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May/June 2006 Vol. XVI, No. 4, $5.00

NATA

C o nve n t I s s u e io n

Making Headway The latest research in concussions Analyzing Sports Drinks Take-Home Workouts


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NATA Booth No. 1506

OFFICIAL S P O RT S M E D I C I N E SUPPLIER

Circle No. 100

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May/June 2006, Vol. XVI, No. 4

CONTENTS

54

45 6

13

43

Q&A Mark White Southeast Guilford High School, N.C. Student Corner Personal Injury Protection By Greg Frounfelter Sideline Planning for Heat Illness

65 NATA Show Planner 99 NSCA Convention Preview 120 Advertisers Directory 113 114 118

Product Pages Product Launch Chest & Upper Body More Products

124

CEU Quiz For NATA and NSCA members

105

Treating The Athlete

16 Making Headway From the cellular level on up, researchers are learning more about how concussions affect the brain, offering hope for better ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat this dangerous injury. By David Hill Nutrition

31 Fluid Dynamics The ever-changing variety of sports drinks and recovery drinks can be overwhelming. Knowing what to look for will keep you from feeling bottled up. By Michelle Rockwell Optimum Performance

45 Summer Sets No matter where your athletes are living for the summer, you want them to be making strength gains. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how to ensure they are following through on their programs. By Abigail Funk Leadership

54 More Than an ATC How can an athletic trainer get involved in student-athlete welfare outside of his or her usual duties? The opportunities are just a couple steps away. By R.J. Anderson Sport Specific

105 Irish Intensity Cover: ŠJamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos ATHLETICBID.COM

At the University of Notre Dame, a finely tuned training program helped the volleyball team finish 30-4 last season, its best record in over a decade. By Michael Joseph T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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You can lead athletes to water. You can even make ‘em drink. So why are they still dehydrated? ®

The case for drinking Gatorade during exercise. When exercise robs their bodies of salt, electrolytes and carbohydrates, even the brightest student-athletes can falter. Especially when they try to replenish these dwindling stores with only water. Athletes who drink only water have reduced performance over time because of poor voluntary intake, increased urine production, impaired fluid-to-electrolyte balance and inadequate carbohydrate supply. Hydration from a physiological point of view: Drinking only water during exercise causes a decrease in the concentration of sodium in an athlete’s blood. This turns off thirst and triggers the kidneys to start dumping water. As a result, they will drink less and lose more.


Š2005 S-VC, Inc.

So, whether your main concern is performance or safety, research consistently shows that drinking a scientifically formulated sports drink, like Gatorade, before, during and after physical exercise helps athletes stay better hydrated than water alone. Now you know,

if your athletes are exercising, make sure the trough is filled with Gatorade.

Learn more at gatorade.com/ athletictrainers Circle No. 101

NATA Booth No. 1307


Great Ideas For Athletes...

Editorial Board Marjorie Albohm, MS, ATC/L Director of Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Research, Orthopaedics Indianapolis Jon Almquist, ATC Specialist, Fairfax County (Va.) Pub. Schools Athletic Training Program Brian Awbrey, MD Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Instructor in Orthopaedics, Harvard Medical School Jim Berry, MEd, ATC, SCAT/EMT-B Director of Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer, Myrtle Beach (S.C.) High School

Knee Strap Cho-Pat’s Original Knee Strap is designed to alleviate certain knee discomforts due to overuse syndromes, arthritis, and other forms of degeneration. Nearly two million sold! Sizes: XS - XXL • Colors: Black and Tan

Dual Action Knee Strap Patented device offers an extra level of pain relief and protection from knee degeneration and overuse syndromes. Stabilizes and strengthens the joint while allowing full mobility. Sizes: Sm - XL

Achilles Tendon Strap This patented device will reduce stress upon the Achilles Tendon and provide effective relief from pain and discomfort associated with Achilles Tendonitis. Sizes: Sm - Med - Lrg

www.cho-pat.com 1-800-221-1601

Gary Gray, PT, President, CEO, Functional Design Systems Maria Hutsick, MS, ATC/L, CSCS Head Athletic Trainer, Boston University Christopher Ingersoll, PhD, ATC, FACSM Director, Graduate Programs in Sports Medicine/Athletic Training University of Virginia Jeff Konin, PhD, ATC, PT Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine, James Madison University Tim McClellan, MS, CSCS Director of Perf. Enhancement, Makeplays.com Center for Human Performance

May/June 2006 Vol. XVI, No. 4 Publisher Mark Goldberg Editorial Staff Eleanor Frankel, Director R.J. Anderson, Kenny Berkowitz, Abigail Funk, David Hill, Dennis Read, Greg Scholand, Laura Smith Circulation Staff David Dubin, Director John Callaghan

Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD Director, Sports Medicine Nutrition Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. Health System

Michael Merk, MEd, CSCS Director of Health & Fitness, YMCA of Greater Cleveland

Art Direction tuesdaythursday Brand Advertising

Christine Bonci, MS, ATC Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, Women’s Athletics, University of Texas

Jenny Moshak, MS, ATC, CSCS Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, University of Tennessee

Production Staff Bridget Mundy, Director Adam Berenstain, Jonni Campbell, Jim Harper

Cynthia “Sam” Booth, ATC, PhD Manager, Outpatient Therapy and Sportsmedicine, MeritCare Health System

Steve Myrland, CSCS Owner, Manager, Perf. Coach, Myrland Sports Training, LLC Instructor and Consultant, University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine

Debra Brooks, CNMT, LMT, PhD CEO, Iowa NeuroMuscular Therapy Center Cindy Chang, MD Head Team Physician, University of California-Berkeley Dan Cipriani, PhD, PT Assistant Professor, Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State Univ. Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCS Clinic Director, Orthopedic & Sports Phys. Ther., Dunn, Cook, and Assoc. Bernie DePalma, MEd, PT, ATC Head Athl. Trainer/Phys. Therapist, Cornell University Lori Dewald, EdD, ATC, CHES Athletic Training Program Director and Associate Professor of Health Education, University of Minnesota-Duluth Jeff Dilts, Director, Business Development & Marketing, National Academy of Sports Medicine David Ellis, RD, LMNT, CSCS Sports Alliance, Inc. Boyd Epley, MEd, CSCS Asst. A.D. & Dir. of Athletic Perf., University of Nebraska Peter Friesen, ATC, NSCA-CPT, CSCS, CAT, Head Ath. Trainer/ Cond. Coach, Carolina Hurricanes Lance Fujiwara, MEd, ATC, EMT Director of Sports Medicine, Virginia Military Institute Vern Gambetta, MA, President, Gambetta Sports Training Systems Joe Gieck, EdD, ATC, PT Director of Sports Medicine and Prof., Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia Brian Goodstein, MS, ATC, CSCS, Head Athletic Trainer, DC United

Mike Nitka, MS, CSCS Director of Human Performance, Muskego (Wisc.) High School Bruno Pauletto, MS, CSCS President, Power Systems, Inc. Stephen Perle, DC, CCSP Associate Prof. of Clin. Sciences, University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic Brian Roberts, MS, ATC, Director, Sport Performance & Rehab. Ctr. Ellyn Robinson, DPE, CSCS, CPT Assistant Professor, Exercise Science Program, Bridgewater State College Kent Scriber, EdD, ATC, PT Professor/Supervisor of Athletic Training, Ithaca College Chip Sigmon, CSCS Strength and Conditioning Coach, Carolina Medical Center Bonnie J. Siple, MS, ATC Coordinator, Athletic Training Education Program & Services, Slippery Rock University Chad Starkey, PhD, ATC Visiting Professor Athletic Training Education Program Ohio University Ralph Stephens, LMT, NCTMB Sports Massage Therapist, Ralph Stephens Seminars Fred Tedeschi, ATC Head Athletic Trainer, Chicago Bulls Terrence Todd, PhD, Co-Director, Todd-McLean Physical Culture Collection, Dept. of Kinesiology & Health Ed., University of Texas-Austin

IT Manager Julian Cook Business Manager Pennie Small Special Projects Dave Wohlhueter Administrative Assistant Sharon Barbell Advertising Materials Coordinator Mike Townsend Marketing Director Sheryl Shaffer Marketing/Sales Assistant Danielle Catalano Advertising Sales Associates Diedra Harkenrider (607) 257-6970, ext. 24 Rob Schoffel (607) 257-6970, ext. 21 T&C editorial/business offices: 2488 N. Triphammer Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-6970 Fax: (607) 257-7328 info@MomentumMedia.com Training & Conditioning (ISSN 1058-3548) is published monthly except in January and February, May and June, and July and August, which are bimonthly issues, for a total of nine times a year, by MAG, Inc., 2488 N. Triphammer Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850. T&C is distributed without charge to qualified professionals involved with competitive athletes. The subscription rate is $24 for one year and $48 for two years in the United States, and $30 for one year and $60 for two years in Canada. The single copy price is $5. Copyright© 2006 by MAG, Inc. All rights reserved. Text may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part, without the permission of the publisher. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Periodicals postage paid at Ithaca, N.Y., and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Training & Conditioning, P.O. Box 4806, Ithaca, NY 14852-4806. Printed in the U.S.A.

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NATA Booth No. 1720


Q&A Mark White Southeast Guilford High School, N.C. For Mark White, MS, LAT, ATC, Head Athletic Trainer at Southeast Guilford High School in Greensboro, N.C., the phrase “all in a day’s work” barely covers everything he packs into 24 hours. As a teacher of health, physical education, and introduction to sports medicine, White starts his day with education and ends with athletics. For the fall and winter sport seasons, White’s primary afterschool duties revolve around athletic training. In the spring, he is Head Coach of the boys’ golf team. And through all the seasons, White serves as the President of the North Carolina Athletic Trainers’ Association (NCATA), a position he was recently re-elected to for a second term. A 20-year veteran of high school athletics, White graduated from Appalachian State University in 1985 with a major in physical education and a minor in athletic training. He’s been employed by the same school system for 21 years, and at Southeast Guilford for 15 years. As President of the NCATA, White is pushing a proposal that would mandate athletic training positions at every high school in the state. One of White’s proudest accomplishments is the creation of the soon-to-be-built NCATA Hall of Fame, and his fingerprints are also all over the association’s much-improved Web site and monthly newsletter. Here, White talks about what it takes to juggle all of his responsibilities, including raising a family, and provides his take on the future of high school sports medicine in North Carolina. He also shares his experience of responding to an athlete who was under cardiac arrest. T&C: What do you like about working in the high school setting? White: The kids we work with and their parents are usually very appreciative of everything we do. And that makes for a really nice environment. I like that I work full-time at the school, which means I’m there all day and can better stay on top of things. If a kid is injured, I can see them the next morning before classes begin to start treatment right away. An advantage the high school level has over college is that high school athletic trainers go home every night and don’t work many weekends. It’s pretty much a five-day-a-week job. 6

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Treating athletes is just one part of Mark White’s duties at Southeast Guilford. I bust my tail to get everything taken care of during the week but I rarely have to work Saturdays or Sundays. How do you foster a good working relationship with the coaches at your high school? Being around as long as I have, they value my opinion. One of the keys to getting them behind me is having a history of correct injury assessments. If you continually make assessments that a doctor or MRI substantiate, coaches trust that you know what you’re talking about. How do you describe your communication style with coaches? I’m laid-back and pretty quiet. I see myself as a coach’s athletic trainer. If a kid is able to play safely, we’ll let them. But if they’re not able to play without doing more damage, I’ll explain very clearly why they aren’t ready. We get kids back fairly quickly and I think coaches are more supportive and easier to work with when they see that you’re working hard to make that happen. Why do you coach golf? It keeps me refreshed. Family time is increased with coaching golf, because when the sun goes down, you can’t play ATHLETICBID.COM


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Q&A golf anymore and you get to go home earlier than you would as an athletic trainer who regularly covers night events. How do you adjust your athletic training schedule when golf season starts? The last five years we’ve had phys. ed. student-teachers at our school who were also studying to be athletic trainers. After they graduated, we hired them as full-time teachers and so

“In that instance on the lacrosse field, there was never a thought in my mind that I couldn’t do the procedures correctly. I felt comfortable that we were not going to lose that kid that night.” they handle most of the sports medicine duties in the spring. I still do some Friday night coverage as an athletic trainer so I’m not completely out of it—I’m kind of the backup plan. How has working with parents changed over the years? Parents today are more gung-ho about their kids playing every game and getting noticed by colleges, and sometimes those parents can make it difficult for the athletic trainer when

®

their kid gets injured. They’ll push hard for you to clear their kid to return to play, even if he or she is not ready. They might tell me, “My son has to play this game because there’s going to be a college coach in the stands.” Well, it’s not going to benefit the athlete if the college coaches are watching him when he’s only playing at 75 percent. You want that kid to be seen when he’s 100 percent, not hurting. I always try to explain that to parents by giving them the big-picture scenario. In 2000 you were covering a home lacrosse game when a visiting player went into cardiac arrest. What went through your mind as you helped resuscitate him and ultimately save his life? Everything went right for that kid that night. Unbeknownst to me, the referee, whom I had never met before, was also an anesthesiologist. When we got to the kid, he looked at me and said, “We’re going to have to do CPR. Do you know how to do it?” I said, “Yeah, let’s do it.” So he started doing the respirations and I started doing chest compressions. I just concentrated on doing my part and keeping a good rhythm. We did CPR for about 15 minutes before EMS arrived with a defibrillator and he regained a pulse. What went through my mind was making sure I did the right things. What did you learn from that experience? It reminded me of the importance of being prepared and also

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T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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Q&A Mark White Head Athletic Trainer, Head Golf Coach Southeast Guilford High School, Greensboro, N.C. President, North Carolina Athletic Trainers’ Association www.ncathletictrainer.org “Right now we’re working on legislation that would establish a certified athletic trainer position at every high school in the state. A lot of people in the profession believe that as a teacher and athletic trainer you’re doing two jobs but only getting paid for one.”

the importance of being focused during the annual re-certification process athletic trainers go through. Even though that training can seem kind of tedious, you need to practice it regularly so it all comes back when you need it. In that instance on the lacrosse field, there was never a thought in my mind that I couldn’t do the procedures correctly. I felt comfortable that we were not going to lose that kid that night.

I don’t have those types of students very often, but when I do, I bring them along slowly. I teach a basic sports medicine class and if I have a student who’s really interested, I’ll let them shadow me on the field. They start by handling hydration and making sure ice is available on the field. As they progress, they’ll also do some treatments in the athletic training room like apply heat pads and some minor taping.

Did that experience change your perspective on having defibrillators easily accessible? I didn’t have any at the time, and now I have two. Within nine months of the incident, we raised enough money to buy our first one. This past fall we got another one. One unit stays in our athletic training room and one stays in our school’s front office. With the technology as inexpensive as it is now, it’s really not an option to not have one. It’s a piece of equipment you hope you never have to use, but it’s there when you need it. I tell people that the first time I will use it will probably be on an official, coach, parent, or someone in the stands—people who tend to be more at risk.

What are you most proud of during your time as President of the North Carolina Athletic Trainers’ Association? In my first term, Appalachian State University was building a new basketball arena, and we secured space in it for our hall of fame. It was a long, drawn-out process, but we finally have an official hall of fame spot at ASU.

How do you prioritize your workload? At our school, academics comes first for everybody—studentathletes, coaches, and athletic trainers. My athletic training is pretty much secondary and I have to find time for it because in the big picture, I was hired to be a teacher and I receive a supplement to be the athletic trainer. Time is what you make it. I do not set out and plan my day because I never know what awaits me when I hit the front door each day. I am very good at multi-tasking and prioritizing which issues are most pressing. Six of your former students work as certified athletic trainers. How do you integrate students interested in sports medicine into your day-to-day duties? ATHLETICBID.COM

“With athletic training education programs evolving to include even more of an emphasis on sports medicine, most college students don’t have time to pursue a teaching certificate. As a result, there are going to be fewer and fewer people like me who have dual credentials as a teacher and athletic trainer getting into the high school setting.” What’s the most pressing issue facing sports medicine in North Carolina? With athletic training education programs evolving to include even more of an emphasis on sports medicine, most college students don’t have time to pursue a teaching certificate. As a result, there are going to be fewer and fewer people like me who have dual credentials as a teacher and athletic trainer getting into the high school setting. T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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Q&A We want to make athletic training a stand-alone profession at the high school level and put a licensed person in every high school. People aren’t going to want to work all day teaching, then spend all night covering games or in the athletic training room, which is what I was brought up doing. Right now we’re in initial talks with the state’s Department of Public Instruction to get their feelings on things. One of

“You have to get your feet wet and explore every avenue and setting, then decide what suits you best and what your goals are … Athletic training education has changed, and so have the work settings. There are a lot of options.” our goals is to make sure the position doesn’t count against a principal’s allotment of non-faculty positions. What is your advice for recent grads on getting started in the field? You have to get your feet wet and explore every avenue and setting, then decide what suits you best and what your goals are. Look at the big picture. Where do you want to be in 15 or 20 years? Athletic training education has changed, and

NATA Booth No. 624

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T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

so have the work settings. There are a lot of options once kids get out of college, like physician extenders and extreme sports. You have to find your niche. I would also urge students to check out the high school setting and see what it’s all about. I just had an intern who didn’t think she would like the high school level, then after her time with me, she changed her mind. Although the time constraints at this level are great, it can be pretty rewarding. How do you integrate your family into all that you do? Family definitely needs to come first and you need to manage your time the best you can to make that happen. I’ve been married for 18 years and have a four-and-a-half-year-old daughter. My wife is a registered nurse so she’s pretty busy too. We have a great relationship and encourage each other to do our own thing. When our daughter came along, it changed my work perspective a little. I like to be home more—I don’t always like to stay the extra half-hour after practice that I used to. I like to get home so I can read my daughter a bedtime story before she goes to sleep. It also helps that my daughter is old enough that she can come with me when I cover events. She rides around with me on the Gator and stands next to me on the sidelines. As she gets older I foresee her spending a whole lot more time with me while I’m working. ■

Circle No. 106 ATHLETICBID.COM


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NATA Booth No. 808

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Student

Sponsored by

Corner A special feature for your athletic training students

Personal Injury Protection As an athletic training student, you are learning a lot about injury prevention in athletes. You should also know how to avoid injuries to your own body in this often strenuous profession. BY GREG FROUNFELTER

B

y now, you already know that athletic trainers spend long hours covering sporting events, treating athletes, and performing administrative tasks. But what you may not know is that the job can come at the expense of your own well being. A former classmate told me about her 22-year-old brother-in-law who recently graduated with a bachelor’s degree in athletic training and was recovering from spine surgery. He had injured his L5-S1 disc transferring an injured athlete off the field. My first thought was that he was far too young to have such an injury. But when I thought about it further, I realized it’s quite easy for an athletic trainer of any age to incur an injury on the job. The risks to athletic trainers are not limited to such acute injuries. In many cases, cumulative conditions such as shoulder or back pain result from years of overuse and poor body mechanics. Risk factors include sustained stressful postures, repetitive movements, overhead and extended reaching, and faulty body posture. For athletic trainers, the primary trouble spots are the lower back and shoulders.

ATHLETICBID.COM

When completing any task, the body can be used in ways that minimize or maximize the strain placed on it. As an athletic trainer, you would never encourage someone to bend at the waist to pick up a heavy load or stoop over a task for prolonged periods. We know these activities increase the load on a back and heighten the risk of injury. Likewise, repetitive bending can wreak havoc on the lower back. Now consider the tasks athletic trainers repeat every day. For example, think about the last time you helped tape a team before practice. Did you slouch forward, especially on your fourth or fifth ankle? Did your back feel a little sore? And how were you positioned the last time you helped stretch a hamstring? It’s easy (sometimes painfully easy) to forget about proper body mechanics in the flurry of athletic training room activity. Fortunately, ergonomics can reduce repetitive strain on the body and decrease the risk of injury. Ergonomics provides us with safety zones we can use to reduce injury risk. Using these zones keeps joints at their midrange, where they are strongest and can best handle loading. In the spine, the safety zone is considered the neutral position, which is the same position we take in proper upright posture. The cervical and lumbar spines should have lordotic curves, and the thoracic spine should have its typical kyphotic curve. One motion we do all the time is getting something out of an athletic training kit. When you do so, do you squat down or bend at the waist? From our biomechanics courses we

know that we should strive to maintain the lordosis in our lumbar spine during functional activity (i.e., we should squat or kneel down to reach objects that are below our knees). The key is getting in the habit of doing so now, when you are starting your career. A second part of maintaining a neutral spine is avoiding rotation. Most lumbar injuries occur during forward bending and rotation. It is simply best to avoid excessive use of these positions whenever possible. Another vulnerable area is the shoulder. We are able to reach quite far from our bodies with our arms, but overreaching forward or overhead can cause problems for the shoulder such as rotator cuff tendonitis or bursitis. It is recommended that you perform 80 to 90 percent of your reaching tasks within arm’s length of the body. By keeping the elbow close to the body, you can provide improved mechanics for the rotator cuff musculature and prevent microtrauma. Step stools and ladders can minimize extended overhead reaching, and heavy objects should never be carried overhead. Making use of safety zones may require changes to your working environment. For example, locate taping supplies where you do not need to bend or overreach to get them. And make step stools easily available for the times when you need to reach objects on higher shelves. Greg Frounfelter, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS, is an Athletic Trainer and Physical Therapist in the Physical Medicine Department at Agnesian Healthcare-Waupun Memorial Hospital in Waupun, Wis. He can be reached at: frounfelterg@agnesian.com. T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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After 29 surgeries, 15 on his left knee alone, retired NFL player Mark Schlereth has finally found relief. MARK SCHLERETH Pro Football’s King of Pain and ESPN Personality/Sport Analyst

“For twelve seasons I battled in the trenches for both the Washington Redskins and the Denver Broncos. Playing in the NFL afforded me the opportunity to live out my childhood dreams! As a veteran starter on the offensive line, I stood next to some of the best players in NFL history. I helped my teams win three World Championships, and was elected to represent my team twice in the Pro Bowl. Having the courage to live out your dreams takes great sacrifice and most assuredly comes with a price!

© 2006, CYTOSPORT, Benicia, CA 94510

When the pundits look back at my career it’s not the Super Bowls or Pro Bowls that will define me. What will forever define my career are the twenty-nine surgical procedures that I endured to make my dreams become a reality, earning me the moniker pro football’s ‘King of Pain’. I’m sure you can imagine that after twenty-nine operations, fifteen on my left knee alone, my life was filled with pain and anguish. Lining up on Sunday forced

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Corner You may also want to consider the design of your computer workstation. While the hustle and bustle of an athletic trainer’s day can tax the body in several ways, improper mechanics while typing can lead to wrist, neck, and eye problems, as well as muscle-tension headaches. To avoid these types of injuries, be sure to set up your computer workstation properly. You should directly face the computer while sitting in an upright position. The top of the screen (minimum size of 15 inches) should be level with your eyes and 18 to 24 inches from your face. Your forearms should be parallel to the floor and elbows bent at a 100- to 110-degree angle, and your keyboard should have a wrist support. Your feet are best positioned flat on the floor or resting at a 10- to 20-degree slant. Your chair should have lumbar support and allow your knees to rest at an angle between 100 and 110 degrees. And arrange your desk so the things you need the most—especially your computer mouse—are within a forearm and hand’s length from your torso.

When you find yourself leaning forward a lot, try a reverse-body positioning stretch, such as bending backward into spinal extension and scapular retraction. Do this every one to two hours or whenever you find yourself slouching for any length of time. Environmental changes will not eliminate all risks, however, especially since some tasks require you to stay in prolonged static positions. Two common examples are performing evaluations on the field and taping athletes. Even with the use of proper environmental modifications, in both cases we will tend to lean forward at the waist and spine. When you find yourself leaning forward a lot, try a reverse-body positioning stretch, such as bending backward into spinal extension and scapular retraction. Do this every one to two hours or whenever you find yourself slouching for any length of time. This simple strategy does a lot to unload the mechanical strain of forward bending. In addition, bending your knees and widening your stance when standing will lower your center of gravity and help you get closer to your work without slouching. I find this very helpful when taping at a station. While much of your education has focused on taking care of student-athletes, it’s never too soon to start taking care of yourself. Repetitive stress injuries often go unnoticed for years while slowly doing damage that can last a lifetime. Some of these suggestions may seem awkward to incorporate, but they are worth the effort. Take care of yourself so you can optimally take care of those in your charge. ■

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NATA Booth No. 800 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

©GETTY IMAGES

Making Headway BY DAVID HILL

F

or most athletic injuries, the management and rehabilitation are handson. A sprain, for example, gets iced, braced, and strengthened. Not so when the injury is a concussion. There is no icing, bracing, or strengthening for this type of injury. The best medicine is simply making sure the athlete recovers fully so that no more harm is done. Researchers, however, are digging below the surface and looking deep inside the brain to better understand mild traumatic brain injuries. They are trying to fill gaps in understanding what happens to a brain that’s been concussed. Their

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From the cellular level on up, researchers are learning more about the ways concussions affect the brain, offering hope for better ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat this dangerous injury. work is helping to explain why concussions can go undetected at least temporarily, and why athletes who’ve suffered a mild traumatic brain injury are more susceptible to a second and potentially more serious episode. This, in turn, offers hope for improved detection and

treatment while driving home the importance of properly managing concussions. CELL CHEMISTRY To understand recent developments in concussion management, we must follow researchers into the brain—deep inside, to the cells. Building on earlier work with animals and now armed with sophisticated imaging equipment, researchers have reached a general agreement on what happens during and after a concussion. David Hill is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: dhill@MomentumMedia.com. ATHLETICBID.COM


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TREATING THE ATHLETE As described by David Hovda, PhD, Program Director at the UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, a concussion happens when the brain is jarred severely enough that most of its neurons fire at once, flooding the space between cells with chemical neurotransmitters. The neurons begin reuptake of the chemicals, but this leads to an imbalance, primarily from the excessive

verted into restoring the chemical balance. How long the increased risk lasts, however, isn’t clear. “In concussed animals, we know their brains are still vulnerable to a second concussion after seven days,” Hovda says. “But we don’t know if they are any more vulnerable at day one than they are at day seven.” As scientists develop the chemistrybased model of concussion, there is

“There are a couple of blood tests being researched that may indicate whether there is injury in the brain … I can envision using them on the sideline of an athletic event.” calcium and potassium ions in the cascade of neurotransmitters. Cells seek to restore balance, but this requires a tremendous amount of energy, which the brain obtains by diverting it from normal functions such as short-term memory. The neurochemical cascade happens in the first few seconds after the injury, often resulting in retrograde and anterograde amnesia, a sign of vulnerability to further injury as cell-level energy is di-

hope that chemical tests and even drug treatment for concussion may emerge. “There are a couple of blood tests being researched that may indicate whether there is injury in the brain,” says Jeff Bazarian, MD, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Rochester. Such blood tests work by detecting chemical evidence of brain trauma, such as damage to the axonal fibers connecting neurons to one another.

“This axonal injury releases some cell products—proteins—into the blood where they can be detected by a test,” Bazarian says. “I can even envision using this on the sideline of an athletic event to help decide whether someone needs to go to the hospital or can return to the field.” Designing therapy based on these chemical reactions, however, is a more distant goal. Most therapy trials focus on severe brain injury, says Hovda, where the objective is preventing cell death, which seems to be rare in concussions. However, one avenue being tested does hold the possibility of speeding recovery from mild traumatic brain injuries. The hypothesis focuses on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that helps facilitate learning. Its synthesis in the brain can be stimulated by diet and exercise, but in braininjured animals, exercise too soon after an injury diverts energy away from damage repair—a downside that negates the benefits of increased BDNF production. “We’re exploring the possibility of taking people or animals with

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Formerly titled Sports Injury Management, this third edition sets the new standard for prevention and care of injuries. Using a problemsolving approach, you’ll explore all of the core information an athletic trainer needs to know, including prevention, recognition, assessment, management, and disposition of injuries and diseases common in active individuals. Basic medical concepts and related scientific information are woven throughout to help you build a strong foundation of knowledge in athletic training practices. Features: • Back-of-book Student Resource CD-ROM includes an interactive study tool with new review questions and the digital teaching tool, Dynamic Human Anatomy (DHA). DHA offers anatomy video clips from Acland's Video Atlas of Human Anatomy and interactive anatomy illustrations. • New chapter on taping and bracing provides the principles of taping and wrapping with common techniques demonstrated for the upper and lower extremities, including the construction of custom pads and orthotics. • Information on performance altering substances such as tobacco, caffeine, alcohol, and ergogenic aids. 2004/736 pages/Approx. 565 illustrations/0-7817-5001-6/$89.95

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TREATING THE ATHLETE mild traumatic brain injury and giving them an alternative fuel to burn during exercise,” Hovda says. “Then that exercise could increase BDNF and improve their recovery.” NOT ALL CONCUSSIONS ARE EQUAL In addition to deepening their understanding of the cellular mechanisms of concussion, researchers are examining how different parts of the brain are affected by the injury. The emerging picture is complex. Mark Lovell, PhD, Director of the Sports Concussion Program at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), and colleagues have begun testing concussed high school athletes with functional MRI scanners. The images can show which parts of the brain are working normally and which have depressed metabolism, an indication that they’ve slowed or shut down.

“There is a suggestion that the type of hit you take can affect the type of concussion you experience … A blow to the temporal lobes on the side of the head can often lead to difficulties with memory.” One part of Lovell’s research correlates these functional images with the results of neurocognitive testing. Researchers are beginning to see how depressed activity in one area of the brain may result in impairment on a certain type of test, while injuries in another area show up through other tests. “There is a suggestion that the type of hit you take can affect the type of concussion you experience,” Lovell explains. “If you have impact to the area of the brain that influences consciousness, then the characteristic pattern we see is people with slower reaction times. Meanwhile, a blow to the temporal lobes on the side of the head can often lead to difficulties with memory.” Hovda points out how this knowledge could eventually affect concussion management. “Let’s say a region of the brain that is responsible for appreciation of art was affected,” he says. “If ATHLETICBID.COM

that athlete doesn’t use that part of the brain very often or you don’t ask about it, you won’t recognize any associated symptoms.” The location of the injury could also affect the nature of any subsequent injuries. “If you bang the front part of your head, then the temporal lobes on the side of the brain may not be vulnerable,” says Hovda. “So if you bang your head again before you’ve fully recovered, the frontal lobes could be devastated while the sides remain uninjured.”

Researchers are finding complexities in how concussion affects different populations of athletes. These, too, have implications for assessment and management of the injury. “Children between the ages of 5 and 14 probably have a much different response to mild traumatic brain injury than do older people,” Hovda says. “And males respond differently to mild traumatic brain injury than females, whose responses differ depending on where they are in their menstrual cycle, since estrogen can help protect the brain.”

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TREATING THE ATHLETE sion, while high school players typically took a week, with some showing effects four weeks post-injury. “I’ve been running the NFL and National Hockey League concussion research programs for more than 10 years, and it always amazes me how fast the professional players bounce back compared to high school kids,” says Lovell. “We see about 100 kids a week in our clinic, and there’s no question in my mind that high school kids take longer to recover.” One possible reason that young ath-

Lovell has seen drastic differences in recovery times between high school and professional football players. His observations were confirmed in a study led by Elliott Pellman, MD, chairman of the NFL Mild Traumatic Brain Injury committee, and published in the February issue of Neurosurgery. Concussed NFL and high school players were given neurocognitive exams and those scores were compared to their baseline records. The majority of the pro players returned to their pre-injury levels within two days of the concus-

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letes’ brains are more susceptible to injury and take longer to recover is that their neural networks aren’t completely formed and are still fragile. “We know that the brain matures up until about age 25,” says Mickey Collins, PhD, Assistant Director of the UPMC Sports Concussion Program. “There’s myelization occurring in the frontal lobes, and the brain is still maturing through the teenage years and into the young-adult years. Another hypothesis is that kids are more sensitive to changes in the neurotransmitter glutamate.” For any age, the danger of multiple concussions is real. However, younger athletes again appear to be the most vulnerable. “Among high school athletes, we’ve found a threshold effect where if they have three or more concussions, they tend to show detriments in memory, concentration, and attention span,” Lovell says. “We did a similar study of NFL players and didn’t find that. We also know that second-impact syndrome has only happened in younger brains, 18 years old and under.” However, a study published in the October issue of Neurology found retired NFL players more likely to suffer dementia than other men their age. Retired players having experienced three or more concussions were five times more likely to be diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, and three times more likely to report significant memory problems compared to players without a history of concussion, according to co-lead researcher Kevin Guskiewicz, PhD, ATC, Director of the Sports Medicine Research Laboratory at the University of North Carolina. A BIGGER TOOLBOX While researchers grapple with the hows and whys of concussion, athletic trainers are left to deal with the day-to-day evaluation and management of concussed athletes. Although observation of symptoms still plays a central role, technology is broadening the arsenal of weapons athletic trainers have at their disposal. For example, Virginia Tech has been testing a system that uses motion sensors in football helmets to detect and measure heavy impacts. More of a research tool than a clinical one at this point, the HIT system (High Impact Telemetry) may eventually be able to validate the number and severity of strong blows well enough to signal that an athlete is concussed.

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

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But when the concussed players’ cognitive function was assessed against their baseline results, there was no difference in severity of impairment or time of recovery. And that, says Mickey Collins, PhD, Assistant Director of the Concussion Program, has significant implications for what happens after the injury. “Up to 20 percent of the sample hadn’t recovered by three weeks,” says Collins. “We’re talking about a significant proportion of these kids who were taking a long time to recover from the injury. A very important lesson here is that if an athlete has a concussion and has not recovered and goes back to play, the risk levels are very high—and it doesn’t matter what helmet he’s wearing.”

ecently developed football helmets are being marketed as potentially able to reduce the risk of concussions. A study published in February shows they help to do just that, but that they do not necessarily reduce the severity of injuries that do occur. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Concussion Program had 1,000 high school players wear traditional helmets and 1,000 wear the new model, the Riddell Revolution. (Other similar helmets were not included in the study.) Among all the players, 6.2 percent suffered a concussion: those wearing the traditional helmet, 7.6 percent, and 5.4 percent of those wearing the newer design. That translates to a 31-percent reduction in risk.

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TREATING THE ATHLETE For two football seasons, Mike Goforth, MS, ATC, Head Athletic Trainer at Virginia Tech, has distributed specially outfitted helmets among the Virginia Tech football team at practices and games. Goforth says it is not only the size of the force that determines a concussion’s severity, but also the location of the blow. Each helmet contains

players at each position take and where on their head the impact comes. Linebackers and running backs get hit in the face mask and front of the helmet, while wide receivers get more hits to the side of the helmet. Defensive linemen get the most hits, typically in a Mohawk-like pattern on top of the head, Goforth, says.

During the 2005 season, Georgia Tech’s football team provided test subjects for DETECT, which administers a seven-minute battery of cognitive tests through a headset designed to filter out noise and visual distractions. small motion sensors that detect and measure impacts and each has telemetry devices that instantly relay the information to a sideline computer. The goal is to define the amount of force required to cause a concussion, and determine which areas of the brain are more susceptible to cognitive impairment. At Virginia Tech, not every player gets a high-tech helmet, but over a two-year period a lot of information has been gleaned about how many hits

NATA Booth No. 819

And players get hit hard—up to 150 times the force of gravity. “To hear that the human body can take a 50-G blow and not have any clinical signs or even a headache—to me that was pretty amazing, and it shows us the sport is a lot safer than we thought,” Goforth says. “It shows the usefulness of our helmets and the toughness of the human body.” The blows are recorded and can be correlated with game film footage. Each player’s case history, so to speak, is also

Circle No. 192

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matched to his performance as judged by coaches. Researchers are looking to see if any trends emerge linking repeated blows or possibly concussive blows with a change in performance—missing a blocking assignment or botching a pass route, for instance. The research has reinforced the knowledge that no two concussions are alike, and each one needs individualized management. “Take our defensive linemen,” Goforth says. “They’ll have 25 75-G blows a game and not show any critical signs. And then you might have a kid take one 4-G blow and have a concussion. It depends on their susceptibility and the location of the hit.” When a very hard blow is detected, a red flag is raised, and Goforth gives that player a close look on the sidelines. Someday, he says, it might be possible to validate the number or severity of blows, or both, well enough for the HIT system to signal a concussion on its own. But the science isn’t there yet. Neurocognitive testing, meanwhile, is gaining mainstream acceptance in the treatment and management of concussions, including return-to-play decisions.

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TREATING THE ATHLETE It’s already looked at as a way to detect concussions on the sideline. Engineers and neuroscientists at Georgia Tech and Emory University are working on a neurocognitive device that might help athletic trainers and other medical professionals better detect concussions without removing players from the stadium. During the 2005 season, Georgia Tech’s football team provided test subjects for DETECT (Display Enhanced Testing for Concussion and mTBI system). The device administers a seven-minute battery of cognitive tests through a headset designed to filter out noise and visual distractions. Like computer-based neurocognitive systems—ImPACT and Concussion Sentinel are two widely used products—DETECT requires a pre-injury baseline from each athlete to compare against. “We’re trying to pick up subtle changes in cognitive function that aren’t detectable through conventional means,” says Michelle La Placa, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory. “And it’s in-

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tended to pick up signs of a concussion earlier than the other platforms, which typically are used two to three days post-injury. It’s not diagnostic—if it indicates a problem, we recommend more testing on a larger and more comprehensive system.” La Placa notes that DETECT is designed for picking up mild concussions—the kind that might otherwise go unnoticed during a game but would nonetheless leave an athlete vulnerable to long-lasting problems if he or she were reinjured. “If a player can’t walk straight or they don’t know what day it is, they’re already going to be kept out of the game and sent for further evaluation,” she says. “We’re trying to pick up subtle concussions in players who show few outward symptoms.” MANAGEMENT EVOLUTION For now, though, the basic assessment and management message for people on the sports-medicine front lines remains the same: Be cautious when dealing with concussions. The most recent international consensus statement on sports concussion came out of a

November 2004 meeting in Prague, and the takeaway message was the same as at the 2001 meeting in Vienna: Concussed athletes need to sit out, should not compete again until symptoms have resolved, and older systems of grading concussion that rely on severity of immediate symptoms are outdated. Regardless of the presence of hightech systems, the decision to let someone play or hold them out will still be made by people. And nothing in current research has led experts to deviate from the cautious approach. “I agree with the overall principles that came out of both the Vienna and Prague meetings,” Lovell says. “Don’t let somebody play who has symptoms—when in doubt, sit them out. If you believe the athlete is lying to you or downplaying their symptoms, hold them out. And we definitely believe in gradually returning athletes to play as they go through a systematic increase in their activity level. “The brain is not a muscle, and it’s not a joint,” Lovell concludes. “It’s the most complex organ in the human body, and I think we need to have a great deal of respect for protecting it.” ■

Manage Myofascial Pain Syndromes & trigger points Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch® prescription topical anesthetic skin refrigerant provides a fine stream of spray with a cooling effect equivalent to Gebauer’s Fluori-Methane, which has been discontinued. Use Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch in conjunction with the Spray and Stretch Technique to help manage Myofascial Pain Syndromes in the head (like TMJ/TMD), neck, shoulders, extremities, and low back. Freezing may alter skin pigmentation. Do not spray in eyes.

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Spray & Stretch

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ROGERS ATHLETIC IS RAISING THE BAR

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NUTRITION

Fluid Dynamics The ever-changing variety of sports drinks and recovery drinks can be overwhelming. Knowing what to look for will keep you from feeling bottled up.

BY MICHELLE ROCKWELL

W

hen many of today’s top coaches and athletic trainers were in college, deciding what athletes would drink was easy—there really was no choice at all. Drinking anything during practice was often seen as a sign of weakness, and if any liquid was available during games, it was water. Now, athletic trainers can choose from a dizzying array of sports drinks and recovery drinks in a seemingly endless variety of types and flavors. Athletes are bombarded with advertisements touting one drink over another and may be more influenced by flashy marketing than by hard science. In this article we’ll look at what’s in sports drinks and recovery drinks and help you pick the best ones for your athletes. In most cases this means taking a closer look at the back label than the front, since you’ll be searching for the right mix of ingredients in the right amounts to meet your athletes’ needs. The primary reason for using a sports or recovery drink can usually be classified into one or more of four categories: improving hydration, enhancing performance, optimizing recovery, and adding weight or lean mass. There can be a great deal of overlap between these goals—proper hydration improves performance, carbohydrates help improve performance and speed recovery, and Michelle Rockwell, MS, RD, is the former Coordinator of Sports Nutrition at the University of Florida and now serves as a nutrition consultant for several sports teams and athletes from U.S. Soccer, Major League Baseball, and the World Tennis Association. She can be reached at: michellerock1@aol.com.

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any weight-conscious athletes complain that sports drinks have “too many calories” or “too much carbs” and are reluctant to use them. It’s up to athletic trainers to promote good hydration even when faced with these complaints. Tell athletes that carbohydrates consumed during exercise are used directly as fuel for performance. The analogy of gas fueling a car works well with some athletes. Another recommendation for calorie-phobic athletes is to prioritize sports drink calories, since they can impact performance and safety so significantly. These athletes could reduce calories consumed in a meal or snack outside of exercise to allow for sports drink calories while remaining within their total calorie goals. For example, 16 ounces of a typical sports drink (the minimum amount recommended for one hour of exercise) contains 120 calories. This is about the same as 1/3 muffin, 1/3 cup of rice, mayo on a sandwich, or one can of soda. A standard recovery drink has about the same number of calories as one peanut butter and jelly sandwich, one slice of thick-crust pepperoni pizza, three homemade chocolate chip cookies, or one small Caesar salad. Calorie-conscious athletes may also make the mistake of choosing low-calorie or no-calorie fitness beverages, which have fewer sugars—and thus fewer calories and carbs—than most sports drinks. While these beverages do help with overall hydration when consumed in adequate amounts, they are not an appropriate substitute for sports drinks because they lack sufficient carbohydrates and, in many cases, electrolytes. Fitness beverages can play a role in athletes’ diets when they are used to supplement or replace water intake. Athletes who don’t like water may hydrate better with a flavored beverage. Gymnasts, golfers, and baseball and softball players I have worked with enjoy drinking fitness beverages and notice benefits of improved hydration, since they drink more of these than they did water. Calorie-conscious athletes should be warned against diluting their sports and recovery drinks. Diluting these drinks can lower the carbohydrate, electrolyte, and other nutrient content beneath the formulated levels designed to match sweat loss and optimize fluid and overall nutrient absorption.

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protein can aid in recovery and weight gain. The key is having your goals drive the choice of beverage. When weighing your options, keep in mind that even the most well-formulated drink has no value if athletes won’t drink it. Fortunately, the wide variety of flavors available means you should be able to find one to fit any athlete’s palate. However, taste preferences often change with intense activity, so it is critical that athletes train with the beverages they plan to use when competing. Also, athletes respond to and tolerate beverages in different ways. So be prepared to tailor your offerings to individual needs. INSIDE SPORTS DRINKS Sports drinks are commonly used before, during, and after practices and competitions to help athletes stay properly hydrated. This can improve performance by reducing fatigue while protecting against dehydration and heat-related injury. The most basic source of hydration is water, but sports drinks offer additional ingredients that aid in hydration while also providing other benefits. Each drink uses a different mix of ingredients, many of which are examined below. First, decide what you want to get from a sport drink, then find the one with the ingredients that best fit your athletes’ goals. Carbohydrates: One of the biggest advantages sports drinks have over water is carbohydrates. Research has repeatedly shown that carbohydrates consumed before and during exercise can improve performance in endurance activity lasting more than an hour or in stop-and-go sports that have intermittent periods of high-intensity exercise. Athletes involved in purely anaerobic sports, strength training, or low-intensity exercise for less than an hour can usually use plain water to hydrate, as long as they drink enough. Although sports drinks are not very high in calories, they can add up in athletes who don’t burn them off through activity. When exercising more than one hour, to ensure the right level of carbohydrates, athletes are encouraged to consume about 30 grams of carbohydrates one to two hours prior to exercise, preferably in liquid form. This is about the amount found in a 16-ounce bottle of most sports drinks. Once they start their ATHLETICBID.COM


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NUTRITION activity, athletes should consume 30 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per hour. Since sports drinks should be between six and eight percent carbohydrate— or about 15 grams of carbohydrate per eight-ounce serving—this will typically

percent carbohydrate do not optimize energy delivery to muscle. You also want to look for drinks that use a combination of different sugars, such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose. When used alone, fructose and other

Sports drinks with more than eight percent carbohydrate should be avoided because the increased carbs can interfere with fluid absorption and cause gastric upset. equal 16 to 32 ounces of a sports drink. Sports drinks with more than eight percent carbohydrate should be avoided because the increased carbs can interfere with fluid absorption and cause gastric upset. Those with less than six

single sugars can cause gastric distress, including bloating and diarrhea. Specifically designed to promote rapid fluid and cabrohydrate absorption, classic sports drinks have a high glycemic index, which means they pro-

vide immediate energy during exercise. Some manufacturers use non-traditional carbohydrate sources, such as rice or maltodextrin, to create drinks with a lower glycemic index aimed at endurance athletes. These manufacturers claim that the slower rise in blood sugar provided by lower glycemic index sources better meets the demands of endurance and ultra-endurance exercise. Research with athletes in actual exercise situations has not confirmed these claims. Furthermore, there are not complete data about how well athletes tolerate these more complex carbohydrate sources. As long as athletes begin exercise with ample carbohydrate stores and take in sports drinks at consistent intervals during exercise, energy will remain available throughout the activity.

CAUGHT IN THE CROSSFIRE

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he topic of which beverages we should and shouldn’t be drinking received wide attention recently when a group of wellknown researchers established the Beverage Guidance System published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. America’s obesity epidemic was cited as the driving force behind the recommendations—it has been reported that up to 30 percent of our calories currently come from beverages. The researchers recommended getting only 10 to 14 percent of our calories from beverages, a decrease that would likely require a significant drop in consumption of sweetened beverages. Specifically, they touted drinking more water. If someone desires a more varied beverage selection, he or she should select from tea and coffee first, followed by skim and low fat milk, and noncaloric drinks (like diet soda or flavored waters). Fruit juices, even 100 percent fruit juices, should be limited to less than eight ounces per day, while sodas and sports drinks should be used “sparingly except by endurance athletes because these beverages provide calories.”

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While these guidelines have merit and offer benefits for much of the general population, I have two major concerns for athletes who may read or hear these recommendations. First, any message that recommends cutting back on beverage consumption can confuse athletes who are constantly hounded by sports medicine professionals preaching good hydration habits, following them around with water bottles, and making them check the color of their urine. Research has shown that many athletes start training sessions in sub-optimal hydration status, rarely drink enough to match fluid loss during exercise, and follow poor recovery nutrition and hydration practices. With athlete safety our priority and the consequences of dehydration and heat illness so severe, we need to continue promoting adequate fluid consumption, even if that means sometimes drinking drastically more than the 98 ounces of fluid recommended in the guidelines. And the recommendation to use beverages with added sugar calories sparingly could be misleading for athletes who are looking to enhance performance or improve their recovery from exercise.

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NUTRITION Sodium: Sports drinks almost always include electrolytes to help replace those lost through sweat, mainly sodium. Most classic sports drinks have between 70 and 120 mg of sodium per eight-ounce serving, which matches typical sodium sweat loss. Sodium also promotes optimal hydration by: making

ercising in extreme heat; who have high sweat sodium rates (indicated by a salty film on their face or jersey after working out); or who have muscle cramping known to be related to sodium imbalance. Athletes not in these categories should stick with standard sports drinks since consuming more sodium

Adding protein to sports drinks is an increasingly popular trend. The theory is that added protein will help stimulate insulin secretion, thereby enhancing carbohydrate uptake and utilization, which would theoretically slow fatigue. the body like a “sponge” to hold onto water; triggering the thirst mechanism that stimulates further drinking; and for some athletes, improving the taste, which encourages consumption. Some sports drinks designed specifically for endurance athletes contain higher levels of sodium, typically 200 to 300 mg per eight ounces, since sodium losses via sweat can be more extreme in endurance activities. These drinks are appropriate for athletes: exercising or competing for more than two hours; ex-

than is lost through sweat can cause dehydration and muscle cramping. Protein: Adding protein to sports drinks is an increasingly popular trend. The theory is that added protein will help stimulate insulin secretion, thereby enhancing carbohydrate uptake and utilization, which would theoretically slow fatigue in endurance exercise. Manufacturers of sports drinks containing protein claim they can also minimize post-exercise muscle damage. The research into using protein this

way is mixed. Several studies have not supported claims of decreased fatigue and muscle damage, and some that showed a performance benefit have been criticized for their design. Hopefully, more data will be available in the near future, as this is certainly an area of interest to many athletic trainers. Proponents of protein-containing sports drinks recommend a 4:1 ratio of carbohydrates to protein. This, for example, would mean 16 grams of carbohydrates for every four grams of protein. That works out to two grams of protein per eight-ounce serving. Athletic trainers should consider three potential issues before using protein-containing sports drinks. First, protein slows gastric emptying, which could mean bloating, gas, diarrhea, or similar discomfort during exercise. Second, it can also interfere with fluid absorption, a main reason for using sports beverages. Third, adding protein to sports drinks alters the taste. Some athletes find the taste very chalky and unpalatable during exercise. Since the jury is still out on whether sports drinks with protein may enhance

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NUTRITION performance, athletes should avoid using these drinks if gastric issues or taste interferes with beverage consumption. The risk of decreasing hydration far outweighs the potential performanceenhancing benefits. Plus, drinks with protein may run afoul of NCAA supplement-distribution rules depending on their exact make-up or protein level. Amino acids: There is some research showing that branched-chain amino acids and other individual amino acids (glutamine and leucine, for example) consumed on a daily basis, although not necessarily while exercising, can delay fatigue in endurance exercise. Athletes who hear about this potential link may want to use sports drinks with added amino acids for this reason. However, these drinks typically contain a much lower quantity of amino acids than the level used in research and are unlikely to have the same effect. Plus, the addition of amino acids might make it impermissible for schools to provide these beverages to their athletes under NCAA supplement-distribution rules. Magnesium, Calcium, and Potassium: Found in many sports drinks, these

and more sports drinks are adding B vitamins, which play a role in energy usage, and antioxidants (Vitamin C, Vitamin E, and selenium), which may help combat muscle damage. However, there is no evidence to suggest that consuming these during exercise benefits performance or hydration. Rather than looking for these in a sports drink, ensure that athletes’ overall diets meet vitamin and mineral needs, or supplement with a basic multivitamin. Caffeine: Although caffeine has recently been added to some sports

drinks, these should not be confused with “energy drinks,” which usually contain herbs and other stimulants. Several studies have shown that 200300 mg of caffeine (equivalent to two cups of coffee) consumed prior to exercise may improve performance. Note that one serving of these caffeine-containing drinks commonly contains less than 50 mg of caffeine. Thus, athletes would have to drink a high volume of these fluids to experience any benefit. Although recent research has refuted the belief that caffeine is a diuretic,

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While athletes can get small amounts of magnesium, calcium, and potassium from sports drinks, the primary source should be their regular diet— through fruits, vegetables, nuts, milk or other dairy, and fortified foods such as cereals. minerals are lost in sweat, but generally in minimal amounts. Some sports medical professionals have linked deficiencies of these elements to muscle cramping, but the links have not been supported by research. While athletes can get small amounts of magnesium, calcium, and potassium from sports drinks, the primary source should be their regular diet—through fruits, juices, vegetables, nuts, milk or other dairy, and fortified foods such as cereals. Other vitamins and minerals: More

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NATA Booth No. 1800 Circle No. 129


NUTRITION we know it does contribute to increased urine output, and thus could impact hydration status. Any athlete who uses a sports drink with caffeine should enter training or competition especially wellhydrated and be sure to drink enough fluids throughout the activity. I would not recommend caffeine-containing sports drinks before, during, or after activity for any athlete exercising in extremely hot conditions. It’s also important to consider that individuals have different responses to caffeine. Side effects can include headache, jitters, nervousness, a racing heartbeat, GI upset, and diarrhea. These side effects may be enhanced by adrenaline during competition times. Note that caffeine at high concentration levels is banned by the NCAA and other sports-governing bodies. It is unlikely for an athlete to reach banned levels through caffeine-containing sports drinks, but other beverages, dietary supplements, and medications contain caffeine and additional stimulants. The combination of these products and caffeinated sports drinks could cause problematic caffeine levels.

INSIDE RECOVERY DRINKS In years past, recovery drinks were largely an ad hoc product, with each school using its own brew of ingredients. An NFL strength and conditioning coach remembers his first graduate assistant position where one of his primary responsibilities was making recovery

well beyond the protein mixes of days gone by. As a result, athletic trainers and strength coaches need to determine what they want from a recovery drink and find the one that best fits their needs. Recovery drinks are generally designed for athletes to use after training or competing at an intense level for

Recovery drinks are generally designed for athletes to use after training or competing at an intense level for more than one hour. But they can also be used in other ways. shakes for players to drink after weightlifting sessions, using a specific protein powder prescribed by the head strength coach. He tried an endless variety of ingredients, but the shakes tasted absolutely awful and players would do anything to avoid drinking them: Some even brought an extra pair of shoes to dump their shakes into. Now, recovery drinks are a mainstream product. Their taste and texture are designed to appeal to athletes, not turn them away. And their contents go

more than one hour. But they can also be used in other ways. Some use them when illness or injury precludes regular meals, and athletes who can’t tolerate solid food before a game use them as a pre-competition meal. Others take them between multiple events on the same day or as between-meal snacks to gain weight. Be aware that NCAA rules limit the content of drinks that schools are allowed to supply to their athletes. Carbohydrate/electrolyte drinks may be

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NUTRITION provided, but the addition of protein, amino acids, or other substances may make it impermissible for a school to provide a drink, or in some cases, for an athlete to consume it. Protein: The main ingredient in many recovery drinks is protein, which supports muscle growth, repair, and strength development. The protein can come from a wide variety of sources,

also include individual amino acids (e.g., glutamine or leucine) which are marketed as further enhancing recovery and muscle growth, but these effects have not been confirmed by research. Carbohydrates: A mainstay of sports drinks, carbohydrates also have a role in recovery since they help replenish energy stores depleted during exercise. Carbohydrates should come from both

Chocolate milk has recently been touted as a good recovery beverage for athletes. It is similar in calories, macronutrients, and micronutrients to many recovery beverages â&#x20AC;Ś But it does contain lactose, which some athletes will be unable to tolerate. including milk (casein and whey), soy, and eggs. Drinks containing milk products can cause gastric problems, especially for lactose-intolerant athletes. Look for drinks containing at least 10 grams of proteinâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from a source the athlete can tolerateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially when the product is for use following anaerobic or strength exercise. Some drinks

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high-glycemic and low-glycemic sources. The high-glycemic sources promote glycogen resynthesis, which can begin immediately when the right sugars are available, while lower-glycemic carbs can help restore energy over time. These drinks should have at least 40 grams of carbohydrates, and as much as 60 to 80 grams for endurance athletes.

Beverages vary in sugar content, but keep in mind that products made with milk contain milk sugar (lactose), which is a natural sugar and not an added sugar. Other products are sweetened with glucose, sucrose, fructose, and even high fructose corn syrup. Vitamins and Minerals: Most recovery drinks contain substantial amounts of vitamins and minerals, with calcium and iron usually leading the way. Antioxidants such as Vitamins C and E are often used because of their potential role in limiting muscle soreness and supporting recovery. B-vitamins, zinc, and Vitamin A are included because they are critical components of energy utilization and muscle-building. Drinks containing vitamins and minerals can boost overall daily intake in key areas where athletes are commonly deficient, such as calcium, iron, zinc, and antioxidants. However, there is no additional benefit from consuming these right after exercise. Muscle-building ingredients: Some manufacturers include supplements such as creatine, DHEA, tribulus, carnitine, and vanadium, to market their

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NUTRITION product’s ability to promote muscle growth. Most recovery drinks contain minimal amounts of these ingredients, if any, and thus are likely below any effective dose level. Athletes should be reminded that products containing dietary supplements or herbs are not closely regulated and carry the risk of impurity and contamination. Milk: Chocolate milk has recently been touted as a good recovery beverage for athletes. It is similar in calories, macronutrients, and micronutrients to many recovery beverages—eight ounces of reduced fat chocolate milk has 130 calories, eight grams of protein, 24 grams of carbohydrates, two grams of fat, and 300 milligrams of calcium. Chocolate milk is preferred over white milk since the high-glycemic sugar in the chocolate helps with immediate glycogen resynthesis. Of course, chocolate milk does contain lactose, which some athletes will be unable to tolerate, particularly if their GI system grows more sensitive with exercise. Limited research is available on the effectiveness of chocolate milk in supporting muscle recovery. One study at

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Indiana University found that chocolate milk was similar to a sports drink in supporting athletes’ recovery between two exercise bouts. Further research on the usefulness of chocolate milk for exercise recovery will be beneficial. Chocolate milk does have the advantage of being fairly inexpensive, familiar to athletes, and easy to purchase. Some athletes who are not comfortable using dietary supplements would be comfortable using a whole food like milk. And, like all traditional recovery beverages, it is useful for athletes whose appetite is suppressed following activity. On the other hand, unlike sports and recovery drinks that can be stored at room temperature, milk is highly perishable and must remain refrigerated. I will never forget the look on an athletic trainer’s face when a swim coach and I decided we’d like to begin using chocolate milk as a recovery beverage for some members of the swim team. My thought, of course, was about the nutrition. Her thought was where to store and refrigerate enough containers of milk for 40 people to use for twice-daily workouts—more than 450 containers per

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week. What would she do if they weren’t all used up at the end of the week? How would she chill them on the pool deck? We ultimately used a dining hall refrigerator in a storage closet under the pool to store individual-sized milk containers, which we re-ordered every five days. The containers were transferred poolside in coolers with lots of ice and restocked each hour. In summary, sports drinks and recovery beverages can play an important role in athletes’ training, performance, and overall health. Take advantage of the opportunity to educate and guide athletes you work with toward their winning drink combination. ■

For More Details ■ To read a previous article in T&C on NCAA supplement-distribution restrictions, search “Reading Labels” at our Web site. ■ For an article on caffeine and athletic performance, search “The Latest Buzz.” These articles are archived at: www.AthleticSearch.com.

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Emergency Planning for Heat Illness

www.gssiweb.org

Jon Almquist, ATC Athletic Training Specialist, Fairfax County Public Schools

In eight of the past ten summers, at least one high school football player lost his life because of heat stroke.1 It’s a tragic occurrence that can devastate a family, a team and an entire community. With players reporting for practice at one of the hottest times of the year, there are many factors that need to be considered to properly safeguard athletes from the heat. Proper emergency preparedness protects athletes from the dangers that come along with warm weather and is a critical step that sports professionals, such as athletic trainers, coaches and athletic directors, must address on an annual basis. The most important concept is acclimation. Simply put, acclimation is the body’s ability to adapt to the heat so it can cool itself efficiently. The process of acclimation can take anywhere from 10-14 days depending on the athlete’s level of conditioning at the start of practice. There may be exceptions, but many athletes are not physiologically prepared to deal with the environmental stress preseason practice puts on their bodies. There must be a period of acclimation built into the first two weeks of practice to address this risk.2 Athletes and parents must be educated about the importance of acclimation.

A PLAN FOR PREVENTING HEAT ILLNESS Hold meetings with prospective players and their parents to discuss preparation for preseason practices. ឣ Distribute pre-season conditioning programs. ឣ Recommend that athletes start with 15-20 minutes of continuous exercise outside, and add 5-10 minutes each day in the weeks immediately before practice.3 ឣ Integrate the uniform in stages – over the course of a week, move from helmets-only to helmets and shoulder pads and finally to the full uniform.2 (Football uniforms can amplify heat stress and create dangerous environments for heat illness.) ឣ Create a practice schedule that minimizes the risk of heat illness by avoiding the mid-day heat. Practices should increase slowly in intensity and duration. ឣ

RISK FACTORS: UNIFORMS, POOR HYDRATION HABITS Heat illness often occurs when an athlete produces body heat faster than it can be lost. The goal of sports professionals is to take steps that minimize the risk of heat illness. This can be done by creating opportunities to shield athletes from excessive heat. Uniforms should be introduced slowly to the acclimation period. A study conducted by Penn State and Kansas State Universities showed that practice uniforms doubled insulation and a full-regulation game uniform tripled insulation, cutting sweat evaporation (the major avenue of heat loss for athletes) by two-thirds.3

According to a research study conducted on a high school football team, as many as 70 percent of the team’s players arrived at practice already significantly dehydrated.4 Dehydrated players are more susceptible to a rapid rise in body temperature, muscle cramps, and physical fatigue. Coaches and athletic trainers should require athletes to weigh-in and weigh-out of practice to record the amount of fluid loss as a way to help athletes modify their hydration practices during exercise. The cumulative effects of fluid loss can be dangerous to athletes, so sports professionals should make every effort to minimize that effect, ensure that fluid breaks are incorporated into the practice schedule at frequent intervals. Ideally, when athletes are sweating, they should replace fluid and electrolyte losses every 15-20 minutes. Sports drinks are preferred in these conditions for a number of reasons: ឣ The flavor and electrolytes in sports drinks maintain thirst and encourage drinking, helping athletes stay better hydrated.5 ឣ Sodium and other electrolytes stimulate hydration and decrease the onset of muscles cramps.6 ឣ The carbohydrates in sports drinks fuel working muscles, enabling athletes to go longer and harder.7

EMERGENCY PLANNING Even with all of the education and preparation, athletes can still be susceptible to heat illnesses, such as exertional heat stroke. In the event of a heat emergency, it is important to understand the risks involved and have a plan of action in place. Before the start of the season, it is crucial to develop a plan to initiate immediate cooling and reduce the chances of permanent disability.8 During preseason meetings, athletic programs should develop an emergency plan that specifically delegates roles to each member of the team. The staff should designate individuals who will call EMS, who will direct EMS to the location of the emergency, who will act as first responders, and who will control the scene. It is essential that sports professionals be vigilant in monitoring athletes, design an acclimation and practice plan, and develop an emergency action plan to ensure that each staff member understands his role. By practicing proper hydration and acclimation strategies, sports professionals can help athletes maximize their true athletic potential in a safe and winning environment. For more information on supplements, please visit the SportsScience Center at www.gssiweb.org. REFERENCES 1

Mueller, FO and RC Cantu. Twentieth Annual Report: Fall 1982-Spring 2002: national Center for Catastrophic Sport injury Research, 2003. Bergeron, M.F. et. al. Youth Football: Heat Stress and Injury Risk. Med Sci Sports Exer. 37(9): 1421-1430, 2005. 3 Kulka, J and Kenny, WL. Heat balance Limits in Football Uniforms: How different uniform ensembles alter the equation. Phys Sportsmed. 30(7): 29-39, 2005. 4 Stover EA et al. Drinking strategy for improving indicators of hydration status in high school football players. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 36: 549, 2004. 5 Hubbard, RW et al. Voluntary dehydration and alliesthesia for water. J. App. Physiol. 57: 868-873, 1984. 6 Meyer, et al. Med Sci Sports Exerc 24:776-781, 1992. 7 Below, PR et al. Fluid and carbohydrate ingestion independently improve performance during 1 hour of intense cycling. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 34: S230, 2002. 8 Armstrong, LE et. al. whole-body cooling of hyperthermic runners: Comparison of two field therapies. Am. J. Emerg. Med. 14: 355-358, 1996. 2


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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

©CHRIS MURPHY

Summer Sets No matter where your athletes are living for the summer, you want them to be making strength gains. Here’s how to ensure they follow through on their programs.

BY ABIGAIL FUNK

E

ach spring heralds the close of another school year. If you’re fortunate, your athletes have been giving 100-percent effort in practices, strength-training sessions, and competitions. Alas, all good things must come to an end. Unless you’re on a campus where teams stick around to work out together, with the last final exam of the spring, these athletes will head off for summer break. And you’ll be left with a quiet weightroom and lots of questions. What kind of shape will they be in when they come back? Will they keep ATHLETICBID.COM

up with their lifting and conditioning programs? And can you expect them to successfully do so on their own, without your guidance? The most comforting answers would be yes, yes, and yes. But college athletes living off campus for the summer likely have their own priorities, and your strength and conditioning program may not top their lists. “I find summer to be a double-edged sword,” says Bill Klika, CSCS, SSC, USAW, Fitness and Strength and Conditioning Coordinator at Fairleigh Dickinson University-College at Florham. “In theory, the athletes

have more time to train, but they’re not supervised, they have summer jobs, and there are a lot of distractions. For many athletes, it’s harder to train during the summer than during the school year.” Though your athletes may be far from campus, there are still ways you can help them maintain, and even improve, the strength and conditioning levels they developed during the school year. By supplying your athletes with a well Abigail Funk is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. She can be reached at: afunk@MomentumMedia.com T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE thought-out plan, making sure they have a place to work out, and following up from time to time, you can tilt the odds toward successful summer training. FALL INTO SUMMER The best way to build a successful summer program is to start on the very first day a team walks into the weightroom in the fall. If you wait until April to get your athletes ready for summer, it’s probably going to be too late. But if you lay an early foundation of motivation and education, they’ll be ready to improve on their own come June. “The key is to set up the base for a summer program throughout the school year,” says Ray Lauenstein, author of The Making of a Student Athlete and Director of AthletesAdvisor.com.

“There’s often the assumption that college athletes are fairly self-motivated. And that’s true for most of them, but not for all. Motivation from coaches during the year will carry over during their individual summer workouts.” Also important is educating athletes about the importance of strength training throughout the year. “Explain to the athletes that strength is a tool for improving their sport performance,” says Drew Peterson, MA, CSCS, USAW, Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at Humboldt State University. “Teach them that strength is the base of everything they do—running, conditioning, speed, and resistance to injury.” “Every time we work together, I tell them why what we’re doing is important and how the exercise is going

GIVE ’EM A BREAK

W

hen designing summer workouts, don’t forget that this time of year is a break time for athletes. While it’s important that they work hard, they also need to take time to regenerate both physically and emotionally. “If your athletes don’t show up fresh because they were pushed too hard all summer, they’re in a bad position to start the season,” says Ray Lauenstein, author of The Making of a Student Athlete and Director of AthletesAdvisor.com. “If it could have been prevented by taking a couple of mental health days during the summer, what’s the harm? Rest days or days where they do something different like biking or swimming are important.” When Sarah Testo, CSCS, Strength and Conditioning Coach at Keene State College, checks in with her athletes during the summer and hears they have a family vacation coming up, she tells them to take the whole week off. “Or if it’s halfway through the summer and they haven’t taken a break, I tell them to take a week off,” she says. “An unloading week with light activity is important.” Bill Klika, CSCS, SSC, USAW, Fitness and Strength and Conditioning Coordinator at Fairleigh Dickinson UniversityCollege at Florham, takes advantage of the calendar by plotting workouts so the week of July 4 is used for active rest and recovery. “I want to be realistic,” he says. “I don’t want to set up a program to fail. That’s why there are days of more and less intensity and volume built into the program.” After all, it is summer. “Everyone needs a couple of days to do nothing, eat what they want, and hang out with friends,” Lauenstein says. “The health benefit of a day away from the grind is far more beneficial than any gains from one extra day of lifting.”

ATHLETICBID.COM

to help them in their sport,” says Sarah Testo, CSCS, Strength and Conditioning Coach at Keene State College. “I hope that later on they say to themselves, ‘Okay, I need to lift because it’s going to help me not get pushed off the ball.’ ‘This is going to help keep my knee healthy.’” SUMMER PROGRAMS Once you give your athletes the knowledge and training they need to work out properly on their own, you can confidently develop a summer strength and conditioning program they can easily follow. Testo starts by meeting with the sport coaches to understand what they want each specific player to improve on over the summer. “I basically work for the coaches,” she explains. “I ask them what they want out of their kids, and design programs based on that information.” Some sport coaches simply want all of their athletes to be active over the long break, so you can send home one set of exercises for an entire team. Other coaches are much more specific and will tell you what they’d like the program centered around, so as to meet team and individual goals. And others won’t give you any guidance at all, in which case you can develop programs based on your own knowledge of the individual athlete and the demands of their sport. Most strength coaches agree that no matter what type of program you’re designing, the more specific, the better. “The detail of the program should encompass everything from what to do for a warmup to recommended post-workout stretches,” says Scott Burgess, ATC, CSCS, President of CompleteAthlete, a sports performance and rehabilitation clinic in Derry, N.H. “I am very detailed in communicating the number of sets and reps that are expected and how quickly each lift should be completed.” Lauenstein agrees, saying that most athletes respond well to having a firm structure to follow. “Any time you give someone options they’re more inclined to do whatever seems like more fun,” he says. “They’re not trained in the science of conditioning so you want to tell them exactly what to do.” Testo, though, has experimented with giving some teams a menu of options. “I’ve done a little of both,” she says. “Some teams prefer the freedom of getting a list of all the different exerT&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE cises, then picking from each area—an Olympic lift, a chest exercise, a hamstring, etc. Some teams would rather that I just write out their exact workout day-by-day. I do whichever each team prefers.” After developing programs for each team, Testo meets with athletes to make individual modifications. “I like to physically go over their programs with them,” she says. “It’s especially important when an athlete is recovering from an injury. If I know they have a weakness in a certain area of the body, I can

give them specific exercises to help improve that weakness. They should really concentrate on improving their individual needs over the summer so when they come together as a team in the fall, they are ready to work on the team goals.” Klika makes an effort to keep his summer workouts consistent with what the athletes do during the year. “During the school year their workouts are extremely detailed,” he says. “Therefore, so is what I send home. Workouts are also updated weekly during the school

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year, so I do the same with their summer routines.” Sometimes, it may be necessary to simplify the summer program since you won’t be able to provide direct supervision. “I include less-complex exercises in the summer to increase the likelihood that the athlete performs them safely and correctly,” says Allen Hedrick, MA, CSCS, Coach Practitioner and Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at the United States Air Force Academy. “For example, I’ll have an athlete perform a push press rather than a jerk.” Testo also tries to keep her programs simple. “To make it easier, I include pictures for every exercise,” she says. “I want each athlete to understand how to do them without me being there to tell them.” A SUMMER HOME Even if you don’t have a palatial weightroom at your school, you are at least familiar with the facility and can develop your programs around it. Come summertime, though, you may be dealing with as many facilities as you have athletes. Before sending them out on their own, Klika meets with each of his athletes to learn where they will be working out. “At least half of them say they’re going back to their high school gym, which is great,” he says. “Another 25 percent tell me they’re going to join their local gym. “Then the other 25 percent say, ‘Coach, I live in the middle of nowhere. My high school gym stinks. What can I do?’” Klika continues. “For those kids, I get on the phone and start using my networking skills. Nine out of 10 college strength coaches let athletes from other schools work out at their facility, and we do it, too.” Peterson also taps into his network to find places for his athletes to work out. “I’ll call a kid’s high school, a junior college, or another college in the area to see if there’s any way we can get them working out in those facilities,” he says. “We don’t ask each other to make up programs for our athletes, just allow them access to a weightroom.” Peterson’s programs typically incorporate a fair amount of Olympic lifts and some gyms don’t accommodate that type of training. “So we decided to modify a lot of the Olympic lifts into dumbbell lifts,” he says. “Dumbbells are the ATHLETICBID.COM


OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE one standard in everybody’s weightroom. And I tell athletes it’s better to do what they can rather than nothing at all.” But what should you do when an athlete has exhausted all options and still has no access to weight equipment?

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Klika makes an effort to keep his summer workouts consistent with what the athletes do during the year. “During the school year their workouts are extremely detailed,” he says. “Therefore, so is what I send home.” You may have to modify the program you send home with them. “We perform manual resistance training or partnerresisted exercises at certain points during the school year,” Hedrick says. “Athletes have those exercises to fall back on when they don’t have access to a weightroom.” (See “Access Denied,” below.) model T12M

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE STAYING IN THE LOOP Even though you won’t see most of your athletes during the summer, out of sight doesn’t have to mean out of mind. Give athletes your contact information and encourage them to call or e-mail if they have questions. “We don’t want them to be unsure of any portion of their program,” Hedrick says. “Confusion

problems. An athlete has the opportunity to tell you, ‘The knee I injured last year hurts on the outside when I do this exercise.’ And you can help by saying, ‘Okay, let’s try a different exercise’ or ‘let’s talk about your form.’” You can also require your athletes to be proactive by sending you their results. Hedrick and Klika have their ath-

Burgess asks athletes to e-mail results back to campus. “A goal-response sheet gets turned in every two weeks and we can catalog that material, even though we can’t report it back to the coach during the summer,” he says. or uncertainty can lead to injury or decreased training results.” And don’t forget that communication is a two-way street. “Under NCAA rules, strength coaches are allowed to contact athletes over the summer,” Lauenstein says. “Checking in can only help. For one, it shows the athletes that we as coaches really want to know how they’re doing. Two, it keeps the athletes honest. And three, it helps ward off any

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letes chart their own progress, while Peterson and Burgess ask them to email results back to campus. “A goalresponse sheet gets turned in every two weeks,” Burgess says. “A strength coach can catalog that material, and although you can’t report it back to the coach during the summer, when the season starts, you can review with the coach what the athlete needs to work on.” Air Force Academy athletes are test-

ed prior to leaving for the summer and again when they return. Hedrick says knowing a test is looming is enough to keep them on track. Burgess does the same with his athletes. “If there is no improvement by the time they get back to campus, there are two reasons for it,” he says. “One, they were ill, or two, they just didn’t do the work.” So other than the threat of a test, how can you keep the less-driven athletes motivated? Lauenstein suggests telling them to find a workout partner. “I see a lot of kids working out in groups, whether it’s with old teammates or high school rivals,” he says. “It’s so much easier to keep an appointment when someone’s counting on you. People generally work better and harder in a group environment because they push each other.” And in the Darwinian world of athletics, those who don’t want to work will usually weed themselves out. “It’s not really an option for most college athletes to not do an off-season strength program,” Lauenstein says. “They either do it and play, or they don’t do it and they don’t play because someone outperforms them come preseason.” ■

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Focus on Ground-Based Training With Steve Emtman Former Head Football Strength Coach University of Washington

What is ground-based training and how does it work? Put very simply, ground-based is a type of training that doesn’t involve the isolation of individual muscle groups. The athlete is working with his feet planted right on the ground, instead of on a seat or bench. It’s a category of training that involves a lot of different exercises and different apparatus. Ground-based training acknowledges the importance of keeping the entire body balanced during the course of development. A majority of sports are based around closed-chain movement, and that’s the basic concept involved. It makes sense to use the ground as your base during training, because it’s typically your base when you’re competing in a sport. What are the main benefits of ground-based training? One big advantage is that it’s a much more efficient way to train, because you’re working several muscle groups at the same time. That’s especially important if your strength program involves a large number of athletes, since it is virtually impossible to schedule time for working individual muscle groups. Core strength is extremely important in most sports, and it’s something that most athletes need to work on. Groundbased training works the core but also goes a step further to develop an athlete’s strength transfer. More muscle recruitment is the key, so it’s important to train in a setting where you’re not on a seat with your core completely relaxed. The core is engaged at all times during ground-based training.

Is there a particular class of athletes who benefit most from ground-based training? All athletes who draw their power from the ground can benefit from ground-based training, since it can help them identify and correct any weak links in the movement chain. Even a golfer, for instance, is performing closedchain movement basically 100 percent of the time—golfers draw their power from the ground just like football players. Are there any drawbacks to ground-based training There really isn’t a downside. The only thing to remember is that you need to be especially careful that the athletes don’t put their bodies into unsafe positions on groundbased machines. You definitely need a sound core so that you can maintain proper alignment and use the machines properly, so it requires some level of instruction. But it’s no different from how you have to coach the power clean and other types of lifts. You have to coach people on how to use the machines properly, but that’s common sense when it comes to strength equipment.

Why is the concept of strength transfer important?

What is an example of a great ground-based training machine?

If you’ve got an athlete who can lay flat on his back on a bench press and press a huge amount of weight, that’s great—but in reality, what matters most is whether he can take that strength and transfer it, or apply it to what he’s doing in his sport. Ground-based serves as a bridge between exercises like the bench press and squat, which have a singular, frontal plane of motion, and moves them into the transverse and sagittal planes. In some groundbased exercises you can actually move your feet and take steps, but most often your feet are planted on the ground. Strength transfer also means that the exercises are more challenging all around, because they’re not focused only on specific muscles.

Hammer Strength makes a machine called the Combo Twist, and it’s my favorite machine for this type of work. The great thing about the Combo Twist is that you can achieve a very effective torso rotation, where you’re doing a push and a pull at the same time. With the feet planted, you can do a press with both arms, and each arm has its own interaction. If you’re pushing with one arm, you can pull with the other and force the core to stabilize the hips in the center of those two movements. If you’re training for a closed-chain sport and trying to develop a good dynamic, explosive movement, working multiple muscle groups together and focusing on the core are two of the keys to doing it right.


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LEADERSHIP

More Than

Elizabeth Codjoe, Head Athletic Trainer at Marymount University, serves as faculty advisor to her athletic departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SAAC. Here, she works with student-athletes to clean up a nearby community park. 54

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JOHN ARONSON ATHLETICBID.COM


LEADERSHIP

an ATC How can an athletic trainer get involved in student-athlete welfare outside of his or her usual duties? The opportunities are just a couple rakes away.

BY R.J. ANDERSON

M

ost athletic trainers enter the profession for three reasons: They love sports, they are interested in healthcare, and they want to help others. For some, that last reason is what it’s really all about. They not only want to aid athletes through their sports-medicine services, but are also motivated to help students mature and become leaders. For example, Stephanie Baker-Watson, MS, ATC, Head Athletic Trainer at Aurora University, coordinates her school’s CHAMPS/Life Skills program, works with the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC), and serves as Senior Woman Administrator. At Washington College, Head Athletic Trainer Thad Moore, MA, MS, ATC, is a faculty advisor to the Student-Athlete Mentor (SAM) group and works with athletes on character development. “The biggest reason I took on the additional roles is that I feel part of athletic training is educating and counseling athletes, and this is a way to do that on a different level,” says Moore, who is also President of the Maryland Athletic Trainers’ Association. “Because the student-athletes see me involved in different things, they know I really care about them as people, not just as athletes, and it makes them more comfortable around me—they know they can come to me about pretty much any issue. That allows me to do my job better.” In this article, Baker-Watson, Moore, and other athletic trainers who have taken extra steps to promote student-athlete welfare describe their projects and how they’ve made those projects successful. They also explain why they put in the extra hours for their students.

ATHLETICBID.COM

LEADING LEADERS At Marymount University in Arlington, Va., Head Athletic Trainer Elizabeth Codjoe, MS, ATC, serves as a faculty advisor to her school’s 25-member SAAC, which represents 185 studentathletes. The purpose of the SAAC is to encourage student-athlete leadership and provide athletes with a voice in both campus and NCAA legislation. As a faculty advisor, Codjoe acts as a sounding board and as liaison between student-athletes and senior-level administrators. She is there to hear studentathlete project ideas and offer feedback on what she feels will and will not work in a particular situation. Codjoe estimates that she spends about 20 hours a month working with the SAAC. She meets with the group one Sunday a month for an hour and a half, and more often when a project deadline or community service effort is looming. The rest of that time is devoted to informal counseling of committee members, making sure projects are on schedule, and talking about SAAC ideas with senior-level administrators. “Right now they’re doing a community service project where they’re cleaning up a park in the Arlington neighborhood,” Codjoe says. “They also sent out a letter asking the parents of every Marymount student to purchase care packages put together by the SAAC that are distributed during exam week. This project doubles as a fundraiser to support other SAAC endeavors.” Another SAAC-sponsored project is running the student-athlete awards banquet. “Last year they decided to have a fun event instead of a formal banquet,” Codjoe says. “So we had a field-day ceremony where teams competed against

each other in events like five-legged races, tug-of-war, dodge ball, and a donut eating contest.” One of Codjoe’s biggest challenges in advising the SAAC is trying not to be over-controlling. She’s learned that it’s important for the faculty advisors to allow the student-athletes to actually lead the group. Sometimes that means watching them do things differently than she would. “It’s so easy for us as adults to want to take over and run the projects and do things our way,” says Codjoe. “But you have to let them make mistakes. It’s their voice that needs to be heard, not the persons advising them. You have to take a backseat and let them develop the projects—you are there only to give tips and advice.” One way Codjoe and her co-advisor, Women’s Lacrosse Coach Darcy Littlefield, stepped back was by reducing their presence at the group’s meetings—instead of attending every weekly meeting, they join the group once a month. “It forced the athletes to get things going on their own,” says Codjoe. “The president took a larger leadership role, and as she did, things began to run more smoothly because the rest of the group saw her as the go-to person instead of myself or Darcy. Now we’re just overseers, making sure they have the proper tools and resources to complete their projects.” What makes an athletic trainer a good candidate for mentoring studentathlete leaders? For Codjoe, it’s a natural fit with her athletic training skill R.J. Anderson is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: rja@MomentumMedia.com. T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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LEADERSHIP set. “As athletic trainers we do a lot of counseling by default,” Codjoe says. “Because we’re accessible and neutral on most issues, we are an ideal sounding board for student-athletes.” Marymount’s athletes aren’t the only ones benefiting from the SAAC. Codjoe feels that working with student-athletes in a different setting has improved her athletic training skills. “I’m a better listener now,” says Codjoe. “I don’t just see an injury as a ‘knee’ but rather I look at the whole person and all of the factors that go into the injury—because there are also social and mental factors that need to be taken into consideration.” LIFE LESSONS Other athletic trainers are boosting student-athlete welfare by getting involved with their school’s CHAMPS/ Life Skills program. Used at over 400 NCAA institutions, the program’s purpose is to teach student-athletes offthe-field skills that are critical to their present and future success. At Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, the athletic training department is responsible for planning and host-

ing events that make up the school’s CHAMPS/Life Skills program. Head Athletic Trainer Jeff Webster, MS, ATC, and Assistant Athletic Trainer Angela Meserole, ATC, the program’s Head Coordinator, work to bring in presenters for a variety of subjects. Webster believes the key to making these programs work is giving the student-athletes ownership of them. “We poll our kids and ask, ‘What are the things you as a student-athlete have problems with or need help with,’” he says. “We also go to the SAAC and they tell us what they want and then they do a great job of promoting it to athletes throughout the department. We’re constantly talking about our programs in the athletic training room and asking coaches what they want to see. It’s a three-pronged approach: the athletic trainers, the SAAC, and the coaches.” One particular topic student-athletes at Penn State Behrend indicated they wanted more information on was nutrition. To satisfy that need, Webster and Meserole brought in a nutritionist who works with the Pittsburgh Steelers. “She spoke about general nutrition dur-

ing her presentation and the kids asked more specific questions afterward,” says Webster. “She also gave out her e-mail address for those who had more questions. She was really down-to-earth and the kids found her very helpful.” Webster says it’s important to keep the CHAMPS program fresh by offering a variety of topics. For instance, this year he brought in a footwear specialist who gave a presentation about foot biomechanics and proper fit of athletic shoes. The footwear specialist offered one-on-one time in addition to his formal presentation, which Webster finds especially effective. “He spent an extra 45 minutes after the presentation looking at individual kids’ shoes and their foot type,” says Webster. “An athlete would say they were having medial shin pain, and he’d say, ‘This is what kind of shoe you need and this is what you should stay away from.’” Some of the more successful programs simply bring student services available campus-wide directly to the student-athletes. “The Continuing Distance Education Department does a resume-building presentation at the end of every year,”

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NATA Booth No. 1911


LEADERSHIP says Webster. “The counselors also take a look at each individual’s resume and give pointers for improving it. It’s a service available to every student on campus, but we use CHAMPS to make it more accessible to student-athletes, who tend to be more time-crunched.” Webster says that because of their open, grassroots relationships with student-athletes, he and Meserole are the ideal people to run the school’s CHAMPS/Life Skills program. “It’s easier for us because in the athletic training room we hear a lot of uncen-

sored conversation and we know what the hot-button issues are for our student-athletes,” he says. “We hear things that the coaches might not and we counsel kids informally on a daily basis. It really is a perfect fit.” GOING FOR GRANTS At Aurora University, an hour outside Chicago, Baker-Watson is involved in just about every area of student-athlete services, including both the school’s CHAMPS/Life Skills program and SAAC. Most recently, she decided to

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step up her efforts by securing grants for new student-athlete welfare programs. Working closely with a professional grant writer from the school, BakerWatson’s first success was a $10,000 grant from the NCAA to fund a program called “Stepping It Up and Bringing It Down,” which ran during the 2004-05 school year. A collaborative effort between the athletic department and the university’s Office of Residence Life, the project taught students to use leadership skills to avoid the negative consequences of alcohol consumption. The program began with a survey administered to Aurora students asking them to list their perceptions related to alcohol use. With that data, Baker-Watson helped develop a marketing strategy designed to correct misperceptions and encourage positive behaviors related to drinking. The second phase of the grant funded a leadership academy that included athletic team leaders and members of campus organizations who were charged with carrying out the marketing strategy to curb alcohol abuse. Those 32 student leaders, of which 18 were student-athletes, acted as “change agents,” planning and hosting events. Though alcohol awareness was the initial area addressed by the group, it also hosted a variety of events that spoke to other campus issues, including diversity education and conflict resolution. The project and the year were punctuated with the leadership academy’s development and execution of final projects that addressed quality-oflife concerns on campus. “For their final projects, the leadership academy identified an area on campus that they felt needed change, and using the skills that we taught them and their connections with senior level administration, attempted to effect change,” says Baker-Watson. “Then student leaders presented those projects to the university president and senior staffers.” The leadership academy also taught student-athletes how to point their teammates in the right direction. “They found out that they are in a leadership capacity for a reason: People see something in them,” says Baker-Watson. “And they learned to use that to their advantage and communicate to their teammates about right and wrong. “We weren’t encouraging those student-athletes to get up on a soap box and preach,” she adds. “But we didn’t want them to shy away from conflict.” ATHLETICBID.COM


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Phone: 402-476-6669 â&#x20AC;¢ Toll-free: 888-746-2378 â&#x20AC;¢ Web site: www.nsca-cc.org â&#x20AC;¢ E-mail: commission@nsca-cc.org Circle No. 147


LEADERSHIP

FINDING TIME

H

ow do the athletic trainers in this article find the time to work on student-athlete welfare issues? Stephanie Baker-Watson, MS, ATC, Head Athletic Trainer at Aurora University, collaborates with others so the work is divided up and not overwhelming. “It’s about asking for help and getting other people in the athletic department involved, especially those who have the same sort of passion you do,” says Baker-Watson. “Maybe they’re good at selecting speakers, but don’t want to host the event, so you find ways to work together and share the load. “Also, my athletic director is extremely supportive and helped me obtain an ethnic minority and women’s internship grant this past year,” BakerWatson adds. “And one of the duties we created

for the position, in addition to coaching, was to have that person work with our CHAMPS/Life Skills program.” It also helps to focus on the activity at hand and not get too caught up with multi-tasking. “I’m a to-do list kind of person—everything goes in my to-do list book,” says Baker-Watson. “When I schedule an hour to write a grant, that’s what I’m doing: just writing the grant. I schedule specific times for those kinds of things so they don’t interfere with my athletic training responsibilities. “I bring that same sort of commitment to my athletic training duties,” she adds. “If I need to plan and make phone calls, I don’t try to do that when I’m working in the athletic training room. And I don’t multi-task during practice because my focus is solely on my student-athletes and coaches.”

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LEADERSHIP you have explained things so thoroughly,â&#x20AC;? she says. And grant writing is not as time-consuming as one might think. After five sessions of brainstorming and conceptualizing, Baker-Watson wrote the grant application in three one-hour sittings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can complete a grant application easily in two months if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on it a little bit once a week,â&#x20AC;? says Baker-Watson. When people ask Baker-Watson why she puts so much effort into improving student-athlete welfare, her answer is simple. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that my role is to give student-athletes the greatest experience they can possibly have,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I look at all the other areas of their lives off the field and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;How can we improve them?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of work, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth it,â&#x20AC;? Baker-Watson adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In athletic training, the people who come to you are usually hurt, so you see them at their lowest point. Watching kids go through leadership training and apply those skills within the context of their team shows them at their peak. Seeing that is a great high for me.â&#x20AC;?

This year, Aurora is using NCAA funding for a project called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strengthening Our Community,â&#x20AC;? which examines and promotes diversity, inclusion, and participation between the Aurora campus and the surrounding community. Presenters included a drum circle facilitator and an expert on embracing cultural differences and finding common ground. One facet of the project involves a cross-promotional effort to bring together the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SAAC and the campus Latin American Student Organization (LASO) to foster greater understanding of each organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals and objectives. These efforts include the LASO and SAAC working together to increase participation at each organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sponsored eventsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; LASOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pinata Day and the SAACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spring Fan Appreciation Days. This time around, Baker-Watson authored the $9,400 grant application on her own, without the aid of a professional. For those interested in securing grants, Baker-Watson says the devil is in the details. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The goal is to make sure anyone reviewing the grant will come away with very few questions because

MAKING MENTORS At Washington College, Moore is one of three faculty supervisors for the 50person Student-Athlete Mentor (SAM) group, which has goals of building leaders in the locker room and projecting positive student-athlete behavior on campus and in the community. Moore guides the SAMs through a variety of projects, including selecting and hosting educational speakers for the studentathletes in areas like drug and alcohol awareness, sexual harassment, and nutrition. Moore serves as a conduit between the student-athletes and the senior-level administrators at Washington, and also writes the $500 NCAAsponsored speaker compensation grants that help fund presentations. One of the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ongoing projects is a national program called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Character Counts,â&#x20AC;? in which student-athlete mentors divide into small groups and visit local elementary and middle schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The SAMs work with the teachers to go over the six pillars of character: trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, and citizenship,â&#x20AC;? says Moore. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each week during the school year, the

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LEADERSHIP SAMs take one of those pillars and conduct a 15- or 20-minute educational program. The kids love it and it’s a great form of community involvement.” A constant theme the SAMs promote is “athletes supporting athletes.” It’s a message pushed within the group, and within each of their teams. “We’re a small school, so it really means something if 40 men’s lacrosse players attend a volleyball game,” says Moore. “We also try to reinforce the message by hosting an athlete appreciation day where the SAMs grill hamburgers and hot dogs for the student-athletes and anyone else who stops by.” Between helping plan events and attending about one meeting a month, Moore says working with the SAM group occupies about four hours a month. “It’s pretty easy because our SAMs are really proactive and self-sufficient,” he says. “It also helps that I’m one of three advisors, so we can divvy up the workload.” Moore also points to the SAM Council—a five-person leadership corps within the group—as carrying a lot of organizational weight. “We emphasize

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that it’s their program and that we’re just there to help them help themselves,” he says. “We meet with the council before the montly SAM meetings, then at the meetings the council takes charge, leads us through the agenda, and opens it up for questions and ideas.” Another project Moore recently undertook is the establishment of a monthly captains’ meeting with representatives from each team. After hearing about a similar idea at a conference last year, Moore pitched the concept to his athletic director and got the go-ahead. One idea that the captains are working on is establishing a “safe ride” program to curb drunk driving by Washington students. Still in the planning stages, it would call for team captains to operate a taxi service from 11 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. on the weekends, driving students home from local bars and parties. “We’re trying to tap into as much leadership in the athletic department as we can,” says Moore, who is the sole advisor for the captains’ meetings. “It’s another voice coming from the athletic department that we hope will enact positive change.”

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Though certified athletic trainers are not routinely called on to advise student-athlete leadership groups, Moore says it is the very nature of his sports medicine position that makes him an ideal advisor. “I already have a good relationship with those athletes and they know I’m a neutral party,” he says. “An athlete might have some reservations about going to a coach or athletic director with some types of questions, but they tend to be pretty candid when talking to me. “I’m also in-tune enough with the internal workings of the athletic department,” he continues, “that if they ask questions, I can usually give them an answer.” Like Baker-Watson, Moore finds that getting involved with student-athletes outside the athletic training room gives him a fresh perspective and an enhanced appreciation for the athletes he treats. “I love working with studentathletes, and this is another avenue to do that,” he says. “Now, I not only see them when they’re hurt, I get to see them out doing some good in the community, which I really enjoy.” ■

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63


www.TownsendDesign.com NATA Booth No. 1533

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Training & Conditioningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Preview of the National Athletic Trainersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association Trade Show

June 16-17, 2006

Georgia World Congress Center Atlanta, Georgia

Sponsored by


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Training & Conditioning is pleased to present you with a preview of the 2006 NATA Convention in Atlanta. Below is information on some of the latest products to be displayed, as well as key contact information on manufacturers and suppliers who will be at the show. And remember to pull out your show tickets (located between pages 64 and 65)—they include coupons for free items, the chance to win prizes, and special discounts.

Active Ankle Systems, Inc. Booth No. 1800

The information presented in the T&C NATA Show Planner is current as of April 24, 2006. For updates and more information, please refer to the official NATA Trade Show Planner and Exhibitor Directory available in the June NATA News, in each edition of the Convention Daily News, and onsite at the 57th NATA Annual Meeting and Trade Show.

Braces & Supports Active Ankle Systems, Inc.

Aircast LLC Booth No. 1101

Antibody, Inc. Booth No. 1824

Booth No. 1800 Ankle protection isn’t black and white anymore. With the new All-Sport Chameleon™ from Active Ankle® athletes can choose from eight bright interchangeable strap covers that come with each brace. The solid U-shaped frame ensures maximum strength, while the molded, fabriclined EVA padding provides lightweight comfort. The All-Sport Chameleon offers great style with the same great protection that has made Active Ankle one of the top brace manufacturers in the industry. Circle No. 600 The CF-Pro is a professional-grade, semi-custom ankle support with the patented Active Ankle design. Created for high-performance athletes of every level, the CF-Pro is constructed with carbon fiber to provide exceptional strength and moldable flexibility. The CF-Pro may be custom-molded with a heat gun for a precise fit, ensuring maximum comfort and protection. Available only through a medical professional. Circle No. 601

Aircast LLC

Armor Sports Booth No. 934

66

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Booth No. 1101 The next degree in Aircast’s Ankle Support™ is the A60, a sleek stabilizer that can be placed on either side of the ankle to help guard against sprains and prevent roll-over. Manufactured from breathable material, the A60 ensures that the wearer stays comfortably cool and dry. Its lightweight, anatomic design easily fits in footwear without creating bulk, while the single strap securely

holds it in place, replacing time-consuming lacing and taping. Circle No. 602 Aircast’s new A2™ Wrist Brace is designed to provide support for wrist injuries such as ligament instability, sprain, and muscle strain. Using dualremovable stabilizers located above and below the hand, the A2 controls wrist movement while allowing fullfinger dexterity. Adjustable straps allow for a personalized fit, while the contoured shape and cool, breathable material ensures comfort. Easy to apply, the A2 Wrist Brace can be worn during most daily activities. Circle No. 603

Antibody, Inc. Booth No. 1824 The BodyGuard shoulder brace from Antibody is designed to accommodate shoulder injuries, including dislocations, subluxations, and slight separations. Because of its inner surface and custom design, the BodyGuard actually attaches to the wearer and works with the entire muscle group, providing strain distribution over the entire garment and significant compression to the injured area. The BodyGuard is effective for a wide array of sports in which shoulder injuries occur, including track, baseball, football, basketball, wrestling, hockey, and volleyball. Circle No. 604

Armor Sports Booth No. 934 Armor Sports’ AirArmor Knee and Leg Protection System is a very unique lateral knee orthosis. Supported from the waist, this brace means no migration and no more constricting thigh straps. ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW AirArmor’s durability and lightweight (18 ounces) carbon-composite construction stays comfortably in place for any athlete—not just football offensive linemen. AirArmor has been shown to reduce knee injuries by 95 percent in NCAA football games. This brace is backed by a four-year unconditional warranty on the carbon-composite assembly. Circle No. 605

Bio Skin/Cropper Medical Booth No. 924 Cropper Medical offers the Q Lok™ Dynamic Patellofemoral Brace. In 2004, researchers from the University of Southern California proved that pain relief in patellofemoral patients directly results from increases in PFP joint surface contact. The Q Lok uses the latest science in patellofemoral treatment to maximize pain relief by maximizing joint surface contact. The Q Lok provides unique results in pain relief, patient compliance, and therapy. Circle No. 606 The TriLok™ Ankle Control System offers a new method for applying a proven principle for ankle control. The TriLok uses a lever arm called the Footlok Strap™, which controls inversion, plantar flexion/inversion, and eversion. The TriLok is made with the patented Bio Skin® material, which provides one of the industry’s best compressions for optimal control and proprioception. It’s lightweight, has a low profile, and is universal for the left and right ankle. Experiment with a TriLok today to feel the difference. Circle No. 607

Brace International, Inc. Booth No. TBD Brace International offers the MAX™, a major advancement in the design of shoulder girdle supports. The snug-fitting, lightweight material allows for comfort with movement while protecting the glenohumeral joint from subluxations and dislocations. Its strap design system offers many options for maximal stability where needed, allowing athletes to reach their required range of motion. Circle No. 608

DM Systems, Inc. Booth No. 818 AnkleTough® offers a system of progressive resistance that can be customized to fit the needs of any athlete. Using AnkleTough can help prevent the recurrence of ankle injuries by strengthening and conditioning the surrounding ankle muscles and tendons. The system is comprised of color-coded resistive tension straps in four strengths (light, medium, strong, and tough). Now with a lower price, AnkleTough is available in the four-pack (one each of four straps plus an exercise instruction guide) or in an eight-pack, each with the same resistance level. Circle No. 609 Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer®, a multisport, dynamic shoulder-stabilizing brace, from DM Systems significantly reduces subluxations and dislocations, according to a recent survey. Ninetythree percent of the respondents confirmed that when worn during athletic activity, Cadlow reduced the number of shoulder injuries. Cadlow’s unique patented pull system strengthens the shoulder to allow athletes to fully function at their sport without the fear of shoulder pain or re-injury while maintaining a full range of motion. An improved design makes fitting Cadlow even easier, requiring less than 15 minutes to fit the patient, and its reduced cost makes Cadlow an affordable solution. Circle No. 610

Bio Skin/Cropper Medical Booth No. 924

Brace International, Inc. Booth No. TBD

DM Systems, Inc. Booth No. 818

Kneebourne Therapeutic Booth No. TBD The Elite Seat by Kneebourne Therapeutic is a portable knee-extension device designed for non-operative treatments of degenerative knee conditions. By evenly distributing force across the leg, the Elite Seat provides an effective way of achieving full-knee hyperextension and reducing pain in bent knees caused by any of the following conditions: acute ACL injury, inadequate post-operative rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, total-knee arthoplasty, arthrofibrosis, deconditioned knee with a flexion contracture, or arthritis. Circle No. 611

Kneebourne Therapeutic Booth No. TBD ATHLETICBID.COM

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

67


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW McDavid

McDavid Booth No. 2100

Booth No. 2100 The 189 Ankle X from McDavid features multi-patented, hinged-cuff technology, that restricts excessive rotation (twisting) and inversion (turning) forces—the primary causes of both high- and lowankle sprains. This brace’s ultrathane shell hugs the contour of the ankle for maximum fit and comfort. The shell is durable, yet flexible enough to not inhibit an athlete’s comfort and performance. The 189 Ankle X features an easy-fit strap, making it fast and convenient to secure the ankle. Circle No. 612

Medical Specialties, Inc.

Medical Specialties, Inc. Booth No. 624

Mueller Sports Medicine Booth No. 1132

Booth No. 624 Med Spec’s ASO® ankle stabilizing orthosis is a patented ankle support that can be worn either preventively or during the treatment of an acute ankle sprain. The patented features include figure-eight stabilizing straps and an elastic cuff design that provides superior functionality and support. The ASO also features a felted seam, creating excellent durability and comfort. Finger pulls allow for quick adjustments and continual support. Circle No. 613 The EpiGel™ from Med Spec has a comfortable, low-profile design to aid in the treatment of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) or golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis). The EpiGel elbow support provides relief with two adjustable gel pads that compress the extensor and flexor muscles without restricting circulation of the forearm. The soft gel pads also dampen vibration. The patented strap-retention system allows for easy application and the universal design fits a broad size range of patients. Circle No. 614

Mueller Sports Medicine

Pro Orthopedic Devices, Inc. Booth No. 1103 68

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Booth No. 1132 The new and redesigned stabilizer from Mueller Sports Medicine has been designed with unique features to maximize comfort and performance. Criss-crossing elastic straps above and below the knee provide self-adjusting support and compression, and the new softer, more breathable fabric allows comfortable all-day wear. A double interior buttress helps support the kneecap

and assists with proper tracking of the patella. Flexible steel springs further help support both sides of the knee and the wrap-around design allows easy on and off. The stabilizer is available in one size and in black. Circle No. 615 The new and redesigned MuellerHinge™ 2100 now fits either leg—right out of the package. Secondary compression wraps help hold the upper and lower cuffs in place, while an improved hinge adhesion of the cuffs adds durability. Designed to protect the knee from lateral blows in all positions, the MuellerHinge™ helps protect the medial collateral ligament and helps reduce the possibility of hyperextension injuries. The patented Triaxial Hinge literally tracks the knee motion and allows maximum mobility. One size fits either knee and it is available in black. Circle No. 616

PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. Booth No. 1103 The PRO 610 Arizona Ankle Brace by PRO Orthopedic is the next evolutionary step in ankle-brace technology. This brace features two figure-eight straps designed to fit either the right or left foot and is constructed of heavy-duty nylon—all of which creates a low-profile, durable, and lightweight brace. The figure-eight lift straps encircle the foot to provide lateral and medial support, while the hook-and-loop fasteners allow quick and easy adjustment even with the shoe on. A neoprene tongue provides a comfortable pad under the laces, eliminating instep irritation. Circle No. 617 PRO Orthopedic’s PRO Universal Protective Elbow Wrap features a halfinch foam inner pad combined with a hard outer shell to provide maximum impact protection for the elbow. A small pocket on the inside of the wrap provides correct positioning to keep it from migrating. An outer neoprene cover meets the safety requirements of most ruling organizations, eliminating the need for additional padding. The wraparound design also allows users to achieve a custom-fit by conforming to their elbows while discouraging migration. This wrap is ideal for hockey and football. Circle No. 618 ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Pro-Tec Athletics Booth No. 800 Unparalleled in comfort and effectiveness, the Shin Splints Compression Wrap by Pro-Tec Athletics alleviates symptoms of medial and anterior shin splints. It includes a compression strip to provide targeted compression and help prevent tearing of the soft tissue away from the tibia. In addition, the Shin Splints Compression Wrap absorbs stress to the tibia and helps to stabilize the area. Its contoured design keeps pressure off the calf area in cases of Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome. Circle No. 619

Swede-O, Inc. Booth No. 1600 Swede-O’s new Thermoskin Hinged Elbow helps prevent hyperextension of the elbow. Its criss-cross locking straps restrict the elbow’s range of motion as the medial and lateral hinges provide a hyperextension stop at 0 degrees. Thermoskin’s patented Trioxon lining is clinically proven to increase subcutaneous skin temperature two to three degrees, creating the ideal level of heat therapy. Thermoskin also increases blood flow to damaged tissue to help accelerate the healing process and provides a light compression to counteract tissue swelling. Circle No. 620 The new Swede-O X8 Ankle Brace is designed with two dual-purpose straps instead of the common four-strap design. The pre-positioned straps serve as both figure-eight straps and top-locking straps. The brace’s exclusive strap design allows easier application, ensures proper strap placement, and provides greater leverage for a more secure fit. Circle No. 621

Townsend Design Booth No. 1533 Townsend Design’s RebelPro functional knee brace provides exceptional protection and stabilization for injured athletes. Patented hinge and anti-migration technology optimizes functional control and promotes user compliance. This technology ensures that the brace will maintain total contact with the leg throughout range of motion with guaranteed suspension. Lightweight, very durable, ATHLETICBID.COM

and with a low profile, the RebelPro can be ordered custom, “customized,” or in prefabricated sizes. For ordering information, call toll-free or visit Townsend Design’s Web site. Circle No. 622 Townsend Design’s custom carbongraphite Premier Ankle Brace provides one of the best protective devices for athletes (and patients) who have severe or chronic ankle instabilities. The lowprofile design fits into nearly any athletic shoe, where joints can be set to allow limited side-to-side movement. Your players will perform at the top of their game with unyielding support and total confidence. For ordering information, call toll-free or visit Townsend Design’s Web site. Circle No. 623

Pro-Tec Athletics Booth No. 800

Swede-O, Inc.

Electrotherapy

Booth No. 1600

Accelerated Care Plus Booth No. 827 The Omnisound 3000E is the next generation of ACP’s Omnisound system. An important feature of the new Omnisound 3000E is its fast front-panel access to the patented Delta T mode. Delta T allows a therapist to select the desired temperature increase for the targeted tissue. The 3000E’s timer automatically adjusts to achieve the correct temperature increase—it’s that simple. There are now over 35 publications supporting the Omnisound 3000 and its Delta T technology. Circle No. 624 The Omnistim FX2 from Accelerated Care Plus uses PENS (Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation) to induce contractions in agonist/antagonist muscles, which simulate the “livefiring” pattern of muscles during normal activity. Identified by electromyographic studies, PENS refers to the pattern of electrical firing in muscles and has been incorporated into the FX2’s protocols. Muscle contractions in the agonist/ antagonist muscle groups provide afferent inputs that assist in retraining the CNS and spinal motor loops to promote normal muscle function. Circle No. 625

Townsend Design Booth No. 1533

Accelerated Care Plus Booth No. 827 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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EXHIBITOR PREVIEW

BioMedical Life Systems, Inc. Booth No. 524

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Booth No. 1812

BioMedical Life Systems, Inc.

NSCA

Booth No. 524 The QuadStar® II is a portable fourchannel digital NMS, INF, and TENS device with three programmable biphasic waveforms (symmetric, sinusoidal, and asymmetrical) to deliver customized therapies. Nine pre-programmed fixed sequences are also offered, enabling the user to program 20 minutes each of INF, NMS, and TENS therapy. A graphic representation of the timing parameters assists the user to program the on/off ramps and on/off times. Additionally, a patient-lock system prevents the patient from changing any parameters. When the lock is turned off, a patient compliance meter is displayed. Circle No. 626

Booth No. 919 Speed, agility, and quickness are essential components in athletic competition. NSCA’s Speed, Agility & Quickness video is designed for strength and conditioning coaches, performance coaches, and athletes looking for a training edge on the competition. This video shows how to increase velocity, change direction with efficiency, and react in a split-second. The video contains information on the correct starting technique for the 40yard dash, plyometric techniques, overspeed drills, ladder drills, reactive drills, and more. Circle No. 629

BioMedical Life Systems introduces its new generation of electrotherapy devices: the four-channel QuadStar® Elite, which features up to eight electrodes and offers TENS and NMS therapy and high-volt and interferential stimulation. This unit includes nine pre-programmed protocols and four waveforms (symmetrical and asymmetrical biphasic-square waves, sine wave, and monophasic high-volt, twin peak) from which users can select, or they can sequence two or more modalities for a complete treatment. The device comes ready to use, with a patient-lock compliance system, timer, and all accessories. It runs by a rechargeable battery pack (included) or a wall adapter. Circle No. 627

Education NSCA Booth No. 919

NSCA Certification Commission Booth No. 919 70

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Booth No. 1812 A subsidiary of Wolters Kluwer NV, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins is a leading international publisher of professional health information. LWW provides essential information for athletic trainers, health and fitness professionals, and students in printed and electronic formats, including textbooks, journals, CD-ROMs, and via Intranets and the Internet. Visit LWW at the NATA Convention at booth 1812 or go online www.lww.com to see the company’s athletic training, sports medicine, and health and fitness products. Circle No. 628

Football demands explosive strength, power, and quickness. NSCA’s Training For Football video presents a detailed sequence of exercises and drills for teaching the Clean, Jerk, and Snatch exercises. The video features stepwise progressions that offer coaches the capacity to train athletes of various abilities. Key points for ensuring the proper execution of exercises are demonstrated, allowing coaches to confidently incorporate these explosive exercises into their training programs. Circle No. 630

NSCA Certification Commission Booth No. 919 Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning, Second Edition textbook is a must for any professional library and is an invaluable resource for those needing additional preparation in exercise science-related content and concepts. This edition includes 658 pages within 26 chapters and more than 300 fullcolor photographs, designed to provide a clear, visual depiction of proper testing protocols, flexibility, and plyometric- and resistance-training exercise techniques. Each chapter is accompanied by a glossary of terms, questions, and references. ($63 for NSCA members; $70 for nonmembers.) Circle No. 631 Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning Multimedia Symposium CDs provide a unique opportunity for strength and conditioning professionals to experience live lectures and to prepare for the CSCS® exam from the convenience of their desktop. Each of ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW the 17 CDs includes an interactive video and slide presentation, a printable presentation outline that includes tables, figures, and photos, and an interactive set of self-assessment questions written in the same style as actual exam questions. ($134.95 for NSCA members; $199.95 for non-members.) Circle No. 632

OPTP Booth No. 920 OPTP offers the IAOM DiagnosisSpecific Management DVD Series, which emphasizes accurate, evidencebased clinical diagnoses as the basis of effective treatment. Each DVD in the 12-title series focuses on a specific joint system and contains detailed information and techniques associated with surface anatomy, basic functional examination, soft-tissue treatments, and manual therapy interventions. The DVD menu organization allows for easy navigation in the clinic, academic setting, or home. Circle No. 633

Heat Stress AvaCore Technologies Booth No. 1940 AvaCore Technologies offers the corecooling device CoreControl™. As heat stress causes an athete’s core body temperature to rise, strength, endurance, and cognitive functions deteriorate rapidly. CoreControl is a non-invasive, painless method for accelerating the body’s natural-cooling capacity (200percent faster than skin-cooling methods). Use of the device cools the core of the body significantly during exercise, and speeds up cool-down and recovery after workouts. CoreControl reduces the risk of heat-related injuries. Circle No. 634

HQ, Inc. Booth No. 740 Early intervention to rapidly and accurately assess core body temperature on the field is necessary in the proper prevention, evaluation, treatment, and management of exertional heat stroke. Research indicates that external methods of monitoring core temperature have not been proven valid under conditions of intense exercise. The CorTemp™ sysATHLETICBID.COM

tem—featuring the CorTemp ingestible temperature pill and data monitor—provides an easy, affordable approach in assessing elevated core temperature on the field and the effectiveness of cooling methods on the sidelines. CorTemp is FDA-cleared and used by professional and collegiate teams nationwide. Circle No. 635 Sports medical professionals can now wirelessly monitor core body temperatures live from the sidelines during practices or games. The CorTemp™ PDA radio frequency-monitoring system from HQ, Inc. receives data transmitted via RF from multiple CorTemp data recorders worn by an athlete or handheld by medical staff on the field. The CorTrack™ PDA software features builtin high-temperature alarms, trending, and data for each athlete, allowing medical staff to focus on the critical decisionmaking process of assessing elevated core temperature on the field and the effectiveness of cooling methods on the sidelines. This system is used by professional and collegiate teams. Circle No. 636

Morning Pride Booth No. 2015 Morning Pride’s unique Kore Kooler Rehab Chair is an efficient solution to heat-stress issues. The Kore Kooler allows athletic trainers to affordably, portably, and effectively address the health and safety of their athletes. Designed to allow athletes to immerse their hands and forearms in ambient water—through the use of limb-immersion technology— Kore Kooler is scientifically proven to be one of the most effective rehab protocols to lower core body temperature. Circle No. 637

OPTP Booth No. 920

AvaCore Technologies Booth No. 1940

HQ, Inc. Booth No. 740

WissTech Enterprises Booth No. 2135 WissTech Enterprises is the manufacturer of the patented Hydration Station brand of portable drinking fountains. WissTech offers a complete line of drinking fountains to meet the needs of athletics professionals nationwide. WissTech was founded in 1998 by a practicing certified athletic trainer who understood the challenges involved in keeping athletes hydrated. Visit the company’s Web site for pictures and descriptions of the complete Hydration Station line of products. Circle No. 638

Morning Pride Booth No. 2015

WissTech Enterprises Booth No. 2135 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Cramer Products, Inc. Booth No. 1506

Game Ready Booth No. 1725

Hot & Cold Therapy Cramer Products, Inc. Booth No. 1506 Cold therapy is one of the best ways to combat pain and swelling due to overexertion and heavy stress on muscles and joints. The Cramer Cold Shoulder Wrap provides complete cold therapy coverage to the shoulder, rotator cuff, upper arm, and elbow for athletes who place a heavy workload on those areas. The Cold Shoulder Wrap is designed to be portable with one size fitting most athletes. It serves as a proven right- and left-sided solution to icing athletes in an easy-to-use package. The sealed ice cells prevent leaking and the anti-microbial finish helps to prevent odors. Circle No. 639

Game Ready

Pro-Tec Athletics Booth No. 800

Whitehall Mfg., Inc. Booth No. 901

Booth No. 1725 Want to help your athletes come back faster from soft tissue injuries and orthopedic surgeries? The portable Game Ready Accelerated Recovery System features active intermittent compression, controllable cryotherapy, and revolutionary dual-action wraps that are ergonomically engineered for almost every body part—all designed to accelerate the body’s natural healing processes. “I’ve seen a two-fold increase in recovery rates. Guys are back in half the time.”—Stan Conte, PT, ATC, San Francisco Giants Circle No. 640 Chosen by world-champion professional teams and top universities and high schools, the Game Ready Accelerated Recovery System simultaneously provides intermittent compression and controllable cryotherapy to help accelerate healing after acute or chronic injuries or following orthopedic surgery. Leading athletic trainers recommend Game Ready: “I’ve used Game Ready consistently with fabulous results. Every athletic trainer should have it in their training room.” Jasen Powell, Head Athletic Trainer, Los Angeles Clippers Circle No. 641

Pro-Tec Athletics

Anodyne Therapy Booth No. 505 72

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Booth No. 800 Experience the benefits of a direct, active ice massage with Pro-Tec Athletics’ Ice-Up portable ice massager. Ice-Up provides quick deep-tissue relief

for ligament, tendon, and muscular injuries. It stays frozen up to 10 hours within its portable leak-proof carrying cooler, allowing for immediate post-activity ice massages anywhere. Treatments take only five to seven minutes—as opposed to 15 to 20 minutes with passive ice packs—for a speedy recovery. Circle No. 642

Whitehall Mfg., Inc. Booth No. 901 Whitehall Manufacturing offers a complete line of moist heat-therapy treatment products that are convenient and easy to use. Each heating unit is fabricated from heavy-gauge stainless steel and polished to a satin finish. Standard features include a snap-off thermal protector that prevents overheating and a rounded bottom that minimizes bacteria build-up. The heating units are available in various sizes and colors. Circle No. 643 The ThermaSplint™ from Whitehall Manufacturing features dual voltage, an illuminated on/off switch, and quick heat-up time. The unit operates on a solar-powered digital thermometer that allows the temperature to be adjusted with digital readouts for different splinting thermoplastics. The ThermaSplint is constructed from heavy-gauge stainless steel. Circle No. 644

Injury Treatment Anodyne Therapy Booth No. 505 The Anodyne Therapy System is an infrared photo-energy therapy that rapidly increases local microcirculation up to 3,200 percent in just 30 minutes, facilitating faster recoveries by increasing a patient’s range of motion and reducing swelling and complication rates after surgery (such as scarring, adhesions, and infections). Eleven studies published in peer-reviewed journals have discussed the positive effects of Anodyne. Additionally, more than 10,000 physicians have prescribed Anodyne, and over 4,500 clinical sites and more than 20 professional and university teams—and even the U.S. Navy—currently use the Anodyne Therapy System. Circle No. 645 ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Ari-Med Pharmaceuticals Booth No. 900 Depend on Flexall 454® topical pain relieving gels from Ari-Med Pharmaceuticals for clinical and athletic training room settings. Flexall gels are used by leading athletic trainers to treat the world’s top athletes. Enhance ultrasound, cryotherapy, TENS, and massage therapy. Flexall gels feature unique vitamin E-enriched aloe vera gel formulas with menthol as the active ingredient. They absorb quickly and are greaseless, non-staining, and gentle on the skin. Professional sizes are available. Circle No. 646 Since 1980, Bushwalker Bags have been handcrafted in America to exacting standards for quality and durability. Discover the company’s line of medical bags, belt packs, crutch bags, field kits, equipment bags, luggage, and specialty bags that are the best in the industry. They come with a lifetime warranty on workmanship. The bags are available in six standard colors, and custom embroidery is also available. Bushwalker Bags set the standard. Circle No. 647

Biofreeze®/Performance Health Booth No. 808 The Biofreeze® family of pain-relieving products includes a soothing gel, a convenient roll-on, and the new natural Cryospray™. Biofreeze® effectively relieves pain from athletic injuries, strains, sprains, and stiff joints. Biofreeze® gel is available in 16-oz., 32oz., and one-gallon professional pump bottles; 16-oz. spray bottles; and gravity dispenser boxes with 100 five-gram doses. The 4-oz. gel tubes, 4-oz. spray bottles, and 3-oz. roll-ons are designed for patient self-care at home. Biofreeze® is endorsed by U.S.A. Judo. Circle No. 648

BSN-Jobst, Inc. Booth No. 1733 Lightplast Pro by BSN-Jobst is a lightweight stretch tape that’s ideal for allpurpose taping and strapping of ankles, wrists, and fingers. It is easy to tear and unwinds consistently for smoother, faster wrapping. It even holds securely in the presence of moisture. This tape is available in black or white. Circle No. 649 ATHLETICBID.COM

Leukotape P by BSN-Jobst is a hightensile strength, rigid tape that’s specifically designed for patellofemoral taping to correct patellar position. It is also excellent for managing chronic shoulder problems, realigning shoulder-related structures, and taping and retraining muscles. Its aggressive zinc oxide adhesive gives it a secure, reliable hold. Circle No. 650

Ari-Med Pharmaceuticals Booth No. 900

Cramer Products, Inc. Booth No. 1506 Cramer Co-Stretch Non-Adhesive Stretch Tape is an innovative choice that beats traditional stretching and selfadhering tapes. It has excellent tensile strength, tears clean, and features a “no-slip” grip, making it clearly superior to other tapes. It’s excellent for use as an anchor for tape applications or compression bandages. It contours easily to the body, allowing you to effortlessly wrap any appendage. Circle No. 651

Biofreeze®/ Performance Health Booth No. 808

Dynatronics Booth No. 1720 Capable of delivering three independent light therapy treatments simultaneously (one light probe and two pads), the new Dynatron X3™ is one of the most powerful light therapy devices available. Users can choose between four light probes that provide combinations of infrared, laser, and blue light while the device delivers two unattended treatments with the powerful 8” x 10” Dynatron XP™ Light Pad. With 16,000 mW of power, the Dynatron X3 provides up to three individual treatments at the same time. Circle No. 652 The Dynatron XP™ Light Pad is big, fast, flexible, and unattended. Covering an 8” x 10” area, the Dynatron XP is 100 times larger than competitive light probes, making the treating of large areas of the body fast and easy. With 7,500 mW of power, the entire lower back can be treated in less than 10 minutes. The XP is compatible with all six Solaris devices as well as the new DX2™ Combination Light Therapy/ Traction System. Circle No. 653

BSN-Jobst, Inc. Booth No. 1733

Cramer Products, Inc. Booth No. 1506

Dynatronics Booth No. 1720

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EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Hartwell Medical Booth No. 1932 Hartwell Medical is a well-known manufacturer of a complete family of innovative emergency medical response products, such as the No.1 selling vacuum splint, the EVAC-U-SPLINT®. Fast, effective, and easy to clean, the EVACU-SPLINT system is a complete multipurpose, multi-use vacuum immobilization kit that provides secure immobilization without circumferential pressure, which eliminates the potential for tissue, vessel, and nerve damage. Even difficult fractures and dislocations can be stabilized easily and quickly with a level of comfort that is unmatched by any other splinting technology. Durable and versatile, the EVAC-U-SPLINT system provides state-of-the-art immobilization to meet all your needs. Circle No. 654

Hartwell Medical Booth No. 1932

IOMED, Inc. Booth No. 1620

Kelly Kinetics Booth No. 701

Medical Outfitters Booth No. 1721

Medi-Dyne Booth No. 1934

IOMED, Inc. Booth No. 1620 The Companion 80 is IOMED’s iontophoresis electrode with a self-contained battery. The Companion 80 delivers an 80 mA-per-minute treatment over 24 hours, compensating for patients with higher skin resistance. Its reserve battery capacity and cut-off switch ensures that patients will receive their treatment before it turns off. Companion 80’s hightech design conforms well to treatment areas, fits comfortably beneath clothing and its hypoallergenic adhesive adheres well even in the shower. Circle No. 655 TransQFLEX is IOMED’s iontophoresis electrode, specifically designed to treat highly contoured areas of the body, such as hands and ankles. Because the TransQFLEX has a unique clover leaf-shape and features an ultra-thin conductive material, this electrode conforms extremely well to those highly contoured areas, making it optimal for drug delivery. Circle No. 656

Kelly Kinetics

NExTT Solutions, LLC Booth No. 525

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Booth No. 701 Kelly Kinetics offers the Pivot Plate, which uses the patented Variable Offset Pivot System. To increase or decrease neuromuscular demand, the fulcrum can

be placed at varying arm lengths. To target select musculature for strengthening, the fulcrum can be selectively placed in the best biomechanical position. Unlike traditional balance boards, Pivot Plate users are affixed to the platform, allowing them to vary their center of gravity for a range of resistance levels. Circle No. 657

Medical Outfitters Booth No. 1721 With over 18 years of experience in the physical therapy and rehabilitation markets, Medical Outfitters is also known as being a full-line sports medicine supply and equipment provider. While being both a distributor and manufacturer, the company can take care of your needs, from concept to finished product. Add in its exceptional customer service and Medical Outfitters offers some of the best deals in the industry. Circle No. 658

Medi-Dyne Booth No. 1934 Medi-Dyne’s Skin-On-Skin® now measures 1-1/2” x 2” and combines water and vitamin E to provide superior cushioning and friction reduction. This unique combination soothes and protects blisters and minor dermal abrasions while hydrating and softening your skin for optimal pain reduction and healing. Skin-On-Skin’s new measurement provides users with an additional size to accommodate when injuries need more than a one-inch square but less than a three-inch circle. Circle No. 659

NExTT Solutions, LLC Booth No. 525 NExTT Injury Management© has been servicing athletic training rooms for more than 24 years, incorporating methods and styles from a variety of staffs. This first-hand working knowledge is the foundation of the program and what sets NExTT Solutions apart from the competition. With quick filter views, a single-page treatment log and an interactive episode history calendar, this software operates just like a real day in the training room. Circle No. 660 ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Oakworks Booth No. 1024 Oakworks® introduces the PowerLine™ Treatment Table–the power of strength at a very competitive price. Lacquered, 100-percent solid hardwood construction eliminates swelling and flaking in humid and wet environments, and does not utilize the delaminating of pressboard, which is used by other manufacturers. Simple assembly is guaranteed because legs can be detached—perfect for the training room. This treatment table is weight-rated for 500 pounds and its options include a high-capacity shelf, QuickLock™ Face Rest, and paper towel-holder. Circle No. 661 The P3 Patient Positioning Platform by Oakworks® offers superior comfort as you properly position patients of any size. Oakworks’ advanced lower-profile design reduces excessive cervical extension/flexion while the resilient platform provides the optimal support needed for both prone and supine positioning. Large vent areas allow the patient to breathe easily in the prone position, and the removable pads are easy to clean and less costly to replace. Visit Oakworks’ Web site for more information. Circle No. 662

OPTP Booth No. 920 The new UE Ranger from OPTP is a custom-designed rehabilitation instrument specifically for patients recovering from neuromotor or musculoskeletal injuries with involvement of the upper extremities (i.e., shoulder girdle, elbow, and wrist). The UE Ranger offers the capacity to begin the re-establishment of healthy movement at a passive level, and progress incrementally within a patient’s own capabilities. For more information, call OPTP toll-free or visit the company online. Circle No. 663

EMR, administrative functions, and advanced data mining for trends-analysis. With real-time Web-based online and offline access, all medical personnel and performance staff involved in the care of an athlete can easily enter, manage, analyze, and share important health and fitness data across their organizations to ensure the competitive status of all their athletes. Circle No. 664

Prossage Heat™/ Performance Health

Oakworks Booth No. 1024

Booth No. 808 Prossage™ Heat is a uniquely-blended, area-specific, non-slip, controllable-glide warming ointment that’s 100-percent natural. It’s formulated specifically for deep-tissue work, myofascial release, and trigger point therapy. Prossage Heat makes it easier to “hook” the deep fascia, allowing you to work faster and more efficiently, with less pain for the athlete. Heating the tissues with Prossage Heat reduces spasms in muscles, ligaments, and joint capsules. Prossage Heat is available in three-, eight-, and 16-ounce bottles. Circle No. 665

PROTEAM by Hausmann Booth No. 1911 PROTEAM by Hausmann is pleased to announce its new model, the A9098 Back Saver Crank Hydraulic Hi-Lo Taping Table. The taping table has a durable crank hydraulic system that allows for easy adjustment of table height from 32 to 42 inches high. Your back will thank you. Comprised of durable construction in natural oak laminate with a choice of 12 PROTEAM vinyl colors, this table also features spacious storage for supplies and a heavy-duty, 500-pound weight capacity. PROTEAM also offers a wide selection of modular taping stations, treatment tables, cabinets, and lockers. Circle No. 666

OPTP Booth No. 920

Presagia Corp. Booth No. 1822

Prossage Heat™/ Performance Health Booth No. 808

Presagia Corp. Booth No. 1822 Presagia Sports™, formerly InjuryZone™, is the industry’s premier athlete health-management solution to incorporate a comprehensive athlete ATHLETICBID.COM

PROTEAM by Hausmann Booth No. 1911 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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EXHIBITOR PREVIEW PROTEAM by Hausmann

PROTEAM by Hausmann Booth No. 1911

SAM Medical Products Booth No. 819

SwimEx Booth No. 1025

Thought Technology Booth No. 708

Booth No. 1911 PROTEAM by Hausmann offers a variety of taping and treatment tables designed to enhance the functional capacity and appearance of training rooms, including the new 4718 Electric Hi-Lo Split Leg Treatment Table. Each padded leg rest adjusts up to 45 degrees, with positive locking positions for added safety. This durable, heavy-duty, 500-pound weight capacity table also features a sliding door, spacious storage, and an optional air-spring activated backrest (#69 as shown). It is available in natural oak laminate and a choice of 12 PROTEAM vinyl colors. Circle No. 667

SAM Medical Products Booth No. 819 SAM® Splint, among the most universal splints on the planet, is now available as the SAM Splint XL, designed to offer greater support for regular-sized limbs and to be more comfortable for larger individuals. This new version of the SAM Splint is now 5-1/2 inches wide. From a minor thumb or ankle sprain, to a compound femoral fracture, there is a SAM Splint for any and all of your splinting needs. Circle No. 668 Treat hot spots and blisters with the advanced gliding action of Blist-O-Ban® with BursaTek® Patented Technology from SAM Medical. Relief from problems associated with shear and friction is critical in any sport, and the gliding principle is the answer. Give your athletes an edge using technology based on the bursa, the body’s natural defense against friction. Blist-O-Ban is ultra-thin and can be used for treatment or prevention. Circle No. 669

SwimEx

Williams Technology International Booth No. 2001 76

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Booth No. 1025 SwimEx, the manufacturer of choice for over 100 professional and collegiate sports teams nationwide, makes the only pool on the market today that combines a patented paddlewheel water-propulsion system, molded fiberglass composite construction, multiple water depths, and built-in workstations

to provide both a superior functional aquatic therapy session and reliable performance over time. Visit the company’s Web site to learn more about all of its products, including its new motorized integrated treadmill—the industry’s most challenging water conditioning workout. Circle No. 670

Thought Technology Booth No. 708 For more than 30 years, Thought Technology has been a world leader in manufacturing biofeedback equipment that is highly-sensitive and portable to better meet physical therapists’ needs. The new MyoTrac Infiniti and MyoTrac Infiniti Clinical integrate both surface electromyography biofeedback and electrical stimulation with easy-to-use display settings that give rapid control over treatment parameters. The officefriendly MyoTrac Infiniti Clinical system also offers a USB connection, BioGraph Infiniti software, and a specialized Rehabilitation Suite that allows recording and replaying of patient sessions on a PC and the ability to download saved data from a compact flash. Circle No. 671

Williams Technology International Booth No. 2001 Williams Technology International is an Atlanta-based biotechnology company that is committed to the development of innovative products that dramatically improve patients’ lives while filling unmet needs in the marketplace. Zoraflexx is the first product borne out of this new approach—proven results in the following areas: Grade 1 and 2 ankle, knee, and elbow injuries; all tendonitis cases (especially patella tendonitis); and bursitis. Visit the company’s NATA booth to learn more about how Zoraflexx can help you maximize results by decreasing recovery time. Circle No. 672

ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Nutrition The Gatorade Co. Booth No. 1307 After years of extensive research, scientists at the Gatorade Sports Science Institute have developed Gatorade Endurance Formula for athletes’ longer, more intense workouts and competitions. Gatorade Endurance Formula is a specialized sports drink with a five-electrolyte blend containing nearly twice the sodium (200mg) and three times the potassium (90mg) of Gatorade Thirst Quencher to more fully replace what athletes lose in sweat when fluid and electrolyte losses become substantial. Circle No. 673 Gatorade Nutrition Shake is a balanced nutritional supplement that’s ideal for use as a high-energy meal replacement, or a pre-event or between-meal snack. Gatorade Nutrition Shake contains vitamin C, calcium, and iron, so it’s great for athletes who want to perform at their best and need to supplement their diet with a convenient, balanced, and nutritious product. Gatorade Nutrition Shake is available in two flavors: chocolate and vanilla. Circle No. 674

Protective Apparel Antibody, Inc. Booth No. 1824 The BodyGuard compression shorts by Antibody prevent and accommodate lower-body injuries to the groin, hamstring, quadriceps, hip flexors, and hip pointers. Because of their inner surface and custom design, they attach to the wearer and transfer their stored elastic energy to the muscles, creating torque and assisting with muscle flexion and extension. The shorts also provide constant compression, strain distribution, impact absorption, heat circulation, and absorption of fatigue-inducing muscle vibrations caused by repetitive use. Circle No. 675

ATHLETICBID.COM

McDavid Booth No. 2100 McDavid’s patented HexPad™ Protective Wear provides another layer of protection for today’s athletes. HexPads are small, hexagonalshaped pads that are permanently bonded to compression wear—such as shirts, shorts, and other protective equipment. These pads are designed to conform, flex, and stretch with the contours of the body, providing maximum coverage and protection. They are breathable and extremely lightweight, allowing for maximum comfort and performance. All HexPad Protective Wear features McDavid’s HdC™ moisture-management system, which is also permanently bonded to the fabric’s molecular structure. Circle No. 676

The Gatorade Co. Booth No. 1307

Stromgren Supports Booth No. 721 Stromgren’s Basketball Girdle is a compression short with FlexPad™ protective pads for the hip, tailbone, and thigh areas. FlexPad protective pads are lightweight, closed-cell, EVA impact-absorbing foam pads that are laundered into the fabric, providing a unique combination of protection and performance. Also known as the “Bangin’ Machine”, this girdle is designed to help reduce injuries from aggressive play by absorbing impact, while also providing maximum compression and moisture management. Circle No. 677 Stromgren’s Protective Football Compression Short features a football girdle that provides maximum compression and moisture management, combined with the revolutionary FlexPad™. FlexPad protective pads are lightweight, closed-cell, EVA impact-absorbing foam pads that are laundered into the fabric, providing a unique combination of protection and performance. The moisture-wicking compression of this fabric enables greater muscle stability, allowing an athlete to compete at the maximum level for a longer period of time. Circle No. 678

Antibody, Inc. Booth No. 1824

McDavid Booth No. 2100

Stromgren Supports Booth No. 721

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EXHIBITOR PREVIEW Strength & Fitness Ball Dynamics International, LLC

Ball Dynamics International, LLC Booth No. 2020

Fitter International, Inc. Booth No. 1632

Hammer Strength Booth No. 1736

Impulse Training Systems Booth No. 1532

Booth No. 2020 Ball Dynamics International offers the FitBALL Pressure Points Program, a self-administered accupressure routine that uses Pressure Points Balls to activate 20 of the most important points of accupressure and increase blood flow to the surrounding muscle groups to enhance flexibility and lessen the chance of injury. This program warms up muscles more safely and more efficiently than many conventional warmup routines. The FitBALL Pressure Points package includes two Pressure Points balls, an instructional DVD, and a reference poster. Circle No. 679

Fitter International, Inc. Booth No. 1632 Fitterfirst’s Xco Trainer is a new product that builds and tones muscles while strengthening surrounding connective tissue and stabilizing joints. The Xco Trainer’s innovative design allows for 3-D freedom of movement, so that users can train anywhere in an unlimited variety of positions. Delayed impact at the end of each motion— caused by a granulate mass shifting inside the tube—produces muscle overload for maximum results. The Xco Trainer is available in 1-, 1.3-, 2-, and 2.6-pound sizes, and discounts are available on team sets. Circle No. 680

Hammer Strength

Keiser Corp. Booth No. 1715

Kelly Kinetics Booth No. 701

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Booth No. 1736 One of Hammer Strength’s most popular pieces of equipment, the Jammer, is part of the innovative Ground Base product line. The highly-versatile machine is ideal for athletes to train explosive movements. To maximize athletic performance, users train with their feet on the ground, to promote totalbody stabilization and better balance that will transfer to movements on the playing field. In the standing position, the athlete’s body is able to respond naturally to the exercise exertion and gravity, spurring strengthening of corresponding muscle groups and enhancing coordination. Circle No. 681

Impulse Training Systems Booth No. 1532 Impulse Training Systems believes the key to increasing performance is neurological. This training methodology can be seen in high-performance athletics and rehabilitation, and everything in between. Inertial exercise trainers focus on this critical aspect of training motion. The training is gravity-free and accommodates any level of ability (from stroke patients to Olympic-level athletes). Impulse Training Systems offers a wide variety of exercises and programs, building improvement in training disciplines used by champion athletes. Circle No. 682

Keiser Corp. Booth No. 1715 Keiser’s Power Rack 3110 allows for a wide spectrum of training exercises that enhance an athlete’s power and stability. Athletes who have trained on the Power Rack 3110 have seen overall strength gains, better speed, more control, and explosive power. The Power Rack works by incorporating pneumatic strength columns, which can be attached to the bar—with Keiser’s patented air technology—either by itself or in combination with free weights. Circle No. 683 Used by countless physical therapists, the Functional Trainer from Keiser Corporation has been a trusted addition to rehabilitation facilities worldwide. This multi-functional machine incorporates two adjustable arms to accommodate high/low training positions, including hundreds of different rehab applications. The Functional Trainer is one of the most basic and versatile cable machines ever to hit the market, giving you the ability to train at any speed and without any impact. Circle No. 684

Kelly Kinetics Booth No. 701 Kelly Kinetics’ SoloMax Self-Massage Tool provides the user with three different options for easily massaging those hard-to-reach spots on his or her body. The user can choose from three snap-in attachments: the rolling wheel attachment, the traditional deep-tissue accupressure knob, or the three-finger scratcher attachment. The SoloMax is ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR PREVIEW designed with a quick-release tab so the unit can break down easily for convenient transport. Circle No. 685

Magister Corp. Booth No. 1740 Virtually identical to latex bands, REP Bands® resistive exercise bands from Magister Corp. offer greater elastic response, higher resiliency, and faster recovery. The patented REP Bands are the only resistive exercise bands manufactured exclusively in the United States. Circle No. 686 The new Airex® Piloga Mat from Magister is developed specifically for the Pilates market with input from several Pilates professionals. The Piloga mat is longer—75 inches—than most mats and is made from a denser foam than other Airex mats. The increased density of the Piloga Mat prevents the hyperextension of the wrist while providing cushioning to the small bones of the hands and feet. Circle No. 687

Medi-Dyne Booth No. 1934 Medi-Dyne’s new CoreStretch is designed to elongate the back, stretching the muscles, tendons, and ligaments—not only those in the back but also those in your legs (including hamstrings and shins) that work in conjunction with the lumbar region. Traditional and conventional back-stretching methods are either too difficult to use or force the back to curve instead of elongate. CoreStretch is light and collapsible, making it easy to transport. Circle No. 688

Perform Better Booth No. 909 The Perform Better Sled of Champions is the only resistance sled that allows for both pushing and pulling exercises from multiple positions. The unique sled handles allow the user to go high or low, vertical or horizontal, and angle inside or outside. The flexible hand positioning allows for a wide variety of training variations. The unit is designed so all you have to add is your Olympic Plates to achieve desired resistance. The Sled of Champions in the 2006 ATHLETICBID.COM

Perform Better catalog. Call Perform Better toll-free for your copy or check its Web site. Circle No. 689 When it comes to Plyoboxes, how safe is safe? Perform Better answers the question by offering the SPS Plyo-Safe Plyobox Set. The padded exterior of the three-box set eliminates fear of injury from missed jumps. Add to this the steel reinforced oak wood construction details for extraordinary stability. The set includes 10-, 16-, and 22-inch boxes, (one each), which can fit together to produce heights of 12, 18, 24, 28, 34, 40, and 50 inches for training variety. See the SPS Plyo-Safe Plyobox Set in the 2006 Perform Better catalog. Circle No. 690

Power Systems, Inc. Booth No. 1709 For more than 20 years, Power Systems has been setting a standard by being a one-stop resource for innovative and effective sports-performance and rehabilitation products and creative educational programs. Its catalogs and Web site offer quality products for agility, core strength, strength training, plyometrics, and balance. Its experienced staff are professionals from the sports, fitness, and rehabilitation fields. Their backgrounds include Master’s degrees in exercise physiology, exercise science, recreation, kinesiology, and sports medicine, as well as Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists and certified personal trainers. Power Systems is recognized for its complete selection, competitive pricing, and 100-percent customer satisfaction. Circle No. 691

PrePak Products Booth No. 1033 PrePak’s Web-Slide Exercise Rail System is for those who use exercise equipment such as tubing, bands and pulleys—devices that provide resistance, stretching, and range-of-motion. The rail system includes everything needed to quickly and effectively train and monitor those in need of rehab and fitness programs: fixtures, exercise devices, and instructional materials. The Deluxe Assortment offers three additional posters, an ExerBand Fitness Bar and EzChange Handles on all tubes. Circle No. 692

Magister Corp. Booth No. 1740

Medi-Dyne Booth No. 1934

Perform Better Booth No. 909

Power Systems, Inc. Booth No. 1709

PrePak Products Booth No. 1033

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EXHIBITOR PREVIEW SPRI Booth No. 2123 SPRI’s Flexor™ is designed to enhance balance and work the core and lower body, while providing multi-directional variable resistance. As two separate units, they help the user function in a true-to-life environment by allowing the hips and knees to function in their natural patterns. Change the distance between units for a variation of functional movements. The Flexor is sold in pairs. Circle No. 693

SPRI Booth No. 2123

The 28-inch Contour-Weights® by SPRI are soft, flexible, weighted, neoprenecovered barbell-style tubes that wrap comfortably around the body. Secure them around the waist, arms, and legs or drape them around the neck to perform any muscle-conditioning exercise desired. These weights are available in 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 25, and 30 pounds. The six-inch Mini Contour-Weights® are a smaller version of the original that conform to your hands with an elastic strap

efi Sports Medicine/ Total Gym Booth No. 1832

that helps secure the weight comfortably and prevent hand fatigue. Available in one to five pounds. Circle No. 694

efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym Booth No. 1832 efi Sports Medicine’s electric PowerTower™ no longer requires a client to get on and off the unit as it delivers level changes at the touch of a button. The PowerTower features a groundbreaking dynamic pulley system that adjusts to girth and height, allowing for optimum force angles specific to each exercise. Other features include a wide base, a telescoping squat stand with three adjustable heights, built-in pull-up bars, and a fold-away foot-holder for hamstring and abdominal work. This unit accepts all of efi’s Total Gym Pilates accessories and comes with an exercise manual categorized by muscle group and the Pilates repertoire. Circle No. 695

Want better outcomes and accelerated results? OMNISTIM ®, OMNISOUND ®, NEUROPROBE ®, MEGAPULSE ® Welcome to the ACP Advantage ACP electrotherapy equipment is found in more professional training rooms than any other electrotherapy equipment made. That’s because the challenges faced today by professional, collegiate and amateur sports have never been more demanding. ACP offers turn-key clinical solutions for rehab hospitals, out-patient clinics, collegiate and professional training rooms that truly make a difference. With patented medical technologies and proven clinical pathways, ACP provides the expertise your rehab facility or training room needs to enhance clinical outcomes while improving patient care. With sports related injuries on the rise, the Training and Rehabilitation Industry is looking for solutions. And now there's Accelerated Care Plus. Proprietary Technology. Proven Clinical Pathways. On-Going Education and Support.

Accelerated Care Plus New ideas for healthcare

TM

800-350-1100 Visit us online at www.acplus.com

Pittsburgh Athletic Training with ACP equipment PittsburghSteelers Steelers Training StaffStaff with ACP equipment John Norwig, ATC (center), Head Athletic Trainer Ryan Grove, ATC (left) and Ariko Iso, ATC (right)

© 2005, Accelerated Care Plus

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NATA Booth No. 827 ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth 3-Point Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703 1100 Butterworth Court, Stevensville, MD 21666 410-604-6393 • www.3pointproducts.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room AB O Lean, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 Accelerated Care Plus Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . 827 The company offers electrotherapy equipment. 9855 Double R Blvd., #100, Reno, NV 89511 800-350-1100 • www.acplus.com Categories: Electrotherapy See ad on page 80

Find product info on page 69

Active Ankle Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1800 Foot/ankle protective/preventative products. 233 Quartermaster Ct., Jeffersonville, IN 47310 800-800-2896 • www.activeankle.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 38

Find product info on page 66

Adams USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1936 PO Box 489, Cookeville, TN 38502 800-251-6857 • www.adamsusa.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel ADDA Tech Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2034 3542 de la Concorde Blvd. Est., Ste. 106, Laval, PQ Canada H7E 4W1 888-661-2860 • www.clinicmaster.ca Categories: Software ADVANCE Newsmagazines . . . . . . . . . . . . 2114 2900 Horizon Dr., King of Prussia, PA 19406 610-278-1400 • www.advanceweb.com Categories: Educational Materials Aegis Sciences Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . 1333 345 Hill Ave., Nashville, TN 37210 615-255-2400 • www.aegislabs.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Aircast LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1101 Manufacturer of ankle and wrist braces and cryocompression devices. 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901 800-526-8785 • www.aircast.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room See ads on pgs. 22,27 Find product info on page 66

Al Rice & Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1716 3307 Industrial Pkwy., Jeffersonville, IN 47130 800-456-1142 • www.alrice.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Alert Services, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1032 PO Box 1088, San Marcos, TX 78667 830-372-3333 • www.alertservices.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room AlignMed, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2035 2909 Tech Center Dr., Santa Ana, CA 92705 800-916-ALIGN • www.alignmed.com Categories: Braces & Supports Ambra LeRoy Medical Products . . . . . . . . 1426 4335 - C Taggart Creek Rd., Charlotte, NC 28208 866-203-4760 • www.ambraleroy.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room

Company Booth American Optometric Association Sports Vision Assn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1938 243 N. Lindbergh Blvd., 1st Fl. St. Louis, MO 63141 800-365-2219 • www.aoa.org Categories: Educational Materials American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2103 8111 Gatehouse Rd., Falls Church, VA 22042 800-667-2968 • www.redcross.org Categories: Educational Materials Amerisport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 918 2695 N. Larkin, Fresno, CA 93727 800-766-7878 • www.amerisport.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Amrex Electrotherapy Equipment. . . . . . . 1622 641 E. Walnut St., Carson, CA 90746 800-221-9069 • www.amrex-zetron.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Rehab Equipment Andover Coated Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 1700 9 Fanaras Dr., Salisbury, MA 01952 800-432-6686 • www.andovercoated.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room Anodyne Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505 A trusted name in light therapy. 9737 High Dr., Leawood, KS 66206 877-832-8527 • www.anodynetherapy.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Rehab Equipment See ad on page 61

See ad on page 110 Find product info on pages 66,77

Aquatic Fitness Products / Burdenko Water Walker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 715 P.O. Box 1246, Fargo, ND 58107 877-757-2802 • www.burdenkoww.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Aquatics by Sprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 905 P.O. Box 3840, San Luis Obispo, CA 93403-3840 800-235-2156 • www.sprintaquatics.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Educational Materials, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Ari-Med /Diversa Products Group . . . . . . . 900 Ari-Med offers the Flexall brand of pain-relieving gels. 1615 University Dr., Ste. 135, Tempe, AZ 85281 800-527-4923 • www.ari-med.com; www.bushwalkerbags.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 94

Find product info on page 73

Armor Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 934 Armor Sports manufactures the AirArmor Knee and Leg Protection System and lateral knee braces for injury prevention. 2030 N. Forbes Blvd, # 106 , Tucson, AZ 85745 520-623-9800 • www.armorsports.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 86

ATHLETICBID.COM

Find product info on page 72

Antibody, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1824 Customized compression shorts and shoulder braces. P.O. Box 369, Cheltenham, MD 20623 301-782-3700 • www.antibody.com Categories: Braces & Supports

Find product info on page 66

Company Booth Arrowhead Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1018 220 Andover St., P.O. Box 4264 Andover, MA 01810 800-225-1516 • Fax: 978-475-8603 Categories: Trainer’s Room ArthroCare ENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614 680 Vaqueros Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 800-348-929 • www.arthrocare.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Asics America Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . 1839 16275 Laguna Canyon Rd., Irvine, CA 92618 949-453-8888 • www.asics.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel AvaCore Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1940 AvaCore provides cooling equipment for prevention and recovery from heat stress. 333 Parkland Plaza Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48103 800-AVACORE • www.avacore.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment See ad on page 36

Find product info on page 71

Back on Track USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517 P.O. Box 6159, Freehold, NJ 07728 954-647-4003 • www.backontrack.nu/usa/ Categories: Braces & Supports Bailey Manufacturing Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1001 118 Lee St., Lodi, OH 44254 800-321-8372 • www.baileymfg.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Balanced Body Pilates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1739 8220 Ferguson Ave, Sacramento, CA 95828-0931 800-745-2837 • www.pilates.com Categories: Educational Materials, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Ball Dynamics International, Inc./ FitBALL USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2020 Distributor of professional-quality training and rehab accessories, including the FitBALL® brand. 14215 Mead St., Longmont, CO 80504 800-752-2255 • www.fitball.com Categories: Educational Materials, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 87

Find product info on page 78

Bauerfeind USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1021 55 Chastain Rd., Ste. 112, Kennesaw, GA 30144 800-423-3405 • www.bauerfeindusa.com Categories: Braces & Supports Bellaire Industry & Trading Company. . . . 1835 Sing-Hong Yeung, Middle Island, NY 11953 631-924-2751 • www.ultrabeautydevice.com Categories: Rehab Equipment Bike Athletic Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1635 3330 Cumberland Blvd., Atlanta, GA 30339 678-742-8000 • www.bikeathletic.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Magnetic Therapy Bio Compression Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . 2014 120 W. Commercial Ave., Moonachie, NJ 07074 201-939-0716 • www.biocompression.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth Bio Ex Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923 PO Box 926, Smithville, TX 78957 800-750-2756 • www.bioexsystems.com Categories: Nutrition, Rehab Equipment, Software Bio Skin/Cropper Medical, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 924 Bio Skin braces protect the ankles with its TriLok brace and treat anterior knee pain with its Q-Lok brace. 240 E. Hersey St., Ste. 2, Ashland, OR 97520 541-488-0600 • www.bioskin.com Categories: Braces & Supports See ad on page 35

Company Booth Biodex Medical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 925 20 Ramsay Rd., Shirley, NY 11967-0702 631-924-9000 • www.biodex.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Company Booth 800-BIOFREEZE; 866-4- PROSSAGE • www.biofreeze.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Trainer’s Room

Biofreeze® / Performance Health, Inc. . . . 808 Biofreeze is a versatile pain reliever that enhances modalities and relieves pain. Prossage Heat is a 100-percent all-natural area-specific warming ointment. 1017 Boyd Rd., Export, PA 15632

BioMechanics Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2036 600 Harrison St., San Francisco, CA 94107 415-947-6000 • www.biomech.com Categories: Educational Materials

Find product info on page 67

See ads on pgs. 12,83 Find product info on pages 73,75

BioMedical Life Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . 524 Manufacturer of portable electromedical devices and accessories. P.O. Box 1360, Vista, CA 92083 800-726-8367 • www.bmls.com Categories: Electrotherapy See ad inside back cover Find product info on page 70

Bledsoe Brace Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1617 2601 Pinewood Dr., Grand Prairie, TX 75051 972-647-0884 • www.bledsoebrace.com Categories: Braces & Supports Board of Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 820 4223 S. 143rd Cir., Omaha, NE 68137 402-559-0091 • www.bocatc.org Categories: Educational Materials Body Support Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 1712 1040 Benson Way, Ashland, OR 97520 800-448-2400 • www.bodysupport.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Bodyblade / Hymanson, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 1826 PO Box 5100, Playa Del Rey, CA 90296 800-772-5233 • www.bodyblade.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Borden Perlman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1732 2850 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-896-3434 • www.bordenperlman.com Categories: Insurance Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBD Brace International offers the MAX™, a major advancement in the design of shoulder girdle supports. P.O. Box 19752, Atlanta, GA 30325 800-545-1161 • www.braceint.com Categories: Braces & Supports See ad on page 42

Find product info on page 67

Bradford Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2221 2101 Magnolia Ave. S., Ste. 518 Birmingham, AL 35205 800-217-2849 • www.bradfordhealth.com Categories: Educational Materials Brecon Knitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 840 PO Box 478, Talladega, AL 35161 800-841-2821 • www.breconknittingmill.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Trainer’s Room BREG, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1908 2611 Commerce Way, Vista, CA 92083 800-321-0607 • www.breg.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment NATA Booth No. 2123

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Circle No. 156 ATHLETICBID.COM


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Circle No. 157

NATA Booth No. 808


Break Faster! Jump Higher! © 2006 NZ MFG LLC, Tallmadge, OH T&C0605

Tu r f C o r d z

TM

Pr o C o r dz

High-level resistance training products with the safety & reliability pro athletes demand! TurfCordz are distributed by M-F Athletic Co.

800-556-7464 • www.performbetter.com Circle No. 191

Company Booth BSN-Jobst, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1733 Manufacturer of sports medicine, wound, vascular and skin care products. 5825 Carnegie Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28209-4633 800-221-7573 • www.jobst-usa.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 62

Find product info on page 73

BTE Technologies, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1616 7455 L New Ridge Rd., Hanover, MD 21076 800-331-8845 • www.btetech.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Cardiac Science Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2121 3303 Monte Villa Pkwy., Bothell, WA 98021 800-426-0337 • www.cardiacscience.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Chattanooga Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1008 4717 Adams Road, Hixson, TN 37343 800-592-7329 • www.chattgroup.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Cleenfreek Sports Hygiene Performance Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2120 1248 Ticonderoga, St. Louis, MO 63017 800-591-3585 • www.cleenfreek.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Coca-Cola North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732 One Coca-Cola Plaza, Atlanta, GA 30313 800-438-2653 • www.powerade.com Categories: Nutrition Collegiate Pacific/Sports Cool . . . . . . . . . 1141 13950 Senlac Dr., Ste. 100 , Dallas, TX 75234 512-731-9100 • www.cpacsports.com Categories: Heat Stress Collins Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1809 370 Paramount Dr., Raynham, MA 02767 508-580-2825 • www.collinssportsmedicine.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Computer Sports Medicine, Inc. (CSMI) . . 1121 101 Tosca Dr., Stoughton, MA 02072 800-359-6851 • www.csmisolutions.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Coretection Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2013 877-853-CORE • www.coretection.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Corganics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2122 25 Highland Park Village, # 100-764, Dallas, TX 75052-2789 866-939-9541 • www.corganics.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1506 Athletic training room and sports medicine supplies 3/27/06 3:44:36 PM 153 W. Warren; P.O. Box 1001, Gardner, KS 66030 800-345-2231 • www.cramersportsmed.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Educational Materials, Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room See ad inside front cover Find product info on page 72,73

Creative Custom Products, LLC . . . . . . . . . 933 PO Box 414, Cedarburg, WI 53012 800-368-8182 www.creativecustomproducts.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Circle No. 158

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ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth Crossover Symmetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2108 Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Cutters Gloves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700 4902 E. McDowell Rd., Ste. 103 Phoenix, AZ 85008 800-821-0231 • www.cuttersgloves.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Cybex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2002 10 Trotter Dr., Medway, MA 02053 508-533-4300 • www.cybexinternational.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Dartfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 709 1301 Hightower Trail, Ste. 111, Atlanta, GA 30350 888-655-3850 • www.dartfish.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Software Deep Muscle Stimulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1815 2711 East Coast Hwy., Ste. 206 Corona del Mar, CA 92625 877-368-7523 • www.d-m-s-.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room dj Orthopedics, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 908 2985 Scott St., Vista, CA 92083 760-727-1280 • www.djortho.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment

Company Booth DM Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 818 Resistive-exercise products and shoulder braces for training and rehabilitation. 1316 Sherman Ave. , Evanston, IL 60201 800-254-5438 • www.dmsystems.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment See ad on page 25

Find product info on page 67

Dynatronics Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1720 7030 Park Centre Dr., Salt Lake City, UT 84121 800-874-6251 • www.dynatronics.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment See ad on page 5

Find product info on page 73

EBI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 811 100 Interpace Parkway, Parsippany, NJ 07054 800-526-2579 • www.ebimedical.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment Econoline Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1436 1800 Industrial Center Circle, Charlotte, NC 28213 800-367-8319 • www.econoline.com Categories: Trainer’s Room efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym . . . . . . . . . 1832 Total Gym is the leading manufacturer of gravitybased training, conditioning, and rehabilitational equipment. 7755 Arjons Dr., San Diego, CA 92126

Circle No. 159 ATHLETICBID.COM

Company Booth 800-541-4900 • www.totalgym.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 46

Find product info on page 80

Elrey Enterprises, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737 220 Hurst Ln., Corydon, IN 47112 877-964-4537 • www.thewoggler.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. ERMI,Inc. (End Range of Motion Improvement, Inc.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 203 Rio Circle, Decatur, GA 30030 877-503-0505 • www.ermiproducts.com Categories: Rehab Equipment F.A. Davis Company/Publishers . . . . . . . . 1523 1915 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA 19103 800-323-3555 • www.fadavis.com Categories: Educational Materials Fabrifoam Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1816 900 Springdale Dr., Exton, PA 19341 800-577-1077 • www.fabrifoam.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

NATA Booth No. 721 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

85


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth Fastech Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 809 1100 Owendale Dr., Ste. J, Troy, MI 48033 800-351-3668 â&#x20AC;˘ www.fastechlabs.com Categories: Rehab Equipment Ferno Performance Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1432 70 Weil Way, WIlmington, OH 45177-9371 888-206-7802 â&#x20AC;˘ www.ferno.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room Ferris Mfg. Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609 16W300 83rd St., Burr Ridge, IL 60521 800-633-2399 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 630-887-1008 Categories: Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room FieldTex Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2040 3055 Brighton-Henrietta TL Rd. Rochester, NY 14623 800-353-7763 â&#x20AC;˘ www.fieldtex.com Categories: Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room FieldTurf Tarkett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1821 8088 Montview, Montreal, PQ H4P 2L7 800-724-2969 â&#x20AC;˘ www.fieldturf.com Categories: Sports surfaces

Company Booth Fitness Anywhere, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 718 58 W. Portal Ave., #108, San Francisco, CA 94127 888-878-5348 â&#x20AC;˘ www.fitnessanywhere.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Company Booth Foot Management, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000 7201 Friendship Rd. , Pittsville, MD 21850 410-835-3668 â&#x20AC;˘ www.footmanagement.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment, Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room

Fitter International, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1632 The company provides functional, core stability, balance, and strength-training products for sports & rehab. 3050 - 2600 Portland St. S.E., Calgary, AB, Canada T2G 4M6 800-FITTER-1 â&#x20AC;˘ www.fitter1.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room

Footcare Express . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1925 2980 Aventura Blvd., Aventura, FL 33180 877-657-3338 â&#x20AC;˘ www.footcarexpress.com Categories: Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room

See ad on page 61

Find product info on page 78

FlanTech Computer Services . . . . . . . . . . . 638 329 E. Court, Iowa City, IA 52240 319-351-5666 â&#x20AC;˘ www.flantech.net Categories: Software Fluoroscan Imaging Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 510 35 Crosby Dr., Bedford, MA 01730 781-999-7300 â&#x20AC;˘ www.fluoroscan.com Categories: Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fraid Nots/Tom Drum, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 625 P.O. Box 10412, Pompano Beach, FL 33062 888-565-9559 â&#x20AC;˘ www.tomdrum.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Freedom-of-Teach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1640 Alameda, CA 94105 510-769-1828 â&#x20AC;˘ www.freedom-of-teach.com Categories: Educational Materials Game Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1725 Game Ready combines active compression and cryotherapy into one system. 2201 Dwight Way, Berkeley, CA 94704 888-426-3732 â&#x20AC;˘ www.gameready.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Room See ad on page 17

Find product info on page 72

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+NEEAND,EG0ROTECTION3YSTEM $/%3./4INTERFEREWITH SPEEDANDAGILITY $EMONSTRATEDTO 2%$5#%KNEEINJURIESBY



s,IGHTWEIGHTÂ&#x2C6;ONLYnOUNCES s3UPPORTEDFROMTHEWAISTTHROUGH THE!IR!RMOR4-GIRDLE s.OCONSTRICTINGTHIGHSTRAPS s.OMIGRATION s /PTIMIZEPLAYERCOMPLIANCEANDSATISFACTION ,ATERAL4HIGH0ROTECTION3TYLE !IR!RMOR4-4HE"%34PROTECTION FROMKNEEINJURIESPLUSPROTECTION FROMLATERALTHIGHBRUISING/PTIMAL FOROFFENSIVELINEMEN

NATA Booth No. 934

86

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

,IGHT3TYLE!IR!RMOR4-/04)-5- KNEEINJURYPREVENTIONSYSTEM $ESIGNEDFORANYATHLETE

WWW+NEE!RMORCOM Circle No. 160 ATHLETICBID.COM


Company Booth Gatorade Co., The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1307 With more than 35 years of scientific research and testing on athletes to help keep them hydrated, Gatorade re-hydrates, replenishes, and refuels better than water. 555 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60661 312-821-1000 • www.gatorade.com Categories: Nutrition

FitBALL STRENGTH

Find product info on page 77

GE Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2008 384 Wright Brothers Drive Salt Lake City, UT 84116 801-517-6435 • Fax: 801-328-4300 Categories: Electrotherapy Gear 2000/Z-Cool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 719 13 Fern Ct., Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 843-671-3434 • www.gear2000.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel General Physiotherapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1537 13222 Lakefront Dr., St. Louis, MO 63045 800-237-1832 • www.g5.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Golden Beverages, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1041 555 S. Town East Blvd., Mesquite, TX 75149 972-755-0289 • www.goldenpicklejuice.com Categories: Nutrition Graston Technique. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 705 3833 N. Meridian St., Ste. 307 Indianapolis, IN 46208 888-926-2727 • www.grastontechnique.com Categories: Educational Materials, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

© 2006 Ball Dynamics International, LLC

See ad on pages 2-3

®

NEW FitBALL SoftMeds • New alternative to dumb-bells • Perfect for smaller hands • Soft, safe and comfortable • Firmness easily adjustable

800-752-2255 www.fitball.com

Discover the NEW line of FitBALL brand products at NATA booth 2020! Circle No. 161

Grimm Scientific Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . 710 P.O. Box 2143, Marietta , OH 45750 800-223-5395 • Fax: 740-374-5745 Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment Hapad, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1814 5301 Enterprise Blvd., Bethel Park, PA 15102 800-544-2723 • www.hapad.com Categories: Braces & Supports Hartmann-Conco, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 724 481 Lakeshore Pkwy., Rock Hill, SC 29730 803-985-1130 • www.hartmann-conco.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Hartwell Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1932 Hartwell Medical manufactures the CombiCarrier® scoop backboard; the EVAC-U-SPLINT® durable immobilization product line; FASPLINT™ semidisposable immobilization products; and innovative field-responder products. 6352 Corte del Adeto, Ste. J, Carlsbad, CA 92011 Untitled-2 1 800-633-5900 • www.hartwellmedical.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 92

Find product info on page 74

Healthcare Providers Service Organization 932 159 E. County Line Rd., Hatboro, PA 19040 800-982-9491 • www.hpso.com Categories: Insurance HealthTech Direct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2115 404-788-5095 • www.healthtechdirect.com Circle No. 162 ATHLETICBID.COM

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

87


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth HeartSine Technologies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 813 940 Calle Amanecer, Ste. E San Clemente, CA 92673 866-478-7463 • www.heartsine.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Henry Schein/MBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1522 135 Duryea Rd., Melville, NY 11747 800-972-2611 • www.henryschein.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Educational Materials, Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room HQ, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 740 Heat illness monitoring system. 210 9th St. Dr., W. Palmetto, FL 34221 941-721-7588 • www.hqinc.net Categories: Heat Stress See ad on page 112

Find product info on page 71

Human Kinetics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2022 P.O. Box 5076, Champaign, IL 61825-5076 800-747-4457 • www.humankinetics.com Categories: Educational Materials Hydration Solutions, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 821 6504 Lampe Ct., Hermitage, TN 37076 615-884-7601 • www.hydrationsolutions.com Categories: Heat Stress HydroWorx International, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 1920 1961 Fulling Mill Rd, Middleton, PA 17057 800-753-9633 • www.hydroworx.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Hygenic Corporation / Thera-Band. . . . . . 1636 1245 Home Ave., Akron, OH 44310 800-321-2135 • www.thera-band.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment Impact Concussion Management Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1615 PO Box 23288, Hilton Head, SC 29925 877-646-7991 • www.impacttest.com Categories: Software Impact Innovative Products, Inc. . . . . . . . 1339 P.O. Box 11, 8075 Pennsylvania Ave. Irwin, PA 15692 724-864-8440 • www.zoombang.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room Impulse Training Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1532 Impulse Training Systems offers a training program that develops an athlete’s coordination, power, strength, and endurance. P.O. Box 2312, Newnan, GA 30264 800-964-2362 • www.impulsepower.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room See ad on page 50

Find product info on page 78

Innovation Sports, Inc., an Ossur Co. . . . . 1223 19762 Pauling, Foothill Ranch, CA 92610 800-222-4284 • www.ossur.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment

88

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Company Booth Innovative Sports Training, Inc. . . . . . . . . 2009 3711 N. Ravenswood Ste. 150, Chicago, IL 60613 773-244-6470 • www.innsport.com Categories: Rehab Equipment International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine-USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1927 P.O. Box 86177, Tucson, AZ 85754 877-426-6932 • www.iaom-us.com Categories: Professional organization IOMED, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1620 IOMED, first in iontophoresis, provides the broadest range of products. 2441 S. 3850 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84120 800-621-3347 • www.iomed.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment See ad on page 95

Find product info on page 74

Jaybird & Mais, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1708 360 Merrimack St., Lawrence, MA 01843-1740 800-76-JBIRD • www.jaybird.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Johnson & Johnson Sports Medicine. . . . 1106 U.S. Rt. 1 @Aaron Rd. North Brunswick, NJ 08902 732-422-6003 • www.jnj.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room Jones & Bartlett Publishers, Inc. . . . . . . . . 812 409 Tall Pine Dr., Sudbury, MA 01776 800-832-0034 • www.jbpub.com Categories: Educational Materials K&K Insurance Group, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1514 1712 Magnavox Way, Ft. Wayne, IN 46804 800-441-3994 • www.kandkinsurance.com Categories: Insurance Keiser Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1715 Keiser provides pneumatic-resistance equipment that allows users to train at any resistance, speed, and angle without shock-loading their joints. 2470 S. Cherry Ave., Fresno, CA 93706 800-888-7009 • www.keiser.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 11

Find product info on page 78

Kelly Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701 Innovative rehabilitative and massage therapy products. 1413 41st St. S., Great Falls, MT 59405 888-645-3559 • www.kellykinetics.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment See ad on pg. 40

Find product info on pages 74,78

Key Functional Assessments, Inc. . . . . . . . 636 2905 Lagerway Cove, Austin, TX 78748 800-333-3KEY • www.keymethod.com/home.htm Categories: Software Kinesio USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 915 3939 San Pedro Dr. N.E., Bldg. C, Ste. 6, Albuquerque, NM 87110 888-320-8273 • www.kinesiotaping.com Categories: Educational Materials, Trainer’s Room Kinetic Innovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733 PO Box 19066, Omaha, NE 68119 712-347-5152 • www.kineticinnovations.com Categories: Braces & Supports

Company Booth Kneebourne Therapeutic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBD The Elite Seat by Kneebourne Therapeutic is a portable knee-extension device designed for non-operative treatments of degenerative knee conditions. 15299 Stoney Creek Way, Noblesville, IN 46060 866-756-3706 • www.eliteseat.com Categories: Injury Treatment See ad on page 91

Find product info on page 67

KorFlex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2112 Life Fitness/Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . 1736 Life Fitness is the global leader in designing and manufacturing a full line of cardiovascular & strength-training equipment. 10601 W. Belmont Ave., Franklin Park, IL 60131 800-634-8637 • www.lifefitness.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 53

Find product info on page 78

LifeWave. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627 4131 N. Stratford Rd., N.E., Atlanta, GA 30342 800-630-6575 • www.energyrich.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. . . . . . . . . . 1812 Publishers of books, journals, and electronic media for athletic trainers. 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106 800-638-3030 • www.lww.com Categories: Educational Materials, Massage Products, Nutrition See ad on page 20

Find product info on page 70

Lohmann & Rauscher, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 814 6001 S.W. Sixth Ave., Ste. 101, Topeka, KS 66615 800-279-3863 • www.lohmann-rauscher.com Categories: Braces & Supports M.S. Plastics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815 10 Park Pl., Butler, NJ 07405 800-593-1802 • www.msplastics.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1740 Non-latex resistive-exercise products for rehabilitation and fitness markets. P.O. Box 4323, Chattanooga, TN 37405 800-396-3130 • www.magistercorp.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 58

Find product info on page 79

Magnatherm - International Medicine Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 913 P.O. Box 45030, Kansas City, MO 64171 800-432-8003 • www.magnatherm.com Categories: Electrotherapy Mannix Testing and Measurement . . . . . . . 503 600 Broadway, Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-887-7979 • www.mannix-inst.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Marsh Affinity Group Services . . . . . . . . . 2127 1440 Renaissance Dr., Park Ridge, IL 60068-1400 800-503-9230 • www.seaburychicago.com Categories: Insurance

ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth McDavid Sports Medical Products . . . . . 2100 McDavid is an industry leader in sports medical products, protective padding, and protective athletic wear. 10305 Argonne Dr., Woodridge, IL 60517 800-237-8254 • www.mcdavidusa.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room See ad on pg. 19

Find product info on pages 68,77

McGraw-Hill Higher Education . . . . . . . . . 1039 1285 Fern Ridge Pkwy., Ste. 200 St. Louis, MO 63141 314-439-6738 • www.mhhe.com Categories: Educational Materials McKenzie Institute, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1534 126 N. Salina St., Syracuse, NY 13202 800-635-8380 • www.mckenziemdt.org Categories: Educational Materials McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1106 7050 Camp Hill Rd., Ft. Washington, PA 215-273-7908 • Fax: 215-273-4116 Categories: Trainer’s Room Med Spec (ASO). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 624 Med Spec® offers innovative sports medicine products. 4600-K Lebanon Rd., Charlotte, NC 28227

Company Booth 800-582-4040 • www.medspec.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment See ad on page 10

Find product info on page 68

Medco Sports Medicine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1321 500 Fillmore Ave., Tonawanda, NY 14150 800-556-3326 • www.medco-athletics.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products. . . . . . . . 1934 Manufacturer and distributor of foot supports and stretching products. P.O. Box 1649, Colleyville, TX 76034-1649 800-810-1740 • www.medi-dyne.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on pgs. 42,87

Find product info on pgs. 74,79

Medical Fitness Association . . . . . . . . . . . 2217 P.O. Box 73103, Richmond, CA 23235 804-327-0330 • www.medicalfitness.org Categories: Educational Materials Medical Outfitters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1721 Medical Outfitters is a full-line distributor of sports medicine equipment and supplies. 11529 W. 79th St., Leneka, KS 66214 800-628-5282 • www.medicaloutfitters.net Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment,

Circle No. 163 ATHLETICBID.COM

Company Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 96

Booth

Find product info on page 74

Medical Quant USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1820 27100 Richmond Rd., Ste. 9, Solon, OH 44139 440-542-0761 • www.medicalquant.com Categories: Rehab Equipment Medical Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 841 115 Princeton Rd., Athens, GA 30606 866-763-3786 • medicalsummary.com MedTreo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2041 877-777-8736 • www.medtreo.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Medtronic Physio Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1214 11811 Willows Rd, NE, Redmond, WA 98073 800-442-1142 • www.physio-control.com Categories: Trainer’s Room MedZone Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2101 PO Box 2068, Sun City, AZ 85372 866-MEDZONE • www.medzonecorp.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Trainer’s Room Metron Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2016 • www.metron.com.au Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

NATA Booth No. 1103 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

89


Company Booth Mettler Electronics Corp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1020 1333 S. Claudina St., Anaheim, CA 92805 800-854-9305 • www.mettlerelectronics.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment Mission Pharmacal Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 904 PO Box 786099, San Antonio, TX 78278-6099 800-531-3333 • www.missionpharmacal.com Categories: Nutrition, Trainer’s Room Morning Pride/Total Fire Group . . . . . . . . 2015 Morning Pride developed the unique Kore Kooler Rehab Chair, an efficient solution to heat-stress issues. 1 Innovation Ct., Dayton, OH 45413-0616 800-688-6148 • www.korekoolerrehabchair.com Categories: Heat Stress See ad on page 18

Find product info on page 71

Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 1132 Complete sports medicine supplies, tapes, braces and supports. One Quench Dr., P.O. Box 99 Prairie du Sac, WI 53578 800-356-9522 • www.muellersportsmed.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 7

Find product info on page 68

National Center for Drug Free Sports, Inc., The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1624 810 Baltimore, Kansas City, MO 64105 816-474-8655 • www.drugfreesport.com National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. . . . . . 713 1 AMS Cir., Bethesda, MD 20198 877-226-4267 • www.niams.nih.gov Categories: Educational Materials National Medical Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 823 12415 N. Old Meridian, Carmel, IN 46032 800-662-7283 • www.nmadirect.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. National Strength & Conditioning Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 919 The national association for strength and conditioning coaches, specialists, and sports professionals. 1885 Bob Johnson Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 80906 800-815-6826 • www.nsca-lift.org Categories: Educational Materials, Insurance, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 109

Find product info on page 70

Neuro Resource Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 1100 Jupiter Rd., Ste. 190, Plano, TX 75074 877-314-6500 • www.nrg-unlimited.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Rehab Equipment New Option Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 618 6718 Oakbrook Blvd., Dallas, TX 75235 800-872-5488 • www.newoptions-sports.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room NExTT Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 218 West Washington Ave., Ste. 830 South Bend, IN 46601

Circle No. 164

Company Booth 574-233-3960 • www.nexttsolutions.com Categories: Software Nova Southeastern University . . . . . . . . . 1714 3301 College Ave. Ft. Lauderdale-Davie, Fl 33314-7796 800-541-6682 • www.nova.edu Categories: Educational Materials NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . . . . 919 NSCA Certification Commission provides Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and NSCACertified Personal Trainer certifications. 3333 Landmark Cir., Lincoln, NE 68504 888-746-2378 • www.nsca-cc.org Categories: Educational Materials, Insurance See ad on page 59

Find product info on page 70

O-Pro Mouth Guards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1218 888-836-9751 • www.opro.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Oakworks, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1024 Oakworks® manufactures world-class portable and stationary treatment tables for all sports. 923 E. Wellspring Rd., New Freedom, PA 17349 800-916-4603 • www.oakworkspt.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on back cover Find product info on page 75

Octogen Pharmacal Co., Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . 1005 2750 Cambridge Hills Rd., Cumming, GA 30041 770-888-8881 • www.octogen.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Optimal Nutrition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 2202 P.O. Box 2555, Rock Hill, SC 29732 800-817-9808 • www.onsperformance.com Categories: Nutrition OPTP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 920 OPTP provides products and resources for foam rollers, core stability, proprioception, and stretching. P.O. Box 47009, Minneapolis, MN 55447 800-367-7393 • www.optp.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Educational Materials, Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room See ad on pg. 93

Find product info on pages 71,75

Orthometrix, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1840 2700 Research Dr., Ste. 400, Plano, TX 75074 972-309-8906 • www.orthometrix.net Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. OrthoRX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1916 2700 Research Drive, Ste. 400, Plano, TX 75074 636-405-3038 • www.orthorx.net Categories: Injury Treatment Pacific Health Laboratories. . . . . . . . . . . . . 804 100 Matawan Rd., Ste. 420, Matawan, NJ 07747 732-739-2900 • www.pacifichealthlabs.com Categories: Nutrition Parker Laboratories, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1119 286 Eldridge Rd., Fairfield, NJ 07004 973-276-9500 • www.parkerlabs.com Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Trainer’s Room


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth PCC, Inc. Air Purification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1823 P.O. Box 22294, Little Rock, AR 72201 501-221-0361 • www.ecoquestintl.com Categories: Nutrition, Trainer’s Room Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 909 A complete catalog of functional training and rehabilitation equipment. P.O. Box 8090, 11 Amflex Dr. Cranston, RI 02920-0090 800-556-7464 • www.performbetter.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 21

Company Booth Pneumex, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1633 3115 N. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint, ID 83864 208-265-4105 • www.pneumex.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Power Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1709 Power Systems, Inc. is a leading supplier of sporttraining, health, and fitness products. P.O. Box 31709, Knoxville, TN 37930 800-321-6975 • www.power-systems.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Find product info on page 79

Find product info on page 79

Perry Dynamics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1825 2810 N. Jasper St., Decatur, IL 62526 800-315-8185 • www.perrydynamics.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Pre-Paid Legal Services/Lasky & Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1817 8800 Thunderbird Dr., Pensacola, FL 32514 850-501-8889 • www.prepaidlegal.com/info/ nataassoc Categories: Legal Services

Philips Medical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 611 3000 Minuteman Rd., Andover, MA 01810 800-453-6860 • www.medical.philips.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Physiomed North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613 401 Lakeview Dr., Farmerville, LA 71241 318-368-7266 • www.physiomed.com Categories: Rehab Equipment

Premier Software, Inc. (Simtrak Mobility) . 805 P.O. Box 203, Winfield,, IL 60190 630-906-6630 • www.simtrak.com Categories: Software, Trainer’s Room PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1033 Maufacturer of the Web Slide Exercise Rail, Home Ranger Shoulder Pulley, and Free-Up Massage Cream.

Company Booth 4055 Oceanside Blvd., Ste. L Oceanside, CA 92056-5821 800-544-7257 • www.prepakproducts.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 63

Find product info on page 79

Presagia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1822 Presagia provides Web-based athlete healthmanagement solutions. 147 St. Paul St., Ste. 300 Montreal, PQ, Canada H2Y 1Z5 866-696-7198 • www.presagia.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Software, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 96

Find product info on page 75

Preventec International, LLC . . . . . . . . . . 1837 1820 The Exchange, Ste. 150, Atlanta, GA 30339 904-206-2113 Categories: Educational Materials PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 1103 PRO Orthopedic specializes in neoprene supports, braces, and sleeves—off the shelf or custom-made. 2884 E. Ganley Rd., Tucson, AZ 85706 800-523-5611 • www.proorthopedic.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Magnetic Therapy, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 89

Find product info on page 68

Get It Straight

WWW.ELITESEAT.COM • 866-756-3706 • 15299 Stony Creek Way Noblesville, Indiana 46060 Circle No. 165 ATHLETICBID.COM

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EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800 Manufacturer of sports medicine supports, braces, and cryotherapy products. 2735 152nd Ave. N.E. , Redmond , WA 98052 800-779-3372 • www.injurybegone.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Trainer’s Room See ad on pg. 15

Find product info on pages 69,72

Professional Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2005 54 Hugh Adams Rd., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435 850-892-5731 • www.ezywrap.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment Prognotions, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602 Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room PROTEAM by Hausmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1911 PROTEAM provides customized taping stations and treatment furniture for athletic trainers, including modular taping tables, split-leg tables, and whirlpool tables. 130 Union St., Northvale, NJ 07647 888-428-7626 • www.proteamtables.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on pg. 57

Find product info on pages 75,76

Company Booth PureFit, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1904 2 Avellino, Irvine, CA 92620 866-PURE-FIT • www.purefit.com Categories: Nutrition PureWorks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1614 4120 S. 500 West, Ste. 1, Salt Lake City, UT 84123 801-262-PURE • www.protectedbypureworks.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Quadex Pharmaceuticals, LLC . . . . . . . . . 2038 2469 Ft. Union Blvd., Salt Lake City, UT 84121 801-453-9614 • www.viroxyn.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Quantum Devices, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714 112 E. Orbison St., Barneveld, WI 53507 877-927-7432 • www.warp-heals.com Categories: Electrotherapy Regent Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1433 3585 Engineering Drive, Ste. 250 Norcross, GA 30092-2820 800-805-0585 • us.regentweb.net Categories: Trainer’s Room Remington Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739 3145 McCart, Ft. Worth, TX 76110 888-333-4526 • www.drinkables.com Categories: Nutrition

Company Booth Renfrew Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 824 111 Great Pond Dr., Windsor, CT 06095 860-688-8000 • www.renfrewathletics.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Trainer’s Room Rich-Mar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1422 15499 E. 590th Rd., Inola, OK 74036 800-762-4665 • www.richmarweb.com Categories: Educational Materials, Electrotherapy Riddell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1416 669 Sugar Lane, Elyria, OH 44035 800-275-5338 • www.riddell.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 704 1662 W. 820 North, Provo, UT 84601 866-780-4107 • www.rmuohp.edu Categories: Educational Materials RUN Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1737 22702 Via Santa Maria, Mission Viejo, CA 92691 949-348-1234 • www.runtech.com Categories: Software Safe4Hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2017 129 E College Ave., Ste. 200, Westerville, OH 43081 888-368-7477 • www.safe4hours.com Categories: Trainer’s Room SAM Medical Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 819 4909 W. Coast Hwy., Ste. 245, Newport, OR 97365 800-818-4726 • www.sammedical.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 26

ELEVATE YOUR GAME

Chosen for use at the 1994, 1999 and 2002 Olympic Games

Confidence inspires performance- on the field of play, AND in the training room. Hartwell Medical is proud of its long history of providing the splinting and immobilization technology trusted by the greatest athletes – and Athletic Trainers – in the world. Whether it’s the convenience of our FASPLINT ™ semi-disposable vacuum splints, the quality and construction of our EVAC-U-SPLINT ® durable vacuum splints, or the creativity and genius of the CombiCarrier ® “scoop” backboard, our products will enable you to deliver “Olympic-Level” care to your athletes– on the field, and in the training room.

6352 Corte del Abeto, Suite J • Carlsbad, CA 92011-1408

800-633-5900 • 760-438-5500 • Fax 760-438-2783 NATA Booth No. 1932

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Circle No. 166

www.HartwellMedical.com

Find product info on page 76

Saunders Group, Inc., The . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1808 4250 Norex Dr., Chaska, MN 55318 800-966-3140 • www.thesaundersgroup.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Educational Materials, Hot & Cold Treatment, Magnetic Therapy, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment Saunders/Mosby/Churchill . . . . . . . . . . . . 2116 P.O. Box 945, New York, NY 10159-0945 888-437-4636 • www.intl.elsevierhealth.com Categories: Educational Materials Schering-Plough Healthcare Products . . 1216 3 Connell Dr., Berkeley Hts., NJ 07922 908-679-1640 • www.drscholls.com, tinactin.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Schutt Sports Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 922 1200 East Union, Litchfield, IL 62056-0426 www.schutt-sports.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Seneca Medical, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1900 85 Shaffer Park Dr., Tiffin, OH 44883 800-447-0225 • www.senecamedical.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Sharps Compliance, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501 P.O. Box 94, Clear Lake, IA 50428 800-207-0976 • www.sharpsinc.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Shuttle Systems by Contemporary Design 1536 Rehabilitation and fitness equipment. PO Box 5089, 10005 Mt. Baker Hwy. Glacier, WA 98244-5089 800-334-5633 • www.shuttlesystems.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 24 ATHLETICBID.COM


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth Simone Super Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1827 123 Franklin Corner Rd., Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-896-2646 • www.simonesuperenergy.com Categories: Nutrition Slack, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1035 6900 Grove Rd., Thorofare, NJ 08086 856-848-1000 • www.slackbooks.com Categories: Educational Materials Solaris, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 722 6737 W. Washington St., West Allis, WI 53214 414-918-9180 • www.solaris-tribute.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

Company Booth Steens Americas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 1620 North I-35 E., Ste. 304, Carrollton, TX 75006 866-264-8444 • web www.steensna.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Company Booth PO Box 1230, 713 Main St. Ste. 201, Hays, KS 67601 785-625-4674 • www.stromgren.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room

STL International, Inc./Hang Ups . . . . . . . 1037 9902 162nd St. Court East, Puyallup, WA 98375 800-847-0143 • www.stlintl.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Summit America Insurance Services, LC . . 1019 7400 College Blvd., Ste. 100, Overland Park, KS 66210; 2180 S. 1300 E., Ste. 520, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 800-955-1991 • www.summitamerica-ins.com Categories: Insurance

Stromgren Supports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 721 Designer of compression shorts/tops and protection-performance apparel.

See ad on page 85

Find product info on page 77

Spenco Medical Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634 PO Box 2501 6301 Imperial Dr., Waco, TX 76712 800-877-3626 • www.spenco.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Magnetic Therapy, Trainer’s Room Sport Tapes, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610 35 Crosby Rd., Dover, NH 03820 800-752-4944 • www.tape-o.com Categories: Trainer’s Room SportPharm Pharmacueticals . . . . . . . . . . . 801 381 Van Ness Aven., Ste. 1507 Torrance, CA 90501 800)-272-4767 • www.sportpharm.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Sports Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 865 Muirfield Dr., Hanover Park, IL 60133 800-323-1305 • www.esportshealth.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

©2006 OPTP

Stretches everything more effectively. Including your budget.

Sports Medicine Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 PO Box 173, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-455-3753 • www.sportsmedicineconcepts.com Categories: Educational Materials Sports-O-Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1813 P.O. Box 502, Goshen, IN 46527 574-903-8895 • www.sportsozone.com Categories: Trainer’s Room SportsMedic, Inc. (Med Pac) . . . . . . . . . . . . 802 P.O. Box 373, Buffalo, MN 55313 800-414-9031 • www.medicalbags.com Categories: Trainer’s Room SportsTemp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1923 Self-adhesive temperature monitoring strips. 7767 S. Valentia St., Englewood, CO 80112 303-796-8234 • www.sportstemp.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 56

SPRI Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2123 SPRI Products is a leading manufacturer and distributor of rubberized-resistance exercise products for health and fitness professionals. 1600 N. Wind Blvd., Libertyville, IL 60048 800-222-7774 • www.spriproducts.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 82

Find product info on page 80

StarTrac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1539 225 S. Tropical Trail #516, Irvine, CA 92606 714-669-1660 • www.startrac.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. ATHLETICBID.COM

While there are many machines and products that help stretch, none are as simple, effective and affordable as the Stretch Out® Strap from OPTP. The unique design fits anyone, and the included instruction booklet demonstrates 30 solo stretches to increase range of motion for major muscle groups. Exercise poster and video are also available. Want increased flexibility and performance without sore muscles? Go farther with the Stretch Out Strap.

www.optp.com/ad 1-800-367-7393 T O O L S F O R F I T N E S S • K N O W L E D G E F O R H E A LT H

Circle No. 167

NATA Booth No. 920 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth SuperSpine™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 941 13260 Glen Circle Rd., Poway, CA 92064 858-487-3700 Categories: Rehab Equipment Swede-O, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1600 Swede-O offers the new X8 ankle brace and Thermoskin Thermal Supports. 6459 Ash St., North Branch, MN 55056 800-525-9339 • www.swedeo.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment See ad on page 60

Find product info on page 69

SwimEx , Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1025 SwimEx offers a wide range of aquatic therapy and conditioning pools. 846 Airport Rd., Fall River, MA 02720 800-877-7946 • www.swimex.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 56

Find product info on page 76

Synergy Therapeutic Systems . . . . . . . . . 1917 P.O. Box 952548 , Lake Mary, FL 32795-2548 800-639-3539 • www.synergytherapeutic.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, Inc.. . 604 1670 94th Ln. N.E., Blaine, MN 55449 866-795-0057 • www.goengo.com Categories: Braces & Supports

Company Booth Tanita Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 2625 S. Clearbrook Dr. Arlington Heights, IL 60005 800-826-4828 • www.tanita.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Tec Laboratories, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2204 7100 Tec Labs Way S. W., Albany, OR 97321 800-ITCHING • www.teclabsinc.com Categories: Trainer’s Room The Stick/RPI of Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1527 120 Interstate North Pky. East, Ste. 424 Atlanta, GA 30339-2158 423-562-2702 • www.thestick.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room Theracraft, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2033 Therapy Innovations, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 735 Categories: Rehab Equipment Theraquip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1921 2000 N. Church St., Greensboro, NC 27405 800-632-1312 • www.theraquip.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

www.bushwalkerbags.com tel.800.527.4923 fax.480.966.9806 WHEELED MED BAGS

A25SI Skatewheel Deluxe

A28SI Superskate

CARRY MED BAGS

A25 Deluxe Med Bag

BELT PACKS B22 Medium

B20 Small

Company Booth Thermionics Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 938 3501 S. 6th St. , Springfield, IL 62703 800-800-5728 • www.thermipaq.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment Thermo-Electric Co., Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1438 455 Route 30, Imperial, PA 15126 800-633-8080 • Fax: 724-95-1892 Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment Thomson Delmar Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . 1734 5 Maxwell Dr., Clifton Park, NY 12065-2919 800-347-7707 • www.delmarhealthcare.com Categories: Educational Materials Thought Technology Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 708 Biofeedback devices 2180 Belgrave Ave., Montreal , PQ, Canada H4A 2L8 514-489-8251 • www.thoughttechnology.com Categories: Rehab Equipment See ad on page 123

Find product info on page 76

Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1533 Pre-sized and genuine custom functional knee braces; custom elbow brace 4615 Shepard St., Bakersfield, CA 93313-2339 800-432-3466 • www.townsenddesign.com Categories: Braces & Supports See ad on page 64

Find product info on page 69

BUSHWALKER Validated, SINCE 1 9 8 0 BAGS adding Flexall® to ultrasound therapy. A25C Wheeled Deluxe

TRAVEL BAGS

A18 Large Fold-up

MED BAG ACCESSORIES A11 Combo Kit A10 Vial Kit

Learn how a 25:75 Flexall and ultrasound gel mixture provided results equal to 100% ultrasound gel, with an added analgesic sensation of warmth. For a copy of our latest study supporting the addition of Flexall pain relieving gels to your therapeutic ultrasound treatments and a free sample, call us toll free at 800-527-4923 or request by email at info@ari-med.com PAIN RELIEVING GELS

B25 Deluxe

NATA Booth No. 900

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A9 Unit Dose

Circle No. 194

NATA Booth No. 900

Circle No. 195 ATHLETICBID.COM


The Broadest Range of Iontophoresis Products 速

EXPERT INSIGHT Thomas M. Parkinson, Ph.D. www.rehabpub.com

For More Information Contact: IOMED, Inc. 800 621-3347 E-mail: cs@iomed.com www.iomed.com Circle No. 169

NATA Booth No. 1620


EXHIBITOR LISTING Company Booth Training & Conditioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1909 The only trade magazine serving athletic trainers and professionals who work on the treatment/ prevention of injuries and the conditioning of competing athletes. 31 Dutch Mill Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850 607-257-6970 • www.athleticsearch.com Categories: Educational Materials Travanti Pharma, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2011 2520 Pilot Knob Rd., Ste. 100 Mendota Heights, MN 55120 866-467-2824 • www.travantipharma.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Tren, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 P.O. Box 4222, Huntington Beach, CA 92605-4222 888-600-TREN • www.tren.net Categories: Nutrition Tyco Healthcare/Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1516 15 Hampshire St., Mansfield, MA 02048 800-962-9888 • www.tycohealthcare.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Ultra Athlete, LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1914 8470 Allisow Pointe Blvd, Ste. 100 Indianapolis, IN 46250 317-713-2910 • www.ultraankle.com Categories: Braces & Supports

Company Booth Unique Sports Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608 840 McFarland Rd., Alpharetta, GA 30004 770-442-1977 • www.uniquesports.us Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel VariSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2037 P.O. Box 5288, Evanston, IL 60204-5288 800-259-5356 • www.ultraslide.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Wendell-Allan Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 1768 E. 25th St., Cleveland, OH 44114 216-881-8299 • www.torexhealth.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Whitehall Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 901 Manufacturers of hydrotherapy and healthcare equipment. P.O. Box 3527, City of Industry, CA 91744 800-488-8999 • www.whitehallmfg.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment See ad on page 49

Find product info on page 72

Williams Technology International, LLC . . 2001 Zoraflexx is an innovative analgesic paste for Grade-1 and -2 sports injuries and tendonitis. 5641 Stillwater Ct., Stone Mountain, GA 30087 678-427-1680 • www.zoraflexx.comn Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 33

Find product info on page 76

Company Booth WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2135 WissTech Enterprises manufactures the Hydration Station, one of the most affordable portable nodrip drinking fountains. P.O. Box 1002, Sugar Land, TX 77487 800-809-8184 • www.wisstechenterprises.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 111

Find product info on page 71

Xanamed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1833 www.xanamed.co.za Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equip. Xtreme Research Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 632 2683 Via de la Valle #409, Del Mar, CA 92014 www.xgun.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Yortho.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 100 W. Southlake Blvd., Ste. 142: PMB 200 Southlake, TX 76092 877-294-7667 • www.yortho.com Categories: Braces & Supports Zensah™ Performance Apparel . . . . . . . 1040 545 W. 18th St., Hialeah, FL 33010 305-984-6436 • www.zensah.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Zoll Medical Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 269 Mill Rd., Chelmsford, MA 01824 978-421-9655 • www.zoll.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

See Us At NATA Booth #1721

Circle No. 170 NATA Booth No. 1822

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S P O N S O R P RO F I L E S BioMedical Life Systems has been manufacturing portable electrotherapy devices and accessories since 1983. For professionals in the athletic training field, the company developed the QuadStar® line of portable, multi-modality electrotherapy devices. This line is designed specifically so that athletic trainers no longer have to choose between carrying multiple electrotherapy devices and leaving devices back in the training facility to treat their athletes. The two newest units—the four channel QuadStar® Elite and QuadStar® II—ensure that athletic trainers are fully-prepared to treat athletic injuries—right on the sidelines. The QuadStar Elite includes TENS, NMS, High-Volt, and Interferential Stimulators, allowing trainers the ability to sequence two or more modalities for complete treatments. Similarly, the QuadStar II is a portable four-channel digital NMS, INF, and TENS device with three programmable biphasic waveforms (symmetric, sinusoidal, and asymmetrical) that deliver customized therapies. Each unit includes simple-to-use instruction guides and nine pre-programmed protocols. For more information on how these and other BioMedical Life Systems’ electrotherapy units can assist athletic trainers, visit the company online at: www.bmls.com. Over the past 87 years, athletic training and Cramer Products have progressed side by side. A clear vision and a sensible approach to the needs of the physically active are common qualities shared by the men and women of Cramer Products and the thousands of dedicated professionals who serve as athletic trainers and sports medicine clinicians. The Cramer approach of hard work and a tireless allegiance to athletic training has led to the introduction of numerous product innovations, from state-of-the-art braces and supports to the first electrolyte replacement sports drink and the recently introduced Cramer Stay Cool Towel® and ProShox® mouth guard. Cramer’s approach is straightforward and simple: a commitment to support athletically-active individuals with proven treatments. Perhaps that’s why Cramer remains the most trusted name in training rooms the world over. Cramer Products is proud to have been the NATA’s original corporate supporter, and it is pleased to advance its solid relationship with the organization today. To find out more about Cramer, please visit the company’s Web site: www.cramersportsmed.com Gatorade Thirst Quencher’s formula contains fluid, electrolytes, and carbohydrates to replace what is lost in sweat. It is based on more than 35 years of scientific research and testing on athletes to help keep them hydrated. Gatorade rehydrates, replenishes and refuels better than water. RE-HYDRATE—Gatorade has the flavor to keep your athletes drinking, and a six-percent carbohydrate solution that’s optimal for speeding fluids back into their systems. No fluid is absorbed faster than Gatorade. REPLENISH—If your athletes don’t replace the electrolytes they lose when they sweat, they risk becoming dehydrated which can take them out of the game. By putting electrolytes back, Gatorade helps athletes drink more, retain fluids, and maintain fluid balance. REFUEL—Unlike water, Gatorade has the right amount of carbohydrates (14 grams per eight ounces) to give your athletes’ working muscles more energy, help them fight fatigue, and let them keep their mental edge. For more information, visit www.gssiweb.org Oakworks® is committed to keeping athletes in peak condition before, during, and after the game. The training room suite includes everything athletic trainers need to prevent and treat injuries: the Portable Taping Table (with carrying case and field feet), PowerLine™ Treatment Table, and P3 (Patient Positioning Platform)—all bariatric weight-rated to 500 pounds. The Boss™ Portable Treatment Table is one of the strongest and most durable tables on the market. It is bariatric weight-rated to 600 pounds and sports a full array of accessory options for on-the-spot sideline support. Oakworks portable equipment is lightweight for easy transportation and storage—yet strong enough to support your largest athlete undergoing strenuous treatment. It is engineered with the best possible ergonomics for the athletic trainer—no more strained backs and aching joints while working in constrained spaces. Oakworks tables offer the best work surface for both home and away events. See all Oakworks has to offer at www.oakworkspt.com The Biofreeze® family of pain relieving products includes a soothing gel, convenient roll-on, and a new no-touch natural Cryospray™. Biofreeze® contains Ilex®, an herbal extract for fast-acting, penetrating, and long-lasting pain relief. Applied generously, patients/clients will experience relief immediately. Biofreeze® provides relief of minor aches and pains of muscles and joints associated with simple backaches, arthritis, strains, bruises, and sprains. Use Biofreeze® to relieve pain prior to massage therapy, soft-tissue triggerpoint therapy, rehabilitation exercises and stretching, or to provide pain relief between office visits. Biofreeze® can be used up to four times a day and is available in a 16-oz. Cryospray™ bottle, and 16-oz., 32-oz., and gallon-size gel pump bottles. A gravity dispenser box filled with 100 five-gram single-use application packets is also available for clinical use. The 4-oz. gel tubes, 4-oz. Cryospray™ bottles, and 3-oz. roll-ons are perfect for use at home between visits. Biofreeze® is endorsed by U.S.A. Judo. Visit www.biofreeze.com and www.prossage.us for more information on Performace Health’s products. ATHLETICBID.COM

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Exhibitor Snapshots What You Need to Know About the Companies Attending This Year’s Convention Aircast LLC . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1101 What’s New: New products include the A60 Ankle Brace and the A2 Wrist Brace.

Anodyne Therapy . . . . . . . Booth 505 Known for: Anodyne Therapy has been a trusted name in light therapy since 1994.

different waveforms, each of which can be used sequentially. At The NATA Show: BMLS will be showing two new digital EMS and TENS devices. The company will also be demonstrating the portable QuadStar Elite.

Cramer Products, Inc. . . Booth 1506 Ari-Med/Diversa Products Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 900 Known for: The company markets Flexall® gels and manufactures Bushwalker Bags. At The NATA Show: Flexall samples and ultrasound studies will be available at AriMed’s booth, as well as new bag models for attendees to preview.

Armor Sports . . . . . . . . . . Booth 934 Known for: AirArmor is a knee brace your athletes will enjoy wearing. At The NATA Show: Attendees can enter the company’s daily drawings for a free pair of AirArmor. What’s New: AirArmor has been reduced in weight to 18 ounces.

AvaCore Technologies . . Booth 1940 Known for: AvaCore manufactures a unique, non-invasive core-body cooling product. At The NATA Show: The company will have new models on display, as well as pricing information.

Ball Dynamics International, Inc./ Fitball USA . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 2020 Known for: The company has one of the largest stability ball inventories in the U.S. At The NATA Show: Over 20 new FitBALL products will be on display. What’s New: Ball Dynamics has expanded its FitBALL product line.

Known for: Cramer Products started sports medicine in 1918. At The NATA Show: The company will display its new products and offer a free giveaway. What’s New: Cramer Products has introduced the Cramer Cold Shoulder Brace.

DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . Booth 818 Known for: DM Systems offers three unique products that can help athletic trainers rehab their athletes: the CadlowTM shoulder stabilizer, the AnkleTough® ankle rehab system, and the Adjusticizer® exercise sytem. At The NATA Show: DM Systems is offering lower pricing on both Cadlow and AnkleTough. What’s New: Cadlow has been improved so that fitting the devices takes less than 15 minutes.

Known for: The Biofreeze family of painrelieving products includes a soothing gel, convenient roll-on, and new notouch natural spray. At The NATA Show: The company will be offering attendees complimentary samples of Biofreeze and Prossage Heat.

Hartwell Medical. . . . . . . Booth 1932 At The NATA Show: All products will be available for demonstration on-site, with some products also available for purchase. Hartwell Medical will be conducting a drawing for a prize (Evac-U-Splint Extremity Kit).

IOMED, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1620 Known for: Products involving iontophoresis—an important modality for treating inflammation. At The NATA Show: Attendees will find new free educational materials and have a chance to enter an iPod contest.

Keiser Corporation. . . . . Booth 1715 Known for: Keiser offers equipment that provides constant force, regardless of speed. At The NATA Show: Attendees can learn more about how Keiser adds the power dimension to their rehab programs.

Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . Booth 1740 Fitter International, Inc.. . Booth 1632 Known for: For over 20 years, Fitter International has been a provider of functional training equipment and a leader in balance training. At The NATA Show: Fitter has released several new products attendees will be interested in seeing. What’s New: New products include Cobblestone Mats, Xvest, Area Mats, Vew-Do Flow, and MFT Balance Trainer/ Tester.

Game Ready . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1725 Biofreeze® / Performance Health, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 808

What’s New: Gatorade has introduced new flavors and has started new research into the evolution of the Gatorade Performance Series.

Known for: Game Ready can help athletes come back from injuries and surgery faster. At The NATA Show: Visitors can register to win a free Game Ready system at the company’s booth. What’s New: Attendees can learn about Game Ready’s athlete rehab program, dual-connector hose, and hip/groin wrap.

Known for: Magister is a leading supplier of non-latex resistive-exercise products for the rehabilitation industry (REP Band® exercise products). At The NATA Show: Attendees can see all Magister products, including REP Band®, Eggsercizer® Hand Exerciser; AIREX Exerciser and balance products, and Cambion Orthotic products. What’s New: Magister can now customimprint the Eggsercizer® Hand Exerciser.

McDavid Sports Medical Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 2100 Known for: The company is a recognized leader in sports medical products, protective padding, and protective athletic wear. At The NATA Show: Attendees will be able to view a variety of new products. What’s New: New from last year is the HexPad Protective Wear line, the 189 Ankle X, and the Multi-Action Knee Strap.

The Gatorade Co. . . . . . . Booth 1307 BioMedical Life Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 524 Known for: BioMedical Life Systems (BMLS) has been manufacturing portable electromedical devices since 1983. At The NATA Show: BMLS will have a free drawing for the QuadStar II Combination Device. This portable device has three

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Known for: Gatorade is dedicated to educating athletes and sports-health professionals on the prevention of dehydration and heat illness. At The NATA Show: Attendees can get a first-hand look at the company’s product innovations, including the Gatorade InCar Drinking System.

Med Spec (ASO) . . . . . . . . Booth 624 At The NATA Show: Med Spec will demonstrate several new and improved products. What’s New: The company that offers the ASO ankle brace introduces the new ASO Flex Hinge brace.

ATHLETICBID.COM


Exhibitor Snapshots What You Need to Know About the Companies Attending This Year’s Convention Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1934 Known for: The comany manufactures Tuli’s brand, foot care, stretching, and blister-prevention products. At The NATA Show: Its new Skin-on-Skin Blister Prevention and CoreStretch backstretching device will be on display.

Medical Outfitters. . . . . . Booth 1721 Known for: The company offers over 200,000 products, along with knowledgeable and friendly customer service staff. What’s New: Medical Outfitters is a new distributor in the sports medicine market. Medical Outfitters has merged with another company, opening the door to new products and better pricing.

Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1132 At The NATA Show: New products will be shown and demonstrated at the company’s booth. What’s New: Mueller Sports Medicine has introduced several innovative products to the market.

NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 919 Known for: NSCA Certification Commission’s CSCS® enhances an athletic trainer’s marketability and career opportunities. At The NATA Show: The commission will be demonstrating its new exam preparation tool: Multimedia Symposium CDs. What’s New: Multimedia Symposium CDs help athletic trainers experience a live symposium from their desktop.

Oakworks, Inc. . . . . . . . . Booth 1024 Known for: Oakworks’ athletic training tables are among the best and most durable in the industry. At The NATA Show: Attendees can see the company’s complete suite of training room equipment. What’s New: The P3 (Patient Positioning Platform) and the PowerLine™ Treatment Table are new for 2006.

OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 920 Known for: OPTP’s products are among the best in terms of quality, and the company offers the lastest in education. At The NATA Show: Attendees can see the lastest products OPTP offers on display. What’s New: The company recently updated its Web site. ATHLETICBID.COM

Power Systems, Inc. . . . Booth 1709

PROTEAM by Hausmann. . Booth 1911

Known for: Power Systems carries an extensive line of balance, strength, and agility products and programs. At The NATA Show: The company will have up to 25 percent of all products on display and can give attendees a 30-day price quote guarantee. What’s New: Power Systems has introduced Resist-A-Balls, Power MedBalls, Rocker Boards, balance pads, and more.

Known for: PROTEAM is a leading provider of athletic training room function and design solutions. At The NATA Show: Attendees can enter a raffle for two iPods. What’s New: The company has introduced its Hi-Lo Split-Leg Table Model 4718 and the Convertible Two-Person Hi-Lo Taping/Treatment Table Model A9062.

Swede-O, Inc. . . . . . . . . . Booth 1600

Known for: PrePak Products offers quality rehab/exercise products at low prices. At The NATA Show: The company’s new catalog and updated products will be on display. What’s New: PrePak Products has introduced its ExerBand Portable Home Gym.

Known for: Swede-O and Thermoskin continue to develop new and innovative products for athletic trainers. At The NATA Show: Attendees can see the new X8 ankle brace and register for prizes. What’s New: The company has introduced numerous new products over the past year.

Presagia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1822

SwimEx, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1025

Known for: Presagia develops advanced health-management solutions that enhance the level of care for athletes. At The NATA Show: Attendees will find that the latest release of Presagia Sports (formerly InjuryZone) has exciting new features. What’s New: Presagia became the new name of the company previously named eSysMedicals.

Known for: The company offers a wide range of rehab options for hot and cold pools, aquatic therapy, and conditioning. At The NATA Show: Attendees can learn about SwimEx’s new pool sizes and motorized treadmill. What’s New: The company now offers its motorized treadmill option to its pool product line.

PrePak Products. . . . . . . Booth 1033

Thought Technology Ltd. . Booth 708 PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booth 1103 Known for: The company was founded by an athletic trainer and NATA Hall-ofFame member. At The NATA Show: New custom fabrication forms will be available at the company’s booth. What’s New: PRO Orthopedic has introduced its new compression badge material in convenient dispenser boxes.

Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . Booth 800 Known for: The company offers unique supports, braces, and cryotherapy products. At The NATA Show: Attendees can enter a raffle for free samples and view new products. What’s New: Pro-Tec has introduced its new Hinged Knee Brace and Hot/Cold Therapy Wraps, and has enhanced its customer service.

Known for: Athletic trainers can learn about Thought Technology’s line of SEM 6 systems, including home trainers, clinical devices, and multi-modality clinical devices. What’s New: The company has released the MyoTrac Infiniti and Rehab Suite.

Williams Technology International, LLC. . . . . . Booth 2001 Known for: The company offers the new Zoraflexx, an external analgesic paste with neutral modality. Zoraflexx can get athletes back in action one to two weeks faster.

WissTech Enterprises. . . Booth 2135 Known for: The company’s hydration units have been engineered by athletic trainers for athletic trainers. At The NATA Show: WissTech Enterprises offers a complete line of indoor and outdoor portable drinking fountains. What’s New: The company has introduced its Hydration Station Drinking Cart.

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2006 National Conference & Exhibition July 12-15, 2006 • Hilton Washington Hotel, Washington, DC

The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), the worldwide authority on strength training and athletic conditioning, will hold its 29th Annual National Conference July 12-15, 2006, in Washington, D.C. This premier strength and conditioning event kicks off with a pair of dynamic keynote speakers: Melissa Johnson, Executive Director of the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, and Tom Osborne, U. S. Congressman (Neb.) and former University of Nebraska Head Football Coach. “With over 30 sessions, 62 high level presenters, and over 1,800 strength and conditioning professionals from around the world in attendance, this conference is sure to inform and motivate,” says Bob Jursnick, NSCA Executive Director. The general session includes more than 30 educational sessions in a two-track format, keeping attendees updated on the most relevant and current information in the field. Well-respected sport and exercise scientists and practitioners are offering enlightening research-based presentations that bridges science and practical application. Speakers include: Greg

Haff, Len Kravitz, William Kraemer, Juan Carlos Santana, Jay Hoffman, Donald Chu, Harvey Newton, Lee Brown, John Graham, and Jeff Falkel. Additionally, there are five concentrated pre-conference symposia to choose from on Wednesday, July 12. These in-depth four- and eight-hour sessions examine specific strength and conditioning topics. Attendees may choose from: Personal Training A-Z; Program Development: The One Hour Perfect Program; Strength & Conditioning for Soccer; Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Athletes: The Effects on Strength, Body Composition, and Injury Rehabilitation; and Plyometrics: Fun, Facts, Fallacies and Program Designs for the Young Athlete. Unpublished, original sports exercise research will be showcased once again. This year more than 100 original research presentations—brief 15-minute oral presentations or comprehensive poster presentations—will be held throughout the show. Look for specific times and locations in your itinerary. Also, at the conference, attendees can also explore the exhibit hall. Wall-to-wall

exhibitors fill the massive space with strength training equipment, nutritional items, educational products, computer software, and fitness gear. The exhibit hall provides a great opportunity for attendees to interact with equipment providers to preview the latest products to hit the industry. Trade show hours are: Thursday, July 13 7 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. (Exhibitor Reception) Friday, July 14 7 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturday, July 15 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. The NSCA Career Services Center will available throughout the conference. The association encourages attendees to come prepared with a resume, as employers will be conducting interviews on site. For more information on the NSCA National Conference, call 800-815-6826, or visit the NSCA Web site at: www.nscalift.org/conferences/general.shtml.

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Exhibitor Spotlight Biofreeze®/Performance Health.......................Booth 12 800-246-3733 Fax: 724-733-4266 health@biofreeze.com www.biofreeze.com Performance Health is the maker of Biofreeze®, a unique and effective analgesic formulated to provide a variety of benefits for therapy, pain relief, exercise/training, and overall comfort. Hammer Strength 800-643-8637 commercialsales@lifefitness.com www.hammerstrength.com Hammer Strength, the world leader in plate-loaded exercise equipment, offers a comprehensive line of strength-training machines that combine the feel of free weights with the safety of traditional resistance machines. Jump Stretch.................................................Booth 416 800-344-3539 Fax: 330-793-8719 slarosa@jumpstretch.com www.jumpstretch.com Jump Stretch offers the complete line of Flex Band® exercise equipment. Flex Bands were developed by former football coach Dick Hartzell, and are used to provide variable isotonic resistance in a variety of settings for strength training and rehab. Keiser Corporation...............Booths 626, 628, 727, 729 800-888-7009 Fax: 559-256-8100 salea@keiser.com www.keiser.com Keiser has been training world-class athletes for over 25 years. Thanks to Keiser’s Pneumatic Technology, anyone can train at any speed and any resistance level. By developing speed as well as strength, you develop power, which is the key to improved performance. NSCA Certification Commission 888-746-2378 Fax: 402-476-7141 commission@nsca-cc.org www.nsca-cc.org The NSCA Certification Commission’s Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist® (CSCS®) and NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer® (NSCA-CPT®) certifications are considered the Credentials of Distinction in the strength and conditioning and personal training professions. Perform Better.............................Booths 733, 734, 736 800-556-7464 Fax: 800-682-6950 performbetter@mfathletic.com www.performbetter.com Perform Better offers some of the highest-quality functional training equipment at very reasonable prices. Coaches, athletes, athletic trainers, and therapists look to Perform Better for innovative and effective products designed to develop speed, agility, and coordination, and to aid in rehabilitation. Power Lift Booths 402, 404, 406, 408, 410, 503, 505, 507, 509, 511 800-872-1543 Fax: 515-386-3220 mrichardson@power-lift.com www.power-lift.com Power Lift is a leading innovator in the heavy-duty strengthtraining industry. Precise engineering and the high quality of manufacture make Power Lift the choice of strength-training professionals. Power Systems, Inc..............Booths 602, 604, 703, 705 800-321-6975 Fax: 800-298-2057 fitness@power-systems.com www.power-systems.com Since 1986, Power Systems has been providing coaches and athletes with the most current and effective training products and programs for strength training, speed development, plyometrics, and agility training. Call or go online today to request a free catalog.

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2006 Conference Workshop Schedule July 12-15, 2006 • Hilton Washington Hotel, Washington, DC

Thursday, July 13, 2006 9 a.m. – 10 a.m. The Scientific Basis of Elastic Resistance Training: For Research to Application Philip Page, MS, PT, ATC, CSCS

9 a.m. –11 a.m. P.A.S.S. Your Way to Athletic Performance Success John Graham, MS, CSCS,*D

10 a.m. – 11 a.m. Nutrition Periodization for Endurance Athletes: Taking Sports Nutrition to the Next Level Robert Seebohar, MS, RD/LDN, CSCS

11 a.m. – 12 p.m. The Physiology of Periodization: Why it Works David Pearson, PhD, CSCS,*D

Using a Multi-Dimensional Approach to Monitoring and Enhancing Recovery Ian Jeffreys, MSc, CSCS,*D, NSCACPT,*D, NSCA Coach Practitioner

1 p.m. – 2 p.m. High Velocity Training in the Periodized Model

3 p.m. – 5 p.m. Current Controversies in Exercise Len Kravitz, PhD

Lee Brown, EdD, CSCS,*D

1 p.m. – 3 p.m. Body Weight Training for the Modern Gladiator Rhadi Ferguson, MAT, CSCS; Juan Carlos Santana, MEd, CSCS,*D

4 p.m. – 5 p.m. Heath Issues Associated with Anabolic Steroid Administration: Are They Exaggerated? Jay Hoffman, PhD, CSCS,*D

2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Whole Body Vibration: History, Scientific Justification, and Practical Applications Patrick Jacobs, PhD, CSCS,*D

Is Fatigue All in Your Head?—Central and Peripheral Mechanisms of Fatigue Joseph Weir, PhD

Warm Up for Athletes: Benefits, Drawbacks, and What Should be Done Ann Snyder, PhD, CSCS

Friday, July 14, 2006 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Neuro-Biomechanics of Maximum Velocity Running Loren Seagrave

Periodization and Advanced Athletes

3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Agility Training Revolution

Greg Haff, PhD, CSCS

Jim Kielbaso, MS, CSCS

Preventing Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: What Does the Research Tell Us to Do?

10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Use of Video Feedback and Analysis for Improved Performance Harvey Newton, MA, CSCS

Declan Connolly, CSCS

U N P A R A L L E L E D Q U A L I T Y, C O N S I S T E N T P R O D U C T S ,

W I T H S P E C TA C U L A R R E S U LT S Glute-Ham

SPS provides a full line of Racks and Plyometric Strength Training Equipment. SPS equipment is currently used by: Plyo-Boxes The Baltimore Ravens The New York Giants The Cleveland Browns The New Orleans Saints The Indiana Pacers The Los Angeles Lakers The University of Arkansas Rutgers University Boston College X-20 Rack ...and many other professional, collegiate, high school and private training facilities.

A Great Exercise and a Great Partner ALL IN ONE! MediBallsTM are NOT like other medicine balls. They are the original gel filled medicine balls that offer significant performance advantages over other medicine balls. Their compact and perfectly balanced shape make them longer lasting, easier to see, and easier to catch. They can be used indoors, outdoors, and even in the pool! Try the MediBallsTM with the adjustable rebounder. With its round design you can be assured of consistent returns. It is the perfect training partner for medicine ball exercises! • Upper Body Plyometrics • Speed • Power • Hand/Eye Coordination • Rehabilitation

MediBalls

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available in 6 sizes – 2 lbs. to 15 lbs.

Manufactured By:

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TOPAZ

TOLL FREE: 1.800.526.4856 www.ucsspirit.com

8100 South Akron • Suite 320 • Centennial, CO 80112 • www.topazusa.com

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2006 Conference Workshop Schedule July 12-15, 2006 â&#x20AC;˘ Hilton Washington Hotel, Washington, DC

High and Dry, Cold and Wet: Tales from the Edges of the Bell Shaped Curve Lawrence Armstrong, PhD

1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 p.m. The Deceleration Method Martin Rooney, MS, CSCS

1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 p.m. Athletic Body in Balance Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCS

2 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 p.m. Training the Missing Links Michael Castrogiovanni, CSCS

How to Avoid Injuries Meg Stone; Michael Stone, PhD

3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. Performance Enhancement: New Techniques and Technology Greg Haff, PhD, CSCS; Jeff McBride, PhD, CSCS

3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 p.m. Steroid Education and Awareness William Kraemer, PhD, CSCS; Dave Ellis, CSCS, RD; Michael Barnes, MEd, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D

4 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 p.m. Research Trends in Lower Back Pain: Rethinking Our Approach to Exercise and Rehabilitation Protocols

1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 p.m. Training the Post-Rehabilitation Shoulder Robert Panariello, MS, PT, ATC, CSCS

1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 p.m. Core Developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Science, Progressions, and Implementations into Training

Kenneth Cieslak, DC, ATC, CSCS

Saturday, July 15, 2006 9 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10 a.m. Functional Training

Pete Bommarito, MS, CSCS, USAW

2 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 p.m. Maximizing Program Adherence Through Coaching Techniques

Steven Plisk, MS, CSCS,*D

Athletic Testing: The Key to Improved Performance

Mark Nutting, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D

Frank Spaniol, EdD, CSCS,*D

3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. Methods and Techniques for Assessing Body Composition

10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11 a.m. Recovery Nutrition Dave Ellis, CSCS, RD

Dale Wagner, PhD, CSCS

10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12 p.m. Theory and Practice of Agility Training

3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 p.m. Yoga as a Training Modality

John Cissik, MS, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D

11 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12 p.m. The Relationship Between the Athletic Coach, Athletic Department, and Strength and Conditioning TyRonne Turner

John Gillespie, CSCS, NSCA-CPT

4 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 p.m. Individualization Strategies: Prescribing Safe and Effective Lifting Techniques for Everyone Jonathan Anning, PhD, CSCS, RTS

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SPORT SPECIFIC

Irish Intensity At the University of Notre Dame, a finely tuned training program helped the volleyball team finish 30-4 last season, its best record in over a decade. BY MICHAEL JOSEPH

P

reparing female athletes for high-level volleyball competition is an exciting challenge. Here at the University of Notre Dame, we strive to build a sound foundation that allows each player to reach her maximum potential. The overall goal of our program is to develop a total athlete by improving her strength, flexibility, power, and athleticism, which she can then use on the court of competition. We use a proper progression that reduces the risk of injury while developing the traits needed for the sport of volleyball. Our program also emphasizes motivation. We tell our athletes there are many factors that play a role in their physical development, but there are only two factors they can control: intensity and effort. If they give their all in these two areas, we promise to motivate and push them to new levels both physically and mentally. For our part, we try to give them as much variety as possible in their workouts and provide competition in many different forms. We also teach them how what they do in the weightroom relates to making them better volleyball playersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;once an athlete truly comprehends how training can enhance her play, motivating her becomes much easier.

MATT CASHORE ATHLETICBID.COM

Michael Joseph, MS, CSCS, SCCC, is an Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach at the University of Notre Dame. He can be reached at: mjoseph1@nd.edu. T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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SPORT SPECIFIC FOUNDATION FOR SUCCESS When designing a strength and conditioning program for volleyball, I keep eight key areas in mind: strength, core, flexibility, power development, agility, injury prevention, conditioning, and recovery. No area is more important than the next, and each is intertwined in the development of the others. We start with strength development because it is the foundation for all the other areas. Our goal is to develop a

(progression), manual resisted curls, reverse hypers, and single leg RDLs. The gluteals will be activated during jumping, squatting, lunging, step-ups, dead lifts, and Olympic movements. Our program is based on multi-joint Olympic-style movements (squats, cleans, snatches) with supplemental exercises that are progressed and cycled. The intensity of our resistance-training workouts remain consistent all year, but the volume and workload change de-

Abdominal and low back development is a central ingredient in rotational speed, power transfer, body control, and injury prevention, all of which are very much needed in the game. For example, a player going up for a spike needs to have great power from her core while maintaining precise body positioning. complete athlete who is balanced and has no deficient areas that may cause injury or prevent her from reaching full potential. Most freshman volleyball players who enter our program have a very good athletic base and sport specific development, but are deficient in certain areas of total body strength. The most common problems we see are a lack of posterior shoulder, back, gluteal, and hamstring to quadriceps strength ratio. We work hard to correct these during strength development so they do not lead to imbalance issues down the road. For posterior shoulder development, I incorporate isolated shoulder exercises such as DB rear shoulder raises, band saber (diagonal) raises, manual resistance, static holds (blackburns), band and plate shoulder complexes, and scapular isolations and pulls. I use a push/pull method on my upper body workouts but usually add one to two extra sets of back exercises in correlation to the presses. For lower back isolation, I include chin-ups, seated rows, cable rows, DB rows, pulldown variations, inverted pull-ups, weighted hyperextensions, and others. In addition, during our Olympic lifts, the trapezius, rhomboids, and deltoids are being activated. The last area of the posterior chain is the gluteals and hamstrings. I try to develop the hamstrings by incorporating several exercises such as RDLs, leg curls, good mornings, glute/ham raises 106

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pending on the season. The workouts are developed to maximize volume of workload in the least amount of time without sacrificing strength gains. Core strength is the second area for developing a total volleyball player, as deficiencies in this area can limit other components from achieving full potential. In addition, abdominal and low back development is a central ingredient in rotational speed, power transfer, body control, and injury prevention, all

of which are very much needed in the game. For example, a player going up for a spike needs to have great power from her core while maintaining precise body positioning. We incorporate core work into the warmup, weighted exercises in the workout, and end-of-workout team drills. Types of exercises include basic bodyweight floor abs, dynamic movements such as med-ball throws, and those that incorporate abdominal activation such as a walking lunge with a twist. We stress full range of motion and contraction rather than volume of repetitions. The most overlooked area for development is flexibility, which can be the single most limiting factor for an athleteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s physical progression. Without it, a volleyball player may not extend her shoulder complex to its full capacity, which will limit her spiking and serving ability. Problems in flexibility can also hamper her ability to lunge for a difficult dig. Since coaches have a limited amount of time to spend with their athletes, flexibility often loses out to other areas of training. To make our flexibility drills time efficient, we incorporate them into our dynamic warmups through kicks, lunges, and hurdles, and place them between major exercises that require recovery time. At the end of each workout, the team goes through several static stretches led by a captain or senior.

DYNAMIC WARMUP This sample dynamic warmup should take about 15 minutes. Most movements are completed for 10-15 yards. Walk-outs (crawling to hamstring stretch) Walking knees to chest Knees to chest w/skip Straight-leg kicks (walking) Straight-leg kicks (skipping) Forward walking lunges with twist Backward walking lunges with twist High-knee runs Backward runs Side lunges Groin skips Spidermans Lying hip rotations Scorpions Hurdles or wall drills (hip mobility)

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SPORT SPECIFIC

SAMPLE WEEK The following weeklong weight-training workout is progressed through a periodized style of percentages. For the power movements we start at 4x4 sets/reps and go down to 3x1. For strength exercises, we work from 4x10-12 down to 3x2. For supplemental exercises we work from 3x12 to 2-3x6. Power and strength exercises stay constant for the entire cycle but we vary the supplemental exercises for variety.

Monday: Total Body

Wednesday: Upper Body

Thursday/Friday: Lower Body

Warmup and core work Jump training Power clean Back squat RDL Squat lunge Reverse hyperextension DB incline press Chin-ups Medball push-ups DB row DB 30’s (front/side/ rear shoulder raise) Weighted sit-ups Four-way ankle

Warmup and footwork drills Plyos Medball throws Box jumps or box fast-feet step-ups Snatch Bench press Machine row Alt. DB shoulder press Inverted pull-ups Plate raise Band retraction Static shoulder holds (6 prone positions) Medball abs

Warmup/core/hip mobility Jump training: side-step and block Hang clean Front squat or band squat (speed) Glute/ham raise Barbell step-up Good morning Manual resistance (hip/ankle flexion) Plate rotations (abs) Shoulder complex

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SPORT SPECIFIC Also, any athlete that has severe flexibility issues will do extra work to help increase range of motion. The area that our volleyball coaches are most concerned with is power development, especially as it relates to vertical jumping. They know the higher their front row players can jump, the more successful their team will be. But we also pay a lot of attention to lateral and forward horizontal power in order to build explosive agile athletes. Volleyball players need power to move very quickly in all directions to get to the ball and to produce strong shoulder movement for serves, spikes, and sets. Our program incorporates many training stimuli to maximize each athlete’s power. The weight training contains several exercises designed to maximize speed of movement such as cleans, snatches, resisted boards, and band squats with lighter weight loads. We also use several unloaded triple-extension movements in order to increase power output and speed of contraction of the muscles. These may include box jumps, plyometrics, and slide boards. Each athlete is progressed from ba-

sic plyometrics, proper landing technique, and Olympic movements to higher impact movements and more complex lifts. We also take into consideration the amount of foot contacts per workout and per week to eliminate overtraining or injury.

We incorporate reactive and competitive drills that are as volleyball specific as possible … When doing a simple pro shuttle (5-10-5), each athlete must touch the line with both hands in a dig-style motion to develop hips being low and body control. At Notre Dame, our coaches want the most athletic and best defensive team in the nation, so we put a lot of emphasis on agility and footwork development. Due to sport specialization, many volleyball players lack basic agility and footwork skills and don’t possess the all-around athleticism that multi-sport athletes have. The ability to quickly react, accelerate, and decelerate in any direction leads to more blocks and digs. There-

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fore, we use agility and footwork drills as often as we can—as a warmup, during workouts, as a conditioning tool, or sometimes as a team competition. We start with basic drills such as foot ladders, jump rope, line hops, and dots to develop fast feet. For agility, we use

basic cone drills to teach body control, foot placement, low center of gravity, and proper positioning on the balls of the feet. Once our athletes master the basics, we incorporate reactive and competitive drills that are as volleyball specific as possible. For example, when doing a simple pro shuttle (5-10-5), each athlete must touch the line with both hands in a dig-style motion to develop hips being low and body control. Although we

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SPORT SPECIFIC do some position-specific drills, I feel that all the players should be able to get to every ball on the court whether they are a libero or a middle blocker, so all of our front line players have the same agility goals as our liberos. Two specific drills that I use are a two-point wave and a four-point mirror cone drill. The two-point drill allows the athletes to move on my visual commands in a blocking, shuffle, run, defensive slide, dig, or roll direction, and it lasts for 5-10 seconds. The mirror cone drill is set up like a basic cone

drill with two separate squares and two athletes facing each other. One athlete is the leader and the other must react in an opposite movement. If the leader comes forward the other athlete must come forward and block, and if the leader goes back, the follower must slide back and dig. The movements can go in any direction and last 8-12 seconds. Injury prevention is another focal point of our training regimen. The shoulder, knee, and ankle are the areas most prone to injury in volleyball. Our goal is to reduce the overall number of injuries

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and the recovery time needed when injuries do occur. The shoulder can receive considerable stress from overuse or improper mechanics. Freshmen are most at risk due to the increased amount of practice and competition they see at the collegiate level. We incorporate several shoulder complexes (see “Strong Shoulders” on page 103) in the warmup or workout with tubing or plates (2.5 or 5 pounds) to isolate the small musculature of the shoulder girdle and rotator cuff. Exercises such as medicine ball push-ups and box walk-ups are implemented for shoulder stabilization. The devastating ACL injury is prevalent in women’s volleyball, so we teach proper jumping and landing techniques, which are critical for female athletes to develop balance and reduce the stress placed on knee ligaments. We make sure the athlete lands on the balls of her feet with her knees in alignment with the middle toe and not coming in together, and then sits immediately back on her heels. We incorporate several activities that improve proprioception in the knee and surrounding stabilizing musculature, such as landing on uneven surfaces and squatting on balance boards. We use resistance training to strengthen the quadriceps and hamstrings for symmetry. Ankle injuries are also common, and we try to limit their severity by adding strength and stability to the joint. Many of the exercises we use for knee stability will activate the ankle and lower-leg proprioceptors and stabilizers. We also develop flexibility through strength by using bands with exercises, such as the four-way ankle. Volleyball is a very anaerobic power sport (the average volley lasts between five and 10 seconds), so we focus our conditioning protocols on shorter shuttles, sprints, and runs that are 60 seconds or less. We use 300-yard shuttles, widths, 400’s, 200’s, sprints, and gamesituation conditioning to prepare for the season. The off-season contains the longer duration runs with a longer rest-towork ratio. As we get closer to the start of camp, the runs are shortened with less rest. Our goal is to play at a higher level of intensity in the fifth game than we do in the first game of the match. All the above efforts will be hindered without proper recovery, which includes rest and good nutritional intake. Because Notre Dame students typically have a ATHLETICBID.COM


SPORT SPECIFIC heavy course load, we continually remind our athletes they need more rest than non-athletes and can’t skimp on sleep. We do our part by making their training as efficient as possible. We also talk a lot about nutrition, since many female athletes struggle with wanting to look like very thin models and will eat for fashion instead of athletic gains. We are very fortunate to have a sports nutritionist on staff to help educate the athletes on proper nutrition and recovery from workouts. But most of our athletes still need constant reinforcement to get enough calories from the right sources, in the right proportions of carbs, protein, and fat. YEARLY PROGRAM Once the season is over in December, the team understands that time is counting down towards the next season. They know that how they train in the off-season and preseason will determine the end result the following year. Our program is broken up into three training periods with smaller cycles in each period. The off-season cycle runs from January to May, the preseason

n o i t a r d Hytation S

STRONG SHOULDERS The following is a sample shoulder complex. Two sets of 10 reps of each exercise are done with either a dumbbell, plate, or band. Proper technique and isolation of musculature around the shoulder capsule is the goal of the complex. Front raise Side raise Empty can Prone lateral Internal/external rotation at 90 degrees (standing) Supra raise from June to August, and in-season is September to December. We design a program to constantly stimulate the body and make the neuromuscular system continually adapt to different stimuli during weight training, jump training, and conditioning workouts. Off-season: The off-season is a critical time for us to establish a great base and work on any deficiencies the athlete may have in strength, jumping, or movement. The first cycle of off-season conditioning lasts eight weeks. Players train

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with resistance three days a week—upper body, lower body and total body are spilt among the days. Each workout contains a non-weight-bearing triple extension movement and an Olympic movement such as a clean, snatch, or jerk. Warmups include footwork drills, hip mobility, shoulder stabilization, and core development. We conduct agility workouts two days a week, focusing on proper foot placement, hip level, and body control for changing direction. Conditioning is done at the end, with

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SPORT SPECIFIC longer durations and rest intervals than at other times of the year. The second off-season cycle usually starts in March with the six to seven weeks of spring practice. We follow a similar schedule to the first cycle but cut back on volume due to practice time and the number of hours each NCAA participant can spend on athletics. We train three days per week, focusing on our major lifts, hip work, and flexibility. A high intensity is maintained, but at a lower volume. We keep increasing vertical and horizontal power. Agility and condition-

ing sessions are still implemented twice a week at the beginning or end of practice for 15 to 30 minutes. Preseason: The nine to 10 week preseason period usually begins in late May or early June. It is broken into two cycles, with a recovery week in the first week of July. The goal of this period is preparing the athletes for the demanding season ahead, so conditioning and sport-specific drills become more important. The schedule typically includes three days of lifting and conditioning and two days of agility training. Lifts

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are more complex and more dynamic than in previous stages. Percentages are used to cycle the focal lifts and the amount of volume is reduced. The agility workouts incorporate more volleyball movements and reactions. The conditioning runs are shorter with reduced rest intervals and are done on court as game-situation drills. The competition component is important at all times of the year but during this time period we keep a running score during competitive drills. In-season: My philosophy is that we need to get stronger and more explosive during the season and not just maintain our preseason levels. Our mentality is to train hard with intelligence, which means we keep the intensity high but have a low volume of training. During the in-season we lift two times per week with agility and conditioning one to two times per week. Bands and alternative

Testing is done at the beginning of off-season, the end of off-season, and end of preseason. After testing, we always reassess the program. If our testing does not show good improvement, we’ll revisit what we do in each area. means of training are used to limit the stress on the athlete’s body. We do three to four exercises and a few supplemental or injury-prevention exercises. We try to maintain good hip mobility and shoulder strength. Our goal is to peak in December and not fall off in November. Testing is important and done at the beginning of off-season, the end of offseason, and end of preseason. After testing, we always reassess the program. My goal is to push each player to a new level of mental toughness and physical performance. If our testing does not show good improvement, we’ll revisit what we do in each area. Irish volleyball has made a commitment to be great both on the court and in the weightroom. We follow very simple guidelines: We expect nothing less than great effort and a relentless desire to be the best team in the country every year. ■ ATHLETICBID.COM


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CHEST & BACK Creative Health Products, Inc. 800-742-4478 www.chponline.com Creative Health Products is a leading discount supplier of rehabilitation, fitness, exercise, and athletic testing and measuring products. The company offers a unique testing device that measures the strength of the legs and is ideal for measuring the strength of the thighs, chest, back, and upper torso, as well. It is easy to use and is an innovative way to measure an athlete’s improving strength and to assess his or her overall fitness level. The device is now available with either a kilogram or pounds gauge. Circle No. 504 Exertools 800-235-1559 www.exertools.com The 2036 Pec/Rear Delt is part of Exertools’ E-Series Equipment. The delt’s lumbar-support back pad and seat move together with an easy glide adjustment. Its floating-arm design allows users to create their own exercise pattern while maintaining resistance in only one path. Five starting points adjust to create any desired prestretch for pectoral work—plus one starting point for rear deltoid isolation. A supplemental 305-pound weight stack fine tunes resistance in fivepound increments, with the ease of a pin. This unit measures 51”L x 30”W x 62/74”H. Circle No. 505 Hammer Strength 800-634-8637 www.hammerstrength.com The Hammer Strength Olympic Heavy-Duty Line—including the new Combo Rack, 6’ x 8’ platform, and wood inserts—offers facilities a comprehensive selection of performance-enhancing training products. Tough and rugged, the spaceefficient Combo Rack lets two athletes train simultaneously. This 114

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high-quality lifting platform features full sub-floor framing, a finished oak surface, and rubber impact mats. With Hammer Strength’s new Combo Rack, platform, and inserts, no other brand has a lineup this deep. Call toll-free, or visit Hammer Strength online. Circle No. 506 NZ Mfg., LLC 800-556-7464 www.performbetter.com Used by leading professional baseball, football, and basketball teams, TurfCordz offer the safety, security, and reliability athletes demand in resistance-training products. The TurfCordz Modular Sprint and Speed Belt (shown) is used by the U.S. Olympic Speed Skating Team in its training programs. Manufactured by NZ Mfg., TurfCordz are available through M-F Athletic Company. For more information on the entire innovative TurfCordz line, call 800-556-7464 or visit www.performbetter.com. Circle No. 507 Power Lift 800-872-1543 www.power-lift.com The Combo Power Rack from Power Lift combines two lifting stations into one space-saving rack. It is available in eight- and nine-foot heights and comes with all of the following: two pairs of safety spot bars, two pairs of patented rhino-hook bar catches, and two dual-grip chin-up bars. The unit also includes storage for bars, weights, and bumper plates. The space inside the rack accommodates two people for spotting two bench press stations at once. The Combo Power Rack can be customized with Power Lift’s patented Lever Action Benches and Olympic lifting platforms. Circle No. 508 The innovative, patented Lever Action Bench is designed to fit into all Power Lift racks. The front handle and wheels allow for easy center positioning into one of two locking positions on the spotters’ platforms. The spotters’ platforms are now located on the racks,

making for a step-through design. The Lever Action Bench can be adjusted horizontally while locked into position, allowing users to easily position themselves under the Olympic bar in incline positions. Circle No. 509 Power Systems 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com Perform traditional and non-traditional strength, core, and stability movements with the uniquely-designed NRG Ball System. Available in five-, seven-, and nine-pound units, the NRG Ball increases training options— including sport-specific applications—by integrating medicine ball and barbell workouts into one unit. Each unit consists of a medicine ball and two 12-inch interchangeable, foamcontoured handles. An optional golf handle is also available. Instructional video, exercise guide, and chart are included. Circle No. 510 Rogers Athletic Co. 888-765-3248 www.rogersathletic.com Rogers Athletic, known for football training equipment, is applying its years of expertise in athletic skills training to strength and conditioning equipment with the introduction of its Brute Rack System. The Brute Rack System, equipped with Monster Arms, provides your athletes with a closed-chain, freeweight training experience. This unit’s workstation enables athletes to perform multiple exercises that typically require four to six exercise-specific machines. Call Rogers Athletic toll-free for information. Circle No. 511 The Brute Full Rack from Rogers Athletic provides the benefit of both power racks and exercise-specific ATHLETICBID.COM


CHEST & BACK machines in one system. The company’s patent-pending Monster Arms™ feature omni-directional movement to develop specific muscle groups. All accessories lock into place on the uprights (Monster Arms, chin-up bar, lock-and-load hooks, and technique trays). The Docking Synchro Bench also adds diversity to athletes’ exercise programs with its two locking positions and 27 inches of travel adjustment. Circle No. 512 Samson Equipment 800-472-6766 www.samsonequipment.com Samson Equipment’s 104HHUB is a great addition to the company’s outstanding plate-loaded line. The unique design allows the athlete to combine unilateral and bilateral movements from seven different positions. It’s fully-equipped with easy-to-load weight horns, adjustable handles, and adjustable framework, all engineered to fit athletes of every size. Work everything from the chest to the shoulders, bilaterally and unilaterally, with comfort and ease. Combine variety and quality with one of the best names in the business. Circle No. 513 Samson Equipment’s 907RHP Reverse Hyperextension continues to be among the best in its class. Quality construction is the key to its design, which features 1630DS precisionground sealed ball bearings for unbelievably smooth action. Like all Samson equipment, this power bench is produced with .188-inch steel square tubing. All of this, combined with easily adjustable handles and a roll pad for ankle placement, makes the Reverse Hyperextension one of the smoothest, most durable power benches you will ever find. Circle No. 514

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The Total Gym 26000 is the next generation of the original clinical model. The unit provides 10 resistance levels and comes equipped with impressive new features inspired by the needs of the commercial environment. The new wide-based telescoping squat stand adjusts to three heights, facilitating correct biomechanics for squats, bridges, calf raises, and plyometric exercises. The new folding foot-holder for hamstring curls and ab crunches locks into place for use and then easily folds away. The folding platform also allows the telescoping squat stand to be folded away for storage. Circle No. 515

For safety and durability count on WerkSan. The company has a strong, worldwide reputation for high-quality weightlifting equipment. The company’s engineers are devoted to producing safer, better-performing, longer-lasting equipment. WerkSan manufactures the official barbell of U.S.A. Weightlifting, is certified by the I.W.F., and the company stands behind its equipment. WerkSan bars are guaranteed for life and its bumper plates are guaranteed for two years from the date of purchase. Circle No. 518

SPS by UCS 800-526-4856 www.ucsspirit.com The X-60 System offers two activity zones with space for individual spotters. Its versatility makes it ideal for larger facilities. It’s constructed with four 3”x 3” seven-gauge uprights with 3/4-inch nickel-plated hook plates as well as two interior facing hook plates to create the interior activity zone. The X-60 is available in eight- and nine-feet heights, with a Combo Grip Pull-Up Bar, two pairs of singlebar catchers, interior safety spot arms, and a 12- and 18-inch deep diamond plate spotter’s platform. It is compatible with all SPS system accessories. Circle No. 516 WerkSan Sports USA 877-WERKSAN www.werksanusa.com

WerkSan is now the official barbell of U.S.A. Weightlifting and is certified by the I.W.F. The company’s engineers are devoted to producing safer, better-performing, longer-lasting weighttraining equipment. WerkSan’s bars are precision-made from specially-developed Scandinavian steel and use five carbon-fiber bearings—not just four steel bearings—strategically located at stress points to increase strength, durability, and performance. WerkSan

Xvest 800-697-5658 www.thexvest.com “I have found the Xvest to be an excellent tool for providing overloads in plyometrics, strength training, conditioning, and rehabilitation programs. The fit and adaptability are excellent. The Xvest allows freedom of movement and doesn’t interfere with any of the agility, bounding, or running programs that I write for a wide variety of athletes, both collegiate and professional. The Xvest has proven itself in my programs. Thank you for all your efforts and help in improving my capability as a strength and conditioning specialist.” —Donald A. Chu, Ph.D., PT, ATC, CSCS, author of Jumping Into Plyometrics Circle No. 519 Xvest has a new weight configuration, and it’s heavy: 84 pounds of heavy. The new Xvest, known as the Fire Fighter model, was developed especially for fire fighters and their rigorous training. It has the same basic design as the original Xvest, but internally it has a new weight configuration that allows for 84 pounds of weight. Because of its ability to adjust weight like the original Xvest, everyone from body builders to military personnel is buying them. For more information on all the Xvest models, call the company or visit its Web site. Circle No. 520 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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COMPANY Q & A

A Dialogue About Foam Roller Production with OPTP Designer Jeff Polley Please provide our readers some background on OPTP.

Jeff Polley, OPTP Designer/ Copywriter, is a member of OPTP’s New Product Review Board. He takes part in evaluating new products to ensure they meet OPTP’s quality standards.

OPTP started out as a supplier of physical therapy products in 1976. Since then, we’ve gained an international presence supplying virtually all health and fitness industries. Over the years we’ve also expanded into the development of exclusive products, publishing, and DVD production. Foam Rollers would be one of the exclusive products you’ve developed then? Yes. Our development of the OPTP Axis™ Roller is a fairly recent project that came about due to the declining quality of the standard white foam

for curing the foam. Being air-blown makes these particular rollers inconsistent and more susceptible to breakdown because of the tiny air pockets within the cells of the foam. Tie in an inadequate amount of time for curing and the quality suffers tremendously: during the curing process the foam hardens and becomes what we know as firm. It’s this firmness that contributes to the roller holding its shape. When not allowed to firm up 100 percent, the roller will soften, dent, and deform sooner than intended, causing investment, inventory, and ordering problems for those dependent on rollers. In most cases these rollers can’t be expected to hold up for any longer than a few months. Signs of breakdown will usually begin sooner if they’re used repetitively. And what makes the OPTP Axis™ Roller superior? Our Axis Roller gives all the benefits of traditional rollers, but without the breakdown. Its molded-foam technology is firm in density, has a smooth surface, and will not lose its shape after repetitive, moderate-to-heavy use. The reason is that the Axis Roller is made up of solid foam beads that get compressed during the molding process. Fitness, athletic, and rehab professionals will love the durability and lasting power of this roller—you can depend on it to last several months without any sign of breakdown.

rollers. OPTP alone has had to reject thousands of rollers over the past year. Part of the problem has to do with the nature of the foam, and part has to do with the manufacturers trying to save time and increase production by cutting a few, yet essential, corners. OPTP 3800 Annapolis Ln., Ste. 165 Minneapolis, MN 55447 800-367-7393 customerservice@optp.com www.optp.com/ad 116

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What causes these standard white rollers to break down? The process of making these foam rollers includes an air-blown element and a specific amount of time

There seems to be more to foam rollers than originally thought. Is there a place to learn more about them? OPTP recently published a newsletter about the various foam roller production methods. It’s available on our Web site, www.optp.com, as a downloadable PDF. Our latest catalog—Volume 18—has quite a bit of information on the different types of rollers, as well. For a free copy, call us at 800-3677393. We’re also more than happy to answer any questions you might have about our products. ATHLETICBID.COM


TESTIMONIAL

TESTIMONIAL

Presagia’s Software Commended by ATCs Nationwide

Universities Pleased with PROTEAM Purchases

“Presagia has a superior product and has been diligent to answer all the questions, concerns (although my guess is there aren’t many), and queries about the company. You are to be commended for your outstanding customer service.”

“I wanted you to know that the University of Alabama is very pleased with its decision to purchase PROTEAM’s modular taping stations and split leg tables for its athletic training rooms. Hausmann worked very well with us to design

TESTIMONIAL

Blist-O-Ban Meets Marathon Needs “I just want to tell you that Blist-O-Ban® is a life-saving product for those of us who run. I completed the Seattle marathon with no blisters, and you can bet I will never run another event without using this product. Thank you from the bottom of my feet.” K. Koshida, 2005 Seattle Marathon

Julia Dunn, ATC Head Athletic Trainer Whitman College, Walla Walla, Wash. “We are happy that a company was able to put together such a comprehensive injury tracking and health management package. We firmly believe Presagia Sports enables us to provide an unparalleled level of healthcare to athletes that is second to none.” Keith Clements, ATC Head Athletic Trainer University of Tennessee “Presagia Sports has enabled us to streamline our record-keeping process and provide our athletic trainers with the information they need—when and where they need it. In addition, we have been able to expand the scope of what we record to build a more complete medical file on our student-athletes.” Chad Kinart, MS, ATC Assistant Director of Athletic Training University of Nebraska, Omaha

Presagia Corporation 147 Saint Paul St., Ste. 300 Montreal, PQ H2Y 1Z5, Canada 888-465-8725 info@presagia.com www.presagia.com ATHLETICBID.COM

our athletic training room around our needs—even custom building the taping stations to our specifications. The customer service that we have received and continue to receive is unmatched. The University of Alabama uses the PROTEAM split leg tables and modular taping stations everyday. They are truly well-made and ‘PROTEAM Tough’. In fact, they are strong enough to stand up to the University of Alabama’s football team.” Rodney Brown Athletic Trainer University of Alabama “When we designed and built our new sports medicine center at Binghamton University, our goal was to create a first class facility for our staff and student-athletes. The quality and professional appearance of our PROTEAM tables helped us accomplish that goal. The compliments we have received from other sports medicine professionals have confirmed that we made the right choice.” Daniel King, MS, ATC Director of Sports Medicine Binghamton University

PROTEAM by Hausmann 130 Union St. Northvale, NJ 07647 888-428-7626 info@hausmann.com www.proteamtables.com

“I wanted to express my extreme pleasure and satisfaction with your product. Blist-O-Ban did exactly what it was designed to do. I did not even remember that I had it on until I got home and removed my socks. It was then that I realized that Blist-O-Ban had saved my race.” O. Harper, 2005 New York City Marathon “On race day, I applied a Blist-O-Ban to each heel before the swim and they protected my heels throughout the entire bike and run. They endured moisture from the swim and sweat and not once did I feel them impose on my comfort in either the bike or running shoe. It’s definitely a product I would recommend in order to eliminate the chances of blistering and discomfort when running or cycling.” Phil Cook, Triathlete

SAM Medical Products 7100 S.W. Hampton St., Ste. 217 Portland, OR 800-818-4726 customerservice@sammedical.com www.blistoban.com T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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MORE PRODUCTS C.H.E.K Institute 800-552-8789 www.chekinstitute.com C.H.E.K Institute’s Whole-in-One Golf Fitness Card Set is an innovative pocket-size system that provides information on assessments, stretches, and functional exercises and programs, based on techniques used by

today’s top golfers. The set contains 120 plastic cards that are designed to withstand sweat and moisture. Select specific cards to carry on an enclosed ring for a portable pre-game warmup or workout. Developed by Paul Chek, these cards are easily adaptable to any rotational sport, such as tennis. Circle No. 521 Cho-Pat 800-221-1601 www.cho-pat.com Cho-Pat’s Shin Splint Compression Sleeve eases the pain associated with shin splints. Designed and evaluated by medical professionals, this unique device tackles inflammation and discomfort by using gentle compression to support the lower-leg muscles. It also tends to stimulate circulation and maintain warmth controlling excess fluid. Finally, two straps act as shock-absorbers by reducing micro-trauma to the tendons and other soft tissue, and keeping the device in proper position. Circle No. 522 CytoSport 888-CYTOMAX www.cytosport.com Cytomax® sport energy drink has been fueling the pros for more than 16 years. Studies show that after three hours of intense exercise, athletes drinking Cytomax perform better and lactic acid levels 118

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

are 40 percent lower, helping to reduce cramping and post-workout soreness, while promoting re-hydration, strength, and improved endurance. It is made with a unique blend of PolyLactate™, other complex carbohydrates, and electrolytes, providing an optimal energy supply. The patented PolyLactate delivers energy faster, fuels the body more optimally, and protects it from acid build-up. Circle No. 523 CytoFlex™ Pain Relieving Gel is a fastacting, powerful combination of hyaluronic acid, glucosamine, chondroitin, and MSM that helps alleviate pain related to overused joints. CytoFlex’s super strength provides penetrating pain relief where you need it, when you need it. Applied topically, results are evident from the first use in most cases. CytoFlex has been accepted by personal trainers, physical therapists, and athletes alike seeking joint pain relief. Circle No. 524 Equinox Holdings, Inc. 212-774-6335 www.equinoxfitness.com Equinox operates upscale, full-service fitness clubs and an integrated selection of Equinox-branded programs, services, and products for strength and cardio training. Since its inception in 1991, the company has developed a lifestyle brand that represents service, value, quality, expertise, innovation, attention to detail, market leadership, and results. Equinox is rapidly expanding, offering a variety of exciting opportunities, including positions in general management, operations management, membership sales, personal training, group fitness instruction, and massage therapy. Please visit the company’s Web site for more information. Circle No. 525

Gebauer Company 800-321-9348 www.gebauerco.com/tc Gebauer’s Spray & Stretch® prescription skin refrigerant provides a fine-stream spray and cooling effect equivalent to Gebauer’s Fluori-Methane®. Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch is available in a convenient aerosol can and is non-flammable. Call Gebauer Company or visit online for product and prescribing information and to locate a local distributor. Circle No. 526 Gebauer’s first non-prescription topical skin refrigerant, Instant Ice®, is ideal for the temporary relief of minor pain and swelling from sprains, strains, bruising, contusions, and minor sports injuries. Available in either mist or mediumstream spray cans, Gebauer’s Instant Ice stream spray is also used for the temporary relief of muscle spasms. Call Gebauer Company or visit online for product, prescribing information, and to locate local distributors. Circle No. 527 Genetic Potential 800-699-5867 www.vertimax.com A new low-load velocity-specific training program is now available for the ultimate in force development. The VertiMax PLUS series is a revolutionary advancement in functional, sports-specific total-body training. It is the only system capable of applying multiple loads at multiple body locations, including the ankles, knees, hips, shoulders, and arms, while performing explosive lower- and/or upper-body training. The VertiMax PLUS series is strongly endorsed by many NFL, NBA, and NCAA Division-I head coaches. Visit ATHLETICBID.COM


MORE PRODUCTS VertiMax’s Web site for more details and satisfied customer testimonials. Circle No. 528 Go Flow 888-463-5699 www.outdoorboss.com Being one of the most versatile, selfcontained drinking systems on the market, the BOSS™ Drinking System from Go Flow is an affordable way to re-hydrate athletes. No more contaminated bottles or messy cups littering your facility. The patented BOSS is completely self-contained and easy to transport. The system comes complete with four drinking lines, a five- or 10-gallon Rubbermaid® cooler, and a smart charger. Circle No. 529 Jump Stretch, Inc. 800-344-3539 www.jumpstretch.com The goal at Jump Stretch is to provide equipment that simulates actual game conditions to improve performance, including equipment that utilizes anaerobic training. Most sports require short bursts of explosive power. Squats and squat thrusts performed with Flex Bands® provide a safe and highly-effective method for improving explosiveness. Jump Stretch has been helping professional, college, and high school teams improve vertical jump, speed, and power since 1980. Circle No. 530 SmartPractice 800-762-7877 www.smartpractice.com The EMT ToothSaver™ by SmartHealth has a unique formula that keeps knocked-out teeth alive for up to 24 hours, so the natural tooth can be replaced. Its rejuvenating fluid protects tooth tissue from dehyATHLETICBID.COM

dration, allowing athletic trainers to treat injuries that are more serious. The EMT ToothSaver easily stores in any first-aid kit, so you’re always prepared for dental accidents. Circle No. 531 Sports Innovations 800-288-3954 www.sportsltd.com Every sports team needs water, and the Aqualift Portable Drinking System delivers—from children on the playing field to the professionals of the NFL. Aqualift is among the finest hydration system on the market, engineered from the highest-quality materials available. Aqualift continues to be the choice hydration units of professional, college, and high school athletic teams worldwide. Aqualift includes 10 gallons, four drinking hoses (with stacking capabilities), and a battery with a charger. Circle No. 532 Training Zone Concepts 888-797-8379 www.smartvest.net The weight-adjustable SmartVest and SmartShorts, from Training Zone Concepts in Flint, Mich., offer guaranteed fit, with specific models and sizing for women and men. Their comfort-compression and naturalfeel offer an exciting path to neuromuscular speed development. The SmartVest’s and SmartShort’s patented functional design promotes speed and power through brain and body compatibility. This mind-movement training augments form as well as technique, keeping the athlete relaxed, alert, and responsive. View SmartVest and its new companion, SmartShorts, at the company’s Web site, where school and team pricing is available. Circle No. 533 Victory Air, Inc. 803-233-7035 www.victoryfan.com Victory Air’s High Pressure Flash evaporative fogging unit is the next

generation of foggers, featuring the first high-pressure pump that can siphon from a standing water source. This unit comes complete with a cycle timer, which pulses the fogging process so as not to excessively humidify the air. It can be used in conjunction with fans, tents, or a nozzle line to create a cool barrier. This product gives you Victory over heat. Circle No. 534 Wilson Case 800-322-5493 www.wilsoncase.com The new Wilson Case CheckMate Athletic Trainer’s Trunk is ready to fly, sized just right for checked baggage on most major airlines. It is a tough, compact athletic case filled with Wilson Case’s most popular organizing options. The CheckMate features tiltbins, adjustable dividers, removable trays, and an open area in the base. With all this, your gear will be in position for game time. The handy pull-out handle and recessed wheels offer quick and easy handling. Check it out online. Circle No. 535 The New Wilson Case Mini SplitTop is compact, yet complete. The Mini SplitTop is a smaller version of Wilson Case’s most popular SplitTop Athletic Trainer’s Case. It is sized just right to be checked as baggage on most major airlines. The Mini SplitTop includes two inner-locking doors with tape spindles in one section and adjustable dividers in the other. The base of the case provides a large open area for bulkier gear and containers. Put everything in place for gametime in this great athletic trainer’s case. Check it out online. Circle No. 536

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ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

155 . . . 129 . . . 115 . . . 120 . . . 150 . . . 182 . . . 116 . . . 160 . . . 178 . . . 108 . . . 188 . . . 125 . . . 134 . . . 151 . . . 194 . . . 158 . . . 118 . . . 126 . . . 102 . . . 117 . . . 127 . . . 100 . . . 152 . . . 109 . . . 123 . . . 103 . . . 137 . . . 128 . . . 130 . . . 161 . . . 149 . . . 195 . . .

PAGE NO.

Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Active Ankle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Aircast (A2 Wrist Brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Aircast (A60 Ankle Brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Anodyne Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Antibody (The BodyGuard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . . 23 ArmorSports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Austin Plastics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Biofreeze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 BioMedical Life Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . IBC BioSkin Performance Braces . . . . . . . . . 35 Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 BSN-Jobst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 BushwalkerBags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 C.H.E.K. Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer (DM Systems) . . . 25 CeraSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Contemporary Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 CoreControl (AvaCore) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Cramer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IFC Creative Health Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 CytoSport (CytoFlex) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 CytoSport (CytoMax) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Dynatronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 efi Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Exertools (DynaBoards/DynaTubes) . . . . . . . 37 Exertools (PlyoBack/Exballs) . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 FitBALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Fitterfirst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Flexall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

111 . . . 101 . . . 121 . . . 184 . . . 132 . . . 142 . . . 166 . . . 185 . . . 140 . . . 169 . . . 186 . . . 107 . . . 131 . . . 165 . . . 112 . . . 190 . . . 146 . . . 113 . . . 162 . . . 133 . . . 170 . . . 106 . . . 104 . . . 105 . . . 181 . . . 147 . . . 189 . . . 167 . . . 114 . . . 136 . . . 153 . . . 171 . . .

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Game Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Gatorade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Gebauer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Gladiator Mouthguards . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Go Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Hartwell Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 HQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Impulse Training Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 IOMED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Keiser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Kelly Kinetics (Ankle Isolator). . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Kneebourne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Kore Kooler (Morning Pride) . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins . . . . . . . . . 20 Magister Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 McDavid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Medi-Dyne (Skin-On-Skin) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Medi-Dyne (stretching aids) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Medical Outfitters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Medical Specialties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . 59 Oakworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BC OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Power Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Presagia Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

163 . . . 110 . . . 157 . . . 145 . . . 178 . . . 122 . . . 192 . . . 193 . . . 138 . . . 173 . . . 164 . . . 144 . . . 156 . . . 174 . . . 159 . . . 148 . . . 143 . . . 187 . . . 175 . . . 154 . . . 191 . . . 177 . . . 179 . . . 180 . . . 141 . . . 139 . . . 172 . . . 183 . . . 176 . . . 124 . . .

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PRO Orthopedic Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Prossage Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 PROTEAM by Hausmann. . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 ProThermo (ThermoTek) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Rogers Athletic Co.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 SAM Medical Products (Blist-O-Ban) . . . . 26 SAM Medical Products (SAM Splint) . . . . . 26 Samson Weight Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Silver Leaf Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 SmartPractice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Sports Temp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 SPRI Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 SPS by UCS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Stromgren Supports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Swede-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 SwimEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Thought Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Topaz Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 TurfCordz/NZ Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . 84 VertiMax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Victory Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 WaterBoy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 WerkSan Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Whitehall Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Wilson Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Xvest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Zoraflexx (Williams Technology) . . . . . . . . . . 33

PRODUCTS DIRECTORY CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

500 . . . 532 . . . 521 . . . 522 . . . 504 . . 524 . . . 523 . . . 515 . . . 525 . . . 505 . . . 537 . . . 527 . . . 526 . . . 529 . . .

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Aircast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . 119 C.H.E.K. Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Creative Health Products . . . . . . . . . . . 114 CytoSport (CytoFlex) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 CytoSport (Cytomax) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 efi Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Equinox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Exertools (2036 Pec/Rear Delt) . . . . . . . . . 114 Exertools (E-Series) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Gebauer Company (Instant Ice) . . . . . . . . 118 Gebauer Company (Spray & Stretch) . . . . 118 Go Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

506 . . 530 . . . 502 . . . 538 . . . 501 . . . 508 . . . 509 . . . 510 . . . 503 . . . 511 . . . 512 . . . 513 . . . 514 . . . 531 . . .

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Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Power Lift (Combo Power Rack) . . . . . . . . . 114 Power Lift (Lever Action Bench) . . . . . . . . . 114 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Rogers Athletic (Brute Rack System) . . . . . 114 Rogers Athletic (Brute Full Rack) . . . . . . . 114 Samson Equipment (104HHUB) . . . . . . . 115 Samson Equipment (907RHP) . . . . . . . . . 115 SmartPractice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

516 . . . 533 . . . 507 . . 528 . . . 534 . . . 539 . . . 517 . . . 518 . . . 535 . . . 536 . . . 519 . . . 520 . . .

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SPS by UCS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Training Zone Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 TurfCordz/NZ Mfg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 VertiMax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Victory Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 WaterBoy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 WerkSan Sports (barbell) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 WerkSan Sports (weightlifting equip.) . . . . 115 Wilson Case (CheckMate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Wilson Case (Mini SplitTop) . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Xvest (Don Chu) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Xvest (Fire Fighter model). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

NATA SHOW PL ANNER DIRECTORY CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

624 . . . 625 . . . 600 . . . 601 . . . 602 . . . 603 . . . 645 . . . 604 . . . 675 . . . 646 . . . 647 . . . 605 . . . 606 . . . 607 . . . 648 . . . 626 . . . 627 . . . 608 . . . 649 . . . 650 . . . 634 . . . 639 . . . 651 . . . 609 . . . 610 . . . 652 . . . 653 . . . 695 . . . 679 . . . 680 . . . 640 . . . 641 . . .

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Accelerated Care (3000E) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Accelerated Care (FX2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Active Ankle Systems (All-Sport Chameleon). . . 66 Active Ankle Systems (CF-Pro) . . . . . . . . . 66 Aircast (A60) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Aircast (A2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Anodyne Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Antibody (shoulder brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Antibody (compression shorts) . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Ari-Med (Flexall 454) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Ari-Med (Bushwalker Bags). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Armor Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Bio Skin (Q Lok) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Bio Skin (TriLok) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Biofreeze. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 BioMedical Life (QuadStar II) . . . . . . . . . . . 70 BioMedical Life (QuadStar Elite) . . . . . . . . . 70 Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 BSN-Jobst (Lightplast Pro). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 BSN-Jobst (Leukotape P) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 CoreControl (AvaCore) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Cramer (Cold Shoulder Wrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Cramer (Co-Stretch Tape) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 DM Systems (AnkleTough) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 DM Systems (Cadlow) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Dynatronics (Dynatron X3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Dynatronics (Dynatron XP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym. . . . . . . . 80 FitBALL (Ball Dynamics) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Fitterfirst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Game Ready (Giants) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Game Ready (Clippers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

673 . . . 674 . . . 681 . . . 654 . . . 635 . . . 636 . . . 682 . . . 655 . . . 656 . . . 683 . . . 684 . . . 657 . . . 685 . . . 611 . . . 637 . . . 628 . . . 686 . . . 687 . . . 612 . . . 676 . . . 659 . . . 688 . . . 658 . . . 613 . . . 614 . . . 615 . . . 616 . . . 660 . . . 629 . . . 630 . . . 631 . . . 632 . . .

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Gatorade (Endurance Formula) . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Gatorade (Nutrition Shake) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Hartwell Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 HQ (CorTemp) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 HQ (CorTemp PDA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Impulse Training Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 IOMED (Companion 80) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 IOMED (TransQFLEX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Keiser (Power Rack 3110) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Keiser (Functional Trainer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Kelly Kinetics (Pivot Plate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Kelly Kinetics (SoloMax) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Kneebourne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Kore Kooler (Morning Pride) . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins . . . . . . . . . 70 Magister (REP Bands) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Magister (Airex Piloga Mat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 McDavid (189 Ankle X) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 McDavid (HexPad) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Medi-Dyne (Skin-On-Skin) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Medi-Dyne (CoreStretch) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Medical Outfitters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Medical Specialties (ASO) . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Medical Specialties (EpiGel) . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Mueller (stabilizer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Mueller (MuellerHinge 2100) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 NExTT Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 NSCA (Speed/Agility) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 NSCA (Training For Football) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 NSCA Certification (textbook) . . . . . . . . . . 70 NSCA Certification (CDs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

CIRCLE COMPANY NO.

661 . . . 662 . . . 633 . . . 663 . . . 689 . . . 690 . . . 691 . . . 692 . . . 664 . . . 617 . . . 618 . . . 619 . . . 642 . . . 665 . . . 666 . . . 667 . . . 668 . . . 669 . . . 693 . . . 694 . . . 677 . . . 678 . . . 620 . . . 621 . . . 670 . . . 671 . . . 622 . . . 623 . . . 643 . . . 644 . . . 672 . . . 638 . . .

PAGE NO.

Oakworks (PowerLine) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Oakworks (P3 Platform) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 OPTP (IAOM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 OPTP (UE Ranger) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Perform Better (Sled of Champions) . . . . . . 79 Perform Better (SPS Plyo-Safe Set) . . . . . . 79 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Presagia Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 PRO Orthopedic (610 Ankle Brace) . . . . . . 68 PRO Orthopedic (Universal Elbow Wrap) . . 68 Pro-Tec (Shin Splints Wrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Pro-Tec (Ice-Up). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Prossage Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 PROTEAM (Hi-Lo Taping Table) . . . . . . . . . . 75 PROTEAM (Hi-Lo Treatment Table). . . . . . . . 76 SAM Medical (Splint) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 SAM Medical (Blist-O-Ban) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 SPRI (Flexor) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 SPRI (Contour-Weights) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Stromgren (Basketball Girdle) . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Stromgren (Compression Short) . . . . . . . . . . 77 Swede-O (Hinged Elbow) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Swede-O (X8 Ankle Brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 SwimEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Thought Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Townsend Design (RebelPro) . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Townsend Design (Premier Ankle Brace) . . 69 Whitehall (moist heat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Whitehall (ThermaSplint) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Zoraflexx (Williams Technology) . . . . . . . . . . 76 WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71


MORE PRODUCTS Exertools 800-235-1559 www.exertools.com Exertools’ E-Series Equipment attracts users with its alluring low-profile, aesthetically-compelling design, and integrated biangular technology will enhance the weightlifting experience through lifting patterns that are smooth, controlled, and comfortable. The 2044 Functional Trainer is part of this series. Its pulleys adjust into 17 positions and its stacks are angled to create a space-efficient personal training area. This functional trainer has stack weight of 2 x 225 pounds, measures 33”L x 68”W x 92”H, and has handle storage for a standardhandle package. Circle No. 537

National Academy of Sports Medicine 800-460-NASM www.nasm.org Learn NASM’s Optimum Performance Training for Performance Enhancement™ in a new two-day workshop coming to your area. In this

comprehensive, hands-on workshop, you’ll earn 1.6 NASM CEU’s and develop the skills necessary to assess and design programs to enhance athletic performance and decrease the risk of injury for just about any athletic client. Circle No. 538

Waterboy Sports, Inc. 888-442-6269 www.waterboysports.com Waterboy Sports offers an extensive product line of fans, misters, tents, and hydration units that are designed to meet the price ranges and specific needs of the athletic training community. Visit the company online to see its complete product line. All Waterboy Sports products are built to withstand the punishment of constant use and any abuse an angry athlete can exhibit. Call today to find out more on how Waterboy Sports can provide your team’s hydration and climate-control solutions. Circle No. 539 Sports,

Inc.

Do you have ENOUGH BANDS for your team? WVU does! Shown here is just one of three rubber-band rooms at West Virginia University.

For information on setting up a band room in your facility, call us at 1-800-344-3539. Stay ahead of your competition with Flex Bands...the best-kept secret in pro sports! Used by the Giants, Jaguars, Raiders, Ravens, Angels, Padres, Red Sox, and many more, Flex Bands have been improving athletic performance since 1980!

Jump Stretch, Inc. 1230 N. Meridian Rd. Youngstown, OH 44509 www.jumpstretch.com 1-800-344-3539 Fax: 1-330-793-8719 Circle No. 186

ATHLETICBID.COM JumpStretchAdForTC1505v3.indd 1

NSCA Booth No. 416

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COMPANY Q & A

Oakworks® Offers a “Suite” Deal The following interview was conducted with Rich Elsen, Oakworks’ Medical Market Director. Oakworks has long been associated with the massage industry. Was the inclusion of athletic training equipment a difficult add-on? Actually, yes, we did have a bit of a struggle. The Oakworks name conjures up a “soft” image—relaxation, therapeutic massage, candles, etc., and we had to overcome that perception for the athletic training market. Our

That has my interest piqued. What are they? Our training room suite consists of three tables and a P3. Two of the tables can be used outdoors, important if you have an athlete who’s been injured during a game. You want the athlete taken care of right away—not transported to an indoor facility—to take advantage of the “golden period.” To do that, you need portable, weather-proof equipment that is capable of supporting large bodies. Oakworks’ Portable Taping Table and Boss™ Treatment Table do just that, and our PowerLine Treatment Table sets a new standard in athletic training with its solid hardwood construction and optional extenders. What are the “golden period” and “P3”?

emphasis had to be one of strength and durability, power, toughness. We needed to prove that Oakworks could meet the needs of this market—and we have. Our tables were used in the 2004 Summer Olympics and are currently used by many professional and major college sports teams. The neat thing about our athletic training products is that they are professional enough for the big players, but affordable for the local high school—with no difference in quality. So Oakworks developed new products for the athletic training field? Oakworks P.O. Box 238 Shrewsbury, PA 17361 800-916-4603 relsen@oakworks.com www.oakworkspt.com 122

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

Exactly. And, the products we’re displaying at the NATA Annual Meeting in June comprise a complete training room suite. We’re exhibiting everything an athletic trainer needs for bodywork positioning—either in the training room or on the sideline.

Sorry, I’ll back up. The golden period, according to the Orthopedic Physician Associates, occurs with sudden trauma. It’s the moment prior to when the surrounding muscles go into spasm—the time when every second counts and the ideal time to treat injured tissue. The P3 is Oakworks’ Patient Positioning Platform. It has a biomechanical design that offers support and comfort needed for prone and supine interventions—important considerations that ensure patient compliance. You have the whole set up for a training room. But what about away games? All this equipment is portable. We like to think of it as the “home-field advantage to go.” When you’re on the road, you never know what you’ll encounter. So Oakworks has designed equipment to be used in a locker room or a supply closet, on linoleum, and on muddy fields. We’ve covered all the bases, so to speak. Make sure to stop by and see us at our NATA Booth 1024! ATHLETICBID.COM


WEB NEWS Heat-Stress Resources Found Online at HQ, Inc. HQ, Inc., is the developer of the CorTemp® ingestible temperature pill and data monitor system that provides an easy, affordable approach in assessing elevated core temperature on the field and the effectiveness of cooling methods on the sidelines. Its Web site features in-depth descriptions on various monitoring and data recording products and fine-resolution product images. Visitors can download HQ’s complete catalog and news clips, as well as find tips on how athletic trainers and coaches can recognize symptoms of heat stress and illness of their athletes before serious harm occurs. Visitors can read the latest on heat stress, as the site includes links to media reports, peer-reviewed studies, and magazine articles about this topic. To learn more about these resources, visit HQ.

www.hqinc.net See Exercises and Product Information on Jump Stretch’s Site The Jump Stretch Web site features background information on owner/inventor Dick Hartzell as well as detailing band sizes and widths, including resistance levels. If you click on Flexibility Routine, you will see the start and finish of each exercise in a moving-picture format. By clicking on the Order Now icon, you can check out the various combinations of bands the company sells, as well as running stations, home gym packages, and instructional videos. For additional information, residents of the continental U.S. can call toll-free, and anyone can e-mail from the link within the site.

www.jumpstretch.com Keiser Re-designs Functional-Training Web Site If you have an interest in power, strength, or functional training, Keiser Corporation’s re-designed Web site is made for you. Visitors can easily locate information based on their interest in exercise/training programs; equipment pictures and catalogs; service and support; marketing support; company news and events; and purchasing needs (including ordering and finance options). Visitors can even download videos to see how Keiser’s products and programs can work for them. Also featured is an outside link to the company’s Institute on Aging, which showcases Keiser’s commitment to research and development of health and functional training for athletes of all ages.

www.keiser.com

SEMG Triggered Stim The Complete Physical Medicine Solution MyoTrac Infiniti systems allow you to measure high-resolution surface electromyography (SEMG) and perform electrical stimulation in a large number of configurations. The MyoTrac Infiniti stands apart from the competition by also performing SEMG-triggered stimulation. SEMG is used to trigger stimulation, to help athletes improve volitional activation of target muscle groups. This combination of three modalities enhances treatment possibilities and eliminates the need for multiple devices. Key features include:

• touch screen • on board memory • compact flash • USB connection to PC & BioGrap Infiniti Thought Technology Ltd. Tel: (800) 361-3651 • 514-489-8251 Fax: 514-489-8255 http://www.thoughttechnology.com

software

Contact us for more information

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Circle No. 187 ATHLETICBID.COM

NATA Booth No. 708 T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

123


CEU QUIZ

T&C May/June 2006 Volume XVI, No. 4

Training & Conditioning is pleased to provide NATA and NSCA members with the opportunity to earn continuing education units through reading issues of the magazine. The following quiz is based on articles that appear in this issue of Training & Conditioning. By satisfactorily completing the quiz and mailing it back to T&C, readers can earn 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) continuing education units.

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form (on page 126) that represents the best answer for each of the questions below. Complete the form at the bottom of page 126, include a $20 payment to Training & Conditioning, and mail it by July 15, 2006 to the following address: Training & Conditioning, ATTN: 16.4 Quiz, 2488 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca, NY 14850. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will be notified of their earned credit by mail no later than August 1, 2006. Personal Injury Protection (pages 13-15) Objective: Learn how to protect yourself, not just the athletes in your care, from injury. 1. What are some of the risk factors for injury that athletic trainers are regularly exposed to? a) Faulty postures and repetitive movements. b) Extended reaching during long days. c) Stress and prolonged sitting. d) Frequent bending and heavy lifting. 2. To prevent back injuries, certified athletic trainers should use _____ to lift their training kits. a) Good biomechanics. b) A hoist. c) A Saunders Strap. d) Their biceps. 3. Eighty to 90 percent of reaching tasks are recommended to be kept: a) Overhead. b) At knee level. c) Within an arms length of the body. d) At shoulder height. 4. In a proper workstation setup, how far should your computer monitor screen be from your eyes? a) 6-12 inches. b) 12-18 inches. c) 18-24 inches. d) 24-30 inches. 5. In addition to the above stipulation, what is the proper computer workstation setup position? a) Elbows resting on the desk and head up. b) Wrists in 45 degrees of extension. c) Knees in 30 degrees of flexion. d) Forearms parallel to the floor and elbows bent at a 100-110 degree angle.

Making Headway (pages 16-28) Objective: To become updated on the latest research in concussion assessment and treatment. 6. A neurochemical cascade occurs: a) During high intensity training. b) In the first few seconds after an injury. c) Six weeks post-injury. d) During sleep. 124

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

7. What does brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) do? a) Depress metabolism. b) Facilitate learning. c) Decrease appetite. d) Divert energy away from damage repair. 8. Young athletesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brains may be more susceptible to injury and take longer to recover because: a) They are less cautious during sports. b) They have less skull protection. c) Their brain has not yet matured. d) They use lower quality equipment. 9. Football players may sustain hits up to: a) 150 times the force of gravity. b) 2 times their body weight. c) 10 miles per hour. d) 100 pounds. 10. What does the management of an athlete with a concussion remain at? a) The athlete must pass a DETECT test. b) Wait a day, let them play. c) Minor symptoms make it safe to play. d) When in doubt, sit them out.

Fluid Dynamics (pages 31-42) Objective: To understand the rationale behind the different nutritional contents of various sports drinks and recovery drinks. 11. The article places the use of sports drinks into the following four categories of use: a) Improve endurance, weight loss, improve hydration, and enhance performance. b) Weight loss, improve hydration, enhance performance, and optimize recovery. c) Prevent muscle cramps, improve hydration, weight loss, and recovery. d) Improve hydration, enhance performance, optimize recovery, and weight gain. 12. Once an athlete begins activity, they should consume _____ grams of carbohydrate per hour. a) 10-20. b) 20-40. c) 30-60. d) 50-80. ATHLETICBID.COM


13. Sports drinks should contain what percentage of carbohydrates? a) 2-5. b) 6-8. c) 8-11. d) 11-14. 14. Sports drinks with a high carbohydrate content may cause: a) Dehydration. b) Gastric upset. c) Muscle cramps. d) Nervousness. 15. Endurance athletes may prefer drinks with: a) Lower glycemic indexes. b) Higher sugar content. c) Higher carbohydrate content. d) Lower caloric content. 16. Most sports drinks contain sodium that matches the typical amount of sodium lost in sweat, which is _____ milligrams per eight ounce serving. a) 50-60. b) 70-120. c) 120-140. d) 140-150. 17. Higher sodium content sports drinks are more appropriate for athletes who do what? a) Perform anaerobic activity. b) Exercise more than 2 hours. c) Exercise in moderate temperatures. d) Have persistent muscle tightness. 18. The recommended ratio of carbohydrates to protein is: a) 1:1. b) 2:1. c) 3:1. d) 4:1. 19. Studies have shown that consuming what prior to exercise may improve performance? a) 5 mg of vitamin B. b) 200-300 mg of caffeine. c) 50 mg of selenium. d) 200 mg of vitamin C.

21. When compared to recovery beverages, _____ has similar calories, macronutrients, and micronutrients. a) Apple juice. b) Tofu. c) Chocolate milk. d) Orange juice.

Summer Sets (pages 45-50) Objective: Learn how to motivate your athletes to stay on track with their summer conditioning programs. 22. According to Ray Lauenstein, the best way to build a successful summer program is to: a) Begin summer program instruction in April. b) Minimize summer program requirements. c) Use an online log. d) Build upon a base set up during the year. 23. The Air Force Academy encourages summer workout compliance by: a) Requiring each person to use a workout partner. b) Requiring a witness to sign his/her workout log. c) Testing the athletes before they depart for the summer and upon their return in the fall. d) Having the coach check in with the athletes weekly.

Irish Intensity (pages 105-112) Objective: To understand one strength and conditioning coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective on training an NCAA Division I volleyball team for success. 24. The University of Notre Dame begins their volleyball strength and conditioning program with: a) Core strengthening. b) Strength development. c) Agility training. d) Aerobic Conditioning. 25. Volleyball players are more prone to injure which body parts? a) Shoulder, knee, and ankle. b) Shoulder, neck, and knee. c) Hip, knee, and ankle. d) Shoulder, hip, and ankle.

20. What is the main ingredient in recovery drinks that helps muscle growth, repair, and strength development? a) Protein. b) Carbohydrate. c) Milk-related products. d) Antioxidants.

Answer sheet is on page 126 ATHLETICBID.COM

T&C MAY/JUNE 2006

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CEU QUIZ

ANSWER FORM

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form below that represents your selection of the best answer for each of the previous questions. Complete the form at the bottom of this page, include a $20 payment to Training & Conditioning, and mail it to the following address: Training & Conditioning, ATTN: 16.4 Quiz, 2488 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca, NY 14850, no later than July 15, 2006. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will receive 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) CEU’s, and will be notified of their earned credit by mail no later than August 1, 2006.

A

B

C

D

Personal Injury Protection

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Making Headway

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6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Fluid Dynamics

B

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D

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Summer Sets

22. 23. Irish Intensity

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11. 12.

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

A

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24. 25.

Last Name ____________________________________ First Name _______________________________ MI______ Mailing Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________ State _________ Zip Code _____________________ Daytime Telephone ( _________ ) ________________________________________ E-Mail Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ Payment Information

❏ $20 check or money order (U.S. Funds only) payable to: Training & Conditioning ❏ Visa

❏ Mastercard

❏ Discover

❏ American Express

Account Number _______________________________________________ Expiration Date ____________________ Name on Card _____________________________________ Signature ______________________________________

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ATHLETICBID.COM


ADDITIONAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

EARN BOC CEUs

• Complete quizzes found in the Strength & Conditioning Journal • Complete online quizzes at www.nsca-cc.org Phone

402-476-6669

Toll Free

888-746-2378

E-mail

commission@nsca-cc.org

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Association Corner The following associations offer services of interest to our T&C readers. Keep your career in motion… NSCA Educational Events for 2006 • NSCA National Conference and Exhibition • NSCA’s Performance Series Symposia

• Lifting for Power • Plyometrics, Speed, and Agility • Training for Hockey • Nutrition: Recovery and Regeneration

For dates, locations, and session information call 800-815-6826, or visit www.nsca-lift.org

National Strength and Conditioning Association

The Voice of the Doctors who care for the Pros The PTP provides resources and services for all sports medicine professionals.

Visit www.proteamphysicians.com to find a PTP doctor, ask a question of a PTP doctor, or explore the educational materials from PTP regarding prevention, treatment and performance.

SPECIALIST IN SPORTS CONDITIONING ISSA Certification Program • • • •

Be the conditioning coach for your team. Expand strength & conditioning programs. Maximize earning potential as a coach. Learn to enhance athletic performance. CALL FOR FREE INFO:

1.800.892.4772

www.FitnessEducation.com

International Sports Sciences Association

Ided[i]Za^cZZfj^ebZci[dgndjgVi]aZi^XigV^c^c\XVgZZg# • Optimum Performance Training™ method • Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES) certiÀcation • OPT™ for Performance Enhancement workshops

Athletic Therapy. Rapid return to work and play.

Athletic Therapists are dedicated to the promotion and delivery of quality care through injury prevention and rehabilitation and emergency services. In collaboration with other health care professionals, athletic therapists work to create a healthier environment that encompasses the needs of the active community, including the high-performance athlete.

For more information please visit us online at www.athletictherapy.org

All NATA certified athletic trainers are eligible to receive a free subscription to T&C.

• Continuing education for NASM, NATA and NSCA • Clinical Applications • Flexibility, core, balance, power, speed and strength training

NATA Bronze Corporate Partner

Call 1-800-460-6276 or visit www.nasm.org.

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Introducing the QuadStar®Elite Complete Electrotherapy System Benefits for the Trainer: •One device to buy •One device to carry •Multiple Usages

Unique Features: •4 Channels/8 Electrodes •T.E.N.S., N.M.S., High-Volt, Interferential •Preprogrammed regimens •Programmable regimens can be saved in memory for ease of use. •Sequence two or more modalities for complete treatment. •Rechargeable battery pack and wall adaptor

Waveforms available: •Symmetrical Biphasic Square Wave •Asymmetrical Biphasic Square Wave •Sine Wave, •Monophasic High-Volt , Twin Peak

BioMedical Life Systems, Inc. P.O. Box 1360 Vista, CA 92085-1360 Tel: 800-726-8367 Fax: 760-727-4220

Website: www.bmls.com E-mail: information@bmls.com

Circle No. 188

NATA Booth No. 524


THE POWER OF STRENGTH

the

POWER of OAKWORKS® BARIATRIC 500 LB. + WEIGHT RATING

PORTABLE SIDELINE TABLES

OAKWORKS® New P OWER L INE ™ TREATMENT TABLES

Patient Positioning Platform™**

New BOSS™ * Water and puncture resistant.

H-BRACE WITH SHELF

PORTABLE TAPING TABLE Industry leading adjustable height range.

Solid hardwood construction.

Perfect positioning. Perfect comfort.

see us at

NATA # 1024

B O O T H * CS System ™ (Complementary Suspension): U.S. Patent #6,192,809

800.916.4603

www.oakwor kspt.com

© 2006 O AKWORKS ®, Inc.

Circle No. 189

**Patent Pending

www.oakwor ks .com

Training & Conditioning 16.4  

2006 NATA CONVENTION ISSUE

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