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July/August 2006 Vol. XVI, No. 5, $5.00

Preventing Heat Stress Ready to Retire?

Hydro Power New ideas in water workouts


The real secret of effective training is conditioning your brain to recognize what kind of food your body needs. Muscle Milk Collegiate meets all compliance standards for College Athletics. Trusted and used by top programs such as ASU, CAL Athletics, UCLA, Florida State, Georgia Tech, University of Hawaii, Stanford and many more. Available now in 5 delicious, easy mixing flavors of powder and coming soon in a convenient Ready-to-Drink formula.

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July/August 2006, Vol. XVI, No. 5

CONTENTS

31 39 6

10

37

Bulletin Board NCAA releases drug use study … triad research among high school athletes … kudos to our editorial board members. Comeback Athlete Ali Mims Florida State University Sideline Exertional Heat Stroke

54 Special Section Web Site Supplier Profiles

64 69 70 77 78

Product Pages Heat Stress Product Launch Ankle & Foot Care Aquatic Therapy More Products

76 Advertisers Directory 84

CEU Quiz For NATA and NSCA Members

On the cover: Author Maria Hutsick watches one of her athletes perform a pool workout. Article begins on page 16. Photo ©Mark Morelli. ATHLETICBID.COM

Optimum Performance

Power 16 Hydro You know the pool is great for rehab, but how about making it a part of your strength-training program? Pool workouts can build your athletes’ fitness while safeguarding them from overuse injuries. By Maria Hutsick Leadership

to Retire 23 Ready Whether you dream about taking on new challenges or playing golf all day in your retirement, neither happens without some preparation. In this article, six athletic trainers talk about how they are making (or have made) the transition. By Kenny Berkowitz Nutrition

Strongest Survive 31 The It doesn’t substitute for proper training or diet, but creatine can have a place in a strength program. The key is knowing how to use it. By David Hill Treating The Athlete

But Not Bothered 39 Hot August in South Carolina is hot and humid. NATA Hall of Famer Rod Walters explains how he helps the Gamecocks beat the preseason heat. By Dr. Rod Walters Sport Specific

Direction 48 Changing When Bradley University men’s basketball revamped its in-season strength and conditioning program last year, the end result was a trip to the Sweet Sixteen. By Ronnie Wright T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

1


If your athletes don’t have the best communication skills, we suggest listening to their urine. ®

The case for drinking Gatorade during exercise. They’re in high school. They’re awkward. It’s just not realistic to expect them to tell you how they feel. But you need to find out what’s causing some of them to complain of dizziness and disorientation during two-a-days. Help the players help themselves. Drill it into their heads; urine should look more like lemonade than apple juice. Some believe that dehydration during exercise stems only from not drinking enough water. Potentially, it could be that they’re drinking only water.

2

T&C SEPTEMBER 2005

ATHLETICBID.COM


Š2005 S-VC, Inc.

Hydration, from a cellular point of view:

Water absorption results from the intestinal absorption of glucose and fructose, along with electrolytes like sodium, potassium and chloride. As these solutes are absorbed, water molecules follow down the osmotic gradient.

So, this is what we’ve learned from the urinals: the carbohydrates and electrolytes in Gatorade create the proper environment for effective water absorption and rehydration. Which means anytime an athlete sweats, Gatorade is the better choice over water. Now you know,

proper hydration relies on more than just water.

ATHLETICBID.COM

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Learn more at gatorade.com/ athletictrainers

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Great Ideas For Athletes...

Editorial Board Marjorie Albohm, MS, ATC/L Director of Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Research, Orthopaedics Indianapolis Jon Almquist, ATC Specialist, Fairfax County (Va.) Pub. Schools Athletic Training Program Brian Awbrey, MD Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Instructor in Orthopaedics, Harvard Medical School

Dual Action Knee Strap Patented device offers an extra level of pain relief and protection from knee degeneration and overuse syndromes. Stabilizes and strengthens the joint while allowing full mobility. Sizes: Sm - XL

Achilles Tendon Strap This patented device will reduce stress upon the Achilles Tendon and provide effective relief from pain and discomfort associated with Achilles Tendonitis. Sizes: Sm - Med - Lrg

www.cho-pat.com 1-800-221-1601

Christopher Ingersoll, PhD, ATC, FACSM Director, Graduate Programs in Sports Medicine/Athletic Training University of Virginia Jeff Konin, PhD, ATC, PT Visiting Associate Professor, University of South Florida Tim McClellan, MS, CSCS Director of Perf. Enhancement, Makeplays.com Center for Human Performance

Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD Director, Sports Medicine Nutrition Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. Health System

Michael Merk, MEd, CSCS Director of Health & Fitness, YMCA of Greater Cleveland

Cynthia “Sam” Booth, ATC, PhD Manager, Outpatient Therapy and Sportsmedicine, MeritCare Health System

Cho-Pat’s Original Knee Strap is designed to alleviate certain knee discomforts due to overuse syndromes, arthritis, and other forms of degeneration. Nearly two million sold! Sizes: XS - XXL • Colors: Black and Tan

Maria Hutsick, MS, ATC/L, CSCS Head Athletic Trainer, Boston University

Jim Berry, MEd, ATC, SCAT/EMT-B Director of Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer, Myrtle Beach (S.C.) High School

Christine Bonci, MS, ATC Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, Women’s Athletics, University of Texas

Knee Strap

Gary Gray, PT, President, CEO, Functional Design Systems

Debra Brooks, CNMT, LMT, PhD CEO, Iowa NeuroMuscular Therapy Center Cindy Chang, MD Head Team Physician, University of California-Berkeley Dan Cipriani, PhD, PT Assistant Professor, Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State Univ. Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCS Clinic Director, Orthopedic & Sports Phys. Ther., Dunn, Cook, and Assoc. Bernie DePalma, MEd, PT, ATC Head Athl. Trainer/Phys. Therapist, Cornell University Lori Dewald, EdD, ATC, CHES Athletic Training Program Director and Associate Professor of Health Education, University of Minnesota-Duluth Jeff Dilts, Director, Business Development & Marketing, National Academy of Sports Medicine David Ellis, RD, LMNT, CSCS Sports Alliance, Inc. Boyd Epley, MEd, CSCS Director of Coaching Performance, National Strength & Conditioning Association Peter Friesen, ATC, NSCA-CPT, CSCS, CAT, Head Ath. Trainer/ Cond. Coach, Carolina Hurricanes Lance Fujiwara, MEd, ATC, EMT Director of Sports Medicine, Virginia Military Institute Vern Gambetta, MA, President, Gambetta Sports Training Systems Joe Gieck, EdD, ATR, PT Director of Sports Medicine and Prof., Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia (retired) Brian Goodstein, MS, ATC, CSCS, Head Athletic Trainer, DC United

Jenny Moshak, MS, ATC, CSCS Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, University of Tennessee Steve Myrland, CSCS Owner, Manager, Perf. Coach, Myrland Sports Training, LLC Instructor and Consultant, University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine

July/August 2006 Vol. XVI, No. 5 Publisher Mark Goldberg Editorial Staff Eleanor Frankel, Director R.J. Anderson, Kenny Berkowitz, Abigail Funk, Dennis Read, Greg Scholand, Laura Smith Circulation Staff David Dubin, Director John Callaghan Art Direction Message Brand Advertising Production Staff Bridget Mundy, Director Adam Berenstain, Jonni Campbell, Jim Harper IT Manager Julian Cook Business Manager Pennie Small

Mike Nitka, MS, CSCS Director of Human Performance, Muskego (Wisc.) High School

Special Projects Dave Wohlhueter

Bruno Pauletto, MS, CSCS President, Power Systems, Inc.

Administrative Assistant Sharon Barbell

Stephen Perle, DC, CCSP Associate Prof. of Clin. Sciences, University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic

Advertising Materials Coordinator Mike Townsend Marketing Director Sheryl Shaffer

Brian Roberts, MS, ATC, Director, Sport Performance & Rehab. Ctr.

Marketing/Sales Assistant Danielle Catalano

Ellyn Robinson, DPE, CSCS, CPT Assistant Professor, Exercise Science Program, Bridgewater State College

Advertising Sales Associates Diedra Harkenrider (607) 257-6970, ext. 24 Rob Schoffel (607) 257-6970, ext. 21

Kent Scriber, EdD, ATC, PT Professor/Supervisor of Athletic Training, Ithaca College Chip Sigmon, CSCS Strength and Conditioning Coach, Carolina Medical Center Bonnie J. Siple, MS, ATC Coordinator, Athletic Training Education Program & Services, Slippery Rock University Chad Starkey, PhD, ATC Visiting Professor Athletic Training Education Program Ohio University Ralph Stephens, LMT, NCTMB Sports Massage Therapist, Ralph Stephens Seminars Fred Tedeschi, ATC Head Athletic Trainer, Chicago Bulls Terrence Todd, PhD, Co-Director, Todd-McLean Physical Culture Collection, Dept. of Kinesiology & Health Ed., University of Texas-Austin

T&C editorial/business offices: 31 Dutch Mill Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-6970 Fax: (607) 257-7328 info@MomentumMedia.com Training & Conditioning (ISSN 1058-3548) is published monthly except in January and February, May and June, and July and August, which are bimonthly issues, for a total of nine times a year, by MAG, Inc., 31 Dutch Mill Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850. T&C is distributed without charge to qualified professionals involved with competitive athletes. The subscription rate is $24 for one year and $48 for two years in the United States, and $30 for one year and $60 for two years in Canada. The single copy price is $5. Copyright© 2006 by MAG, Inc. All rights reserved. Text may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part, without the permission of the publisher. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Periodicals postage paid at Ithaca, N.Y., and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Training & Conditioning, P.O. Box 4806, Ithaca, NY 14852-4806. Printed in the U.S.A.

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Board NCAA Releases Drug Use Study

Gulp, Don’t Sip

Twenty-four percent of college athletes who use steroids are certain that their coaches know they use them, and 21 percent say their coach, athletic trainer, or team physician supplies the drugs. Those findings are part of the most recent NCAA Study of Substance Use Habits of College Student-Athletes, released in its entirety in April. Conducted every four years, the study polls students across all NCAA divisions. Twenty thousand athletes responded to the most recent survey. The good news, however, is that overall steroid use fell from 1.5 to 1.2 percent between 2001 and 2004. The NCAA attributes declining use to successful education programs for student-athletes, but urges better steroid education for coaches who may be turning a blind eye. Continuing a decade-long trend, amphetamine use increased during the four-year period, from 3.2 to four percent. Division III athletes reported the highest level of use at 4.6 percent. Among amphetamine users, 31.9 percent said they take the drugs, which include Ritalin and Adderall, to combat Attention Deficit Disorder. However, there is concern that athletes with prescriptions are passing amphetamines along to teammates. Nearly 7.5 percent of users say they take amphetamines for a performance boost, and 27.9 percent take them to increase energy. Softball players reported the highest rate of amphetamine use, at 5.2 percent. Consistent with previous years’ data, most athletes who reported using amphetamines, steroids, and other ergogenic drugs said they began using them in high school. More than half of steroid users began using the drug in high school, compared with 35 percent who started in college and 14 percent who started prior to high school. A new drug testing policy is in effect this summer, as the NCAA seeks to close a lingering window of opportunity for athletes to use drugs—the summer months. Athletes in Divisions I and II are now eligible for random testing in June and July. All sports are eligible, but this year’s focus is on Division I baseball and football. According to the National Center for Drug Free Sport, which conducts drug testing for the NCAA, five to 10 athletes from each team are being randomly selected for testing this summer. If the selected students aren’t on campus, drug testing collectors will visit their homes or workplaces. Athletes who test positive will lose their eligibility for one calendar year.

Consuming sports drinks may put athletes more at risk for tooth decay than drinking soda, especially if they sip the drinks over a long period of time. That finding was reported in a recent issue of General Dentistry, a journal published by the American Academy of General Dentistry. The study, conducted by J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, PhD, Director of Biomaterials Research at the University of Maryland Dental School, used extracted teeth to simulate 13 years of normal exposure to energy drinks, fitness water, sports drinks, lemonade, and iced tea. When von Fraunhofer weighed the teeth after exposure, he discovered that exposing teeth to sports drinks stripped them of more enamel than exposing them to iced tea or cola—an effect he attributes to the organic acids contained in citrus flavors, a common sports drink ingredient that can break down calcium. The sports drink industry takes issue with the study, claiming that von Fraunhofer’s methods were too different from real-world consumption to be useful. The industry also points to an earlier study in the 2002 issue of the European journal Caries Research that found no relationship between sports drinks and tooth decay. More research is needed, but for athletes who want to lower their risk, dentists suggest the following tips: • Gulp sports drinks, don’t sip. Athletes who take a swig from a sports drink every few minutes during a workout or contest expose their teeth to a repeated acid bath, creating the highest risk. • Rinse with water after finishing the sports drink. • Use a straw. • Avoid tooth brushing immediately after consumption. Because it is abrasive, the toothpaste works the acid further into teeth. • Cut back on sports drinks by alternating with water.

■ The 2005 NCAA Study of Substance Use Habits of College Student-Athletes can be downloaded at: www.ncaa.org/library/research/substance_use_habits/2006/2006_substance_use_report.pdf. 6

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

■ Read von Fraunhofer’s study, “Effects of Sports Drinks and Other Beverages on Dental Enamel,” in General Dentistry, at: www.agd.org/media/2005/feb/sport_bev.asp.

Triad Risk Starts Early Those hoping to prevent female athletes from developing the symptoms of female athlete triad syndrome—disordered eating, menstrual irregularities, and low bone mass—would do well to focus education efforts on high school girls, according to a study published in the February 2006 issue of the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. San Diego State University researchers examined 170 female high school athletes ATHLETICBID.COM


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in eight sports for the study, and discovered that 20 percent of them exhibited at least one aspect of the triad. The study reports that 18 percent of its sample showed disordered eating patterns, while 24 percent had menstrual irregularities. Twenty-two percent had low bone mass, with girls in sports that emphasize lean body mass at a greater risk than those in other sports. “We were surprised at the fairly large percentage of girls with low bone density,” Jeanne Nichols, PhD, SDSU

Professor of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences and co-author of the study, told the San Diego State Universe. Nichols added that this finding is particularly troubling because women develop 98 percent of their total bone mass by about age 20. While fewer than two percent of the participants met the criteria for all three elements of the triad, the authors are concerned that the prevalence of individual symptoms at such a young age puts them at risk for developing the

full triad over time. “The results are a wake-up call for physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and coaches who work with female athletes,” coauthor Mitchell Rauh, PhD, PT, MPH, Professor of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences at SDSU, told the San Diego State Universe. “These conditions may happen earlier than realized and these professionals should start to encourage positive behaviors now.” ■ The study, “Prevalence of the Female Athlete Triad Syndrome Among High School Athletes,” can be accessed by going to: archpedi.amaassn.org. Click on “past issues,” then click on “February, 2006.”

Editorial Board Members Honored During the National Athletic Trainers’ Association’s 57th Annual Meeting and Clinical Symposia in Atlanta in June, several members of the Training & Conditioning Editorial Board were recognized for their contributions to the profession. At Training & Conditioning, we would like to extend our congratulations to the following individuals, whose insight consistently helps us in our mission: Jon Almquist, ATC, Specialist, Fairfax County (Va.) Public Schools: Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award. Jim Berry, MEd, ATC, Director of Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer, Myrtle Beach (S.C.) High School: Athletic Trainer Service Award. Tina Bonci, MS, ATC, Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine, Women’s Athletics, University of Texas: Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award. Chris Ingersoll, PhD, ATC, Director, Graduate Programs in Sports Medicine/Athletic Training, University of Virginia: NATA Foundation Volunteer of the Year Award.

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Chad Starkey, PhD, LAT, ATC, Visiting Professor, Athletic Training Education Program, Ohio University: Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award and Sayers “Bud” Miller Distinguished Educator Award. ■ ATHLETICBID.COM


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Comeback

Athlete

Ali Mims Florida State University

But the road also delivered her to the FSU starting lineup at the start of the 2005 season, where she led her team to a Final Four appearance in the NCAA Division I Women’s Soccer Championship. Despite permanent foot and ankle pain and some lost athleticism, Mims recorded seven shutouts on the season and provided plenty of inspiration and leadership for a young but talented team. Mims’s story begins at the start of her sophomore year when she was competing for the starting goalkeeper position. During a scrimmage at the University of Georgia, she came out to challenge a breakaway in the game’s opening minutes and collided with an opposing attacker. She heard, and felt, her leg snap. For Mims the injury was extremely painful, but X-rays showed it to be a relatively straightforward fracture, and the next day surgeons performed a successful intramedullary rod placement. With the rod in place, doctors told Mims she could expect to fully recover in seven months and be ready for the 2003 season. However, almost immediately post-surgery, Mims’s injury became anything but straightforward. Andrew Borom, MD, who performed the last 10 of Mims’s surgeries, describes his patient as a walking worst-case scenario. “Ali basically had everything that could possibly go wrong for a tibia fracture,” says Borom, a foot and ankle specialist at Total Orthopedic Care in Tallahassee. “I’ve never seen a series of complications like Ali had—there’s not a problem I can think of that she didn’t suffer from. 10

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

FLORIDA STATE SPORTS INFO

Around the Florida State University campus, goalkeeper Ali Mims is known as “the soccer player who broke her leg.” Mims earned the nickname after sustaining a closed left tibia fracture on Aug. 23, 2002, and spending the better part of two years on crutches. Though medically accurate, the label barely begins to describe the trials and tribulations Mims experienced on her way back to defending the net. After having intramedullary rod placement surgery, Mims began a multi-year journey down a road fraught with complications, 21 separate surgeries, and countless hours of rehab.

After overcoming a litany of complications from a tibia fracture, goalkeeper Ali Mims led Florida State to the semifinals of the NCAA Division I women’s soccer championships last year. She is hoping to bring home a title this fall. “The complications weren’t really anyone’s fault—everything was done exactly right during the initial rod placement,” Borom adds. “But she got an infection and that led to a whole bunch of other problems.” The first wave of complications hit Mims right off the bat. On her first day post-surgery, she developed signs of compartment syndrome and underwent a fasciotomy that required 10-inch incisions on each side of her leg. Later that same day, Mims’s breathing became labored and she was diagnosed with sustained pulmonary fatty emboli, which led to adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). After five days in the Intensive Care Unit, the emboli resolved and Mims was released from the hospital with open fasciotomy wounds. ATHLETICBID.COM


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■ Ali Mims Injury: Closed left tibia fracture Rehab Hurdle: Overcoming 21 surgeries and multiple setbacks. Quote from ATC: “There wasn’t a day she didn’t give 100 percent in rehab. She never complained, never whined. She said, ‘Just tell me what I need to do to get back on the field.’” Result: Returned to become the starting goalkeeper for Florida State and led her team to the 2005 NCAA Champions Cup Final Four.

Back in Tallahassee, 22 days after leaving the hospital, Mims began developing fevers that doctors linked to infections growing around her fasciotomy sites. After oral antibiotics had no effect, irrigation and debridement were performed to help control the tunneled areas of infection discovered in her distal tibial region. She continued with these weekly procedures for the next four months, until the incision was closed on Jan. 31, 2003. At that point, Mims and Rhonda Kelly, ATC, Assistant Ath-

letic Trainer at Florida State, began rehab still with the goal of returning in time for the 2003 season. The protocols, which emphasized maintaining a sterile environment to protect Mims’s recently closed wounds, included gait training, low-chain flexibility programs, ankle and foot strengthening with an ankle isolator, a tibial hammer machine, and calf machines, and proprioception work with a BAPS board, foam squares and rollers, and a trampoline. “We wanted to challenge her perception of balance,” says Kelly, who worked

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Comeback one-on-one with Mims for two hours a day after her incisions were closed. After a few weeks, Mims regained some strength and ROM and was cleared to participate in the team’s spring workouts on a limited basis. But all was not right. Mims had painful tingling at the bottom of her left foot that did not respond to treatment. In addition, the big toe on her left foot contracted whenever her foot dorsiflexed.

“When her left foot dorsiflexed, it caused a severe contracture of her big toe, which would rub uncomfortably against the top of her shoe … After discussing the options, we elected to fuse the big toe into a straightened position, and also release the tendons of all five toes to prevent clawing and contracture.” “As time progressed, her big toe began clawing up and the pain was increasing,” says Kelly. “It got to where she wasn’t able to continue a normal rehab protocol. Imagine simply walking around with your toe constantly in the curled position. Add the demands of soccer into the equation and you’re talking about a lot of pain.” Kelly’s concern about Mims’s symptoms was justified by Borom, who diagnosed her with several ailments. First, he found nerve entrapment that was a side effect of Mims’s earlier compartment syndrome. This had produced dysesthesia, or a painful pins-and-needles sensation at the bottom of Mims’s foot. Because dysesthesia is not treatable beyond pain management, Mims will likely be on medication for the condition for the rest of her life. Borom also honed in on Mims’s big toe. “When her left foot dorsiflexed, it caused a severe contracture of her big toe, which would rub uncomfortably against the top of her shoe,” says Borom. “After discussing the options, we elected to fuse the big toe into a straightened position, and also release the tendons of all five toes to prevent clawing and contracture.” Around the same time as this procedure, Mims also had the locking rod screws from her tibial rod removed to relieve some soft tissue irritation they were causing. Mims was again on crutches and in a walking boot for five weeks, performing mild ankle and toe ROM exercises. Once out of the boot she began aquatic therapy with Kelly to work on flexibility and strengthening. But just as Mims was noticing improvement in her rehab, further testing revealed chronic osteomyelitis, a latent deep infection around the screw removal sites. Borom surmised that the condition had carried over from her initial injury and was awakened by the screw removal. The diagnosis meant more surgeries to clear the infection and an end to her goal of coming back for the 2003 season. That fall, Mims experienced a torrent of conflicting emoATHLETICBID.COM

tions. “When I was alone, especially at night, I would cry myself to sleep and ask, ‘Is it really worth going through all this pain just to play soccer?’” she says. “There were plenty of times when I couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel. It seemed like I was taking one step forward and two steps back every day.” Mims says the support she received from her teammates, coaches, as well as Kelly, Borom and other sports medicine personnel at Total Orthopedic Care, helped keep her motivated through those dark times. “My teammates and coaches were very good at reminding me that, ‘Hey, we haven’t forgot about you and we can’t wait for you to be back out there with us,’” says Mims. “It helped to hear that stuff all the time. It got me back on track and focused on what I was fighting for. “The hardest part was watching practices and games and knowing I couldn’t contribute,” says Mims. “Yet it was also the best part of my day, because that’s what I love to do and be around.” During that time, Mims also heard plenty of voices urging her to look at the big picture. Returning to play was an option, but some doctors warned that playing could lead to long-term problems. “They told Ali, ‘We can’t guarantee that what you’re doing now won’t affect you 10 or 20 years from now,’” says Kelly. “But Ali had a passion, and I don’t think anyone could have swayed her drive to continue competing in athletics.” After one last surgery—her 21st in all—to remove an antibiotic rod and clean up some of the hardware around her

Mims controls her foot and leg pain by taking medication three times a day, but it is always present. She continues to suffer from dysesthesia, which she compares to walking on seashells. “There are times when my leg really hurts, especially after a hard week of practice. But usually, I’m pretty good about blocking out the pain.” big toe in November 2003, Mims once again began rehab. “That spring she had a lot of work to do because she hadn’t quite recovered from having her toe tendons released and the hardware removed,” says Kelly. “We started with the same basic protocols as before. At first we did a lot of underwater treadmill work so that we weren’t loading the area unnecessarily, which would have made her compensate for the injury.” As Mims grew stronger, she began land-based exercises, and Kelly introduced other strengthening work such as towel gathers, wobble board and Thera-Band exercises, ladder drills, and tibial hammer and proprioceptive training drills. During those months she also began concentrating on goalkeeper-specific drills. “There wasn’t a day she didn’t give 100 percent in rehab,” says Kelly. “She never complained, T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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Athlete

Comeback

never whined. She said, ‘Just tell me what I need to do to get back on the field.’” After this final period of rehab, Mims finally rejoined her teammates for the 2004 season. She served as a backup, appearing in three games, starting one, and didn’t allow a goal. Mims was still not at the top of her game, but was beginning to taste some of the fruits of her labor. That spring, Mims received a bachelor’s degree in business and enrolled in FSU’s MBA program. When the 2005

“I’ve seen people with similar injuries go on complete disability and never work for the rest of their lives … And Ali’s out there playing soccer—and playing well.” season opened, she was granted two medical redshirt years and was named the starting goalkeeper. She was charged with anchoring the backline for one of the ACC’s most inexperienced teams. Picked in the preseason to finish sixth in the league and unranked in national polls, FSU relied on a stingy defense and plenty of hustle as the team powered its way to the Champions Cup Final Four. Mims plays with pain and limitation, however. She controls her foot and leg pain by taking medication three times a day, but it is always present. She continues to suffer from dyses-

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Athlete

Comeback done my job, so I got to sit back and watch her do hers. It was great.” Looking ahead, Mims is excited about the 2006 season and competing for a national championship. But a day doesn’t go by when she isn’t reminded of the past, and the help and support she received from her physicians (including Doug Henderson, MD, an orthopedist at the Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic who helped handle Mims’s case) as well as her athletic trainer. “Rhonda has been by my side every step of the way,” says Mims, noting that Kelly accompanied her on every doctor’s visit—50 trips to Borom’s office in 2003 alone. “She put so much time into me—not only in rehab, but into designing the program and thinking about what would be best for me. “Rhonda did everything possible to get it right,” Mims continues. “She wants all of her patients to return stronger than they were before. She doesn’t just treat the injury, she treats the person.” For Kelly, that approach starts with getting to know her patient. “You have to look at the big picture of an individual, not just the cards they’ve been dealt,” says Kelly. “When you ask about all the facets of their life and show a genuine interest, it builds trust between you and the athlete. You have to work hard to gain it and it’s essential that you don’t lose it, especially when dealing with such a sensitive and drawn out injury like Ali’s.” Mims also credits Borom’s thorough approach as a big reason for her comeback. “He really cared about me—not just getting me back on the field, but also what was best for my life after soccer,” says Mims. “He answered all my questions and left no stone unturned. I feel blessed that this experience has left me with really great friendships with both Rhonda and Dr. Borom.” In 2005, Borom attended one of Mims’s first starts, which he says was like watching one of his own kids play. Since then, he has attended at least six more games. “I’ve seen people with much lesser injuries just totally give up—and I’ve seen people with similar injuries go on complete disability and never work for the rest of their lives,” says Borom. “And Ali’s out there ATHLETICBID.COM

playing soccer—and playing well.” “It was a tough road, but it’s made me the player and person I am today,” says Mims. “A lot of people know me as ‘the soccer player who broke her leg’ and I’m not really bothered by it. “Most of those people—and none of my current teammates—were even here when the injury happened,” she continues. “They just hear the stories. I really hope those stories can inspire other people going through an injury and encourage them to not give up.” ■

Send Us Your Success Stories! To nominate an athlete to be featured in this Comeback Athlete section, please send your name, the athlete’s name, his or her rehab story, and contact information to: 31 Dutch Mill Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850 ef@MomentumMedia.com fax: 607-257-7328 or call us at: 607-257-6970, ext. 18

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

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ATHLETICBID.COM


OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

Power You know the pool is great for rehab, but how about making it a part of your strength-training program? With a little creativity, pool workouts can build your athletes’ fitness while safeguarding them from overuse injuries.

BY MARIA HUTSICK

©MARK MORELLI

M

any of our coaches used to laugh when I told them their athletes could benefit from a water workout. They were under the impression that a water workout meant simply splashing around and having fun in the pool. They stopped laughing, however, once they saw one. We have all heard about (and many of us use) aquatic therapy for rehab, but have you considered applying the same ideas to training healthy athletes? If you are looking for a way to design intense workouts that don’t lead to soreness or risk injury, then water workouts are a great idea. Working out in the pool has many benefits. When standing in chest deep water, an athlete weighs only 10 percent of his or her normal body weight. The reduction means athletes can work out harder at higher intensity levels several days in a row, without causing wear and tear on their joints and general muscle soreness. Not many strength coaches would allow an athlete to do two landbased, high-intensity sprint workouts on consecutive days, but when working out in a pool you can do two or three intense workouts in a row and not worry about overtraining injuries. In addition, water is 12 percent more resistant than air because there are no gravitational forces. Working out in a pool for 30 minutes gives you similar benefits of a two-hour, land-based workout. Water accommodates resistance— the harder you push or pull through it, the more resistance you experience. ATHLETICBID.COM

Water also forces athletes to work their muscles both eccentrically and concentrically. This allows an equal ratio of strength and reciprocal contraction and relaxation of the muscles. PROGRAM DESIGN When planning an aquatic workout, follow the same principles as those of land-based exercises. Frequency, intensity, and volume must be considered, while planning and periodization are also important. You should structure the workouts with specific goals and organization. For example, decide whether you want to use water workouts as your primary exercise vehicle or just occasionally as an adjunct for speed and plyometric work. There are plenty of implementation options for water workouts—the key is figuring out what fits for you and your training program. You can conduct a water workout in a large pool, a small pool, or anyplace that has enough water to fit the number of athletes you are training. I have even put football athletes in a lake during some of our preseason camps in Maine. If you don’t have a pool at your school, you can sometimes use pools at hotels or fitness clubs. Water workouts can be done in varying depths for specific purposes. Deep water is best for cardio work, while chest deep water is great for interval and power workouts, as well as plyometrics. Almost any exercise you do on land can be done in the water. For both upper and lower body exercises, additional resistance can be added with water dumbbells, hand paddles, leg resistance,

weighted boots, and bungee cords. You can also use the athletes’ equipment to make the workout very sport-specific—a tennis racket, hockey stick, or bat can be effective additions to pool workouts. Just like on land, correct body position is very important when performing the exercises. Water is great for emphasizing proper body position because it naturally slows down motion. Here is an example of a water workout that incorporates strength, plyos, and cardio: Warm-up: Almost anything that raises heart rate and gets the blood circulating is an acceptable warmup. For example, athletes can swim two lengths of the pool using any stroke or do calisthenics such as jumping jacks or high knees in chest-deep water. Strength: Lunges can be done in chest deep water—forward, backward, and side-to-side. High kicks can be done in all directions and resistance can be added to the legs to increase the intensity of the workout. Water dumbbells can be incorporated for upper body exercises, and paddles can be added for rotator cuff routines and other types of shoulder exercises. Plyometrics: Jumps can be incorpoMaria Hutsick, MS, LATC, ATC, CSCS, is the Director of Sports Medicine at Boston University and Athletic Trainer for the USA women’s Olympic ice hockey team. She has served on the NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports and the NATA’s Board of Certification. She can be reached at: houndog@bu.edu. T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE rated into the workouts by putting boxes or stools in the water. For example, depth jumps can be performed in the water by placing the plyo boxes in the pool at varying depths. Jump off the box, land soft, and jump up out of the water as high as you can. To prevent injury, athletes should wear an old pair of sneakers or sturdy aqua shoes. A pace clock should be visible or a heart rate monitor should be used to assess how hard the athlete is working.

drills in the pool, you can paint a ladder on the pool bottom. For plyometrics, you can place weighted cones or hurdles on the pool’s bottom and perform jumps over them. To add more resistance, athletes can wear cuff weights on their ankles. To warm up before strength, agility, or plyometric work, swim a few slow and easy laps. In chest deep water, walk 10 yards forward and then backward. Concentrate on staying on your heels

I have found that if you can do an exercise on land, with a little imagination, you can usually adapt it for the pool … For plyometrics, you can place weighted cones or hurdles on the pool’s bottom and perform jumps over them. Measuring heart rate determines if athletes are working hard enough and if they have recovered enough to proceed to the next exercise. STRENGTH, AGILITY, & PLYOS Some coaches and athletic trainers say they feel limited with pool workouts. But I have found that if you can do an exercise on land, with a little imagination, you can usually adapt it for the pool. For example, to do agility ladder

while taking baby steps. Make sure to swing your arms as you walk. Here are some lower-body exercises I use: Hamstring curls: Stand on one leg and perform a hamstring curl with the opposite leg. Alternate while standing still. Add forward walking followed by backward walking. For a plyometric exercise, add a jump while performing the curls. Forward kicks: Standing in a stationary position, lift your thigh and kick

SAFETY FIRST afety is an important component to factor into your water workouts. Athletes must be able to swim, or they must wear an aqua jogger when in deep water. The person conducting the workouts must also know how to swim and be able to perform a rescue if needed. If you are conducting a workout for more than 10 athletes, an assistant coach or coaches should be present to help control the team and assist in case of an emergency. There should also be some specific rules in place to ensure safety. For example, no horseplay or running on the deck are standard rules. Diving boards and starting blocks must also be off limits. Our rules include that athletes entering the pool facility must sit on the pool deck and wait for instructions before entering the water. Also, we always thoroughly explain what the athletes will be doing in the water before they get in. This helps remove the temptation to fool around.

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your lower leg out in front of you. Alternate doing it with each leg followed by forward and backward walking. Add a jump to turn it into a plyometric exercise. For variety, alternate doing six forward kicks and six backward hamstring curls. Small jumps: Stand with legs apart and knees slightly bent. Then perform four jumps, turn 90 degrees to the right and do four more jumps, then turn 90 degrees to the left and do four jumps. Progress to 180 degree turns, then 360 degree turns. Lunges to a front kick: Standing on your right leg, lunge back on your left leg, then bring your left leg forward and perform a kick. Repeat four times and switch legs. Use your arms for balance and push the water forward when lunging back. Push the water backward when front kicking. Skateboards: Imagine that you are standing with your right leg on a skate board and pushing off with your left. Stand on right leg, knee slightly bent. Left leg should be forward. Push with the left leg, pulling it through and behind your right. Repeat 10 times and switch legs. Heel clicks: Jump and click your right heel to your left. Repeat 10 times and switch to your left. You can perform these while moving forward then backward. Skips: Skip forward for the length or width of the pool then skip backward to your starting point. Repeat 10 times or perform continuously for 40 seconds. Rest one minute and repeat. Tire runs: These are the same as tire drills used in football. Pretend that you have two parallel lines of tires and move forward with your body open and vertical, legs turned out with feet flexed as you alternate pushing down with each leg. You can add high knees or push for a faster foot turnover. Frog jumps: With your arms between your knees, push down with your hands and pretend you are hopping over a fire hydrant. Perform 10 reps and repeat. Side kicks: This is similar to a karate kick. Stand on your right leg and kick out to the side with your left. Repeat five times with right leg and then switch legs. Kick board runs: Sit on a kick board with your legs straddling the board, like riding a horse. Use your lower legs to propel you forward the length of the pool and then go in reverse backward ATHLETICBID.COM


OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

For speed work, the author uses two running styles to train athletes in the water. The traditional running motion (shown here) is for when she wants all-out, 100-percent effort, while a cross-country skiing motion is implemented to add intensity and variety.

©MARK MORELLI

to your starting position. Here are some of my favorite upperbody exercises: Sweep in/out: Stand with one leg in front and one back like a split stance. With arms held out to the side, hold hand paddles or water dumbbells just below the surface, sweeping your arms forward, then back to the starting position. Breast stroke arms: Using a split stance, hold hand paddles or dumbbells just below the surface of the water with arms relaxed. Extend arms directly in front of your body, then sweep them out to the sides, simulating a swimming breast stroke. Recover to starting position and repeat. Curls: With elbows bent and arms at your side, alternate pushing down with one arm and pulling up with the other. Palms can be up or down. Press/Pulls: Standing in a split stance, begin with arms at your side, palms up. Keeping your arms straight, raise them in front of you to just below the surface of the water. Then turn your palms down and push the water down and back behind you. You can do this with both arms at the same

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE time or alternate. Pistons: Stand in a split stance with dumbbells at your side. Alternate pushing up and down like pistons in an engine. Stick swings: With a tennis racket, baseball or softball bat, golf club, field hockey stick, or ice hockey stick in hand, move the object through the water as you would in sport. Use forehand and backhand stokes, swing the bat both left and right, practice your golf swing, or take shots on goal with hockey sticks. SPEED WORK For speed work, I use two running styles to train my athletes in the water. One is a traditional running style and the second is a more difficult cross-country skiing motion. We alternate the two forms to add intensity and keep the workout interesting. Whenever we want all-out, 100-percent effort, we use the traditional running motion, which is often more natural for the athletes so they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to think about form as much. Here is a more detailed description of the styles: Traditional running form: Using a running or marching motion, the athlete coordinates arm and leg movements

as they would when running on a track. Head, shoulders, hips, and feet are vertically aligned. In addition, the head should be up, chest out, abdominal muscles tight (but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold your breath), and buttocks muscles squeezed together. Cross country skiing form: In these exercises, the athlete coordinates arms and legs as they would to cross country ski. The body is vertically aligned and legs and arms are kept straight. The basic motion is to scissor the legs forward and backward from the hip leading with the toes while the arms pull through the water. Here is a sample speed workout: â&#x20AC;˘ 20 x 15-second runs at 90-100% effort. 15-second jog between reps. Do 4 sets of 5 with a 1-minute jog between each set. â&#x20AC;˘ 10 x 30-second runs at 90% effort. 30-second jog between reps, alternate cross country motion every other rep. â&#x20AC;˘ 25 x 5-second sprints at 100% effort. 5-second jog between reps. â&#x20AC;˘ 12 x 18-second high knee, pumping

arms running at 100% effort. â&#x20AC;˘ 8 x 45-second runs, alternate cross country at 80% effort with 15-second jog between each rep. â&#x20AC;˘ 10 x 90-second progression runs. 1st 30 seconds at 80%. 2nd 30 seconds at 90%. 3rd 30 seconds at 100%. One minute recovery jog between each rep. â&#x20AC;˘ 6 x 1-minute runs at 90% effort. 30-second jog between each run. â&#x20AC;˘ 10 x 1-minute cross country at 100% effort with resistance. 1.5-minute jog between each run. â&#x20AC;˘ 7 x 2-minute runs or cross country at 80-90%. 1 to 2-minute jog between each run. â&#x20AC;˘ Pyramid run: 1 x 15 seconds at 100%. 1 x 30 seconds at 100%. 1 x 45 seconds at 100%. 1 x 1 minute at 100%. 1 x 1.5 minutes at 100%. 1 x 2 minutes at 100%. 15 to 30-second jog between each run.

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE At Boston University I have used water workouts in both team situations and one-on-one. With teams, we typically use water workouts in place of land workouts once or twice a week during the preseason. I have found them especially helpful in preventing the type of leg injuries that often develop during preseason training in basketball and soccer. One athlete in particular who benefited from water therapy was a U.S. Olympic women’s ice hockey player whose chronic patellar tendonitis sidetracked her workouts, hindering her overall fitness level. I switched all of her workouts to the pool and within a month she gained not only cardio fitness, but also power and strength. She was able to return to the ice and was an integral part of the team that won a silver medal at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics. Although you may think of water workouts primarily as a rehab tool, you may also want to consider them as an element of strength training. With a little planning, your athletes can soon be ready to take the plunge. ■

RESOURCES: There are now many books and videos available on how to utilize water in your fitness and strength training programs. Here are some of my favorites: The Complete Waterpower Workout Book, by Lynda Huey, will take you through a variety of strength and conditioning programs. This book also has excellent photographs depicting each exercise. Huey has worked with both elite and average athletes for many years. www.lahuey.com Strength & Power Water Workout, with Karen Westfall, is a DVD that offers advanced interval training with plyometric and power movements. It alternates between strengthening and aerobics. www.waterworkout.com Here are some Web sites that contain good information on workouts and products: www.aquajogger.com www.waterwellnessworkouts.com www.hydrotone.com www.waterfitness.com

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LEADERSHIP

Ready to Retire Whether you dream about taking on new challenges or playing golf all day in your retirement, neither happens without some preparation. In this article, six athletic trainers talk about how they are making (or have made) the transition.

BY KENNY BERKOWITZ

W

hen he reached 60 years old, Joe Gieck was ready to start winding down his career as an athletic trainer. At that point, he was teaching classes, doing research, and treating athletes as Director of Sports Medicine, Professor of Human Services, and Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Virginia. He had also been the Director of Life Skills and the Curriculum Director of the university’s masters program in athletic training. And though he enjoyed everything he was doing, he was ready to stop working so darn hard. Seven years later, Gieck is officially retired from UVa and working parttime as a physical therapist. He likes the freedom of less responsibility and spending more time with his family. ATHLETICBID.COM

And he continues to reassess his goals every year to make sure he is getting everything he wants out of life. “All through your career, it’s important to think about your next step,” says Gieck, EdD, ATR, PT. “But once you hit 50 years old, you need to set aside some time every year to reassess your plans. Where do you see yourself 10 years down the road? Do you still want to be chasing 18-year-olds when you’re 60 or 65? How’s your health? By 50, it’s time to get those things in order.” Working nights and weekends in a demanding field is hard enough when you’re in your 30s and 40s. But by the time you reach your 50s and 60s, it gets even harder, and at some point, even

CHRIS MURPHY

Kenny Berkowitz is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: kb@MomentumMedia.com. T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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LEADERSHIP

OUR PANEL The following are the six athletic trainers we talked to about their plans for retirement. Daphne Benas, 54, Assistant Athletic Trainer at Yale University, is currently laying the foundations for a second career in real estate.

Cash Birdwell, 65, Associate Athletic Director and Football Athletic Trainer at Southern Methodist University, plans to continue as a part-time athletic trainer after retiring this year.

Joe Gieck, 67, retired in 2005 as Director of Sports Medicine at the University of Virginia. He keeps active by consulting with community groups, volunteering as a physical therapist, working on his farm, and spending time with his family.

Dennis Hart, 57, retired as Head Athletic Trainer at North Mesquite (Texas) High School at the end of the school year. He currently works as a middle school athletic trainer and as a marketer for a sports medicine clinic.

Joe Iezzi, 53, Head Athletic Trainer at Downingtown (Pa.) High School West, plans to retire in six or seven years to become a part-time athletic trainer and consultant.

Bucky Taylor, 53, Head Athletic Trainer at Mesquite (Texas) High School, would like to retire in three or four years. He intends to keep working part-time as an athletic trainer and mentor to younger athletic trainers.

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the most dedicated athletic trainers are ready for the next stage. But what does “the next stage” mean? In this article, we profile six athletic trainers who have made or are making the transition, from full-time, 60-houra-week athletic trainers to planning for retirement. For some, the change has to do with slowing down physically and mentally. For others, it is simply time for a different challenge. And for a few, a threat to their health pushed them to rethink their priorities. FINISHING WELL At 53 years old, Bucky Taylor considers himself very, very lucky. Thirty-two years ago, fresh out of college, he found his dream job as Head Athletic Trainer at Mesquite (Texas) High School and has been there ever since. He loves his profession and loves coming to work every day. He has invested wisely over the years, and with the help of a good benefits package, he expects to have enough money to carry him through the next stage of life. But at this point, he still doesn’t know what that next stage will be. “Retirement scares me, because I don’t know that I can find anything that will fulfill me like being a full-time athletic trainer,” says Taylor, MEd, LAT, ATC. “I’ve seen some folks who have transitioned well—they’ve found a niche for themselves, continued to be active, and kept giving back to the profession. I’ve also seen folks who haven’t transitioned well—who are just wandering around bored, without a purpose, feeling like caged animals. “I think that the difference is in the preparation they made beforehand,” he continues. “You need an exit plan.” With three or four years to go before he expects to retire, Taylor is working out the details of his own plan. He’d like to work about 25 hours a week and has started networking with drug-testing companies to look into a job administering tests to area high school students. He’d also like to continue working with younger athletic trainers and is considering a transition into a formal teaching position or informal mentoring program. “I can’t completely walk away, so I’d like to do some kind of outreach where I teach the next generation of athletic trainers,” says Taylor. “I think I would enjoy that, because I’ve got some experience that I could pass on to others ATHLETICBID.COM


LEADERSHIP that might help them down the road.” For inspiration, he’s reading Bob Buford’s Finishing Well: What People Who Really Live Do Differently!, which contains interviews with people like Kenneth Blanchard, T. Boone Pickens, and Roger Staubach talking about their successful transitions to retirement. Some common threads Taylor has found in their stories include a desire to give back, stay productive, and remain physically active. “Everybody is different, but whoever you are, you need to think about what will meet your needs and what you want to do after you hang up your scissors,” says Taylor. Before he leaves Mesquite, Taylor

“As athletic trainers, we run the risk of going from being extremely busy to sitting around the house with nothing to do … Or we retire when we’re past the point of burnout.” hopes to finish training his replacement and create another full-time athletic training position. He is easing out of his leadership responsibilities in the athletic department and delegating more of his athletic training administrative duties to his assistant. “When I leave here, I want to know that this department will have all the tools it needs to keep things going,” says Taylor. “I’ve invested so much of myself in this place, and before I walk away, I’m going to make sure all the bases are covered and the kids have been provided for.” MAKING A PLAN With only six months to go until retirement, Cash Birdwell, MLA, LAT, ATC, is sending out his resume for the first time in 34 years. Currently an Associate Athletic Director and Football Athletic Trainer at Southern Methodist University, Birdwell would like to find a part-time position as a hands-on athletic trainer. So he’s reading the want ads, networking with colleagues about new opportunities, and investigating possibilities for freelance event coverage in the Houston area. Birdwell began planning five years

ago when he was diagnosed with cancer. His first step was to consult with SMU’s human resources department, which confirmed that he was fully qualified for retirement benefits and that both he and his wife would continue to be covered by the university’s health plan. From there, Birdwell concentrated on financial planning for his family’s future and started to think about how to make his transition. His health took a turn for the better, and he has continued to work full-time at SMU, but the cancer was a wake-up

call that it was time to focus on retirement plans. No later than December, he will leave SMU, and he’s looking forward to setting aside time to relax, enjoy his family, and maintain his health. Ideally, he’ll also work between 15 and 30 hours a week, piecing together gigs covering high schools, junior colleges, long distance races, and cheerleading and sports camps. Birdwell’s advice is to plan ahead and slowly ease out of the profession. “As athletic trainers, we run the risk of going from being extremely busy to all of

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LEADERSHIP a sudden sitting around the house with nothing to do,” he says. “Or we retire when we’re past the point of burnout and ruin our health. “Don’t wait to retire until your health is so bad that you need a wheelchair,”

Mesquite (Texas) High School for a pair of part-time jobs. Two days a week, he is a part-time athletic trainer for Mesquite’s eight middle schools, traveling to each school once every two weeks. On a

“Everybody needs to evaluate themselves every single year to make sure that other people aren’t wondering, ‘When is she going to retire?’ … I know I don’t want to be doing athletic training to the bitter end.” he advises. “Stay active as long as you can, keep setting an example for your staff, and be accountable until your last day on the job.” CREATING A POSITION After 36 years as a full-time high school athletic trainer, Dennis Hart, MEd, LAT, ATC, decided to slow down by keeping only the part of the job he loves best: working with student-athletes. He officially began his retirement this summer, trading his job as Head Athletic Trainer at North

third day, he’ll help market a sports medicine practice of six orthopedic surgeons, visiting former colleagues at schools and sports organizations around the Dallas area. At 57 years old, Hart gets full retirement benefits from the school district, plus a shorter work week, more time with his family, and a new set of professional challenges. Mesquite’s middle school athletes get their first athletic trainer, and the sports medicine clinic gets a public relations manager with extensive contacts as former president of the

Southwest Athletic Trainers’ Association. “I needed to reduce my work schedule and allow myself the freedom to spend more time with my extended family,” says Hart. “This is my way of staying involved in athletic training without the extensive demands of the high school season, and I think it’s going to be a really positive change.” To create the athletic training position at Mesquite’s middle schools, Hart spent four years reworking his proposals, ultimately persuading administrators that middle school coverage was needed to help protect athletes from injury and the school district from liability. Through the process, he learned the ingredients of a persuasive argument. “You have to develop a plan and provide justification for your position,” says Hart. “Get insights from your colleagues in the profession, look for athletic trainers who are already doing similar things, and keep rethinking your proposal from an administrator’s perspective. Be persistent and expect success. I always knew this was a good idea, but I needed to refine it to fit the financial resources of the school district.”

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LEADERSHIP For athletic trainers who are thinking about switching gears, Hart suggests starting with a list of the pros and cons of the profession and your present job. “On one page, make a list of all the things you like about being an athletic trainer,” says Hart. “On another page, make a list of all the things you don’t like about being an athletic trainer. Then ask for some advice. Go to somebody you respect, talk about the issues, and compare your lists to see how you can apply the positives to change the negatives. “That’s one of the things our professional organizations provide,” he continues, “a group of people who can energize you, motivate you, and help you come up with new ways of approaching athlete care.” CHANGING CAREERS At 44 years old, following a diagnosis of breast cancer, Daphne Benas stepped down as Head Athletic Trainer at Yale University. In the 10 years since, she’s worked as Assistant Athletic Trainer during the school year and taken summers off to work as a physical therapist. After years of 60-hour work weeks— plus many more hours at home, catching up on paperwork—she sees reducing her workload as one of the best decisions she ever made. “When I was running a Division I athletic training program, my job was with me 24 hours a day,” she says. “I never got away from it. When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, it made me realize there were other things I wanted to do in my life. Those last couple of years being head athletic trainer were very stressful, and I was tired of being tired. I came to realize I needed a change.” Scaling down from head to assistant athletic trainer has allowed her to work fewer hours, with less travel and less stress. The physical demands are also much more manageable, making it possible to work another job and maintain her health. It’s also given her time to think and plan for her retirement from athletic training, which will come in five to six years, allowing her to go in a completely different direction: real estate. With a partner, Benas owns 10 apartment buildings in downtown New Haven, which they design, renovate, and rent out. “I love being an athletic trainer, but I also love having the opportunity to ATHLETICBID.COM

do something totally different,” says Benas, MS, ATC, PT. “Real estate is work with a capital ‘W,’ but it’s very stimulating. I’m still dealing with people, which is what I’ve been doing for my whole working life. But this offers a new creative outlet, where I get to design apartments. And I know that the work I’ve done as an athletic trainer has helped me prepare to succeed in business.” Benas says the key to her career transitions has been remaining open to new ideas and opportunities. “I’ve

learned that if the opportunity is there, you really need to go with it,” she says. “If it doesn’t work out, you’ve still gained some knowledge. There’s a lesson here about being flexible and not being afraid of change. “Everybody needs to evaluate themselves every single year to make sure that other people aren’t wondering, ‘When is she going to retire?’” continues Benas. “I know I don’t want to be doing athletic training to the bitter end—there are so many other things that interest me.”

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LEADERSHIP WINDING DOWN With the increasing responsibilities of the profession added to the ongoing challenge of recovering from an automobile accident, it’s no surprise that 53-year-old Joe Iezzi is feeling the physical demands of growing older. “It’s starting to get to me,” says Iezzi, MS, ATC, PES. “Even though I have an assistant, the things I used to do without an assistant are harder now, because the demands are so much greater than they were before, both at the high school and collegiate level.” After 13 years as a college athletic trainer, Iezzi is beginning his 19th year as Head Athletic Trainer at Downingtown (Pa.) High School West, where he works between 40 and 60 hours a week. With more teams to cover and more athletes to treat, the job is far more complex than when he started, and injuries from a head-on car collision in 1999 have made it difficult for Iezzi to stand for long periods of time, especially on cold nights. The accident helped Iezzi focus on the things that are most important to him, including his plans for retirement.

He hopes to stay at his job for another six or seven years, then shift to a combination of part-time athletic training and consulting work. After years of experience as President of the Pennsylvania Athletic

ily emergencies. But before he makes it to that point, he’s working on winding down the right way. His plan for the next seven years includes maintaining a healthy balance of work and life. To work more effec-

Iezzi plans to continue advocating for the profession in front of regional school boards and giving public lectures about athletic training. He’d also like to create a regional substitution system for athletic training coverage, which would help athletic trainers find game-day replacements in cases of sickness or family emergencies. Trainers’ Society and a member of the NATA board of directors, Iezzi still enjoys giving presentations, and he plans to continue advocating for the profession in front of regional school boards and giving public lectures about athletic training. He’d also like to create a regional substitution system for athletic training coverage, which would help athletic trainers find game-day replacements in cases of sickness or fam-

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tively, he’s set a firm treatment schedule, learned to say no when athletes and coaches don’t follow those rules, and hired a full-time assistant athletic trainer to provide additional coverage. When he’s not working with athletes, Iezzi takes care of himself. “You have to have a physical outlet,” he says. “Staying physically fit is an important part of avoiding burnout. So is sleep—I try to get my seven or eight

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LEADERSHIP hours every night. And I find time for myself, staying home at night to watch a comedy on television, or officiating high school and college basketball and

STAYING INVOLVED When Joe Gieck retired a year ago, the athletic training world said goodbye to one of its icons and heroes. But for the

“Change is coming, and the best way to prepare yourself is to be proactive … Talk to people about your financial plans. Consider volunteering in the community. But whatever new tasks you take on, make sure you’re not sucked into feeling you’re back at a full-time job. Nobody ever carved on their tombstone, ‘I wish I’d spent one more day at the office.’” baseball games. Even though it’s demanding, it’s a great release. When I’m officiating, I don’t worry about athletic training or anything else.” Most of all, he spends more time with his family. “At this stage in life, the monetary compensation isn’t as important as having time away from the job,” he says. “Having weekends with my family has become a lot more important.”

longtime athletic trainer at Virginia, it was time to say hello to being just a regular guy. Along with volunteering three halfdays a week as a physical therapist in the practice of one of his former students, Gieck keeps busy by consulting on substance-abuse policy for the NCAA and working with community groups on fundraising. He’s also spending time with his family, super-

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vising the building of a summer house in Montana, and working on his farm, where he grows hay, manages timber, and rents hunting and fishing cottages. It’s the kind of life he’s been planning for the last seven years, and now that retirement has arrived, it’s been very rewarding. And every year, he keeps reassessing his goals to make sure his schedule leaves enough time to enjoy this next stage of life. Gieck has doled out a lot of important advice to athletic trainers over his career, and after years of studying burnout in athletic trainers, he has some advice on retirement. “Change is coming, and the best way to prepare yourself is to be proactive,” he says. “Take initiative. Maintain a healthy lifestyle. Keep up your exercise routine. Control your diet. Talk to people about your financial plans. Consider volunteering in the community. But whatever new tasks you take on, make sure you’re not sucked into feeling you’re back at a full-time job. Nobody ever carved on their tombstone, ‘I wish I’d spent one more day at the office.’” ■

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NUTRITION

The Strongest Survive It doesn’t substitute for proper training or diet, but creatine can have a place in a strength program. The key is knowing how to use it. BY DAVID HILL

I

t’s a classic case of guilt by association. Average people, including many of your athletes and their parents, have no easy way to wade through media hype surrounding steroids and other illegal performance enhancers. Every week seems to bring new accusations and innuendo about who’s doing what, leaving the impression that all performance-enhancing substances are the same and anything beyond milk is suspect. As a result, many people are wary of creatine, not sure exactly what it does or how it does it. Even though it’s a naturally occurring compound, found in human and animal muscle tissue, some people simply lump it in with the steroids and other banned substances that make headlines. For this reason, it’s up to strength coaches and sports-medicine professionals to offer guidance and separate fact from supposition. “I meet misinformed people every day who think there are documented cases of devastating side effects associated with creatine, when this is not the case,” says Eric Rawson, PhD, CSCS, Assistant Professor in the Department of Exercise Science and Athletics at Bloomsburg University and a leading researcher on the substance. “There’s a great deal of literature documenting the David Hill is a former Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning.

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NUTRITION performance-enhancing effects of creatine. And a huge number of people are using it with very few reports of serious side effects.”

Creatine’s effect is so well accepted, Rawson says, that research into it has largely switched from the sports-performance area to clinical use in treating

“The most consistent finding in the literature is that individuals who lift weights and take creatine make more progress in the weightroom than those who lift weights and take a placebo.” Rawson is among a sizable number of researchers, clinicians, and sports-performance specialists who say creatine doesn’t deserve its murky reputation.

diseases of the muscles, such as muscular dystrophy. The issue, however, is which athletes should use creatine? And given the sen-

WATERED DOWN

A

common concern about creatine is that it can lead to dehydration in athletes. But Eric Rawson, PhD, CSCS, a leading researcher of creatine, says that belief comes not from research but from inferences and coincidence. Athletes may begin using creatine just as they’re beginning intense preseason conditioning, often in summer heat, and they connect dehydration to creatine. “I don’t understand why this is still an issue,” says Rawson, Assistant Professor in the Department of Exercise Science and Athletics at Bloomsburg University. “We understand that creatine increases the water content of the muscle, so why do we keep talking about dehydration? Several studies that have tracked the effects of creatine supplementation in hard-training athletes on a variety of measures of muscle dysfunction, such as cramps and muscle strains—things that you would associate with changes in body water—have found similar incidence in athletes who ingest creatine and those who do not. “Researchers have also addressed this in clinical trials where they’ve dehydrated athletes ingesting creatine or a placebo, and examined a variety of different physiological changes, including temperature regulation,” he says. “They’ve found creatine supplementation does not have any dehydrating effects whatsoever.” Still, concerned that creatine, like other supplements, can increase demands on the kidneys, Bob Seebohar MS, RD, CSCS, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Florida, is wary of adding it at a time when hydration levels may be stressed, such as during preseason football camp. “It’s really hot and humid in Florida, and the players don’t always hydrate well to begin with,” he says. “So if they’re going to use creatine, I would prefer it be after the bowl season and through the spring semester.”

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sitivity of the times to anything that isn’t straight from the grocery aisle or restaurant menu, how should a strength and conditioning or sports-medicine program navigate this sensitive issue? SAFETY & EFFECTIVENESS There is a strong consensus among researchers that creatine is both safe and effective when used appropriately in recommended doses and protocols, says Robin Meiggs, MS, Assistant Director of the Human Performance Lab at Humboldt State University and a member of the NCAA Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports Committee. Meiggs has reviewed many studies into creatine and has conducted or overseen studies at her own lab. One study, which used members of the women’s rowing team she coaches at Humboldt State as test subjects, supported the theory that creatine helps athletes train harder and longer by donating phosphate ions to replenish stores of the cell fuel adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in short bouts of high-intensity, power exercise. Rawson draws an analogy to carbohydrate loading among endurance athletes. “If you ingest creatine from a dietary supplement, you’ll increase the amount of creatine in your muscle,” he says. “Then, we would expect performance in any sport that relies on the creatine phosphate energy system to be enhanced a small amount. Typically that’s in sports consisting of brief, repeated, intense bouts of activity. “But the real benefit seems to come in the weightroom,” he continues. “The most consistent finding in the literature is that individuals who lift weights and take creatine make more progress in the weightroom than those who lift weights and take a placebo. It’s more of a training aid than a performance enhancer, though the benefits received in the weightroom can translate to onfield performance gains.” The distinction between training aid and performance enhancer is an important one that is often lost on athletes. For example, Bob Seebohar, MS, RD, CSCS, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Florida, says a linebacker might think that using creatine will help him play hard longer, but that isn’t so. “Creatine can increase lean muscle mass by helping him push on heavier weights, but by itself, that’s not going to help him on the field,” he says. ATHLETICBID.COM


NUTRITION “An athlete can be very successful in increasing lean body mass and muscle composition, but not have the energy to use it during games.” As for weight gain, the research is unsettled but seems to suggest any perceived increase in bulk from creatine use results more from water retention than increased muscle mass. Rawson says some research has suggested that increased water content in cells might affect protein synthesis and in theory muscle building, but the link is far from definitive. “Over the short term,” he says, “it just seems to be water gain.” Even when used properly, creatine doesn’t work equally well for everyone. One main reason is that some people begin with greater amounts of creatine

ters, but what they actually listen to,” says Mickey Marotti, MS, MA, CSCS, MSCC, Director of Strength and Conditioning at the University of Florida. “We tell our athletes, ‘Lift right, train hard, get plenty of rest and recovery, eat right, and drink plenty of fluids. Maximum effort equals maximum results.’ Then an athlete reads something and thinks, ‘This guy says creatine is good, so I should be taking it.’ But they don’t remember all the guidelines that go along with it. They just remember in some cases it works.

“So we’re really careful about what we tell our athletes about supplements, because the majority of them aren’t eating right, and they’re not training properly,” he continues. “But if they are doing all those things and creatine is something they want to look at, we’ll gather all the information we can, and then make the right choice for each individual situation.” The first point to make with athletes is that creatine is a supplement—something extra to be used after other, more basic steps to increase performance are

When athletes approach Seebohar about using creatine or other supplements to gain weight or strength, he first wants to make sure they are getting enough calories and nutrients. in their muscles, usually because of genetics or diet. Creatine is naturally present in the muscles of animals, so it’s in meat and fish. Thus, athletes with low base levels of creatine, such as vegetarians, often make the greatest gains in strength when using creatine. “If you have a quarter tank of gas in your car, you can add a lot more to it than a person who’s starting with the tank three-quarters full,” Rawson says. “That’s how skeletal muscle is—some people have lower amounts, some have higher amounts. Those with the lowest amounts receive the greatest increase in muscle creatine following supplementation, and subsequently receive the greatest improvement in performance.” OTHER CONSIDERATIONS Athletes expecting creatine to be a magic elixir that solves their strengthtraining problems are in for a rude awakening. For all of its positive attributes, creatine offers no quick fix. This can be a tough message to get across to athletes who simply want to get bigger, stronger, or faster. “It’s not what athletes hear that matATHLETICBID.COM

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NUTRITION exhausted. When athletes approach Seebohar about using creatine or other supplements to gain weight or strength, he first wants to make sure they are getting enough calories and nutrients. Often, they simply aren’t eating enough,

batter in the lineup.” Some people are concerned that even with a cautious, first-things-first approach, creatine use could lead to more potent and dangerous, banned ergogenic aids. The idea is that once athletes

“You can either take a low dose of creatine for about a month or a high dose of creatine for about five days, and the changes inside your muscles will be identical. One just happens more quickly than the other … But if athletes choose to do a loading dose, beyond five days they should be on a very low-dose maintenance level.” so he helps them change their diet to gain more calories from wholesome food—especially meats—simply by eating greater amounts and more often. Next might come energy and protein additions, often in liquid form to reduce the chance of spoiling the appetite for regular meals. “You shouldn’t lead off with creatine,” says Seebohar. “Creatine should be in the dugout, the third or fourth

use a supplement like creatine, they will be more receptive to other, more questionable substances. “Encouraging the use of supplements can lead young people to believe there is a magic bullet they can take that will make them faster and stronger and more likely to win,” says Kay Hawes, Director of Media Relations for the National Center for Drug Free Sport. “There is a concern that young

people might not understand the difference between taking a creatine supplement and taking a steroid.” Others, though, see no hard evidence to support the slippery-slope argument. “Anything is possible,” says Mike Nitka, MS, CSCS, Director of Human Performance and Health and a Physical and Health Education Teacher at Muskego (Wis.) High School, “but I don’t think I can refer to any study that says the use of creatine supplements may lead to consideration of anabolic steroids.” Another concern, especially in the NCAA and other settings where athletes can be tested for use of banned substances, is the risk of contamination. Unlike drugs, nutritional supplements are not highly regulated, so it’s largely buyer beware. As part of her duties on the Medical Aspects Committee, Meiggs hears appeals from athletes who have tested positive for banned substances. “We hear, ‘The only things I took were nutritional supplements,’” she says. “Student-athletes think if something is being sold in a store, it must be okay. But sometimes these supplements

NUTRITION:: Recovery and Regeneration NUTRITION September 8 – 9, 2006 • Colorado Springs, Colorado Pushing athletes to their physical limits will inherently incorporate nutritional interventions. Sport nutrition remains one of the industries hottest topics and with the amount of information available to the practitioner, it can often be difficult to discern between what is accurate and applicable and what is not.

Key Speakers include: Karen Daigle, MS, RD — sport physiologist for the U.S. Olympic Committee at the Colorado Springs Training Center. Dave Ellis, RD, CSCS — recognized as a pioneer in applied sports nutrition. Rob Skinner, MS, RD/LD, CSCS — Director of the Homer Rice Center for Sports Performance at Georgia Tech University.

To register and/or join the NSCA, call 800-815-6826 800-815-6826, or visit www.nsca-lift.org/Conferences/nutrition.shtm www.nsca-lift.org/Conferences/nutrition.shtmll . National Strength and Conditioning Association Bridging the gap between science and application Circle No. 124

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ATHLETICBID.COM


are made in the same location as banned substances, and they’re tainted in the production process.” At Florida, Seebohar goes so far as to call manufacturers to ask about their production practices. “Athletes will come to me and say ‘I just bought this,’ and I’ll look at the label,” he says. “I’ll cross-reference ingredients with the NCAA and IOC lists of banned substances, and then call companies myself. It’s hit or miss whether they’re helpful, but I ask whether they prepare supplements with possibly pre-steroidal components, and if they wet-wash their equipment between supplements.” MAKING IT WORK While NCAA schools are not allowed to supply creatine to their athletes, its use violates no NCAA rules. As a result, athletes may look to you for help when deciding whether to take it. This decision should include many factors, because there is no pat answer. A primary consideration is the sport the athlete plays. Since creatine helps increase power and explosiveness, endurance athletes will receive little benefit from its use. Football

“Most scientists do not support the use of any dietary supplements in teenagers and adolescents. We really have just two studies that have examined creatine supplementation in young athletes.” falls at the other end of the spectrum because power and explosiveness are so valued. But what about the sports in the middle? “Basketball would be classified as a power sport because, for example, in a sprint for the ball, it comes down to who gets there first, and if everything else is equal, it will be the person who has worked on developing power,” Nitka says. “In baseball, can you make that one throw from the outfield to third base or maintain a powerful swing? When I talk about power, it’s one maximal effort followed by a period of recovery and repeating that effort.” To get the maximum benefit, athletes also need to understand how to properly use creatine. Two major points are that loading isn’t necessary and that many athletes take far more creatine than they need. The established dosage guideline is 0.3 grams per kilogram of body weight per day for loading, and 0.03 grams for maintenance, Rawson says. For an 85-kilogram (187 pound) athlete, that’s 25 grams in loading or 2.5 grams in maintenance. “You can either take a low dose of creatine for about a month or a high dose of creatine for about five days, and the changes inside your muscles will be identical. One just happens more quickly than the other,” Rawson says. “But if athletes choose to do a loading dose, beyond five days they should be on a very low-dose maintenance level. The important message to get to the athletes is that they don’t need to take excessive amounts. Everyone has a ceiling on how much their muscles can take, and after that, it doesn’t help.” Bottom line, the question of whether athletes should be usATHLETICBID.COM

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NUTRITION ing creatine is best answered with more questions. “It’s like if you asked me, ‘Hey, Bob, are peanuts good?’” says Seebohar. “The answer is generally yes, but what if you’re allergic or you’re trying to lose weight? You need to know more about their personal scenario before even indulging in an answer.” A QUESTION OF AGE Although creatine is generally considered to be safe and effective when used properly, many people believe proper use does not include high school ath-

letes, since almost all of the studies on it have involved people of college age and older. This doesn’t mean that creatine is not safe for younger athletes, including those in high school, only that its effects have not been thoroughly examined in that age group. “Some of our kids do use it, but we discourage them from doing so,” says Sean Cox, ATC, Head Athletic Trainer at Salem (N.H.) High School. “Our reasoning is that there is no valid study on the use of creatine in the high school population. We’re worried that kids

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T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

are using a substance that may at some point be found to cause harm.” A cautious approach for high school athletes appears reasonable to Rawson. “Most scientists do not support the use of any dietary supplements in teenagers and adolescents,” he says. “We really have just two studies that have examined creatine supplementation in young athletes, and no papers that have directly examined kidney function and other related questions. So the question becomes, can we use our information on adults for younger athletes? The conservative answer would be no, we should not. We should just say it hasn’t been researched, so we don’t know the answer.” That lack of definitive information has prompted some high schools to steer clear of the subject. “Our procedure is that we—as a school system, as coaches, and as an athletic program—will not recommend any food supplement,” says Charles Meagher, Athletics Coordinator for Gwinnett County (Ga.) Public Schools. “It’s just not the school’s business.” Not all high schools are silent on creatine, however. Whenever athletes raise the subject, Cox approaches it as a chance to educate them. He encourages athletes to do their own research, stressing that creatine is appropriate only in certain sports and only as an addition to proper nutrition and training. At Muskego, Nitka will often first analyze the athlete’s diet—many skip breakfast or subsist on nutrient-deficient processed food—and their rest and recovery, in order to drive home the message that creatine is no shortcut. He’ll also bring parents and family physicians into the mix, insisting that athletes consult them before making any decisions. Rawson says that simply leaving athletes to make decisions about using creatine on their own may not work out well. “There was a paper published in 2001 that reported 70 percent of high school athletes who used creatine took more than the recommended amount,” he says. “Whether we have information about adverse effects or whether we do not, and even if you believe that the excess is simply excreted, 70 percent of high school athletes ingesting above what’s recommended on the label is something we need to address. We can do a better job educating our athletes.” ■ ATHLETICBID.COM


NUTRITION

R e c o g n i t i o n a n d Tr e a t m e n t o f E x e r t i o n a l Heat Stroke – The Keys to Success Douglas J. Casa, PhD, ATC, FACSM Director, Athletic Training Education, University of Connecticut

Even with proper acclimation and hydration strategies, athletes performing intense exercise in the heat can still suffer from exertional heat stroke. It may not be possible to prevent all cases of heat stroke, but with accurate core temperature assessment and rapid cooling, it is possible to dramatically increase the survival rates of athletes suffering from heat stroke. ASSESSING THE ATHLETE The two key criteria to determine if an athlete is suffering from exertional heat stroke are: ឣ Central Nervous System Dysfunction3-5 ឣ CNS dysfunction may include coma, altered consciousness, confusion, or irrational behavior. It is important to remember that an athlete may experience a brief lucid interval soon after the onset of exertional heat stroke. During this time the athlete may be able to verbally communicate and often this lucid interval delays treatment. Medical staffs often wrongly assume that an athlete can not be lucid while suffering from exertional heat stroke. During intense exercise occasions, athletic trainers should assume that a collapsed athlete or visibly struggling athlete is suffering from exertional heat stroke until dangerously elevated core temperature is ruled out. ឣ Dangerously Elevated Core Body Temperature 3-5 ឣ Generally, core temperature in heat stroke will be 105°F or greater. It is imperative that rectal temperature is obtained.1 Athletic trainers cannot rely on inaccurate temperature devices for evaluation of exertional heat stroke. The spuriously low readings given from an invalid measure may delay treatment and further jeopardize an athletes life.1 Historically, athletic trainers have typically relied upon invalid measurement tools and sites to assess core body temperature7 – axillary, oral, aural (tympanic), or temporal. These tools are easy to use, inexpensive, non-invasive and can provide rapid readings. Unfortunately, these measurements are NOT valid in athletes who have been exercising in the heat and their readings can result in delayed cooling.8,9 The only two valid options for field use in the assessment of exertional heat stroke is rectal temperature and ingestible thermistors.1,2,5 To use ingestible thermistors, athletes must ingest a temperature pill a few hours prior to each practice. Because of cost and time constraints, this practice is uncommon. Therefore, athletic trainers must be prepared (through education and proper equipment preparation) to measure rectal temperature.1,2,5 Although this method is invasive and inconvenient, it has proven efficacy when assessing heat ATHLETICBID.COM stroke victims.1

RAPID COOLING – COOL FIRST, TRANSPORT SECOND The recovery of the athlete is directly correlated with the amount of time the athlete’s core body temperature remains above a critical threshold (105°). Rapid cooling decreases the potential for cell damage and increases the potential for full recovery.1-6 Cold water immersion serves as the gold standard protocol due to the superior cooling and survival rates that result with its use. When exertional heat stroke occurs, the affected athlete should be placed in a cold water tub immediately. If an immersion tub is not available, the athlete should be cooled by any means possible.1 Alternate methods include a cold shower, continuous changing of ice water towels over as much of the body as possible, ice placed over the athlete’s body, or some combination of these methods.6 Tips for implementation of cold water immersion include: ឣ Rapidly use a rectal thermistor to assess temperature before beginning immersion. Leave the device in place during cooling to track temperature for timely removal of the athlete from the tub. ឣ Immerse the athlete in the tub – shoulders to hips. Ensure that the athlete’s head is not submerged. ឣ Remove the athlete from the tub once core temperature is lowered to approximately 102°F. ឣ Be sure the immersion tub can adequately hold large athletes (e.g., 100-gallon stock tank). ឣ Maintain water temperature at approximately 50°F. ឣ If measuring rectal temperature cannot be maintained during cooling, re-check temperature at the 5-10 minute mark. If no accurate means of assessing temperature is available, assume approximately 0.37°F/min1 (.2°C/min) for a cooling rate. In most situations, an athlete can be cooled by icewater immersion from 108° to 102° in just 15-30 minutes. For more information on hydration and exertional heat illness, please visit the SportsScience Center at www.gssiweb.org. REFERENCES 1

Casa D. J., L. E. Armstrong, M. S. Ganio, S. W. Yeargin. Exertional heat stroke in competitive athletes. Current Sports Medicine Reports. 4:309-317, 2005. Binkley, H. M., J. Beckett, D. J. Casa, D. Kleiner, P. Plummer. National Athletic Trainers Association position statement: Exertional heat illnesses. Journal of Athletic Training. 37(3):329-343,2002. 3 Casa, D. J., & W. O. Roberts. Considerations for the medical staff. In: Exertional Heat Illnesses, L. E. Armstrong (ed.). Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics, pages 169-196, 2003. 4 Casa, D. J., & L. E. Armstrong. Exertional heatstroke: A medical emergency. In: Exertional Heat Illnesses, L. E. Armstrong (ed.). Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics, pages 29-56, 2003. 5 Casa, D. J., J Almquist, S. Anderson, et al. Inter-Association Task Force on Exertional Heat Illnesses Consensus Statement. NATA News, pages 24-29, June 2003. 6 Bergeron M. B., D. B. McKeag, D. J. Casa, et al. Youth football: Heat stress and injury risk. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 37(8):1421-1430, 2005. 7 Dombek P. M., Casa D.J., Yeargin S. W., Mazerolle S. M., Ganio M. S,, Armsotrong L. E., Maresh C. M. Athletic trainers knowledge and behavor regarding the prevention, recognition, and treatment of exertional heat stroke at the high school level. Journal of Athletic Training. 41(2S):S47, 2006. 8 Becker S. M. Casa D. J., Brown C. M., Yeargin S. W., Ganio M. S., Roti M. W., Boots L. M., Huggins R. A., Armstrong L. E., Maresh C. M. Examining the validity of devices that assess body temperature during outdoor exercise in the heat. Journal of Athletic Training. 41(2S):S105-106, 2006. 9 Brown C. M., Casa D. J., Becker S. M., Yeargin S. W., Ganio M. S., McDermott B. P., Siegler J. C., Blowers J. A., Boyd P. W., Glaviano N. R., Armstrong L. E., Maresh C. M. Examining the validity of devices that assess body temperature during exercise in a heat chamber. Journal of Athletic Training. 41(2S):S106, 2006. T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006 2

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ATHLETICBID.COM T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006 Life is simple. Stay in the game. HYDRATE OR LOSE.

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

The author checks his Wet Bulb Globe Thermometer. ©ALLEN SHARPE

Hot But Not Bothered August in South Carolina is hot and humid. NATA Hall of Famer Rod Walters explains how he helps the Gamecocks beat the preseason heat.

BY DR. ROD WALTERS

I

t is widely recognized that athletic trainers who spend any amount of time operating in hot weather should have a plan to prevent heat illness. Whether you are in Maine, California, or somewhere in between, preseason practice on a summer day can lead to heat-related problems for any team. Here at the University of South Carolina, we have a lot of experience dealing with hot, humid weather. Over the years, we have developed a plan for working with individual athletes to

ATHLETICBID.COM

identify signs of heat illness, maintain hydration levels, and monitor environmental stresses. This preventative maintenance helps us beat the heat without sacrificing practice time. ONE ATHLETE AT A TIME A key component to our prevention program is understanding that every student-athlete is at risk for heat illness and needs to be examined and counseled individually. This process starts with our preparticipation medical examination, where we evaluate each athlete’s risk

for heat illness (along with their overall health). We identify those student-athletes with signs of increased potential for heat-related problems, whether it be a less-than-optimal fitness level, history of sensitivity to heat illness, or previous Rod Walters, DA, ATC, is Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine at the University of South Carolina. He served on the NATA’s Board of Directors from 1997-2003 and was inducted into the NATA Hall of Fame last year. He can be reached at: rwalters@gwm.sc.edu. T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

39


TREATING THE ATHLETE illness. We then monitor these at-risk players very carefully and act on any abnormal or concerning signs. We also look for salty sweaters— those who lose an excessive amount of sodium while working out. These athletes typically leave a white residue on their uniforms and equipment after their perspiration dries. Researchers who study water loss in athletes recommend that these athletes be prehydrated to greater levels. Therefore, we provide them with an enriched sodium drink prior to practice and engage in aggres-

sive hydration treatments during and after participation. Each student-athlete is also counseled individually by the athletic training staff regarding heat concerns. We ask them about any prescriptions, supplements, and energy drinks they may consume, and encourage them to avoid drinking alcohol during preseason. Athletes are also advised to refrain from excessive use of cold medications or other medications that may produce diuretic activities since this can increase the risk of heat-related problems.

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Student-athletes are also encouraged to report all injuries and illnesses to the athletic training staff as they happen and are told that failure to do so can increase the chance of heat illness. We explain that in order for us to keep them safe, they need to do their part by communicating with us. Acclimatization can also be a concern with some athletes. We generally have each of our student-athletes, including incoming freshmen, on campus for a minimum of one summer school session. Being here over the summer allows our athletes to practice in extreme heat and humidity and become acclimatized to those conditions before engaging in team preseason activities. WATER EVERYWHERE Of course, the number-one tool to prevent heat-related problems is hydration. We conducted a water-turnover study among our football players and observed huge losses—as much as 24 pounds of lost fluid in a day. Players were studied during two-a-day practices in August, and we found that during a 24-hour period, players were turning over about 11 liters (almost three gallons) of fluid. This occurred day-in and day-out for five days straight. The study revealed players in the 200- to 300-pound range perspire the most and really need to focus on replacing fluids and electrolytes. Based on those findings and my experience, I emphasize the importance of electrolyte replacement, especially sodium. Assuming that a player has a normal sweat sodium content of around 40 mEq/L and loses 11 liters of fluid in a day, that’s 440 mEq of sodium lost each day. We know this equates to 10 grams of sodium, the equivalent of 25 grams of sodium chloride. Under these circumstances, an athlete will quickly run into a sodium deficit if he or she is drinking only water to hydrate. Therefore, we use sports drinks that have a higher sodium content than water. We also like sports drinks because of their nutritional value and because we see them as an attractive alternative to caffeinated beverages. Constant fluid replacement is a major message from our athletic training staff. Sports drinks and water are placed within an arm’s reach throughout our facilities. Those beverages are available at the practice fields, and in the locker rooms, athletic training room, dining ATHLETICBID.COM


TREATING THE ATHLETE halls, dormitories, and meeting rooms. Players are encouraged to drink at least 16 ounces during each meeting and before and after each practice session. During football practice, portable water dispensers are located next to each position group, and any athlete who wants a quick drink may get one at any time he is not actively participating in a drill. In addition, fluid breaks are worked into each practice and strictly enforced. An athletic training student is assigned to each of the position groups, making copious amounts of cooled water and sports drinks available to each player. Student-athletes also need to be educated about monitoring their pre- and post-exercise weight on a daily basis. Any weight loss greater than four percent needs to be replaced prior to leaving the locker room. Furthermore, before working out again, their weight should be within two percent of the previous day’s, and we identify each athlete’s target body weight on a weekly basis. Along with hydration tips, athletes are given instruction in proper nutrition to help them prevent heat illness. During football preseason two-a-days, all players are required to eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner on campus. Additionally, in the evening, a snack is provided after the last meeting and a carbohydrate-protein supplement is provided following strength training workouts. We also try to schedule meals in a way that encourages sufficient fluid and food replacement. Traditionally, athletes have meals shortly after practice. However, when we ask them to rehydrate immediately after practice, they often feel waterlogged and not as hungry when they sit down to eat. As a result, we try to schedule meetings or rest times immediately after practice, then meals an hour or more later. This allows athletes’ hunger to peak as they sit down to eat, providing a higher-quality fueling session. UNDERSTAND THE ENVIRONMENT We can’t turn down the sun’s intensity, but we do look at the time of day we practice. For football, we try to avoid the hottest part of the day—typically between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. The NCAA’s practice guidelines for Division I football, implemented in 2003, have greatly assisted with this. If two practices are held on one day, only one practice is allowed the following day. ATHLETICBID.COM

We generally practice early in the morning and later in the evening on days we practice twice, and we only practice in full pads once a day. Even with those types of limitations in place, it is critical that athletic trainers monitor environmental stress and communicate this information and their recommendations to coaches prior to each practice. We monitor conditions using the Wet Bulb Globe Thermometer (WBGT) and apply those readings to the protocol adapted from the United States Marine Corps guidelines

(see “How Bad Is It?” on page 42). The WBGT was developed in the late 1950s for the Marine Corps Recruit Depot on Parris Island, S.C. It was later adopted universally by researchers as a heatstress index. The first temperature (Tg), which represents the integrated effects of radiation and wind, is measured by the device’s black globe thermometer. A second thermometer measures the natural wet-bulb temperature (Tnwb). This thermometer consists of a bulb covered with a wet cotton wick that is fed dis-

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

HOW BAD IS IT?

T

he Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index, developed by the United States Marine Corps, provides a way to account for air temperature, humidity, sunlight, and wind when determining the risk of heat illness. At the University of South Carolina, we use the following chart to determine how to limit activities based on the WBGT Index.

WBGT Index (˚F)

Flag Color

Heat Condition

80-84.9

Green

Heavy exercises for unacclimatized personnel will be conducted with caution and under constant supervision.

85-87.9

Yellow

Strenuous exercises, such as marching at standard cadence, will be suspended for unacclimatized troops in their first two or three weeks. Outdoor classes in the sun are to be avoided.

88-89.9

Red

All physical training will be halted for those troops who have not become thoroughly acclimatized by at least 12 weeks of living and working in the area. Those troops who are thoroughly acclimatized may carry on limited activity not to exceed six hours per day.

90 and Above

Black

All strenuous non-essential outdoor physical activity will be halted for all units.

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Circle No. 131 ATHLETICBID.COM


TREATING THE ATHLETE tilled water. Evaporation from the wet bulb cools the thermometer, which then measures the integrated effect of humidity, wind, and radiation. The final temperature element is the air temperature (Ta). It is measured by a thermometer shielded from radiation by a weather screen. It is the standard temperature that you usually see quoted in television weather reports and forecasts. The three measurements, Tg, Tnwb, and Ta, are combined into a weighted average ((Tnwb x 0.7) x (Tg x 0.2) x (Ta x 0.1)) to produce the WBGT. We use this standard to adjust practice times based on environmental stressors, and we rely on it to make recommendations to our coaches regarding work-to-rest intervals during workouts. The higher the WBGT index, the greater the need for rest and recovery and the more aggressive we need to be with hydration tactics. Although the index gives us a good idea of the dangers presented by environmental factors, we take further precautions during football sessions by increasing our index by 10 to account for the equipment the players

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wear. And we generally use this guide only for athletes who are in good condition, acclimatized, and exercising in situations with adequate medical supervision (which includes primary care physicians, certified athletic trainers, and athletic training students). If athletes have lower levels of conditioning or are not acclimatized, or if the medical staff is limited, guidelines presented in the table from the “National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statement: Exertional Heat Illness” are usually followed. ON THE LOOKOUT In the event a student-athlete presents with symptoms of heat related illness, aggressive steps are taken to assess his or her medical status and provide the appropriate treatment. Any altered level of consciousness, general fatigue, or other symptoms are noted. Core body temperature assessment (rectal monitoring) is recommended, and those with temperatures above 103 degrees are submerged in a cold-water tank. The athlete is monitored while in the tank, and removed from the water when their temperature

lowers to 101. This procedure allows aggressive treatment in the event the condition progresses to heat stroke. Here are more details on how we treat heat-related illnesses: Heat cramps: Fluids must be replaced to resolve cramps. Therefore, we start by reestablishing normal hydration status and replacing sodium losses. Next, we stretch and massage the involved muscles to help reduce the acute pain of the cramp. Heat exhaustion: We remove athletes from activity and take them to a shaded or air-conditioned area, removing excess clothing and equipment. We then: • Assess body temperature rectally. Those with temperatures above 103 degrees are placed in a cold-water tank. • Keep athletes in the tank until rectal temperature is less than 101 degrees. We then lay them comfortably with legs propped above heart level. • Rehydrate athletes orally with cool water or sports drinks, if they can tolerate fluids. If athletes can’t tolerate oral fluids, physicians may use intravenous normal saline. • Monitor heart rate, blood pressure,

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TREATING THE ATHLETE respiratory rate, core temperature and central nervous system (CNS) status. • If rapid improvement is not seen, we transport the athlete to an emergency medical facility. Exertional heat stroke: We start by removing the athlete’s clothing and equipment and immediately immersing him in cold water (approx. 60 degrees). If cold-water immersion is not possible, we move him to a shaded area or air-conditioned facility and begin alternative cooling strategies such as spraying the body with cold water, placing ice bags on the neck and groin, or applying ice over the entire body. We then: • Call 911 • Closely monitor ABCs, core temperature, and CNS status. • Place an intravenous line using normal saline (if medical staff is available). • Cease aggressive cooling when core temperature drops to 101 degrees. • Transport to a medical facility. COMMUNICATION The final piece of the puzzle in prevent-

ing heat illness is communication. We let athletes know the dangers of not hydrating—and how it can decrease their performance. When they see all the steps we take, they start to understand the seriousness of getting fluids into their bodies. Of course, communication with coaches is also vital. We provide them with the actual measures of heat and propose breaks based on what is scheduled for that practice. In terms of long-range planning, we discuss ideal practice times to minimize heat exposure while maximizing exercise. When everyone is on board with hydration and preventing heat illness, the results are less risk to athletes and better workouts. Sometimes, it takes a lot of small steps to get everyone together, but each is a giant leap in making everyone safer. ■

To download a PDF of the NATA’s position statement on exertional heat illnesses, go to: www.nata.org/publicinformation/ files/exertionalheatillness.pdf.

References

Bergeron, M.F., et al., “Youth football: heat stress and injury risk.” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 2005. 37(8): p. 1421-30. Binkley, H.M., et al., “National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statement: Exertional Heat Illnesses.” Journal of Athletic Training, 2002. 37(3): p. 329-343. Casa, D.J., et al., “National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statement: Fluid Replacement for Athletes.” Journal of Athletic Training, 2000. 35(2): p. 212-224. Corps, U.M. Marine Corps Heat Injury Prevention Program. 2002 [cited May 27, 2006]. NCAA, 2005-06 NCAA Division I Manual. 2005. NCAA, Sports Medicine Handbook. Eighteenth Edition, ed. D. Klossner. 2005. 115. Stofan, J.R., et al., “Sweat and sodium losses in NCAA football players: a precursor to heat cramps?” International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2005. 15(6): p. 641-52.

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

COOL STUFF The following companies manufacture or sell products designed to help cool down competitive athletes. COOLING ITEMS

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Arctic Heat USA www.arcticheatusa.com Arctic Heat body cooling vests Avacore Technology www.avacore.com CoreControl cools from the inside out Morning Pride/Total Fire Group www.korekoolerrehabchair.com KoreKooler rehab cooling chair

Gatorade www.gatorade.com Gatorade Thirst Quencher and Gatorade Rain MET-RX www.met-rx.com MET-Rx ready-to-drink nutrition shake for post-workout

ENVIRONMENTAL HEAT INDEX MONITORS Mannix Testing & Measurement www.mannix-inst.com Psychrometers and thermo-hygrometers for heat index measurements WeatherHawk www.weatherhawk.com WeatherHawk wireless personal weather station Xtreme Reseach www.xgun.com Skyscan (thermal indicator) Ti-Plus multi-function heat index warning system

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Cera Products www.ceraproductsinc.com CeraSport fluid and electrolyte replacement drink

Powerade www.powerade.com Powerade liquid hydration and energy drink

AG Industrial Equipment www.agcoolers.com QuietCool evaporative coolers

Shafer Enterprises www.coolshirt.net Cool Shirt personal cooling system

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Big Ass Fans www.BigAssFans.com Energy efficient cooling for athletic facilities Cool Breeze of Texas www.waycoolfans-america.com Way Cool portable evaporative cooling fans Cool Draft www.cooldraft.com Evolution portable high-pressure fog fans Go Flow www.goflow.net Go Flow misting and cooling fans MVP Industries www.fitventilation.com F.I.T. Ventilation fans and misters Stellar Orthopedics www.stellarorthopedics.com Mobile II misting fan cooling system

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

Port-A-Cool www.port-a-cool.com Portable evaporative cooling units

RG Medical Diagnostics www.rgmd.com DataTherm continuous body temperature monitor

Victory Air, Inc. www.victoryfan.com Fans, misters and new portable HP flash evaporative pump

SportsTemp, LLC www.sportstemp.com Body temperature monitoring strips

HEAT STRESS MONITORS/TESTS HQ, Inc. www.hquinc.net Cortemp ingestible core body thermometer pill Mini Mitter www.minimitter.com VitalSense and the Jonah swallowable capsules Quest Technologies www.quest-technologies.com QUESTemp II body temperature monitor and QUESTemp thermal environment monitors

Hydrate, LLC www.hydrate1.com Aquapus hydration system HydroMax www.hydromaxsystems.com Wearable during competition hydration unit

Uridynamics www.uridynamics.com HydraTrend urine test strips for monitoring hydration status HYDRATION UNITS Cramer Products, Inc. www.cramersportsmed.com Coil Cool portable drinking unit Go Flow www.goflow.net GoFlow self-contained drinking system Hydration Solutions www.hydrationsolutions.net Scorpion portable drinking units

Waterboy www.waterboysports.com Waterboy’s chiller drinking unit WissTech www.wisstechenterprises.com Portable and bench hydration stations PERFORMANCE APPAREL McDavid Sports Medicine Products www.mcdavidusa.com Ultralight durable and lightweight apparel Nike www.nikegridiron.com Nike Pro moisture management

Stromgren Supports www.stromgren.com Permalite performance apparel and moisture management system UnderArmor www.underarmour.com HeatGear moisture-wicking apparel WSI Sports www.wsisports.com WikMax perspiration dispersal clothing Zensah www.zensah.com Seamless construction Zensah fabric with silver ions TENTS FSI North America www.fsinorth.com Cooling tents Hurst Enterprise www.hurstenterprise.com E-Z Up tents, fans/misters, hydration units

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Direction

SPORT SPECIFIC

Changing

When Bradley University men’s basketball revamped its in-season strength and conditioning program last year, the end result was a trip to the Sweet Sixteen.

BY RONNIE WRIGHT

T

his past year, our men’s basketball team at Bradley University experienced its best season in a decade. Posting 22 wins and a top-25 ranking, the squad’s success continued into the NCAA Division I tournament, where we knocked off the University of Kansas and the University of Pittsburgh to reach the Sweet Sixteen. One of our seniors, Marcellus Sommerville, graced the cover of Sports Illustrated during the team’s run, as our program reached new heights in garnering pub-

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T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

licity for the university. But what was most gratifying for me as strength coach was that the team came on strong in the second half of the season. In 2004-05, we had struggled as the season wound down, losing 10 of our last 12 games. So before this most recent season, we changed the philosophy of our in-season strengthtraining program, and it definitely paid off. While I don’t contend that the lifting program was the sole reason for our success in the postseason, I do feel the

changes made a difference. Our players were bigger, stronger, and faster than they had been in previous years, and, most importantly, they had stamina and were fresh late in the season. And we did it all without the resources that larger NCAA Division I programs have. Ronnie Wright, CSCS, is beginning his sixth year as Head Strength & Conditioning Coach at Bradley University. He was previously Assistant Strength Coach at Wichita State University. He can be reached at: rrw@bradley.edu. ATHLETICBID.COM


Circle No. 137


SPORT SPECIFIC

2004-05 WORKOUT This is the workout we followed during the 2004-05 basketball season. MONDAY Bench Press 1 x 12, 1 x 10, 1 x 8 Military Press 1 x 10, 1 x 8, 1 x 6 Lat Pull-Down 1 x 10, 1 x 8, 1 x 6 Straight Bar Curl 3 x 10 Dumbbell Extensions 3 x 10 Wrist Curls 3 x 15 Leg Press 3 x 10 Leg Curls 3 x 10 Leg Raise 3 x 20 Back Extensions 3 x 12

WEDNESDAY Incline Bench 3 x 10 Upright Row 3x8 Cable Rows 3 x 10 Dumbbell Curls 3x8 Cable Press-Down 3 x 12 Reverse Wrist Curls 3 x 15 Hack Squat 3 x 10 Straight-Leg Deadlift 3 x 12 Decline Abs 3 x 25 Medicine Ball Twists 3 x 15

FRIDAY Bench Press 1 x 10, 1 x 8, 1 x 6 Dumbbell Military Press 3x8 Front Pull-Down 3 x 10 Cable Curls 3 x 10 Bench Dips 3 x 12 Wrist Curls 3 x 15 Leg Press 3x8 Leg Curls 3x8 Crunches 3 x 30 Back Extensions 3 x 12

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T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

ATHLETICBID.COM


SPORT SPECIFIC PREVIOUS STRATEGY Like most programs, we struggle with how much time our athletes should spend in the weightroom. We know they are juggling games and practices with class work and studying. So, in years past, we limited the time our basketball players spent in-season doing strength and conditioning. Our goal in past years was simply to maintain the strength and body weight they gained during preseason lifting. From November to mid-March, we asked athletes to visit the weightroom two to three times a week. Lifting times were built around individual academic schedules, team practices, and individual skill training. They did not lift as a team, but came in when it best fit their schedules. The program focused on total-body strength and basketball-specific movements, with all players doing the same workout with some minor deviations for those with injuries and redshirt players. The set and rep scheme was built for strength maintenance. (See “200405 Workout” on page 50.) As the season progressed, we noticed our athletes were struggling.

®

Even though we had given them a nutrition plan to follow over the holiday break, the demands of practices, games, travel, classes, and academics

On the court, they exhibited decreased performance and strength. They were also lagging at the end of games. Our post players were getting

The actual lifting program was similar to the previous year. The focus was on both total-body and basketball-specific gains, but we changed the set and rep scheme to increase strength and bodyweight during the in-season period. eventually took a toll. Players lost an average of 12 pounds of lean bodyweight, with some losing more than 30 pounds. Those who had lost the most weight had the greatest difficulty with strength and stamina. In the weightroom, several athletes were not maintaining the strength gains from their off-season workouts. They were performing the requisite exercises, but because they were often working out individually, there was a loss of intensity and motivation, and they were regressing.

pushed out of position and our guards were falling behind on fast breaks. TIME FOR CHANGE Based on that season’s problems, Head Coach Jim Les and I decided to make changes to the strength program for the 2005-06 year. Coach Les is a strong advocate of strength training and gave me the autonomy to build a program that I felt was necessary—to not only maintain what we had worked to establish in the off-season, but also build upon during the season. The result was

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51


SPORT SPECIFIC

2005-06 CIRCUIT WORKOUT This is the circuit-training workout we followed during the 2005-06 basketball season. MONDAY 1. Bench Press 1 x 10, 1 x 5, 1 x 3, x 2

WEDNESDAY 1. Incline Bench 1 x 10, 1 x 6, 1 x 3, x 2

FRIDAY 1. Bench Press 1 x 10, 1 x 6, 1 x 4, x 2, 2 x 1

DAY 4 (added as schedule permits)

2. Decline Bench 3 x 6-8 Incline DB Bench 3 x 8-10

2. DB Bench 3 x 10-12 Cable Crossovers (Bent) 3 x 12-15

2. Decline Bench 3 x 8-10 Push-Ups Feet Up 3 x 12

1. Upper Body Stretch

3. Military Press 3 x 8-10 DB Military Press 3 x “12” Military Press 3 x 8-10

3. Upright Rows 3 x 10 Three-Way DB Raises 3x8 Upright Rows 3 x 10

3. DB Military Press 3 x 8-10 Seated Lateral Raise 3 x 10 DB Military Press 3 x 8-10

4. Lat Pull-Downs 3 x 10 Front Pull-Downs 1x6 Lat Pull-Downs 3 x 10

4. Straight Bar Rows 3 x 10-12 One-Arm DB Row 3 x 8-10 Reverse Cable Rows 3 x 5F, 10T1/2, 5F

4. Pull-Ups 1x8 Cable Rows 3 x 10-12 Chin-Ups 3x8

5. Straight Bar Curls 3 x 6-8 Close Grip Bench 3 x 8-10 Straight Bar Curls 3 x 6-8

5. E.Z. Bar Curls 3 x 6-8 Standing DB Curls 1 x 6F, 10B1/2, 6F E.Z. Bar Curls 3 x 6-8

5. Preacher Curls 3 x 7F, 10B1/2, 7F Lying Cable Extensions 3 x 12-15 Preacher Curls 3 x 7F, 10B1/2, 7F

6. Push-Ups Push-Ups Feet Up Push-Ups Hands Up

6. E.Z. Bar Extensions 3 x 8-10 Preacher Curls (SB) 3 x 6-8 E.Z. Bar Extensions 3 x 8-10

6. Incline Lying Ext. 3 x 8-10 Press-downs 3 x 10F, 10B1/2, 10F Incline Lying Ext. 3 x 8-10

6. Close Grip Bench 3 x 8-10 Seated DB Extensions 3 x 10-12 Close Grip Bench 3 x 8-10

8. Ball Pike 3 x 15

7. Hammer Curls 3 x 10-12 Reverse Wrist Curls 3 x 20

7. Wrist Curls 3 x 30 Reverse DB Curls 3 x 12

7. Incline Hammer Curls 3 x 15 Rope Rolls 3x4

8. Leg Press 3 x 5F, 10 1/2, 5F, 10 1/2, 5F Leg Curls 3 x 12-15 Seated Toe Raise 3 x 40

8. Power Squat 3 x 8F, 10 1/2, 8F Leg Extensions 3 x 30 Standing Toe Raise 3 x 30\30\30

8. Hack Squat 3 x 7F, 10 1/2, 7F Leg Curls (Single) 3 x 6\6\6\6 Seated Toe Raise 3 x 30\30

9. Decline Abs T1/2 Only 9. Decline Abs 4 x 50 1 x 30\30\ Hold Mid 30 sec. Leg Raise Hip Rotations 3 x 25 3 x 25

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9. Decline Abs 3 x 40\40\30\30\20\20 Hanging Leg Raise 3 x 15

2. Bridges Side\Side\Front Hold 40 sec x 3 sets 3. Med Ball Back to Back 4 x 30 4. Med Ball Catch and Toss (single leg) 3 x 12 5. Total Hip Machine 3 x 10 (4-Way)

7. Box Jumps 3 x 8, x 3

9. Abs As A Group

Key to Abbreviations for 2005-06 Workout: “12” = 4 reps at top 1/2 of motion, 4 at bottom 1/2 of motion, 4 at full ROM SB = Straight Bar F =Full ROM 1/2 =1/2 ROM T1/2 = Top 1/2 ROM B1/2 = Bottom 1/2 ROM

ATHLETICBID.COM


SPORT SPECIFIC a more comprehensive and structured program that included higher demands and produced much better results. The actual lifting program was similar to the previous year. The focus was on both total-body and basketball-specific gains but we changed the set and rep scheme to increase strength and bodyweight during the in-season period. First, we restructured the weekly inseason schedule by upping the number of days in the weightroom to four times per week. Three of those four days, athletes were required to show up at a designated team time. The fourth day was built around their individual schedules. We also changed to a circuit style of lifting, with increased sets and reps and supersetting. Using a circuit (14 athletes, nine stations, no doubling up) better accommodated the team’s time. Increased sets and reps allowed us to make gains, and supersetting allowed us to increase muscle endurance and maintain mass. (See “2005-06 Workout” on page 52.) Another focus was to increase range of motion in specific lifts. We did this by using full, top, and bottom lifts,

.EW

which isolate specific muscles to ensure each is strengthened. After tinkering for a year with various circuits in all of our sports, basketball in particular, I found that the order of exercises and the rep scheme is crucial to success. We also made sure to get buy-in from the athletes on these changes. In the previous program, their bodyweight dropped along with their strength and after I showed them this on paper, it was obvious to the players that they needed to embrace this new program in order to meet their goals. Once our team discovered the new training method improved their strength, gave them an edge on their opponents, and assisted them in winning games, they bought into the program completely. With the team working out together, we could put greater emphasis on a competitive atmosphere. Circuit training works best if you make it competitive, so we grouped athletes who were competing for playing time together. We also asked members of the starting team to push and assist the younger players. To increase emphasis on nutrition, we gave the team pre-made, NCAA-

approved shakes and had a nutritionist work with them individually. The nutritionist educated players on how to eat properly, inexpensively, and when in a hurry, and how to cook and shop for easy-to-prepare, effective meals. In addition, athletes met regularly during the academic year for team breakfasts. This was very important in making sure they were starting the day well. EXCEEDING OUR GOALS What were the results? The average lean bodyweight loss at the conclusion of postseason (which was a full three weeks later than the previous year) was fewer than six pounds. Every player maintained or increased prescribed weights in their lifting program. Simply stated, we kept or exceeded the strength and weight we had worked to gain in the off-season. We believe this program helped our team tremendously, especially during our NCAA tournament run. Our goal in the spring preceding the 200506 season was 20 wins and an NCAA bid. The end result was 22 wins and a NCAA Sweet Sixteen appearance. ■

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2006 Supplier Web Site Directory The following directory offers information on the Web sites of leading suppliers to assist you in researching product purchases for the coming school year. Web site components and special features are highlighted for this group of qualified Training & Conditioning advertisers. Below, you can locate companies by category, then look on the page listed to find out all about their Web site. Or browse the entire listing to see all the products and suppliers available. Page No.

Page No.

Braces

Electrotherapy/Light Therapy

Bio Skin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 BodyGuard, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cho-Pat, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 McDavid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Medical Specialties, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 PRO Orthopedic Devices . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 BioMedical Life Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Cold & Heat Therapy Biofreeze® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Game Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Gebauer Co., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 McDavid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Prossage™ Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Pro-Tec Athetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Whitehall Mfg., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Conditioning Equipment Ball Dynamics, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Beacon Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Burdenko Water Walkers . . . . . . . . . . . 56 DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 HydroWorx International, Inc.. . . . . . . . 58 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Life Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 59 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Shuttle Systems by Contemporary Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 SPRI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Stott Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 SwimEx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Thera-Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Turf Cordz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Vertimax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Xvest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Education Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Human Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins . . . . . . . . 59 NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . 59 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Power System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 SPRI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Stott Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

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T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

Heat Stress Aqualift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 CeraSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Core Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cytosport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 HQ, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Hydrate, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Hydration Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 KoreKooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Outdoor Boss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Port-A-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Quest Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Sportstemp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Victory Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 WaterBoy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 WeatherHawk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 WissTech Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Injury Prevention & Treatment Aqualift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Biofreeze® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Bio Skin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 BodyGuard, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Bushwalker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 CeraSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cho-Pat, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Core Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cytosport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Game Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Gebauer Co., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 HQ, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Hydrate, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Hydration Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 HydroWorx International, Inc.. . . . . . . . 58 KoreKooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 McDavid, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 MDI–Microtek Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Medical Specialties, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Oakworks® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Outdoor Boss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Port-A-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Presagia Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. . . . . . . . 61 Prossage™ Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Pro-Tec Athetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Quest Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 SAM® Medical Products . . . . . . . . . . . 61 SmartPractice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Sportstemp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Page No. Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Tru-Balance Products Corp. . . . . . . . . 62 Turf Cordz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Victory Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 WaterBoy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 WeatherHawk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 WissTech Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Nutrition CeraSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Pacific Health Laboratories . . . . . . . . . 60 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Performance Apparel Bio Skin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 BodyGuard, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 McDavid, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Stromgren Supports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Rehabilitation Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Ball Dynamics, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 BioMedical Life Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 efi Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 HydroWorx International, Inc.. . . . . . . . 58 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Keiser Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Oakworks® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Shuttle Systems by Contemporary Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 SPRI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Stott Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 SwimEx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Thera-Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Tru-Balance Products Corp. . . . . . . . . 62 Turf Cordz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Whitehall Mfg., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Vertimax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Weight Training Austin Plastics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Ball Dynamics, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 efi Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Keiser Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Life Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Power Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Samson Weight Training Equipment . . 61 SPRI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Turf Cordz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 WerkSan Sports USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 ATHLETICBID.COM


Web Site Directory

www.acplus.com Specialized Rehabilitation & Orthopedic Programs Site includes: • Product catalog • “Member’s Lounge” resource center and library • Access to the National Medical Library database • Company background and contact info

www.hydrateorlose.com

www.athleticrecordboards.com

Portable Drinking Systems

Athletic Record Boards

Site includes: • Product specs and images • Patent information • Customer list • Complete price list

Site includes: • Samples and images of boards for various sports • Pricing information • Technical information

Special features: • Hydration information • Animated site introduction

Special features: • Downloadable printer program for custom-printed record board labels

Special features: • Downloadable product literature • Online product movies See ad on page 38

www.fitball.com Professional-Quality Fitness & Rehabilitation Products Site includes: • Product images and descriptions • Company background • Catalog request • Dealer information Special features: • Online store • Links to FitBALL® dealers

www.bauerfeindusa.com Sports-Medicine Braces & Supports Site Includes: • Product info • Company background • Glossary of indications Special Features: • Online store • Downloadable product literature

www.beaconathletics.com Field Maintenance & Training Equipment Site includes: • Downloadable product catalog • Product specs • Field maintenance tips • Pro Series products Special features: • Online store • Custom design services

See ad on page 82

www.biofreeze.com Topical Pain Relieving Products Site includes: • Product listings and descriptions • Customer testimonials • News, press releases, and endorsements • Frequently asked questions Special features: • Flash • Outside links

www.bmls.com

www.bioskin.com

Portable Electromedical Devices & Accessories

Performance Supports & Custom Braces

Site includes: • Company background • Electrode placement chart • “What Is New” menu option • Product comparisons and specifications

Site includes: • Product descriptions and sizing • Product applications • Customer testimonials • Contact information

Special features: • Site is accessible in seven languages • Tutorial downloads

Special features: • Online store • Video clips and animated demonstrations

See ad on page 7 ATHLETICBID.COM

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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Web Site Directory

www.antibodywear.com Custom Compression Sportswear & Injury Prevention Site includes: • Product specs • Customer testimonials • Pricing • Research articles Special features: • Online store • Measurement tutorials

See ad on page 36

www.bushwalkerbags.com

www.burdenkoww.com

Innovative Bracing Products

Aquatic Fitness Products

Site includes: • Product specs • Company background • Sizing charts • Fitting instructions

Site includes: • Product info • Customer testimonials • Ordering info • Company contact info

Special features: • Product images

Special features: • Video demonstrations • Sample exercises

See ad on pages 74 & 81

www.ceraproductsinc.com

See ad on page 20

www.cho-pat.com

Athletic Training Bags & Accessories

Hydration Solutions

Sports-Medicine Products

Site includes: • Product specs • Company background • Pricing • Product photos for most items

Site includes: • Company background • Product descriptions • Customer testimonials • Scientific articles

Special features: • Online store

Special features: • Online store

Site includes: • Product descriptions and sizing • Customer testimonials • Company background and contact information • Medical information

See ad on page 79

See ad on page 81

www.avacore.com

www.cramersportsmed.com

Special features: • Online store • Product images

See ad on page 4

www.cytosport.com

Portable Core Cooling System

Sports-Medicine Products

Sports Energy Drink

Site includes: • Product description and images • Application overview • News clips • Company background and contact information

Site includes: • Product catalog • Bid builder • Athletic trainer forum • Corporate history

Site includes: • Product information and specs • Company background • Events and athletes • Customer testimonials

Special features: • Downloadable catalog • Virtual tours of products

Special features: • “Cyto-Science” • Online store

Special features: • Endorsements and customer testimonials

See ad on page 46 56

www.braceint.com

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

See ad on inside front cover ATHLETICBID.COM


Web Site Directory

www.dmsystems.com Rehab, Wound Care, & Orthopedic Products Site includes: • Detailed product info and downloadable images • Literature available via PDFs or e-mail request • Testimonials from clinicians who use and recommend the products • Company profile, with lists of affiliations and trade shows

Special features: • Videos on the Heelift, Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer, and Elbowlift • International dealer/sales rep locator

See ad on page 29

www.exertools.com

www.dynatronics.com Advanced-Technology Medical & Rehabilitation Devices Site includes: • New products • Money-saving promotions • Complete catalog with product images • Corporate information Special features: • Dealer locator • New Web site coming soon See ad on page 5

www.functionaldesign.com

Exercise, Fitness, & Therapy Products

Continuing Education & Functional Fitness Products

Site includes: • Product photos and specs • Company history • Links to certified partners

Site Includes: • Product descriptions • Customer testimonials • Company background • Retail and discount pricing info

Special features: • Great pricing information • Golf-training packages

See ad on page 74

www.gatorade.com

Special Features: • Online store • Product images

See ad on page 87

www.gebauerco.com

Sports Drinks

Topical Skin Refrigerants

Site includes: • Background on the world’s most researched beverage • Informative articles and scientific research on hydration • Fluid-loss calculator to customize hydration needs • Discounted hydration packages for coaches and ATCs Special features: • Access to the Gatorade Sports Science Institute • Information on the new Gatorade Endurance Formula

Site includes: • Product instructions and uses • Product MSDS • Product and technical information • Product demos

See ad on pages 2-3 ATHLETICBID.COM

Special features: • Online store • Downloadable product literature

www.efisportsmedicine.com Innovative Health & Fitness Equipment Site includes: • efi rehab, commercial, and home exercise products • Online store with comparison shopping • Total Gym exercise library • Customer support, testimonials, and efi Gravity® newsletters

Special features: • Customized personal training fitness programs at totalgymworkout.com • Customer referral network with customer content

See ad on page 11

www.gameready.com Active Cold & Compression Therapy Site includes: • Product descriptions, images, and user’s manuals • Customer testimonials, news, and user lists • Science and technology background • Company background and contact information Special features: • Clinical evaluation white paper • Thermal imagery comparisons See ad on page 19

www.hammerstrength.com Cardiovascular & Strength-Training Equipment Site includes: • Up-to-date product information • Showcase facilities • Brochure request • Fitness articles and educational materials Special features: • Product demonstrations via streaming video • Strength color configurator

See ad on page 14 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

57


Web Site Directory

www.hqinc.net CorTemp™ Core Body Temperature Monitoring System Site includes: • Product specs and applications overview • Resource library • Product brochures • Company background and contact information Special features: • “Free CorTemp™”grant program • Video clips and media links See ad on page 41

www.hydrationsolutions.net

www.humankinetics.com

www.hydrate1.com

Sports & Fitness Publishing

Hydration Systems

Site includes: • Training books, videos, and DVDs • Convenient online shopping • Free catalogs, including one for strength and conditioning • Conditioning resources for every major sport

Site includes: • Pricing • Product specs • Contact info • Latest news

Special features: • Hundreds of informative book excerpts • Video and DVD clips See ad on page 50

www.hydroworx.com

Special features: • News about product debut at 2006 NATA Convention

See ad on page 20

www.jumpstretch.com

Portable Hydration Systems

Therapy & Rehabilitation Pools

FlexBand Exercise Equipment

Site includes: • Product specs and images • Company background • Pricing • Contact information

Site includes: • Product descriptions and sizing • Customer testimonials • Company background

Site includes: • Background information on company and FlexBand inventor Dick Hartzel • Fitness center information • Training seminar and continuing education credit sign-up information • Downloadable brochures

Special features: • Information on parts and accessories to go with the Scorpion hydration units

See ad on page 65

www.keiser.com Fitness & Training Equipment Site includes: • Fitness equipment for various markets • Product catalog and specifications • Corporate history and extensive service sections • Training programs Special features: • Video clips • Marketing support section and downloadable images

Special features: • Downloadable specs and installation guides • Video case studies

Special features: • Video clips • Online store See ad on page 40

www.korekoolerrehabchair.com

See ad on page 87

www.lifefitness.com

KoreKooler™ Rehabilitation Products

Cardiovascular & Strength-Training Equipment

Site includes: • Product image • Downloadable product literature • Sales contact info

Site includes: • Up-to-date product information • Showcase facilities • Brochure request • Fitness articles and educational materials

Special features: • Causes and factors for heat stress • Comparison of earlier auxiliary cooling techniques

Special features: • Product demonstrations via streaming video • Strength color configurator

See ad on page 45 58

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

ATHLETICBID.COM


Web Site Directory

www.lww.com

www.magistercorp.com

www.mcdavidusa.com

Sports-Medicine Journals & Educational Materials

Non-Latex Resistive Exercise & Balance Products

Sports Medical & Protective Apparel Products

Site Includes: • Product descriptions and rates • Professional and ACSM resource centers • Online customer service • Trade show calendar

Site includes:

Site includes: • Product specifications • Message forum • Advertising and public-relations center • Dealer locator

Special Features: • Free downloadable samples • Job search

• Product info • Downloadable literature for consumers • Literature request form and e-mail contact link • Distributor search

Special features: • “Distributor Resources” offering downloadable product images and forms • Company history and press releases

See ad on page 25

www.mdimicrotek.com Emergency Medical Products Site includes: • Product descriptions • Product images • Company background and contact information • ISO and CE certifications Special features: • Vacuum splint training video • CPR Microshield custom label program

www.medspec.com Orthopedic & Sports-Medicine Products Site includes: • Literature request • Customer testimonials • Sizing charts • Product images Special features: • Online ordering • Product information

Special features: • E-commerce • Downloadable specs and images See ad on page 21

www.muellersportsmed.com Sports-Medicine Products Site includes: • Product information • Information on team and institutional products • Online product training • Store locator Special features: • Downloadable catalog and product specs • Video of Mueller’s latest TV ad

See ad on page 8

See ad on page 26

See ad on page 12

www.nasm.org

www.nsca-lift.org

www.nsca-cc.org

Sports-Medicine Education & Certification Site includes: • Personal training certification and advanced credentials info • Continuing education • Online resource center Special features: • Newsletter • Workshop schedules

See ad on page 51 ATHLETICBID.COM

Strength & Conditioning Education Site includes: • Scientific journals • Educational videos and books • Articles • Networking Special features: • Store • Video training tips

See ad on page 34

Strength & Conditioning Certification Site includes: • CSCS® and NSCA-PT® exam registration • Review material descriptions and ordering info • Resource center with FAQs and downloads • International exam info Special features: • Online practice exams and quizzes • Online CEU tracking See ad on page 9 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

59


Web Site Directory

www.oakworkspt.com Stationary & Portable Athletic Training Equipment Site includes: • Individual pop-up boxes for game packages • Pop-up boxes with available options and accessories • Page of specials • Close-up views and descriptions of all equipment

Special features: • Subscription page for Oakworks’ online news • Link to Oakworks’ associations and sponsorships

See ad on outside back cover

www.accelerade.com Protein-Powered Sports Drink Site includes: • Product descriptions and nutrition facts • Product research • Product comparison table • “Where To Buy” section Special features: • Online store with special discounts • Newsletter sign-up

www.optp.com/ad Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Site includes: • Product descriptions, specs, and images • “What’s New” resource page • Downloadable newsletter and catalog pages • Log-on “Favorites” re-order feature Special features: • Online store • DVD clips See ad on page 15

www.performbetter.com Functional Training & Rehab Products Site includes: • Complete Perform Better catalog with pricing • Timely specials • Schedule of Perform Better one-day and three-day seminars • Online ordering

Special features: • Articles and newsletters on training and conditioning • Assistance with facility design or updating

See ad on page 27

www.power-lift.com Strength Training Equipment Site includes: • Downloadable brochures • Room-layout sample section • Client photos and testimonials • Catalog request form Special features: • Video clips of various pieces of equipment • Online color configurator

60

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

www.power-systems.com

www.outdoorboss.com Outdoor Hydration & Cooling Equipment Site includes: • Info on the Boss Drinking System • Info on misting fans • Info on Frogg Toggs rain gear • Info on Cool N Dry sports towels Special features: • Online store

See ad on page 47

www.port-a-cool.com Portable Evaporative Cooling Units Site includes: • Product info and images • Application info • Frequently asked questions • Company contact info Special features: • Downloadable brochures and catalogs • Press room

See ad on page 67

www.prepakproducts.com

Athletic Conditioning Equipment & Programs

Professional Rehabilitation & Fitness Equipment

Site includes: • Product pages organized by category and sport • “How-To” exercises and articles of interest • Free catalog request page • “On Sale” products page

Site includes: • Online store • Trade show schedule • Company background and contact information • Credit application

Special features: • Online store • “New Products” page, available only online See ad on page 33

Special features: • Downloadable catalog and MSDS forms • Free sample request

ATHLETICBID.COM


Web Site Directory

www.presagia.com Comprehensive Athlete Health Management Software Site includes: • Presagia Sport (formerly InjuryZone) product information • Presagia rehab product information • Calendar of events • Latest company news Special features: • Case studies and customer testimonials • Schedule an online demonstration with a company representative

www.proorthopedic.com Neoprene Supports

Area-Specific Deep Tissue Ointment

Site includes: • Company background • Product descriptions and sizing information • Pricing and ordering information • Custom-fabricated support ordering information

Site includes: • Product listings and descriptions • Customer testimonials • News and press releases • Frequently asked questions

Special features: • Online store • Product images See ad on page 72

www.injurybegone.com Sports-Medicine Products Site includes: • Injury information • Detailed product information • Customer testimonials • Quick click-thru buying Special features: • Store and distributor locator • Injury video

See ad on page 35

www.samsonequipment.com

www.prossage.us

www.Quest-Technologies.com

Special features: • Flash • Outside links

See ad on page 28

www.sammedical.com

Environmental Heat Stress Monitoring Products

Fracture Management & Wound Care

Site includes: • Product comparison guide and specs • Product application news and notes • Product ordering info • Online equipment rentals

Site includes: • Product specs and images • Downloadable product literature • Applications and instructions overviews • Trade show calendar

Special features: • Online technical support • Online customer service

Special features: • Training videos • Newsletter

See ad on page 66

www.shuttlesystems.com

See ad on page 73

www.smartpractice.com

Custom Weight-Training Equipment

Rehabilitation & Fitness Equipment

Dental & Medical Supplies

Site includes: • Product descriptions • Demonstration videos • General product specifications • Images of equipped facilities

Site includes: • Product specs, images, and descriptions • Ordering info • Links to athletic training organizations • Trade show calendar

Site includes: • Product descriptions and images • Pricing information • Company background • Catalog requests

Special features: • “Samson Difference” video • President Bush workout video

Special features: • Online store • Dealer locator

Special features: • Online store • Specials and discount offers

See ad on page 71 ATHLETICBID.COM

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

61


Web Site Directory

www.sportsimports.com

www.sportstemp.com

Indoor Volleyball, Badminton, & Tennis Equipment

Core Temperature Measurement Strips

Site includes: • Complete product line • Product specs • Court layouts • Catalog request

Site includes: • Product description • Company background • User testimonials • Press releases

Special features: • Facility planner • Online store

Special features: • Online store • Heat illness Flash and PowerPoint presentations

www.spriproducts.com Fitness Products Site includes: • Product descriptions and images • Online catalog request • News and event information • Dealer locator Special features: • Featured exercises • FAQs on a wide variety of products

See ad on page 22

www.stromgren.com Athletic Supports, Apparel, & Equipment Site includes: • Product specs • Sizing info • Contact info • Catalog request Special features: • Links to moisture-management apparel • Product images

www.stottpilates.com

Aquatic Therapy Pools

Site includes: • Customer testimonials and media endorsements • Downloadable PDFs of corporate and video brochures • Listings for international education and training opportunities • Monthly newsletter featuring promotions and sales

Site includes: • In-depth product descriptions for all models • Registration for educational seminars • Information on “Try, Buy, and Travel Free!” program • Contact information for local dealers

Special features: • Online store • Worldwide instructor finder

See ad on pages 43 & 53

www.Thera-Band.com Progressive Elastic Resistance Exercise Products Site includes: • Product descriptions • Exercise programs • Research and case studies • Instruction guides Special features: • Searchable database of research, exercises, case studies, and more

See ad on page 30 62

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

www.swimex.com

Pilates

Special features: • Video clips and DVD requests • Cost-analysis request See ad on page 22

www.townsenddesign.com

www.trubalancecorp.com

Orthopedic Bracing Solutions

Postural Corrective Foot Orthotics

Site includes: • Functional ligament brace descriptions • Osteoarthritis brace descriptions • Post-operative brace descriptions • Specialty brace descriptions

Site includes: • Company background • Orthotic system description • Detailed images Special features: • Pain chart

Special features: • Online ordering for registered customers • Downloadable order forms See ad on page 80 ATHLETICBID.COM


Web Site Directory

www.nzmfg.com

www.vertimax.com

www.victoryfan.com

Athletic Training & Rehab Products

All-Sport Training System

Athletic Field Cooling Fans

Site includes: • Product descriptions • Product images • Company information • Catalog request

Site includes: • Product descriptions, features, and advantages • Customer testimonials • Models and ordering information • Vertimax training techniques

Site includes: • Athletic and gymnasium product specs and images • Company background • Contact info • Accessories and repair items

Special features: • Vertimax video clips • Vertimax product photos

Special features: • Downloadable product brochures • Feedback forum

Special features: • Online store • Downloadable user’s guides

See ad on page 83

www.waterboysports.com Sports & Industrial Hydration Systems

See ad on page 49

www.weatherhawk.com

See ad on page 42

www.werksanusa.com

Weather Stations

Weightlifting Equipment

Site includes: • Product specs • Company contact page • Pricing information • Company background

Site includes: • Product information and specifications • Customer testimonials • Links to online weather stations • Online store

Site includes: • Product images, specs, and pricing • Company profile, guarantees, and return policy • Contact information

Special features: • Online ordering • New 2007 newsletter

Special features: • Free software downloads • Links to weather information

See ad on page 42

www.whitehallmfg.com

Special features: • Online store and printable order form • Bilingual option (Spanish)

See ad on page 46

www.wisstechenterprises.com

www.thexvest.com

Hospital & Therapy Products

Hydration Units

Weighted Vests

Site includes: • Product specs • Company history • Product descriptions • Installation instructions

Site includes: • Product specs and images • Warranty information • Company background and contact information • Pricing

Site includes: • Product specs and images • Customer testimonials • Plyometric exercises and training programs • Company background and contact information

Special features: • Downloadable specs • Downloadable brochures

Special features: • Dealer locator

Special features: • News video clips • Online store

See ad on page 68 ATHLETICBID.COM

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

63


HEAT STRESS AVAcore Technologies, Inc. 888-AVACORE www.avacore.com CoreControl

Powerflo, Powerflo 50, Coil Cool

CoreControl can be used to rapidly extract excess core body heat to help maintain peak physical and mental performance, increase endurance, reduce the risk of heat stress or heatrelated cramping, and accelerate recovery. It’s intelligent performance optimization.

Cramer Products offers three types of portable hydration units to help hydrate athletes. Cramer’s newest unit, the Powerflo 50, offers an impressive 50 gallons of portable hydration.

Primary Advantages: The portable CoreControl cools the body non-invasively, quickly, and conveniently from the inside out, using “thermal portals” in the hand. CoreControl reduces the rate of core temperature increase, enhances recovery, and helps eliminate heat as a limiting factor to performance. Circle No. 500 Cera Products, Inc. 1-866-237-2770 www.cerasport.com CeraSport, CeraLyte CeraSport is a rice-based electrolyte drink that was developed along with physicians at Johns Hopkins University to provide athletes with superior hydration, enhanced energy, and prolonged endurance. CeraSport’s patented formula promotes fast absorption of electrolytes and fluids without causing the cramps and nausea associated with sugar-based drinks. Primary Advantages: Helps prevent dehydration, allows for quick fluid and electrolyte replacement, sustains energy better than many sugar-based blends, minimizes the cramping and nausea associated with other sports drinks, improves circulating fluid volume, does not attract bees. Circle No. 501

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Primary Advantages: Cramer’s hydration units are constructed out of 100-percent water-portable and FDAapproved materials for drinking water. Circle No. 502 CytoSport, Inc. 888-298-6629 www.cytosport.com Cytomax Use Cytomax while training or exercising to ensure proper hydration, electrolyte replacement, and energy balance, and to reduce fatigue. Drink it 15 minutes prior to training and consistently during your workout for maximum results. Primary Advantages: Patented alpha LPolylactate™ buffers lactic acid production and minimizes postexercise muscle soreness. Complex carbohydrates provide sustained energy without the sugar “crash” while antioxidants help prevent free-radical damage to muscle cells. Circle No. 503 Gatorade 800-88-GATOR www.gatorade.com Gatorade Endurance Formula Gatorade Endurance Formula is a specialized sports drink with a fiveelectrolyte blend designed to meet the fluid and electrolyte needs of athletes during longer, more intense workout sessions, like twoa-day football practices or all-day soccer tournaments.

Primary Advantages: During prolonged activity, fluid and electrolyte losses can be significant. Gatorade Endurance Formula contains nearly twice the sodium (200 mg) and three times the potassium (90 mg) of Gatorade Thirst Quencher, which is the appropriate beverage for most active people and athletes. Circle No. 504 Outdoor Boss 888-463-5699 www.outdoorboss.com The Boss Drinking System The Boss drinking system is one of the most affordable and portable self-contained drinking systems on the market. It weighs only 12 pounds and is extremely versatile. Primary Advantages: The Boss can be used with a hand cart, golf cart, or any other transportation device. It is completely sealed to prevent any contamination. Using this device helps to eliminate wasted cups and water bottles. Circle No. 505 HQ, Inc. 941-721-7588 www.hqinc.net CorTemp™ Ingestible Core Body Temperature Monitoring Systems The CorTemp Monitoring System, featuring the CorTemp ingestible temperature pill, has been marketed throughout the world for over 17 years. Once ingested, the pill wirelessly transmits an athlete’s core body temperature to a handheld monitor, where the data is picked up and recorded. It’s realtime, easy-to-use, and convenient for stationary or mobile environments. CorTemp is FDA-cleared. Primary Advantages: Early intervention is an absolute necessity in the proper prevention, evaluation, and treatment of heat stress. Research indicates that external methods of monitoring core temperature are not always valid under conditions of ATHLETICBID.COM


HEAT STRESS intense exercise. The CorTemp system provides an internal, non-invasive, affordable approach in assessing elevated core temperature on the field, and measuring the effectiveness of cooling methods on the sidelines. Circle No. 506 Hydrate, LLC 407-694-1034 www.hydrate1.com Aquapus The Aquapus is a 50-gallon hydration system that allows up to eight players to quickly and easily replenish vital fluids lost during practice and competition.

Morning Pride Manufacturing 800-688-6148 www.korekoolerrehabchair.com Kore Kooler™ Rehab Chairs Kore Kooler™ Rehab Chair is an affordable, portable, and effective way to cool athletes down and get them back on the field. The product uses a revolutionary approach called limb immersion, which employs large amounts of water to transfer heat and reduce core temperature.

immersion is the most effective way to lower core body temperature. The Kore Kooler Rehab Chair’s patented design utilizes this proven method to reduce core temperature and heat stress vulnerability quickly and safely. Circle No. 509

Primary Advantages: The latest research shows that hand and forearm

Primary Advantages: The Aquapus offers easy transportation of 50 gallons of water due to its built-in hitch. It saves athletic trainers valuable time, so they can be on the field with athletes, where they are needed. Circle No. 507 HydrationSolutions 877-887-7601 www.hydrationsolutions.net Scorpion Hydration Systems Scorpion Hydration Systems from HydrationSolutions were designed in concert with athletic trainers to keep the needs of athletes and athletic trainers in mind. The systems are designed to deliver dependable service and to simplify water delivery for athletic programs. Primary Advantages: Scorpion products are constructed using steel—not aluminum or plastic—to ensure a lasting product. Each unit can be charged by simply plugging it into the quickdisconnect wire harness. This design eliminates the need to remove the battery. Circle No. 508

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HEAT STRESS General Shelters of Texas, S.B. Ltd./Port-A-Cool® 800-695-2942 www.port-a-cool.com Port-A-Cool® Port-A-Cool® portable evaporative cooling units are ideal for the driving range, dugout, weight room, practice field, locker room, pool area, gym, sideline, tennis court, or anyplace else where traditional air conditioning is ineffective or cost-prohibitive. It’s environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

Primary Advantages: Port-A-Cool® units allow athletes to work longer and harder while keeping cool and protected from the dangers of heat stress. It can also serve as a backup when standard air conditioning is unavailable. Circle No. 510

Sports Innovations, Ltd. 800-288-3954 www.hydrateorlose.com Aqualift Portable Drinking Systems Hydration is a key to winning, and Aqualift portable drinking systems deliver. From young athletes on the practice field to professionals in the NFL, this system is a must. Aqualift features four hoses with fully adjustable drinking valves, a UL-approved fiberglass electrical enclosure with quick release locking latches, a 12-volt power supply, and an automatic charger. It’s easy to use and built to last. Primary Advantages: The Aqualift’s frame components are made of aluminum to safely carry up to 500 pounds, and large pneumatic tires offer easy maneuverability on all types of terrain. A removable stainless steel filter screen and adjustable pump make for problem-free daily use and maintenance. Remember, hydrate or lose. Circle No. 511 SportsTemp 877-570-4328 www.sportstemp.com SportsTemp™ Simply stick SportsTemp™ on the forehead before exercise, and you can monitor the athlete’s core brain temperature for the duration of any workout or practice. SportsTemp has been tested and proven to be extremely accurate.

Introducing the QUESTemp° Series n today's ultra competitive sports environment, managing the health and safety of athletes is paramount to winning. Exertional heat illnesses inhibit an athlete's ability to perform at peak levels, threatens their life safety and exposes your organization to potentially significant liabilities. Quest Technologies is the world leader in heat stress monitoring technologies that allow accurate, real-time understanding of environmental and physiological conditions

I

that directly affect an athlete's ability to stay healthy and compete successfully. Quest Technologies offers a total solution including monitors on a purchase, rental and rent-to-own basis as well as on-site educational seminars on the subject of heat stress. To learn more, call 1-800-245-0779 or visit our web site at www.Quest-Technologies.com.

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Stromgren Supports 800-527-1988 www.stromgren.com Polar Heat Temperature-Controlled Compression Shirts

www.Quest-Technologies.com

Red, Rugged and Reliable

Primary Advantages: SportsTemp is inexpensive, tested by medical professionals, and proven accurate. It’s not just a temperature-measuring device, but also a heat illness-prevention tool. There is no expensive equipment to buy, and using it is as easy as putting on a bandage. Circle No. 512

ISO 9001:2000 Registered Company & ISO 17025 Accredited Calibration Lab

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Help your athletes stay safe and comfortable when working out in extreme heat and cold with Stromgren’s Polar Heat Compression Shirt. A cold/heat pack is strategically positioned in a ATHLETICBID.COM


HEAT STRESS a simple 30-second urine test. The strips can be used before and after events, or between

trap-top pocket located between the athleteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoulder blades to cool or heat the body for over three hours at a time. The shirt is made of moisturewicking compression material to keep skin dry during long, intense workouts. Primary Advantages: Field tests prove that the Polar Heat Compression Shirt helps athletes maintain a safe core body temperature. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s available in black or white in adult sizes at your local sporting goods dealer. For more information, go online today or call Stromgren. Circle No. 513 Uridynamics, Inc. 866-748-7463 www.uridynamics.com Hydration Monitoring Test Strips HydraTrend test strips provide athletes with a quick, convenient way to check their hydration status by performing

intense workouts. Primary Advantages: Being properly hydrated prior to endurance activities will optimize performance and competitiveness. The test strips can be used to determine the effectiveness of your hydration program, taking the guesswork out of good hydration status. Circle No. 514 Victory Air 803-233-7035 www.victoryfan.com

Primary Advantages: Adjustable settings allow you to add humidity to the air as desired. Minimal maintenance is required since there are no nozzles or filters to worry about. An optional stroller assembly incorporates the water tank for easy transportation. Victory Air fans and misters are extremely affordable. Circle No. 515

Check out

Fans & Misters

www.AthleticBid.com

The Stroller Fan with Atomizer from Victory Air offers flash evaporative cooling for athletes in environments where heat stress may pose a danger.

to contact these companies.

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HEAT STRESS Waterboy Sports, Inc. 888-442-6269 www.waterboysports.com

20 GALLON TEAM MATE

25 GALLON TANKER

Hydration Equipment

Hydration Station

Waterboy Sports is not just a single product, but an extensive product line designed to meet various price ranges and the specific needs of the athletic training community. Visit the company online to see its complete product line.

WissTech Enterprises offers a complete line of indoor and outdoor portable drinking fountains. The Hydration Station is produced in 20-, 25-, and 50-gallon capacities. The new Drinking Cart is intended for indoor use.

Primary Advantages: All Waterboy Sports products are designed to accommodate both the athlete and the athletic trainer. Each product is built to withstand the punishment of constant use and any abuse an angry athlete can dish out. Circle No. 516 WeatherHawk 866-670-5982 www.weatherhawk.com WeatherHawk Weather Stations

50 GALLON MEGA TANKER

NO-DRIP DRINKING CART P.O. BOX 1002 SUGAR LAND, TX (800)809-8184 (281)277-7238 FAX: (281)491-6319

www.wisstechenterprises.com

WissTech Enterprises 800-809-8184 www.wisstechenterprises.com

WeatherHawk weather stations monitor, display, and record conditions for managing heat stress parameters. They are also used to validate wind speed and direction during events that may set new athletic records. Primary Advantages: WeatherHawk stations provide real-time data displays of wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, and heat index. Data is logged with time and date for record keeping. Circle No. 517

Primary Advantages: The Hydration Station is manufactured for durability. It features an all-welded cart with industrial casters and wheels to ensure years of worry-free service. Durable chrome-plated brass drinking valves are easy to use and warranted against breakage. Circle No. 518

HOW TO REQUEST OR RENEW A FREE SUBSCRIPTION: The easiest way to subscribe is to go to our website at www.momentummedia.com and fill out a subscription request form. Alternatively, a subscription request card is provided in every issue. If a request card is not available, then on your institutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s letterhead, provide us with your: 1. request to receive or renew a free subscription 2. signature and date of request 3. title and school or company name 4. mailing address 5. brief description of your job and the type of institution for which you work

ARE YOU MOVING? The USPS will not forward your subscription. In order to keep receiving your free subscription, you must notify us of your new address. All subscription requests and changes of address must be made via our website, or by fax or mail. TRAINING & CONDITIONING, SUBSCRIPTION DEPT., PO BOX 4806, ITHACA, NY 14852-4806 or www.momentummedia.com or faxed to: 607-257-7328 Attn: TRAINING & CONDITIONING, SUBSCRIPTION DEPT.

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NEW Product Launch Neuroprobe® 500 Pain Management System

CoreStretch™

Unique features: • TENS, IFC, or Monochromatic Infrared Light to reduce pain and increase circulation • Provides painless sub-sensory (microcurrent or nerve block) or sensory (sensory, motor, or noxious level TENS) stimulation • Electrical point stimulation with audio/visual detection of acupuncture/trigger points combined with infrared light and e-stim for treatment of multiple locations or patients

Benefits for the user: • Combines light therapy SLD pads with two channels of electrical stimulation for simultaneous treatment of multiple locations or patients • All probes allow rapid identification of active acu/trigger points by audio signal and digital display of skin impedence

Accelerated Care Plus 800-350-1100 www.acplus.com Circle No. 519

Unique features: • Can be used for multiple stretches • Simple design makes it easy for anyone to use • Strong, light construction can easily be disassembled • Adjustable to most any size

Benefits for the user: • Effectively and simply stretches the back, shoulders, lats, piriformis, IT bands, hamstrings, and shins • Can be taken with you wherever you go

Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products 800-810-1740 www.medi-dyne.com Circle No. 520

Ankle Spat Wrap (ASW) Unique features: Unique features: • Designed for athletes and larger individuals • Greater support for tibial shaft fractures • Size: 5.5” x 36”

Benefits for the user: • Fits a broader range of athletes • Offers more stability for all limbs and the neck area • Radiolucent and waterproof • Lightweight and reusable

SAM Medical Products 800-818-4726 www.sammedical.com Circle No. 521 ATHLETICBID.COM

• Patent-pending ASW breathes and wicks away moisture and perspiration • Medial and lateral straps support the ankle complex with even compression

Benefits for the user: • Effectively designed to be worn over the athlete’s shoe • Has the look of a spat-taped ankle • Is easy to put on either the right or left foot • Available in black or white at your local sporting goods dealer

Stromgren Supports 800-527-1988 www.stromgren.com Circle No. 522 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE Active Ankle 800-800-2896 www.getchameleon.com Ankle protection isn’t black and white anymore. With the new All-Sport Chameleon™ from Active Ankle®, athletes can choose from eight bright interchangeable strap covers that come with each brace. The solid U-shaped frame ensures maximum strength, while the molded, fabric-lined EVA padding provides lightweight comfort. The All-Sport Chameleon offers great style with the same great protection that has made Active Ankle one of the top brace manufacturers in the industry. For more information, visit the company online. Circle No. 523 Antibody 410-581-0900 www.antibodywear.com The BodyGuard Compression Ankle Brace is designed to add comfort, stability, and performance enhancement to the sprained ankle. In the uninjured ankle it reduces the incidence of sprains, strains, and impact trauma, while adding stability and performance enhancement. As with all BodyGuards, it provides compression, support, heat circulation to the muscles and tendons, strain distribution, and impact absorption. Circle No. 524 Ball Dynamics International 800-752-2255 www.fitball.com The new FitBALL® Deluxe Board from Ball Dynamics has an extra-large surface—19.5” x 27”—with ample room for full-body training. The heavy-duty plastic construction is perfect for high-usage fitness and rehab facilities. With a fulcrum height of five feet, the multidirectional base offers balance challenges for 70

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both beginners and advanced users. The FitBALL Deluxe Board is part of the newly-expanded FitBALL® line of professional-quality fitness and therapeutic products. Circle No. 525 Cho-Pat, Inc. 800-221-1601 www.cho-pat.com The Achilles Tendon Strap helps alleviate the pain and discomfort associated with Achilles tendonitis. It reduces strain on the tendon by spreading muscular contraction and promoting early heel rise. Developed in cooperation with the Mayo Clinic, this patented strap is used by many sports-medicine professionals, who recognize it as an effective addition to the traditional Achilles tendonitis treatment procedures. Circle No. 526 DM Systems, Inc. 800-254-5438 www.dmsystems.com AnkleTough® offers a system of progressive resistance that can be customized to fit the needs of any athlete. Using AnkleTough can help prevent the recurrence of ankle injuries by strengthening and conditioning the surrounding ankle muscles and tendons. The system is comprised of color-coded resistive tension straps in four strengths (light, medium, strong, and tough). Now with a lower price, AnkleTough is available in the four-pack (one each of four straps plus an exercise instruction guide) or in an eight-pack, each with the same resistance level. Circle No. 527 Exertools 800-235-1559 www.exertools.com The Dyna-Disc from Exertools has become a staple in all kinds of training protocols. It’s the perfect companion for abdominal, lower back, proprioception, balance, stabilization, and weight-

shift exercises. The Dyna-Disc is a seamless pad 14 inches in diameter and two inches thick. It can be used to perform a wide variety of exercises from a standing or seated position, providing many of the same benefits as a gymball. Circle No. 528 Game Ready 888-426-3732 www.gameready.com Chosen by world-champion professional teams and top universities and high schools, the Game Ready Accelerated Recovery System simultaneously provides intermittent compression and controllable cryotherapy to help accelerate healing after acute or chronic injuries or following orthopedic surgery. Leading athletic trainers recommend Game Ready: “I’ve used Game Ready consistently, with fabulous results. Every athletic trainer should have it in their training room,” says Jasen Powell, Head Athletic Trainer of the Los Angeles Clippers. Circle No. 529 Jump Stretch, Inc. 800-344-3539 www.jumpstretch.com Jump Stretch founder Dick Hartzell has perfected a way of treating ankle sprains that gets the athlete up and running (literally) within minutes or hours, rather than weeks or months. Hartzell contends that RICE is antiquated, and that rest and ice actually prolong the healing process. A video detailing his tractioning technique is available for $15. Three Flex Bands® (one average and two minis) are necessary to perform the treatment. Circle No. 530

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE Kelly Kinetics 888-645-3559 www.kellykinetics.com The Ankle Isolator™ from Kelly Kinetics combines an adjustable weighted column that provides a unique resistive torsion and proprioceptive feeling with a patented biomechanical isolation channel to allow for precise placement of resistance over the insertion of the targeted musculature. Whether it’s post-injury or preventative strengthening, stretching, or manipulation, this versatile non-weightbearing device can be easily adjusted in half-pound increments to accommodate both early-stage patients and fully functional athletes. Circle No. 531 Magister Corp. 800-396-3130 www.magistercorp.com Virtually identical to latex bands, REP Bands® resistive exercise bands from Magister Corp. offer greater elastic response, higher resiliency, and faster recovery. Patented REP Bands are the only resistive exercise bands manufactured exclusively in the United States. Circle No. 532 McDavid 800-237-8254 www.mcdavidusa.com The 189 Ankle X has redefined the standard for ankle protection. Its multi-patented hinged cuff technology restricts excessive rotation (twisting) and inversion (turning) forces, which are often the causes of both high and low ankle sprains. The brace features an ultrathane shell, which hugs the contours of the ankle for maximum fit and comfort. The shell is durable, yet flexible enough to maintain an athlete’s comfort and performance. Learn more by visiting the company’s Web site. Circle No. 533

The lightweight, breathable 195 Ultralight laced ankle brace from McDavid remains a cornerstone of training rooms worldwide. Offering a convincing simulation of athletic taping, the brace’s fully adjustable figure-6 straps refuse to bunch or collapse, maintaining performance as well as comfort. As an added bonus, straps can be retightened quickly and easily without bothersome relacing, keeping athletes where they belong: in the game. Circle No. 534 Medical Specialties, Inc. 800-582-4040 www.medspec.com The ASO® Flex-Hinge from Medical Specialties combines the ASO’s patented strapping system with an articulated plastic shell for superior ankle stabilization. The upper portion of the internal plastic shell is incorporated into the eyelet lace closure to create an inner cuff around the tibia and fibula. This cuff resists separation of the tibia and fibula to help treat syndesmosis ankle sprains and high ankle sprains. The semi-rigid plastic shell conforms to the anatomy of the ankle, which allows the stabilizing straps to capture the calcaneus and resist inversion or eversion during motion. Circle No. 535 Mueller Sports Medicine 800-356-9522 www.muellersportsmed.com The lightweight, hinged Lite™ Ankle Brace from Mueller Sports Medicine helps prevent rollover injuries and protects weak or injured ankles. The brace allows full vertical mobility without restriction while the padded, semi-rigid shells help protect against inversion and eversion sprains. The slim-line design with one strap allows for easy on/off and a comfortable fit in most shoe styles. Ideal for volleyball and basketball, the Lite Ankle Brace is extremely lightweight and comfortable. It’s available in black or white, and one size fits both the left and right foot. Circle No. 536 Circle No. 145

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE Mueller Sports Medicine 800-356-9522 www.muellersportsmed.com

OPTP 800-367-7393 www.optp.com/ad

Mueller’s innovative new Hg80 line of products includes the patented Hg80 Adjust-To-Fit™ Ankle Brace, which has been designed with features that maximize comfort and performance. The extended free-floating tongue has an additional padded center liner to help protect against chafing from laces, and lacing guides to help avoid bunching across the talar joint. The lack of binding under the heel area further adds to the comfort of this brace, while Mueller’s exclusive HydraCinn™ fabric helps wick moisture away from the foot. The Adjust-To-Fit side panels provide support and a custom fit with minimum relacing, while flexible steel springs stabilize both sides of the ankle. This one-size brace fits shoe sizes from women’s six to men’s 18, and includes a free nylon mesh laundry bag. Circle No. 537

The Multi Challenge Board can be used for active and reactive rehabilitation of ankle injuries, and for ROM and strength conditioning for the lower kinetic chain. It is also a useful tool for core muscle strengthening and stabilization, stretching, improving proprioception and balance, and motor skill training. Included with the Multi Challenge Board is an insert demonstrating a variety of easy, intermediate, and advanced exercises. OPTP offers a variety of other balance-related products as well. For more information and a free catalog, call the company or visit its Web site. Circle No. 538 The simple design of the FootWheel by OPTP provides myofascial release to stretch and relax the foot. Its multiple wheels effectively release trigger

points and tense muscles with a gentle rolling motion. Not only will it soothe tired, achy feet, but it is a must in the management of plantar fasciitis. For more information and a free OPTP catalog, call toll-free or visit the company Web site. Circle No. 539 PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. 800-523-5611 www.proorthopedic.com Designed to fit either foot, the Pro 610 Arizona Ankle Brace from PRO Orthopedic Devices is constructed of heavy-duty nylon to create a lowprofile, durable, and lightweight brace. Two figureeight lift straps encircle the foot, providing lateral and medial support. Hook-

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ANKLE & FOOT CARE and-loop fasteners allow quick and easy adjustment. A neoprene tongue provides a comfortable pad under the laces, eliminating instep irritation. Circle No. 540 Pro-Tec Athletics 800-799-3372 www.injurybegone.com Tired of Achilles tendon pain? ProTec Athletics has the answer with the Achilles Tendon Support. This Achilles tendon brace offers comfortable compression to stabilize the tendon and reduce stress. It also features an elastic strap that provides a lift to the heel, preventing excessive stretching of the tendon. Comfortable and effective, the Achilles Tendon Support will help prevent further damage and enhance the healing process, allowing your athletes to get back into competition sooner. Circle No. 541

Pro-Tec Athletics offers Arch Pro-Tec arch supports. These supports provide a slight lift to the arch by applying upward compression, alleviating plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. Targeted support reduces stress to the arch region and alleviates inflammation and tearing of the plantar fascia. Visit the Pro-Tec Web site to learn more about all of the company’s quality products. Circle No. 542 SAM Medical Products 800-818-4726 www.sammedical.com SAM® Splint, one of the most versatile splints on the planet, is now available as the SAM Splint XL, designed to offer greater support for irregular-sized limbs and to be

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more comfortable for larger individuals. This new version of the SAM Splint is 5–1/2 inches wide. From a minor thumb or ankle sprain to a compound femoral fracture, there is a SAM Splint for any and all of your splinting needs. Circle No. 543 SAM Medical Products 800-818-4726 www.blistoban.com Treat hot spots and blisters with the advanced gliding action of Blist-OBan® with BursaTek® patented technology. Relief from problems associated with shear and friction is critical in any sport, and the gliding principle is the answer. Give your athletes an edge with technology based on the bursa, the body’s natural defense against friction. Blist-O-Ban is ultra-thin and can be used for treatment or prevention. Circle No. 544


ANKLE & FOOT CARE Stromgren Supports 800-527-1988 www.stromgren.com

The Hygenic Corporation 800-321-2135 www.thera-band.com

Tru-Balance Products Corp. 866-429-9874 www.trubalancecorp.com

The new Model 390 Ankle Lock from Stromgren Supports isn’t just another lace-up ankle support—it’s the newest concept in ankle support technology. The newly patented Model 390 combines the simplicity of a lace-up with a permanently attached but comfortable heel cup and side stabilizers for better-thantape support. The athlete is allowed a full range of motion, but inversion and eversion of the ankle complex is a lock: The heel cup stabilizes the heel as the side stabilizers lock the medial and lateral ankle complex to help prevent any abnormal movement. Circle No. 545

The new Thera-Band® Resistance Band Dispenser Packs allow clubs, gyms, and clinics to distribute and track sales of individuallywrapped, precut TheraBand latex bands, while minimizing the potential for passing skin infections through shared band usage. Each dispenser includes 30 folded, polybagged 5-foot/1.5m bands in a single color. Each wrapped band includes safety information and refers users to www.Thera-BandAcademy.com for exercise examples. Band packs are available in yellow, red, green, blue, and black. Call today to find a distributor. Circle No. 546

The Performance Grabber orthotic insole offers athletes a unique performance advantage by supporting foot tendons and stabilizing the heelbone and arch. It features a layer of Politec® material to reduce heel strike impact, absorb shock, and provide energy return with every step. The sides of the insole form to the foot to provide stability and prevent slippage, which helps prevent injury. The Performance Grabber is lightweight and washable. Circle No. 547

Check out

www.AthleticBid.com to contact these companies.

Get the new Foam Roller DVD from Exertools. It really rules. Our new DVD by Working Well Solutions shows step-by-step how to improve posture and strengthen your core in just minutes a day. Exertools features the widest selection of high quality Follers™ Foam Rollers. Available for fast delivery in 1”- 6” diameters, full, half, quarters and three-quarter round. Check out our cool Follers’ covers to keep the classic 6” x 36” clean and easy to transport. See it all on-line at www.exertools.com where you’ll find the lowest prices. Or call to order at 800-235-1559.

Follers is a registered trademark and Exertools is a trademark of Exertools, Inc. ©2006Exertools, Inc.

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TESTIMONIAL

COMPANY NEWS

TESTIMONIAL

High Praise For Flex Bands

Nutrition Symposium Offers You More

SwimEx Shows Off Its Versatility

“I have used Jump Stretch’s Flex Bands in each of my six years as Head Baseball Coach at Youngstown State University, and I have been very

Sports nutrition remains one of the strength and fitness industry’s hottest topics, and with the amount of information available to the practitioner, it can often be difficult to discern what is accurate and applicable from what isn’t.

For technology, versatility, and functionality, these athletic trainers have found that there’s simply no better pool on the market.

pleased with how they’ve aided our strength training, flexibility, and injury recovery. We use the Flex Bands every day, and I tell our players that their bands are their most important piece of equipment. “We have had a number of pitchers make significant increases in their velocity, and I attribute much of it to the use of Flex Bands. We’ve had several pitchers drafted (including one current Major Leaguer), and that was not a regular occurrence before we started using the bands. Flex Bands have helped tremendously by increasing our players’ flexibility and arm strength. “Decreased rehab time is probably the most significant effect of the bands. Sprained ankles that normally take three to four weeks to recover from now take only three to four days, thanks to Flex Bands and tractioning. And pulled muscles are pretty much a thing of the past.

The NSCA will help you put your athletes on the right track with the Nutrition: Recovery & Regeneration Symposium, September 8-9, 2006, in Colorado Springs, Colo. Pushing athletes to their physical limits naturally involves nutritional intervention. The focus of this symposium is recovery and regeneration for the athlete. It will cover specific topics, including advanced dietary interventions, the implications of overtraining, illegal ergogenic aids, and variable biochemical assay of recovery and regeneration interventions. Highlighted speakers include Dave Ellis, RD, Karen Daigle, MS, RD, and Rob Skinner, MS, RD/LD, CSCS. For more information or to register, call or go online today.

“I feel Flex Bands are a must for any organization looking to maximize player performance.” Mike Florak Head Baseball Coach Youngstown State University, Ohio

Jump Stretch, Inc. 1230 N. Meridian Rd. Youngstown, OH 44509 800-344-3539 www.jumpstretch.com ATHLETICBID.COM

NSCA 1885 Bob Johnson Drive Colorado Springs, CO 80906 800-815-6826 www.nsca-lift.org

“With the SwimEx, we’re able to adjust the resistance and measure the player’s progress during recovery. The SwimEx pool is an essential tool that helps us get injured players back on the court as quickly as possible.” Gary Briggs, ATC Head Athletic Trainer Utah Jazz “SwimEx offered the versatility we needed. With the adjustable current and plyometric workstations, SwimEx allows us to simulate skating as well as defensive movements, so we can use it to train or rehabilitate any member of the Stars.” Dave Surprenant, ATC Head Athletic Trainer Dallas Stars “SwimEx pools require the least amount of maintenance and offer the widest array of rehabilitation and conditioning options for our athletes. In addition, we were able to work with SwimEx on a custom design, allowing the pools to be a showpiece for our facility.” Bob Howard, ATC Head Athletic Trainer University of Connecticut

SwimEx, Inc. 846 Airport Rd. Fall River, MA 02720 800-877-7946 www.swimex.com T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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126 . . . 127 . . . 112 . . . 104 . . . 150 . . . 155 . . . 151 . . . 121 . . . 156 . . . 102 . . . 135 . . . 154 . . . 100 . . . 103 . . . 107 . . . 149 . . . 157 . . . 152 . . . 111 . . . 101 . . . 109 . . .

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Antibody (The BodyGuard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . . 38 Aquatic Fitness Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Biofreeze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Brace International (Fluk). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Brace International (MAX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 BushwalkerBags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer (DM Systems). 29 CeraSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CoreControl (AVAcore) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Corganics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 CytoSport (Muscle Milk). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IFC Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 efi Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 FitBALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Flexall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Game Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Gebauer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

129 . . . 138 . . . 113 . . . 141 . . . 128 . . . 159 . . . 160 . . . 133 . . . 117 . . . 114 . . . 105 . . . 118 . . . 108 . . . 139 . . . 106 . . . 124 . . . 161 . . . 110 . . . 136 . . . 119 . . . 143 . . .

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HQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Human Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Hydrate, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 HydrationSolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 HydroWorx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Kneebourne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IBC Kore Kooler (Morning Pride) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Magister Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 McDavid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 MDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Medical Specialties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . . 9 NSCA Nutrition Conference . . . . . . . . . . 34 Oakworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BC OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Outdoor Boss (Go Flow) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Port-A-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

123 . . . 146 . . . 125 . . . 120 . . . 142 . . . 147 . . . 148 . . . 145 . . . 116 . . . 140 . . . 132 . . . 115 . . . 122 . . . 153 . . . 158 . . . 137 . . . 131 . . . 130 . . . 134 . . . 144 . . .

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Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 PRO Orthopedic Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Prossage Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Quest Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 SAM Medical (Blist-O-Ban) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 SAM Medical (Splint XL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 SmartPractice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 SportsTemp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Stromgren (Ankle Spat Wrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Stromgren (Polar Heat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 SwimEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Thera-Band/Hygenic Corporation . . . . . 30 Tru-Balance Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 TurfCordz/NZ Mfg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 VertiMax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Victory Air, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 WaterBoy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 WeatherHawk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

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519 . . . Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

508 . . . HydrationSolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

510 . . . Port-A-Cool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

523 . . . Active Ankle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

550 . . . HydroWorx (1200 Series). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

553 . . . Power Systems (Aqua Rack) . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

524 . . . Antibody . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

549 . . . HydroWorx (500 Series) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

554 . . . Power Systems (Water Cuffs) . . . . . . . . . . . 77

511 . . . Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . . 66

530 . . . Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

575 . . . PRO Orthopedic (Pro 407 Elbow Brace) . . . 82

548 . . . Aquatic Fitness Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

531 . . . Kelly Kinetics (Ankle Isolator). . . . . . . . . . . . 71

540 . . . PRO Orthopedic (Pro 610 Ankle Brace) . . . 72

525 . . . Ball Dynamics (FitBALL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

509 . . . KoreKooler (Morning Pride) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

541 . . . Pro-Tec (Achilles Tendon Support). . . . . . . . . 73

573 . . . Biofreeze. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

532 . . . Magister Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

542 . . . Pro-Tec (arch supports) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

557 . . . Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

533 . . . McDavid (189 Ankle X) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

574 . . . Prossage Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

501 . . . Cera Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

534 . . . McDavid (195 Ultralight) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

521 . . . SAM Medical (Product Launch) . . . . . . . . . . 69

526 . . . Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

566 . . . MDI (Econo-Vac) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

544 . . . SAM Medical Products (Blist-O-Ban) . . . . 73

500 . . . CoreControl (AVAcore) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

565 . . . MDI (MicroShield/MicroMask) . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

543 . . . SAM Medical (Splint XL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

502 . . . Cramer Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

520 . . . Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products . . . . . . 69

576 . . . SmartPractice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

579 . . . Creative Health Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

535 . . . Medical Specialties (ASO Flex-Hinge) . . . . 71

512 . . . SportsTemp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

503 . . . CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

564 . . . Medical Specialties (DynaTrack) . . . . . . . . 78

522 . . . Stromgren (Ankle Spat Wrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

527 . . . DM Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

537 . . . Mueller (Hg80 Adjust-To-Fit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

545 . . . Stromgren (Model 390 Ankle Lock) . . . . . . . . 74

558 . . . Dynatronics (Dynatron X3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

536 . . . Mueller (Lite Ankle Brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

513 . . . Stromgren (Polar Heat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

559 . . . Dynatronics (Dynatron XP Light Pad) . . . . . . 78

567 . . . NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

555 . . . SwimEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

577 . . . efi Sports Medicine (Cuff Link) . . . . . . . . . 82

568 . . . NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

572 . . . The Hygenic Corp. (Performance Health) . . 81

578 . . . efi Sports Medicine (PlyoRebounder) . . . . . 82

570 . . . NSCA Certification (CSCS) . . . . . . . . . . . 80

556 . . . Thera-Band/Hygenic (Aqua Belt) . . . . . . . 77

528 . . . Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

569 . . . NSCA Certification (Strength/Conditioning) . . 80

546 . . . Thera-Band/Hygenic (dispenser) . . . . . . . 74

529 . . . Game Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

552 . . . NZ Mfg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

547 . . . Tru-Balance Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

504 . . . Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

571 . . . Oakworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

514 . . . Uridynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

560 . . . Gebauer (Instant Ice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

539 . . . OPTP (FootWheel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

562 . . . VertiMax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

561 . . . Gebauer (Spray and Stretch). . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

538 . . . OPTP (Multi Challenge Board) . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

515 . . . Victory Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

506 . . . HQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

505 . . . Outdoor Boss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

516 . . . WaterBoy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

563 . . . Human Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

580 . . . Perform Better (catalog) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

517 . . . WeatherHawk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

507 . . . Hydrate, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

551 . . . Perform Better (underwater treadmill) . . . . . 77

518 . . . WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

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AQUATIC THERAPY Aquatic Fitness Products 877-757-2802 www.burdenkoww.com The Water Walker’s unique design offers an aquatic workout that burns two to three times as many calories as standard water or land jogging, while placing minimal stress on the joints. Its wings plane out as the foot thrusts downward to increase resistance, then retract during upward movement. The Water Walker comes with an instructional DVD containing 22 exercises that can be used to develop speed, strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, and endurance. Circle No. 548 HydroWorx International, Inc. 800-753-9633 www.hydroworx.com Finally, the pool of your dreams at the right price. The HydroWorx 500 Series pool offers tremendous versatility and remarkable value. This 14’L x 7’6”W x 5’ deep pool includes an integrated underwater treadmill, directional resistance jets, and multiple therapy work stations. The pool can be used to provide physical therapy, sports-performance training, conditioning, personal training, and even spa treatments. Circle No. 549 The HydroWorx 1200 Series includes technology that represents a quantum leap forward in aquatic therapy and fitness. This HydroWorx pool provides physical therapists and athletic trainers with ultimate flexibility in a barrier-free modular pool that satisfies the contrasting demands of traditional rehab patients and elite athletes. The HydroWorx 1200 Series contains the same moveable floor technology and features as the HydroWorx 2000 Series, compacted into a 9’L x 6’W x 6’3” deep space. Now, nothing is impossible. Circle No. 550

ATHLETICBID.COM

Perform Better 800-556-7464 www.performbetter.com Perform Better offers a unique underwater treadmill with a safe, self-propelled system that works only as hard as the user and allows for weight-reduced walking or running in water. A unique flywheel mechanism keeps the treadmill moving, and its double-sided platform can be used roller-side down for light-resistance exercises. Check out this underwater treadmill in the Perform Better catalog, or call the company tollfree to learn more. Circle No. 551 NZ Mfg., LLC 800-886-6621 www.nzmfg.com

doorways. For more information, visit online or call toll-free. Circle No. 553 Add resistance and increase the effectiveness of water workouts or rehabilitation programs by wearing Power Systems’ Water Cuffs on the ankles or wrists. These soft, non-abrasive, closed-cell foam cuffs also improve the body’s buoyancy and add drag to strengthen muscles. Fully-adjustable straps secure the cuffs around the ankle and under the foot. One size fits most. Circle No. 554 SwimEx, Inc. 800-877-7946 www.swimex.com

NZ Mfg. now offers an additional chute size for its StrechCordz Drag Belt/Tow Tether product line. Athletes can choose from an eight-inch (yellow) chute, a 12inch (blue) chute, and now a 16inch (black) chute. Used by swimmers of all abilities, the Drag Belt/Tow Tether allows for resistance swimming, while the drag chute is compatible with flip turns. Each chute is made with a coated material for durability in the water, and it clips on and off the tether for quick interchangeability. For more information or to order this item, call the company toll-free or visit online to find an NZ Mfg. dealer nearest you. Circle No. 552

SwimEx, the manufacturer of choice for over 100 professional and collegiate sports teams nationwide, has introduced a new motorized, integrated treadmill. When combined with the SwimEx wall of water, it creates one of the most challenging water conditioning workouts on the market today. Constructed of durable high-traction rubber with a non-corrosive frame, the treadmill is integrated into the SwimEx pool floor and features variable speeds of up to eight miles per hour, a speed indicator, and a removable handrail for optional support. Athletes enjoy the benefits of high-intensity aquatic protocols in a low-impact environment. Circle No. 555

Power Systems 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com

The Hygenic Corporation 800-321-2135 www.thera-band.com

Clean up the deck and protect your investment in aquatic training equipment with Power Systems’ Aqua Rack. This three-tiered rack can hold and transport most aquatic equipment by securely cradling the gear in mesh hammocks, which allow for water run-off and ventilation. The end posts can be used for hanging resistance tubing, swim bags, or towels. The Aqua Rack is constructed of sturdy two-inch PVC with swivel casters for smooth mobility. Measuring 57”W x 29”L x 40”H, it easily rolls through most

The Thera-Band® Aqua Belt is uniquely shaped to hold your clients upright in the water. It is a specially contoured soft foam pad that comfortably prevents users from tilting while jogging and performing deepwater activities. Holding an upright upper-body position is crucial when performing aquatic cardiovascular and rehabilitation exercises. Proper form prevents injuries and helps make exercises more effective. Call today to find a distributor. Circle No. 556 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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MORE PRODUCTS Brace International, Inc. 800-545-1161 www.braceint.com

Gebauer Co. 800-321-9348 www.gebauerco.com

Brace International offers the MAX™, a major advancement in the design of shoulder girdle supports. The snug-fitting, lightweight material allows for comfort with movement while protecting the glenohumeral joint from subluxations and dislocations. Its strap design system offers many options for maximal stability where needed, allowing athletes to reach their required range of motion. Circle No. 557

Gebauer’s Instant Ice non-prescription skin refrigerant can be used like ice for minor pain and swelling from sprains, strains, bruising, contusions, and minor sports injuries. Gebauer’s Instant Ice is ideal for facilities that restrict the use of flammable components. It is available in a mist spray or stream spray aerosol can, and can be purchased directly from Gebauer by calling the company or visiting its Web site. Circle No. 560

Dynatronics 800-874-6251 www.dynatronics.com Capable of delivering three independent light therapy treatments simultaneously (one light probe and two pads), the new Dynatron X3™ is one of the most powerful light therapy devices available. Users can choose between four light probes that provide combinations of infrared, laser, and blue light while the device delivers two unattended treatments with the powerful 8” x 10” Dynatron XP™ Light Pad. With 16,000 mW of power, the Dynatron X3 provides up to three individual treatments at the same time. Circle No. 558 The Dynatron XP™ Light Pad is big, fast, flexible, and unattended. Covering an 8” x 10” area, the Dynatron XP is 100 times larger than competing light probes, making the treatment of large areas of the body fast and easy. With 7,500 mW of power, the entire lower back can be treated in less than 10 minutes. The XP is compatible with all six Solaris devices, as well as the new DX2™ combination light therapy/traction system. Circle No. 559

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Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch topical anesthetic skin refrigerant replaces Gebauer’s Fluori-Methane, which has been discontinued. Use Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch fine stream spray in conjunction with the spray and stretch technique to effectively manage myofascial pain, restricted motion, trigger points, muscle spasms, and minor sports injuries. The product is non-flammable and available only by prescription. It can be purchased through your medical supplier or wholesaler, or directly from Gebauer. Circle No. 561 Genetic Potential 800-699-5867 www.vertimax.com A new low-load, velocity-specific training program is now available for the ultimate in force development. The VertiMax PLUS series is a revolutionary advancement in functional, sportspecific, total-body training. It is the only system capable of applying multiple loads at multiple body locations, including the ankles, knees, hips, shoulders, and arms, while the athlete is performing explosive lowerand/or upper-body training. The VertiMax

PLUS series is strongly endorsed by many NFL, NBA, and NCAA Division I head coaches. Visit VertiMax’s Web site for more details and customer testimonials. Circle No. 562 Human Kinetics 800-747-4457 www.HumanKinetics.com Stretch to Win offers a complete flexibility training system—a proven winner for today’s athlete. Authors Ann and Chris Frederick have trained many elite and aspiring athletes. Their scientifically based program starts with evaluation tools that can be used to create a personal flexibility assessment. Based on that evaluation, you can create a customized stretching matrix that optimally trains the muscles and connective tissue most pivotal to performance in your sport. Circle No. 563 Medical Specialties, Inc. 800-582-4040 www.medspec.com With its easy-to-apply design, the DynaTrack Patella Stabilizer aids in the treatment of patellofemoral dysfunction. Each size fits either the left or right knee. The internal buttress can be positioned to apply either lateral or medial pressure on the patella. The amount of pressure can be adjusted by changing the tension on the straps leading from the internal buttress and from the outer wrap. A large popliteal opening permits high degrees of flexion with no discomfort. Circle No. 564 Microtek Medical - MDI 800-824-3027 www.mdimicrotek.com MDI’s CPR MicroShield and CPR MicroMask offer unrivaled performance for CPR situations. The CPR MicroMask features a valve with a large opening, allowing less restrictive rescue breathing and conforming to all types of facial anatomy. It features a positive, oneway, non-rebreathing valve complete ATHLETICBID.COM


MORE PRODUCTS with a 3M Filtrete filter, and it is flexible in a wide range of temperatures. The CPR MicroShield protects first responders and allows for proper performance of CPR. The patented one-way valve and singlepiece design maintains structural integrity and assures no barrier leakage. Circle No. 565 The MDI Econo-Vac™ is the only disposable vacuum splint you can afford to lose, eliminating the concern over lost splints left at the field or the hospital. It incorporates a positive locking pinch clamp to ensure the vacuum is not accidentally compromised. The Econo-Vac Deluxe

Extremity Set includes one of each of the five extremity splints, and is available in a durable nylon case with the Econo-Vac handheld pump and adapter. For details on the latest innovation or to place an order, call MDI or visit the company’s Web site. Circle No. 566 National Academy of Sports Medicine 800-460-NASM www.nasm.org Learn NASM’s Optimum Performance Training for Performance Enhancement™ in a new two-day workshop that’s coming to your area. In this comprehensive, hands-on workshop, you’ll earn 1.6 NASM CEUs and develop the skills necessary to assess and design programs to enhance athletic performance and decrease the risk of injury for just about any athletic client. Circle No. 567

www.bushwalkerbags.com tel.800.527.4923 fax.480.966.9806 WHEELED MED BAGS

A25SI Skatewheel Deluxe

A28SI Superskate

CARRY MED BAGS

A25 Deluxe Med Bag

BELT PACKS B22 Medium

B20 Small

NSCA 800-815-6826 www.nsca-lift.org Speed, agility, and quickness are essential components in athletic competition. NSCA’s Speed, Agility & Quickness video is designed for strength and conditioning coaches, performance coaches, and athletes looking for a training edge over the competition. This video shows how to increase velocity, change direction with efficiency, and react in a split-second. The video contains information on the correct starting technique for the 40-yard dash, plyometric techniques, over-speed drills, ladder drills, reactive drills, and more. Circle No. 568

BUSHWALKER Validated, SINCE 1 9 8 0 BAGS adding Flexall® to ultrasound therapy. A25C Wheeled Deluxe

TRAVEL BAGS

A18 Large Fold-up

MED BAG ACCESSORIES A11 Combo Kit A10 Vial Kit

Learn how a 25:75 Flexall and ultrasound gel mixture provided results equal to 100% ultrasound gel, with an added analgesic sensation of warmth. For a copy of our latest study supporting the addition of Flexall pain relieving gels to your therapeutic ultrasound treatments and a free sample, call us toll free at 800-527-4923 or request by email at info@ari-med.com PAIN RELIEVING GELS

B25 Deluxe

Circle No. 151 ATHLETICBID.COM

A9 Unit Dose

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MORE PRODUCTS NSCA Certification Commission 888-746-2378 www.nsca-cc.org The Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning Multimedia Symposium CDs offer strength and conditioning professionals convenient access to industry-leading presentations right from their desktop. Listen and follow along as industry professionals lecture on the content areas, scientific principles, concepts, and theories relevant to the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist® (CSCS) examination. Each CD includes an interactive video and slide presentation, a printable outline, and interactive selfassessment questions written in the same style as actual exam questions. The price is $134.95 for NSCA members and $199.95 for non-members. Circle No. 569

The Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist® (CSCS) examination from the NSCA Certification Commission identifies individuals who possess the knowledge and skills needed to design and implement safe and effective strength and conditioning programs for athletes. The exam consists of two sections—a Scientific Foundations section and a Practical/Applied section. The major content areas covered by the exam include exercise sciences, nutrition, program design, exercise technique, testing and evaluation, and organization and administration. Prerequisites for the CSCS exam are a four-year degree and CPR certification. The cost is $260 for NSCA members and $380 for non-members. Circle No. 570

Oakworks 800-916-4603 www.oakworkspt.com Oakworks®’ Portable Taping Table is a rugged piece of equipment that can support your largest athlete, yet it weighs only 35 pounds. With a height range of 32 to 42 inches, it’s the only adjustable, portable taping table on the market with independently telescoping legs, which is critical for immediate sideline care. The marinegrade polymer top, aluminum construction, and complementary suspension system guarantee durability and dependability. The Game Package includes the table, field feet, a carrying case, and a shoulder strap. Circle No. 571

Full length insert combines dynamic arch and heel support providing greater foot stability and balance control. SUPPORTS FOOT TENDONS Aligns foot with lower leg for balance. PREVENTS FOOT SLIPPAGE Provides stability & helps prevent foot injury. STABILIZES HEELBONE & ARCH Enables a faster response time. ENERGY RETURN A layer of POLITEC® reduces stress shock & returns energy up through the feet.

Tru-Balance Products Corp. Phone: 866-429-9874 • www.tru-balancecorp.com Circle No. 153

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MORE PRODUCTS The Hygenic Corporation 800-321-2135 www.thera-band.com

Biofreeze® 800-246-3733 www.biofreeze.com

Prossage Heat 866-4-Prossage www.prossage.us

The Hygenic Corporation, a leading manufacturer of products and solutions utilized in the healthcare and wellness markets under the Thera-

The Biofreeze® family of pain-relieving products includes a soothing gel, a convenient roll-on, and the new natural Cryospray™. Biofreeze effectively relieves pain from athletic injuries, strains, sprains, and stiff joints. Biofreeze gel is available in 16-oz., 32-oz., and onegallon professional pump bottles; 16oz. spray bottles; and gravity dispenser boxes with 100 five-gram doses. The 4-oz. gel tubes, 4-oz. spray bottles, and 3-oz. roll-ons are designed for patient self-care at home. Biofreeze is endorsed by U.S.A. Judo. Circle No. 573

Prossage™ Heat is a uniquely blended, area-specific, non-slip, controllable-glide warming ointment that’s 100-percent natural. It’s formulated specifically for deep-tissue work, myofascial release, and trigger point therapy. Prossage Heat makes it easier to “hook” the deep fascia, allowing you to work faster and more efficiently, with less pain for the athlete. Heating the tissues with Prossage Heat reduces spasms in muscles, ligaments, and joint capsules. Prossage Heat is available in three-, eight-, and 16-oz. bottles. Call Prossage today for a free sample. Circle No. 574

Band®, Dyna-Band®, Parabath®, and Hygenic® brand names, has announced the acquisition of Performance Health, Inc., developer of the Biofreeze® brand of topical analgesics and Prossage™ brand of warming massage ointment. “We are excited to bring together two of the most trusted and effective product lines in the healthcare profession,” says Stewart Lorenzen, Hygenic Chief Executive Officer, “and we look forward to leveraging the strengths of each to further expand our global market presence.” Circle No. 572

Stabilize Chronic Shoulder Dislocators, Separators, and Subluxators With over a decade of experience in shoulder brace design the MAXTM Shoulder Brace by Brace International, Inc. is an evolution in shoulder girdle support. The snug-fitting, lightweight material (under 2 pounds) allows for comfort with movement while its strap design system allows for many options to help protect the glenohumeral joint. Maximum Protection, Maximum Range of Motion

We highly recommend its use for all sports.

800-545-1161 Toll Free - www.braceint.com Circle No. 155 ATHLETICBID.COM

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MORE PRODUCTS PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. 800-523-5611 www.proorthopedic.com

SmartPractice 800-762-7877 www.smartpractice.com

efi Sports Medicine 800-541-4900 www.efisportsmedicine.com

The Pro 407 Hyperextension Elbow Brace from PRO Orthopedic Devices features a pair of lightweight composite hinges, fully enclosed in pockets to

The EMT ToothSaver™ by SmartHealth has a unique formula that keeps knocked-out teeth alive for up to 24 hours, so the natural tooth can be re-inserted. Its rejuvenating fluid protects tooth tissue from dehydration, allowing athletic trainers to treat injuries that are more serious. The EMT ToothSaver can be easily stored in any first-aid kit, so you’re always prepared for dental accidents. Circle No. 576

With its 90-degree and isolator handles, the Cuff Link® from efi Sports Medicine® closes the kinetic chain for rehab of the upper shoulder extrem-

ensure proper stability through flexion and extension. Two adjustable hook and loop straps criss-cross, allowing the wearer to adjust the amount of extension control as desired. An opening at the elbow eliminates pressure on the joint, aids in the proper positioning of the sleeve, and discourages migration in extreme activities. Circle No. 57

FitBALL BALANCE ®

NEW FitBALL Deluxe Board © 2006 Ball Dynamics International, LLC

• Extra-large surface has ample

room for full body training • Heavy-duty plastic construction

for high-use fitness and rehab • Multi-directional base offers balance challenge for both beginners and advanced users

Call us for our new dealer catalog featuring FitBALL brand products!

800-752-2255 www.fitball.com

ity and shoulder girdle. It provides an ideal environment for shoulder rangeof-motion development and strengthening, and encourages lower-back and abdominal work. Cuff Link improves scapular stabilization and mobility and provides progressive recruitment of muscle and proprioceptive fibers. An instructional DVD is included. Circle No. 577 PlyoRebounder®, from efi Sports Medicine®, is a multi-faceted tool for developing or rehabbing quickresponse proprioception. It enhances core strength, upper- and lower-plyometric agility, and reaction time. For higher levels of athletic performance and balance training, combine PlyoRebounder with efi’s balance products by MFT. The PlyoRebounder can also be used as a low-impact jogger, accommodating up to 300 pounds of weight. An instructional DVD is included. Circle No. 578

More articles, more product info, and more resources... just a click away at

www.AthleticSearch.com

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CATALOG SHOWCASE Creative Health Products, Inc. 800-742-4478 www.chponline.com Since 1976, Creative Health Products has been a leading discount supplier of rehabilitation, fitness, exercise, and athletic equipment, as well as health, medical, and fitness testing and measuring products, all available at reduced prices. Creative Health Products offers heart rate monitors; blood pressure testers; pulse oximeters; body fat calipers; scales; strength testers; flexibility testers; stethoscopes; pedometers; exercise bikes; ergometers; stopwatches; fitness books and software; exercise bands; step benches; hand and finger exercisers; heating pads; and more. Circle No. 579

WEB NEWS New Presagia Web Site Works for You 2006 has been an exciting year for Presagia. In addition to re-branding its flagship athlete health-management software InjuryZone as Presagia Sports, the company has created an all-new Web site. You will notice some major improvements, including graphic enhancements, a more streamlined design, and updated content. All of these changes have been made to optimize the overall Web-surfing experience for visitors. Presagia is continually updating its site, so check back often for the latest information and news about one of the most advanced software programs available to manage athlete health. Also, read the company’s customer success stories to learn how Presagia can work for you.

www.presagia.com SAM® Medical Offers a Wealth of Information Online Visit SAM Medical Products’ Web site today and read about the company’s newest and most exciting product innovations. A frequently updated news page includes articles, press releases, and information about studies demonstrating the safety and effectiveness of SAM products. Also available on the site are detailed product profiles complete with photos, a trade show calendar, and downloadable newsletters. You can find the SAM Medical dealer nearest you, and even order some products directly from the site.

www.sammedical.com Check out

www.AthleticBid.com to contact these companies.

TM

Perform Better 800-556-7464 www.performbetter.com The new 2006 Rehabilitation Edition of the Perform Better catalog is a special publication that focuses on training and rehab products that speed up recovery so that individuals can resume their normal activities. This book is neatly organized into 14 sections, including Flexibility, Recovery, Strengthening, Balance, Stabilization, and more. This free edition is available from Perform Better by calling toll-free, or it can be requested online at the company’s Web site. Circle No. 580 ATHLETICBID.COM

This Meet be Faster! Quicker! Stronger! • Explosive off-the-block starts! • Faster over the hurdles! • The safety, security and reliability

professional athletes demand! • To learn more about the innovative TurfCordz line, call 800-556-7464 or online at www.performbetter.com TurfCordz are distributed by M-F Athletic Company © 2006 NZ MFG LLC, Tallmadge, OH T&C0806

800-556-7464 • www.performbetter.com Circle No. 158 T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

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CEU QUIZ

T&C July/August 2006 Volume XVI, No. 5

Training & Conditioning is pleased to provide NATA and NSCA members with the opportunity to earn continuing education units through reading issues of the magazine. The following quiz is based on articles that appear in this issue of Training & Conditioning. By satisfactorily completing the quiz and mailing it back to T&C, readers can earn 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) continuing education units.

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form (on page 86) that represents the best answer for each of the questions below. Complete the form at the bottom of page 86, include a $20 payment to Training & Conditioning, and mail it by September 15, 2006 to the following address: Training & Conditioning, ATTN: 16.5 Quiz, 31 Dutch Mill Road, Ithaca, NY 14850. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will be notified of their earned credit by mail no later than November 1, 2006. Hydro Power (pages 16-21) Objective: See how water workouts are great for not only rehabbing athletes, but for strength training them too. 1. When standing in chest-deep water, an athlete weighs what percentage of his or her normal body weight? a) 5. b) 10. c) 15. d) 20. 2. One benefit of working out in water includes: a) Less chance of dehydration. b) Less wear and tear on joints. c) Less perspiration. d) Activities can be more sports-specific.

8. Why is age an area for concern when it comes to creatine use? a) Research has only been conducted on collegeaged and older athletes. b) Adolescents have displayed kidney dysfunction with creatine use. c) Research indicates growing adolescents require twice the dosage. d) College-aged athletes utilize creatine more efficiently.

3. Because there are no gravitational forces, water is more resistant than air by what percentage? a) 12. b) 15. c) 30. d) 33.

9. What percentage of high school athletes who took creatine took more than the recommended amount? a) 60. b) 70. c) 80. d) 90.

4. According to the author, working out in a pool for 30 minutes gives a benefit similar to _____ hour(s) of a land-based workout. a) 1. b) 2. c) 2.5. d) 3.

10. One concern with creatine use that hasn’t been explored enough is that it can lead to: a) Constipation. b) Diarrhea. c) An increased demand on the kidneys. d) An increased heart rate.

The Strongest Survive (pages 31-36) Objective: Understand the latest research and opinions on the use of creatine for athletes. 5. One concern that crops up with the use of supplements is the risk of _________________. a) Weak potency. b) Contamination. c) Inconsistent dosages. d) A watered-down effect. 6. Creatine helps increase what? a) Flexibility. b) Endurance and flexibility. c) Power and explosiveness. d) Reaction time. 84

7. The established dosage guideline is _____ grams per kilogram of body weight per day for loading. a) .25. b) .3. c) .4. d) .5.

T&C JULY/AUGUST 2006

Hot But Not Bothered (pages 39-47) Objective: Learn about one university’s heat stress prevention program. 11. In the article, Dr. Walters explains South Carolina’s heat stress prevention program, which begins with: a) Identifying athletes with increased potential for heat problems. b) Monitoring axilla temperature of each athlete at each practice. c) Weigh-ins before and after practice. d) Monitoring blood pressure throughout practice.

ATHLETICBID.COM


12. What are “salty sweaters” provided with as part of the program? a) Low sodium drinks. b) An enriched sodium drink prior to practice and aggressive hydration. c) One extra water break during practice. d) A protein drink before practice. 13. The author reports on a study that found athletes turned over an average of how many liters of fluid during two-a-day practices in August? a) 5. b) 11. c) 14. d) 20. 14. According to this article, players weighing _____ pounds perspire the most and need to focus on replacing fluids. a) 150-175. b) 175-210. c) 200-300. d) 225-325. 15. What is a normal sweat sodium content? a) 10 mEq/L. b) 20 mEq/L. c) 30 mEq/L. d) 40 mEq/L. 16. Ten milligrams of sodium is equivalent to how many grams of sodium chloride? a) 10. b) 15. c) 20. d) 25. 17. A major message from the athletic training staff at South Carolina to student-athletes is: a) Minimize caffeinated beverages. b) Water is superior to sports drinks. c) Protein intake must be increased two-fold in season. d) Constant fluid replacement is important. 18. Weight loss greater than what percentage should be replaced before athletes leave the locker room? a) 1. b) 2. c) 3. d) 4.

20. The University of South Carolina _______________ to account for equipment football players wear. a) Decreases the index by 20. b) Decreases the index by 10. c) Increases the index by 10. d) Increases the index by 20. 21. The recommended method of core body temperature assessment is: a) Forehead monitoring. b) Axilla monitoring. c) Ear canal monitoring. d) Rectal monitoring. 22. The article references a temperature of _____ degrees necessary to submerge the athlete in cold water. a) 101. b) 102. c) 103. d) 104. 23. When cold-water immersion is not possible, treatment of exertional heat stroke includes what? a) Stretching and massaging the involved muscles. b) Spraying the athlete with cool water and providing drinks. c) Placing the athlete in a supine position with legs elevated. d) Moving the athlete to a cooler area, calling 911, monitoring their ABC’s, and beginning alternative cooling.

Changing Direction (pages 48-53) Objective: How Bradley University revamped its strength and conditioning program. 24. The author indicates some changes made in their team’s weight lifting program that include: a) Team-oriented circuit style lifting. b) Freestyle lifting. c) Individual lifting times and programs. d) A decreased number of sets and repetitions. 25. Nutrition was emphasized by: a) Weekly pamphlets and handouts. b) Review of a nutrition log. c) Providing athletes with pre-made NCAA approved shakes and individual education by a nutritionist. d) Group discussions that suggested healthy eating habits.

19. Weather conditions may be monitored with the: a) Dry Air Temperature Index. b) Proximity of Sun to Earth Formula. c) Wet Bulb Globe Thermometer. d) UV Index.

Answer sheet is on page 86 ATHLETICBID.COM

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CEU QUIZ

ANSWER FORM

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form below that represents your selection of the best answer for each of the previous questions. Complete the form at the bottom of this page, include a $20 payment to Training & Conditioning, and mail it to the following address: Training & Conditioning, ATTN: 16.5 Quiz, 31 Dutch Mill Road, Ithaca, NY 14850, no later than September 15, 2006. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will receive 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) CEU’s, and will be notified of their earned credit by mail no later than November 1, 2006.

A

B

C

D

Hydro Power

1. 2. 3. 4.

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The Strongest Survive

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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Hot But Not Bothered

11. 12.

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13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23.

A

B

C

D

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Changing Direction

24. 25.

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Last Name ____________________________________ First Name _______________________________ MI______ Mailing Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________ State _________ Zip Code _____________________ Daytime Telephone ( _________ ) ________________________________________ E-Mail Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ Payment Information

❏ $20 check or money order (U.S. Funds only) payable to: Training & Conditioning ❏ Visa

❏ Mastercard

❏ Discover

❏ American Express

Account Number _______________________________________________ Expiration Date ____________________ Name on Card _____________________________________ Signature ______________________________________

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ADDITIONAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

EARN BOC CEUs

• Complete quizzes found in the Strength & Conditioning Journal • Complete online quizzes at www.nsca-cc.org Phone

402-476-6669

E-mail

Toll Free

commission@nsca-cc.org

888-746-2378

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Association Corner The following associations offer services of interest to our T&C readers. Keep your career in motion… NSCA Educational Events for 2006 • NSCA National Conference and Exhibition • NSCA’s Performance Series Symposia

• Lifting for Power • Plyometrics, Speed, and Agility • Training for Hockey • Nutrition: Recovery and Regeneration

For dates, locations, and session information call 800-815-6826, or visit www.nsca-lift.org

National Strength and Conditioning Association

The Voice of the Doctors who care for the Pros The PTP provides resources and services for all sports medicine professionals.

Visit www.proteamphysicians.com to find a PTP doctor, ask a question of a PTP doctor, or explore the educational materials from PTP regarding prevention, treatment and performance.

SPECIALIST IN SPORTS CONDITIONING ISSA Certification Program • • • •

Be the conditioning coach for your team. Expand strength & conditioning programs. Maximize earning potential as a coach. Learn to enhance athletic performance. CALL FOR FREE INFO:

1.800.892.4772

www.FitnessEducation.com

International Sports Sciences Association

Ided[i]Za^cZZfj^ebZci[dgndjgVi]aZi^XigV^c^c\XVgZZg# • Optimum Performance Training™ method • Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES) certiÀcation • OPT™ for Performance Enhancement workshops

Athletic Therapy. Rapid return to work and play.

Athletic Therapists are dedicated to the promotion and delivery of quality care through injury prevention and rehabilitation and emergency services. In collaboration with other health care professionals, athletic therapists work to create a healthier environment that encompasses the needs of the active community, including the high-performance athlete.

For more information please visit us online at www.athletictherapy.org

All NATA certified athletic trainers are eligible to receive a free subscription to T&C.

• Continuing education for NASM, NATA and NSCA • Clinical Applications • Flexibility, core, balance, power, speed and strength training

NATA Bronze Corporate Partner

Call 1-800-460-6276 or visit www.nasm.org.

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Get It Straight

THE ELITE SEAT™ IS AN EXTREMELY EFFECTIVE AND SAFE WAY TO HELP PATIENTS ACHIEVE SYMMETRIC MOTION BETWEEN KNEES. BASED ON AN ON-GOING STUDY, MANY PATIENTS WHO WERE PREVIOUSLY STRONG CANDIDATES FOR SURGERY TO CORRECT THEIR PROBLEMS, NOW HAVE THE OPTION OF NON-OPERATIVE REHABILITATION THAT CAN EFFECTIVELY INCREASE EXTENSION AND DECREASE PAIN. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, E-MAIL US AT:

INFO@ELITESEAT.COM A Product of

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Training & Conditioning 16.5  

July/August 2006