s richly lyrical nature but also recognizes Brahms’s use of several of his own songs as thematic material for the work: the first movement quotes Komm bald! (“Come Soon!,” Op. 97, No. 5) and Wie Melodienziehtes (“It Flows Like Melodies,” Op. 105, No. 1), while the finale recalls bits of Auf dem Kirchhofe (“In the Churchyard,” Op. 105, No. 4), Meine Lieder (“My Songs,” Op. 106, No. 4), and Meine Liebeistgrün (“My Love Is Evergreen,” Op. 63, No. 5). The published edition of the A major Sonata notes that it is “for Piano and Violin,” an indication of the complete integration of the participants that marks Brahms’s greatest instrumental works. The opening movement is a full sonata structure (the piano initiates both the principal and subsidiary themes), though it contains little of the dramatic catharsis often found in that form. This is rather music of comforting tranquility and warm sentiment that is as immediately accessible as any from Brahms’s later years. The Andante, with its episodes in alternating tempos, combines the functions of slow movement and scherzo, a structural modification Brahms had also tried in the F major String Quintet, Op. 88. The finale confirms the pervasive lyricism of the entire work to such a degree that the composer’s correspondent Elisabeth von Herzogenberg was moved to say, “The whole Sonata is one caress.”

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joshua bell, violin

Program Notes

Fantasy for Violin and Piano in C Major, Op. 159 (D. 934) (1827) Franz Schubert (Born January 31, 1797, in Vienna; died November 19, 1828, in Vienna) The Fantasy in C major (D. 934), the most important of the small handful of compositions that Schubert wrote for violin, was composed quickly in December 1827 for a concert given on January 20 by the 21-year-old Czech virtuoso Josef Slavik (whom Chopin described as “the second Paganini”), at which the young violinist also planned to introduce a concerto of his own making. For the program, Slavik enlisted the assistance of a friend of the composer, the pianist Carl Maria von Bocklet (to whom Schubert dedicated both the D major Piano Sonata, D. 850 of 1825 and this Fantasy), and Schubert conceived the new piece as a display vehicle for these two excellent performers. The program won little praise. The reviewer for the journal Der Sammler wrote, “The Fantasy for Violin and Piano by Mr. Franz Schubert somewhat exceeded the duration the Viennese intend to devote to spiritual enjoyment. The hall emptied itself little by little, and the present writer admits that he is unable to say anything about the end of the piece.” Only the Vienna correspondent for the London Harmonicon found that the composition “possesses merit far above the common order.” Though there is a certain quotient of merely virtuosic note-spinning in the variations section of the Fantasy (Schubert himself was skilled both as a violinist and pianist), the difficulties encountered by the work’s first hearers probably stemmed more from the music’s formal originality and harmonic daring than from any deficiencies in its craft. The Fantasy is arranged in seven continuous sections which bear only a tenuous relation to the traditional layout of the sonata form. The work opens with rustling piano figurations that underpin the lyrical flight of violin melody which prefaces a strongly rhythmic episode in quicker tempo, faintly tinged with Hungarian exoticism. There follows a set of elaborately decorative variations on Schubert’s song Seimirgegrüsst (“I Greet You”), composed to a poem of Friedrich Rückert in 1821. The rustling figurations of the introduction return briefly to serve as the bridge to the “finale,” a brilliant showpiece for the participants. A shadow of Seimirgegrüsst passes across the Fantasy before a brief, jubilant coda closes the work.

Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Piano in G Major, Op. 13 (1867) Edvard Grieg (Born June 15, 1843, in Bergen, Norway; died September 4, 1907, in Bergen, Norway) Grieg completed his studies at the Leipzig Conservatory in 1863. Rather than heading directly home to Norway, however, he settled in Copenhagen to study privately with Niels Gade, at that time Denmark’s most prominent musician and generally regarded as the founder of the modern Scandinavian school of composition. During his three years in that lovely city, Grieg met Rikard Nordraak, another young composer from Norway who was filled with the glowing ambition of establishing a distinctive musical identity for his homeland. His enthusiasm kindled Grieg’s nationalistic interests, and together they established the Euterpe

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Society to help promote Scandinavian music. Grieg’s concern with folk music grew stronger during the following years, especially when he was left to carry on the Euterpe project alone after Nordraak’s premature death in 1866 at the age of 23. Also during this Danish sojourn, Grieg met Nina Hagerup, a fine singer and his cousin. More than familial affection passed between the two, however, and they soon found themselves in love. Nina’s mother disapproved of the match (“He is nothing. He has nothing. And he makes music no one wants to hear,” was the maternal judgment), and plans for a wedding were postponed. Back in Norway, Grieg’s creative work was concentrated on the large forms advocated by his Leipzig teachers and by Gade. By the beginning of 1867, he had produced the Piano Sonata, Op. 7, a violin sonata, a symphony (long unpublished and made available only as recently as 1981), and the concert overture In Autumn. He also carried on his work to promote native music, and gave an unprecedented concert exclusively of Norwegian compositions in 1866. Its excellent success brought him a notoriety that lifted him to the front rank of Scandinavian musicians; he was appointed conductor of the Philharmonic Society in Christiania (Oslo), had a full schedule of pupils, and was popular as a piano recital artist. As a result of his success, he was able to retrieve his fiancée, Nina, from Copenhagen, and the couple was married in June 1867. The daughter born the following spring was yet another mark of Grieg’s increasingly happy life. It was at the confluence of these happy personal, professional, and nationalistic streams in his life, “in the euphoria of my honeymoon,” he wrote, that Grieg composed the Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Piano in G major in the summer of 1867. The score was dedicated to John Svendsen, Grieg’s compatriot composer and a champion of his music, and first played by Grieg and violinist Gudbrand Böhn, concertmaster of the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra, in Oslo on November 16, 1867. The G major Violin Sonata, so pervaded by the influence of Norwegian folk music that Grieg called it his “national” sonata, opens with a slow, poignant introduction whose initial violin cadenza contains the thematic seeds from which much of the movement grows. The mood brightens for the sonata form’s main theme, a buoyant dance-like melody. The second theme is in the nature of a delicate, wistful waltz. The exposition becomes more animated, and culminates in a heroic transformation of the second theme. The development section treats both the main and second subjects in a manner that would have pleased Grieg’s professors in Leipzig, and leads to the recapitulation of the earlier materials and a brilliant ending. The second movement is in a three-part form (A–B–A) which takes a sweetly nostalgic song as the subject for its outer sections and a lovely melody in a sunnier key, reminiscent of a springar dance played on the traditional Hardanger fiddle, for its central episode. The finale achieves a pleasing balance of themes, moods, and folk influences in a movement that provides a tasteful showcase for both musicians. ©2010 Dr. Richard E. Rodda

Joshua Bell For more than two decades, Joshua Bell has enchanted audiences worldwide with his breathtaking virtuosity and tone of rare beauty. He came to national attention at the age of 14 in a highly acclaimed orchestral debut with Riccardo Muti and the Philadelphia Orchestra. A Carnegie Hall debut, the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, and a recording contract further confirmed his presence in the music world.  Today he is equally at home as a soloist, chamber musician, and orchestra leader. His restless curiosity and multifaceted musical interests have taken him in exciting new directions that have earned him the rare title of “classical music superstar.” “Bell,” Gramophone stated simply, “is dazzling.” Named by Musical America as the 2010 Instrumentalist of the Year, highlights of Bell’s 2010-11 season include fall performances with the New York Philharmonic and the symphony orchestras of Philadelphia, San Francisco, Houston, and St. Louis. The year concludes with chamber music performances with Steven Isserlis in Frankfurt, Amsterdam, and at Wigmore Hall in London, followed by a tour to Italy, France, and Germany with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. The new year commences with performances with the Concertgebouw Orchestra in the Netherlands and Spain, and a recital tour to Canada, the U.S., and Europe that includes Wigmore Hall, Lincoln Center, and Symphony Hall in Boston. Bell will again collaborate with Steven Isserlis on tour in Europe and Istanbul with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. Bell records exclusively for Sony Classical, a Masterworks label bringing new audiences to classical music and new music to classical audiences. Bell’s first sonata recording of French repertoire, which is also his first duo recording effort with Jeremy Denk, will be released in 2011. Recent releases include the soundtrack to Colored Girls, At Home With Friends, featuring Chris Botti, Sting, Josh Groban, Regina Spektor, Tiempo Libre, and others, the Defiance soundtrack, Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto with the Berlin Philharmonic, The Red Violin Concerto, The Essential Joshua Bell, Voice of the Violin, and Romance of the Violin, which Billboard named the 2004 Classical CD of the Year, while also naming Bell the Classical Artist of the Year. Since his first LP recording at age 18, Bell has made critically acclaimed recordings of the concertos of Beethoven and Mendelssohn both featuring his own cadenzas, Sibelius, and Goldmark, as well as the Grammy Award-winning Nicholas Maw concerto. His Grammy-nominated Gershwin Fantasy premiered a new work for violin and orchestra based on themes from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. Its success led to a Grammy-nominated all-Bernstein recording that included the premiere of the West Side Story Suite as well as a new recording of the composer’s Serenade.   With the composer and double bass virtuoso Edgar Meyer, Bell appeared on the Grammy-nominated crossover recording Short Trip Home and a disc of concert works by Meyer and the 19thcentury composer Giovanni Bottesini. Bell also collaborated with

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Sam Haywood Sam Haywood is a critically acclaimed British pianist whose performances have thrilled audiences worldwide. A frequent collaborator with Joshua Bell and Steven Isserlis, his upcoming dates include recitals in the U.K., Germany, France, Indonesia, Japan, Poland, Austria, Russia, Romania, Switzerland, Greece, the U.S., and the Czech Republic.

Bell is the recipient of the 2008 Academy of Achievement Award for exceptional accomplishment in the arts, and in 2009, he was honored by Education Through Music for his dedication to sharing his love of classical music with disadvantaged youth. In 2010, he received the Humanitarian Award from Seton Hall University.

Haywood’s latest release, Chopin’s Own Piano, is the first to have been made on Chopin’s own 1846 Pleyel piano. To celebrate the Chopin anniversary, he performed at Lancaster House with Steven Isserlis in the presence of HRH Princess Alexandra on the same day and at the same venue as Chopin’s own performance for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in 1848.

With more than 35 CDs recorded, Sony Classical film soundtracks also include The Red Violin, which won the Oscar for Best Original Score; the Classical Brit-nominated Ladies in Lavender; and Academy Award-winning film Iris featuring an original score by James Horner. Bell appeared as himself in the film Music of the Heart starring Meryl Streep. Millions of people are just as likely to have seen him on The Tonight Show as on Tavis Smiley, Charlie Rose, or CBS Sunday Morning. In 2010, Bell starred in his fifth Live from Lincoln Center Presents broadcast: Joshua Bell with Friends@ The Penthouse. Other PBS shows include Great Performances – Joshua Bell: West Side Story Suite from Central Park, a Memorial Day Concert performed on the lawn of the United States Capitol, Sesame Street, and A&E’s Biography. He was one of the first classical artists to have a music video air on VH1, and he has been the subject of a BBC Omnibus documentary. Bell has been profiled in publications ranging from The New York Times and Newsweek to People Magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful People issue, Gramophone, and USA Today. Bell and his two sisters grew up on a farm in Bloomington, Indiana. As a child, he indulged in many passions outside of music, becoming an avid computer game player and a competitive athlete. He placed fourth in a national tennis tournament at age 10 without having taken a single lesson, and still keeps his racquet close by.  Bell received his first violin at age four after his parents, both psychologists by profession, noticed him plucking tunes with rubber bands he had stretched around the handles of his dresser drawers. By 12, he was serious about the instrument, thanks in large part to the inspiration of renowned violinist and pedagogue Josef Gingold, who had become his beloved teacher and mentor.

joshua bell, violin

Wynton Marsalis on the Grammy-winning spoken-word children’s album, Listen to the Storyteller, and Bela Fleck’s Grammy-winning Perpetual Motion. He has twice performed on the Grammy Awards telecast, performing music from Short Trip Home and West Side Story Suite. Bell has premiered new works by composers Nicholas Maw, John Corigliano, Aaron Jay Kernis, Edgar Meyer, Behzad Ranjbaran, and Jay Greenberg.

Haywood has composed several small-scale works for solo piano and various duos, including Song of the Penguins, published by Emerson Editions and inspired by the film March of the Penguins. He is also involved in educational projects and has co-written a children’s opera. Haywood began playing the piano at age four, inspired by evenings listening to crackly LPs of Beethoven sonatas with his grandmother. Following his success at age 13 in the BBC Young Musician of the Year competition, he received the Isserlis Prize from the Royal Philharmonic Society and later studied with Paul Badura-Skoda and at the Royal Academy of Music with Maria Curcio, a pupil of Artur Schnabel. Haywood is keen to include lesser-known works in his solo recital programs. Rosetti, Gade, Franz Xaver Mozart, Alkan, Field, Isserlis, McLeod (commission), and Hummel have recently been featured. He has also edited a new edition of piano works by Julius Isserlis, Carl Frühling’s Clarinet Trio, and a new solo piano transcription of the Romance from Chopin’s First Piano Concerto. Outside his musical world, Haywood enjoys walks in his native England’s Lake District and is a keen amateur magician and photographer. www.samhaywood.com.

In 1989, Bell received an Artist Diploma in Violin Performance from Indiana University. His alma mater also honored him with a Distinguished Alumni Service Award only two years after his graduation. The recipient of the coveted Avery Fisher Prize, he has been named an “Indiana Living Legend” and received the Indiana Governor’s Arts Award. In 2005, he was inducted into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame and in 2009, he performed at Ford’s Theatre before President Obama, which was followed by an invitation from the President and Mrs. Obama to perform at the White House. Bell performs on the 1713 Gibson ex Huberman Stradivarius violin and uses a late 18th century French bow by Francois Tourte. For more information, visit www.joshuabell.com.

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Mondavi Center support

mondavi center

corporate support

DONORS

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Our generous donors allow us to bring world-class artists and speakers to the region’s doorstep, and energize and inspire tens of thousands of school children and teachers through our nationally recognized Arts Education programs. In thanks for their generous gifts, donors receive a host of benefits including:

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· Priority Seating · Access to Donor-Only Events · Advance ticket sales for Just Added shows · Meet the artists · Much, much more…

Office of Campus Community Relations

Remember: Ticket sales cover only 40% of our costs.

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Help support the art you love: Donate today! For more information, visit us at MondaviArts.org/supportus or contact our Development Staff at 530.754.5436

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Mondavi Center Grantors and arts education sponsors

Friends of Mondavi Center

Event & Additional Support Partners Boeger Winery Ciocolat

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Seasons Restaurant Watermelon Music


Individual Supporters MondaviCenter InnerCircle Inner Circle donors are dedicated arts patrons whose leadership gifts to the Mondavi Center are a testament to the value of the performing arts in our lives. Mondavi Center is deeply grateful for the generous contributions of the dedicated patrons who give annual financial support to our organization. These donations are an important source of revenue for our program, as income from ticket sales covers less than half of the actual cost of our performance season. Their gifts to the Mondavi Center strengthen and sustain our efforts, enabling us not only to bring memorable performances by worldclass artists to audiences in the capital region each year, but also to introduce new generations to the experience of live performance through our Arts Education Program, which provides arts education and enrichment activities to more than 35,000 K-12 students annually. For more information on supporting the Mondavi Center, visit MondaviArts.org or call 530.754.5437.

† Mondavi Center Advisory Board Member * Friends of Mondavi Center

Mondavi Center support

mondavi center

Impresario Circle $25,000 and up

John and Lois Crowe †* Barbara K. Jackson †* Grant and Grace Noda* virtuoso Circle $15,000 - $24,999

Joyce and Ken Adamson Friends of Mondavi Center* Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Anne Gray † Benjamin and Lynette Hart †* In memory of Alison S. and Richard D. Cramer William and Nancy Roe †* Lawrence and Nancy Shepard † Joe and Betty Tupin † Shipley and Dick Walters* Maestro Circle $10,000 - $14,999

Oren and Eunice Adair-Christensen* Wayne and Jacque Bartholomew †* Dolly and David Fiddyment † Samia and Scott Foster † Mary B. Horton* M. A. Morris* Tony and Joan Stone † Benefactors Circle $6,000 - $9,999 Michael Alexander California Statewide Certified Development Corporation Camille Chan † Patti Donlon † First Northern Bank † Bonnie and Ed Green †* Dee and Joe Hartzog † The One and Only Watson Margaret Hoyt* Sarah and Dan Hrdy William and Jane Koenig Greiner Heat, Air, and Solar Garry Maisel † Stephen Meyer and Mary Lou Flint † Grace and John Rosenquist* Raymond and Jeanette Seamans* Ellen Sherman Della Aichwalder Thompson Larry and Rosalie Vanderhoef †* And one donor who prefers to remain anonymous

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Mondavi Center support

Producers Circle $3,000 - $5,999

Neil and Carla Andrews Hans Apel and Pamela Burton Cordelia S. Birrell Neil and Joanne Bodine Barry and Valerie Boone Brian Tarkington and Katrina Boratynski Ralph and Clairelee Leiser Bulkley* Cantor & Company, A Law Corporation Michael and Betty Chapman Robert and Wendy Chason Chris and Sandy Chong* Michele Clark and Paul Simmons Tony and Ellie Cobarrubia* Claudia Coleman Eric and Michael Conn DLMC Foundation Nancy DuBois Catherine and Charles Farman Mr. and Mrs. Domenic Favero Donald and Sylvia Fillman Judith and Andrew Gabor Kay Gist Kathleen and Robert Grey Judith and William Hardardt* Lorena Herrig* Dr. Ronald and Lesley Hsu Debra Johnson, M.D. and Mario Gutierrez Gerald and Virginia Jostes Teresa and Jerry Kaneko* Dean and Karen Karnopp* Nancy Lawrence, Gordon Klein, and Linda Lawrence Drs. Richard Latchaw and Sheri Alders Ginger and Jeffrey Leacox Robert and Barbara Leidigh John T. Lescroart and Lisa Sawyer Nelson Lewallyn and Marion Pace-Lewallyn Betty J. Lewis Dr. and Mrs. Ashley T. Lipshutz Paul and Diane Makley* In memory of Jerry Marr Janet Mayhew* Robert and Helga Medearis Verne Mendel* Derry Ann Moritz Richard and Mary Ann Murray Charles and Joan Partain Suzanne and Brad Poling Lois and Dr. Barry Ramer Roger and Ann Romani Melodie Rufer Hal and Carol Sconyers* Tom and Meg Stallard* Tom and Judy Stevenson* Donine Hedrick and David Studer Jerome Suran and Helen Singer Suran* Nathan and Johanna Trueblood Ken Verosub and Irina Delusina In loving memory of 58

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John Max Vogel, M.D. Claudette Von Rusten John Walker and Marie Lopez Elizabeth F. and Charles E. Wilts Bob and Joyce Wisner* Richard and Judy Wydick And five donors who prefer to remain anonymous Directors Circle $1,100 - $2,999 Beulah and Ezra Amsterdam Russell and Elizabeth Austin Murry and Laura Baria* Lydia Baskin* Paul and Connie Batterson Virginia and Michael Biggs Kay and Joyce Blacker* Jo Anne Boorkman* Clyde and Ruth Bowman Edwin Bradley Linda Brandenburger Robert Burgerman and Linda Ramatowski Davis and Jan Campbell David J. Converse, ESQ. Gail and John Cooluris Jim and Kathy Coulter* John and Celeste Cron* Terry and Jay Davison Jim and Carolyn DeHayes Cecilia Delury and Vince Jacobs Mike and Cheryl Demas Bruce and Marilyn Dewey Martha Dickman* Dotty Dixon* Richard and Joy Dorf* Merrilee and Simon Engel Thomas and Phyllis Farver* Tom Forrester and Shelly Faura Nancy McRae Fisher Pam Gill-Fisher and Ron Fisher* Dr. Andy and Wendy Huang Frank Joseph George and Elaine LaMotta Karl Gerdes and Pamela Rohrich Henry and Dorothy Gietzen Fredic and Pamela Gorin John and Patty Goss* Florence and Jack Grosskettler* Diane Gunsul-Hicks Charles and Ann Halsted Paul and Kathleen Hart In memory of William F. McCoy Timothy and Karen Hefler Charles and Eva Hess Sharna and Mike Hoffman Suzanne and Chris Horsley* Claudia Hulbe Ruth W. Jackson Clarence and Barbara Kado Barbara Katz* Robert Kingsley and Melissa Thorme Cheryl and Matthew Kurowski Hansen Kwok Brian and Dorothy Landsberg Mary Jane Large and Marc Levinson Edward and Sally Larkin*

Claudia and Allan Leavitt Hyunok Lee and Daniel Sumner Yvonne LeMaitre* Linda and Peter Lindert Spencer Lockson and Thomas Lange Angelique Louie Natalie and Malcolm MacKenzie* Dennis H. Mangers and Michael Sestak Susan Mann Judith and Mark Mannis Marilyn Mansfield Michael and Maxine Mantell Yvonne L. Marsh Robert Ono and Betty Masuoka Shirley Maus* Kenneth McKinstry Steve and Sonja Memering Joy Mench and Clive Watson Fred and Linda Meyers* John Meyer and Karen Moore Eldridge and Judith Moores Patricia and Surl Nielsen Dr. James Nordin and Linda Orrante Philip and Miep Palmer Prewoznik Foundation Linda and Lawrence Raber* Larry and Celia Rabinowitz Kay Resler* Alessa Johns and Christopher Reynolds Thomas Roehr Don Roth and Jolán Friedhoff Liisa A. Russell Beverly “Babs” Sandeen and Marty Swingle Ed and Karen Schelegle The Schenker Family Neil and Carrie Schore Jeff and Bonnie Smith Wilson and Kathryn Smith Ronald and Rosie Soohoo* Richard L. Sprague and Stephen C. Ott Maril Revette Stratton and Patrick Stratton Karmen Streng Tony and Beth Tanke George and Rosemary Tchobanoglous Dr. Haluk and Ayse Tezcan Brandt Schraner and Jennifer Thornton Claude and Barbara Van Marter Louise and Larry Walker Janda J. Waraas Bruce and Patrice White Dale and Jane Wierman Paul Wyman Elizabeth and Yin Yeh And five donors who prefer to remain anonymous


Donors Encore Circle

$600 - $1,099 Gregg T. Atkins and Ardith Allread Michael and Tootie Beeman Drs. Noa and David Bell Susan and Kent Calfee Donald and Dolores Chakerian Gale and Jack Chapman William and Susan Chen John and Cathie Duniway Nell Farr and Anna Melvin Doris and Earl Flint Murray and Audrey Fowler Carole Franti* Paul J. and Dolores L. Fry Charitable Fund Gatmon-Sandrock Family Craig Gladen Paul N. and E. F. “Pat” Goldstene David and Mae Gundlach Robin Hansen Roy and Miriam Hatamiya Katherine Hess Barbara and Robert Jones Kent and Judy Kjelstrom Paula Kubo Anesiades Leonard Stanley and Donna Levin Maria Manoliu Frances Mara Gary C. and Jane L. Matteson Barbara Moriel James Morris Hedlin Family Don and Sue Murchison Robert Murphy Richard and Kathleen Nelson Alice Oi John Pascoe Jerry L. Plummer Ann and Jerry Powell* J and K Redenbaugh John Reitan Heather and Jeep Roemer Jeannie and Bill Spangler Lenore and Henry Spoto Sherman and Hannah Stein Les and Mary Stephens Dewall Lynn Taylor and Mont Hubbard Roseanna Torretto* Henry and Lynda Trowbridge* Robert and Helen Twiss Steven and Andrea Weiss Denise and Alan Williams Kandi Williams and Dr. Frank Jahnke Karl and Lynn Zender And four donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Robert Mazalewski and Yvonne Clinton Sean and Sabine McCarthy Del and Doug McColm Julie and Craig McNamara Don and Lou McNary Glen And Nancy Michel Robert and Susan Munn* William and Nancy Myers Anna Rita and Bill Neuman Forrest Odle John and Carol Oster Sally Ozonoff and Tom Richey Frank Pajerski Jack and Sue Palmer Dr. John and Barbara Parker Bonnie A. Plummer* Deborah Nichols Poulos and Prof. John W. Poulos Harriet Prato Edward and Jane Rabin J. David Ramsey Rosemary Reynolds Guy and Eva Richards Ronald and Sara Ringen John and Marie Rundle Bob and Tamra Ruxin Tom and Joan Sallee Dwight E. and Donna L. Sanders Mark and Ita Sanders* Howard and Eileen Sarasohn Jerry and Kay Schimke Mervyn Schnaidt Maralyn Scott Nancy Sheehan and Rich Simpson In memory of Charles R.S. Shepard Kathie Shigaki Elizabeth Smithwick Al and Sandy Sokolow Edward and Sharon Speegle Curtis and Judy Spencer Elizabeth St Goar Tim and Julie Stephens Pieter and Jodie Stroeve, and Diane Barrett Kristia Suutala Nancy Teichert Cap and Helen Thomson Butch and Virginia Thresh Dennis and Judy Tsuboi Ann-Catrin Van Ph.D. Robert Vassar and Nanci Manceau George and Denise Gridley Donald Walk, M.D. Geoffrey and Gretel Wandesford-Smith Norma and Richard Watson Dr. Fred and Betsy Weiland Daniel Weiss and Elena Friedman-Weiss Chuck White Lisa Yamauchi and Michael O’Brien Iris Yang and G. Richard Brown Wesley Yates Ronald M. Yoshiyama Hanni and George Zweifel

Orchestra Circle

$300 - $599 Michelle Adams Mitzi S. Aguirre Susan Ahlquist Paul and Nancy Aikin Steven Albrecht and Jessica Friedman Drs. Ralph and Teresa Aldredge Thomas and Patricia Allen Al and Pat Arthur Michael and Shirley Auman* Robert and Joan P. Ball Robert Hollingsworth and Carol Beckham Don and Kathy Bers* Elizabeth Bradford Paul Braun Rosa Marquez and Richard Breedon Joan Brenchley and Kevin Jackson Irving and Karen Broido* In Memory of Rose Marie Wheeler John and Christine Bruhn Manuel Calderon De La Barca Sanchez Jackie Caplan Michael and Louise Caplan Michael and Susan Carl Richard Carlsen Doreen T. Chan Amy Chen and Raj Amirtharajah Dorothy Chikasawa* Charles and Mary Anne Cooper James and Patricia Cothern Catherine Coupal* Larry Dashiell and Peggy Siddons Thomas B. and Eina C. Dutton Micki Eagle Mark E. Ellis and Lynn Shapiro Sheila and Steve Epler Janet Feil David and Kerstin Feldman Susan Flynn Tom and Barbara Frankel Sevgi and Edwin Friedrich* Dr. Deborah and Brook Gale Marnelle Gleason and Louis J. Fox* Marvin and Joyce Goldman S.D. Gray Donald Green William Green and Martin Palomar Stephen and Deirdre Greenholz Marilyn and Alexander Groth Judy Guiraud Gwen and Darrow Haagensen Sharon and Don Hallberg David and Donna Harris Stephen and Joanne Hatchett Cynthia Hearden Len and Marilyn Herrmann Fred Taugher and Paula Higashi Frederick and Tieu-Bich Hodges Frederick and B.J. Hoyt Pat and Jim Hutchinson* Don and Diane Johnston Weldon and Colleen Jordan Mary Ann and Victor Jung David Kalb and Nancy Gelbard Edith Kanoff Charles Kelso and Mary Reed Ruth Ann Kinsella* Richard and Rosie Kirkland Joseph Kiskis Peter Klavins and Susan Kauzlarich Norma Klein Charlene R. Kunitz Allan and Norma Lammers Darnell Lawrence Katie Thomas and Richard Lawrence Ruth Lawrence Frances and Arthur Lawyer* Carol and Robert Ledbetter Michael and Sheila Lewis* David and Ruth Lindgren Bill and Harriet Lovitt Helen Ma Bunkie Mangum Pat Martin*

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

And 10 donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Mainstage Circle $100 - $299

Leal Abbott Thomas and Betty Adams Mary Aften Jill Aguiar Suzanne and David Allen David and Penny Anderson Valeriejeanne Anderson Elinor Anklin and George Harsch Janice and Alex Ardans Clemens Ford Arrasmith Debbie Arrington Fred Arth and Pat Schneider Jerry and Barbara August George and Irma Baldwin Charlotte Ballard Beverly and Clay Ballard Charlie and Diane Bamforth* Elizabeth Banks Michele Barefoot and Luis Perez-Grau

Lupie and Richard Barton Cynthia Bates Paul and Linda Baumann Lynn Baysinger* Delee and Jerry Beavers Claire and Marion Becker* Mark and Betty Belafsky Lorna Belden Merry Benard Carol L. Benedetti William and Marie Benisek Robert C. and Jane D. Bennett Márta Battha Béres Bevowitz Family Boyd and Lucille Bevington Ernst and Hannah Biberstein John and Katy Bill Andrea Bjorklund and Sean Duggan Lewis J. and Caroline S. Bledsoe Fred and Mary Bliss Marchia Bond Brooke Bourland* Mary and Jill Bowers Adney and Steve Bowker Alf and Kristin Brandt Robert Braude and Maxine Moser Dan and Millie Braunstein* Pat and Bob Breckenfeld Margaret Brockhouse Don and Liz Brodeur David and Valerie Brown Linda Clevenger and Seth Brunner Martha Bryant* Mike and Marian Burnham Margaret Burns and Roy W. Bellhorn Victor and Meredith Burns William and Karolee Bush Robert and Lynn Campbell Robert Canary John and Nancy Capitanio James and Patty Carey Anne and Gary Carlson Jan Carmikle, ‘90 John Carroll Bruce and Mary Alice Carswell* Jan B. and Barbara J. Carter* Caroline Chantry and James Malot Frank Chisholm Michael and Paula Chulada Arthur Chung and Karen Roberts Betty M. Clark Gail Clark L. Edward and Jacqueline Clemens Bill and Linda Cline Barbara Cody Stephan Cohen Sheri and Ron Cole Harold and Marj Collins Steve and Janet Collins Patricia Conrad and Ann Brice Jan and Gayle Conroy Judith Cook Pauline Cook Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cook Victor Cozzalio and Lisa Heilman-Cozzalio Bill and Myra Cusick Elizabeth Dahlstrom-Bushnell* John W. and Joanne M. Daniels Dena Davidson Johanna Davies Mary Hanf Dawson Jody Deaderick Ed and Debby Dillon Joel and Linda Dobris Richard Epstein and Gwendolyn Doebbert Val Dolcini and Solveig Monson Val and Marge Dolcini* Gordon Douglas Sue Drake* Ray Dudonis Anne Duffey Leslie Dunsworth Marjean Dupree Victoria Dye and Douglas Kelt J. Terry and Susan Eager Harold and Anne Eisenberg Eliane Eisner Brian Ely and Robert Hoffman Allen Enders Adrian and Tamara Engel Sid England Carol Erickson and David Phillips M. Richard and Gloria M. Eriksson

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59

Mondavi Center support

mondavi center


Mondavi Center support

Jeff Ersig Christine Facciotti Adrian Farley and Greg Smith Andrew D. and Eleanor E. Farrand* Elizabeth Fassler Elizabeth and Timothy Fenton Steven and Susan Ferronato Martin Filet and Mary McDonald Margery Findlay Kieran and Martha Fitzpatrick Judy Fleenor* Manfred Fleischer David and Donna Fletcher Glenn Fortini Marion Franck and Bob Lew Frank Brown Barbara and Edwin Frankel Anthony and Jorgina Freese Joel Friedman Kerim and Josina Friedrich Joan M. Futscher Myra A. Gable Lillian Gabriel Charles and Joanne Gamble Claude and Nadja Garrod Xiaojia Ge and Ronghua Li* Ivan Gennis Peggy Gerick Gerald Gibbons and Sibilla Hershey Mary Lou and Robert Gillis Eleanor Glassburner Roberta R. Gleeson Burton Goldfine Robert and Pat Gonzalez* Robert and Velma Goodlin Michael Goodman Susan Goodrich Alouise Hillier Victor Graf Tom Graham Jacqueline Gray* Kathleen and Thomas Green Paul and Carol Grench Cindy and Henry Guerrero June and Paul Gulyassy Wesley and Ida Hackett* Jim and Jane Hagedorn Frank and Rosalind Hamilton William and Sherry Hamre Jim and Laurie Hanschu Marylee and John Hardie Richard and Vera Harris Cathy Brorby and Jim Harritt Sally H. Harvey Marjorie Heineke Donald and Lesley Heller Paul and Nancy Helman Martin Helmke and Joan Frye Williams Rand and Mary Herbert Eric Herrgesell, DVM Roger and Rosanne Heym Elizabeth and Larry Hill Calvin Hirsch and Deborah Francis Michael and Peggy Hoffman Jan and Herb Hoover Steve and Nancy Hopkins Allie Huberty David and Gail Hulse Deborah Hunter Eva Peters Hunting Lorraine J. Hwang Gabriel Isakson William Jackson Kathryn Jaramillo Dr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Jensen Pamela R. Jessup Carole and Phil Johnson John and Jane Johnson Steve and Naomi Johnson Michelle Johnston Warren and Donna Johnston In memory of Betty and Joseph Baria Andrew and Merry Joslin Martin and JoAnn Joye* John and Nancy Jungerman Fred and Selma Kapatkin Shari and Timothy Karpin Jean and Stephen Karr Anthony and Beth Katsaris Yasuo Kawamura Phyllis and Scott Keilholtz* Gary Kieser Dave and Gay Kent Michael Kent and Karl Jandrey Cathryn Kerr

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Pat and John Kessler Larry Kimble and Louise Bettner Ken and Susan Kirby Dorothy Klishevich Paulette Keller Knox Muriel Knudsen Winston and Katy Ko Paul and Pamela Kramer Dave and Nina Krebs Marcia and Kurt Kreith Sandra Kristensen Elizabeth and C.R. Kuehner Nate Kupperman Leslie Kurtz Cecilia Kwan Donald and Yoshie Kyhos Ray and Marianne Kyono Terri Labriola Bonnie and Kit Lam* Marsha M. Lang Lawrence and Ingrid Lapin Bruce and Susan Larock Kathleen Larson Leon E. Laymon C and J Learned Marceline Lee and Philip Smith Nancy P. Lee The Hartwig-Lee Family Nancy and Steve Lege The Lenk-Sloane Family Edward N. Lester Evelyn A. Lewis Melvyn and Rita Libman Guille Levin Libresco Jim and Jami Long Kim Longworth Mary Lowry Henry Luckie Paul and Linnae Luehrs Diana Lynch Maryanne Lynch Ed and Sue MacDonald Leslie Macdonald and Gary Francis Julin Maloof and Stacey Harmer Sandra Mansfield Joseph and Mary Alice Marino Pam Marrone and Mick Rogers Donald and Mary Martin Garth and Linda Martin J. A. Martin Mr. and Mrs. William R. Mason Bob and Vel Matthews Leslie Maulhardt Katherine F. Mawdsley* Karen McCluskey* John McCoy Nora McGuinness* Donna and Dick McIlvaine Tim and Linda McKenna Blanche McNaughton* Richard and Virginia McRostie Martin A. Medina and Laurie Perry Wener Paul Harder III DeAna Melilli Barry Melton and Barbara Langer Sharon Menke The Merchant Family Roland Meyer Leslie Michaels and Susan Katt Lisa Miller Phyllis Miller Sue and Rex Miller Douglas Minnis Steve and Kathy Miura* Kei and Barbara Miyano Sydney Moberg Vicki and Paul Moering Joanne K. Moldenhauer Amy Moore Debra Moore Hallie Morrow Marcie Mortensson Tony and Linda Mras Robert and Janet Mukai The Muller Family Terry and Judith Murphy Steve Abramowitz and Dr. Alberta Nassi Joni Neibert M.A. Nelson Margaret Neu* Cathy Neuhauser and Jack Holmes Robert and Donna Curley Nevraumont* Keri Mistler and Dana Newell Kan Ching Ng Malvina Nisman

Nancy Nolte and James Little John Chendo and Esther Novak Patricia O’Brien* Kay Ogasawara Dana Olson James Oltjen Marvin O’Rear David and Debra Oshige Bob and Beth Owens Carlene and Mike Ozonoff* Michael Pach Joan S. Packard Thomas Pavlakovich and Kathryn Demakopoulos Bob and Marlene Perkins Lee/Michael Perrone Ann Peterson and Marc Hoeschele Pat Piper Vicki and Bob Plutchok Ralph and Jane Pomeroy* Bea and Jerry Pressler Ann Preston John Provost Evelyn and Otto Raabe Jan and Anne-Louise Radimsky Kathryn Radtkey-Gaither Lawrence and Norma Rappaport Evelyn and Dewey Raski Olga Raveling Sandi Redenbach* Mrs. John Reese, Jr. Martha Rehrman* Michael A. Reinhart and Dorothy Yerxa Eugene and Elizabeth Renkin Judy, David, and Hannah Reuben Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rice Bill Rich John Richards Fred and Bernadeen Richardson Joyce Rietz Ralph and Judy Riggs* Caroline and Stephen Roberts Warren G. Roberts David and Kathy Robertson Tracy Rodgers Richard and Evelyne Rominger Mary F. Rosa Sharon and Elliott Rose Jean and George Rosenfeld Barbara and Alan Roth David and Catherine Rowen Paul and Ida Ruffin Hugh Safford Terry Sandbek and Sharon Billings* Kathleen and David Sanders Fred and Polly Schack John and Joyce Schaeuble Tyler Schilling Leon Schimmel and Annette Cody Fred and Colene Schlaepfer Janis J. Schroeder and Carrie L. Markel Jean Schwarzkopf Robert and Jenifer Segar Brian Sehnert and Janet McDonald Dan Shadoan and Ann Lincoln Jay and Jill Shepherd Ruth and Robert Shumway Sandra and Clay Sigg Dr. and Mrs. R.L. Siegler Andrew Sih and Caitlin McGaw Mark Berman and Lynn Simon Michael and Elizabeth Singer Joy Skalbeck Barbara Slemmons Judith Smith Jean Snyder Roger and Freda Sornsen Greg and Pam Sparks Joseph and Dolores Spencer Marguerite Spencer Miriam Steinberg Harriet Steiner and Miles Stern John and Johanna Stek Judith Stern Raymond Stewart Deb and Jeff Stromberg Patricia Sturdevant Becky and James Sullivan Thomas Swift Joyce Takahashi Stewart and Ann Teal Pouneh Tehrani Francie Teitelbaum Jeanne Shealor and George Thelen Julie Theriault, PA-C

Virginia Thigpen Janet Thome Robert Thorpe Brian Toole Robert and Victoria Tousignant Katharine Traci Michael and Heidi Trauner Gary and Jan Truesdail Barbara and Jim Tutt Chris Van Kessel Bart and Barbara Vaughn* Marian and Paul Ver Wey Richard and Maria Vielbig Merna and Don Villarejo Charles and Terry Vines Evelyn Matteucci and Richard Vorpe Carolyn Waggoner* M. Therese Wagnon Maxine Wakefield and William Reichert Marny and Rick Wasserman Caroline and Royce Waters Marya Welch* Dan and Ellie Wendin Martha West Robert and Leslie Westergaard* Susan Wheeler Regina White Linda K. Whitney Kristin Wiese Phillip and JoAnne Wile Ward Willats Mrs. Jane L. Williams Suzanne and Keith Williams Janet Winterer The Wolf Family Jennifer Woo Linda Yassinger Timothy and Vicki Yearnshaw Norman and Manda Yeung Phillip and Iva Yoshimura Heather M. Young and Peter B. Quinby Larry Young and Nancy Lee Phyllis Young Melanie and Medardo Zavala Drs. Matthew and Meghan Zavod Phyllis and Darrel Zerger* Timothy Zindel Karen Ziskind Mark and Wendy Zlotlow And 55 donors who prefer to remain anonymous

CORPORATE MATCHING GIFTS American Express Foundation Gift Matching Program Bank of America Matching Gifts Program Chevron/Texaco Matching Gift Fund ExxonMobil Foundation McGraw-Hill Company Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation Monsanto Company The Sacramento Bee Wachovia Foundation Matching Gifts Program Wells Fargo Foundation We appreciate the many Members who participate in their employers’ matching gift program. Please contact your Human Resources department to find out about your company’s matching gift program. Note: We are pleased to recognize the Members of Mondavi Center for their generous support of our program. We apologize if we inadvertently listed your name incorrectly; please contact the Development Office at 530.754.5436 to inform us of corrections.


Friends celebrate 20 years!

of Mondavi Center

The 2010-11 season marks the 20th anniversary of the Friends of Mondavi Center. Twenty years ago, a small, energetic, creative group of volunteers saw a need and began what was then Friends of UC Davis Presents. As the Mondavi Center opened in 2002, the group became the Friends of Mondavi Center. With an ever growing roster of 180 members, during the 2009-10 season enthusiastic Friends of Mondavi Center logged over 9000 volunteer hours supporting Arts Education programs! The Friends of Mondavi Center volunteer opportunities include managing and staffing the Gift Shop whose profits benefit Arts Education and planning social events and fundraisers which support the School Matinee Ticket Program. During the 2009 -2010 season, the School Matinee Ticket Program identified and provided school matinee tickets free of charge to schools and programs in the region which otherwise would not have been able to attend. Friends also are docents who present short talks to students in preparation for them attending school matinees. Docents use materials that are researched and written by other Friends. Friends also act as ushers for the school matinee performances.

The Friends of Mondavi Center is an active donor-based volunteer organization that supports activities of the Mondavi Center’s presenting program. Deeply committed to arts education, Friends volunteer their time and financial support for learning opportunities

Other activities of the Friends of Mondavi Center include the Adult Education Committee which staffs pre- and post-performance lectures and the Spotlight Series, Mondavi Center Tours and the Ad Hoc Committee, providing support as needed to the Arts Education Program.

related to Mondavi Center performances. When you join the Friends of Mondavi Center, you are able to choose from a variety of activities and work with other Friends who share your interests.

For information on becoming a Friend of Mondavi Center, email Jennifer Mast at jmmast@ucdavis.edu or call 530.754.5430.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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Mondavi Center staff

Mondavi Center staff DON ROTH, Ph.D. Executive Director Jeremy Ganter Associate Executive Director PROGRAMMING Jeremy Ganter Director of Programming Erin Palmer Programming Manager Ruth Rosenberg Artist Engagement Coordinator Lara Downes Curator: Young Artists Program

AUDIENCE SERVICES Emily Taggart Audience Services Manager/ Artist Liaison Coordinator Yuri Rodriguez Events Manager Natalia Deardorff Assistant Events Manager Nancy Temple Assistant Public Events Manager BUSINESS SERVICES Debbie Armstrong Senior Director of Support Services

ARTS EDUCATION Joyce Donaldson Associate to the Executive Director for Arts Educaton and Strategic Projects

Carolyn Warfield Human Resources Analyst

Jennifer Mast Arts Education Coordinator

Russ Postlethwaite Billing System Administrator

Mandy Jarvis Financial Analyst

DEVELOPMENT Debbie Armstrong Senior Director of Development

MARKETING Rob Tocalino Director of Marketing

production Christopher Oca Stage Manager

Elisha Findley Development Coordinator

Will Crockett Marketing Manager

Christi-Anne Sokolewicz Stage Manager

Erin Kelley Senior Graphic Artist

Jenna Bell Production Coordinator

Morissa Rubin Senior Graphic Artist

Zak Stelly-Riggs Master Carpenter

FACILITIES Steve McFerron Director of Facilities Greg Bailey Lead Building Maintenance Worker INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Darren Marks Programmer/Designer

Steve David Ticket Office Supervisor

Mark J. Johnston Lead Application Developer Tim Kendall Programmer

Dena Gilday Payroll and Travel Assistant

TICKET OFFICE Sarah Herrera Ticket Office Manager

Russell St. Clair Ticket Agent Head Ushers Huguette Albrecht George Edwards Linda Gregory Donna Horgan Mike Tracy Susie Valentin Janellyn Whittier Terry Whittier

Daniel Goldin Master Electrician Michael Hayes Head Sound Technician Adrian Galindo Scene Technician Kathy Glaubach Scene Technician Daniel Thompson Scene Technician

Mondavi Center advisory Board The Mondavi Center Advisory Board is a university support group whose primary purpose is to provide assistance to the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis, and its resident users, the academic departments of Music and Theatre and Dance, and the presenting program of the Mondavi Center, through fundraising, public outreach, and other support for the mission of UC Davis and the Mondavi Center. 10-11 Season Board Officers John Crowe, Chair Lynette Hart, Vice-Chair Joe Tupin, Vice-Chair Dee Hartzog, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Lor Shepard, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Garry P. Maisel, Corporate Relations Co-Chair Camille Chan, Corporate Relations Co-Chair

Members Wayne Bartholomew Camille Chan John Crowe Lois Crowe Patti Donlon David Fiddyment Dolly Fiddyment Mary Lou Flint Samia Foster

Scott Foster Anne Gray Bonnie Green Ed Green Benjamin Hart Lynette Hart Dee Hartzog Joe Hartzog Barbara K. Jackson Garry P. Maisel

Stephen Meyer Nancy Roe William Roe Lawrence Shepard Nancy Shepard Joan Stone Tony Stone Joe Tupin Larry Vanderhoef Rosalie Vanderhoef

Ex Officio

Linda Katehi, Chancellor, UC Davis Enrique Lavernia, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor, UC Davis Jessie Ann Owens, Dean, Division of Humanities, Arts & Cultural Studies, College of Letters & Sciences, UC Davis Margaret Neu, President, Friends of Mondavi Center Sally Ryen, Chair, Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center

Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee

friends of mondavi center

The Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee is made up of interested students, faculty, and staff who attend performances, review programming opportunities, and meet monthly with the director of the Mondavi Center. They provide advice and feedback for the Mondavi Center staff throughout the performance season.

10-11 Executive Board Margaret Neu, President Laura Baria, Vice President/Membership Francie Lawyer, Secretary Jo Anne Boorkman, Adult Education Sandra Chong, K-12 Education John Cron, Mondavi Center Tours Phyllis Zerger, Outreach Martha Rehrman, School Matinee Ticket Program Fundraising Eunice Adair Christensen, Gift Shop Manager, Ex Officio Joyce Donaldson, Director of Arts Education, Ex Officio

10-11 Committee Members Sally Ryen, Chair Prabhakara Choudary Adrian Crabtree Susan Franck Kelley Gove Holly Keefer

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Sandra Lopez Danielle McManus Bella Merlin Lee Miller Bettina Ng’weno Rei Okamoto

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Hearne Pardee Isabel Raab Kayla Rouse Erin Schlemmer Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie


Ticket Exchange Policy • Once a season ticket request is processed, there are no refunds. • If you exchange for a higher priced ticket, you will be charged the difference. The difference between a higher and lower priced exchanged ticket is not refundable. • Tickets must be exchanged at least one business day prior to the performance. • Tickets may not be exchanged after your performance date. • Gift certificates will not be issued for returned tickets. Parking You may purchase parking passes for individual Mondavi Center events for $6 for each event at the parking lot or with your ticket order. Rates are subject to change. Parking passes that have been lost or stolen will not be replaced. Group Discounts Entertain friends, family, classmates, or business associates and save money. Groups of 20 or more qualify for a 10% discount. Payment must be made in a single check or credit card transaction. Please call 530.754.2787 or 866.754.2787. Student Tickets (50% off the full single ticket price*) Eligibility: Full-time students age 12 & over enrolled for the current academic year at an accredited institution and matriculating towards a diploma or a degree. (Continuing education enrollees are not eligible). Proof Requirements: School ID for the current academic year OR photocopy of your transcript/report card/tuition bill receipt for the current academic year. Children For events other than the family series it is recommended that children under the age of 5 not be brought to the performance for the enjoyment of all patrons. A ticket is required of all children regardless of age; any child attending a performance should be able to sit quietly throughout the performance. Privacy Policy Mondavi Center collects information from patrons solely for the purpose of gaining necessary information to conduct business and serve our patrons more efficiently. We also sometimes share names and addresses with other not-for-profit arts organizations. If you do not wish to be included in our e-mail communications or postal mailings, or if you do not want us to share your name, please notify us via e-mail, U.S. mail, or telephone. Full Privacy Policy at www.MondaviArts.org.

POlicies

POlicies and information

Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities Mondavi Center is proud to be a state-of-the-art public facility that meets or exceeds all state and federal ADA requirements and is fully accessible to patrons with disabilities. Parking for patrons with DMV placards is available on the street level (mid-level) of the nearby parking structure, and on the surface lots near the covered walkway. There is also a short-term drop-off area directly in front of the entrance. Patrons with disabilities or special seating needs should notify the Mondavi Center Ticket Office of those needs at the time of ticket purchase. Requests for sign language interpreting, real-time captioning, Braille programs, and other reasonable accommodations should be made with at least two weeks notice. Mondavi Center may not be able to accommodate special needs brought to our attention at the performance. Seating spaces for wheelchair users and their companions are located at all levels and prices for all performances. Ushers are available at the doors to Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Please explain to the usher how best to assist you, if needed. Special Seating Mondavi Center offers special seating arrangements for our patrons with disabilities. Please call the Ticket Office at 530.754.2787 [TDD 530.754.5402]. Listening Enhancement Devices Listening Infrared Systems are installed in both Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Receivers that can be used with or without hearing aids are available for patrons who have difficulty understanding dialogue or song lyrics. They may be checked out at no charge from the Patron Services Desk near the lobby elevators. Elevators Mondavi Center has two passenger elevators serving all levels. They are located at the north end of the Yoche Dehe Grand Lobby, near the restrooms and Patron Services Desk.

Service Animals Mondavi Center welcomes working service animals that are necessary to assist patrons with disabilities. Service animals must remain on a leash or harness at all times. Please contact the Mondavi Center Ticket Office if you intend to bring a service animal to an event so that appropriate seating can be reserved for you.

Restrooms All public restrooms are equipped with accessible sinks, stalls, baby-changing stations, and amenities. There are six public restrooms in the building: two on the Orchestra level; two on the Orchestra Terrace level; and two on the Grand Tier level. *Only one discount per ticket.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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September 2010

Imago, ZooZoo sun, nov 7

march 2011

Madeleine Albright

Delfeayo Marsalis Group

mon, mar 7

Wed, Sep 29

San Francisco Symphony

Center

Thur, Sep 30

Christopher O’Riley, piano sat-sun, nov 13-14

october 2010

Paul Taylor Dance Company

Bayanihan, National Folk Dance Company of the Philippines

Tous les Matins du Monde

sat, nov 13

fri, Oct 1

thu, nov 18

Dianne Reeves

Ornette Coleman

sat, Oct 2

sat, nov 20

Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers

Jeanine De Bique, soprano

sun, Oct 3

Rising Stars of Opera

Mondavi 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1

wed-fri, nov 10-12

sat-sun, nov 20-21

december 2010

Los Lobos

Tord Gustavsen and Solveig Slettahjell

Dresden Staatskapelle

Alexander String Quartet

Gamelan Çudamani

Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano

Stew and The Negro Problem

Kronos Quartet

Jonah Lehrer

Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum

Music and Madness Festival

Lara Downes Family Concert

sat, Oct 9

wed, Oct 13 sat, Oct 23

sun, Oct 24

tue-wed, Oct 26-27 wed, Oct 27

thu-sun, Oct 28-31

wed-sat, dec 1-4 sun, dec 5 sun, dec 5 thu, dec 9

fri, dec 10

sun, dec 12

American Bach Soloists, Messiah

Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Tango Fire: Tango Inferno thu, mar 10

Yefim Bronfman, piano sat, mar 12

Alexander String Quartet sun, mar 13

San Francisco Symphony and Chorus thu, mar 17

Curtis On Tour

sat-sun, mar 19-20

Dan Zanes and Friends sun, mar 20

St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra sat, mar 26

Young Artists Competition Winners sun, mar 27

april 2011 Branford Marsalis & Terence Blanchard fri, apr 1

Takács Quartet, with Nobuyuki Tsujii, piano sat, apr 2

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater tue-wed, apr 5-6

The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma fri, apr 8

sat, dec 18

Lara Downes with David Sanford

Venice Baroque Orchestra with Robert McDuffie, violin

january 2011

China Philharmonic Orchestra

Delfeayo Marsalis Octet

sat-sun, jan 15-16

Buika

thu, jan 20

Alexander String Quartet

sat, jan 22

november 2010 wed, nov 3

wed-sat, nov 3-6 sat, nov 6 sun, nov 7

Kenric Tam

Mark O’Connor and Julian Lage Itzhak Perlman, violin Daniel Handler wed, jan 26

25th Hour

thu, jan 27

MOMIX, Botanica

sat-sun, jan 29-30

Simone Dinnerstein and Tift Merritt sat-sun, jan 29-30

february 2011 Mark Morris Dance Group wed, feb 2

Vijay Iyer

wed-sat, feb 2-5

Joshua Bell, violin wed, feb 9

Bill Frisell Trio and John Scofield Trio

sat-sun, apr 9-10 tue, apr 12

Max Raabe and Palast Orchester wed, apr 13

Béla Fleck, Zakir Hussain, & Edgar Meyer thu, apr 14

Der Untergang (Downfall) thu, apr 21

Buddy Guy

fri, apr 22

David Sedaris thu, apr 28

Pablo Ziegler, Beyond Tango fri, apr 29

may 2011 Lucinda Childs, DANCE tue, may 3

Roby Lakatos Ensemble thu, may 5

june 2011 Alexander String Quartet sun, june 5

fri, feb 11

New Century Chamber Orchestra with Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg sat, feb 12

La Rondine 64

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thu, feb 17

MondaviArts.org 530.754.2787

866.754.2787 (toll-free)


Playbill Issue 5: Jan-Feb 2011