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July/August 2007 Vol. XVII, No. 5, $7.00

Salt in their Sweat An in-depth look at salt loss during exercise

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July/August 2007, Vol. XVII, No. 5

CONTENTS 30 17

6

14

41 51

59 60 65 67 72

Comeback Athlete Debra Huss Seattle Pacific University Bulletin Board NCAA ban on antiestrogens begins … Study analyzes Tommy John surgery … A look at overtraining syndrome. Sponsored Pages Athlete Protein Needs Special Section Web Site Supplier Profiles Product News Product Launch Heat Stress Products Aquatic Therapy Ankle & Footcare More Products

74

Advertisers Directory

80

CEU Quiz For NATA and NSCA members

Cover Photo: AP Photos TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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Career Options

Orders 17 Doctor’s Working alongside physicians in a clinical setting isn’t exactly what athletic trainers are trained for. But more and more are finding the role of physician extender to be the right career move. By Kenny Berkowitz Optimum Performance

with Science 24 Playing Research tells us that periodization is the best approach to designing strength programs. Applying it in sport-specific situations, though, takes a little experimenting. By John Cissik, Michael Barnes, & Allen Hedrick Treating The Athlete

Treading Lightly

30 Speeding up rehab and preventing overtraining have never been easier, thanks to new ideas in using underwater treadmills. By R.J. Anderson Nutrition

Salt in their Sweat

36 Why do some athletes experience extremely high rates of salt loss when exercising? And how do we prevent them from getting cramps and heat illness? Here’s how to work with salty sweaters. By Josh Hingst Sport Specific

From Low to High

45 The University of Kentucky’s strength and conditioning program for volleyball has helped athletes go from dig to spike—and from losing to winning—in record time. By Stephanie Tracey-Simmons T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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Marjorie Albohm, MS, ATC/L Director of Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Research, Orthopaedics Indianapolis Jon Almquist, ATC Specialist, Fairfax County (Va.) Pub. Schools Athletic Training Program Brian Awbrey, MD Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Instructor in Orthopaedics, Harvard Medical School Jim Berry, MEd, ATC, SCAT/EMT-B Director of Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer, Myrtle Beach (S.C.) High School Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD Director, Sports Medicine Nutrition Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. Health System Christine Bonci, MS, ATC Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, Women’s Athletics, University of Texas Cynthia “Sam” Booth, ATC, PhD Manager, Outpatient Therapy and Sportsmedicine, MeritCare Health System Debra Brooks, CNMT, LMT, PhD CEO, Iowa NeuroMuscular Therapy Center Cindy Chang, MD Head Team Physician, University of California-Berkeley Dan Cipriani, PhD, PT Assistant Professor, Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State Univ. Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCS Clinic Director, Orthopedic & Sports Phys. Ther., Dunn, Cook, and Assoc.

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Keith D’Amelio, ATC, PES, CSCS Head Strength & Conditioning Coach/ Assistant Athletic Trainer, Toronto Raptors Bernie DePalma, MEd, PT, ATC Head Athl. Trainer/Phys. Therapist, Cornell University Lori Dewald, EdD, ATC, CHES Health Education Program Director, Salisbury University Jeff Dilts, Director, Business Development & Marketing, National Academy of Sports Medicine David Ellis, RD, LMNT, CSCS Sports Alliance, Inc. Boyd Epley, MEd, CSCS Director of Coaching Performance, National Strength & Conditioning Association Peter Friesen, ATC, NSCA-CPT, CSCS, CAT, Head Ath. Trainer/ Cond. Coach, Carolina Hurricanes Lance Fujiwara, MEd, ATC, EMT Director of Sports Medicine, Virginia Military Institute

Brian Goodstein, MS, ATC, CSCS, Head Athletic Trainer, DC United Gary Gray, PT, President, CEO, Functional Design Systems

July/August 2007 Vol. XVII, No. 5

Allan Johnson, MS, MSCC, CSCS Coach, Speaker, Consultant

Publisher Mark Goldberg

Maria Hutsick, MS, ATC/L, CSCS Head Athletic Trainer, Boston University

Editorial Staff Eleanor Frankel, Director R.J. Anderson, Kenny Berkowitz, Nate Dougherty, Abigail Funk, Dennis Read, Greg Scholand, Laura Ulrich

Christopher Ingersoll, PhD, ATC, FACSM Director, Graduate Programs in Sports Medicine/Athletic Training University of Virginia Jeff Konin, PhD, ATC, PT Visiting Associate Professor, University of South Florida

Circulation Staff David Dubin, Director John Callaghan

Tim McClellan, MS, CSCS Director of Perf. Enhancement, Makeplays.com Center for Human Performance

Art Direction Message Brand Advertising

Michael Merk, MEd, CSCS Director of Health & Fitness, YMCA of Greater Cleveland

Production Staff Don Andersen, Director Jonni Campbell, Jim Harper, Miles Worthington

Jenny Moshak, MS, ATC, CSCS Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, University of Tennessee

IT Manager Julian Cook

Steve Myrland, CSCS Owner, Manager, Perf. Coach, Myrland Sports Training, LLC, Instructor and Consultant, University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine

Business Manager Pennie Small

Mike Nitka, MS, CSCS Director of Human Performance, Muskego (Wisc.) High School

Administrative Assistant Sharon Barbell

Special Projects Dave Wohlhueter

Advertising Materials Coordinator Mike Townsend

Bruno Pauletto, MS, CSCS President, Power Systems, Inc. Stephen Perle, DC, CCSP Associate Prof. of Clin. Sciences, University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic Brian Roberts, MS, ATC, Director, Sport Performance & Rehab. Ctr. Ellyn Robinson, DPE, CSCS, CPT Assistant Professor, Exercise Science Program, Bridgewater State College Kent Scriber, EdD, ATC, PT Professor/Supervisor of Athletic Training, Ithaca College Chip Sigmon, CSCS Strength and Conditioning Coach, Carolina Medical Center Bonnie J. Siple, MS, ATC Coordinator, Athletic Training Education Program & Services, Slippery Rock University Chad Starkey, PhD, ATC Visiting Professor, Athletic Training Education Program, Ohio University Ralph Stephens, LMT, NCTMB Sports Massage Therapist, Ralph Stephens Seminars

Vern Gambetta, MA, President, Gambetta Sports Training Systems

Fred Tedeschi, ATC Head Athletic Trainer, Chicago Bulls

Joe Gieck, EdD, ATR, PT Director of Sports Medicine and Prof., Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia (retired)

Terrence Todd, PhD, Co-Director, Todd-McLean Physical Culture Collection, Dept. of Kinesiology & Health Ed., University of Texas-Austin

Marketing Director Sheryl Shaffer Marketing/Sales Assistant Danielle Catalano Advertising Sales Associates Diedra Harkenrider (607) 257-6970, ext. 24 Pat Wertman (607) 257-6970, ext. 21 T&C editorial/business offices: 31 Dutch Mill Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-6970 Fax: (607) 257-7328 info@MomentumMedia.com Training & Conditioning (ISSN 1058-3548) is published monthly except in January and February, May and June, and July and August, which are bimonthly issues, for a total of nine times a year, by MAG, Inc., 31 Dutch Mill Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850. T&C is distributed without charge to qualified professionals involved with competitive athletes. The subscription rate is $24 for one year and $48 for two years in the United States, and $30 for one year and $60 for two years in Canada. The single copy price is $7. Copyright© 2007 by MAG, Inc. All rights reserved. Text may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part, without the permission of the publisher. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Periodicals postage paid at Ithaca, N.Y. and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Training & Conditioning, P.O. Box 4806, Ithaca, NY 14852-4806. Printed in the U.S.A.

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Comeback

Athlete

Debra Huss Seattle Pacific University BY R.J. ANDERSON

But Huss told her coaches she was not in significant pain and iced her ankle. It appeared to be a very minor sprain. Minutes later, she felt better and readied for her floor routine. Then, while completing her first tumbling pass, Huss felt the popping sensation again, this time accompanied by shooting pain. She fell to the mat, clutching her ankle. Upon examining Huss, Jeanette Kotch, ATC, Assistant Athletic Trainer at Seattle Pacific, saw no signs or symptoms that indicated a major injury. “There was no swelling, and Debra was even able to walk on her ankle a little,” says Kotch. “The team doctor originally thought it was an ankle sprain, and a couple of weeks later we let her return to practice and work on events that had low impact on her ankle. She did well during practice and began competing again on the uneven bars, where the only ankle impact was on the dismount.” About three weeks after her initial injury, Huss was working on her balance beam routine in practice. Upon landing on the beam after a series of moves, she felt her ankle pop again. This time, she could not flex her foot in a plantar function. Knowing that something wasn’t right, Kotch took Huss to a foot specialist, Edward Blahous, Jr., DPM, Assistant Director of Podiatric Residency at the Swedish/Providence Medical Campus, where Huss underwent a series of MRI tests. Blahous reviewed Huss’s MRI results several times before finally diagnosing her injury as posterior tibialis tendon dislocation. The injury occurred when Huss’s left retinaculum ruptured and allowed the posterior tibialis tendon to dislocate. Surgery was required to relocate the posterior tibialis tendon behind the medial malleolus and suture the retinaculum back to the bone. “Debra had surgery in April,” says Kotch. “But neither Dr. 6

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

SEATTLE PACIFIC UNIVERSITY PHOTO

It was Feb. 4, 2006, and Seattle Pacific University gymnast Debra Huss had just sprung off the vault, flipped through the air, and landed awkwardly. She felt an unfamiliar popping sensation in her left ankle and limped off the mat. The reigning USA Gymnastics (USAG) Women’s Collegiate national champion in three events—all-around, floor exercise, and uneven bars—Huss was one athlete nobody wanted to see injured.

A USAG Women’s Collegiate champion in 2004 and 2005, Debra Huss overcame a posterior tibialis tendon dislocation to be named the meet’s MVP this past winter. Blahous nor I knew if she would be able to return to an elite level of gymnastics competition, if at all. I had never seen that particular type of injury, and he had never seen it happen to a gymnast.” In dealing with an unfamiliar injury, Kotch says it was imperative that she maintained close contact with the physicians. “I stayed in constant communication with Blahous and the clinic’s co-director, Dr. Richard Bouché [DPM],” says Kotch. “Because of my unfamiliarity, I really had to trust in their knowledge. At the beginning, I would either e-mail or R.J. Anderson is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: rja@MomentumMedia.com. TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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Athlete

Comeback talk to them on the phone at least once a week. Once Debra started progressing with her weight-bearing work, I talked to them every couple weeks.” The rehab plan was fairly straightforward. The initial goals were to return Huss’s range of motion and strength levels to pre-injury levels. But several challenges awaited Kotch: the uncertainty of Huss regaining her form, demanding coaches who wanted Huss back as soon as possible, and the fact that this was the junior gymnast’s first major injury. After the surgery, Huss was non-weight bearing and on crutches for four weeks. During this time, Kotch’s work with Huss concentrated mostly on restoring range of motion in her ankle. While wearing a protective boot, Huss also performed limited strengthening exercises such as hamstring curls and straight leg raises in four directions. She started with only body weight then progressed to lifting with very light weights on her thighs. She also did upper-body strength training that didn’t stress her ankle. After a month, Huss was cleared to begin weight-bearing exercises. Kotch started this phase in the athletic training room by having the gymnast do side-to-side shifting movements and forward and backward walking. Huss also continued doing range-of-motion work. She progressed quickly, and six weeks post-surgery, she was bearing full weight. “We didn’t focus on gymnastics at that time, but rather on regaining her strength and conditioning,” says Kotch, who worked with Huss five days a week for about two hours a day.

“She felt very confident in her gymnastics ability and that she could regain her skills in just a few months prior to the season. So we focused on getting her endurance up with walking, biking, and eventually some ellipticals.” Kotch was not on campus during the summer, so Huss worked with Chris Glatz, PT, a Physical Therapist at Advanced Manual Therapy & Sports Rehabilitation, who was in contact with Kotch via e-mail. Huss and Glatz met three days a week, continuing to improve her ankle’s range of motion and her strength. When the fall semester began, Huss was anxious to resume her gymnastics training. However, she still had lingering pain in her ankle. “There was some lack of rotation and movement in my ankle, which made it painful to do certain moves,” says Huss. “At that point, the doubts started creeping in. I wasn’t sure I’d be able to compete in every event, especially the vault. But I kept doing all my rehab exercises with Jeanette and eventually the ankle started responding.” As Huss began a slow reintroduction into sport, she trained mostly on the uneven bars. From there, she progressed to practicing her balance beam dance moves. “We slowly added tumbling on the floor,” says Kotch. “She wasn’t doing any leaps or flipping at that point.” By November, Huss was doing all of her flips and tumbling moves at 100 percent on uneven bars, beam, and floor. The one discipline she had not attempted was the one she feared most.

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Athlete

Comeback ■ Debra Huss Gymnast Seattle Pacific University Injury: Posterior tibialis tendon dislocation

Result: After missing most of the 2006 season, Huss, a two-time USA Gymnastics Women’s Collegiate Nationals all-around champion, returned for her senior season and was runner-up in the 2007 USAG all-around competition. Quote: “Debra had never suffered a serious injury before, so I had to constantly help her understand what level of pain was okay and what wasn’t,” says Jeanette Kotch, ATC, Assistant Athletic Trainer at Seattle Pacific. “At the same time, I had to listen carefully to what she thought was the right progression.”

Due to the jarring nature of both the takeoff and landing in the vault, and because it was how she had injured herself in the first place, Huss was hesitant to welcome the event back to her repertoire. But her reluctance frustrated her coaches. “Before my surgery, my head coach told me she expected me to come back and compete in the all-around (which requires gymnasts to perform every discipline, including vault). I wasn’t really motivated to vault, and I didn’t think it was very likely that I would compete in all-around competitions,” says Huss. “But eventually I realized that if I could vault again, it would help the team. So I started working on it at the end of November.” When the season began in mid-January, Huss was expected to compete in the all-around and Kotch was confident the senior was ready. Despite being physically prepared for the season, performing that first vault was difficult. “I was very nervous, especially since I had not been training for the event that long, and I hadn’t even practiced landing on the hard mat. I had only used the really soft mat,” says Huss. To help promote more stability in the ankle, Kotch used a somewhat unorthodox taping method on Huss. “I did a standard ankle tape and on top of that I did an Achilles taping,” says Kotch. “When she was preparing for the vault we would tape to her ankle a half-inch felt pad cut to fit the anterior side of her ankle. This prevented her ankle from going into dorsiflexion and added to the Achilles taping.” As luck would have it, at the season’s opening meet, vault was the first event Huss was scheduled to participate in. “I was so unsure about how it would feel and if it would hold up,” says Huss. “But I had to trust my ability and just go for it.” All the hard work then paid off. Huss landed her vault with no pain. And as the season progressed, she improved in the event to the point where she posted repeated personal bests. “I was even better than I was before I got injured, which was weird,” says Huss. “It made me realize I could do much more than I ever thought I could.” The onset of competition didn’t mean Huss was done with TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

her individual sessions with Kotch. Before every practice, Huss visited the athletic training room for 30 to 60 minutes of ankle flexibility, strength, and balance work. “Because gymnasts have such great balance to begin with, balance work with them can be a challenge,” says Kotch. “I would start by having Debra do some exercises using a floor-height balance beam and when that became easy, we progressed to a medium-height beam and then to one

“I wasn’t really motivated to vault or compete in all-around competitions. But eventually I realized that if I could vault again, it would help the team. So I started working on it at the end of November.” that was regular height. I had her balance on the beam using one foot for 30 seconds, then progress to doing it with her eyes closed, then do it while turning her head.” Kotch also carefully monitored Huss’s workload during the team’s grueling three-and-a-half hour practices. Sometimes, Kotch and the coaches had different ideas on how much Huss could handle. “I had to explain that if Debra took a little time off here and there, it would benefit her in the long run,” says Kotch, who chalked up the coaches’ approaches as an element of the sport’s culture. “I had to constantly remind them that she was a senior and her body was worn down after years of competing. I explained that when the tendon flared up, she shouldn’t be pushed because we did not know how her ankle would react to that.” As she moved through the season, Huss continued to surpass even her own expectations, competing in every meet and finishing as runner-up in the USAG Women’s Collegiate all-around. She was also named team MVP for the third time. Along her long road back, Huss says she learned some T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

11


Athlete

Comeback

valuable lessons. “I’m kind of glad it happened to me because at that point in my career, I think I needed a challenge,” she says. “It taught me to be more understanding and patient. Having to train harder than I was used to changed my perspective on what it means to work hard and appreciate the competition. “It also made me a more well-rounded teammate,” she adds. “It forced me to concentrate on supporting my teammates and cheering for them.”

Kotch also came away from the experience with a few lessons. “Debra had never suffered a serious injury before, so I had to constantly help her understand what level of pain was okay and what wasn’t,” Kotch says. “At the same time, I had to listen carefully to what she thought was the right progression. “Even though I sometimes wanted to move things along more quickly, I realized that I had to let her dictate the pace,” continues Kotch. “Some-

times with an athlete, you want to push them through something because you know they can do it. But there were times with Debra that I had to let go a little bit. If she said she was hurting, I backed off.” Kotch says she also learned to trust Huss’s assessment of her own gymnastic abilities. “When she would say, ‘Jeanette, I don’t need to train this skill today or this week. I’ll be fine,’ I found that she really did know what was best and that it was okay for her to do less,” says Kotch. “She wasn’t trying to get out of a workout or a practice, she just really understood her skill level—which is obviously very high.

“My philosophy is to empower the athlete by giving them the tools and teaching them how to use them. And I’ve learned that there is a time to step back and let that athlete use the tools.”

FEELS LIKE SKIN … ACTS LIKE MUSCLE

“Each person you work with is different, and as an athletic trainer you have to be willing to adapt your methods and expectations for each athlete,” adds Kotch. “My philosophy is to empower the athlete by giving them the tools and teaching them how to use them. And I’ve learned that there is a time to step back and let that athlete use the tools. Knowing when and how to do that is different for each athlete.” ■

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Board NCAA Antiestrogen Ban Begins Following the advice of its Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports, the NCAA has added the class of drugs known as antiestrogens to its list of banned substances. The ban took effect starting Aug. 1. Antiestrogen is a general name for two different types of drugs—aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs)—that regulate the production and absorption of estrogen in the body. Under brand names such as Arimidex, Femara, Aromasin, and Nolvadex, these drugs are usually prescribed to middle-aged and older women with breast cancer and those with an increased risk for the disease due to family history. By depriving the cancer cells of estrogen, these drugs can halt or slow the disease’s spread. In the athletic community, some less-than-scrupulous pharmaceutical Web sites have touted antiestrogens for their performance-enhancing benefits, claiming (among other things) that they can speed up recovery after workouts. Some sites have also claimed that antiestrogens can reduce the “estrogenic” effects for men taking anabolic steroids, such as breast enlargement and female fat distribution. Those claims are not backed up by research, and there are definite health risks associated with using these drugs. “Reducing estrogen levels in basically healthy men may have a deleterious impact on bone turnover as well as potential impact on the central nervous system, lipid metabolism, vascular physiology, and cardiovascular risk, dangers that are not counterbalanced in any way by disease treatment or prevention of disease,” wrote D. Lawrence Wickerham, MD, Associate Chair of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, in The NCAA News. “SERMs are known to increase the risk of major blood clots, which obviously can be lifethreatening.”

High Schools Adjust Sports-Medicine Rules A new school year usually brings with it some high school rules changes on player safety, and this year is no exception. For 2007-08, the NFHS and state associations addressed issues involving mouthguards and softball pitcher safety. In Massachusetts, a mandatory mouthguard rule in basketball had been a magnet for criticism ever since the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) voted it in four years ago. Coaches complained that the mouthguards inhibited communication on the court and said they were unsanitary, since players would frequently drop them on the floor and have to put them back in their mouths. The MIAA’s Sports Medicine Committee, meanwhile, argued they were 14

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

essential to preventing orofacial injuries and concussions. By a 10-6 vote this spring, the MIAA decided to eliminate the mouthguard requirement, despite objections from the Sports Medicine Committee. “Definitely, we still have to have a sensitivity about the safety of our athletes,” one coach told the Massachusetts Sun Chronicle. “[But the rule] was very difficult to enforce … it’s really a sanitary issue.” At the national level, the NFHS Ice Hockey Rules Committee voted to eliminate a requirement for both boys and girls that mouthguards be attached to a player’s facemask. The committee noted that attached mouthguards make it easier for players to let the guards dangle, and believe this rule change will encourage more players to wear them properly. In another safety-related change, back in Massachusetts, the MIAA decided to move its softball pitching rubber back three feet, to 43 feet away from home plate. Association officials said that in addition to boosting offense, the change will give pitchers more time to react to line-drive hits. It also brings the state in line with college softball’s dimensions. This past year, Florida was the only state in which high school softball pitches traveled 43 feet. The Florida High School Athletic Association made the change for 2006-07 on an experimental basis, and association officials are gauging the reactions of players, coaches, and umpires before deciding whether to continue it.

New Study Analyzes Tommy John Surgery In the 33 years since the first Tommy John surgery was performed, countless pitchers from high school to the Major Leagues have sworn by its ability to resurrect careers. Now, for the first time, there is peer-reviewed research to support the notion that pitchers who undergo the elbow surgery come back as good as new. In a study published in the April 2007 issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers from the Penn Sports Medicine Center looked at 68 Major League pitchers who had ulnar collateral ligament surgery (the procedure named after Tommy John) between 1998 and 2003. Of the 82 percent who returned to pro baseball, there was no statistically significant change in their performance as measured by ERA, walks, or average number of hits allowed per inning pitched. Some pitchers have even credited the surgery with improving their performance, but Glenn Fleisig, PhD, Research Director at the American Sports Medicine Institute and a colleague of world-famous orthopedic surgeon Dr. James Andrews, says that’s a false conclusion. “When performance improves after Tommy John surgery, it’s usually due to a combination of three things,” Fleisig explains. “First, the rehab exercises TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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don’t just strengthen the elbow ligament, they strengthen all the muscles of the pitching arm—in many cases making them stronger than they had ever been before. Second, if a pitcher was overusing his arm before the injury, taking time off after surgery gives his body the rest it badly needed. Third, a lot of pitchers re-assess their mechanics when they come back from surgery, and they may end up adjusting their pitching motion and improving performance that way.” All those factors have one important thing in common: A pitcher doesn’t have to undergo surgery to take advantage of them. “If a healthy pitcher wants to get the benefits they see rehabbed pitchers getting, they can do the same things and just skip the injury,” Fleisig says. “Any good strength and conditioning program for baseball pitchers will incorporate the same basic exercises as a post-Tommy John surgery rehab, and a stronger arm can often lead to improved performance.” ■ The study, “Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Baseball Pitchers,” can be found in the April 2007 issue (Vol. 35, Issue 4) of the American Journal of Sports Medicine. To view the abstract for free, and for paid access to the full text, go to: www.ajs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/ 35/4/575.

Bad Combination: Overtrained and Underfed Overtraining Syndrome (OTS) can occur when athletes combine excessive physical and psychological stress with inadequate recovery periods—it’s characterized by persistent fatigue, muscle soreness, depression-like symptoms, and decreased athletic performance. And according to new research, OTS sufferers are likely to compound their problems by being undernourished. In a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in May, researchers from the University of Pretoria in South Africa evaluated 33 athletes from ages 12 to 48. The subjects filled out detailed questionnaires about their nutritional intake each training day, time spent training per week, and emotional state. In addition, clinical examinations were performed on each athlete. Based on this data, the subjects were divided into two groups: OTS athletes and non-OTS athletes. Researchers found that on average, the OTS athletes had significantly lower energy intake per hour of training (adjusting for differences in body weight). Specifically, the OTS athletes came up short in two important macronutrient categories: protein and carbohydrates. OTS athletes were also more likely than non-OTS athletes to skip a recovery meal after physical activity. ■

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CAREER OPTIONS

Doctor’s Orders

Working alongside physicians in a clinical setting isn’t exactly what athletic trainers are trained for. But more and more are finding the role of physician extender to be the right career move. BY KENNY BERKOWITZ

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fter becoming a certified athletic trainer in 2002, Ned Tervola spent the next two years at the Detroit Lakes (Minn.) School System, where he was responsible for the care of 500 athletes competing on 20 teams. There was more than enough work to keep him busy, but Tervola still found himself thinking about the next stage in his career. “There were times when I felt completely bored,” says Tervola, MA, ATC, who now works as Physician Extender at Sports and Orthopedic Specialists in Edina, Minn. “And that’s what drove me to find something that would be more challenging from both a professional and academic standpoint. I wanted to be pushed harder and feel fulfilled. I’m now in the middle of my third year here, and life is significantly different.” Five mornings a week Tervola works in the clinic, where he assists eight orthopedic specialists and sees between six and 12 patients in a typical fourhour shift. Working closely with the physicians, he takes patient histories, assesses injuries, discusses treatment plans, develops home exercise programs, schedules ancillary procedures, coordinates rehabilitation strategies, completes medical dictation, conducts research, and works as a liaison to allied health professionals in the area. Then, after a short lunchtime workout,

A former high school athletic trainer, Joe Greene became a physician extender a decade ago and now serves as Supervisor of Athletic Training Services for the University of Wisconsin Health Sports Medicine Program.

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Kenny Berkowitz is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: kb@MomentumMedia.com. T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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CAREER OPTIONS Tervola spends his afternoons as Assistant Athletic Trainer at Macalester College, where he provides hands-on care in the athletic training room and primary coverage for volleyball and baseball. It’s not exactly what he trained for in graduate school, but Tervola is glad he made the change. “The biggest advantages for me have been working closely with our physicians and having the opportunity to learn a little more each day,” he says. “At a busy clinic like this, there’s more responsibility placed on me, and my assessment skills have grown by leaps and bounds.

ways played, even if they don’t realize it. “Too many athletic trainers don’t understand they’re already working in the physician extender model,” says Raynor, who supervises athletic trainers at three outpatient clinics. “They’re already acting as physician extenders in the athletic training room, whether they’re at a high school, college, or clinic. Every time they evaluate an injury or treat an athlete, they’re working as an extension of their team physician, and functioning under a physician’s protocol. We’ve just never identified an athletic trainer this way.”

“Our physician extenders do a great deal of patient education, spending the one-on-one time with them that’s central to patient satisfaction. Their last question to a patient is always, ‘Are there any more questions you have about your visit?’” “When some athletic trainers hear I’m working as a physician extender, they assume I’m just running around re-stocking examination rooms or shuttling patients from one place to another,” continues Tervola. “It’s considerably more challenging than that, and when I tell them I’m actually doing physical examinations, they’re intrigued and want to hear more about it.” A DAY’S WORK Like Tervola, more and more athletic trainers are finding employment as physician extenders. According to the latest statistics, there are close to 1,000 certified athletic trainers currently working in the role. They may balance part-time clinical work with an outreach position at a local high school or college. Or they may work full-time in family medicine, primary care sports medicine, orthopedics, osteopathics, pediatrics, physiatry, occupational medicine, or chiropractic care. Less than a decade after the NATA officially recognized the position—and began actively promoting it as a viable alternative to the traditional setting— there’s still wide variation in responsibilities from one work site to another. However, Jim Raynor, MS, ATC, Administrator at St. John’s Sports Medicine in Springfield, Mo., argues that being a physician extender is essentially the same role that athletic trainers have al18

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In a typical day at St. John’s, physician extenders alternate between assisting physicians and taking care of their own patient load. They may have scheduled follow-up appointments on injury rehabilitation progress, or be called to join a physician in diagnosing or treating a patient. Over his nine years working as a hands-on physician extender, Raynor encountered a wide variety of issues. “I worked on a broad range of problems, from the traditional football athlete with a blown out knee to the female athlete who didn’t realize she was pregnant to the boy who refused to play baseball because his dad was pressuring him too much,” he says. “For example, the female athlete originally came in for a pre-participation physical,” he continues. “The doctor did the medical component and I took care of the parts related to history, nutrition, and sport readiness. When I asked her questions related to eating disorders and amenorrhea, she realized she hadn’t had her menstrual cycle in three months. I consulted the doctor, who ordered the pregnancy test, and lo and behold, this girl was pregnant. That incident really sharpened my awareness of issues we don’t usually see in a school athletic training room.” Raynor describes his clinics’ philosophy as a collaboration between physicians and athletic trainers. “Because

the physicians are confident in the skills and abilities of our athletic training staff, we’ve been given a lot of professional discretion in what we do,” he says. “That’s made us better athletic trainers because we have to be sharp to work with the physicians here.” At the University of Wisconsin Health Sports Medicine Program, athletic trainers have been working closely with physicians for more than 20 years. Joe Greene, MS, ATC, Supervisor of Athletic Training Services, oversees a staff of three athletic trainers who work in the clinic full-time and 15 athletic trainers who divide their days between the clinic, the university athletic department, and high school teams in the surrounding area. When his athletic trainers work as physician extenders, they essentially escort patients during their entire visit to the clinic. “They take a thorough history for each patient who comes in the door, present the case to one of our physicians, walk patients down to Xray for testing, write referral forms, fit durable medical equipment, and create a medical record of every visit,” Greene explains. “They do a great deal of patient education, spending the one-onone time with them that’s central to patient satisfaction. Their last question to a patient is always, ‘Are there any more questions you have about your visit?’ Getting that kind of attention is an important part of why our patients feel they’ve been taken care of so well.” REAPING THE BENEFITS In a 2004 study conducted at UW Health Sports Medicine, the benefits of the physician extender model came through loud and clear. When working closely with athletic trainers, primary care providers were able to see 10 to 20 percent more patients, and orthopedists were able to see 15 to 30 percent more patients. Athletic trainers provided care for one-third of the patients at the clinic, spending an average of 25 minutes with each one and improving the clinic’s productivity by an average of 10 additional patients a day. “Based on the data presented, our sports medicine clinic throughput would suffer without the assistance of athletic trainers,” Greene wrote in the study’s conclusion. “The value of athletic trainers was also reinforced by interviews with physicians, who strongly believed that their clinics could not support current volume without the three TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


CAREER OPTIONS assistants … Physicians also felt the cost/benefit ratio of hiring an athletic trainer was very favorable and that the athletic trainers’ skills and knowledge in regards to sports injuries and rehabilitation was irreplaceable.” Another study, conducted at Emory Sports Medicine Clinic by Brian Franklin, MS, LAT, and Forrest Pecha, MS, ATC, CSCS, OTC, found a 25-percent improvement in both the number of patients seen and the amount of revenue produced. “Working with an athletic trainer is going to increase a physician’s productivity and allow him or her to see more patients in a day,” says Franklin, Director of Reimbursement Services at Ossur, a prosthetic design company. “It provides an assistant who can educate patients, answer questions during or after an office visit, and free the physician to spend more time caring for each patient.” The benefits to athletic trainers working within the model are equally clear. The most obvious one is financial, says Franklin, who estimates the starting salary for a physician extender is in the $32,000 to $42,000 range, compared to $20,000 to $30,000 for an athlet-

ic trainer beginning work in the traditional setting. On top of that, physician extenders at some clinics may also be eligible for bonuses based on increasing a practice’s productivity. Another plus is the schedule. “The

ple of young kids at home, and now I have a third. Making that change was a quality of life decision that allowed me to be home around 5 o’clock each night and spend time with my family.” Other benefits of working as a physi-

There are also opportunities for advancement. “A physician extender is a highly respected position, and once you perform well in the clinical capacity, physicians will start looking at you as a possible clinic manager.” quality of life issues related to the physician extender role are extremely big positives,” says Greene. “It allows us to work a 9 to 5 day, which is very amenable to athletic trainers trying to balance work and a home life. “I was a high school athletic trainer for 11 years, and there were times during the school year when I worked four evenings a week plus weekend coverage,” continues Greene. “It was fun to work in that capacity, but as I moved through life, there were too many times I couldn’t be home. When I began working as a physician extender, I had a cou-

cian extender are more subtle. “Many of us really enjoy the constant contact and close communication we have with doctors,” Greene says. “We get to know our physicians on a personal level, which helps build our working relationship and create a very satisfying work environment.” There are also opportunities for advancement. “A physician extender is a highly respected position, and once you perform well in the clinical capacity, physicians will start looking at you as a possible clinic or practice manager,” Greene says.

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CAREER OPTIONS For Tervola, one unexpected plus is the ability to help orthopedists prepare conference lectures. “I’ve been reviewing literature and readying presentations for two of our shoulder specialists,” he says. “Helping with a lecture for the 2007 American College of Sports Medicine Conference was uniquely challenging for me because I haven’t done much academic research since I finished graduate school five years ago. “The clinical experience is what originally drew me to this position,” continues Tervola. “But it’s also worked

out well for my career plans. Having this research experience has made me think more about going back to school for further education.” Like Tervola, Greene feels changed by his experience at UW Health Sports Medicine and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in healthcare administration. “Working as a physician extender has spurred an interest for me in higher levels of administration, because I’ve seen areas where I could really make a difference,” he says. “It’s opened up doors for me, as well as for

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a lot of other athletic trainers who have pursued advanced degrees after working in this role.” CREATING OPPORTUNITIES As interest in the physician extender model grows, so do educational opportunities related to it. There are currently fellowship programs to develop athletic trainers into effective physician extenders at Emory Sports Medicine & Athletic Training, the New Hampshire Musculoskeletal Institute, and the Steadman-Hawkins Clinics in Vail, Colo., and Greene-ville, S.C. In the last three years, Emory has graduated 10 athletic trainers from its fellowship program, helping place them in clinical positions around the country. “Our fellowship teaches athletic trainers all the tasks that can be done in a physician’s practice,” says Pecha, Director of Athletic Training Services and Clinical Coordinator at the clinic. “As part of the curriculum, they spend time with musculoskeletal radiologists, learning how to recognize problems through an understanding of MRIs, CTs, and X-rays. They attend summer school with residents, going through gross anatomy, didactic sessions on specific musculoskeletal injuries, clinical diagnoses, and even surgical approaches. They participate in grand rounds with full privileges at the university hospital and scrub for 250 cases in the operating room, where they drive the scope, prep grafts, retract tissue, and suture, as well as observe operations. “Through work in the OR, they gain a better understanding of anatomy and biomechanics,” he continues. “They do their own evidence-based outcome studies. And all the time, they’re refining their clinical exam skills, studying the practice model, and learning to work with durable medical equipment. Really, we’re training them to be the ideal physician extender.” At Wisconsin, Greene is scheduled to launch a new fellowship program in 2008, based in part on the Emory model. “There’s a growing set of tools you need to be an effective physician extender,” says Greene. “Some of these skills aren’t necessarily taught in an undergraduate or even a graduate program in athletic training, including musculoskeletal radiology, general medical conditions related to orthopedics, fitting casts and durable medical equipment, and training in the operat-

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CAREER OPTIONS ing room. If athletic trainers can gain that diverse skill set, there’s a strong likelihood they’re going to be considered for physician extender positions.” Many athletic trainers are also creating opportunities for themselves by working with local physicians to establish new physician extender positions in family practice, pediatrics, and sports medicine clinics. In these situations, Greene suggests approaching physicians you already know and work well with. “Many of these clinical positions started because the athletic trainer was working with a team physician who was covering the local high school,” says Greene. “If you already have a strong relationship, you’re in the perfect place to ask that physician, ‘Have you ever thought of utilizing someone like myself to help care for patients in your clinic?’” Raynor agrees. “If a doctor trusts you and respects the work that you do, he or she is going to be open to hearing your proposal,” he says. “But if you’re considering becoming a physician extender, you’d better be good at what you do. Because when you’re working as a physician extender, you don’t have the luxury of making mistakes. If you’re going to be an asset for the physician, you can’t miss a step.” To market yourself to a physician, you’ll also need to con-

In one study, a part-time athletic trainer working in an orthopedic practice created $28,000 in billable charges over the course of a year ... A full-time athletic trainer added $82,000 to a practice. struct a persuasive argument about the benefits of the position. “The greatest selling points are quality of care and efficient management of resources,” says Raynor. “For example, if a patient comes in with a swollen knee, it will take about 30 to 45 minutes for a physician to do a comprehensive job of evaluating and managing the injury. In the meantime, there’s a growing line of patients in the waiting room, which is why most orthopedists can’t afford to conduct a complete workup. That’s where we can offer the most help—by doing that complete workup. “The physician extender model gives doctors the time to see all their patients, decrease exam and waiting room time, and stay on schedule, while giving patients the kind of one-on-one attention they really need,” he continues. “That’s a huge benefit for both revenue and patient satisfaction.” When deciding who to approach, Raynor recommends the busiest physicians in town—the ones who serve the youngest, most active population and have the longest waiting times. “Those are the physicians who need your help the most because you’ll be able to make the greatest improvements in their patient satisfaction,” he says. Some physicians will want to know details and see research. In these cases, it helps to provide studies about how patients want opportunities to ask questions and receive hands-on attention. “Then, put together some numbers that demonstrate you’d be able to make the office work more efficiently,” says Raynor. “For example, if you can increase the office’s caseload by two or three patients a day, you’ve more than paid for your hiring.” Raynor suggests the NATA Web site as the easiest place to find the data you need for a successful pitch. Along with providing resources for athletic trainers that outline the demands TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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CAREER OPTIONS

NOT FOR EVERYBODY

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n his earlier years as a physician extender, Joe Greene, MS, ATC, Supervisor of Athletic Training Services at the University of Wisconsin Health Sports Medicine Program, believed the job was right for every athletic trainer. “I used to think this position would be attractive to everyone,” says Greene, who supervises three full-time and 15 part-time physician extenders. “Why wouldn’t every athletic trainer want a more regular schedule? Why wouldn’t they want to be paid more?” But as he’s seen more people go through the transition, Greene has changed his mind. “A lot of athletic trainers go into the profession because they want to work with teams—that’s the exciting part of the job for them,” says Greene. “But in the physician extender role, we treat a different set of patients and injuries. We’re not working with athletes all the time, and although we see a large

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number of athletes, there are also a lot of patients who are just trying to stay active.” Even when the tasks feel similar, athletic trainers who choose to work as physician extenders should prepare themselves for a significant transition. There is far less contact with teams and young athletes, less direct involvement in injury rehabilitation, fewer opportunities to focus closely on athletic performance, and little of the camaraderie that comes from being part of an athletic department. Greene suggests fully examining your reasons for wanting to switch before you do. “Before you make that leap, you need to investigate it first and consider what you really enjoy doing the most,” he says. “My best advice is to shadow a physician extender. Spend a day or two observing them at work and their interactions with the physicians. If working closely with physicians isn’t right for you, then neither is this role.”


CAREER OPTIONS

INTO THE FUTURE From his position in the industry, Franklin sees the physician extender role expanding to more athletic trainers. “In the future, we’re going to see more physicians capitalizing on this role, not just in orthopedics and primary care sports

medicine, but in pediatrics and occupational medicine,” he says. “For example, there will be more athletic trainers working as certified orthopedic technologists, which are sometimes called cast techs. “You’ll also see more athletic trainers implementing outcome studies,” Franklin continues. “You’ll see more athletic trainers working as liaisons to attorneys, workman’s comp adjusters, and nurse case managers. On the administrative side, more athletic trainers will be assisting with precertification or preauthorization of surgical procedures. And as more clinics decide to run their durable medical equipment in-house, athletic trainers will be the ideal people to facilitate these programs.” For Raynor, one of the physician extender model’s most significant benefits is its ability to bring athletic training to a new population of both athletes and non-athletes. “Without question, the physician extender model is the strongest one we have for the future,” he says. “Because our profession has a finite scope of dealing only with particular types of patient issues, we need to keep creating environments

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where we can make a difference. “We need to hold on to the things that work but always search for better ways,” continues Raynor. “We need to think outside the box and ask ourselves, ‘Why do we do what we do?’ We need to be careful not to limit ourselves to musculoskeletal issues, because there’s a huge umbrella of concerns to be treated within sports medicine. The physician extender model allows athletic trainers to work closely with physicians, and as we move forward in healthcare, that relationship is going to be one of our greatest assets. Strengthening that bond is the future of our profession.” ■ For additional information and resources on working in the physician extender role, visit the NATA’s Web site at: www.nata.org/employers/index.htm. To download the UW Health Sports Medicine study, “Athletic Trainers in an Orthopedic Practice,” go to: www.nata.org/employers/hospclinic/athletic_therapy_today.pdf.

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of the position, the site offers potential employers cost/benefit analyses, information on patient satisfaction rates, and research on the topic. In one study, a part-time athletic trainer working in an orthopedic practice created $28,000 in billable charges over the course of a year. In another study, one full-time athletic trainer added $82,000 in billed charges to a sports medicine practice. “The amount of detail you need in your pitch will vary depending on the doctor’s personality and the work setting,” says Raynor. “Some doctors are global thinkers who want to look at the big picture but not the little details. Others will want to know exactly how much it’s going to cost and whether everything is going to work out financially. But any successful pitch will cover both quality and efficiency of patient care.”

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

Playing with Science

Research tells us that periodization is the best approach to designing strength programs. Applying it in sportspecific situations, though, takes a little experimenting.

BY JOHN CISSIK, MICHAEL BARNES, & ALLEN HEDRICK

W

NAOMI SHEA

hen an athlete’s goal is to maximize increases in strength, power, or muscular endurance, a strength and conditioning program based on periodization is widely accepted as the most effective approach. For more than two decades, whether they are training football players or gymnasts, most strength coaches have followed this model. However, what is easily forgotten is that periodization is not an exact science. There are enough studies published to let us know that the method works, but there is actually not a lot of data on how to maximize its effectiveness for collegiate and high school athletes in specific situations. Because of this, it’s necessary to use periodization in a flexible way and to continually experiment with it. We’ve seen coaches dogmatically follow a periodization model regardless of the athlete’s situation or needs, and then become frustrated when no gains are made. Periodization is a roadmap to guide us, but we must learn how to choose the correct paths within it.

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John Cissik, MBA, MS, CSCS*D, NSCACPT*D, is the Director of Fitness and Recreation at Texas Woman’s University. Michael Barnes, MEd, CSCS*D, NSCACPT, is a former strength coach for USA Rugby and the San Francisco 49ers. Allen Hedrick, MA, CSCS*D, is the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at the NSCA’s national headquarters and former Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at the U.S. Air Force Academy. All three have authored numerous articles and presented on many topics in strength and conditioning. TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


YOU WORK HARD. YOU PUT IN LONG HOURS. DEDICATION IS YOUR MIDDLE NAME. IT’S TIME TO DEMONSTRATE YOUR EXPERTISE AND ADVANCE YOUR CAREER. IT’S TIME TO GET CERTIFIED. “Athletic trainers who earn the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) are recognized in allied health professions as qualified, knowledgeable and competent strength and conditioning professionals. I feel that obtaining the CSCS gives athletic trainers the opportunity to advance their careers and establish themselves as leaders in their field.” — DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMB, ATC, CSCS,*D ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS The CSCS and NSCA-CPT certifications are accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies.

ATHLETIC TRAINERS: Earn the CSCS certification at your convenience when you register for the computer-based testing option — you pick the date, you pick the place and we’ll be there. > > > FIND OUT MORE: www.nsca-cc.org. Circle No. 117

GO FARTHER


A MODEL FOR SPRINTERS The following is a sample training breakdown for collegiate sprinters and jumpers competing in both the indoor and outdoor track and field seasons.

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Phase

Duration

Goals

Exercises

Volume/ Intensity

General Preparation

SeptemberNovember (12 weeks) and March (4 weeks)

• Teach fundamental exercises • Prehab • Develop strength base • Develop explosiveness

• Upper/lower body multi-joint exercises • Olympic-style lifts from the hang • Hamstring, ankle, shin exercises • Core training

Maximal Strength: low volume (1x/week, 80-90% 1-RM) Power: moderate volume (2x/week, 60-70% 1-RM) Prehab/core: moderate/high volume (2-4x/week, 60-70% 1-RM)

Special Preparation

November-January (8 weeks)

• Continue teaching fundamental exercises • Introduce specific exercises • Prehab • Expand strength base • Expand explosiveness

• Same as in General Preparation • Begin integrating single-leg exercises and split-style variations of the Olympic-style lifts

Strength: moderate volume (2x/week, 80-100% 1-RM) Power: moderate volume (2x/week, 60-70% 1-RM) Prehab/core: moderate volume (23x/week, 60-70% 1-RM)

Preseason

January (2-4 weeks)

• Teach specific exercises • Maintain prehab • Expand strength • Expand explosiveness

• Single-leg/split variations of exercises • Upper/lower body multi-joint exercises • Olympic-style lifts and variations • Prehab exercises

Strength: moderate volume (2x/week, 80-100% 1-RM) Power: moderate volume (2x/week, 60-70% 1-RM) Prehab/core: moderate volume (23x/week, 60-70% 1-RM)

In-Season

February (4 weeks) and April-June (10 weeks)

• Maintain prehab • Expand strength • Expand explosiveness • Peak performance

• Single-leg/split variations of exercises • Upper/lower body multi-joint exercises • Olympic-style lifts and variations • Complex exercises • Prehab exercises

Strength: moderate volume (1x/week, 8090% 1-RM) Power: moderate volume (2x/week, 60-70% 1-RM) Prehab/core: moderate volume (1x/ week, 60-70% 1-RM)

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE A QUICK REVIEW The overall goal of periodization is to bring athletes to a physical peak for their most important competition(s). It also prevents injuries stemming from overtraining and maximizes variation in the training program to ensure optimal physiological adaptations. Periodization generally involves organizing the year into periods, each with a specific focus or goal. Various periodization models may have different names for their organizational structures, but all have the following in common: Off-season: The off-season lays the foundation in terms of muscle size, strength, endurance, and technique. The volume of work is higher than in later phases, while intensity is lower. Exercise selection tends to be general in nature. Preseason: During the preseason, the base fitness developed in the off-season is applied to the sport. The intensity is higher than in the off-season and volume is lower. Exercise selection becomes more specific to the needs of the sport. In-season: This is when the physiological peak should occur. For some teams, this is the most intense train-

es working in a traditional high school or college setting. To start, the research rarely uses athletes as subjects. Since most researchers work in universities, they generally enlist college students enrolled in weight training classes for their studies. This

ing phase of the year. But for teams that focus on sport training and competition during this time period, it is a maintenance phase. Postseason: The postseason follows the final competition and is a rest and recovery phase. It generally lasts for two

While studies have shed light on many aspects of this training model, there are some clear limitations to the research, especially for strength coaches working in a traditional high school or college setting. creates a challenge because highly trained athletes are different from college students enrolled in activity classes. In general, athletes have a higher fitness level, greater training experience, different motivations, and different innate capabilities. All of this means that students enrolled in a physical education course will experience training differently than a competitive athlete. The second problem is that the research is rarely long enough to elicit long-term training effects. Most studies

or more weeks and consists of unstructured training designed to give the athlete a chance to mentally and physically recover from the rigors of competition. RESEARCH ON PERIODIZATION Research into the effectiveness of periodization in the United States has been evolving over the last 25 years. But while studies have shed light on many aspects of this training model, there are some clear limitations to the research, especially for strength coach-

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE last for an academic semester. However, athletes do not train for one semester— they train over a period of months and years. A training protocol that is effective for a semester may or may not continue to work over a longer period of time. This makes it difficult to compare a training program that lasts for six to 12 weeks to a program that is supposed to work for four to five years. A third limitation arises from the modes of exercise used in the studies. Most periodization research focuses strictly on strength training and does not use multiple modes of exer-

es pre-test their athletes and then test them again at the end of the training cycle to determine whether the training program worked. However, athletes should also be monitored on a more frequent basis to assess if the training program, and the specific periodization scheme, is working. There are numerous tests that can be used to measure enhancement of physical performance capabilities, including vertical jump, body fat, squat, pro-agility test, and VO 2 max for aerobic fitness, to name just a few. It is important to align testing with characteristics of

In summated microcycles, the workload is progressively increased during the first three weeks, then reduced considerably the fourth week to provide for recovery. This model decreases the potential for overtraining while allowing for the reintroduction of specific stimuli at regular cyclic intervals. cise. However, athletes use more than strength training in their conditioning programs. They may sprint, perform agility drills, engage in core work, and perform mobility training. All of these activities present different stresses to the body and each interacts with the others. Failing to study periodization using multiple modes of exercise creates an extremely incomplete picture of how to train athletes. Because periodization studies do not simulate athletic situations, how does a coach apply the method scientifically to his or her program? Most important, one must be cautious of employing “cookie cutter” periodization programs. In other words, you cannot take a standard periodization model and apply it directly to all athletes. You should use the method as a starting point, and then assess and explore the nuances of it as you train your specific athletes. You can accomplish this through goals and measurements, experimenting, and knowing how to apply advanced concepts. GOALS & MEASUREMENTS The ultimate measure of the success of a strength and conditioning program is whether it produces quantifiable results. Thus, it is important to test and monitor on a consistent basis. Most coach28

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success in the athlete’s position in his or her particular sport. A good rule of thumb is to perform these tests every four to eight weeks. It is recommended that coaches meet with each athlete to determine realistic short- and long-term goals. There is a great deal of information to be gleaned from these meetings. For instance, you may find that the athlete’s expectations are unrealistic, or that they have goals you weren’t aware of. Ultimately the goals should be high but attainable—and completely understood by the athlete. To ensure that the program is working toward those goals, it is important that you record information about the athlete throughout training. Ideally, you should save data from each training and testing session, because this will allow you to evaluate changes in performance capabilities. You may find that within a training cycle the athlete is not improving and you need to change tactics. Without compiling the data, it would be hard to know this. Also understand that athletes may respond differently to the same program because of variables like training status, age, genetics, diet, environmental and emotional stress, or even reasons we are not yet aware of. Because the research is not there, we need to continually assess the program for our individual athletes.

KEEP EXPERIMENTING When measurements and observation reveal that the program is not working as well as it should, coaches should start experimenting with different tactics. For example, we have found that the standard periodization model does not often translate well to sprinters and jumpers in track and field. In response, we have experimented with a different format for these athletes. We started by listing those principles of sprinters and jumpers that require deviation from many traditional periodization approaches: Not everyone needs bigger muscles. Track and field athletes have to be able to perform with their body weight. Putting too much extra muscle mass on them can affect performance in unintended ways. This means that the first eight to 16 weeks of the training year do not necessarily need to be spent on the hypertrophy training called for by many traditional periodization models. Sprinters and jumpers need to be explosive year round. Track and field athletes need to perform explosive training year-round so that they can mentally transfer the weight room to their event. For example, the variations of the Olympic-style lifts should form the foundation of the training of sprinters and jumpers year-round. Strength affects speed and explosiveness. Improving strength will improve speed and explosiveness in track and field. Therefore, at least some strength work should be done year-round. Heavy weeks are too fatiguing. Traditional heavy weeks of training (e.g., weeks of 90 percent intensity or above) have a tendency to break down many sprinters and jumpers, making their event practice and performance suffer. One solution is to make every Monday a heavy day so that the athletes focus on maximal strength on that day. The rest of the week is divided between lighter explosive and restorative-type training as needed. Link event training with strength training. The same qualities and energy systems should be trained in the weightroom and on the track or field on the same day. This helps the athlete mentally link the two and allows them to recover better between training sessions. For example, if Tuesday involves acceleration work on the track and Wednesday involves heavy Olympic-style lifts, TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE then the athlete has trained short-burst explosiveness (and the phosphagen energy system) two days in a row. Instead, it’s better for the athlete to perform both on Tuesday, which allows for nervous system and energy system recovery on Wednesday. With this information, we can develop a game plan for how to tweak the traditional periodization scheme to make it work for the track and field athlete. We have found it beneficial to chart each phase with the categories of duration, goals, exercises, and volume and intensity. (See “A Model for Sprinters” on page 26.) ADVANCED CONCEPTS Because we don’t have research on how the periodization model works with high-level athletes, it is hard to know when or how to alter the program. We do know, however, that many athletes reach plateaus in their training as they advance. In response, many strength coaches feel that as athletes progress closer to their genetic potential, there is a greater need for variation in their programs.

This can be accomplished in the strength and conditioning program by manipulating the program design variables: volume, intensity, training density, and exercise selection. You may also want to consider the following strength and conditioning methods that vary from a traditional progressive overload: Conjugated Methods: This includes the integration of a strength exercise with an explosive movement. Also called “postactivation potentiation,” the theory is that one exercise will enhance or activate the other. An example would be a back squat used in conjunction with box jumps. Because of physiological mechanisms, postactivation potentiation occurs most notably in fast twitch (type II) muscle fibers. This correlates nicely with developing strength and power characteristics. Summated Microcycles: This model groups together four weeks of training. In the first three weeks, the workload is progressively increased. In the fourth week, the workload is reduced considerably to provide for recovery. Four of these training blocks can then be grouped together to “summate” a

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four-month training cycle. This training model decreases the potential for overtraining while allowing for the reintroduction of specific stimuli at regular cyclic intervals. Concentrated Loading: The idea here is to follow a planned systematic loading scheme in which a period of large volume and intensity is followed by a period of reduced volume and intensity. The theory is that this type of loading scheme results in significant improvements in performance after the athlete recovers. Overreaching is a form of concentrated loading in which the athlete attempts to achieve large gains in a short period of time, after which reduced training occurs. To be a successful strength and conditioning coach, you need to understand the foundations of exercise science and their application, and be willing to dig for research, analyze it, and apply it to your situation. However, you also need to be flexible enough to understand that science has limitations and adjust accordingly. Working with periodization provides a prime opportunity to learn how to do just that. ■

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

Treading Lightly Speeding up rehab and preventing overtraining have never been easier, thanks to new ideas in using underwater treadmills. BY R.J. ANDERSON

A

t Iowa State University, athletes coming back from injuries often find themselves up to their necks in rehab—that’s because they’re up to their necks in water. As is the trend at many collegiate and professional sports medicine facilities, underwater treadmills and aquatic therapy pools play a large role in getting injured athletes back in action at Iowa State. One ISU success story took place in 2006, after a football player ruptured his Achilles tendon on March 31. “Before he could do any land-based exercises, he spent six weeks of rehab working in an aquatic therapy pool with a lot of time on the underwater treadmill,” says Head Athletic Trainer Mark Coberley, MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS, PES, CES. “Once he started working out on land, he progressed very quickly and was cleared to return to the team for two-adays by Aug. 1—and he never had any problems after that. “Aquatic therapy and the underwater treadmill are great tools for us,” Coberley continues. “We use them to enhance everything we do in rehab.” Allen Hardin, MS, PT, SCS, ATC, LAT, CSCS, Co-Director of Sports Medicine at the University of Texas, has also seen great results from his three underwater treadmills. He says they have had the most impact on his rehabbing athletes’ functional progressions. He’s noticed that return-to-play times have decreased and athletes are in better shape when they do return. The results have also caught the attention of Longhorn athletes. “After we installed a pool with an underwater treadmill at our basketball facil-

R.J. Anderson is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: rja@MomentumMedia.com. 30

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TREATING THE ATHLETE ity, we had demand from many athletes in other sports to use it,” says Hardin. “We quickly realized that our other existing pool [which didn’t have a treadmill] did not allow for the same rapid progressions.” Ten years ago, underwater treadmills were an option for only the most elite athletic programs. But today, more and more athletic trainers are adding this modality to their rehab equipment lineup.

speed sprinting activities using the current,” says Coberley. “Not only are the athletes driving the treadmill with their own power, they’re having to overcome a 5 mph current at the same time.” One advantage to having a motorized treadmill, says Coberley, is that by having the treadmill supply the power, an athlete can begin using it earlier in his or her rehab at a time when range of motion and stability are the main goals. Motor-

Even after a rehabbing athlete graduates to dry land, Courson won’t hesitate to bring him or her back to the underwater treadmill to ease to the next progression. “Rather than just doing the advanced moves on land, they do some unloaded work and can transition more easily.” A RANGE OF OPTIONS The main idea behind the use of underwater treadmills is to provide athletes with rehab workouts in an unweighted environment. They are also a great way to condition both injured and healthy athletes by greatly reducing foot-to-ground forces. The most basic underwater treadmills mimic land-based models in appearance, with similar-sized belt options. These stand-alone units can be manually maneuvered into various aquatic therapy pools, and are offered in both motor-driven and pneumatic models. Coberley has a portable self-powered underwater treadmill that he uses in an aquatic therapy pool. And although he’s currently designing a new sports medicine facility that will include a larger aquatic therapy pool with an integrated motorized underwater treadmill, he’ll keep the self-powered unit even after the new facility is built, since he believes there are advantages to both styles. “There are benefits to propelling yourself and benefits to being propelled,” he says. “Our current treadmill is used as a resistance device that builds leg strength in a partial-weight bearing environment,” continues Coberley, adding that the treadmill is inclined. “The athlete provides the power to push the belt, so we’re able to build leg strength from the feet up to the hips.” With the self-powered treadmill, the aquatic therapy pool’s adjustable current provides additional resistance. “We do everything from general gait training with full resistance to high 32

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driven treadmills typically offer speeds between 0 and 10 mph and are available as stand-alone units or as integrated features in an aquatic therapy pool. Integrated treadmills are available in a variety of belt sizes with wide ranges of widths and lengths. To alter water depth, in larger pools, some treadmills can be raised and lowered or offer a remote control feature that adds and removes water. For smaller chamberstyle aquatic therapy pools with integrated treadmills, depth modulation is accomplished by manually adding or removing water from the tank. Ron Courson, ATC, PT, CSCS, Director of Sports Medicine at the University of Georgia, estimates that an athlete who is up to his or her neck in water is roughly 90 percent unloaded, while sternum-level water unloads them by 70 percent, and waist-level water unloads them by 50 percent. Rodney Brown, MA, ATC, CSCS, Director of Rehabilitation Services for the University of Alabama athletic program, takes full advantage of the ability to adjust water depth. “With our pool, the standard depth is five feet, but we can insert some panels to take it to four feet or remove a bottom panel to create a seven-foot-deep well if we want to completely unload the athlete,” he says. “Most of the time, we’re pretty aggressive with our rehab and have the athlete doing partial-weight bearing exercises in four or five feet of water,” he continues. “Rarely do we have an athlete who is completely non-weight

bearing and needs to rehab in seven feet of water.” The newest pool-treadmill combinations allow multiple athletes to do treadmill work while simultaneously training at different speeds and varying depths. At Georgia, Courson is currently helping to design a new athletic training facility and is especially excited about having more depth and speed variability. “The new pool will have two wide underwater treadmills side by side, so I can have a five-foot-tall gymnast who’s just had ACL surgery do a walking program in the pool at the same time a six-foot-six triple jumper is working on functional training,” says Courson. “They can each be working at their own speed and water depth.” UNDERWATER REHAB Courson has used an aquatic therapy pool containing an underwater treadmill for about 10 years and says it allows him to accelerate different aspects of an athlete’s rehab at various stages. “Early on in a rehab, we’ll use it for gait training, loading them appropriately depending on how severe their injury is,” says Courson. “For example, somebody who has an ankle sprain may still have a painful gait when they’re walking on dry land. But if we put them in the pool and unload them in water up to their sternum or neck, they can walk with a normal gait and be pain-free. That allows us to accelerate the rehab, but still be safe. “The next step might be to transition to jogging or running on the underwater treadmill,” continues Courson. “We’ll also incorporate backward walking and running. For example, if I want to emphasize knee ROM, or isolate the hamstrings, I may have them do a backwards gait, either walking or running.” Hardin says he typically begins rehabbing athletes at 20 percent weight bearing to incorporate closed chain exercises and create minimal foot-strike impact. “The athlete can emphasize correct form at this depth for the sport specific exercises such as carioca, back pedaling, and jumps,” says Hardin. “If an athlete is immediate post-surgical and has significant weight-bearing restrictions, we wait until the incision is healed, then put a flotation device on that person and rehab them in neck-deep water. “As they progress through rehab,” he continues, “we will end the water program when the athlete has 50-percent weight bearing status and can maintain TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


TREATING THE ATHLETE

CREATIVE THERAPY Along with great ideas for how to use underwater treadmills, our panel of experts also told us of new ways they are using aquatic therapy without the treadmill in place. At the University of Georgia, Ron Courson, ATC, PT, CSCS, Director of Sports Medicine, uses the aquatic therapy pool to re-introduce functional activity very early on for football kickers and punters rehabbing lower extremity injuries. “We’ll put a waterproof cuff weight on the kicker’s plant leg to keep him more stationary and have him simulate his placekicking in the pool,” says Courson. “That way he’s getting some functional training and resistance from the water. But at the same time, he’s not putting the same stresses on his leg that he would on

dry land. It’s a great transition to get him back to his dry land functional activity.” At Iowa State University, Head Athletic Trainer Mark Coberley, MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS, PES, CES, has had success using his aquatic therapy pool’s adjustable current to provide cervical traction for athletes with neck and back injuries. “To take advantage of the current, we put flotation devices on the athlete’s arms, legs, and torso to suspend the body in the water. Then we attach a cervical traction unit to their head and let the current pull them the length of the pool,” says Coberley. “So we’re getting cervical traction with the therapeutic benefits of 92-degree water in a non-weight bearing environment.”

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Rehabilitation & Conditioning Pools


TREATING THE ATHLETE excellent form during the sport-specific protocols.” Even after a rehabbing athlete graduates to doing most exercises on dry land, Courson won’t hesitate to bring him or her back to the underwater treadmill to ease the progression to more advanced phases of rehab. “Let’s say I have somebody with an ACL tear who has been doing a lot of straight-ahead running on dry land, but I want to transition them to doing more sharp cutting or lateral movement. I might put them in the pool first on the treadmill and have them do some cariocas, lateral slides, and shuffles in a relatively unloaded position,” he says. “That way, rather than just doing the advanced moves on land without any preparation, they’ve done some unloaded work and can transition more easily.” Many rehab protocols can benefit from the use of an underwater treadmill, and Coberley suggests experimenting along the way. “During our first five years with the pool, at least one day a week we would have our staff get into the pool for about an hour and experiment with the exercises we thought we were going to use that week,” says

Coberley. “Our learning curve really went up when we started getting into the water ourselves and trying everything out on each other. Now, I tell everybody I work with, ‘You’re only going to figure out what works if you get into the water and try it yourself.’” ALTERNATE CONDITIONING Along with rehab work, underwater treadmills are being used more frequently as a conditioning tool. “If an athlete is rehabbing from ACL surgery, we don’t want them focusing only on their knee,” says Courson. “They may not be full weight-bearing for several months, but with the aquatic therapy pool and underwater treadmill, our athletes can still work hard to maintain their cardiovascular conditioning. To facilitate that, we try to get them in the pool as soon as their wounds heal following surgery.” Courson takes a similar approach with non-season-threatening injuries, such as a high ankle sprain. “Maybe that athlete is going to miss four weeks and it’s the middle of the season,” he says. “Not only do you want to work on rehabbing their ankle, but you also want to maintain their

conditioning so that when they’re ready to return to play, they haven’t completely lost their fitness level.” But injury doesn’t have to be a prerequisite for underwater treadmill use. At Virginia Tech, Mike Goforth, MS, ATC, Director of Athletic Training, uses the treadmill to prevent injuries and soreness while keeping fitness levels up. “We’ve used it as an alternative conditioning tool for our heavier athletes, such as football linemen and anybody with chronic knee or ankle problems,” says Goforth. “For those athletes, we’ll substitute 20 minutes of underwater treadmill work a couple of days a week in place of their dry land conditioning to cut down on the pounding. We have various programs for them, such as sprintwalk workouts where they run hard, then walk, then run hard, then walk. “Players like it because they can get in there and have a low-impact session that doesn’t hurt their joints,” Goforth adds. “But at the same time, it’s extremely taxing. If you crank the treadmill up and have the jets firing on them, it’s a heck of a workout.” Hardin uses his underwater treadmills

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TREATING THE ATHLETE as an alternative conditioning tool for athletes in all sports, and says the technology is ideal for both low-impact and advanced conditioning workouts. “Anecdotally, we have found that delayed onset muscle soreness tends to be less with water conditioning,” he says. “And research seems to suggest that hydrostatic pressure combines with buoyancy to create an optimal environment for conditioning.” For the past five years, Alberto Salazar, Coach of Nike’s Oregon Project, an elite training academy created in 2001 to promote American distance running, has used an aquatic therapy pool that features an integrated underwater treadmill as an alternative, low-impact conditioning tool to supplement his team’s land-based training. Salazar says his seven runners typically train on the underwater treadmill two or three times a week following specific protocols based on their individual needs. “We use it in two primary ways,” says Salazar, a three-time winner of the New York City Marathon. “One is as a way to do extra conditioning that’s similar to running without the pounding. For instance, some runners may run 100 miles

a week outside and do an extra 15 or 20 miles on the underwater treadmill. We set it as fast as it will go, which is seven minutes per mile, and they usually run about three miles per workout. “The second is as a therapeutic tool, which is equally important,” he continues. “I’ve found that after our runners work out in that pool, their legs feel a lot better. I think it lessens the damage that running on the ground causes.” FINDING THE BEST FIT While the benefits of underwater treadmills may seem relatively clear, figuring out the perfect aquatic complement to your athletic training facility may take a little more focus. “The biggest thing you have to ask yourself is what you want to get done in the pool and with the treadmill,” says Coberley. “There are advantages to each of the different options. To find out what we would take fullest advantage of, my staff and I sat down and asked each other, ‘What needs are we going to have for each sport that this pool will fill?’” When weighing the different options, Goforth advises against getting caught up

in pool size. A smaller treadmill located in a chamber-style pool can be just as effective as a larger one depending on your goals. “Obviously big pools look great for recruiting, but that shouldn’t be what swings your decision,” Goforth says. “You have to consider what you hope to accomplish with aquatic therapy. “A lot of people can justify the big pools because they use the heck out of them and are very inventive,” he continues. “But for our needs, we felt we were better served with a smaller model, especially considering the layout of our facility and our budget at the time. And we’ve never regretted our choice—it’s one of my favorite modalities.” Coberley says he and his staff spent the better part of a year doing research before they installed their aquatic therapy pool and treadmill, and they spent a lot of time looking at other facilities. “In addition to your peers, make sure you talk to all the manufacturers about what they have to offer before making your decision,” he says. “The device is a great adjunct to our treatments, but you’ll want to find the right fit for your particular needs.” ■

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NUTRITION

Salt in their Sweat Why do some athletes experience extremely high rates of salt loss when exercising? And how do we prevent them from getting cramps and heat illness? Here’s how to work with salty sweaters. BY JOSH HINGST ramping, ice baths, IVs, and electrolyte supplements: For those of us who care for football athletes, these are signs that two-a-day practices are officially here. The majority of us, especially in the South, battle heat and humidity every year at this time. We have carted players off the field and placed them in ice baths immediately after practice and we have instructed athletic training students to hold down a 240-pound football player experiencing full body muscle cramps. Educating every athlete about heat illness and providing fluids and electrolytes to help them avoid the dangers is an important part of our job. However, recent research indicates that some athletes need even more care in this area than others. They’re called “salty sweaters,” and when the heat strikes, they are more likely than other athletes to suffer from heat-related illnesses.

C

AT GREATER RISK As the name implies, the biggest difference between salty sweaters and other athletes is that salty sweaters lose more sodium when they sweat—in some cases, a lot more. Consider this: In a study of 10 football players, sodium losses during a two-hour practice ranged from 0.8g to 8.5g. In another study of top male tennis players during matches on a hot, humid day, average sodium loss was 2.7g per hour, but one player lost 12g of salt in an hour. 36

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Although they lose more sodium, salty sweaters have been shown to lose about the same amounts of chloride, potassium, calcium, and magnesium as non-salty sweaters. But the extra loss of salt has a dangerous implication: Research is increasingly showing that salty sweaters are at greater risk for muscle cramps and dehydration. One recent study observed football players during a two-a-day practice and examined differences in fluid and electrolyte losses between a group of athletes with a history of heat cramps and a control group without a history of cramps. Results revealed that the cramping-prone group lost twice as much sodium as the non-cramping group: 5.1g on average for the cramping athletes, and 2.2g for non-cramping athletes during a single 2.5-hour practice. The authors concluded that sodium depletion is a recurrent theme in heat cramping and is most likely one of the factors contributing to its cause. Dehydration can be another risk for salty sweaters, because it appears that they also tend to lose more fluid than non-salty sweaters. In the same study, fluid losses for those with muscle cramps averaged 1.49 liters per hour, while those without cramps averaged 0.99 liters per hour. While more research is needed, it’s probably safe to assume that salty sweaters are also at greater risk of other heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Increased

fluid and sodium losses limit the body’s ability to control its temperature, making all kinds of heat-related problems more likely. IDENTIFYING SALTY SWEATERS How do you know if an athlete is a salty sweater? The most scientific test is to use absorbent patches to collect sweat and employ specialized analyses to determine exact electrolyte losses. This is the method used by researchers. However, for athletic departments, this isn’t very practical. Fortunately, simpler methods are available. At Florida State, we start by using our pre-participation physical exam. Since salty sweaters appear to get muscle cramps more easily, we use our questionnaire to identify athletes with a history of cramping. We also ask our athletes if they have noticed more salt loss themselves. Two simple questions can be sufficient to help identify athletes potentially at risk: How often have you experienced muscle cramps during practice or games? • Never • Sometimes • Frequently Josh Hingst, MS, RD, SCCC, is Director of Sports Nutrition, Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, and Adjunct Professor of Sports Nutrition at Florida State University. He can be reached at: jhingst@fsu.edu. TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


NUTRITION

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NUTRITION When you sweat, does your sweat often sting your eyes or taste salty? • Tastes Salty • Stings Eyes • Neither Visual assessment can also be helpful. We’re careful to check for salt stains on practice clothing and salt on athletes’ skin during practices. Lastly, we keep records of athletes who experience muscle cramps during practices and contests and note how often they get them. Players who commonly succumb to muscle cramps, especially during two-a-day workouts or intense competitions, are flagged as salty sweaters. At Florida State, I would estimate that 10 to 15 percent of our athletes could accurately be classified as salty sweaters. Generally speaking, of the 100-plus athletes on our football rosters, between 10 and 15 are identified as salty sweaters at risk for muscle cramps. DIETARY STRATEGIES Protecting salty sweaters from muscle cramps and heat illnesses means making sure they are replacing the extra so-

dium and fluid their bodies lose during exercise. Using electrolyte supplements is one way to do this, but a more natural and effective method is to help the athlete make changes to his or her diet. At FSU, we prefer to try this route first. I encourage our salty sweaters to increase their consumption of healthy high-sodium foods. Good choices include pretzels, peanuts, baked potato chips, soups, canned vegetables, and lean luncheon meats. Unfortunately, many high-sodium foods athletes are likely to reach for—like regular potato chips, fast food, and frozen dinners— are highly processed and limited in nutritional value compared to fresh and whole foods. So be sure to give athletes specific advice on which salty foods are best. (See “Healthy Salt” on page 40.) Another way to increase sodium intake is to have the athlete use the salt shaker more often, applying salt to healthy, whole foods. Adding one teaspoon of salt to foods provides about 2,000mg of sodium, and this can be used as a guideline when increasing sodium intake through dietary means. Athletes should also focus on calor-

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ic requirements. It is vital that energy needs are met, especially during periods of heightened training. Skipping meals or not eating sufficiently to fuel training can lead to cramps, so in athletes who are already at higher risk, eating enough takes on greater importance. Of course, adequate fluid intake and proper fluid replacement strategies also warrant special emphasis. Similar recommendations for fluid replacement can be used for both salty sweaters and other athletes—they should replace 120 percent of fluid lost during exercise by taking in roughly 20 ounces of water or a carbohydrate/electrolyte/fluid replacement drink for every pound lost during exercise. Because they may lose more fluid than other athletes, weighing salty sweaters before and after practices is important to determine their exact needs. They may lose four to six pounds while non-salty sweaters may only lose two to four. It’s also safe to go a little bit higher in the replacement recommendation, shooting as high as replacing 150 percent of the fluid lost (24 ounces for every pound instead of 20).


NUTRITION In some cases, however, dietary changes may not be enough, especially in extreme conditions such as football, where some players may average 5g of sodium loss via sweat during a single practice. That’s where supplements come in. During two-a-day practices or when training duration exceeds four to six hours per day, salty sweaters should be provided with 3,000 to 5,000mg of sodium immediately after practices in combination with fluid and carbohydrate drinks. We use a pre-made product containing a combination of sodium and potassium. The powder is mixed with either water or a carbohydrate/fluid replacement. It is important to note that the electrolytes need to be consumed in combination with high fluid volumes. When supplementing, each athlete should be treated individually. Initially,

season, it’s important to focus on managing the situations when their status is likely to put them at risk. The first variables to consider are exercise intensity and duration. Salty sweaters are most likely to run into problems when exercise duration hits six hours a day, such as during two-a-days in football. Because coaches also tend to place a considerable amount of emphasis on conditioning during these early practices, they often require a high level of intensity. The next variables to consider are environmental conditions and equipment required for the sport. While it’s obvious that athletes practicing under the hot

sun will sweat a lot, don’t forget about indoor sports like volleyball that may be having multiple practices in an uncooled gym. In addition, sports requiring special equipment can limit the athlete’s ability to cool their body, so they also pose a greater danger for salty sweaters. Competitions can be another time when salty sweaters need extra help. It’s important to make sure they pay particular attention to their pre-competition sodium intake to help prevent them from cramping during competition. At Florida State, we begin supplementing our salty sweaters two to three days prior to a competition, increasing their

Another idea is sodium loading prior to competition. This is a relatively new concept, but early studies have produced positive results. sodium supplementation should be done conservatively, with 1,500 to 3,000 mg. If the salty sweater continues to suffer from muscle cramps, the amount of supplementation can be increased. As mentioned, research has found that in very rare cases, an athlete can lose more than 10g of sodium per hour, and in these cases, up to 6,000mg of sodium supplementation is certainly warranted. Another idea is sodium loading prior to competition. This is a relatively new concept, but early studies have produced positive results. Most research has utilized acute sodium loading protocols in an attempt to increase plasma volume, thereby improving heat tolerance and performance. Recent studies conducted in New Zealand have found sodium loading to increase plasma volume in both men and women. It has also been shown to reduce physiological strain, reduce perceived strain, and increase exercise capacity. DANGER ZONES When creating a strategy to keep a salty sweater free from heat illness across a Circle No. 126 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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NUTRITION

HEALTHY SALT

O

ne way to make sure salty sweaters replace the sodium they lose during exercise is to encourage them to consume more salt in their diets by incorporating some high-sodium foods. However, not all high-sodium foods are created equal, so it’s important to help athletes choose the ones that won’t also add saturated fats, additives, and preservatives to their daily intake.

Healthy Choices Pretzels Peanuts Soy Nuts Baked Potato Chips Whole Grain Crackers Low-Fat Salted Popcorn Soups Canned Vegetables Lean Luncheon Meats Canned Tuna Fish Canned Beans

Unhealthy Choices Regular Potato Chips High-Fat Deli Meats Fast Food Frozen Pizza Frozen Dinners Sausage Hot Dogs Pepperoni High-Fat Canned Hash, Stew, or Chili Instant Macaroni and Cheese

daily sodium consumption by 1,500 to 3,000mg via dietary means or supplementation. This protocol is most common amongst football players, but it may also be warranted for other athletes who have a history of late-game muscle cramps. Lastly, fluid and electrolyte replacement during competition takes on greater importance for salty sweaters. Carbohydrate, fluid, and electrolyte fueling during competitions is vital for salty sweaters, and paying sufficient attention to this can reduce the risk of muscle cramps. In treating salty sweaters, the key is to remember that not all athletes are alike, especially when it comes to sodium losses during exercise. Special steps need to be taken to identify salty sweaters and help them understand their risks. Once they’re identified, it’s up to us to help them stay heat-illness free and performing up to their potential. ■

For a list of references that accompany this article, please visit: www.Training-Conditioning. com/references.

n o i t a r d ion y H tat S www.wisstechenterprises.com 40

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Protein For Athletes: A Practical Guide Jeff Zachwieja, Principal Scientist, Gatorade Sports Science Institute

P

rotein is an essential part of an athlete’s diet and as a sports health professional, chances are you’re fielding questions about protein from your athletes on a daily basis. With so much new information and research emerging, making the right recommendations can be challenging. Here’s some information to help you provide practical answers to your athletes’ questions.

How Much Protein do Athletes Need? Protein requirements do vary between athletes and sedentary individuals but not by much. First, for protein to be effective, total daily energy intake must be adequate. Most athletes can meet their protein needs by consuming 1.2 to 1.4 g/kg/day of protein, and it’s not necessary to consume more than 1.7 g/kg/day even for the hardest training athletes. Using this recommendation, a 70-kg (154lb) endurance athlete would need no more than 120 grams of protein per day.

What Are the Differences Between Essential and Nonessential Amino Acids? The body can make some of the amino acids it needs, but lacks the capacity to create all of them, so it’s necessary for athletes to eat protein containing foods to obtain the amino acids they need. There are 11 amino acids produced by the body and these are termed “nonessential” while nine others, the so called essential amino acids must be supplied by the diet. The body cannot synthesize these amino acids, so they have to be eaten on a regular basis.

What Are Good Sources of Protein? Eggs, tuna fish, chicken, milk, cottage cheese, and nuts are all good sources of protein. For example: 3 eggs = 20 grams of protein 1 chicken breast = 25 grams 16 ounces of milk = 15 grams Athletes who find it tough to meet their daily protein requirements because of poor or restricted diets could use protein shakes and bars or other high-protein processed snacks.

Is More Protein Better? Protein – or more accurately, amino acids – is pulled into the muscles; they can’t be pushed in. In other words, muscles take up amino acids as needed for growth, maintenance, and repair. When those needs are met, excess amino acids are stored as fat, converted to glucose, or burned for energy.

Does Protein Play a Role in Enhancing Hydration? Sodium is the key element for hydration because sodium increases the physiological desire to drink, as well as helps the body retain fluid in the bloodstream. Whether ingested protein plays a role in fluid balance has not been thoroughly examined. Science shows that increasing the calorie content of a beverage slows gastric emptying, regardless of the sources of the extra calories. For that reason, adding protein to a sports drink that already contains sufficient carbohydrate calories may slow down the hydration process. Future research will provide a more complete understanding of these issues.

Is There an Optimal Ratio of Carbohydrate to Protein? No. There is no magic in a specific carbohydrate-to-protein ratio. Research shows that consuming carbohydrate along with enough protein to provide 6 to 10 grams of essential amino acids results in maximal stimulation of post-exercise muscle protein synthesis. Muscles respond to the amount of nutrients they receive, not the ratio of nutrients that are ingested.

What’s the Bottom Line in Terms of Whether Protein Consumed During Exercise Can Benefit Performance? It’s difficult to imagine how protein ingested during exercise would affect performance. Protein is not an important fuel source, and there is no accepted mechanism by which protein would affect performance, especially when carbohydrate is ingested in recommended amounts.

Should Athletes Consume Both Carbohydrate and Protein Following Exercise? Yes. It’s important for athletes to consume both protein and carbohydrate following training, exercise, or competition. A small amount of protein (0.2 g/kg) will facilitate repair and resynthesis of muscle proteins. Sufficient carbohydrate (1.0g/ kg/h) helps stimulate amino acid uptake into muscle and is essential for rapid glycogen resynthesis.

What Can Athletes Do to Jump-Start Their Recovery? Consuming small meals containing carbohydrate and protein throughout the day, especially within 30 minutes after training, is an effective strategy to promote recovery and growth of lean body mass.

Does the Amount of Protein Matter? Small doses of essential amino acids are most effective in maximizing muscle protein synthesis after exercise. There is no evidence to suggest that consuming large amounts of amino acids (e.g., greater than 40 grams of protein) will provide a muscle-building boost. For example, 6 to 10 grams of essential amino acids (attainable by consuming 15 to 20 grams of highquality protein) with some carbohydrate has been shown to optimize muscle protein synthesis.


TREATING THE ATHLETE

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

HEAT STRESS MONITORS/TESTS Hothead Sports, LLC www.hotheadsports.com Heat Observation Technology (H.O.T.) System HQ, Inc. www.hqinc.net Core body temperature monitoring systems Mini Mitter www.minimitter.com VitalSense and the Jonah swallowable capsules Quest Technologies www.quest-technologies.com QUESTemp II body temperature monitor and QUESTemp thermal environment monitors RG Medical Diagnostics www.rgmd.com DataTherm II continuous body temperature monitor

SportsTemp, LLC www.sportstemp.com Body temperature monitoring strips

Sports Innovations, Ltd. www.hydrateorlose.com Aqualift portable drinking systems

Stromgren Supports www.stromgren.com Polar Heat Temperature Controlled Compression Shirt

Uridynamics www.uridynamics.com HydraTrend urine test strips for monitoring hydration status

Waterboy www.waterboysports.com Waterboy’s chiller drinking unit

UnderArmor www.underarmour.com HeatGear moisture-wicking apparel

HYDRATION UNITS Cramer Products, Inc. www.cramersportsmed.com Three types of portable drinking units Outdoor Boss www.outdoorboss.com The BOSS self-contained drinking system

Wenger Corp. www.wengercorp.com Hydrate cart from GearBoss WissTech www.wisstechenterprises.com Portable and bench hydration stations PERFORMANCE APPAREL

Hydration Solutions www.hydrationsolutions.net Scorpion portable drinking units HydroMax www.hydromaxsystems.com Wearable during competition hydration unit

McDavid Sports Medicine Products www.mcdavidusa.com Ultralight durable and lightweight apparel Nike www.nikegridiron.com Nike Pro moisture management

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WSI Sports www.wsisports.com WikMax perspiration dispersal clothing Zensah www.zensah.com Seamless construction Zensah fabric with silver ions TENTS FSI North America www.fsinorth.com Cooling tents Hurst Enterprise www.hurstenterprise.com E-Z Up tents, fans/misters, hydration units


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SPORT SPECIFIC

From Low to High The University of Kentucky’s strength and conditioning program for volleyball has helped athletes go from dig to spike—and from losing to winning—in record time. BY STEPHANIE TRACEY-SIMMONS

I

Last fall, the Wildcats tallied their most overall victories, most Southeastern Conference wins, and best league finish since 1992. UK ATHLETICS TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

n some ways, volleyball is like many other sports. Players have to perform explosive movements, and their success depends on a combination of agility, strength, speed, and coordination. But volleyball also has several unique demands. Because a player can be on the floor for a dig to the setter and release to the outside for an attack within seconds, athletes must learn to very quickly transition from an extremely low stance to a jumping posture. They must also have the stamina for threehour matches while being prepared for short, intense bursts. And there’s no other sport where maximum vertical jump is more important. At the University of Kentucky, we start with a very simple goal in our strength and conditioning program: to provide athletes with a solid foundation so they can reach their full athletic potential while remaining injury Stephanie Tracey-Simmons, SCCC, CSCS, is the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach for Olympic Sports at the University of Kentucky. She previously worked as a strength coach at UCLA and was an outside hitter for Ohio University. She can be reached at: strac2@email.uky.edu. T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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SPORT SPECIFIC free. We achieve this through various exercises and periodization cycles, always keeping in mind the unique demands of the sport. For our volleyball team, that means developing athleticism, a unique type of explosive movement, and both shortand long-term conditioning. Because NCAA Division I volleyball has a short spring season, along with the traditional fall season, our training plan has two periodization cycles. SPEED SCHOOL The majority of our strength and conditioning gains are made during the two off-seasons of collegiate volleyball. The first off-season lasts from January through mid-March. The second runs from May through the first week of August. Summer training is more intense than winter work, and we look for our biggest gains then. (See “On the Year,” below, for a sample yearly training schedule.) During the first off-season, athletes are involved in an eight-week program we call “speed school.” Meeting twice a week, this is when the team works on dynamic flexibility, stabilization, plyometrics, sport-specific agility, and conditioning. Speed school is held at an indoor facility that contains a track, football field, and gymnastics room with a spring floor and mats. A typical day of speed school follows

this format: • Dynamic warmup with tumbling • Jump rope routine • Navy Seals • Hurdle walks • Plyometric work • Strength/power work • Sport-specific agility • Conditioning • Strap stretching. Much of our dynamic flexibility work is done during warmups. Along with many standard drills, we also include tumbling exercises such as forward rolls and cartwheels, which provide great flexibility training for the wrists, ankles, and upper spine. They also test an athlete’s spatial awareness—when a volleyball player makes a dig and must quickly roll and get back up, she is performing a very similar movement. (See “Warmup Time” on page 49.) We also use a jump rope routine to warm up. This provides athletes with some low-level plyometrics, develops foot coordination, and trains quick jumps off the ground. The first series is done on low-impact turf using the yard lines as guides. We usually go about 1520 yards for each exercise: • Bunny hops • Bunny hops back & forth • Single-leg hops: straight down the line, switch feet on the way back • Single-leg hops back and forth • Scissor jumps.

The second series is done facing sideways: • Scissor jumps • Shuffles: back foot leads. Navy Seals involve holding a high jump bar about two feet off the ground and asking athletes to bear crawl under it, which works on their shoulder stability as well as flexibility. For hurdle walks, we use the lowest setting on track hurdles (about 36 inches) and encourage the athletes to get up on their toes and strive for smooth hip mobility. The majority of our vertical jump training is done during speed school’s plyometric work. We start with jumping technique, spending the first two to three weeks teaching take-off and landing positions with very low-level plyometric exercises. We then increase the difficulty with more sport-specific jumps, such as one-foot take offs and approach jumps onto boxes. By the end of the eight weeks, we are performing high-level, multiple-response jumps, such as an approach jump onto a box directly followed by an explosive depth jump onto a soft gymnastics mat. We also train for jumping ability by adding weight or resistance. This is usually done during the summer months because there is more time for recovery. Some ways we do this are: • Repeat and maximum-effort jumps in the sand (which provides resistance but low impact)

ON THE YEAR The following is a sample yearly training schedule for our volleyball athletes at the University of Kentucky.

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Weightlifting

Conditioning

Recovery

In-Season

2x/week, 30-45 min. Focus: keep nervous system fresh, maintain strength

0-2x/week, on court Focus: sport specific agility and fitness

1 day/week

Off-Season

3x/week, 50-60 min.

2-3x/week, speed school Focus: strength and power gains

2-3 days/week Focus: technique, fitness, and plyos

Spring Season

2-3x/week, 40-50 min.

0-2x/week, on court Focus: bar speed, strength gains

1-2 days/week Focus: sport-specific agility and fitness

Preseason

2x/week, 40-50 min.

1-2x/week, on court Focus: strength maintenance

1 day/week Focus: sport-specific agility and fitness

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SPORT SPECIFIC • Band jumps • Medicine ball squat throws • Maximum medicine ball overhead throws • Stadium hops/sprints • Series of jumps on an unstable surface, such as a pole vault pit. During both off-season periods, we do a variety of agility work. Some drills start off very basic and become more sport-specific as the preseason nears. For instance, in our 8x8 yard box drill, the athletes start at cone 1, sprint to cone 2, shuffle to cone 3, backpedal to cone 4, and shuffle to get back to cone 1. As we progress, I’ll use the same setup but have the athletes do an approach with a jump and swing to cone 2, use blocking footwork and perform a block jump at cone 3, use defensive footwork with a shoulder roll to cone 4, and finish by using blocking footwork and a block jump to get back to cone 1. This mimics the dig-to-hit explosiveness athletes need on the court. Even though our drills are mostly sport-specific, speed school also develops general athleticism. Female volleyball players have often spent many

years with their sport, but not as much time on overall athletic movements. We feel working with our players on these types of movements leads to greater agility on the court, therefore helping to prevent injuries. It also taps into the nervous system and helps to keep the athletes’ heart rates at a level similar to what they would be in a game. The summer version of speed school differs from the winter in that it’s a more competitive environment. The volleyball team is joined by athletes in different sports and performs workouts that are based on how fast one can complete the workout, how many total reps the athlete can accomplish in an allotted time, or by maxing out on specific lifts. We call these “workouts of the day” and typically do one to three a week depending on where we are in our periodization plan. CONDITIONING TIME We do the majority of our conditioning work during the same times of the year that we focus on our jumps. This obviously poses some challenges because the type and volume of conditioning exercises can affect maximum vertical jump

height. To remedy that problem, we begin with longer runs while plyometrics are light, then go to shorter runs when the plyos become more intense. We begin conditioning in January with 800-meter runs on Tuesdays and 200-yard shuttle runs on Thursdays for the first two to three weeks. I try to do one day of straight-ahead running and one day in a shuttle format. This system works well with the plyometric schedule because these weeks are primarily spent teaching. In later weeks, as the plyometric schedule gets more demanding, I reduce the distance to 400-meter runs and 100-yard shuttles, and then finally to 300-yard shuttles and 60-, 40-, and 20-yard runs. One of the team’s preseason fitness tests is a 100-yard run set up as a 10x10-yard shuttle. The test involves

PLYO SEQUENCE To view a week-by-week sequence of the plyometric exercises we use, go to: www.training-conditioning. com/UKplyos.pdf.

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SPORT SPECIFIC five sets of two repetitions each, with a 1:1 rest between the reps and 1:30 rest between the sets. Athletes must complete each rep in under 25 seconds. This test is a great indicator of game fitness. Because the volleyball court is about 10 yards wide, it forces quick recovery, the intensity level is high, and it requires efficient change of direction due to the number of turns. IN THE WEIGHTROOM During the winter months, our weightroom work follows a typical linear peri-

odization model with the primary focus on overall strength gains. In the summer, we progress from strength gains to explosive power. At that time, I tend to use more of an undulating periodization plan, which incorporates some of the “workouts of the day.” We then move to doing more doubles and singles at a higher intensity with our major lifts. Power is obviously a key to success in volleyball athletes. We build it through Olympic-style lifts such as power and hang cleans, power and hang snatches, jerks, and also weighted jumping move-

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ments. These lifts require athletes to go from a low position to a high one very quickly, which simulates the act of executing a powerful spike. For the same reason, we do a lot of squats at 90 degrees and below. When we do single-leg squats, the athletes stand on a box, go down all the way on one leg, then come all the way up. I like to include these types of single-leg movements because they simulate slide attacks. We also use several different kettlebell exercises, such as one- and two-handed swings, one-arm snatches and cleans, and thrusters, to help supplement our power work. This provides variety and helps train athletes to be strong in all their explosive on-court movements. When they perform overhead movements with kettlebells, we tell them to shrug their shoulders, which translates into a clean, hard block. We complement these exercises with many other forms of lifting to train the total body. These include back squats, front squats, lunges, single-leg squats, step ups, RDLs, hyperextensions, a variety of pressing and pulling movements, and core work. To train the shoulder complex, we balance our pushing exercises with pulls. We occasionally superset jumping activities with squats or lunges to help simulate game conditions. Unless an athlete is injured, we train in a ground-based fashion. Balance, core strength, and spatial awareness all contribute to the success of a volleyball athlete, so it is important that she trains in an environment that supports the development of these qualities. All these factors are addressed by combining the use of free weights, triple extension movements, and core stability exercises. We also spend time in every lifting session doing a full dynamic warmup. This includes exercises such as leg swings, arm circles, resistive band work, footwork drills, core stabilization, and a series of lightweight exercises designed to strengthen the entire shoulder girdle. IMPORTANT INTANGIBLES When we train, we’re always together as a team. We feel it is vital that athletes learn to compete against their teammates while simultaneously motivating and encouraging them. It creates the right environment for leadership and personal accountability. Communication is another key part

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SPORT SPECIFIC of our success. Head Coach Craig Skinner and I work together on the training program, discussing new ideas, injuries, how hard practices were, and what adjustments need to be made as the team progresses. We also have strong communication with our athlet-

WARMUP TIME When our athletes warm up, they are also working on their flexibility and athleticism. Here is an example of one of the “speed school” warmup routines:

ic trainer. I get a weekly injury report that informs me of any restrictions or limitations on individual athletes. Taking the time to educate our athletes is another important factor in reaching our shared goals. If athletes do not understand the basic concepts of nutrition, recovery, and hydration, they will not see maximum results. We educate our athletes on these points and let them know that they are solely in control of their eating habits, hydration, and recovery. When they are away from the coaching staff, it is up

to them to take ownership for themselves and do what’s necessary to be successful. With the help of this comprehensive strength and conditioning approach, the volleyball team at Kentucky has seen results. We’ve had limited injuries while enjoying back-to-back NCAA Division I tournament appearances. When athletes are provided with a well-designed, thorough program, a national caliber coaching staff, and a strong sense of communication and support, the wins start happening. ■

Walking toe touches x 20 yds backpedal x 20 yds Dynamic quad x 20 yds backpedal x 20 yds Knee pulls into forward lunge x 20 yds right carioca x 20 yds Dynamic hamstring x 20 yds left carioca x 20 yds Standing leg cradles x 8 each leg VB side lunges x 8 each leg Calf raises x 8 each leg Instep lunge x 20 yds twisting reverse lunge x 20 yds High knees x 20 yds backpedal x 20 yds Butt kicks x 20 yds backpedal x 20 yds Forward rolls into jog x 20 yds x 3 Forward dive rolls into jog x 20 yds x 3 Forward roll into a bear crawl x 20 yds VB shoulder roll into a crab crawl x 20 yds Cartwheel into 1 forward roll into 1 cartwheel Roundoff into 1 VB shoulder roll into 1 roundoff Inchworms x 20 yds Rollups x 10 Circle No. 133 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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STAY CONNECTED, STAY CURRENT...DAILY DAILY Training & Conditioning has developed an innovative Web site to keep you in touch with issues facing sports medicine and ďŹ tness professionals

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News items on injury treatment and strength/conditioning, updated daily

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Bonus editorial not found in the pages of Training & Conditioning

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Downloadable MRSA educational posters

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Help with researching products and vendors

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Archives of articles from past issues

TRAINING-CONDITIONING.COM


The following directory offers information on the Web sites of leading suppliers to assist you in researching product purchases for the coming school year. Web site components and special features are highlighted for this group of qualified Training & Conditioning advertisers. Below, you can locate companies by category, then look on the page listed to find out all about their Web site. Or browse the entire listing to see all the products and suppliers available. Page No.

Page No.

Page No.

Braces

Heat-Stress Prevention

Performance Apparel

Antibody, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Bio Skin® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Cho-Pat, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 SAM Medical Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Stromgren Supports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Aqualift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 F.I.T. Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Gear 2000/Z-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 General Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Hothead Sports, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 HQ, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Outdoor Boss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Port-A-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 RG Medical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Stromgren Supports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 WaterBoy Sports, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 WissTech Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Antibody, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Bio Skin® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Gear 2000/Z-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Stromgren Supports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Conditioning Equipment Aquatics by Sprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Ball Dynamics International, LLC. . . . . 52 Beacon Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Creative Health Products . . . . . . . . . . . 53 DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 efi Sports Medicine®/Total Gym® . . . . 53 Ferno Performance Pools . . . . . . . . . . 53 Harbinger Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 HydroWorx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Kytec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 55 NZ Mfg., LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 SwimEx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Vertimax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Xvest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Education American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 California University of Pennsylvania. . 53 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Creative Health Products, Inc. . . . . . . . 53 General Tools & Instruments . . . . . . . . 54 NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 NCCPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 NSCA-Certification Commission . . . . . 56 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Electrotherapy/Light Therapy Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Mettler Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

Hot & Cold Therapy Biofreeze®/Thera-Band® . . . . . . . . . . 52 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Gebauer Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Whitehall Mfg., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Injury Prevention & Treatment American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Antibody, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Bio Skin® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Biofreeze®/Thera-Band® . . . . . . . . . . 52 Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Cho-Pat, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Cramer Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Ferno Performance Pools . . . . . . . . . . 53 Gebauer Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Hibiclens®/Molnlycke . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 HydroWorx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Kneebourne Therapeutics . . . . . . . . . . 55 Mettler Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Oakworks® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 ProTeam® by Hausmann . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Pro-Tec Athetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 RG Medical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 SAM Medical Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Save-A-Tooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 SwimEx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Nutrition

Rehabilitation Aquatics by Sprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Ball Dynamics International, LLC. . . . . 52 Biofreeze®/Thera-Band® . . . . . . . . . . 52 Bio Skin® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 DM Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Ferno Performance Pools . . . . . . . . . . 53 Harbinger Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 HydroWorx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Kneebourne Therapeutic . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Mettler Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 55 NZ Mfg., LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Oakworks® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 SwimEx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Whitehall Mfg., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Vertimax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Team Equipment Beacon Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Fitnessrubber.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Gear 2000/Z-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Stromgren Supports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Weight Training Ball Dynamics International, LLC. . . . . 52 efi Sports Medicine®/Total Gym® . . . . 53 Fitnessrubber.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Power Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Rogers Athletic Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Samson Weight Training Equipment . . 57 WerkSan Barbells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Xvest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Wobenzym®. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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www.instructorscorner.com

www.hydrateorlose.com

First Aid, CPR, & AED Training

Portable Drinking Systems

Site includes: • Purchase training materials online • Instructors’ Corner feature • SafetyNET online newsletter • Course fact sheets

Site includes: • Product specs and images • Patent information • Customer list • Complete price list

Special features: • Instructor Flash newsletter • Find your local Red Cross chapter

Special features: • Hydration information • Animated site introduction

www.sprintaquatics.com Pool Products, Education, & Strength Training Site includes: • Product specs with customer testimonials • Online pricing, ordering, and catalog requests • Large variety of pool products • Company background Special features: • Online store with discounts • Video clips and educational materials

www.fitball.com Fitness & Rehab Accessories Site includes: • Wholesale dealer information • Product specs • Catalog request • Company background Special features: • Online store • eNewsletter

See ad on page 63

See ad on page 34

www.beaconathletics.com

www.biofreeze.com www.thera-band.com

Field Maintenance & Training Equipment Site includes: • Field maintenance tips • “Design to fit” customization • Catalog request • Product announcements Special features: • Product demonstration videos • Online store

See ad on page 68

www.bioskin.com Performance Bracing Site includes: • Product description • Product application instructions • Company description • Customer support Special features: • Newly upgraded site offers easier navigation • Online store

See ad on page 16 52

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

www.antibodywear.com Custom Compression Sportswear & Injury Prevention Site includes: • Product specs • Customer testimonials • Pricing • Research articles Special features: • Online store

See ad on page 12

Sites includes: • Biofreeze® gel in tubes or pump bottles, roll-on and spray • Customer testimonials • Thera-Band® System of Progressive Exercise™ products Special features: • www.thera-bandacademy.com online education and research resource • Downloadable exercise instructions and research references See ad on page 15

www.braceint.com Sports Medicine Bracing Products Site includes: • Product images • Functionality descriptions • Company background • Outside research links Special features: • Online store • Detailed fitting instructions

See ads on page 68 & 73 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


www.cup.edu

www.cho-pat.com

www.cramersportsmed.com

Online Degree Program

Sports Medicine Products

Sports Medicine Products

Site includes: • University history • Information on degree programs • Admissions, financial aid, and application

Site includes: • Product descriptions, sizing, and photos • Company information and background • Customer testimonials • Contact information and downloadable catalog

Site includes: • Product catalog • Bid builder • Athletic trainer forum • Corporate history

Special features: • Online registration and financial aid/ course information • Global Online test drive

See ad on page 67

www.chponline.com

Special features: • Online purchasing • Basic medical information See ad on page 4

www.cytosport.com

Fitness & Measuring Products

Sports Energy Drink

Site includes: • User’s guides • Discount and sale pricing • Product images and descriptions • Catalog request link

Site includes: • Product information/specs/purchasing • Company background • Events and athletes • Testimonials

Special features: • Online store • Links to product information pages

www.dynatronics.com Advanced-Technology Medical Devices, Supplies, & Tables Site includes: • Online catalog with product specifications • Dealer locator • Online warranty registration • Investor relations

See ad on inside back cover TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

Special features: • Downloadable catalog • Virtual tours of products

Special features: • Cyto-Science • Online store

See ad on page 44

www.dmsystems.com Resistive Exercise & Rehabilitation Products Site includes: • Products section with rehabilitation/ resistive exercise products • Literature requests • Trade show calendar • List of affiliated associations Special features: • Downloadable images and logos • Videos demonstrating the Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer

See ad on inside front cover

See ad on page 9

www.efisportsmedicine.com

www.fernoperformancepools.com

Total Gym PowerTower® Site includes: • Product images • Video testimonials • Video demonstrations • Customer network Special features: • Online store • Product comparisons

See ad on page 7

Pools, Underwater Treadmills, & Whirlpools Site includes: • Product descriptions and specs • Product images • Customer testimonials • Reimbursement codes Special features: • Downloadable specs • Whirlpool tanks selector

See ad on page 35 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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www.fitfans.org Dual & Single Fan Products Site includes: • Product specs and downloadable literature • Press releases/What’s New • Company history and industry background • Events calendar Special features: • Online fan products (fan impingement technology) • Information on variable-speed fan motors See ad on page 42

www.gear2000.com Football Shoulder Pads & Moisture Management Site includes: • Z-Cool antibacterial foam specifications • Z-Cool impact test results • Z-Cool catalog request • Company contact information Special features: • Z-Cool close-up graphics of AC protection • Color graphs of impact testing

www.harbingerfitness.com Wholesale Fitness Accessories Supplier Site includes: • Photos of training accessories • Product specs • Dealer application • Training tips Special features: • Flash • Interactive features

www.fitnessrubber.com Rubber Products for the Fitness Industry Site includes: • Complete product selection, including specs on each product • Live chat to answer questions • Industry articles, “Why Rubber?” • 25-percent discount from MSRP, direct to you Special features: • $10 coupon on your first Web order • Price match guarantee See ad on page 71

www.gebauer.com Topical Skin Refrigerants Site includes: • Product instructions and uses • Product MSDS info • Product and technical information • Product demos Special features: • Online store • Downloadable product literature

www.gatorade.com Sports Drinks Site includes: • Background on the world’s most researched beverage • Informative articles and scientific research on hydration • Fluid-loss calculator to customize hydration needs • Discounted hydration packages for coaches and athletic trainers Special features: • Access to the Gatorade Sports Science Institute • Information on the new Gatorade Endurance Formula

See ad on page 2-3

www.generaltools.com Heat Stress Prevention/ Environmental Monitors Site includes: • Product description • Product pricing • Online ordering information • Company information Special features: • Online store • Downloadable specs and images

See ad on page 23

See ad on page 61

www.hibigeebies.com/ sports

www.hotheadsports.com

Hibiclens Antimicrobial Skin Cleanser Site includes: • Product information • Downloadable educational materials • “Where to purchase” information • Contact information Special features: • Video clips • Current articles on MRSA

Heat-Stress Monitoring Technology Site includes: • Product demo • Downloadable research • Downloadable product brochures • Contact information Special features: • Animated Flash intro • Links to heat-stress research

See ad on page 8 54

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


www.hqinc.net CorTemp™ Core Body Temperature Monitoring System Site includes: • Product specs and applications overview • Resource library • Product brochures • Company background and contact information Special features: • Video clips and media links See ad on page 39

www.hydroworx.com Aquatic Therapy Pools Site includes: • Product specs • Customer testimonials • Aquatic video protocols • Research studies Special features: • Rapid Recovery Center—library of video protocols • Webcasts of current athletes’ recovery using HydroWorx See ad on page 31

www.jumpstretch.com FlexBand Exercise Equipment & Accessories Site includes: • Information on training seminars for CEUs • Company background • List of distributors • Customer testimonials Special features: • Online store • Video clips of exercises See ad on page 83

www.kneebourne.com

www.kytec.us

Portable Knee Hyperextension Device

Athletic Training & Speed Equipment

Therapeutic Modalities & Supplies

Site includes: • Instructional video • Online brochure • Contact information

Site includes: • Catalog request • Factory-direct pricing • More than 300 products on display • Sales contact information

Site includes: • Contact information • Company history • Complete product descriptions and images • Information request form

Special features: • Instructional video • Prescription forms

Special features: • Online store • Factory-direct products

www.mettlerelectronics.com

Special features: • Downloadable brochures, spec sheets, and MSDS reports • “Request a Quote”

See ad on page 10

See ad on page 73

See ad on page 20

www.muellersportsmed.com

www.nasm.org

www.nccpt.com

Sports Medicine Products Site includes: • Downloadable product catalog • Store locator • New product announcements • Product training modules Special features: • Detailed information on sports injuries and treatments • Product descriptions and specs

See ad on page 5 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

NASM PES® & CES Advanced Specializations® Site includes: • Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES) details and pricing • Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES) details and pricing • Sample videos of the PES and CES online courses • Testimonials from professional athletes and athletic trainers Special features: • Online store • Video testimonials

See ad on page 22

Personal Trainer Certification Program Site includes: • Product and certification information • Informative articles and newsletters • Opportunities to “private label” your own supplements • Continuing education courses and info on becoming an NCCPT instructor Special features: • Fitness equipment • Personal trainer locator See ad on page 67 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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www.nsca-lift.org Education Programs Site includes: • Career resources • Online journals • Membership benefits/forms • Podcasts (updated weekly) Special features: • Education-based peer-reviewed journals

See ad on page 65

www.optp.com Tools & Resources for Fitness & Rehabilitation Site includes: • In-depth product descriptions • Catalog requests • News and events • Log in for professional pricing Special features: • Video clips and book reviews • Newsletters

Portable & Stationary Treatment Tables

Site includes: • Review material descriptions • Exam registration information (sites and dates) • Commission background • Catalog request

Site includes: • Company background • Product descriptions and specs • Product packages • Product pricing

Special features: • Online recertification • Online store

Special features: • Online store for easy ordering • Downloadable product catalog

See ad on page 25

www.outdoorboss.com Hydration Systems & Misting Fans Site includes: • Product specs • Company background • Customer testimonials Special features: • Online store • Downloadable pricing info

See ad on page 43

www.port-a-cool.com

www.power-lift.com

Portable Evaporative Cooling Units

Strength Training Equipment

Site includes: • Product specs • Company background information • Product options and accessories • Downloadable catalog

Site includes: • Downloadable brochures • Room-layout sample section • Client photos and testimonials • Catalog request form

Special features: • Downloadable specs • Flash maintenance guide

Special features: • Video clips of various pieces of equipment • Online color configurator

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

www.oakworks.com

Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist Certification

See ad on page 27

See ad on page 64 56

www.nsca-cc.org

www.performbetter.com Functional Training & Rehab Products Site includes: • Perform Better catalog with pricing • Convenient online ordering • Timely specials • Schedule of Perform Better seminars Special features: • Online articles and newsletters on training and conditioning • Guidance for facility design and updating See ad on page 19

www.power-systems.com Athletic Conditioning Equipment & Programs Site includes: • Over 1,000 products for strength, balance, agility, and speed • Professional training and “How To” articles • Web-only specials and sale sections • Telecheck and address verification Special features: • Virtual page-by-page catalogs online • Easy-to-shop categories broken down by goals and areas of interest See ad on page 48 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


www.proteamtables.com Taping Stations & Athletic Training Furniture Site includes: • Product images and specs • Customer testimonials • Company background • Contact information Special features: • Downloadable PDF literature

www.injurybegone.com Sports Medicine Products Site includes: • Injury information • Detailed product information • Customer testimonials • Quick click-thru buying Special features: • Store and distributor locator • Injury video

See ad on page 21

www.rogersathletic.com Strength Training & Football Equipment Site includes: • Downloadable product specifications • “Build-Your-Own” custom blocking sled • Catalog and DVD request • Full strength training and football product line

www.sammedical.com

www.rgmd.com DataTherm II Continuous Temperature Monitor Site includes: • Product images • Company background • Product descriptions • Product specs Special features: • Causes and factors of heat stress • Explanation of the importance of temperature monitoring during treatment See ad on page 62

www.samsonequipment.com

Innovative Technology

Weight Training Equipment

Site includes: • Customer testimonials • Product descriptions and instructions • Company history • Events calendar

Site includes: • Product pictures and information • Equipped facilities • General product specs • General warranty information

Special features: • Training videos • Dealer locator

Special features: • Video clips • Custom color options

Special features: • Video clips • Downloadable product specifications

www.Save-A-Tooth.com

See ad on page 38

See ad on page 49

www.stromgren.com

www.swimex.com

Save-A-Tooth Emergency Tooth Preservation System

Protective Performance Apparel & Sports Medicine Products

Site includes: • Ordering page • List of distributors • Product information • Customer testimonials

Site includes: • Product specs • Sizing info • Contact info • Catalog request

Special features: • Online store • FAQ page

Special features: • Links to moisture-management apparel • Product images

See ad on page 75 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

See ad on page 29

Aquatic Therapy Pools Site includes: • In-depth product descriptions for all models • Registration for educational seminars • Information on the “Try, Buy, and Travel Free!” program • Contact information for local dealers Special features: • Video clips and DVD request • Cost-analysis request See ad on page 33 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

57


www.townsenddesign.com

www.nzmfg.com

Orthopedic Bracing Solutions

Resistive Exercise Products

Sports & Fitness Training Systems

Site includes: • Functional ligament brace descriptions • Osteoarthritis brace descriptions • Post-operative brace descriptions • Specialty brace descriptions

Site includes: • New catalog request • Product descriptions and pricing • Online store • Overstock items discounted

Site includes: • Specifications and technical documentation • Downloadable brochures • Training resources • Professional testimonials

Special features: • Online ordering for registered customers • Downloadable order forms

Special features: • Free UPS Ground shipping to the U.S. on Web site orders

See ad on page 71

www.waterboysports.com Sports & Industrial Hydration Systems

www.werksanusa.com

Special features: • Multiple training and demonstration videos • In-depth, sport-specific training programs See ad on page 47

www.whitehallmfg.com

Weightlifting Equipment

Hospital & Therapy Products

Site includes: • Product specs • Company contact page • Pricing information • Company background

Site includes: • Product specs for WerkSan’s full line of equipment • Information regarding weightlifting clinics and consulting • Guarantees and return policy

Site includes: • Product images • Downloadable product literature • Company background • Sales contact information

Special features: • Online ordering • New 2007 newsletter

Special features: • Online store • International shipping available

See ad on page 60

www.wisstechenterprises.com Portable Drinking Fountains Site includes: • Product descriptions • Pricing • Warranty information • Contact information Special features: • Product photos • Printable price list

See ad on page 40 58

www.vertimax.com

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

Special features: • Downloadable spec sheets • Downloadable installation instructions

See ad on page 69

www.wobenzym.com Natural Anti-Inflammatory Enzyme Supplements

www.thexvest.com Weighted Vests

Site includes: • DVD and brochure requests • Detailed product descriptions and uses • Retail locator • Customer testimonials

Site includes: • Product specs and images • Customer testimonials • Plyometric exercises and training programs • Company background and contact information

Special features: • Online store, including $5 coupon • Supplement fact sheet

Special features: • News video clips • Online store

See ad on outside back cover TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


NEW Product Launch American Red Cross Sport Safety Training Program Unique features: • Specifically designed to help coaches and athletic trainers recognize emergencies and make appropriate decisions for first aid care

Stromgren Desert Gear™ Hot Weather Shirt (model 1200RLP) Unique features: • Antimicrobial fabric • Specially designed pitching shirt with raglan sleeve and crew neck • 85 percent nylon, 15 percent Lycra® Spandex and Hydro-Flex® (50 cloth) • Sleeve fabric is 55 percent nylon and 45 percent Lycra Spandex and Hydro-Flex (24 cloth)

Benefits for the user: • Flexible course options allow you to design the course that’s right for your needs, including a stand-alone Sports Injury Prevention and First Aid course with additional training available in adult and child CPR and AED treatment

Benefits for the user: • Available in black, royal, and navy with many sleeve color options • Available now at team sporting goods dealers and from Stromgren’s online store

American Red Cross 800-667-2968 www.redcross.org

Stromgren Supports 800-527-1988 www.stromgren.com

Circle No. 500

Pro Rebel Unique features: • Rigid aircraft aluminum shells • Patented hinge motion, suspension, and rotation control features • Larger, stronger TM6 hinge on the lateral side of the brace provides maximum protection • Backed by a no-mitigation guarantee Benefits for the user: • Can be ordered custom, “customized,” or in standard sizes • “Customized” fabrication gives athletes a custom brace for a pre-sized price

Townsend Design 800-840-2722 www.townsenddesign.com Circle No. 502

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Circle No. 501

Bac-Shield Unique features: • “Fills the gap” by making your hygiene program more effective • Inhibits reproduction of harmful microbes • Active ingredient, Chitosan, has long history of safe, effective applications Benefits for the user: • Use in laundry, locker rooms, surfaces, mats, equipment--practically anywhere bacteria is present • Inhibits the growth of odor-causing bacteria, fungi, mold, and mildew

Adams USA 800-251-6857 www.adamsusa.com Circle No. 503

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HEAT STRESS Cramer Products Inc. 800-345-2231 www.cramersportsmed.com Powerflo, Powerflo 50, Coil Cool

The Ultimate Drinking Machines

Cramer Products offers three types of portable hydration units to help hydrate athletes. Cramer’s newest unit, the Powerflo 50, offers an impressive 50 gallons of portable hydration. Primary Advantages: Cramer’s hydration units are constructed of 100-percent water-portable and FDA-approved materials for drinking water. Circle No. 504 CytoSport, Inc. 707-747-3377 www.cytosport.com Cytomax Drink Cytomax while training or exercising to ensure proper hydration, electrolyte replacement, energy balance, and reduced fatigue. Drink it 15 minutes prior to training and consistently during your workout for the best results. Primary Advantages: Patented alpha L-polylactate buffers lactic acid production and minimizes post-exercise muscle soreness. Complex carbs provide sustained energy without the sugar “crash” and antioxidants help prevent free-radical damage to muscle cells. Circle No. 505

•• •

F.I.T. Fans 727-573-2955 www.fitfans.org

Y

F.I.T. Fans (Fan Impingement Technology) Several years ago, F.I.T. Fans began the process of patenting air impinging streams technology and was granted “patented allowed” status. In 2002, F.I.T. Fans™ became a new division of Magnum Venus Products and released the second-generation F.I.T.® fans.

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Addressing weight and noise issues, F.I.T. Fans systems feature lightweight roto-molded shrouds, corrosionresistant pultrusion frames, and an optional variable-speed motor with two custom 1/2-HP motors. Primary Advantages: Improvements to the overall design include a new bell-shaped, tapered shroud, which increases air velocity and volume (controlled by the pitch of the blades). Circle No. 506 Gatorade 800-88-GATOR www.gatorade.com Gatorade Endurance Formula Gatorade Endurance Formula is a specialized sports drink with a fiveelectrolyte blend designed to meet the fluid and electrolyte needs of athletes during longer, more intense workout sessions, like two-a-day football practices or all-day soccer tournaments. Primary Advantages: During prolonged activity, fluid and electrolyte losses can be significant. Gatorade Endurance Formula contains nearly twice the sodium (200 mg) and three times the potassium (90 mg) of Gatorade Thirst Quencher, which is the appropriate beverage for most active people and athletes. Circle No. 507 Wenger Corp. 800-493-6437 www.wengercorp.com The Hydrate Cart from GearBoss The Hydrate Cart keeps athletes hydrated, safe, and at peak performance by providing water that flows like a drinking fountain from eight drinking stations. This cart is designed to be pulled manually or by a tractor, with turf tires and a heavy-duty aluminum frame. Primary Advantages: It eliminates unsanitary water bottles and coolers, TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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HEAT STRESS offering outstanding performance, durability, and value. It features FDAapproved hoses, tank, fixtures, and two battery-powered rechargeable pumps to keep water pressure strong. The 50-gallon tank is designed for quick and easy filling and draining. Circle No. 508 Gear 2000, Ltd. 785-625-6060 www.gear2000.com Z-COOL Shoulder Pads by Gear 2000

Hothead Sports, LLC 800-531-3238 www.hotheadsports.com Heat Observation Technology (H.O.T.) System The H.O.T. system from Hothead Sports provides remote monitoring of athletes’ body temperature. It transmits above-normal heat readings from the forehead directly to a coach’s or athletic trainer’s PDA.

athletic trainers can monitor a player’s temperature from anywhere on the football field. H.O.T. is a wireless tool that helps detect the rise and ongoing trend of above-normal body temperatures. Circle No. 511

Primary Advantages: Coaches and

The new Z-Cool shoulder pads with 3D air flow foam now carry a patent (no. 7,168,104). Designed for all football positions, Z-Cool offers a unique heattransfer foam system, a plastic inner arch design, and patented air-release clavicle pads. One-inch belts with no-snag buckles are standard. Primary Advantages: Other features include an adjustable cap system that follows arm movement, an AC notchout with cradle pad, an adjustable deltoid pad system, and a Pro-Loc epaulet design. The pads are made with stainless steel non-rusting hardware and antibacterial agents to help reduce odor and microbes. Circle No. 509 Outdoor Boss 888-463-5699 www.outdoorboss.com Boss Drinking System & Go Flow Misting Fans Outdoor Boss provides affordable and versatile practice and sideline equipment to protect athletes from heat illness. You can depend on Outdoor Boss products to keep your athletes hydrated and cool. Primary Advantages: Outdoor Boss products are highly dependable and built to last. The company strives to offer outstanding, innovative products and excellent customer service. Circle No. 510 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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HEAT STRESS HQ, Inc. 941-721-7588, ext. 11 www.hqinc.net CorTemp® Ingestible Core Body Temperature Monitoring System The CorTemp® monitoring system, featuring the CorTemp® ingestible temperature pill, has been marketed throughout the world for more than 17 years. Once ingested, the pill wirelessly transmits an athlete’s core body temperature to a handheld monitor, where the data is picked up and recorded. It’s real-time, easy-touse, and convenient for stationary or mobile environments. CorTemp® is FDA-cleared. Primary Advantages: Early intervention is an absolute necessity in the prevention, evaluation, and treatment of heat stress. Research indicates that external methods of monitoring core

temperature are not always valid under conditions of intense exercise. The CorTemp® system provides an internal, non-invasive, affordable approach for assessing elevated core temperature on the field, and for measuring the effectiveness of cooling methods on the sidelines. Circle No. 512 RG Medical Diagnostics 888-596-9498 www.rgmd.com DataTherm® II The DataTherm II is a continuous temperature monitor with disposable probes and a temperature measurement range up to 113 degrees. It easily fulfills the requirements of temperature monitoring for the treatment of heat illness. PC software allows for downloading

and trending of stored readings. Primary Advantages: The DataTherm II can be a perfect addition to your field equipment. Once heat illness strikes, attach the sensor probe to the appropriate site. The DataTherm II displays readings that can be downloaded to your PC, allowing you to visually trend and store all temperatures. Circle No. 513 Sports Innovations, Ltd. 800-288-3954 www.hydrateorlose.com Aqualift Hydration is a key to winning, and Aqualift portable drinking systems deliver. From young athletes on the practice field to professionals in the NFL, this system is a must. Aqualift features four hoses with fully adjustable drinking valves, a UL-approved fiber-

$>Q>4EBOJ®))

Continuous Temperature Monitor The next generation EHI monitor for real-time continuous body temperature assessment DataTherm II provides precise, on-the-spot temperature monitoring to help you recognize, prevent and treat exertional heat illnesses.

C ompac t... P ortable... E as y- to- us e Disposable probes for multi body site application 140 memories for precise temperature trending Real time computer display High and low audible & visual alarms Superior water resistantance DataTherm used by NFL, NCAA & Army Special Forces Packaged with accessories 21130 B ridge S treet S outhfield, MI 48034 Phone: 888-596-9498 (x 204) Fax: 248-750-0187 E -mail: info@rgmd.com Website: www.rgmd.com Circle No. 136

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HEAT STRESS glass electrical enclosure with quick-release locking latches, a 12V power supply, and an automatic charger. It’s easy to use and built to last. Primary Advantages: The Aqualift’s frame components are made of aluminum to safely carry up to 500 pounds, and large pneumatic tires offer easy maneuverability on all types of terrain. A removable stainless steel filter screen and adjustable pump make for problem-free daily use and maintenance. Remember: hydrate or lose. Circle No. 514 Stromgren Supports 800-527-1988 www.stromgren.com Polar Heat Temperature-Controlled Compression Shirt Help your athletes stay safe and comfortable when working out in extreme heat and cold with Stromgren’s Polar Heat compression shirt. A cold/heat pack is strategically positioned in a trap pocket between the athlete’s shoulder blades to cool or heat the body for more than three hours at a time. The shirt is made of moisture-wicking compression material to keep skin dry during long, intense workouts. Primary Advantages: Field tests prove that the Polar Heat compression shirt helps athletes maintain a safe core body temperature. It’s available in black or white in adult sizes at your local sporting goods store. For more information, go online or call Stromgren. Circle No. 515 WaterBoy Sports, Inc. 888-442-6269 www.waterboysports.com

Your First String Defense Against Dehydration NEW & VED IMPRO

Accept No Substitutes. The Generation II Aqualift* the original Hydration System from Sports Innovations

• 500 lb capacity

• Fused power supply

• All aluminum frame

• 10 gallon insulated beverage container • 4 fully adjustable PVC labcock drinking valves • Multi-unit stacking feature • Adjustable pressure cut off switch

• All terrain maneuverability

• Improved electrical connections

• Easy filling & cleaning

• Dual power supply

Hydration Equipment WaterBoy Sports is not just a single product, but an extensive product line designed to fit various price ranges and meet the specific needs of the athletic training community. Visit the company online to see its complete product line. Primary Advantages: All WaterBoy Sports products are designed to accommodate both the athlete and the athletic trainer. Each product is built to withstand the punishment of constant use and any abuse an angry athlete can dish out. Circle No. 516

1-800-288-3954 www.sportsinnovations.com www.hydrateorlose.com PROUD TO BE MADE IN THE USA *The Aqualift Portable Drinking System is proprietary property of Sports Innovations, Ltd. and is protected by U.S. and Foreign Patents issued and pending.

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HEAT STRESS WissTech Enterprises 800-809-8184 www.wisstechenterprises.com

General Tools & Instruments 800-697-8665 www.generaltools.com

Hydration Station Portable Drinking Fountains

WBGT Handheld Heat Stress Monitor

The Hydration Station line of portable drinking fountains are constructed of the finest components available. All carts are made of welded aluminum with industrial pneumatic wheels. The Hydration Station is designed for durability and longevity.

Designed to monitor environmental thermal conditions, this instrument represents an industry breakthrough for outdoor sports. Four measurement parameters—WBGT (wet bulb globe temperature), TG (globe temperature), TA (air temperature), and % (relative humidity)—make it invaluable for coaches, athletic trainers, athletic directors, and sports medicine practitioners.

Primary Advantages: The Hydration Station provides a convenient, easyto-operate source of portable fluids. Models are available for indoor and outdoor use. Circle No. 517

Primary Advantages: The new and highly accurate WBGT8758 determines true heat stress risk by accounting for air currents, relative humidity, and solar load in addition to air temperature. Circle No. 518

Port-A-Cool, LLC 800-695-2942 www.port-a-cool.com Port-A-Cool®, Küül Pads Port-A-Cool products can help keep your athletes safe and cool on the sidelines and in the dugout, gym, locker room, pool area, and weightroom. Primary Advantages: These products make the air an average of 15 to 25 degrees cooler than ambient air, using natural evaporative cooling. They produce no mist, just cool air for less than a dollar per eight hours of operation. Circle No. 519

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AQUATIC THERAPY Aquatics by Sprint 800-235-2156 www.sprintaquatics.com

Ferno Performance Pools 888-206-7802 www.fernoperformancepools.com

The patented Recumbent Aqua Bike offers adjustable resistance for exercise, rehabilitation, and therapy. It was designed for easy, comfortable sitting and has a safety belt. Made of stainless steel with a plastic seat, it is rust resistant and weighs just 50 pounds, so two people can easily get it in and out of the pool. The Recumbent Aqua Bike is an effective piece of rehabilitation equipment for individuals who want to strengthen their leg joints and muscles, and for those recovering from hip or knee surgery. Circle No. 520

The Ferno Hydro Track Underwater Treadmill System is ideal for smaller clinics and training rooms with limited space. It offers a lowimpact, high-resistance workout for athletes limited by pain or weight-bearing restrictions, and for those who wish to maximize their cardiovascular workouts. The Hydro Track features a variable-speed treadmill that ranges from .5 mph to seven mph, dual-speed resistance jets, and a digital display unit that includes speed, distance, and time to monitor performance. Circle No. 521

The Ferno AquaCiser Underwater Treadmill is an excellent choice for busy sports medicine and physical therapy clinics. It consists of an exercise chamber, a water reservoir, and a control console. The touch-screen console allows you to set personal programs and control the water temperature, depth, treadmill belt direction, speed, and whirlpool jets. The AquaCiser’s variable-speed treadmill ranges from 0 to 9.9 mph and the adjustable water depth can go up to 48 inches. Circle No. 522

Functional Performance

Training Symposium

4FQUFNCFSo t$PMPSBEP4QSJOHT $0

Featured Presenters Juan Carlos Santana MEd, CSCS,*D, FNSCA

Diane Vives MS, CSCS,*D

National Strength and Conditioning Association bridging the gap between science and application Circle No. 139

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AQUATIC THERAPY HydroWorx International, Inc. 800-753-9633 www.hydroworx.com HydroWorx, a premier manufacturer of aquatic rehabilitation and fitness products, offers innovation in every pool. There are fully adjustable floors, underwater treadmills, resistance jets, deep-tissue massage units, and options to fit every application and budget. The company’s collection of pools— the HydroWorx 2000, 1200, 1100, 1000, 600, 500, ThermalPlunge, and PolarPlunge—have proven to be among the most versatile pools for athletic trainers worldwide. Log onto HydroWorx’s Rapid Recovery Center to learn how athletic trainers and other clinicians are accelerating their athletes’ recovery and getting them on the field sooner with HydroWorx. Circle No. 523 The HydroWorx 1100 and 600 Series pools are radically functional pools that can be placed virtually anywhere. Manufactured with a sectional pool shell, they can be transferred into any existing building with ease and flexibility. Tight doorways and limited space are no match for these 7’ 6” W x 14’ L pools. Complete with HydroWorx underwater treadmill and resistance jet technology, each model provides athletic trainers and physical therapists with advanced aquatic tools to give athletes a more advanced recovery. Circle No. 524 Kytec 800-732-4883 www.kytec.us The Swim Chute is designed to strengthen swim-specific muscles and improve power, endurance, and explosiveness. An adjustable clasp regulates 66

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the amount of water that flows through the chute’s orifice, so resistance can vary up to 15 pounds. The Swim Chute can increase your range of motion and flexibility, since it allows you to stretch each muscle group to its maximum potential. The Swim Chute comes with a belt and can also be used for running, jogging, or physical therapy in water. Circle No. 525 NZ Mfg., LLC 800-886-6621 www.nzmfg.com The StrechCordz line of resistance swim training products was designed by competitive swimmers to improve stroke, endurance, and strength, and to offer exceptional safety and comfort. From in-water swimming tethers—like the StrechCordz Short Belt shown here—to dry-land training products, they fit the training and exercise needs of all types of swimmers. Call or go online to learn more about the entire StrechCordz line. Circle No. 526 Power Systems 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com Finally, there’s resistance tubing made specifically for the pool that resists the damaging effects of chlorine. Enhance aquatic strength and rehab workouts with Power Systems’ waterspecific tubing. Improve muscle tone, strength, and flexibility with Aqua VersaTubes in training, group and individual workouts, and rehabilitation by providing resistance through the full range of motion. These powder-free,

polymer-coated tubes have deluxe contoured handles that provide a secure grip in the water. The handles and tubes won’t absorb water, dry out, or crack. They’re available in three resistance levels: light, medium, and heavy. Circle No. 527 SwimEx, Inc. 800-877-7946 www.swimex.com A new integrated, motorized treadmill recently introduced by SwimEx has greatly enhanced the versatility of the company’s aquatic therapy and sports conditioning pools. Integrated directly into the floors of select SwimEx pool models, the motorized treadmills allow variable speeds up to 8 mph, and in combination with other standard SwimEx features enable physical therapists, athletic trainers, and homeowners to custom-design challenging exercise and rehabilitation protocols. Circle No. 528 A line of nine different aquatic therapy pool models from SwimEx offers physical therapists and athletic trainers the ability to configure pool size and workstation features to meet the differing spatial requirements of their facilities, the therapeutic needs of their patient populations, and the financial and growth plans of their practices. All SwimEx aquatic therapy pools feature a patented “wall of water” paddlewheel propulsion system that generates more than 30,000 gallons of laminar water flow per minute at more than 99 current speeds. Circle No. 529

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE Antibody 877-546-2639 www.antibodywear.com

Bio Skin/Cropper Medical 800-541-2455 www.bioskin.com

Cho-Pat 800-221-1601 www.cho-pat.com

The BodyGuard compression ankle brace is designed to add comfort, stability, and performance enhancement to the sprained ankle. In the uninjured ankle it reduces the incidence of sprains, strains, and impact trauma, while adding stability and performance enhancement. As with all BodyGuards, it provides compression, support, heat circulation to the muscles and tendons, strain distribution, and impact absorption. Circle No. 530

Bio Skin TriLok is a high-comfort, high-stability, lightweight ankle device. It uses a three-strap external ligament system for superior ankle control. The patented FootLok strap controls inversion, plantar flexion/inversion, and eversion. Micro-thin ballistic nylon stirrup straps provide a secondary stabilizing mechanism. The TriLok is made with patented Bio Skin material, which provides industry-leading compression for optimal control and proprioception. The TriLok has a low profile and can be used on either foot. Experiment with it today and feel the difference. Circle No. 531

Cho-Pat’s Shin Splint Compression Sleeve eases the pain associated with shin splints. Designed and evaluated by medical professionals, this unique device tackles inflammation and discomfort by using gentle compression to support the lower leg muscles. It also stimulates circulation, maintains warmth, and controls excess fluid. Finally, two straps act as shock absorbers to reduce microtrauma to the tendons and other soft tissue and keep the device in proper position. Call Cho-Pat or visit the company’s Web site for more information. Circle No. 532

ENERGIZE YOUR CAREER E A R N YO U R D E G R E E ON THE INTERNET BS Program in Wellness and Fitness – 100% Online - Transfer credits accepted - 2-Year completion program if you have an Associate’s Degree - NASM Certifications in CPT & PES MS Program in Exercise Science & Health Promotion – 100% Online • Four degree tracks: - Performance Enhancement & Injury Prevention - Rehabilitation Science - Wellness & Fitness - Sport Psychology • NASM certifications in PES, CES, and/or CPT • Network with health & fitness professionals worldwide Phone: 1-866-595-6348 or visit: www.cup.edu/go

www.cup.edu A proud member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE Cramer Products, Inc. 800-345-2231 www.cramersportsmed.com Cramer’s AS1 ankle brace combines the support of a heel-lock strapping system with excellent value when compared to other ankle braces. The brace is constructed with an 840D nylon shell, with a soft neoprene liner for comfort and feel. Non-stretch straps lock the heel in place, and steel spring stays on each side of the brace provide additional support. Circle No. 533 To correctly address the mechanics of a sprain, you must control both the heel and the forefoot. Cramer ankles braces, such as the new Active Ankle® Power Lacer, are designed by athletic trainers and orthopedic experts to help prevent and treat injuries. One of the legends behind Cramer, who played a major role in establishing the company as a leader

in athletic braces, passed away in June. Charles William (Bill) Cramer designed and patented one of the company’s highly successful ankle braces and worked tirelessly to develop products and resources for athletes and athletic trainers. Circle No. 534 DM Systems, Inc. 800-254-5438 www.dmsystems.com AnkleTough offers a system of progressive resistance straps specifically designed for the ankle and customizable for a variety of athletes. AnkleTough can help prevent the recurrence of ankle injuries by strengthening and conditioning the ankle muscles and tendons. The

system comprises color-coded resistive tension straps in four strengths (light, medium, strong, and tough). AnkleTough is available in a four-pack featuring one unit of each strength, and in an eight-pack with each unit having the same resistance level. Circle No. 535 Jump Stretch, Inc. 800-344-3539 www.jumpstretch.com “Don’t Ice that Ankle Sprain!” by Jump Stretch founder Dick Hartzell and Dr. Michael Shimmel will introduce you to the FlexBand Ankle & Strengthening Traction Technique, which is designed to reduce pain and swelling and to speed recovery time from ankle injuries. You will never deal with a sprain the same way again. The book is 85 pages long, includes a companion

Rehab & Therapy Solutions • Flexibility and Range of Motion • Core Strength • Massage • Education • Resistance

Original Pezzi tm EggBalls - broader surface contact with floor for increased stability

We’re More Than Just The #1 Exercise Ball!

PowerWeb tm Combo - two resistance levels in one for increased versatility and value

REP Bands tm - latex free and bulk packaged in dispenser box

© 2007 Ball Dynamics International, LLC

Call For FREE Catalog • 800-752-2255 • www.fitball.com Circle No. 142

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE DVD, and covers horizontal traction, vertical traction, deferred pain, and more. It also includes testimonials from athletes and healthcare professionals. Circle No. 536

ThermaSplint Splint Material Heating Unit

Perform Better 800-556-7464 www.performbetter.com Using a PB Disc Pillow can strengthen the muscles that stabilize your ankles, knees, core, and shoulders. It is a terrific aid for developing joint stabilization and balance. Use one disc for single-leg exercises and situps, or multiple discs for double-leg exercises and push-ups. These soft, unstable discs are 14 inches in diameter and available in Perform Better’s 2007 catalog. Call or go online for your free copy today. Circle No. 564

Model # TS-1A

When treating foot or ankle woes, nothing is more practical than an Airex Foam Mat from Perform Better. It offers a unique soft feel yet provides firm support, making it ideal for low-impact exercises. It is designed with a sanitized closed-cell design for easy cleaning, and it rolls up in seconds. The Airex Foam Mat is available in six sizes. Contact Perform Better to learn more. Circle No. 537

THERMASPLINT The therapists asked and we answered with the next generation of Whitehall ThermaSplints. FEATURES:

Microprocessor Heat Control Removable Lids Temperature Range of 140˚F to 180˚F BENEFITS:

Minimal Heat Loss When Open Correct Temperature for Thermo Plastics Vertical Clearance for Overhead Cabinets

9” (229)

Mueller Sports Medicine 800-356-9522 www.muellersportsmed.com The new Hg80 ankle brace with straps from Mueller Sports Medicine provides superior protection and support with unique features to maximize comfort and performance. The Muellerexclusive moisture-wicking and antimicrobial HydraCinn fabric is latex- and neoprene-free, while the secure stirrup straps and longer elastic crossing straps provide exceptional support through a heel-lock and figure 8 configuration. The figure 8 straps add tension as the ankle moves, offering greater support and a secure fit. This brace is lightweight, extremely soft to the touch, and comfortable. Custom sizes from XS to XL are available in black. Circle No. 538

20-1/2” (521)

Overall height with hinged cover completely closed

Overall height with hinged cover fully open

Inner Pan

Backside

12” x 20” x 4”

Drain valve, fuse panel & power outlet

(305 x 508 x 100 mm)

7-1/2” (191)

23-1/2” (597)

16-1/4” (413)

Temperature On/Off Power Switch

Controller

TS-1A BRIM CAPACITY 14.2 quarts (13.5 liters) Larger Capacity Model Available

Whitehall Manufacturing member of acorn engineering’s family of companies www.whitehallmfg.com

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15125 Proctor Ave. City of Industry, CA 91746 800-782-7706 626-968-6681 Fax 626-855-4862 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE Mueller Sports Medicine 800-356-9522 www.muellersportsmed.com The Mueller Pro Level ATF ankle brace allows unrestricted foot movement while reducing excessive inversion and eversion. The patented self-adjusting inner strap provides superior lateral support while the bi-directional stretch elastic allows complete plantar and dorsal flexion. Flexible steel springs help support both sides of the ankle. This brace fits either foot and is available in sizes XS through XL. Circle No. 539 OPTP 800-367-7393 www.optp.com/ad The simple design of the FootWheel provides myofascial release to stretch and relax the foot. Its multiple wheels effectively release trigger points and

tense muscles with a gentle rolling motion. Not only will it soothe tired, achy feet, but it is a must in the management of plantar faciitis. Circle No. 540 Stretching the gastroc/soleus complex is important for the prevention and treatment of many common lower-leg and foot problems. Stretching with the OPTP Slant can help reduce lowerextremity overuse syndromes, and prevent post-surgical contracture and excessive scar formation. The Slant also assists with general stretching and weight bearing and can help promote a more normal, stable gait. Call OPTP or go online for more information and a free catalog. Circle No. 541

Pro-Tec Athletics 800-779-3372 www.injurybegone.com Pro-Tec Athletics offers Pro-Tec arch supports. These supports provide a slight lift to the arch by applying upward compression, alleviating plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. Targeted support reduces stress to the arch region and alleviates inflammation and tearing of the plantar fascia. Visit the ProTec Web site to learn more about all of the company’s quality products. Circle No. 542 Tired of Achilles tendon pain? ProTec Athletics has the answer with the Achilles Tendon Support. This Achilles tendon brace offers comfortable compression to stabilize the tendon and reduce stress. It also features an elastic strap that provides a lift to the heel, preventing excessive

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE stretching of the tendon. Comfortable and effective, the Achilles Tendon Support will help prevent further damage and enhance the healing process, allowing your athletes to get back into competition sooner. Circle No. 543 SAM Medical Products 800-818-4726 www.sammedical.com The SAM Splint is the gold standard for splinting and is one of the most universal splints available. SAM Medical Products, the maker of the original SAM Splint, has now produced a more versatile option: the SAM Splint XL. Inspired by the recommendations of NFL athletic trainers, the SAM Splint

XL is 5.5 inches wide (1.5 inches wider than the original) and 36 inches long, thus meeting the demands of today’s larger individuals. Circle No. 544 Modeled on the human bursal sac, the Blist-O-Ban bandage is the latest technology to aid in the prevention and healing of blisters. Available from SAM Medical Products, it is clinically proven to stop hot spots from developing into blisters. BlistO-Ban is an extremely thin, breathable, and waterproof bandage. With a strong latexfree adhesive and a slick outer surface, Blist-O-Ban firmly adheres to the skin while the BursaTek dome dissipates the shear and friction (rubbing forces) caused by shoes and athletic equipment. Circle No. 545

Stromgren Supports 800-527-1988 www.stromgren.com The model 329 from Stromgren Supports offers complete heel-lock ankle protection without tape, yet it has outstanding compression and moisturemanagement features. A Spandex sock applies comfortable and even compression to the entire foot complex, yet stays cool and dry because of the moisture-wicking properties of the fabric. Permanently attached heel-lock straps help control severe eversion and inversion of the ankle complex. This support fits both the left and right foot and is available in black or white. Contact your local team dealer or sports medicine distributor, or go online to check out Stromgren’s complete line of protective performance apparel and sports medicine products. Circle No. 546

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MORE PRODUCTS AthletiClean 800-528-8295 www.athleticlean.com To protect athletes’ health and keep their facilities, uniforms, and equipment clean, it’s essential to have a plan for guarding against MRSA and other harmful bacteria. AthletiClean products are prepared with you in mind. They’re easy to use, affordable, and highly effective. The company’s goal is to keep your athletes on the field and out of the doctor’s office. Use AthletiClean products to make your athletic environment clean, sanitary, and odor-free. Circle No. 547 Ball Dynamics International, LLC 800-752-2255 www.fitball.com Exercising has never been this much fun. The FitBALL Kids DVD includes three mini-workouts designed exclusively for

kids from seven to 14 years old who want to learn a fun way to be active. Use of the FitBALL exercise ball has many benefits for kids, including balance, coordination, flexibility, and general fitness skills development. Fast-paced and non-repetitive moves keep kids focused and entertained. The exercises can be done at home or in group settings at school or in the gym. Circle No. 548 Biofreeze®/Performance Health® 800-246-3733 www.biofreeze.com Applied generously, Biofreeze® pain relieving gel and roll-on effectively relieve pain from heel injuries, sore arches, muscle spasms, strains, sprains, and

tendonitis, and will help minimize nextday aches and pains. Use it up to four times a day. It’s available in a 16-ounce spray bottle and 16-ounce, 32-ounce, and gallon gel pump bottles. Also available is a gravity dispenser box with 100 five-gram single-use application packets for clinical settings. Circle No. 549 Brace International, Inc. 800-545-1161 www.braceint.com Brace International offers the MAX™, a major advancement in the design of shoulder girdle supports. The snug-fitting, lightweight material allows for comfort with movement while protecting the glenohumeral joint from subluxations and dislocations. Its strap design system offers many options for maximal stability where needed, allowing athletes to reach their required range of motion. Circle No. 550

See the Heat... Treat the Heat...

Beat the Heat

TM

• Easy-to-use SportsTemp adhesive monitoring strips allow athletic trainers and coaches to recognize the early warning sign of increased body temperature and take preventative heat stroke measures. • Heat stroke is the second leading cause of death among student athletes. • Identified and treated in time, heat stroke can be easily prevented. • Enhance the athletic conditioning processes and TM maximize athletic performance. Use SportsTemp to beat the heat.

Phone 303-693-3842 • www.sportstemp.com Circle No. 148

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MORE PRODUCTS EB Performance, LLC 954-725-8393 www.ebperformance.com EB Performance has introduced PB & Whey Protein Bites. Each Bite is a delicious miniature protein bar packed with organic peanut butter, whey protein, organic agave syrup, and B-vitamins. In addition to being compliant with collegiate athletics rules, these bars are all-natural, preservative-free, and gluten-free. The company has begun selling them through retailers, online, and directly to major college athletic programs. Go online for more information, or call to ask about special team pricing. Circle No. 551 NCCPT Personal Training Certification 800-778-6060 www.NCCPT.org The National Council for Certified

Personal Trainers (NCCPT) is much like a trade school, providing students with the tools they need to work as personal trainers. NCCPT instructors are in the trenches, training. The information is presented in a practical manner, so students can apply their academic knowledge to themselves and their clients. The NCCPT constantly updates its materials to stay current with the latest cutting-edge techniques. Use this certification to recruit personal trainers. Both live courses and home courses are available. Circle No. 552 Gebauer Co. 800-321-9348 www.gebauer.com Gebauer’s Instant IceŽ non-prescription skin refrigerant can be used like ice for minor pain and swelling from sprains, strains, bruising, contusions, and minor sports injuries. Gebauer’s Instant Ice is ideal for facilities that restrict the use of flam-

mable components. It is available in a mist spray or stream spray aerosol can, and can be purchased directly from Gebauer by calling the company or visiting its Web site. Circle No. 553 Gebauer’s Spray and StretchŽ topical anesthetic skin refrigerant replaces Gebauer’s Fluori-Methane, which has been discontinued. Use Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch fine stream spray in conjunction with the spray and stretch technique to effectively manage myofascial pain, restricted motion, trigger points, muscle spasms, and minor sports injuries. The product is non-flammable and available only by prescription. It can be purchased through your medical supplier or wholesaler, or directly from Gebauer. Circle No. 554

Stabilize Chronic Shoulder Dislocators, Separators, and Subluxators With over a decade of experience in shoulder brace design the MAXTM Shoulder Brace by Brace International, Inc. is an evolution in shoulder girdle support. The snug-fitting, lightweight material (under 2 pounds) allows for comfort with movement while its strap design system allows for many options to help protect the glenohumeral joint. Maximum Protection, Maximum Range of Motion

We highly recommend its use for all sports.

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XXXLZUFDVT 800-545-1161 Toll Free - www.braceint.com Circle No. 150 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM



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Circle No. 151 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

108 . . . 137 . . . 123 . . . 149 . . . 142 . . . 110 . . . 111 . . . 143 . . . 150 . . . 106 . . . 140 . . . 102 . . . 130 . . . 100 . . . 154 . . . 104 . . . 128 . . . 124 . . . 146 . . . 101 . . . 116 . . . 135 . . . 105 . . . 122 . . . 126 . . . 120 . . . 153 . . . 107 . . .

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Antibody (The BodyGuard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Aquatics by Sprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 AthletiClean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Ball Dynamics International, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Biofreeze/Performance Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 BioSkin/Cropper Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Brace International (Fluk) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Brace International (MAX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer (DM Systems) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 California University of Pennsylvania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Cramer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IFC Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IBC efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 F.I.T. Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Ferno Performance Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Fitnessrubber.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3 Gebauer Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 General Tools & Instruments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Hothead Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 HPSO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 HQ, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 HydroWorx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Kneebourne Therapeutic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

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151 . . . 113 . . . 103 . . . 115 . . . 141 . . . 139 . . . 117 . . . 118 . . . 129 . . . 112 . . . 138 . . . 132 . . . 114 . . . 136 . . . 125 . . . 133 . . . 152 . . . 109 . . . 148 . . . 119 . . . 121 . . . 147 . . . 131 . . . 134 . . . 144 . . . 145 . . . 127 . . . 155 . . .

Kytec Athletic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Mettler Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 NCCPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Outdoor Boss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Port-A-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 RG Medical Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 SAM Medical Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Samson Weight Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Save-A-Tooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Sports Hygienics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 SportsTemp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Stromgren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 SwimEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 TurfCordz/NZ Mfg, LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 VertiMax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Waterboy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Whitehall Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Wilson Case. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Wobenzym N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BC

PRODUCTS DIRECTORY CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

503 . . . 500 . . . 530 . . . 514 . . . 520 . . . 547 . . . 548 . . . 549 . . . 531 . . . 550 . . . 532 . . . 534 . . . 533 . . . 504 . . . 562 . . . 505 . . . 535 . . . 551 . . . 560 . . . 506 . . . 522 . . . 521 . . . 558 . . . 507 . . . 509 . . . 553 . . . 554 . . . 518 . . . 511 . . . 512 . . . 524 . . . 523 . . . 536 . . .

74

Adams USA (Bac-Shield). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antibody . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aquatics by Sprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AthletiClean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ball Dynamics International, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biofreeze/Performance Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BioSkin/Cropper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cramer (Active Ankle Power Lacer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cramer (AS1 ankle brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cramer (portable hydration units) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creative Health Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DM Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EB Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.I.T. Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ferno (AquaCiser) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ferno (Hydro Track) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fitnessrubber.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gear 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gebauer (Instant Ice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gebauer (Spray and Stretch) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Tools & Instruments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hothead Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HQ, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HydroWorx (1100 and 600 Series) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HydroWorx (rehab/fitness products) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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59 59 67 62 65 72 72 72 67 72 67 68 68 60 79 60 68 73 75 60 65 65 75 60 61 73 73 64 61 62 66 66 68

525 . . . 555 . . . 539 . . . 538 . . . 556 . . . 552 . . . 557 . . . 526 . . . 540 . . . 541 . . . 510 . . . 537 . . . 564 . . . 519 . . . 527 . . . 563 . . . 543 . . . 542 . . . 559 . . . 513 . . . 545 . . . 544 . . . 501 . . . 546 . . . 515 . . . 529 . . . 528 . . . 502 . . . 516 . . . 508 . . . 561 . . . 517 . . .

Kytec Athletic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mettler Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mueller (ATF ankle brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mueller (Hg80 ankle brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NCCPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NZ Mfg., LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OPTP (FootWheel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OPTP (Slant) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outdoor Boss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perform Better (Airex Foam Mat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perform Better (PB Disc Pillow) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Port-A-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Systems (Aqua VersaTubes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Systems (catalog) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pro-Tec (Achilles Tendon Support). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pro-Tec (arch supports). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R Ferguson Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RG Medical Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SAM Medical Products (Blist-O-Ban) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SAM Medical Products (Splint XL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stromgren (Hot Weather Shirt) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stromgren (model 329) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stromgren (Polar Heat compression shirt) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SwimEx (pool models). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SwimEx (treadmill) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Waterboy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wenger (Hydrate Cart) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wenger (Transport Cart) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66 75 70 69 75 73 75 66 70 70 61 69 69 64 66 79 70 70 75 62 71 71 59 71 63 66 66 59 63 60 75 64

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MORE PRODUCTS Mettler Electronics 800-854-9305 www.mettlerelectronics.com

Fitnessrubber.com 888-894-0204 www.fitnessrubber.com

efi Sports Medicine 800-541-4900 www.totalgym.com

Mettler Electronics celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. The very first Sonicator shipped in June of 1957. The Sonicator 740 continues the Mettler tradition in therapeutic ultrasound. As with all Sonicators, the applicators provide unique, direct crystal-to-patient contact for efficient ultrasound delivery. The Sonicator 740 comes with a dualfrequency five-centimeter applicator. An optional battery pack allows the athletic trainer to take ultrasound therapy on the road. Call today for more information. Circle No. 555

Fitness Rubber is a new Web fitness resource that offers Manufacturer Direct Pricing for your rubber weight equipment needs. The company’s products include Kraiburg Solid Rubber Weight Plates, KraiburgSportec Rolled Rubber Flooring, Kraiburg-Sportec Interlocking Fitness Tiles, and FLEXGARD Rubber-Coated Cast Iron Weight Plates, to name a few. Take time to visit the company’s Web site, which offers savings of up to 25 percent. Act now and receive a $10 discount on your initial Web site order. Circle No. 558

The Total Gym® PowerTower®, by efi Sports Medicine, is a motorized incline resistance training apparatus that lets users change resistance levels electronically during the ROM of any exercise. The PowerTower facilitates multi-plane functional training using body weight as resistance. Now, the PowerTower includes a wireless handle—an innovative addition that allows for incremental resistance changes at the touch of a hand-held remote control, at any time during an exercise in progress. Circle No. 560

NASM 800-460-6276 www.nasm.org

R Ferguson Fitness, LLC 815-347-6385 www.rffitness.com

NASM ConEd: Corrective Exercise for Shoulder Impairments will help you keep your clients off the sidelines. This comprehensive online education module covers the functional anatomy of the shoulder complex; how to become proficient in performing shoulder assessments; how to implement corrective strategies for shoulder impairments; and how to market your abilities in a clinic or health and fitness facility. You can earn 0.2 CEUs for NASM, NSCA, and ACE, and five NATABOC CEUs for just $59. Call or go online today to register. Circle No. 556

Get ready to change the way you train your lats. R Ferguson Fitness has designed a revolutionary product called the EZ-Lats Plus Hands Free Training Accessory. This product is about true isolation of the lats, and the term “hands free” refers to the unique elbow cuff design that eliminates the need for the user to grip with his or her hands, thus providing maximum benefit. This product is fantastic for personal trainers, physical therapists, strength coaches, and home users. It can also be used for cable crunches, hands-free seated rows, standing hip extensions, and much more. Call now for your 30-day trial to experience the difference. Circle No. 559

NSCA 800-815-6826 www.nsca-lift.org The NSCA offers a workout towel (11” x 44”) that’s made of terry velour and hemmed. It features the NSCA logo and is available to members for $16.20 and non-members for $18. Also available is the NSCA stadium blanket, which has a waterresistant polyliner back and a Velcro™ pouch bearing the NSCA logo. Sewn-in handles make it easy to carry, and the anti-pilling blue fleece interior will look great for years to come. The blanket is available to members for $29.99 and non-members for $36. Circle No. 557

Wenger Corp. 800-493-6437 www.wengercorp.com The dual-purpose GearBoss TranSport Cart from Wenger Corp. quickly transforms into a sturdy multipurpose table (for sideline use, use as a trainer’s table, etc.) when it’s not carrying gear. As a cart, it’s ideal for moving up to 1,000 pounds of athletic gear around a facility, out to the field, or on the road. It can be pulled manually or towed. The cart’s end braces rotate to function as table legs, or fold flat for storage and transport. Circle No. 561

Your athletes are counting on you! 800,000 teeth are knocked out each year during sports! Is your dental kit ready?

This

NOT This

Save-A-Tooth® Emergency Tooth Preserving System (888) 788-6684 or www.Save-A-Tooth.com Circle No. 152

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COMPANY Q&A

Q&A with Jump Stretch’s Carl LaRosa In your opinion, is stretching beneficial? If so, do you recommend it before or after a workout?

Carl LaRosa, son-in-law of FlexBand inventor Dick Hartzell, is the chief instructor for the FlexBand Training Seminars, held bimonthly at the Jump Stretch Fitness Center in Youngstown, Ohio. He currently serves as the Vice President of Expansion, helping Jump Stretch to grow in the U.S. and around the world.

Some studies indicate that stretching before a workout either has no effect on performance or may actually impede performance. To some extent, I would agree with that, because the stretching done in most of these studies is static, which is a complete waste of time. Instead, we recommend dynamic stretching, which can be appropriate before, during, and after a workout. At our gym, we use FlexBands by Jump Stretch to perform a controlled dynamic stretch. This is more of a “real world” stretch and simulates the way an athlete’s body works. Muscles extend and flex in microseconds when running. One muscle lengthens while its antagonist muscle shortens, and this happens quickly. Can you give an example? At Jump Stretch, we do three rounds of stretching on the hamstring. Round one is a moderate stretch of approximately 10 leg raises with the bands, keeping the knee straight and the toe pointed back. Next, we grasp the

band up high and take a small bend to the knee and lock out for 10 reps. For rounds two and three, we repeat the sequence of 10 leg raises and 10 bends, bringing the leg back a little further each time. This activity “reeducates” the Golgi tendon behind the knee to improve flexibility in the long run. Jump Stretch 1230 N. Meridian Rd. Youngstown, OH 44509 800-344-3539 Fax: 330-793-8719 www.jumpstretch.com 76

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to improve range of motion, which translates into increased stride length and greater running speed. Is there any risk of injury with this type of stretching? We’ve never had an injury stretching this way. Rarely do teams that correctly use the FlexBands suffer injuries. The idea that dynamic stretching can cause injury originated with a study done on inactive people in a nursing home, not a population of athletes. I have, however, seen athletes do a static stretch and then go into a dynamic activity and get hurt. Why a person would do a static stretch before going into a ballistic or dynamic activity like running or kicking is beyond me. Who else can benefit from FlexBands? An interesting study done at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse showed that phase III cardiac rehab patients who used FlexBands to perform dynamic stretches showed increases in hamstring and lower-back flexibility versus those who did traditional non-resistance static stretches. On average, the FlexBand group improved flexibility from the 30th percentile to the 60th by the end of the study. Since it has been shown that the use of FlexBands is safe, effective, and an innovative method of improving lowerback and hamstring flexibility for cardiac rehab patients, it is not a far stretch (pun intended) to assume that it could also help prevent and rehabilitate injuries in the lower-back and hamstring areas of athletes.

The way we teach the hamstring stretch, the leg moves through a full range of motion, with the athlete controlling the intensity of the stretch. This brings blood flow to the area, helping TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


WEB NEWS

A Special Site for American Red Cross Instructors The American Red Cross Instructor’s Corner provides instructors with a wealth of online tools. There are online program updates, which offer new and revised program information for faster, easier implementation. Also available are downloadable instructor tools and teaching aids, electronic presentation tools, course outlines, instructor agreements, course evaluations, and more. You can order training supplies and textbooks 24/7 through the www.ShopStayWell.com link, and even download course record forms to be completed and e-mailed back to your local chapter to expedite the student certification process. View Red Cross publications, such as InstructorFlash and SafetyNET, which are filled with safety tips and articles that provide useful information and updates. You can also obtain information about becoming an instructor, instructor trainer, or authorized provider. Visit the site today.

www.instructorscorner.org Dynatronics Remodels Its Online Home The Dynatronics Web site has a bright new look, with easy-to-use dropdown menus that provide ready access to everything from press releases and shareholder information to the smallest clinical supplies. The dynamic home page changes often, featuring up-to-the-minute news on product releases for the changing marketplace. Easy access is the key to the new site, whether you’re looking for the new X5 Soft Tissue Oscillation Device or just trying to find a dealer nearest you. Warranties can be registered online, e-mails to staff can be sent quickly, and access to Dynatronics’ full catalog of products is immediately at your fingertips.

www.dynatronics.com Learn About Resistance Training Online NZ Mfg. produces top-quality resistive training products for swim training, physical rehabilitation, sports, and general fitness. The company’s Web site offers descriptions, photos, options, and pricing for the innovative products in the StrechCordz, MediCordz, and TurfCordz lines. These products provide safety, comfort, and performance for both professional and amateur athletes. As NZ Mfg. adds new products and improves its existing ones, the site is the place to go to remain up to date.

www.nzmfg.com View Catalogs and Products On Your Computer The Power Systems Web site continues to grow and now showcases more than 1,000 products and programs that can improve strength, speed, agility, balance, and flexibility. The easy-to-use site includes virtual catalogs—visitors can flip through the comprehensive Power Systems fitness and sports performance catalog and the strength supplement catalog page by page. The site also includes Web-only specials, “How To” training routines, helpful articles, sale items, and links to related products. Go online today for more information, to order a product, or to request a catalog.

www.power-systems.com PROTEAM’s Web Site Responds to Your Needs The PROTEAM by Hausmann Web site is user-friendly, easy to navigate, and features information on the company’s entire product line—there’s even a downloadable brochure in PDF format. In addition, a color selector chart, testimonials, and installation photos are included. The specifications and product features are simple, concise, and informative. The photos are large, clear, and complete. Introductions to both the company and its product line have been arranged to save the viewer time and to impart all the necessary information you may need. In other words, all possible questions have been anticipated and answered. It’s like having a knowledgeable company representative talking to you.

www.proteamtables.com New SwimEx Web Site Is Better Than Ever Log on to SwimEx’s Web site and check out its new look. The company has added new features, simplified the navigation, and even incorporated multimedia features to help you learn everything you need to know about SwimEx and aquatic therapy quickly and easily. The new site is organized with users in mind. For therapists, it shows the complete line of SwimEx home conditioning pools in convenient, easy-to-compare panels. In addition to photos and general information on each model, there are full-color drawings that illustrate construction and dimensions, as well as size and depth perspectives. Other sections of the site explore how physical therapists and athletic trainers, including some who work for professional sports teams, use SwimEx aqua therapy for rehabilitation and conditioning. There’s even video of news reports profiling some high-profile installations. See it for yourself today.

www.swimex.com

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CallingHere Cards is what these companies are most known for...

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A leader in lifesaving training for more than 95 years. www.redcross.org

Wholesale supplier of top-quality fitness and strength training accessories. www.harbingerfitness.com

Supplier of quality tools and resources for more than 30 years. www.optp.com/ad

Better materials, better designs, better bracing. www.bioskin.com

Suppliers of high-quality iontophoresis products for 30 years. www.iomed.com

Uniquely designed products with unparalleled comfort and effectiveness. www.injurybegone.com

A leading manufacturer of innovative pain-reducing sports medicine products. www.cho-pat.com

Manufacturer of sophisticated therapeutic devices and supplies for 50 years. www.mettlerelectronics.com

Building equipment for football champions for 35 years. www.rogersathletic.com

Equipment for training without straining. www.shuttlesystems.com

Antimicrobial, antiseptic skin cleanser—part of an effective defense against MRSA. www.hibigeebies.com

A leading emergency tooth preserving system by PhoenixLazerus, Inc. www.save-a-tooth.com

Winning taste... Championship results. www.cytosport.com

Highly respected strength and conditioning and personal training certifications. www.nsca-cc.org

Get injured athletes back up to top speed quickly and safely. www.swimex.com

Manufacturer and distributor of advanced-technology medical and rehabilitation equipment, supplies, and treatment tables. www.dynatronics.com

Created for the extreme demands of high-level athletic training. www.nzmfg.com

Supplier of functional exercise equipment for rehabilitation and athletic training. www.totalgym.com

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CATALOG SHOWCASE

TESTIMONIAL

Creative Health Products, Inc. 800-742-4478 www.chponline.com

Top Athletes Use Keiser

Since 1976, Creative Health Products has been a leading discount supplier of rehabilitation, fitness, exercise, and athletic equipment, as well as health, medical, and fitness testing and measuring products, all available at reduced prices. Creative Health Products offers heart rate monitors; blood pressure testers; pulse oximeters; body fat calipers; scales; strength testers; flexibility testers; stethoscopes; pedometers; exercise bikes; ergometers; stopwatches; fitness books and software; exercise bands; step benches; hand and finger exercisers; heating pads; and more. Circle No. 562

Some of the world’s top training facilities, schools, and sports teams choose Keiser to train their athletes for peak performance.

Power Systems 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com Since 1986, Power Systems has been setting the standard as a leading supplier for sports performance, fitness, and rehabilitation products and programs. It’s the one resource for all your training equipment, supplemental product education, and storage needs. The sports performance catalog has designated areas for core strength, medicine balls, speed, plyometrics, strength equipment, racks, and flooring. The catalog is full of hundreds of new products and dozens of products available exclusively from Power Systems. The company has even lowered some of its prices, enabling the customer to get premium products for less. Call or go online to find out more, to place an order, or to request a catalog. Circle No. 563

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Keiser’s customer list includes: Athletes’ Performance, Train 4 the Game, Fitness Quest 10, TEST Sports Club, Purdue University, Texas A&M, Boston University, the University of Florida, the University of North Carolina, Boston University, the University of Arizona, the St. Louis Cardinals, the Indianapolis Colts, the Buffalo Bills, the New York Mets, the Houston Rockets, Manchester United FC, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the Cincinnati Bengals, the Indiana Pacers, and countless more. “Keiser equipment has become an integral part of our training. Our players have the ability to improve power and explosiveness in a safe, effective manner. We make great use of the squat and hip machines for high-speed, lower-body training, which has been a great addition to our program.” Jon Torine, Strength Coach Indianapolis Colts “...without a doubt the most exciting strength equipment I have seen in more than 20 years. As someone who was brought up with freeweights, I can honestly say that Keiser has developed a piece of equipment that may empty the gym of iron. The feedback has been tremendous. Our players can work the whole body doing football-specific movements with resistance.” Jim Henry, Strength & Conditioning Coach Celtic Football Club Contact Keiser today to see how the company’s equipment can help you provide the most effective training available.

Keiser 2470 S. Cherry Ave. Fresno, CA 93706 800-888 7009 info@keiser.com www.keiser.com

TESTIMONIAL

Total Gym® PowerTower Transitioning from Rehab to Performance Training at the Touch of a Button Dr. Paul Gaspar, President/Founder of Gaspar Doctors of Physical Therapy in San Diego, Calif., takes a progressive approach to rehab by promoting patient autonomy and ultimate independence from physical therapy. He achieves this with efi Sports Medicine’s motorized incline resistance training apparatus, the Total Gym PowerTower. Gaspar, who utilizes the PowerTower for rehabilitation and sports-specific training, says: “The PowerTower offers unparalleled convenience and effectiveness and is easy to control and modify. I can adjust the resistance based on a patient’s needs during the actual exercise with just the push of a button.” The PowerTower uses body weight as resistance on an incline, creating less pressure on the joints and allowing Gaspar to be more aggressive with his patients’ exercise programs in a manner that doesn’t aggravate their symptoms. He can even take his athletes through high-performance functional sports training on the unit, utilizing unrestricted range of motion and core integration. “The machine is designed to move like the body naturally moves,” says Gaspar. “It allows me to be more proactive with patient therapy than if I were just treating an injury.”

Total Gym 7755 Arjons Dr. San Diego, CA 92126 800-541-4900 Fax: 858-764-0018 www.totalgym.com T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007

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CEU QUIZ

T&C July/August 2007 Volume XVII, No. 5

Training & Conditioning is pleased to provide NATA and NSCA members with the opportunity to earn continuing education units through reading issues of the magazine. The following quiz is based on articles that appear in this issue of Training & Conditioning. By satisfactorily completing the quiz and mailing it to MAG, Inc., readers can earn 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) continuing education units.

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form (on page 82) that represents the best answer for each of the questions below. Complete the form at the bottom of page 82, include a $20 payment to MAG, Inc., and mail it by September 30, 2007 to the following address: MAG, Inc., ATTN: T&C 17.5 Quiz, 31 Dutch Mill Road, Ithaca, NY 14850. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will be notified of their earned credit by mail no later than November 1, 2007. Doctor’s Orders (pages 17-23) Objective: Learn more about what physician extenders do and how you can add the title to your athletic training resume. 1. One of the main duties of a physician extender includes: a) Restocking supplies in examination rooms. b) Escorting patients to and from the waiting rooms. c) Assessing injuries, discussing treatment plans, and developing home programs. d) Scheduling return appointments for patients. 2. Statistics indicate there are approximately how many certified athletic trainers working in the physician extender role? a) 500. b) 750. c) 1,000. d) 2,000. 3. In a 2004 study conducted at UW Health Sports Medicine, the orthopedists were able to see _____ more patients and the athletic trainers spent an average of _____ minutes with each patient. a) 15-30; 25. b) 25-35; 25. c) 15-40; 35. d) 20-40; 35. 4. In the same study, interviewed physicians reported that: a) Certified athletic trainers’ skills and knowledge of sports injuries and rehabilitation were irreplaceable. b) The cost/benefit ratio displayed minimal benefit. c) Certified athletic trainers knowledge was superb in nonsports related injuries. d) Clinics were able to see an average of two to four more patients per day. 5. Benefits to certified athletic trainers employed as physician extenders include: a) Less restrictions on continuing education requirements. b) Improved quality of life. c) Improved medical and dental benefits. d) Additional vacation days and retirement opportunities. 6. If a certified athletic trainer would like to pursue a career as a physician extender, the article recommends that he or she: a) Contact a physician that is not too busy to allow you to learn the position. b) Contact a physician that sees older orthopedic patients. c) Contact the busiest physician that sees a younger and active population. d) Send their resume to primary care physicians.

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7. What are the best selling points when trying to create a physician extender position? a) Decreased waiting room time for patients and decreased physician liability. b) Quality of care and efficient management of resources. c) Knowledge of injuries and time management skills. d) Certified athletic trainers are willing to work long hours for lower pay.

Playing With Science (pages 25-29) Objective: See how periodization is evolving as a science and how you can apply it to specific sports. 8. What is the goal of periodization? a) To allow athletes a rest period between competitions. b) To assist with carbohydrate loading. c) To improve glycogen stores. d) To bring athletes to a physical peak for their most important competition(s). 9. The off-season helps: a) Provide variety and prevent boredom. b) Lay the foundation in terms of muscle size, strength, endurance, and technique. c) The athlete to focus on sport training and maintenance. d) Give the athlete a chance to mentally and physically recover. 10. The preseason is: a) More intense, but with lower volume than off-season training. b) Unstructured training designed to allow for recovery. c) Composed of a higher work volume but lower intensity. d) Focused on improving glycogen stores. 11. The conjugated method of adding a strength exercise with an explosive move is also called what? a) Postactivation potentiation. b) Concentration loading. c) Summated microcycles. d) Overreaching summation.

Treading Lightly (pages 30-35) Obective: Learn about new ideas in using underwater treadmills for rehab programs and preventing overtraining. 12. One advantage to having a motorized water treadmill is that: a) The cost is less than a non-motorized model. b) There is a psychological advantage as the athlete sees this as a high tech device. TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


c) An athlete can begin using the treadmill earlier in the rehabilitation program. d) Multiple athletes can work out on the treadmill at the same time.

a) Apply salt to foods. b) Eat more fresh vegetables. c) Decrease water intake. d) Increase protein intake.

13. According to Ron Courson, an athlete that is up to his or her neck in water is approximately _____ percent unloaded. a) 50. b) 75. c) 90. d) 95.

20. One quarter teaspoon of salt is equivalent to _____ milligrams of sodium. a) 1,000. b) 2,000. c) 3.000. d) 4,000.

14. Courson also estimates an athlete in waist-level water is _____ percent unloaded. a) 50. b) 75. c) 90. d) 95.

21. Salty sweaters should replace what percentage of fluid lost during exercise? a) 90. b) 100. c) 110. d) 120.

15. This article indicates the underwater treadmill can be used for what? a) Maintaining cardiovascular conditioning. b) Strength training. c) Stretching. d) Game simulation.

22. The salty sweater should drink _____ ounces of water or carbohydrate/electrolyte/fluid replacement drink for every pound lost during exercise. a) 20. b) 30. c) 40. d) 45.

Salt In Their Sweat (pages 36-40) Objective: Gain an understanding of how to best work with salty sweaters. 16. In a study of football players, the group that experienced cramping: a) Weighed ten pounds more than the non-cramping group. b) Was less likely to experience heat illness. c) Lost twice as much sodium as the non-cramping group. d) Lost less sodium than the non-cramping group. 17. In the same study previously mentioned, fluid loss in the group with muscle cramps averaged _____ liters per hour, while fluid loss in the group without cramps averaged _____ liters per hour. a) .99; 1.49. b) .50; .00. c) 1.49; .99. d) 1.00; .50. 18. According to this article, increased fluid and sodium losses equate to what? a) A limited ability to maintain body temperature, making heat illness more likely. b) Slower reflexes and more on-field errors. c) Improved body temperature regulation. d) Improved muscle activation and firing.

23. A recent study conducted in New Zealand found sodium loading to: a) Decrease heat tolerance. b) Have no effect on plasma volume. c) Decrease athletes’ appetites. d) Increase plasma volume in men and women. 24. At Florida State, cramp-prone athletes begin supplementation to increase sodium intake how long before competition? a) 12 hours. b) 18 hours. c) One day. d) Two to three days.

From Low to High (pages 45-49) Objective: Learn about the University of Kentucky’s strength and conditioning program for volleyball. 25. According to this article, _____ and _____ are two key parts to the success of the University of Kentucky volleyball strength and conditioning program. a) Weight training; education. b) Limited injuries; education. c) Communication; education. d) Plyometrics; periodization.

19. What is one way to increase sodium intake?

Answer sheet is on page 82

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CEU QUIZ

ANSWER FORM

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form below that represents your selection of the best answer for each of the previous questions. Complete the form at the bottom of this page, include a $20 payment to MAG, Inc., and mail it to the following address: MAG, Inc., ATTN: T&C 17.5 Quiz, 31 Dutch Mill Road, Ithaca, NY 14850, no later than September 30, 2007. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will receive 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) CEU’s, and will be notified of their earned credit by mail no later than November 1, 2007.

A

B

C

D

Doctor’s Orders

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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Playing With Science

8. 9. 10. 11.

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B

C

D

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Salt In Their Sweat

16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

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From Low to High

25.

Treading Lightly

12. 13.

14. 15.

A

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Last Name ____________________________________ First Name _______________________________ MI______ Title ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________ State _________ Zip Code _____________________ Daytime Telephone ( _________ ) ________________________________________ E-Mail Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ Payment Information

❏ $20 check or money order (U.S. Funds only) payable to: MAG, Inc. (please note “T&C 17.5 Quiz” on check) ❏ Visa

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❏ Discover

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Account Number _______________________________________________ Expiration Date ____________________ Name on Card _____________________________________ Signature ______________________________________

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ADDITIONAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

EARN BOC CEUs • Complete quizzes found in the NSCA’s Strength & Conditioning Journal • Complete online quizzes at www.nsca-cc.org Toll-free: 888-746-2378 I Online: www.nsca-cc.org E-mail: commission@nsca-cc.org

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ncss60v0.indd 1

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Do you have ENOUGH BANDS for your team? WVU does! Shown here is just one of three rubber-band rooms at West Virginia University.

For information on setting up a band room in your facility, call us at 1-800-344-3539. Stay ahead of your competition with Flex Bands...the best-kept secret in pro sports! Used by the Giants, Jaguars, Raiders, Ravens, Angels, Padres, Red Sox, and many more, Flex Bands have been improving athletic performance since 1980!

Jump Stretch, Inc. 1230 N. Meridian Rd. Youngstown, OH 44509 www.jumpstretch.com 1-800-344-3539 Fax: 1-330-793-8719 Circle No. 153 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM JumpStretchAdForTC1505v3.indd 1

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2007 7/14/05 10:59:42 AM

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Association Corner The following associations offer services of interest to our T&C readers.

Keep your career in motion… NSCA Educational Events for 2007 • NSCA’s Performance Series Symposia

• Essentials of Weight Training • Periodization & Planning • Functional Performance Training

For dates, locations, and session information call 800-815-6826, or visit www.nsca-lift.org

National Strength and Conditioning Association ECA MIAMI SPORTS TRAINING, FITNESS CONFERENCE, AND TRADE SHOW, NOVEMBER 2007

The Voice of the Doctors who care for the Pros

1-800-ECA-EXPO

The PTP provides resources and services for all sports medicine professionals.

Visit www.proteamphysicians.com

OR REGISTER ONLINE

ECA M IAMI 2007

www.ecaworldfitness.com

to find a PTP doctor, ask a question of a PTP doctor, or explore the educational materials from PTP regarding prevention, treatment and performance.

SPECIALIST IN SPORTS CONDITIONING

ISSA Certification Program • • • •

Be the conditioning coach for your team. Expand strength & conditioning programs. Maximize earning potential as a coach. Learn to enhance athletic performance. CALL FOR FREE INFO:

1.800.892.4772

www.FitnessEducation.com

International Sports Sciences Association

Ided[i]Za^cZZfj^ebZci[dgndjgVi]aZi^XigV^c^c\XVgZZg# • Optimum Performance Training™ method • Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES) certification • OPT™ for Performance Enhancement workshops

Athletic Therapy. Rapid return to work and play.

Athletic Therapists are dedicated to the promotion and delivery of quality care through injury prevention and rehabilitation and emergency services. In collaboration with other health care professionals, athletic therapists work to create a healthier environment that encompasses the needs of the active community, including the high-performance athlete.

For more information please visit us online at www.athletictherapy.org

All NATA certified athletic trainers are eligible to receive a free subscription to T&C.

• Continuing education for NASM, NATA and NSCA • Clinical Applications • Flexibility, core, balance, power, speed and strength training

NATA Bronze Corporate Partner

Call 1-800-460-6276 or visit www.nasm.org.

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Soft-Tissue Oscillation Therapy

An EXCITING breakthrough in the treatment of acute and chronic pain!

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Call today to schedule a demonstration.

Dynatronics 800.874.6251 Circle No. 154


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The sooner your clients recover, the better. By supplementing with Wobenzym®N, you can support nearly every metabolic and physiological process involved in recuperation – and help your clients get back in action faster.†

Desk Reference

For more information or to order literature for your clients, visit our website at www. Wobenzym .com/tandc †These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. ©2007 Naturally Vitamins, a Marlyn Nutraceuticals, Inc. company. Wobenzym®N is a registered trademark of Mucos Pharma, GmbH

Circle No. 155

Training & Conditioning 17.5  

July/August 2007